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Sample records for class-v composite restorations

  1. A Comparative Evaluation of Microleakage in Class V Composite Restorations

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    Sujatha Gopal Sooraparaju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare and evaluate the microleakage in class V lesions restored with composite resin with and without liner and injectable nanohybrid composite resin. Materials and Methodology. 60 class V cavities were prepared in 30 freshly extracted teeth. After etching and application of bonding agents these cavities were divided into three groups: Group A (n=20—restored with composite resin, Group B (n=20—flowable composite resin liner + composite resin, and Group C (n=20—restored with injectable composite resin. After curing all the specimens were subjected to thermocycling and cyclic loading. Specimens were stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin and evaluated for dye penetration. Results. Results are subjected to Kruskal Wallis and Wilcoxon test. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, none of the three materials were free from microleakage. All the three materials showed more microleakage at gingival margins compared to occlusal margins. Among all the groups G-ænial Flo showed the least microleakage at the gingival wall.

  2. Marginal microleakage of class V composite restorations before and after AFP gel application

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    Davari Abdolrahim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: The most effective preventing tooth decay method is fluoride compounds applications. Some studies suggested that APF gels caused changes on the superficial physical properties of composite. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the marginal microleakage of class V composite restorations before and after AFP gel application.   Materials and Methods: The class V cavities in buccal surfaces of 45 molar teeth were made in such a way that occlusal margin was placed in enamel and cervical margin in cement. In group 1, at first fluoride-therapy and then cavity preparation and restoration by composite resin was done. In group 2, at first the class V cavities were prepared and restored, then fluoride-therapy was carried out. In group 3, cavities were prepared and restored with no fluoride-therapy. The dye penetration rate in occlusal and cervical margins was examined by stereomicroscope. Data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test.   Results: There was no statistically significant difference between groups ( P=0.975.   Conclusion: Fluoride-therapy using AFP gel before and after class V composite restorations, had no significant effect on the microleakage of dentin and enamel margins.

  3. Microleakage of silorane- and methacrylate-based class V composite restorations.

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    Krifka, Stephanie; Federlin, Marianne; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2012-08-01

    The marginal integrity of class V restorations in a silorane- and a group of methacrylate-based composite resins with varying viscosities was tested in the present study. Different adhesives (OptiBond FL, KerrHawe; AdheSE One, Vivadent; or Silorane System Adhesive, 3M ESPE) were applied to 168 standardized class V cavities. The cavities (n = 12) were filled with a wide range of different viscous composite resins: Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE; els and els flow, Saremco; Tetric EvoCeram and Tetric EvoFlow, Vivadent; Grandio, Voco; and Ultraseal XT Plus, Ultradent. Microleakage of the restoration was assessed by dye penetration (silver staining) on multiple sections with and without thermocycling and mechanical loading (TCML: 5,000 × 5-55°C; 30 s/cycle; 500,000 × 72.5 N, 1.6 Hz). Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test and the Error Rates Method (ERM). The silorane-based composite resin yielded the lowest dye penetration after TCML. Microleakage of methacrylate-based composite restorations, in general (ERM), was statistically significantly influenced by the adhesive system, Moreover, dye penetration at enamel margins was significantly lower than dye penetration at dentin margins. The chemical basis of composite resins and adjacent tooth substance seems to strongly influence marginal sealing of class V restorations for methacrylate-based materials. Moreover, the steps of dental adhesives used affected marginal integrity. The silorane-based composite resin evaluated in the present study exhibits the best marginal seal. The three-step adhesive yielded better marginal sealing than the one-step adhesive for methacrylate-based class V composite restorations.

  4. The Evaluation of Various Restoration Techniques on Internal Adaptation of Composites in Class V Cavities

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    D. Dionysopoulos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different restoration techniques on the formation of internal microgaps between materials and dentin in class V restorations. Materials and Methods. Twenty-five extracted human premolars were prepared with standardized class V cavity outlines (3 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm. The cavities were randomly divided into 5 groups of 10 cavities each and restored according to manufacturer’s instructions: Group 1: preheating (55°C conventional composite (Filtek Z250, Group 2: flowable composite (Filtek Flow, Group 3: Filtek Flow + Filtek Z250 light-cured separately, Group 4: Filtek Flow + Filtek Z250 light-cured simultaneously, and Group 5 (control: Filtek Z250 at room temperature (23°C. The specimens were then thermocycled and cross-sectioned through the center of the restoration. Subsequently, impressions were taken, and epoxy resin replicas were made. The internal adaptation of the materials to the axial wall was analyzed under SEM. Results. The preheated Filtek Z250 (Group 1 showed better internal adaptation than the room temperature groups (P<0.05. The combination of Filtek Flow with Filtek Z250 which was light-cured separately (Group 3 exhibited better internal adaptation than control group (P<0.05. Conclusion. Different restoration techniques exhibit different behavior regarding internal adaptation to dentin after photopolymerization.

  5. Effect of Different Placement Techniques on Microleakage of Class V Composite Restorations

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    M. Moezyzadeh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Various techniques of composite placement have been used to decrease microleakage around the composite restorations. Due to controversial results, the present study was conducted to investigate the effect of different placement techniques on microleakage in class V composite restorations.Materials and Methods: Sixty class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 30 extracted healthy human premolars. The teeth were randomly assigned to five groups, and were restored with composite resin, using five different techniques:(1 horizontal increments (gingivo-occlusal, (2 horizontal increments (occluso-gingival,(3 oblique increments (gingivo-occlusal, (4 oblique increments (occluso-gingival, and(5 bulk placement. After thermocycling, 500 cycles of between 5°C and 55°C (SD=2,and immersion in 0.5% alcoholic Fuschin, the teeth were then sectioned and evaluated for microleakage by stereomicroscope (×16. Microleakage was scored on a 0-4 scale. Nonparametric Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests served for statistical analysis.Results: Gingival margins of class V cavities showed microleakage regardless of the placement technique. Oblique (gingivo-occlusal technique showed less microleakage in gingival margins of the restorations compared to bulk technique. The least microleakagein gingival margins was related to group 3 while the most microleakage was related to group 5. Bulk and oblique (gingivo-occlusal incremental techniques produced significantlydifferent rate of microleakage (P<0.003. Group 3 showed the most difference with groups 5, 1, 2, and 4, respectively.Conclusion: Among four incremental techniques, the gingivo-occlusal oblique filling technique resulted in a lower leakage value, when compared to the bulk filling technique.

  6. Effect of Two Surface Sealants on Microleakage of Class V Resin Composite Restorations

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    Mosa Aboali

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: When composite resin polymerizes, shrinkage stresses tend to produce gaps at the tooth/ restoration interfaces. Surface sealants may reduce or avoid problems related to the marginal interface. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different surface sealants (Fortify and Optiguard on the microleakage of class V resin composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Twenty three sound noncarious molars were collected. Totally, 45 Class V cavities with the occlusal margins in enamel and cervical margins in cementum were prepared in both buccal and lingual surfaces. The specimens were randomly assigned in three groups (15 cavities in each group and then restored with a resin composite. After the finishing and polishing procedures, the restorations in each group were covered with a specific surface sealant, except for the control samples, which were not sealed. After placing restorations, the specimens were thermocycled and then immersed in a 50% silver nitrate solution (tracer agent for four hours, sectioned longitudinally and analyzed for leakage using a stereomicroscope in a blind manner. The marginal microleakage was evaluated at the occlusal and cervical interfaces and compared among the three groups using the Kruskall-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: Microleakage was found in all groups at both occlusal and cervical margins. Significantly greater leakage was observed at the cervical margins compared to the enamel margins of the material groups (P=0.005. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups at occlusal margins (P=0.66. In the cervical region, Fortify showed improved results and statistically presented the lowest degree of microleakage (P=0.003. onclusion: The used sealant materials presented different rates of effectiveness and Fortify decreased marginal microleakage significantly.

  7. Effect of surface roughness of cavity preparations on the microleakage of Class V resin composite restorations.

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    Shook, Larry W; Turner, Edgar W; Ross, Judith; Scarbecz, Mark

    2003-01-01

    This study determined whether surface roughness of the internal walls of a Class V resin composite preparation, using a carbide bur, a medium-grit diamond bur and a fine-grit diamond bur, affected the degree of microleakage of the restoration. The facial and lingual surfaces of 45 non-carious extracted human molars provided 90 samples for evaluation. The specimen surfaces were assigned randomly in equal numbers to one of three groups (n = 30). Conservative Class V composite preparations were made using one of three different burs: a 330-carbide bur, a 330 fine-grit diamond bur or a 330 medium-grit diamond bur (Brasseler USA). After acid etching, PQ1 (Ultradent Products Inc) primer/bonding resin and Vitalescence (Ultradent Products Inc) were applied and cured following the manufacturers' instructions. After minor finishing, the apices of all root surfaces were sealed with Vitrebond (3M), and the unprepared external surfaces were sealed with nail polish to within 1 mm of the restoration margins. The specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours, then subjected to 1,200 thermocycles at 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C with a 30-second dwell time. After cycling, the teeth were immersed in a 5% solution of methylene blue dye for 12 hours. The molars were invested in clear acrylic casting resin, labeled, then sectioned once vertically approximately midway through the facial and lingual surfaces using a diamond coated saw blade. Microleakage was evaluated using a 10x microscope for the enamel and cementum surfaces and blindly scored by two independent examiners. In all cases, regardless of the examiner, at both the enamel and the dentin margins, the analysis revealed no statistically significant differences in microleakage across bur types. Further results show that dentin margins leaked significantly more than enamel margins for all bur types.

  8. Marginal adaptation of class V composite restorations submitted to thermal and mechanical cycling

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    Denise Sa Maia CASSELLI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the effect of the margin location and an adhesive system on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. Material and Methods Class V cavities were prepared in bovine teeth with the gingival margin on the dentin and the incisal margin on the enamel. The cavities were restored with a micro-hybrid composite resin using an etch-and-rinse [Single Bond 2 (SB] or a self-etching adhesive [Clearfil SE Bond (CL]. After finishing and polishing the restorations, epoxy replicas were prepared. The marginal adaptation was analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, 500 x magnification. The higher gap width in each margin was recorded (T0. After the first evaluation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycling (2,000 cycles of 5°C±2°C followed by 55°C±2°C – T1 and mechanical cycling (100,000 cycles of 50 kN and 2 Hz – T2. Replicas of samples were rebuilt after each cycling and analyzed under SEM. The data were submitted to Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon and Friedman testing (α=0.05. Results The SB presented higher gaps in the dentin than the enamel, while there was no difference between the substrate for the CL. In the dentin, the CL showed better marginal sealing than the SB. The opposite occurred in the enamel. There were no significant differences between the baseline, thermal and mechanical cycling for any experimental condition. Conclusions The outcomes of the present study showed that the adhesive system and margin location have an important effect on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations.

  9. Evaluation of internal adaptation of Class V resin composite restorations using three techniques of polymerization

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    José Carlos Pereira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the internal adaptation of Class V composite restorations to the cavity walls using three different techniques of polymerization. METHODS: Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 24 extracted human third molars with margins located above and below the cementoenamel junction. Restorations were placed in one increment using two restorative systems: 3M Filtek A110/ Single Bond (M and 3M Filtek Z250/ Single Bond (H in the same tooth, randomly in the buccal and lingual surfaces. Resin composites were polymerized using three techniques: Group 1 - Conventional (60 s - 600 mW/cm²; Group 2 - Soft-start (20 s - 200 mW/cm² , 40 s - 600 mW/cm²; Group 3 - Pulse Activation (3 s - 200 mW/cm², 3-min hiatus, 57 s - 600 mW/cm². Buccolingual sections were polished, impressions taken and replicated. Specimens were assessed under scanning electron microscopy up to X1000 magnification. Scores were given for presence or absence of gaps (0 - no gap; 1 - gap in one wall; 2 - gap in two walls; 3 - gap in three walls. RESULTS: The mean scores of the groups were (±SD were: G1M-3.0 (± 0.0; G2M-2.43 (± 0.8; G3M- 1.71 (± 0.9; G1H- 2.14 (± 1.2; G2H- 2.00 (± 0.8; G3H- 1.67 (± 1.1. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunnet's tests. No statistically significant difference (p>0.05 was found among groups. Gaps were observed in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: The photocuring technique and the type of resin composite had no influence on the internal adaptation of the material to the cavity walls. A positive effect was observed when the slow polymerization techniques were used.

  10. In vitro Comparison of Microleakage of Nanofilled and Flowable Composites in Restoring Class V Cavities in Primary Molars

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    Rahil Ahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Composite resins undergo microleakage due to polymerization shrinkage particularly when located in cementum or dentin. The purpose of this study was to compare the microleakage of flowable and nanofilled composites in Class V cavities extending on to the root in primary molars. Materials and Methods: Forty eight class V cavities in the cervical part of buccal and lingual surfaces of 24 intact mandibular second primary molars were prepared, with occlusal margins on enamel and gingival margins on cementum. After restoring cavities randomly with nanofilled or flowable composite by incremental technique, specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours, thermocycled, immersed in a basic Fuchsin solution for 24 hours and sectioned buccolingually. Microleakage was evaluated according to the depth of dye penetration along the restoration wall using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by Mann- Whitney U test at a significance level of 0.05.Results Microleakage of flowable and nanofilled composites at the cervical margin showed no statistically significant difference, however occlusal margin in nanofilled composite exhibited significantly less microleakage than flowable composite (p=0.013.Conclusion: In contrast to occlusal margin, there was no statistically significant difference in microleakage between the 2 composites on the gingival margin. Microleakage on the gingival wall was greater compared to occlusal wall for both composites.

  11. Marginal sealing of curing contraction gaps in Class V composite resin restorations.

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    Kemp-Scholte, C M; Davidson, C L

    1988-05-01

    When one uses composite resins, the curing contraction, the stiffness of the material, and the strength of the vulnerable dentinal bond are important factors in determining the marginal adaptation of the restoration. Calculations based on these intrinsic material properties have indicated that both bulk placement and incremental placement of the restorative material in the cervical cavity inevitably lead to marginal gap formation. Sealing of this gap with an unfilled low-viscosity resin, directly after the composite resin is cured, may lead to perfectly closed restoration margins, provided that composites with low linear curing contraction and low Young's modulus are used. These conditions were experimentally shown to be valid for laboratory and clinical situations.

  12. Assessing microleakage of composite restorations in class V cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser irradiation or diamond bur

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    Sakineh Arami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to make a comparison between microleakage of conventionally restored class V cavities using bur and acid etchant and, the ones prepared and conditioned by Er:YAG laser. Materials and Methods: 30 recently extracted intact caries and filling free human permanent molars were used for this study. Then, Cold cure acrylic resin was used to seal the apices. The samples were randomly assigned to 5 groups of six each. Class V cavities were prepared one on buccal and one on lingual surface of each sample. Group 1: cavity preparation by diamond bur and turbine + acid etch, Group 2: cavity preparation by Er:YAG laser + acid etch, Group 3: cavity preparation by Er:YAG laser + Laser etching, Group 4: cavity preparation by diamond bur and turbine + laser etching, Group 5: cavity preparation by Er:YAG laser with no conditioning procedure. The cavities restored with restorative composite resin. Samples were then immersed in 2% methylene blue solution for 24 hours. The data were then analyzed using Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Kruskal-Wallis statistical tests. Results: The Kruskal Wallis test showed a significant difference (P < 0.05 between enamel and cementum margin microleakage, while the higher microleakage was related to the cementum margin of restorations. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in evaluating microleakeage degree of cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser and diamond bur.

  13. An in vitro microleakage study of class V cavities restored with a new self-adhesive flowable composite resin versus different flowable materials

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    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Regarding the importance of sealing ability of restorative dental materials, this study was done to assess the microleakage of class V cavities restored with a new self-adhesive flowable composite resin and compare to different flowable materials. Materials and Methods: Seventy standardized class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of maxillary premolars teeth. The occlusal and the gingival margins of the cavities were located on the enamel and cementum/dentin, resp...

  14. Microleakage comparison of three types of adhesive systems versus GIC-based adhesive in class V composite restorations

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    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: New dentin bonding agents and techniques have been developed to reduce microleakage and create higher bond strength. This in-vitro study compared the microleakage of three resin-based adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive on class V composite restorations.  Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 72 sound premolars, randomly assigned to six groups (n=12 and treated as follows: without any treatment (negative control group; total-etch (OptiBond Solo Plus; two-step self-etch (OptiBond XTR; one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One and GIC-based adhesive (Fuji bond LC with pre-cure and co-cure techniques. The treated cavities were filled with a micro-hybrid resin composite (Point 4, Kerr. Following finishing and polishing procedures, the specimens were placed in 100% humidity, stored in distilled water, thermocycled and then immersed in a methylene blue, sectioned, evaluated for microleakage and scored on a 0 to 3 ordinal scale.  Results: None of the adhesives tested were capable of completely eliminating marginal microleakage. There were statistically significant differences among the test groups at occlusal margins; but at cervical margins were not. The Fuji Bond LC with co-cure and control groups had significantly greater microleakage scores at the occlusal margins. At the cervical margins, the bonded restorations with OptiBond XTR and OptiBond All-in-One adhesives presented significantly lower microleakage scores. Also, there were no significant differences between the resin adhesive groups both at occlusal and cervical margins. The microleakage scores at the cervical margins were markedly higher than the occlusal margins in the groups bonded with OptiBond Solo Plus and Fuji Bond LC with pre-cure. The differences between Fuji Bond LC adhesive with pre-cure and co-cure techniques were significant. Conclusion: This study encourages application of the Fuji bond LC adhesive with pre

  15. Effect of Loadcycling Number on Microleakage of Class V Preparation Restored with Composite and Total Etch Adhesives

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    MA haddad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Characteristics of Dental materials may be examined under stimulated oral conditions like loadcycling and Thermocycling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of loadcycling on microleakage of class V cavity preparations restored with composite and total etch adhesives. Methods: One hundred class V preparations (5mm×3 mm and 2.5mm axial Depth with incisal margin in enamel and gingival margin in dentin, were prepared in the anterior bovine teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups which restored with single Bond (3M-USA or excite (Ivaclar/viva dent/Lichtenstein. Each group was further divided into five subgroups. The numbers of used loadcycles involved respectively 0, 50k, 100k, 200k, 300k. [K=1000]; Then, all the teeth were covered with sticky wax except 1mm around the samples and were immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 hours. Then all the teeth were sectioned longitudinally and the scores of Dye penetration were registered under stereomicroscope. The study data were analyzed using kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney and wilcoxon tests. Results: All the dentin margins showed higher microleakage than enamel margin (P=0.0001. There was no significant difference between the microleakage of single bond and Excite(P>0/05. The effect of the number of loadcycles on the microleakage of the single bond and Excite in dentin and enamel margin was not significant. Conclusion: Enamel margins showed less microleakage than dentin margins. This study did not show any increase in microleakage after increasing the number of loadcycles

  16. The influence of caries disclosing agents and cavity disinfectants on microleakage of gingival floor of class V composite resin restorations

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    Safarcherati H

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: An important purpose of adhesive dentistry is restriction of cavity preparation to carious dentin removal and conservation of sound dentin. Application of caries disclosing agents and cavity disinfectants can help achieving this goal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caries disclosing agents and cavity disinfectants on microleakage of composite resin restorations. Materials and Methods: This experimental in-vitro study was performed on class V cavities in 48 extracted human sound premolars. The teeth were randomly divided into four equal groups. In group 1 caries detector dye (Seek, Ultradent, USA and in group 2 cavity disinfectant (Consepsis, Ultradent, USA were applied on dentinal surfaces. In group 3 both mentioned materials were applied. Group 4 was considered as control group. PQ1 bonding agent and Amelogen composite were used to restore the cavities. Gingival microleakage was assessed by dye penetration. Data were analyzed by Kruskall Wallis and Dunn tests. P<0.05 was the level of significance.Results: Group 2 showed the least and group 4 showed the highest microleakage;however no statistical significant difference was found among the groups.Conclusion: The use of caries disclosing agent (Seek and cavity disinfectant (Consepsis Liquid did not adversely affect the sealing ability of dentin bonding resins.

  17. The effect of surface sealants with different filler content on microleakage of Class V resin composite restorations

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    Hepdeniz, Ozge Kam; Temel, Ugur Burak; Ugurlu, Muhittin; Koskan, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Microleakage is still one of the most cited reasons for failure of resin composite restorations. Alternative methods to prevent microleakage have been investigated increasingly. The aim of this study is to evaluate the microleakage in Class V resin composite restorations with or without application of surface sealants with different filler content. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces with the coronal margins located in enamel and the cervical margins located in dentin. The cavities restored with an adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan) and resin composite (Clearfil Majesty ES-2, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan). Teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 h and separated into four groups according to the surface sealants (Control, Fortify, Fortify Plus, and G-Coat Plus). The teeth were thermocycled (500 cycles, 5–55° C), immersed in basic fuchsine, sectioned, and analyzed for dye penetration using stereomicroscope. The data were submitted to statistical analysis by Kruskal–Wallis and Bonferroni–Dunn test. Results: The results of the study indicated that there was minimum leakage at the enamel margins of all groups. Bonferroni–Dunn tests revealed that Fortify and GC-Coat groups showed significantly less leakage than the Control group and the Fortify Plus group at dentin margins in lingual surfaces (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The all surface sealants used in this study eliminated microleakage at enamel margins. Moreover, unfilled or nanofilled surface sealants were the most effective in decreasing the degree of marginal microleakage at dentin margins. However, viscosity and penetrability of the sealants could be considered for sealing ability besides composition. PMID:27095890

  18. The effect of pre-heating silorane and methacrylate-based composites on microleakage of Class V restorations

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    Soley Arslan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study compared the effects of 4 different temperatures (4°C, 25°C, 37°C, 60°C on the microleakage of silorane and methacrylate-based composites in Class V cavities. Materials and Methods: Standard Class V cavities were prepared at the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molars. The specimens were randomly divided into 2 groups according to the composite resin used (Group I: Filtek Silorane Adhesive System and Filtek Silorane composite; Group II: Clearfil SE Bond and Aelite LS Posterior composite and into 4 subgroups according to temperature treatment (Group A: Refrigeration at 4°C; Group B (control: Storage at room temperature (25°C; Group C: Heated to 37°C and Group D: Heated to 60°C using Calset. Specimens were dyed with 0.5% basic fuchsin, sectioned, and evaluated at 25x magnification. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests at P0.05. Differences in temperature did not significantly affect microleakage values for Filtek Silorane (P>0.05; however, microleakage values of Aelite LS Posterior composite varied according to temperature treatment, with heating resulted in significantly less microleakage than cooling (between Groups IID and IIA and Groups IIC and IIA (P<0.05. Conclusion: Pre-heating was shown to reduce microleakage values of Aelite LS Posterior composite, but did not significantly alter the microleakage values of Filtek Silorane composite.

  19. Clinical Effectiveness of Different Polishing Systems and Self-Etch Adhesives in Class V Composite Resin Restorations: Two-Year Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

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    Jang, J-H; Kim, H-Y; Shin, S-M; Lee, C-O; Kim, D S; Choi, K-K; Kim, S-Y

    The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to compare the clinical effectiveness of different polishing systems and self-etch adhesives in class V composite resin restorations. A total of 164 noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) from 35 patients were randomly allocated to one of four experimental groups, each of which used a combination of polishing systems and adhesives. The two polishing systems used were Sof-Lex XT (Sof), a multistep abrasive disc, and Enhance/Pogo (EP), a simplified abrasive-impregnated rubber instrument. The adhesive systems were Clearfil SE bond (CS), a two-step self-etch adhesive, and Xeno V (XE), a one-step self-etch adhesive. All NCCLs were restored with light-cured microhybrid resin composites (Z250). Restorations were evaluated at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months by two blinded independent examiners using modified FDI criteria. The Fisher exact test and generalized estimating equation analysis considering repeated measurements were performed to compare the outcomes between the polishing systems and adhesives. Three restorations were dislodged: two in CS/Sof and one in CS/EP. None of the restorations required any repair or retreatment except those showing retention loss. Sof was superior to EP with regard to surface luster, staining, and marginal adaptation (p0.05). Sof is clinically superior to EP for polishing performance in class V composite resin restoration. XE demonstrates clinically equivalent bonding performance to CS.

  20. Marginal microleakage evaluation in class V composite restorations of deciduous teeth prepared conventionally and using Er:YAG laser; Avaliacao da microinfiltracao marginal em cavidades classe V de dentes deciduos preparados com laser Er:YAG e alta rotacao

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    Pulga, Neusa Vieira Galvao

    2001-07-01

    The evaluation of marginal microleakage in class V restorations of deciduous teeth prepared using Er:laser and comparison to the ones observed when conventionally prepared, using two photopolimerizable materials, composite resin and glass ionomer cement, was the subject of this study. Twenty eight complete deciduous teeth were divided into four groups Group 1 (G1) prepared with high speed drill + composite resin; Group 2 (G2) prepared with high speed drill + glass ionomer cement; Group 3 (G3) prepared using Er:YAG laser (2.94 {mu}m), 300 mJ, 3 Hz, handpiece 2051, energy density 86 mJ/cm{sup 2} + composite resin; Group 4 (G4) prepared using Er:YAG laser (2.94 {mu}m), 300 mJ, 3 Hz, handpiece 2051, energy density 86 J / cm{sup 2} + glass ionomer cement. After the preparation and restoration the specimens where stored at 37 deg C for 24 hours, thermally stressed, immersed in 50% aqueous solution of silver nitrate for 24 hours while kept in the dark. The specimens were rinsed in water, soaked in photodeveloping solution and exposed to fluorescent light for 6 hours. After this process the samples were sectioned and observed by stereomicroscopy. For comparison the groups were divided into occlusive and cervical microleakage. The results were analysed under the Kruskal-Wallis test. For the occlusive microleakage the statistical significance was 5% among the groups and the average comparison showed higher microleakage for G1 (M=35.1) than for G2 (M=24.0) as well as compared to G3 (M=22.3). The other groups did not present statistical differences among them. For the cervical microleakage the Kruskal-Wallis test did not present any statistical difference. Comparing the occlusive and cervical microleakage data, for every group, using the Wilcoxon test, no statistical differences were observed. Concluding, this study showed the Er:YAG laser to be effective for class V restorations and to result in a smaller microleakage degree using the composite resin. These results indicate

  1. Effect of aluminum chloride hemostatic agent on microleakage of class V composite resin restorations bonded with all-in-one adhesive

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    Mohammadi, Narmin; Bahari, Mahmood; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Mozafari, Aysan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Since hemostatic agents can induce changes on enamel and dentin surfaces and influence composite resin adhesion, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the aluminum chloride hemostatic agent on the gingival margin microleakage of class V (Cl V) composite resin restorations bonded with all-in-one adhesive. Study design: Cl V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 60 sound bovine permanent incisors. Gingival margins of the cavities were placed 1.5 mm apical to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 30. In group 1, the cavities were restored without the application of a hemostatic agent; in group 2, the cavities were restored after the application of the hemostatic agent. In both groups all-in-one adhesive and Z250 composite resin were used to restore the cavities with the incremental technique. After finishing and polishing, the samples underwent a thermocycling procedure, followed by immersion in 2% basic fuschin solution for 24 hours. The samples were sectioned and gingival microleakage was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare microleakage between the two groups. Statistical significance was defined at Padhesive with aluminum chloride hemostatic agent significantly increases restoration gingival margin microleakage. Key words:All-in-one adhesive resin, composite resin restoration, hemostatic agent, microleakage. PMID:22322497

  2. The effect of mechanical load cycling and polishing time on microleakage of class V glass-ionomer and composite restorations: A scanning electron microscopy evaluation

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    Mansoreh Mirzaie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microleakage is one of the challenging concerns in direct filling restorations. Understanding of its related factors is important in clinical practice. The aim of this study was scanning electron microscopy (SEM evaluation of marginal integrity in three types of tooth-colored restorative materials in class V cavity preparations and the effect of load cycling and polishing time on the microleakage. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, class V cavity preparations were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 60 bovine incisors. The specimens were divided into three groups each containing 20 teeth: group 1: Filtek Z350, Group 2: Fuji IX/G Coat Plus, Group 3: Fuji II LC/GC varnish. In each group, 2 subgroups (n = 20 were established based on finishing time (immediate or delayed by 24 h. All specimens were thermocycled (×2,000, 5-50°C. In each sub groups, half of the teeth were load cycled. Epoxy resin replicas of 24 specimens were evaluated under field emission-SEM and interfacial gaps were measured. All teeth were then immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 h, sectioned and observed under stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis′ test and Mann-Whitney U test and a comparison between incisal and cervical microleakage was made with Wilcoxon test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Load cycling and filling material had a significant effect on microleakage, but polishing time did not. Cervical microleakage in Z350/load cycle/immediate polish and Fuji IX/load cycle/immediate or delayed polish and Fuji IX/no load cycle/immediate polish were significantly higher than incisal microleakage. Conclusion: It was concluded that the cervical sealing ability of Fuji IX under load cycling was better than Fuji II LC. Under load cycling and immediate polishing Z350 showed better marginal integrity than both Fuji II LC and Fuji IX. The immediate polishing didn′t cause a statistically

  3. Effect of the erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or diamond bur cavity preparation on the marginal microleakage of class V cavities restored with different adhesives and composite systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Batu Can; Guray, Begum Efes; Dorter, Can; Gomeç, Yavuz; Yazıcıoglu, Oktay; Erdilek, Dina

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the microleakage of Er:YAG laser and diamond bur on different bonding systems in class V restorations. Class V cavities were prepared with Er:YAG laser or diamond bur on 80 intact human molars. Teeth were randomly distributed into ten groups and cavities were restored with CeramX duo (DENTSPLY) or Filtek Silorane (3M/ESPE) using different bonding materials (One Coat 7.0 (Coltène), XP Bond (DENTSPLY), Clearfil Protect Bond (Kuraray), AdperSE (3M/ESPE), and Silorane System Adhesive (3M/ESPE). All specimens were subjected to thermocycling and load cycling. After being immersed in silver nitrate dye, the specimens were sectioned. Microleakage was evaluated by stereomicroscope and SEM. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests. Statistically differences were found between groups (p > 0.05) and cavities prepared with the Er:YAG laser showed higher microleakage than diamond bur. The microleakage of different bonding systems was influenced by the choice of diamond bur or Er:YAG laser for class V composite cavity preparation.

  4. The effect of a new-generation flowable composite resin on microleakage in Class V composite restorations as an intermediate layer

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    Soley Arslan

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Micro-leakage is not affected by the application of either conventional or new-generation flowable composite resin as an intermediate material between composite resin and dental substrates.

  5. Evaluation of microleakage occurred in class V restoration prepared with Er:YAG laser and also with high speed, restored using composite; Avaliacao da microinfiltracao em cavidades classe V preparada com laser de Er:YAG ou alta rotacao, jateadas ou nao com bicarbonato de sodio e restauradas com resina composta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Angelo Maercio Finochio

    2002-07-01

    The microleakage is one of the great problems found in restoring dentistry. In spite of adhesive system evolution, several materials have been studied intending to minimize or to eliminate the microleakage occurred between the tooth and restorative material. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the marginal microleakage in class V cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser or high speed and restored with composite resin. One of the groups received the sodium bicarbonate jet while the other group have not received. Twenty teeth third extracted molars were sectioned in the sense medial-distal being obtained forty samples that were divided in four groups: Group I (G1): prepared with Er:YAG laser (2940 nm), E= 350 mJ/p, F=2 Hz, fluency of 112,5 J/cm{sup 2}. Preparing occlusion margin slice with 250 mJ/p, F=2 Hz, fluency of 80,3 J/cm{sup 2}. The prepared total area was irradiated with E=80 mJ/p, F=2 Hz and fluency of 25,75 J/cm{sup 2}. Every prepared area was finally submitted to sodium bicarbonate jet. Group 2 (G2): it was employed the same parameters used on group 1, except the sodium carbonate jet application. Group 3 (G3): the cavities' prepare were executed with high speed rotation using diamond cylindrical point. The slice confection has been made with the same point with 45 degrees inclined, utilizing also the sodium carbonate jet in all prepared area. Group 4 (G4): it was executed similarly prepared to group 3, without the sodium bicarbonate jet. In all the groups the cavities were washed with water spray and drought with air jet. Dentin and enamel surfaces have been conditioned with phosphoric acid at 35%. All the samples of all groups were restored using the single bond system adhesive and composite resin Z250, kept at 37 deg C in stove during 24 hours, thermally stressed, immersed in silver nitrate solution at 50% for 24 hours while kept in darkness. The specimens were soaked in photo developing solution and exposed to fluorescent

  6. The Class V lesion--aetiology and restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyas, M J

    1995-06-01

    The aetiology of non-carious cervical lesions is discussed. These have been variously described as 'abrasion', 'erosion', 'abrasion/erosion', and 'idiopathic cervical'. However, many lesions do not fit the classical appearance or location of an erosive and/or abrasive origin, and there is increasing interest in the possible role of occlusal stress in their aetiology. Non-carious cervical lesions often require restoration, and there are essentially three options using tooth-coloured materials: a restorative glass ionomer cement, a liner/base glass ionomer cement overlayed with a resin composite, or a resin composite bonded by an enamel/dentine-adhesive. The materials and techniques used in these options are discussed, indicating their advantages and disadvantages. Results of available clinical trials of these systems are given, and the link with the stress theory of cervical tooth loss is described. The preferred restorative approaches in order are: resin-modified restorative glass ionomer; resin-modified liner/base glass ionomer with a microfine resin composite overlay; enamel/dentine bonding agent with a microfine resin composite.

  7. Effect of using different base materials on microleakage of class V restorations

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    İhsan Yıkılgan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of using different base materials on microleakage of class V restorations. Materials and Method: In this study 60 extracted non-cavitated human molar teeth were used. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces in 4 mm mesio-distal, 3 mm gingivo-occlusal width and 3 mm depth. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups: Group 1: resin-modified calcium silicate material (TheraCal LC, Group 2: self-adhesive flowable composite resin (Fusio Liquid Dentin, Group 3: flowable composite resin liner (Tetric N Flow, Group 4: resin-modified glass ionomer liner (Ketac N100, Group 5: control group. Materials in the experimental groups were placed in 1 mm thickness as liner. Then, a nanohybrid composite resin (Grandio was placed and restorations were completed. In the control group, no base material was applied. After finishing and polishing procedures, thermocycling was performed 5000 times between 5-55 °C. Microleakage of restorations was evaluated by using dye penetration method (basic fuchsin. Results were analyzed by Kruskal Wallis with Bonferroni correction and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: Regarding occlusal microleakage, no statistically significant difference was found between the groups (p=0.267; however significant difference was found between the gingival microleakage scores (p=0.004. Compared to Fusio Liquid Dentin and control groups, significantly less dye penetration was found in Theracal LC, Tetric N-Flow and Ketac N-100 groups (p0.01. Conclusion: Within the limitation of this study, the conclusion was that the use of a liner (except Fusio Liquid Dentin under composite resin in a class V cavity reduced the microleakage of the restoration.

  8. Influence of light intensity and curing cycle on microleakage of Class V composite resin restorations Influência da intensidade de luz e métodos de fotoativação no selamento marginal de restaurações classe V em resina composta

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    Maria Jacinta M. Coelho Santos

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a softstart polymerization method from Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen (QTH and Plasma Arc (PAC curing units on microleakage of Class V composite resin restorations with dentin cavosurface margins. Seventy-five bovine incisors received standardized class V cavities in all dentin margins. Teeth were divided into 5 equal groups according to the curing cycle. The cavities were incrementally restored with a composite resin (Single Bond/Z-100, 3M. Light curing was applied as follows: Group I: PAC light continuous-cycle curing at 1600 mW/cm² for 3s; Group II: PAC light step-cycle curing (2s at 800 mW/cm² then 4s at 1600 mW/cm²; Group III: QTH light continuous-cycle curing at 400 mW/cm² for 40s; Group IV: QTH light ramp-cycle curing (from 100 to 600 mW/cm² in 15s followed by 25s at 600 mW/cm²; Group V: QTH light pulse-delay curing (200 mW/cm² for 3s followed by 3 min delay then 600 mW/cm² for 30s. Teeth were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 30 days and then subjected to thermocycling for 500 cycles at 5 and 55ºC. Root apices were sealed and teeth coated with nail varnish before they were immersed in 0.5% fuchsine red dye solution. Teeth were then sectioned and slices were scanned with a computer scanner to determine the area of dye leakage using a computer program (Image Tools. Images of tooth slices were also visually examined under magnification and dye penetration along the tooth/restoration interface was scored. Significant differences in the degree of dye penetration and leakage were detected between groups (pO objetivo deste estudo foi determinar o efeito da polimerização gradual, mediante a utilização de aparelhos de Quartzo-Tungustênio-Halógena (QTH e Arco de Plasma de Xenônio (PAC, no selamento marginal de restaurações classe V em resina composta com margens localizadas em dentina. Setenta e cinco incisivos bovinos receberam preparos de cavidades classe V, na raiz, com o

  9. In vitro evaluation of marginal microleakage in class V restorations with composite resin in bovine teeth. Laser irradiation influences and the adhesive system in the dentin pre-treatment; Avaliacao in vitro da microinfiltracao marginal em restauracoes de classe V com resina composta em dentes bovinos. Influencia da irradiacao laser e sistema adesivo no pre-tratamento dentinario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Wendell Lima de

    2003-07-01

    Microleakage is one of the most important reasons to restorations failure, it is the responsible for marginal colors changing, new caries, hipersensibility and pulpar diseases. Several techniques and materials have been studied to eliminate or, at least, to decrease microleakage. The cavities preparation with Er:YAG laser and autoconditioning adhesive are some of these techniques and materials. This research has the objective to compare, in vitro, microleakage in class V cavities, prepared with high rotation (conventional treatment), Er:YAG laser (Enamel-400 mj/2 Hz/128,38 J/Cm{sup 2}, Dentin 250 mJ/ 2 Hz/ 80,24 J/Cm{sup 2}) and the treatment made at dentin with autoconditioning adhesive (Clerafil SE Bond) using Er:YAG laser (with water or not water) or not using Er:YAG laser. It was used 48 bovines teeth with cavities prepared in vestibular face and gingival wall on cement enamel junction and oclusal wall on enamel. The materials used were autoconditioning adhesive (Clerafil SE Bond) and composite resin Z250. Teeth were divided into four groups of twelve samples each one, according to dentin treatment. Group 1 - Conventional cavity and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 2- Cavity prepared with Er: YAG laser and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 3 - Cavity prepared with Er:YAG laser and dentin conditioning with Er:YAG laser associated to water and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 4 - Cavity prepared with Er:YAG laser and dentin conditioning with Er: YAG laser without water and associated to autoconditioning adhesive. Teeth were restored and stocked at 37 deg C, thermocycled and placed into a 50% silver nitrate solution. Right after, teeth were sliced and evaluated on a stereo microscopic magnifying glass in order to see microleakage degree trying to follow a score from 0 to 3. The findings were submitted to Fisher, Anderson-Darling tests and to the not parametric Sen and Puri test. The results indicated that in gingival edge, the Group 2 showed less microleakage than

  10. Influence of dental bleaching on marginal leakage of Class V restorations

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    Andréia Cristina Ramos Dorini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the in vitro effect of bleaching performed in the dental office and waiting time on the degree of microleakage in class V cavities with margins in enamel, restored with resin composite. Methods: Forty-five human third molars were used, in which the vestibular faces were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated with LED and the palatine faces were not bleached (control. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups with 15 teeth in each: Group 1, restored immediately after bleaching; Group 2, seven days after bleaching; and Group 3, fourteen days after bleaching. After cavity preparation, 35% phosphoric acid, Adper Single Bond 2 adhesive (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Mn, USA, and resin composite Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA were applied. The teeth were thermal cycled and sealed with red nail polish on the bleached faces and blue on the non bleached faces, except for 1mm around the restored region. The samples were classified according to the following scores: 0 = no leakage, 1 = minimum leakage (less than 1 / 3 the length of the wall, 2 = moderate leakage (1/3 to 2/3 of the wall and 3 = extensive leakage (over 2/3 of the wall. The data were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test at a level of significance of 5%. Results: The restorative procedure immediately after bleaching resulted in statistically higher microleakage values (p 0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results, it is advisable to wait at least 7 days after bleaching to make the definitive restoration.

  11. Effect of using different base materials on microleakage of class V restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Yıkılgan, İhsan; Akgül, Sinem; Kuşoğlu, Aslı; Bala, Oya; Ömürlü, Hüma; Türköz, Mehmet Emin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of using different base materials on microleakage of class V restorations.Materials and Method: In this study 60 extracted non-cavitated human molar teeth were used. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces in 4 mm mesio-distal, 3 mm gingivo-occlusal width and 3 mm depth. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups: Group 1: resin-modified calcium silicate material (TheraCal LC), Group 2: self-a...

  12. Effect of using different base materials on microleakage of class V restorations

    OpenAIRE

    İhsan Yıkılgan; Sinem Akgül; Aslı Kuşoğlu; Oya Bala; Hüma Ömürlü; Mehmet Emin Türköz

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of using different base materials on microleakage of class V restorations. Materials and Method: In this study 60 extracted non-cavitated human molar teeth were used. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces in 4 mm mesio-distal, 3 mm gingivo-occlusal width and 3 mm depth. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups: Group 1: resin-modified calcium silicate material (TheraCal LC), Group 2: s...

  13. The effect of rebonding and liner type on microleakage of Class V amalgam restorations

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    Moosavi H.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Application of varnish and dentin bonding agents can effectively reduce microleakage under amalgam restorations. Also rebonding may show some effects on microleakage and its complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of liner/ adhesives on microleakage of Class V amalgam restoration with or without rebonding. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study Class V cavities were prepared on sixty sound human maxillary premolars with the gingival floor 1mm below the CEJ. Cases were divided into six groups of ten teeth each. Specimens in group 1 and 2 were lined with Copalite and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP respectively. In the third group (control no liner was applied. The teeth were then restored with spherical amalgam. Specimens in group 4 to 6 received the same treatments but after filling, the interfaces of restorations and teeth were etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel, rinsed and dried. Adhesive resin of SBMP was applied over amalgam and tooth margins and polymerized (rebonding. Specimens were thermocycled, exposed to dye and sectioned. Microleakage was graded (0-3 using a stereomicroscope at X40 magnification. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon pair wise statistical tests. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Results: The groups lined with SBMP showed the lowest and the groups without liner the highest microleakage (p= 0.001. Significant difference was observed in microleakage mean rank of enamel and dentin margins (p=0.048. Rebonding with resin did not improve the seal (p> 0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, total etch adhesive system had significant effect on microleakage of Class V amalgam restorations especially in cervical margin. Rebonding did not show a significant effect on microleakage.

  14. The competition between enamel and dentin adhesion within a cavity: an in vitro evaluation of class V restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Doudou, Wassila; Kunzelmann, Karl Heinz; Krejci, Ivo

    2012-08-01

    To gain more insight into the consequences of curing contraction within the tooth cavity, we assessed the margin behavior of 12 contemporary restorative systems in class V restorations with margins located on enamel and dentin after mechanical loading and water storage. Mixed class V cavities were prepared on extracted human molars and restored using five etch and rinse and seven self-etch adhesive systems with their corresponding composites. Marginal adaptation was evaluated by using a computer-assisted quantitative marginal analysis in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on epoxy replicas before, after thermal and mechanical stressing and after 1 year of water storage. The interactions of "testing conditions", "adhesive-composite combination" and "tooth substrate" with "marginal adaptation" were evaluated by two-way ANOVA. Fatigue, stress and storage conditions had significant effects on the marginal adaptation. Only two groups (Optibond FL and G Bond) presented equal percentages of marginal adaptation on enamel and dentin; in the other groups, the rate of degradation was product dependent. All materials tested showed a distinct behavior on enamel and dentin. In addition to mechanical resistance and long-term stability, differences within materials also exist in their ability to simultaneously bond to enamel and dentin.

  15. Effect of resin liners on the microleakage of class V dental composite restorations Efeito do uso de forradores resinosos sobre a microinfiltração de restaurações classe V em compósito odontológico

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    Roberta Caroline Bruschi Alonso

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an adhesive applied in layers of different thickness or in association with a filled adhesive or with a low viscosity composite liner on the microleakage of composite restorations. METHODS: Forty bovine incisors were prepared with round cavities (4mm diameter X 2mm depth on the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were assigned to four groups according to the liner used: 1 (control - application of 1 layer of the Scotchbond Multi Purpose adhesive system (SBMP; 2 - application of 3 layers of SBMP; 3 - application of 1 layer of SBMP followed by application of one layer of Optibond FL adhesive; 4 - application of one layer of SBMP followed by application of flowable composite Flow-it. All cavities were restored using composite resin Z100. The microleakage test was conducted according to ISO (TR11405. Data were analyzed by Kruskall-Wallis test (a=0.05. RESULTS: Group 4 showed less leakage than Group 1. Groups 2 and 3 showed intermediate values and there were no statistical differences when they were compared to the values of Groups 1 and 4 CONCLUSION: The use of resin liners with flowable composites can reduce the microleakage of composite restorations.OBJETIVO: O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar os efeitos da aplicação de um adesivo em diferentes espessuras ou em associação com um adesivo com carga ou com compósito de baixa viscosidade na microinfiltração marginal de restaurações com compósito odontológico. MÉTODOS: Quarenta incisivos bovinos foram selecionados e cavidades circulares (4mm de diâmetro X 2mm de profundidade foram preparadas na região da junção cemento-esmalte. Os dentes foram então divididos em quatro grupos de acordo com o forramento utilizado: 1: (controle aplicação do sistema de união Scotchbond Multi Uso (SBMU - 1 camada de adesivo; 2: aplicação de 3 camadas do adesivo SBMU; 3: aplicação do SBMU, seguido pela aplicação de uma camada do adesivo

  16. Microleakage evaluation of class V restorations with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Guedes-Neto, Manoel Valcacio; Cabral, Maria Fernanda Costa; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the marginal microleakage of conventional Glass Ionomer Cements (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGIC). The tested materials were grouped as follows: GIC category - G1 (Vidrion R - SSWhite); G2 (Vitro Fill - DFL); G3 (Vitro Molar - DFL); G4 (Bioglass R - Biodinâmica); and G5 (Ketac Fill - 3M/ESPE); and RMGIC category - G6 (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE); G7 (Vitro Fill LC - DFL); and G8 (Resiglass - Biodinâmica). Therefore, 80 class V cavities (2.0X2.0 mm) were prepared in bovine incisors, either in the buccal face. The samples were randomly divided into 8 groups and restored using each material tested according to the manufacturer. The root apices were then sealed with acrylic resin. The teeth were stored for 24 h in 100% humidity at 37°C. After storage, the specimens were polished with extra-slim burs and silicon disc (Soft-lex - 3M/ESPE), then were isolated with cosmetic nail polish up to 1 mm around the restoration. Then, the samples were immersed in 50% AgNO3 solution for 12 h and in a developing solution for 30 min. They were rinsed and buccal-lingual sectioned. The evaluation of the microleakage followed scores from 0 to 3. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn method test were applied (a=0.05). The results showed that there was no difference between the enamel and dentin margins. However, GIC materials presented more microleakage than RMGIC.

  17. MICROLEAKAGE OF CLASS V RESIN-MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT AND COMPOMER RESTORATIONS IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Ling; LU Yi; LU Qun; XU Qi-hua

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the microleakage of Class Ⅴ restorations made with two resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs) and two polyacid-modified composite resins (PMCRs). Methods Restorations of the four materials ( GC Fuji H LC, VitremerTM, Dyract AP and F2000TM ) were placed in facial Class Ⅴ cavity preparations in forty noncarious human molar teeth. Teeth were randomly assigned to 4 experimental groups of 10 teeth each. After thermal cycling( × 20, 5 -55℃ ), the interface between dentin and restorations was spattercoated with gold and observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then the square and average width of margin gaps of central 1/3 interface were recorded with image analysis software. Results The data indicated no significant differences between all the restorative materials for both occlusal and gingival margins. Further analysis revealed there were statistically significant differences between occlusal margins and gingival margins for VitremerTM and Dyract AP, respectively. Conclusion None of the tested materials guaranteed margins free of microleakage. Resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed similar margin gaps to the polyacid-modified composite resins tested.

  18. Alternative rubber dam isolation technique for the restoration of Class V cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Barry M

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an expedited, atraumatic technique of restoring cervical abrasion-erosion, abfraction or carious lesions using an alternative placement sequence of the dental rubber dam for adequate field isolation. As shown by this technique, the rubber dam retainer is modified and positioned on the tooth with subsequent placement of the dental dam material over theretainer and tooth. This technique saves time and provides good retraction of the gingival tissue and isolation of the cavity preparation from contamination (saliva, hemorrhage) that can potentially cause post-operative symptoms and possible restoration replacement.

  19. The effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation different age patients on the microleakage of Class V resin composite restorations%Er,Cr∶YSGG激光预备不同年龄患者V类洞对复合树脂微渗漏的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王抒智; 贾兴亚; 杨超; 安欣; 杜健男; 李阳

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究比较Er,Cr∶YSGG激光与传统牙钻均分别预备老年及青年离体磨牙V类洞对复合树脂充填微渗漏的影响.方法 于2012年5月~9月,在中国医科大学口腔医院,将10颗老年及10颗青年因牙周病或阻生拔出的无龋坏、无充填物、无隐裂的磨牙,按预备方式不同,平均分为四组:第一组,老年高速;第二组,老年激光;第三组,青年高速;第四组 青年激光,每组5颗牙.经200次冷热循环染色后,将上述所有样本置于0.5%碱性品红溶液中浸泡24小时后,沿牙体长轴通过充填体正中纵行割开,在体视显微镜下根据染料渗入等级评分(0~3)及扫描电镜方法观察充填体微渗漏情况.结果 (牙合)壁和龈壁处,染料渗入结果显示,老年组和青年组染料渗入评分差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),老年组大于青年组;激光组和牙钻组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).充填体边缘微缝隙宽度的结果显示,4组充填体边缘微缝隙宽度差异存在统计学意义(P<0.05),其中老年牙钻组的边缘微裂隙最大,青年激光组的边缘微裂隙最小.结论 在自酸蚀粘结剂的应用条件下,Er,Cr∶YSGG激光预备处理V类洞不能显著减少光固化复合树脂边缘微渗漏的发生;老年磨牙组与青年磨牙组相比较,无论是Er,Cr∶YSGG激光还是牙钻预备光固化复合树脂充填后,微渗漏评分及边缘微缝隙均大于青年磨牙组.%Objective The purpose of this study was to compare and study microleakage of Class V composite restorations following high-speed rotary and Er,Cr:YSGG laser preparation old and young molars. Methods From May 2012 to September, in the Stomatological Hospital of China Medical University ,caries-free vital ten old and ten young molars freshly extracted for periodontic or- orthodontic reasons were used in this study. Prepare different ways are divided into four groups:The first group old high-speed ;The second group old Er

  20. Three-year clinical evaluation of a compomer and a resin composite as Class V filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, John R; Burgess, John O; Ripps, Alan H; Walker, Richard S; Ireland, Edward J; Mercante, Donald E; Davidson, Jessica M

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the placement of two restorative materials, including a compomer (F2000, 3M ESPE) and a resin composite (Silux Plus, 3M ESPE), in non-carious cervical lesions using a self-etching bonding agent (F2000 self-etching primer/adhesive) and a fifth generation bonding agent (Single Bond, 3M ESPE) and to evaluate and compare these restorations for marginal discoloration, secondary caries, anatomical form, retention, surface texture and marginal adaptation at baseline and annually for three years. F2000 and Silux Plus were used to restore the teeth with moderate-sized non-carious cervical lesions. F2000 was placed using two different bonding agents: F2000 self-etching primer/adhesive (F2000SE group) and Single Bond (F2000SB group); Silux Plus was placed as a control using Single Bond (SiluxSB group). Thirty restorations of each material/dentin adhesive combination were placed. All restorations were evaluated at baseline and annually for three years using a modified USPHS scale. At the end of the three-year recall, Silux Plus had significantly better surface texture than F2000 (p < 0.0001). In addition, marginal adaptation significantly worsened over time starting at one year, as compared with baseline, for all groups (p < 0.0001). When anatomic form was compared between F2000 and Silux Plus, the p-value was 0.085, demonstrating that F2000 was slightly better than Silux Plus. Likewise, when comparing marginal adaptation between the F2000SE and SiluxSB groups, the p-value was 0.064, demonstrating that F2000 with the self-etching primer had better margins than Silux Plus with Single Bond. No other differences were found among the groups.

  1. Two-year clinical performance of Clearfil SE and Clearfil S3 in restoration of unabraded non-carious class V lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Martha Goël; Dib, Alejandro; Franco, Guillermo; Estrada, Blanca E; Brackett, William W

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the two-year clinical performance of a self-etching primer and a self-etching adhesive, both of which employ the same acidic monomer. Forty pairs of restorations of AP-X hybrid resin composite (Kuraray Co, Ltd, Osaka, Japan) were placed in caries-free cervical erosion/abfraction lesions. Based on insensitivity to air, the dentin in 62% of these lesions was considered to be sclerotic. The restorations were placed with no abrasion of tooth surfaces, except for cleaning with plain pumice and no use of phosphoric acid etching, which is counter to the manufacturer's instructions that call for etching of unprepared enamel. One restoration from each pair was placed using Clearfil SE Bond, an adhesive employing a self-etching primer, and the other was placed using Clearfil S3 Bond, a self-etching adhesive. To emulate the results likely to occur in a private practice, the restorations were placed by well-educated, experienced clinicians who had no particular expertise in adhesive dentistry research and who placed the restorations according only to their interpretation of the manufacturer's instructions. The restorations were clinically evaluated at baseline and at 6, 12 and 24 months, using modified Ryge/USPHS criteria. For both products, retention of 81%-84% of the restorations was observed over two years, which is lower than has been previously observed with these products and is likely due to limitations in the manufacturer's instructions compounded by inexperience of the operators in adhesive dentistry research. One restoration placed with each adhesive demonstrated secondary caries, which was probably attributable to the study being conducted in a non-fluoridated area and which reduced the percentages of clinically successful restorations to 78%-81%. No statistically significant difference (p = 0.50) between the two adhesives was observed in overall performance.

  2. Human pulp response to a new composite system. Vytol composite restorative and bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalleske, R L; Stanley, H R; Heyde, J B

    1978-09-01

    A new two-paste composite system (Vytol and Vytol Bonding Agent) was evaluated to establish its level of pulpal response in human teeth and to determine whether a calcium hydroxide base is required. Class V cavity preparations were cut in seventy-two teeth of ten male patients whose ages averaged 52.5 years. The teeth were restored and extracted at 1 to 7 days, 12 to 14 days, and 47 to 56 days. Histologic evaluation indicated that the unlined Vytol System reacted very similarly to other commercially available composite restorative materials and that a calcium hydroxide base is effective in reducing or eliminating adverse pulp responses.

  3. Guidelines for Direct Adhesive Composite Restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Society Of Cariology And Endodontology, Chinese Stomatological Association Csa

    2015-01-01

    Direct adhesive composite restoration, a technique to restore tooth defects by bonding composite resin materials, has been widely used in the restoration of dental caries or other tooth defects. Retention of composite resin restoration mainly relies on bonding strength between the materials and dental tissue. The clinical outcomes rely greatly on the regulated clinical practice of dentists. In 2011, the Society of Cariology and Endodontology of Chinese Stomatological Association (CSA) published the 'Practices and evaluation criteria of composite resin bonded restoration (Discussion Version)'. Since then, opinions and comments regarding the 'Discussion Version' have been widely circulated within the Society. The final version of the guideline was based on systematic reviews of scientific literature and requirements for the edit of technical guidelines, and through several rounds of discussions, revisions and supplements. The society recommends this guideline for clinicians to use in their practices, when conducting direct composite restorations.

  4. Effect of cooled composite inserts in the sealing ability of resin composite restorations placed at intraoral temperatures: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Moreno, Francisco José; Rosales-Leal, Juan Ignacio; Bravo, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Polymerization shrinkage causes microleakage of resin composite restorations. New materials and operative techniques should be developed in order to reduce polymerization shrinkage. This research studied the effects of cooled composite inserts and room-temperature composite inserts in the sealing ability of resin composite restorations placed at intraoral temperatures. Forty-eight extracted human molars (providing a total of 155 sections) were kept at intraoral temperatures, and Class V cavities were restored with an ormocer-based resin composite (Admira, Voco). Three restorative techniques were used: conventional bulk insertion (Group I or control group) (n = 53 sections), room-temperature resin composite inserts (Group II) (n = 52) and cooled resin composite inserts (Group III) (n = 50). Microleakage and penetrating microleakage were studied under the microscope. Cooled composite inserts reduce microleakage at the gingival margins with respect to Groups I (p = 0.002) and II (p = 0.014). When small-size cooled composite inserts were used, the sealing ability at the gingival margins of Class V composite restorations was improved with respect to the bulk insertion technique and the room-temperature composite inserts technique.

  5. Composite veneering of complex amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Zanchi, César Henrique; Bueno, Márcia; Piva, Evandro

    2007-01-01

    In large posterior cavities, indirect restorations could provide improved performance when compared to direct restorations, but with higher cost and removal of sound tooth structure. Improved mechanical properties have resulted in good clinical performance for amalgam in large cavities but without an esthetic appearance. Resin composites have become popular for posterior restorations, mainly because of good esthetic results. A restorative technique is presented that combines the esthetic properties of directly bonded resin composite and the wide range of indications for amalgam in stress-bearing areas.

  6. Resin composites : Sandwich restorations and curing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s resin composite has been used for Class II restorations in stress-bearing areas as an alternative to amalgam. Reasons for this were the patients’ fear of mercury in dental amalgam and a growing demand for aesthetic restorations. During the last decades, the use of new resin composites with more optimized filler loading have resulted in reduced clinical wear. Improved and simplified amphiphilic bonding systems have been introduced. However, one of the main problems with res...

  7. Secondary caries formation in vitro around glass ionomer-lined amalgam and composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, P; Kotsanos, N; Papadogianis, Y

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro secondary caries study was to examine the glass-ionomer liner's effect on wall-lesion inhibition when a conventional and a light-cured glass ionomer liner was placed under amalgam and composite resin restorations. Class V preparations in extracted upper premolars were used and ten restorations were used for each of the following groups: (i) two layers of copal varnish and amalgam; (ii) conventional glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iii) light-cured glass-ionomer and amalgam; (iv) bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (v) conventional glass-ionomer, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; (vi) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 0.3 mm short of the enamel margin bonding agent and light-cured composite resin; and (vii) light-cured glass-ionomer, extended 1 mm short of the enamel margin, bonding agent and light-cured composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled and artificial caries were created using an acid-gel. The results of this study showed that artificial recurrent caries can be reduced significantly (P amalgam restorations. The results also showed that when the light-cured glass-ionomer liner was placed 0.3 mm from the cavosurface margin under composite resin restoration, the artificial recurrent caries reduced significantly (P < 0.05).

  8. DIRECT PERMANENT RESTORATIVES - AMALGAM VS COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyashree

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Dental restoration is the most commonly administered dental treatment. These restorations are subjected to dynamic conditions in oral cavity, are likely to fail and need replacement. Ideal restorative material should pass two tests - Longitivity and Esthetics. Longitivity of the restorative material depends on three major factors - first is Patient’s factors, second is Operator`s skills and last is the Restorative material itself. Dentists today have a plethora of materials to choose from. Materials like Silver Amalgam being tested over a century, other nubile but promising materials, developed recently and yet to be tested in long run. This puts a dentist in dilemma so as which material to select to ensure durable clinical p erformance after placement. Amalgam has been tested over 165 years and has fulfilled almost all desired qualities of a restorative material except esthetics. On the other hand composites have advantage in cases where esthetics is of prime importance; howev er Recent studies conclude them at par with amalgam 1 . Performance of these two materials is assessed on following criterions - Longevity, wear resistance, cost effectiveness, marginal leakage and predisposal to secondary decay, biocompatibility, pulp irri tation, tooth preparation, technique sensitivity and esthetics

  9. Upper anterior zone restoration with composites

    OpenAIRE

    Lamas Lara, César; CD, Docente del Área de Operatoria Dental y Endodoncia de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Angulo de la Vega, Giselle; CD, Alumna de la Especialidad de Rehabilitación Oral de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    The anterior sector problems are very common in our professional practice and became vital importance to make a suitable rehabilitation in these cases; we can not do a good rehabilitation if we do not know the basic characteristics, both aesthetic and functional. Today the composites are a valid alternative for the restoration of the anterior sector, since they offer to us a conservative and aesthetic possibility, but independently of the material to use we have to based on certain rules or p...

  10. Histo-pathological study of pulp response to a composite resin restoration with two lining materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, S; Ishikawa, T

    1990-11-01

    This histopathological study investigated the pulp reaction to a restoration system employing a posterior composite resin with or without the pulp protection of visible light curing calcium hydroxide composition and alpha-TCP cement lining to dentin. Black's class V cavities were prepared in 120 adult dog teeth. They were then extracted for histological examination. As a result of this study, their lining materials were found to be effective in pulp protection. To understand the pathological finding, the pH values of "Fulfil", "Universal bond", "VLC Dycal" and "Vitacemen Type II" were measured. The pH levels of "Fulfil" and "Universal Bond" were mildly acidic (4.79-5.18) before polymerization, with no subsequent changes. "VLC Dycal" was initially a strongly alkaline (11.75) and remained this condition. "Vitacemen Type II" was initially acidic (3.78), but eventually reached the milder acidity of 5.12 after 24 hours.

  11. Effect of flowable composite on microleakage of condensable composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlavan A.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Because of polymerization shrinkage and high viscosity of posterior composites, there are some difficulties in using them in posterior restorations. Several methods have been represented to reduce the effect of shrinkage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of curing flowable composites under condensable ones in adaptation and microleakage reduction of posterior composite restorations. "nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, forty class II MO cavities were prepared on extracted intact molar and premolar human teeth. Gingival margins were placed 1 mm apical to CEJ. The teeth were divided into two groups. In group 1, flowable composite (Filek Flow, 3M, ESPE, USA with 0.5-1 mm thickness was applied and cured following application of bonding agent (Single Bond, 3M, ESPE, USA. The rest of the cavity was filled by condensable composite (p60, 3M, ESPE, USA. In group 2 the flowable composite was not cured, and the condensable composite was applied in two increments. After light curing of composites, all the specimens were thermocycled and then immersed in 0.3% basic fuschin. Specimens were sectioned and evaluated for degree of dye penetration under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney test with p<0.05 as the level of significance. "nResults:. There was no significant difference between the two studied groups regarding microleakage. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, neither cured nor uncured flowable composite under condensable composite can omit microleakage in posterior composite restorations.

  12. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (G1-G6) of 10 teeth. G1; consisted of intact teeth and G2; consisted of teeth with MOD preparations were assigned as the positive and negative control groups respectively. Other experimental groups after MOD preparations were as follows: G3, amalgam restoration; G4, composite restoration; G5 combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement only on 1mm of the gingival floor of the proximal boxes; G6, combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement to the height of contact area of the proximal surface of the tooth. Fracture strength of the specimens was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of significance was Pamalgam-composite restoration was similar to that achieved with composite restoration alone and more than that of amalgam restoration alone. It can be concluded that the thickness of amalgam in combined amalgam-composite restorations did not affect fracture resistance of the teeth. Key words:Amalgam, composite, fracture resistance, restoration. PMID:27398176

  13. The effect of polishing systems on microleakage of tooth-coloured restoratives. Part 2: composite and polyacid-modified composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, A U; Wong, M L; Lim, A C

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of polishing systems on the microleakage of composite and polyacid-modified composite resins. Class V cavities were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction of 80 freshly extracted posterior teeth. The prepared teeth were randomly divided into two groups and restored with conventional or polyacid-modified composite resins. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week after removal of excess restorative with diamond finishing burs. The restored teeth were then divided into four groups of ten and finished/polished using the following systems: Two Striper micron finishing system (MFS), Sof-Lex XT (Sof-Lex), Enhance composite finishing and polishing system (Enhance), and Shofu composite finishing kit (Shofu). The finished restorations were subjected to dye penetration testing. Results showed that the microleakage resistance at both enamel and dentin margins of composite and polyacid-modified composite resins are not significantly affected by the different polishing systems.

  14. SEM Evaluation of Internal Adaptation of Bases and Liners under Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Dionysopoulos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microgaps generating between different materials and between materials and dentin after polymerization of the composite restorations, using SEM. Methods: The materials investigated were a composite, an adhesive, a RMGI, and a calcium hydroxide. Thirty third molars were selected and two circular class V cavities (5 mm × 3 mm for each tooth were made. The teeth were randomly assigned into six groups and restored with a combination of the materials. The specimens were subjected to thermocycling and each tooth was sectioned mesiodistally in two halves. Each half was sectioned along the longitudinal axis through the center of the restorations to obtain a slice of 2 mm. The specimens were examined under SEM. The interfaces between the liners, the liners and dentin, and between the liners and the composite were examined for microgaps. Results: The results showed that there was not any significant difference in the mean width of microgaps in the interfaces between Dycal-dentin and Vitrebond-dentin (p>0.05. However, the width of microgaps in the interfaces between dentin-Clearfil Tri-S Bond was significantly smaller (p<0.05. The use of Clearfil Tri-S Bond reduced the possibility of microgap formation between the bonded interface and the materials tested.

  15. Comparative study between Fortify and Nd:YAG laser used for marginal sealing in composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Ricardo S.; Esteves, Grazia V.; Oliveira, Wilson T., Jr.; Matos, Adriana B.; Turbino, Mirian L.; Youssef, Michel N.; Matson, Edmir

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate microleakage of composite restorations submitted to marginal treatment. Class V preparations with walls located in enamel were performed at buccal and lingual surfaces of eighteen recently extracted, non-carious human premolars. Cavities were restored with composite resins and adhesive system. Samples were stored in distilled water for 48h and polished with Sof-Lex discs. Teeth were randomly divide in six groups: G1 - Control; G2 - marginal treatment with surface sealant; G3 - Nd:YAG 25 Hz, 80mJ, 2W; G4 - Nd:YAG 20Hz, 100mJ, 2W; G5 - Nd:YAG 30Hz, 60mJ, 1.8W; G6 - Nd:YAG 30Hz, 40mJ, 1.2W. Contact fiberoptic (300μm) pulsed (1.064 μm) Nd:YAG laser was used for 30sec, under air cooling. Teeth were impermeabilized, immersed in a dye (Rhodamine B) for 4h at 37°, and sectioned. Specimens were evaluated under light microscopy and evaluated with scores. Results were analyzed with Kruskal- Wallis test (p=0.05) and showed that there were significant differences between marginal treatments; there were no significant differences beaten groups 1, 2, 4 and 3, 5, 6; lower values of microleakage were at groups 3, 5, 6. Nd:YAG laser showed marginal sealing ability and decreased microleakage of composite resins restorations.

  16. Benchmarking matching color in composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliau, Guido; Piccoli, Luca; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Romeo, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study was to investigate the color samples (A2, A3 and B1) of three different brands of resin composites using dentine masses. 135 discs were prepared (5 plates for each thickness, color and brand of composite material). A colorimetric evaluation, using white and black background, was performed just after preparation. The color was measured corresponding to “Vita” scale and ΔL, Δa, Δb and ΔE values were calculated using a spectrophotometer. The results showed that Value, Chroma and Hue often differ even if the same commercial color and same thickness is used. In conclusion, this study showed that the perfect aesthetics restoration is possible combining individual abilities, experience and correct techniques. PMID:27512531

  17. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with indirect composite inlay and onlay restorations – An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibraheem F. Alshiddi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, endodontically treated teeth were successfully restored with indirect composite inlay and onlay restorations. However, the fractures that accompanied the inlay restorations were more severe and were unable to be restored.

  18. Evaluation of dental adhesive systems with amalgam and resin composite restorations: comparison of microleakage and bond strength results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neme, A L; Evans, D B; Maxson, B B

    2000-01-01

    A variety of laboratory tests have been developed to assist in predicting the clinical performance of dental restorative materials. Additionally, more than one methodology is in use for many types of tests performed in vitro. This project assessed and compared results derived from two specific laboratory testing methods, one for bond strength and one for microleakage. Seven multi-purpose dental adhesives were tested with the two methodologies in both amalgam and resin composite restorations. Bond strength was determined with a punch-out method in sections of human molar dentin. Microleakage was analyzed with a digital imaging system (Image-Pro Plus, Version 1.3) to determine the extent of dye penetration in Class V preparations centered at the CEJ on both the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molar teeth. There were 32 treatment groups (n = 10); seven experimental (dental adhesives) and one control (copal varnish, 37% phosphoric acid) followed by restoration with either amalgam or resin composite. Specimens were thermocycled 500 times in 5 degrees and 55 degrees C water with a one-minute dwell time. Bond strength and microleakage values were determined for each group. ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests demonstrated an interaction between restorative material and adhesive system with a significant difference among adhesives (p resin composite restorations than in the amalgam restorations. Bond strength testing was more discriminating than microleakage evaluation in identifying differences among materials.

  19. 12-year survival of composite vs. amalgam restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Information about the long-term clinical survival of large amalgam and composite restorations is still lacking. This retrospective study compares the longevity of three- and four-/five-surface amalgam and composite restorations relative to patients' caries risk. Patient records from a general practi

  20. Smile transformations with the use of direct composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameni, Abdi

    2013-01-01

    Mutual concerns shared by dentists and patients regarding removal of natural tooth structure affirm the need for non-invasive restorative treatments. Direct composite restorations are among today's conservative treatment modalities. Direct bonding procedures provide patients with an alternative to high biologic risk and expensive indirect porcelain restorations. This article discusses the principles involved in smile design cases, ways to successfully combine different treatment modalities, and materials to achieve outstanding esthetic and functional results. The article also demonstrates the versatility of today's composite materials for direct smile design restorations.

  1. Microleakage of composite resin restorations with a 10 percent maleic acid etchant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpatrick, R O; Owens, B M; Kaplan, I; Cook, G

    1996-04-01

    Microleakage of Class V composite resin restorations with margins all in enamel were compared in this in-vitro study using Scotchbond MultiPurpose Adhesive (SMP) (3M Corp.), and Scotchbond II (SB II) (3M Corp). Twenty extracted human molars were randomly separated into two groups: Group One, which used the SMP system and Group Two, which used the SB II system. Circular Class V preparations were cut 1.8 mm deep and 3 mm in diameter using a #556 fissure bur. Cavosurface margins, all in enamel, were beveled. The enamel and dentin were treated following manufacturer's directions for each group, and a microfilled composite resin, Silux Plus (3M Corp), was applied in two hand-placed increments. All teeth were finished with Sof-Lex discs, stored in water for seven days, then thermocycled in a water bath for 100 cycles, alternating from 4 degrees C to 58 degrees C. The teeth were placed in a 5 percent solution of methylene blue, rinsed and then invested in resin. All teeth were sectioned vertically and horizontally and a ratio (percentage) of wall length to amount of leakage along each wall was established. The overall mean leakage of Group One was 15.27 percent and Group Two was 13.84 percent. Looking at individual walls, the mean occlusal wall leakage of Group One was 28.41 percent and Group Two was 12.45 percent. Mean gingival wall leakage of Group One was 15.96 percent and Group Two was 21.80 percent. Comparing the two groups, using a student's t test, there was no significant difference between the overall mean leakage or between the gingival wall leakage (p > 0.05); however, there was a significant difference between the occlusal wall leakage (p < 0.05), with SMP exhibiting more leakage.

  2. Three dimensional finite element analysis of mandibular premolar restored with fiber post and resin composite with different cavity designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daraporn Sae-Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the stress distribution and fatigue lifetime of endodontically treated mandibular premolar with various cavity designs for access opening, restored by resin composite with or without a fiber post was performed. A 3D model of a mandibular premolar with one root canal was selected. The 11 study models of tooth structure including enamel, dentine and pulp tissue were generated with different cavity designs, i.e., Class I, Class II OM, Class II MOD, Class V, Class V pulp exposure, cortical and cancellous bone, root canal configuration, as well as fiber post. A load of 150 Newtons was applied on the lingual incline plane of the buccal cusp at an angle of 45 degrees to the long axis of the tooth. The results show that the stress distributions in all models were similar, i.e., the maximum von Mises stresses were observed at the level of the cement-enamel junction (CEJ, and the stress decreased abruptly from the outer to the inner part of the tooth. The maximum von Mises stress along the tooth axis was concentrated at the load-bearing areas, and decreased gradually from the coronal region to the apex of the root. The fatigue lifetimes of the models restored with a fiber post were greater than those without a fiber post.

  3. Microleakage resistance of minimally invasive Class I flowable composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Esteban D; Stevenson, Richard G; Caputo, Angelo A; White, Shane N

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive flowable composite Class I restorations are widely used. However, flowable composites are characterized by low filler contents, modified resin formulations, low moduli of elasticity, low viscosity, generally poor mechanical properties, and decreased long-term stability. The purpose of this study was to compare the microleakage resistance of a wide variety of flowable composites used with their manufacturers' recommended bonding systems to that of a long-used and widely studied microhybrid composite when placed as minimally invasive occlusal restorations. Molar teeth were prepared in a standardized manner, restored, artificially aged, stained, sectioned, evaluated, and analyzed. Microleakage varied substantially, by a whole order of magnitude, among the material groups tested. The control group, a conventional microhybrid composite material, leaked significantly less than all the flowable composite groups. Microleakage varied very slightly among measurement site locations. Tiny microscopic bubbles were seen within many of the flowable composite specimens, as were a few voids.

  4. Connecting River Systems Restoration Assessment Composite Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Well-established conservation planning principles and techniques framed by geodesign were used to assess the restorability of areas that historically supported...

  5. Saginaw Bay Restoration Assessment Composite Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Well-established conservation planning principles and techniques framed by geodesign were used to assess the restorability of areas that historically supported...

  6. Western Lake Erie Restoration Assessment Composite Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Well-established conservation planning principles and techniques framed by geodesign were used to assess the restorability of areas that historically supported...

  7. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance.

  8. Optimizing tooth form with direct posterior composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in material sciences and technology have provided today′s clinicians the strategies to transform the mechanistic approach of operative dentistry into a biologic philosophy. In the last three decades, composite resins have gone from being just an esthetically pleasing way of restoring Class III and Class IV cavities to become the universal material for both anterior and posterior situations as they closely mimic the natural esthetics while restoring the form of the human dentition. In order to enhance their success, clinicians have to rethink their protocol instead of applying the same restorative concepts and principles practiced with metallic restorations. Paralleling the evolution of posterior composite resin materials, cavity designs, restorative techniques and armamentarium have also developed rapidly to successfully employ composite resins in Class II situations. Most of the earlier problems with posterior composites such as poor wear resistance, polymerization shrinkage, postoperative sensitivity, predictable bonding to dentin, etc., have been overcome to a major extent. However, the clinically relevant aspect of achieving tight contacts in Class II situations has challenged clinicians the most. This paper reviews the evolution of techniques and recent developments in achieving predictable contacts with posterior composites. A Medline search was performed for articles on ′′direct posterior composite contacts.′′ The keywords used were ′′contacts and contours of posterior composites.′′ The reference list of each article was manually checked for additional articles of relevance.

  9. Optimizing tooth form with direct posterior composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, Ramya; Srinivasan, Raghu

    2011-10-01

    Advances in material sciences and technology have provided today's clinicians the strategies to transform the mechanistic approach of operative dentistry into a biologic philosophy. In the last three decades, composite resins have gone from being just an esthetically pleasing way of restoring Class III and Class IV cavities to become the universal material for both anterior and posterior situations as they closely mimic the natural esthetics while restoring the form of the human dentition. In order to enhance their success, clinicians have to rethink their protocol instead of applying the same restorative concepts and principles practiced with metallic restorations. Paralleling the evolution of posterior composite resin materials, cavity designs, restorative techniques and armamentarium have also developed rapidly to successfully employ composite resins in Class II situations. Most of the earlier problems with posterior composites such as poor wear resistance, polymerization shrinkage, postoperative sensitivity, predictable bonding to dentin, etc., have been overcome to a major extent. However, the clinically relevant aspect of achieving tight contacts in Class II situations has challenged clinicians the most. This paper reviews the evolution of techniques and recent developments in achieving predictable contacts with posterior composites. A Medline search was performed for articles on "direct posterior composite contacts." The keywords used were "contacts and contours of posterior composites." The reference list of each article was manually checked for additional articles of relevance.

  10. Composite resin: a versatile, multi-purpose restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margeas, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduced more than some 50 years ago, composite resin technology has simplified the manner in which clinicians practice restorative dentistry, offering greater predictability and improved physical properties. Decades of material science and laboratory development along with clinical trials in human subjects have culminated in composite resin being validated as a reliable, multifunctional restorative material. With a wide range of composite resins available today, clinicians can benefit from knowing the infrastructure of a given material in order to determine which type will work best in a particular clinical situation.

  11. [Restoring esthetics and function of posterior teeth using direct composite restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samet, N

    2001-10-01

    The growing demand for esthetic restorations in the posterior segments and the reports from all over the world concerning the possibility of a toxic effect of amalgam brought to the development of the composite resin materials. These allow excellent esthetic results without compromising the quality and long-term stability of the restorations. Out of the various types of posterior esthetic restorations, the most available are the direct ones. There are several substantial differences between fabricating amalgam or posterior composite restorations. The most significant difference concerns bonding to the tooth structures. The key to success in these restorations is the understanding of the reasons for failure, and the ways to prevent them. The failures are divided into two groups: biological failures--namely secondary caries, and mechanical failures--namely fracture and abrasion. The other key is understanding the materials used and their proper handling. This article illustrates in detail a step-by-step procedure the sequence of fabricating a posterior composite restoration in a posterior mandibular tooth, describing both techniques and materials used.

  12. 40 CFR 144.24 - Class V wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class V wells. 144.24 Section 144.24... INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAM Authorization of Underground Injection by Rule § 144.24 Class V wells. (a) A Class V injection well is authorized by rule, subject to the conditions in § 144.84 (b) Duration of...

  13. A restorative approach for class II resin composite restorations: a two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M J M C

    2015-01-01

    This clinical report describes a restorative technique used to replace two Class II resin composite restorations on the upper premolars. A sectional matrix band was used in conjunction with an elastic ring (Composi-Tight) to obtain tight proximal contact. A nanofilled resin composite (Filtek Supreme Ultra) was incrementally applied using oblique layers to reduce the C-factor, each layer being no more than 2 mm thick, and then light cured for 20 seconds with a light-emitting diode lamp (EliparFreeLight 2 LED Curing Light) with a power density of 660 mW/cm(2). A centripetal technique was used to restore the lost tooth structure from the periphery toward the center of the cavity in order to achieve a better contour and anatomy with less excess, thereby minimizing the use of rotary instruments during the finishing procedures. Finally, the resin composite restorations were finished and polished, and a surface sealer (Perma Seal) was applied to fill small gaps and defects that may have been present on the surfaces and margins of the restorations after the finishing and polishing procedures.

  14. Base deflection and microleakage of composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulillo, L A; de Goes, M F; Consani, S

    1994-06-01

    The flexural deflections of human dentin, Herculite XR, Dycal, Vidrion F, zinc phosphate base, and combinations of composite-base were determined. The influence of the flexural deflections in the marginal microleakage was also determined for the composite-base combinations. The flexural deflection test for dentin showed no statistically significant differences between the two floor cavity depths studied. There were significant differences among cements when the thickness of the base was 1 mm whereas no differences occurred at 2 mm. The composite-base combinations did not present statistical differences. There were no statistically significant differences in the microleakage levels among loaded and non-loaded specimens; however, dye penetration was visually greater in loaded samples.

  15. Seven-year clinical evaluation of painful cracked teeth restored with a direct composite restoration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Roeters, J.J.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Bronkhorst, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate long-term clinical effectiveness of treating painful cracked teeth with a direct bonded composite resin restoration. The hypothesis tested was that cracked teeth treated with or without cuspal coverage showed the same performance. Forty-one patients atten

  16. Resin-based composite as a direct esthetic restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala; Acharya, Shashirashmi

    2011-06-01

    The search for an ideal esthetic material for tooth restoration has resulted in significant improvements in both materials and the techniques for using them. Various resin-based composite (RBC) materials have recently been introduced into the market that offer improved esthetic and physical properties. This article reviews RBCs, including their compositions, advantages, and disadvantages, that are contemporary to today's clinical practice as well as those that are under research consideration and/ or in clinical trial phase.

  17. Bond Strength of Repaired Composite Resin Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Máximo de ARAÚJO

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the bond strength of direct composite resins and composite repairs, using 3 different commercial brands - GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (Tokuyama, GII: Filtek Z350 (3M/ESPE and GIII: Te Econon (Ivoclar/Vivadent - and the use of AdperTM Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE adhesive system at the base/repair interface. Method: Thirty conic bases (5 mm x 5 mm x 3 mm of each commercial brand of composite resin were fabricated. All bases of each group were submitted to a thermocycling regimen of 20,000 cycles (5ºC to 55ºC ± 2ºC, for 30 s. The bases of each group were randomly assigned to 3 sub-groups, in which a combination of the commercial brands was performed for the repairs. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C during 7 days and were thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC - MEM 2000 with 500 kgf load cell running at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data in MPa were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey’s test (5%.Results: The following results were found: GI: Palfique Estelite Ó (11.22±4.00 MPa, Te Econom (12.03±3.47 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.66±2.89 MPa; GII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.88±2.04 MPa, Te Econom (7.77±1.64 MPa and Filtek Z350 (10.50±6.14 MPa; and GIII: Palfique Estelite Ó (8.41±2.50 MPa, Te Econom (12.33±3.18 MPa and Z350 (11.73±3.54 MPa.Conclusion: The bond strengths at the interface of the different composite resins submitted to repair were statistically similar regardless of the commercial brand.

  18. Early failure of Class II resin composite versus Class II amalgam restorations placed by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, J D; Sullivan, Diane J

    2012-03-01

    Using the information from remake request slips in a dental school's predoctoral clinic, we examined the short-term survival of Class II resin composite restorations versus Class II dental amalgam restorations. In the student clinic, resin composite is used in approximately 58 percent of Class II restorations placed, and dental amalgam is used in the remaining 42 percent. In the period examined, Class II resin composite restorations were ten times more likely to be replaced at no cost to the patient than Class II dental amalgam restorations. A total of eighty-four resin composite restorations and six amalgam restorations were replaced due to an identified failure.

  19. Restoration of nonlinear motion-distorted composite frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Stern, Adrian; Kopeika, Norman S.

    2000-12-01

    A composite frame image is an interlaced composition of two sub-image odd and even fields. Such image type is common in many imaging systems that produce video sequences. When relative motion between the camera and the scene occurs during the imaging process, two types of distortion degrade the image: the edge 'staircase effect' due to the shifted appearances of the objects in successive fields, and blur due to the scene motion during each field exposure. This paper deals with restoration of composite frame images degraded by motion. In contrast to other previous works that dealt with only uniform velocity motion, here we consider a more general case of nonlinear motion. Since conventional motion identification techniques used in other works can not be employed in the case of nonlinear motion, a new method for identification of the motion from each field is used. Results of motion identification and image restoration for various motion types are presented.

  20. Retention of composite resin restorations in class IV preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Hani

    2002-01-01

    Clinicians often utilized composite resin restorations in combination with different types of preparation to restore class IV fractures on anterior incisors. A new preparation technique called (stair-step chamfer technique) is investigated in this study to detect bond strength to tooth structure. Eighty-eight bovine teeth were divided into 4 groups. Group I had twenty-three samples with a 45 degree bevel that extended 2 millimeters beyond the fracture line. Group II had twenty-three samples with a circumferential chamfer, which extended 2 mm beyond the fracture line and half the enamel thickness in depth. Group III had twenty-three samples with a facial stair-step chamfer, which followed the anatomical contour and extended 2 mm beyond the fracture line with a lingual plain chamfer. Group IV had eighteen samples as controls, which were untreated teeth. The first three groups were prepared and restored with hybrid composite resin in conjunction with a single step bonding agent and as surface penetrating sealer, then tested for shear-bond strength on the Instron machine. The results were that there was no significant difference found between the treated teeth when tested for shear-bond strength. However, according to the site of the fracture, the stair-step chamfer technique gave significantly better results. It can be concluded that, the stir-step chamfer technique provides the clinician better environment to place a composite resin restoration resulting in good shear-bond strength and better esthetics.

  1. Influence of different restorative techniques on marginal seal of class II composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinval Adalberto Rodrigues Junior

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the gingival marginal seal in class II composite restorations using different restorative techniques. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Class II box cavities were prepared in both proximal faces of 32 sound human third molars with gingival margins located in either enamel or dentin/cementum. Restorations were performed as follows: G1 (control: composite, conventional light curing technique; G2: composite, soft-start technique; G3: amalgam/composite association (amalcomp; and G4: resin-modified glass ionomer cement/composite, open sandwich technique. The restored specimens were thermocycled. Epoxy resin replicas were made and coated for scanning electron microscopy examination. For microleakage evaluation, teeth were coated with nail polish and immersed in dye solution. Teeth were cut in 3 slices and dye penetration was recorded (mm, digitized and analyzed with Image Tool software. Microleakage data were analyzed statistically by non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. RESULTS: Leakage in enamel was lower than in dentin (p<0.001. G2 exhibited the lowest leakage values (p<0.05 in enamel margins, with no differences between the other groups. In dentin margins, groups G1 and G2 had similar behavior and both showed less leakage (p<0.05 than groups G3 and G4. SEM micrographs revealed different marginal adaptation patterns for the different techniques and for the different substrates. CONCLUSION: The soft-start technique showed no leakage in enamel margins and produced similar values to those of the conventional (control technique for dentin margins.

  2. A clinical evaluation on adhesive posts in extensive composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavamnasiri M. Associate Professor

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Problem: A few studies have been conducted about bioglass posts."nAim: The aim of this study was to compare bioglass posts with prefabricated metallic posts in clinical performance of extensive composite restorations for anterior endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods: Sixty endodontocally maxillary anterior teeth, with horizontally or vertically destruction, were selected. Teeth were divided into two groups based on the kind of post: Metallic prefabricated parapost and bioglass post. Each group was divided into three subgroups based on anterior bite: normal, deep bite and edge to edge. Gutta-percha was removed from 2/3 of canal length for parapost and 1/3 for bioglass post. After etching with phosphoric-acid (37% and applying dentine bonding syntac, Duo cement was used for the adhesion of bioglass post and a self cured composite (Degufil for parapost. Restoration was done with a hybrid composite (Heliomolar. Follow up studies, radio-graphically and clinically, were done every three months for a 1.5-year period. Exact Fisher and Pearson tests were used for data analysis."nResults: Apical lesion was not observed in any of the radiographs. Post seal was increased by resin cement and dentin bonding agent. Post type did not significantly affect on the clinical success rate of the restorations. The retention of restoration, for both posts, was the same. Crown destruction had no significant effect on success rate. The type of anterior bite had a significant effect on success rate, as the total 6.6% failure rate was related to the patients with anterior deep bite."nConclusion: It is suggested to use metallic paraposts and bioglass posts, in extensive composite restorations for patients with deep-bite, more conservatively.

  3. Marginal behaviour of self-etch adhesive/composite and combined amalgam-composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kournetas, Nikos; Kakaboura, Afrodite; Giftopoulos, Dimitrios; Chakmachi, Magdad; Rahiotis, Christos; Geis-Gerstorfer, J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the marginal and internal adaptation in self-etching adhesive (SEA)/composite restorations with combined amalgam-resin-based composite restorations in the proximal box with and without bonding agent beneath amalgam both before and after load-cycling. Class II restorations, were manufactured as following a) Bonding agent (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, Kuraray) beneath amalgam (Tytin, SDS Kerr) and resin-based composite (Clearfil APX, Kuraray) with SEA, b) Amalgam without bonding agent and resin-based composite with SEA and c) Resin-based composite with SEA. Each group divided into two equal subgroups (n=8). Marginal and internal adaptation of first subgroup evaluated after 7-day water storage and of the second after load-cycling in chewing simulator for 1.2 x 10(6) cycles. Marginal and internal adaptation at cervical and amalgam-composite sites evaluated by videomicroscope and ranked as "excellent"/"non-excellent". Slices of restorations examined under optical microscope to determine the quality of bonding layer. Defects in cervical adaptation observed in the three restorative techniques examined prior loading. Amalgam-composite combination in proximal surface provided comparable marginal and internal adaptation results at cervical wall, to self-etching-composite combination. Portion (25-37.5%) of amalgam-resin-based composite interfaces in proximal box presented no perfect sealing. The application of bonding agent beneath amalgam resulted in relatively inferior cervical adaptation. Loading resulted in fewer excellent restorations in all three restorative techniques but not in a statistically significant level.

  4. Anterior makeover on fractured teeth by simple composite resin restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Priyo Prasetyo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In daily practice dentists usually treat tooth fractures with more invasive treatments such as crown, veneer and bridges which preparation require more tooth structure removal. While currently there is trend toward minimal invasive dentistry which conserves more tooth structure. This is enhanced with the vast supply of dental materials and equipment in the market, including restorative materials. Provided with these supporting materials and equipment and greater patient’s demand for esthetic treatment, dentists must aware of the esthetics and basic principle of conserving tooth which should retain tooth longevity. Purpose: This article showed that a simple and less invasive composite resin restoration can successfully restore anterior esthetic and function of fractured teeth which generally treated with more invasive treatment options. Case: A 19 year-old female patient came with fracture on 21 and 22. This patient had a previous history of dental trauma about nine years before and was brought to a local dentist for debridement and was given analgesic, the involved teeth were not given any restorative treatment. Case management: The fractured 21 and 22 were conventionally restored with simple composite resin restoration. Conclusion: Fracture anterior teeth would certainly disturbs patient’s appearance, but these teeth could be managed conservatively and economically by simple composite resin restoration.Latar belakang: Dalam praktek sehari-hari pada umumnya dokter gigi merawat fraktur dengan restorasi invasif seperti mahkota, veneer dan jembatan yang semuanya memerlukan pengambilan jaringan gigi lebih banyak, sedangkan saat ini trend perawatan gigi lebih menuju kearah invasif minimal yang mempertahankan jaringan gigi sebanyak mungkin. Keadaan ini ditunjang oleh tersedianya berbagai macam bahan dan peralatan kedokteran gigi di pasaran, termasuk bahan restorasi. Dengan tersedianya bahan dan peralatan yang mendukung serta tingginya

  5. Influence of photoactivation method and mold for restoration on the Knoop hardness of resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, William Cunha; Silva-Concilio, Lais Regiane; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; de Souza-Junior, Eduardo Jose Carvalho; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the Knoop hardness in the top and bottom of composite photo activated by different methods when different mold materials were used. Z250 (3M ESPE) and XL2500 halogen unit (3M ESPE) were used. For hardness test, conical restorations were made in extracted bovine incisors (tooth mold) and also metal mold (approximately 2 mm top diameter × 1.5 mm bottom diameter × 2 mm in height). Different photoactivation methods were tested: high-intensity continuous (HIC), low-intensity continuous (LIC), soft-start, or pulse-delay (PD), with constant radiant exposure. Knoop readings were performed on top and bottom restoration surfaces. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05). On the top, regardless of the mold used, no significant difference in the Knoop hardness (Knoop hardness number, in kilograms-force per square millimeter) was observed between the photoactivation methods. On the bottom surface, the photoactivation method HIC shows higher means of hardness than LIC when tooth and metal were used. Significant differences of hardness on the top and in the bottom were detected between tooth and metal. The photoactivation method LIC and the material mold can interfere in the hardness values of composite restorations.

  6. Restoration of primary anterior teeth: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jacob K

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the published data on restorations of primary anterior teeth. The discussion includes Class III restorations, Class V restorations, various forms of full coronal restorations, atraumatic restorative technique (ART) and recommendations for future research.

  7. Effect of postoperative peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubickova, A; Dudek, M; Comba, L; Housova, D; Bradna, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with several adhesive systems. Combined cylindrical Class V cavities located half in enamel and half in dentin were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molars. The cavities were bonded with the self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE-Bond (CLF), Adper Prompt (ADP), and iBond (IBO) and an etch-and-rinse adhesive Gluma Comfort Bond (GLU) and restored with a microhybrid composite Charisma. Experimental groups were treated 25 times for eight hours per day with a peroxide bleaching gel Opalescence PF 20, while the control groups were stored in distilled water for two months and then subjected to a microleakage test using a dye penetration method. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the etching and penetration abilities of the adhesives and morphology of debonded restoration-enamel interfaces after the microleakage tests. Statistical analyses were performed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests at p=0.05. The microleakage of all GLU groups was low and not significantly affected by peroxide bleaching. Low microleakage was recorded for CLF control groups, but after bleaching, a small but significant increase in microleakage at the enamel margin indicated its sensitivity to peroxide bleaching. For ADP and IBO control groups, the microleakage at the enamel margins was significantly higher than for GLU and CLF and exceeded that at the dentin margins. Bleaching did not induce any significant changes in the microleakage. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that in our experimental setup, decreased adhesion and mechanical resistance of the ADP- and IBO-enamel interfaces could be more important than the chemical degradation effects induced by the peroxide bleaching gel.

  8. In vitro wear of flowable resin composite for posterior restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Koichi; Taira, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shiro; Suzuki, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine three- and two-body wear values of flowable resin composites for posterior restorations, using a mechanical loading device. The cavities prepared on flattened extracted molars were restored with flowable resin composites (Clearfil Majesty LV: MLV, Estelite Flow Quick: EFQ, Beautifil Flow Plus F00: BFP, and MI Fill: MIF) using accompanying adhesive systems. A universal resin composite (Clearfil Majesty) was used as a control. The specimens were subjected to in vitro three- and two-body wear testing. MLV showed high wear value (three-body: 14.69 µm, two-body: 0.268 mm(3)) compared with other materials tested in both three- and two-body wear tests. BFP showed high three-body wear value (5.78 µm), whereas low two-body wear value (0.008 mm(3)). MIF and EFQ showed equivalent wear values (MIF, three-body: 0.42 µm, two-body: 0.026 mm(3); EFQ, three-body: 1.15 µm, two-body: 0.14 mm(3)) to that of the control in both wear tests.

  9. Microleakage of Class II Combined Amalgam-Composite Restorations Using Different Composites and Bonding Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sharafeddin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage of composite restorations with and without a cervical amalgam base and to compare the results of dif-ferent composites and bonding agents.Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty mesio-occlusal (MO and disto-occlusal (DO Class II cavities were prepared on sixty extracted permanent premolar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 30 and restored as follows:In group A, the mesio-occlusal cavity (MO, Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 and in the disto-occlusal (DO cavity, Prompt-L-Pop + Z250 were applied. As for group B, in the MO and DO cavities, Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX, and varnish + amalgam (In box + Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX were used respectivelywhile in group C; the teeth were restored with amalgam and varnish mesio-occlusally and with amalgam only disto-occlusally. As for group D, varnish + amalgam (in box + Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 were applied mesio-occlusally and Varnish + Amalgam (in box + Prompt–L–Pop + Z250 disto-occlusally.Marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration into various sections of the restored teeth. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for data analysis.Results: Microleakage in gingival margin was more than that in occlusal margin (P<0.05 and microleakage of combined amalgam-composite restorations was significantly lower than that of conventional composite and amalgam restorations.Conclusion: Marginal microleakage decreased by using amalgam at the base of the box in Class II composite restorations.

  10. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with packable and hybrid composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: With recent introduction of packable composites, it is claimed that they apply less stress on tooth structure because of reduced polymerization shrinkage, and similarity of coefficient of thermal expansion to tooth structure. However, the high viscosity may in turn cause less adaptation, so it is not clearly known whether these materials strengthen tooth structure or not. The aim of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance of maxillary premolars, receiving hybrid or packable composite restorations with different methods of application and curing. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, seventy five intact premolars were randomly assigned to five groups of 15 teeth each. One group was maintained intact as the control group. Similar MOD cavities were prepared in the other teeth. The teeth in group two were restored with Spectrum in incremental layers and light cured with 500 mw/cm2 intensity. The third group were filled with Surefil and cured with light intensity of 500 mw/cm2. The groups four and five were restored with Surefil in bulk technique with two different modes: 500 mw/cm2 intensity and a ramp mode (100-900 mw/cm2 respectively. After thermocycling, force to fracture was assessed and degree of conversion (DC at the bottom of cavities was evaluated for different modes and methods. The curing and placement methods in groups tested for DC (A to D were the same as fracture resistance groups (2 to 5. Data were analyzed using one way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: All the restored groups showed significantly less fracture resistance than the control group, but had no significant difference among themselves. DC of Spectrum was higher than Surefil. Bulk method with 500 mw/cm2 light intensity, significantly decreased DC. DC in bulk method with high light intensity was not significantly different from incremental method with 500 mw/cm2 light intensity. Conclusion

  11. Evaluation of periodontal status adjacent to interproximal surfaces restored with composite resin, in comparison with non-restored interproximal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvia Christina Barros de Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the periodontal status of interproximal surfaces restored with composite resin, in comparison with non-restored interproximal surfaces. Methods: In 65 patients, we analyzed 145 restored surfaces and 145 non-restored surfaces. Results: Most of the restored surfaces (54.3% showed radiographic alterations, which was shown to be higher among restorations with clinically detected proximal excess (56.8% x 52.8%; with lack of restorative material (64.5% x 51.4%; in restorations with proximal overhang (67.7% x 44.4%; in teeth with gingival inflammation?/bleeding (55.1% x 40.0% and in teeth with probing depth exceeding 3 mm (64.3% x 52.9%. However, there were no significant associations for these variables. Of the non-restored surfaces, 24.4% showed radiographic alterations, however there were no significant associations. Conclusion: The results showed a statistical significance for radiographic alterations in restored and non-restored surfaces.

  12. A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCracken, Michael S; Gordan, Valeria V; Litaker, Mark S;

    2013-01-01

    Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations.......Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations....

  13. A new proposal to optimize the occlusal margin in direct resin composite restorations of posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Luís Henrique; Monteiro, Sylvio; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso

    2008-01-01

    Modern operative dentistry provides practitioners of esthetic dentistry the means for performing direct restorations in a virtually imperceptible way. However, this attribute of resin composite can cause difficulties because the absence of contrast between the tooth structure and the restoration can impede visualization of the cavity limits. The purpose of this article is to highlight some operative steps that, when appropriately performed, will facilitate the building of direct resin composite restorations in posterior teeth, significantly reducing the possibility of restorative overextension.

  14. Amalgam and composite posterior restorations: curriculum versus practice in operative dentistry at a US dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenga, Marc E; Mjör, Ivar

    2007-01-01

    This study recorded the number of preclinical lecture and simulation laboratory sessions spent teaching the preparation and placement of amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations. These data were compared to the use of both materials in the operative clinic as placed by third- and fourth-year students. The number of posterior restorations inserted by the students, expressed as a function of the number of restoration surfaces, was also evaluated. The results show that the teaching of posterior restorations pre-clinically has consistently favored amalgam 2.5 to 1 during the last three years. However, clinically, resin composite is being used for posterior restorations 2.3 times more often than amalgam. The only instance that favored amalgam over composite during the last year was in the placement of four surface posterior restorations. This shift in emphasis from amalgam to composite needs to be addressed within dental educational institutions so that newly graduated dentists are prepared to place composite restorations properly.

  15. Effect of the curing method and composite volume on marginal and internal adaptation of composite restoratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; de Souza-Régis, Marcos Ribeiro; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; de Freitas, Anderson Pinheiro; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Cunha, Leonardo Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of curing methods and composite volumes on the marginal and internal adaptation of composite restoratives. Two cavities with different volumes (Lower volume: 12.6 mm(3); Higher volume: 24.5 mm(3)) were prepared on the buccal surface of 60 bovine teeth and restored using Filtek Z250 in bulk filling. For each cavity, specimens were randomly assigned into three groups according to the curing method (n=10): 1) continuous light (CL: 27 seconds at 600 mW/cm(2)); 2) soft-start (SS: 10 seconds at 150 mW/cm(2)+24 seconds at 600 mW/cm(2)); and 3) pulse delay (PD: five seconds at 150 mW/cm(2)+three minutes with no light+25 seconds at 600 mW/cm(2)). The radiant exposure for all groups was 16 J/cm(2). Marginal adaptation was measured with the dye staining gap procedure, using Caries Detector. Outer margins were stained for five seconds and the gap percentage was determined using digital images on a computer measurement program (Image Tool). Then, specimens were sectioned in slices and stained for five seconds, and the internal gaps were measured using the same method. Data were submitted to two-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (pcuring method. For CL groups, restorations with higher volume showed higher marginal gap incidence than did the lower volume restorations. Additionally, the effect of the curing method depended on the volume. Regarding marginal adaptation, SS resulted in a significant reduction of gap formation, when compared to CL, for higher volume restorations. For lower volume restorations, there was no difference among the curing methods. For internal adaptation, the modulated curing methods SS and PD promoted a significant reduction of gap formation, when compared to CL, only for the lower volume restoration. Therefore, in similar conditions of the cavity configuration, the higher the volume of composite, the greater the gap formation. In addition, modulated curing methods (SS and PD) can improve

  16. Marginal microleakage in vitro study on class V cavities prepared with Er:YAG laser and etched with acid or etched with Er:YAG laser and acid; Estudo in vitro da microinfiltracao marginal em cavidades classe V preparadas com laser de Er:YAG e condicionadas com acido ou com laser de Er:YAG e acido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Henrique Dutra Simoes

    2001-07-01

    Microleakage at the interface between the teeth and the restorative materials remains a problem with composite resin restorations. Microleakage at the gingival margins of class V cavities restorations still challenge as they are usually placed in dentin and/or cementum. Previous studies have shown that the cavity preparation with Er:YAG laser is possible. It has been reported that Er:YAG laser has ability to create irregular surface providing micromechanical retention for adhesive dental restorative materials and to improve marginal sealing. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal microleakage on class V cavities prepared with Er:YAG laser and etched with acid or with Er:YAG laser and acid, in compared to those prepared and etched conventionally. Thirty human molars were divided into three groups, namely: group I - prepared with Er:YAG laser (KaVo KEY Laser II - Germany) and etched with 37% phosphoric acid; group II - prepared with Er:YAG laser and etched with Er:YAG laser and 37% phosphoric acid; group III (control group) - prepared with high speed drill and etched with 37% phosphoric acid. All cavities were treated with same adhesive system (Single Bond - 3M) and restored with the composite resin (Z100 - 3M), according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were stored at 37 deg C in water for 24 hours, polished with Sof-Lex discs (3M), thermally stressed, sealed with a nail polish coating except for the area of the restoration and 1 mm around it, and immersed in a 50% aqueous solution of silver nitrate for 24 hours. After that, the specimens were rinsed in water, soaked in a photodeveloping solution and exposed to a fluorescent light for 8 hours. The teeth were embedded in an autopolymerizing resin and sectioned longitudinally using a diamond saw microtome under running water. The sections were photographed. The microleakage at the occlusal cavity and at the gingival margins of each specimen was evaluated with scores (0

  17. The controlled placement and delayed polymerization technique for the direct Class 2 posterior composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, Alan M

    2005-11-01

    Adhesion dentistry and its application to the direct posterior composite restoration is the most controversial topic in dentistry today. The concepts behind this procedure are now the backbone of restorative dentistry. Adhesion dentistry influences basic fillings, crown buildups, post-and-core restorations, cementation, orthodontics, and endodontics. Yet, controversy remains about the correct way to place a direct Class 2 posterior composite restoration. This article will examine the scientific evidence to determine which materials and placement techniques will achieve the optimum direct Class 2 posterior composite restoration at or below the cementoenamel junction using the controlled placement and delayed polymerization technique.

  18. [Restoration of composite on etched stainless steel crowns. (1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, G; Zang, Y; Hosoya, Y

    1990-01-01

    Object of investigation The retention of composite resin to etched stainless steel crowns was tested as a possible method for restoring primary anterior teeth. Method employed 1) SEM observation Stainless steel crowns (Sankin Manufacture Co.) were etched with an aqua resia to create surface roughness and undercut to retain the composite resin to the crowns. Etching times were 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 20 minutes, then washed in a 70% alcohol solution using an ultrasonic washer and dried. A total of 96 etched samples and non etched control samples were observed through the scanning electron microscope (Hitachi 520). 2) Shear bond strength test Stainless steel crowns were etched in an aqua resia from 1 to 20 minutes, then washed and dried. Composite resin (Photo Clearfil A, Kuraray Co.) with the bonding agent was placed on the crowns and the shear bond strength was tested in 56 samples using an Autograph (DCS-500, Shimazu). Results 1) SEM observation showed that the etching surface of stainless steel crowns created surface roughness and undercut. The most desirable surface was obtained in the 3 to 5 minute etching time specimens. 2) The highest bond strength was obtained in a 3 minute etching specimen. It was 42.12 MPa, although 29.26 MPa in mean value. Conclusion Etching with an aqua resia increased the adherence of composite resin to the surface of stainless steel crowns.

  19. Curing units' ability to cure restorative composites and dual-cured composite cements under composite overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Ho; Kim, Su-Sun; Cho, Yong-Sik; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Noh, Byng-Duk

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of using conventional low-power density QTH (LQTH) units, high-power density QTH (HQTH) units, argon (Ar) laser and Plasma arc curing (PAC) units for curing dual-cured resin cements and restorative resin composites under a pre-cured resin composite overlay. The microhardness of the two types of restorative resins (Z100 and Tetric Ceram) and a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II) were measured after they were light cured for 60 seconds in a 2 mm Teflon mold. The recorded microhardness was determined to be the optimum microhard-ness (OM). Either one of the two types of restorative resins (Z100, Tetric Ceram) or the dual cured resin cement (Variolink II) were placed under a 1.5-mm thick and 8 mm diameter pre-cured Targis (Vivadent/Ivoclar AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein) overlay. The specimens that were prepared for each material were divided into four groups depending upon the curing units used (HQTH, PAC, Laser or LQTH) and were further subdi-vided into subgroups according to light curing time. The curing times used were 30, 60, 90 and 120 seconds for HQTH; 12, 24, 36 and 48 seconds for the PAC unit; 15, 30, 45 and 60 for the Laser and 60, 120 or 180 seconds for the LQTH unit. Fifteen specimens were assigned to each sub- group. The microhardness of the upper and and lower composite surfaces under the Targis overlay were measured using an Optidur Vickers hardness-measuring instrument (Göttfert Feinwerktechnik GmbH, Buchen, Germany). In each material, for each group, a three-way ANOVA with Tukey was used at the 0.05 level of significance to compare the microhardnesses of the upper and lower composite surfaces and the previously measured OM of the material. From the OM of each material, 80% OM was calculated and the time required for the microhardness of the upper and lower surface of the specimen to reach 100% and 80% of OM was determined. In Z100 and Tetric Ceram, when the composites were light cured for 120 seconds using the HQTH lamp

  20. Marginal and internal adaptation of class II restorations after immediate or delayed composite placement

    OpenAIRE

    Dietschi, Didier; Monasevic, Manuela; Krejci, Ivo; Davidson, Carel

    2002-01-01

    Direct class II composite restorations still represent a challenge, particularly when proximal limits extend below the CEJ. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of the type of adhesive and the delay between adhesive placement and composite insertion on restoration adaptation. Direct class II MOD box-shaped composite restorations (n=8 per group) were placed on intact human third molars, with proximal margins 1mm above or under CEJ. All cavities were filled with a horizo...

  1. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15 according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [2] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of Panavia F; [3] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [4] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of Panavia F. The adhesive systems and the resin cements were applied according to the experimental groups, using a Tygon matrix.The samples were stored in distilled water at 37±2ºC for 24 hours.Microshear bond strengths were determined using an apparatus attached to an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Results: The results obtained in MPa (SD were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, p<0.05, and showed the following results: [1] 39.76 (5.34; [2] 45.01 (8.53; [3] 46.39 (9.22; [4]45.78 (9.06.There was no statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [2]; and between groups [3] and [4]. However, there was statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [3]. Conclusion:When Clearfil AP-X block was used with Clearfil SE Bond adhesive or RelyX resin cement, the microshear bond strength values were higher.The results suggest that in the union of the resin cements to the restorative composites, hydrophobic adhesives are necessary.

  2. Effect of LED curing on the microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a resin-based composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Theunis G; Du Preez, Ignatius C; Kidd, M

    2005-06-01

    To determine the effect of Light emitting diode (LED) curing on dental resins, microleakage, shear bond strength and surface hardness of a dental composite cured with different LEDs were determined and compared with conventional halogen curing. For microleakage, Class V cavities were restored with Esthet-X, divided into groups, and exposed to one of the curing protocols (Elipar Freelight in soft start and standard modes; Ultra-Lume 2; Spectrum 800). Standard dye penetration tests were performed and the data summarised in a 2-way contingency table of observed frequencies. The Chi-square test was used (psurface hardness, samples of Esthet-X were exposed to the light-curing units (LCUs). Vickers hardness was determined on the upper and the bottom surfaces. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using ANOVA (phardness score for the halogen light was significantly lower than for the LED lights (p<0.01). The Spectrum 800 and the Elipar Freelight (soft start) have significantly higher shear bond strengths than the others (p<0.01). It was concluded that the LED source is more efficient for a comparable overall power output.

  3. A randomized controlled 27 years follow up of three resin composites in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the durability of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations during 27 years. Methods: Thirty participants, 25 female and 5 male (mean age 38.2 years, range 25–63), received at least three (one set) as similar as possible Class II restorations of moderate...... sealing of the restorations was performed after finishing. One operator placed 99 restorations (33 sets). Evaluation was performed with slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline, 2, 3, 10 and 27 years. Results: Postoperative sensitivity was observed in 5 patients. Three participants with 11......: Class II restorations of the three conventional resin composites showed an acceptable success rate during the 27 year evaluation....

  4. Fabrication of Inorganic–Organic Composites for Dental Restorative Materials—A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI; Bencang; YANG; Qing; LI; Jing; WANG; Huining; LIN; Yuanhua; SHEN; Yang; LI; Ming; DENG; Xuliang; NAN; Cewen

    2015-01-01

    The paper is to review recent developments on composite dental restorative materials in terms of filler dimensions. The mechanical properties, biocompatibility and aesthetic performance are determined by fillers morphology, contents and chemical composition. We mainly summarized the 0-, 1-, and 2-dimensional fillers of composites used in dental restoration and their effects on the performance, especially the mechanical properties, which imply desirable applications for dental composites designed with these fillers.

  5. Physical Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    resins . Packable composite resins were first introduced as an alternative to amalgam .10 They are characterized by a high filler load and a filler...clearance: -"_Paper _Article _ Book _ Poster _ Presentation _Other 6. Title: Physical Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative...Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative Material ABSTRACT A new nanohybrid composite activated by sonic energy (SonicFill

  6. Comparative in vivo evaluation of restoring severely mutilated primary anterior teeth with biological post and crown preparation and reinforced composite restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grewal N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to compare the success rate of biological and composite restorations when used to replace structural loss of primary anterior teeth using intracanal post for radicular support of the restoration. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients aged between 3-5 years presenting with early childhood caries (ECC received at least one or more composite and biological restorations for comparative evaluation. A total of 150 restorations were done (75 biological restorations and 75 composite restorations. The restorations were evaluated single-blind according to a modified USPHS system. Assessment of the patient′s response in accepting a biological restoration, psychological impact of the restorations, view of the parents, and peer group reviews, etc. were recorded in a response sheet in presence of the child and the parents. Observations and Results: In vivo clinical performance of biological post and crown restorations and intracanal reinforced composite restorations was comparable with respect to shade match, marginal discoloration, marginal integrity, surface finish, gingival health, retention, and recurrent carious lesions. The cost effectiveness of biological restorations was certainly a positive attribute. Conclusion: The biological restoration presented as a cost effective, clinician friendly, less-technique sensitive, and esthetic alternative to commercially available restorative materials used for restoring deciduous teeth affected by ECC.

  7. Comparison of wear and clinical performance between amalgam, composite and open sandwich restorations: 2-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeo, A; Gray, Gordon B; Sulieman, M A; Jagger, Daryll C

    2004-03-01

    There has been some disquiet over the use of mercury containing restorative materials. The most commonly used alternative is composite resin but this has the potential disadvantage associated with wear and marginal leakage, which in turn, has proven to result in secondary caries and sensitivity. To overcome the shortcomings of a directly placed composite restoration, the glass-ionomer/composite open sandwich technique was introduced followed by the subsequent introduction of compomer systems. The aims of this study were to evaluate the wear and clinical performance of a control group of amalgam restorations compared with that of a group of posterior composite resin restorations fillings and a group of compomer/composite open sandwich restorations placed by a single general dental practitioner. The duration of the study was 2 years. One hundred and thirty three (71.4%) patients were successfully recalled and the wear and clinical performance of each restoration after 6, 12 and 24 months was measured, indirectly. There was no statistically significant difference recorded between the groups at 6 months or 1 year (p > 0.05). However, at the end of the 2-year study, there was a significantly lower rate of wear recorded for the control amalgam restorations compared with other two groups (p = 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference in wear recorded between the two groups of tooth-coloured restorations (p > 0.05). With regards to clinical performance of the restorations, occlusal and proximal contacts in each group of restoration remained satisfactory throughout the study.

  8. Five-year clinical performance of posterior resin composite restorations placed by dental students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the survival over a five-year period of posterior resin composite restorations placed by students. METHODS: Class I and II resin composite restorations placed by second-fourth year dental students were evaluated. Patients attended the dental school every 6 months for a reg

  9. The effectiveness of different polymerization protocols for class II composite resin restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, L.C.G. de; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Geitenbeek, B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of reduced light exposure times on Vickers hardness (VH) of class II composite resin restorations. METHODS: Class II restorations were made in vitro in three 2mm thick increments in a human molar. Two composite resins (Clearfil AP-X; Esthet-X) were polymerized w

  10. Anterior composite restorations: A systematic review on long-term survival and reasons for failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demarco, F.F.; Collares, K.; Coelho-de-Souza, F.H.; Correa, M.B.; Cenci, M.S.; Moraes, R.R.; Opdam, N.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study the literature was systematically reviewed to investigate the clinical longevity of anterior composite restorations. DATA: Clinical studies investigating the survival of anterior light-cured composite restorations with at least three years of follow-up were screened and main

  11. The effects of restorative composite resins on the cytotoxicity of dentine bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghwan; Son, Kyung Mi; Kwon, Ji Hyun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    During restoration of damaged teeth in dental clinics, dentin bonding agents are usually overlaid with restorative resin composites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of restorative resin composites on cytotoxicity of dentin bonding agents. Dentin bonding agents were placed on glass discs, pre-cured and uncured resin composite discs. Bonding agents on the glass discs and composite resins discs were light cured and used for agar overlay cytotoxicity testing. Dentin bonding agents on composite resin discs exhibited far less cytotoxicity than that on glass discs. The polymerization of resin composite increased the surface hardness and decreased the cytotoxicity of bonding agents. In conclusion, composite resins in dental restorations are expected to enhance the polymerization of dentin bonding agents and reduce the elution of resin monomers, resulting in the decrease of cytotoxicity.

  12. Comparative in vivo evaluation of restoring severely mutilated primary anterior teeth with biological post and crown preparation and reinforced composite restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Grewal N; Seth R

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to compare the success rate of biological and composite restorations when used to replace structural loss of primary anterior teeth using intracanal post for radicular support of the restoration. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients aged between 3-5 years presenting with early childhood caries (ECC) received at least one or more composite and biological restorations for comparative evaluation. A total of 150 restorations were done (75 biological re...

  13. Longevity of posterior composite restorations: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opdam, Niek; van de Sande, Francoise; Bronkhorst, Ewald;

    2014-01-01

    including all restorations was constructed and a Multivariate Cox’s regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk-status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials and use of glass-ionomer cement as base......The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data of several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient, materials and tooth related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Methods: Following PRISMA guidelines a search was conducted resulting...... in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database...

  14. Preparing and Restoring Composite Resin Restorations. The Advantage of High Magnification Loupes or the Dental Surgical Operating Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoun, John

    2015-01-01

    Use of magnification, such as 6x to 8x binocular surgical loupes or the surgical operating microscope, combined with co-axial illumination, may facilitate the creation of stable composite resin restorations that are less likely to develop caries, cracks or margin stains over years of service. Microscopes facilitate observation of clinically relevant microscopic visual details, such as microscopic amounts of demineralization or caries at preparation margins; microscopic areas of soft, decayed tooth structure; microscopic amounts of moisture contamination of the preparation during bonding; or microscopic marginal gaps in the composite. Preventing microscope-level errors in composite fabrication can result in a composite restoration that, at initial placement, appears perfect when viewed under 6x to 8x magnification and which also is free of secondary caries, marginal staining or cracks at multi-year follow-up visits.

  15. Clinical approach to anterior adhesive restorations using resin composite veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangani, Francesco; Cerutti, Antonio; Putignano, Angelo; Bollero, Raffaele; Madini, Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    Scientific progress in adhesive dentistry has led to more conservative techniques, both direct and indirect, to solve esthetic problems in anterior teeth. This article will discuss only indirect techniques, which are clearly superior in complex cases in which it will be difficult to recreate harmonious tooth shape and color. After reviewing the literature and highlighting the properties of this technique, the indications and benefits compared to the direct technique will be assessed. This is followed by a step-by-step description of operative procedures, from treatment planning to relining and polishing of the cemented adhesive restoration. The long-term success of veneers depends mainly on the tooth preparation, which should be confined to enamel, involve proximal contact areas, maintain the cervical enamel margin, and incorporate the incisal edge to increase veneer resistance and enable correct placement. Although no clinical follow-up similar to that of ceramic materials is available, the latest-generation resin composites offer interesting features. They can withstand mechanical stress, have excellent esthetic properties, and, most importantly, can be repaired intraorally without impairing their physicochemical and mechanical properties.

  16. Indirect posterior restorations using a new chairside microhybrid resin composite system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, F R; Wei, S H

    2001-01-01

    A plethora of choices is available as potential tooth-colored restoratives for the posterior dentition. Advances in adhesive technology and esthetic chairside microhybrid composite resins have permitted clinicians to perform inlay/onlay restorations. The use of adhesive indirect procedures offers advantages such as better control of polymerization shrinkage and anatomical form, when compared to conventional, direct restorative techniques. This article describes the use of a new chairside microhybrid composite system as an indirect restorative material, using semidirect and indirect techniques that can be accomplished within the realm of a dental operatory.

  17. Effects of Fiber-reinforced Composite Bases on Microleakage of Composite Restorations in Proximal Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Tezvergil-Mutluay; P.K, Vallittu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of direct restorative composite resin upon the addition of an intermediate glass fiber-reinforced composite (GFRC) layer of various fiber orientations between tooth and particulate filler composite resin (PFRC). Materials and Methods: Cavities were prepared both on the mesial and distal surfaces of sixty extracted human molars with one margin placed below and the other above the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Teeth were assigned to five different groups. Four of the groups received a layer of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) resin system impregnated E-glass GFRC at the bottom of the cavity: Group 1; unidirectional continuous GFRC (EVS) in buccolingual direction (EVS-BL), Group 2; EVS in mesiodistal direction (EVS-MD), Group 3; bidirectional woven GFRC (EVN), Group 4; multidirectional short GFRC (EXP-MLT), Group 5; PRFC only (control). After acid etching and priming of the cavities and insertion of GFRC layer with the adhesive resin (Scotchbond Multipurpose 3M-ESPE), the cavities were filled incrementally with PRFC (Filtek Z250, 3M-ESPE) and each layer was light cured for 20 s. After finishing and polishing, the restored teeth were water-stored for 24 h at 37 °C and then thermocycled for 6000 cycles between 5-55 °C, before immersion in 0.5 % basic fuchsin dye for 24 h. After sectioning by 3-5 sagittal cuts, each sequential section was imaged and digitally analyzed to determine the stain depth. Results: All GFRC groups in dentin revealed significantly lower microleakage compared to control (p0.05). The microleakeage in enamel was not different between the groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Use of intermediate GFRC layer between tooth and PFRC could provide alternative method to minimize microleakage. Clinical Relevance: Use of GFRC intermediate layer underneath the particulate filler composite can be used to minimize the leakeage of the restorations. PMID:25512764

  18. SEM evaluation of marginal sealing on composite restorations using different photoactivation and composite insertion methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Murilo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This in vitro study evaluates the influence of marginal sealing methods in composite restorations with different adhesive systems submitted to mechanical load. Materials and Methods: Eighty bovine incisor crowns were embedded in Polyvinyl chloride (PVC molds with the buccal surface exposed, where cavities (4mm x 4mm x 3mm were made. Samples had the adhesive systems, Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond, applied according to the manufacturer′s recommendations. The cavities were filled with a Z-250 composite according to the restoration technique (bulk filling or three increments and photoactivation (conventional, soft start, pulsatile light or light-emitting diode [LED]. The samples were duplicated with epoxy resin for scanning electron microscopy observations. Samples were also submitted to mechanical load (200,000 cycles; 2 Hz and new replicas were made. Results: The results, in percentages, were submitted to ANOVA followed by Tukey′s test (P < 0.05. There was statistical difference between the cycle group (23.84% and the non cycle group (18.63%. Comparing the restoration technique, there was no statistical difference between bulk filling (19.62% and three increments (22.84%. There was no statistical difference among the groups: Pulsatile light (24.38%, soft start (22.75%, LED (21.47% or conventional (16.34%. Furthermore, there were no statistical differences between the adhesive systems: Clearfil SE Bond (21.32% and Single Bond (20.83%. Conclusions: The photoactivation methods, the restorative techniques and the adhesive systems did not influence gap formation.

  19. Effect of enamel margin configuration on color change of resin composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Asami; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Seki, Naoko; Kano, Yukinori; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of enamel margin configuration on color change of resin composite restoration. Enamel disks of 1.0 mm-thick were sliced from sixty bovine anterior teeth and divided into three groups by margin configuration (non-bevel, 45-degree bevel and 45-degree reverse-bevel). The color measurements (L*C*h* values) at the restored bovine enamel disk with resin composite (Estelite Asteria, Estelite Pro, Kalore, Clearfil Majesty) were performed using a digital camera with CIE XYZ color gamut (RC500). All the resin composite restorations with non-beveled and beveled cavities significantly increased L* values compared with the control composite disks (presin composite restoration and color adjustment of the border.

  20. The direct posterior esthetic restoration using state-of-the-art composite resin technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatore, C

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the evolution of both materials and techniques, the direct posterior composite restoration has become a common procedure in today's dental practice. Advances in the adhesive protocol have allowed for the conservative preparation of the dentition by using the micromechanical potential of the sound tooth structure. Improvements of composite resin materials have further enabled the practitioner to re-create the natural esthetic beauty of the dentition while at the same time restoring the functional morphology. This article describes the technical protocol and materials necessary to perform the direct posterior composite restoration in the posterior dentition.

  1. Evaluation of the surface structure of composite restorations in light of own pilot research

    OpenAIRE

    Chalas Renata; Orlowski Miroslaw; Tarczydlo Bozena; Zubrzycka-Wrobel Joanna; Maj Karol; Wojcik-Checinska Ilona

    2016-01-01

    Research on the dental restorative materials employed in remedying dental cavities has been conducted on many levels and areas, both with application of clinical and laboratory methods. One of the elements that determines whether the restoration may be degraded is the condition of its surface. The aim of the study was to assess the texture surface of composite restorations using a non-contact method of teeth models scanning. In this work, ten medium size cavities on the occlusal surfaces of m...

  2. Evaluation of the surface structure of composite restorations in light of own pilot research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalas Renata

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research on the dental restorative materials employed in remedying dental cavities has been conducted on many levels and areas, both with application of clinical and laboratory methods. One of the elements that determines whether the restoration may be degraded is the condition of its surface. The aim of the study was to assess the texture surface of composite restorations using a non-contact method of teeth models scanning. In this work, ten medium size cavities on the occlusal surfaces of molars in adult patients were prepared and restored with resin composite. Before undertaking the procedure and after the finishing and polishing of the restorations, impressions were taken and sent into the laboratory so as to prepare plaster casts. Every cast was then scanned utilizing the non-contact 3D surface measurement instrument so as to assess the texture surface of the restoration. The resulting three dimensional analyses of post-restoration models showed the correct marginal adaptation of resin composite dental material to the hard tooth structures and its smooth filling occlusal surface. Additional comparison of scans done before and after restoring the cavities allowed the calculating of differences in volume, mean and maximum heights. The applied method of analysis is thought to be helpful in the detailed evaluation of restoration dental material texture. Moreover, the enabled possibility of continuous observation is expedient for assessing the usefulness of the method in standard dental practice.

  3. Blending incremental and stratified layering techniques to produce an esthetic posterior composite resin restoration with a predictable prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaff, D

    2001-01-01

    Composite resin restorations play an ever-increasing role as routine restorations in everyday clinical practice. However, the long-term prognosis of these restorations is still widely debated and open to question. The restorative protocols are still evolving, whether for direct or indirect placement, and little evidence is available in the scientific literature as to the ideal choice of site, technique, and category for placement. This article discusses the problems encountered and suggests a clinical restorative protocol to optimize composite resin placement.

  4. 18-year survival of posterior composite resin restorations with and without glass ionomer cement as base.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sande, F.H. van de; Rosa Rodolpho, P.A. Da; Basso, G.R.; Patias, R.; Rosa, Q.F. da; Demarco, F.F.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Cenci, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Advantages and disadvantages of using intermediate layers underneath resin-composite restorations have been presented under different perspectives. Yet, few long-term clinical studies evaluated the effect of glass-ionomer bases on restoration survival. The present study investigated the i

  5. Diagnostic value of DIAGNOdent in detecting caries under composite restorations of primary molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Vali Sichani

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: DIAGNOdent showed a greater accuracy in detecting secondary caries under primary molar restorations, compared to radiographs. Although DIAGNOdent is an effective method for detecting caries under composite restorations, it is better to be used as an adjunctive method alongside other detecting procedures.

  6. Longevity of posterior composite restorations: not only a matter of materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demarco, F.F.; Correa, M.B.; Cenci, M.S.; Moraes, R.R.; Opdam, N.J.

    2012-01-01

    Resin composites have become the first choice for direct posterior restorations and are increasingly popular among clinicians and patients. Meanwhile, a number of clinical reports in the literature have discussed the durability of these restorations over long periods. In this review, we have searche

  7. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations. A 5-year randomized controlled clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    mm as needed to fill the cavity 2 mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2 mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly......Objective: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Material and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52.......4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4...

  8. Interactions between cavity preparation and restoration events and their effects on pulp vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisithphrom, Kessiri; Murray, Peter E; About, Imad; Windsor, L Jack

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the precise effect and rank the importance of cavity preparation and restoration variables on human pulp vitality. Fifty-three Class V unexposed cavities were prepared and restored with calcium hydroxide/amalgam, resin-modified glass ionomer, zinc oxide-eugenol, resin composite, or zinc polycarboxylate materials. Pulp vitality was reduced by the remaining dentin thickness of the cavity preparations, whereas the other variables, including the type of restorative material, had little effect. Restorative materials cause minimal pulp damage in isolation; it is more important to minimize the removal of intact dentin to maintain the vitality of teeth.

  9. Class II direct composite resin restorations with beta-quartz glass-ceramic inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, R E

    1993-11-01

    With the increasing demand for esthetic posterior restorations, numerous techniques have been developed. The direct resin restoration has probably been used most extensively in Class II situations. Problems with Class II direct resin restorations include difficulty in developing proximal contact, occlusal wear, and polymerization shrinkage. Beta-quartz glass-ceramic inserts have been developed in an attempt to reduce the incidence of these potential problems. They can be placed in a one-appointment technique, are relatively inexpensive, and can readily be utilized by the clinician adept in placing Class II composite resin restorations.

  10. 流动性纳米复合树脂充填V类洞微渗漏研究%Microleakage of flowable nanocomposite resins on Class V composite restorations.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董世涛; 张晗; 刘国华; 张丽敏; 郭寅; 闫大奇; 贾占涛

    2014-01-01

    目的 研究流动纳米复合树脂充填Ⅴ类洞的微渗漏程度.方法 在96颗离体的磨牙颊侧制备V类洞,随机分为3组,每组32颗牙.分别充填 Valux Plus前后牙通用树脂、流动性纳米复合树脂Filtek Z350和Filtek P60复合树脂,样本经冷热循环及加压负载试验后,采用碱性品红染色,颊舌向垂直片切后,每组随机取出2个标本在扫描电镜下观察,其余的标本在体式显微镜下观察充填体边缘微渗漏情况.结果 3种材料中流动性纳米复合树脂Z350微渗漏最小,P60复合树脂微渗漏最大.流动性纳米复合树脂Z350与其他两组相比有显著性差异(P<0.01).结论 流动性纳米复合树脂Z350是临床上充填V类洞的较好材料.

  11. Trends in material choice for posterior restorations in an Israeli dental school: composite resin versus amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Gal, Gilad; Weiss, Ervin I

    2011-12-01

    According to a recent American Dental Association survey, posterior composite resin restorations now outnumber amalgam restorations in the United States. Dental schools around the world vary considerably in the extent to which they teach the use of composite resins. We aimed to determine if there has been an increase in the placement of posterior composite restorations in an Israeli dental school and if faculty experience affects the type of posterior restoration placed. In this retrospective study, we recorded and analyzed all the restorations performed by undergraduate students in the last five academic years at the Hebrew University Hadassah School of Dental Medicine in Jerusalem. All clinical records of student treatments between 2004 and 2009 were screened, and direct restorations were registered. Out of 6,094 posterior restorations performed during the study period, 42.3 percent were made of composite resin, increasing from 36.8 percent in 2004-05 to 48.5 percent in 2008-09, an increase of 11.7 percent. When clinical instructors were asked to state their preference if they themselves were to undergo posterior restoration, similar results were obtained. Instructors with less than ten years' experience preferred posterior composite resin restorations in 54.8 percent of the hypothetical situations, compared with 37.2 percent preferred by instructors with ten years of experience or more. It appears that the use of composite resin was influenced mainly by the prevailing trend and was not based on scientific evidence. Dental faculties should define criteria, based on up-to-date clinical studies, for using new materials, taking into consideration differences among instructors regarding treatment concept.

  12. NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR RESTORATION AND PROTECTION OF POWER EQUIPMENT WITH THE AID OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ischenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of possible variants of reconstruction of the power equipment is fulfilled and the conclusion concerning the prospects of such work with the use of composite materials is reached. The data on the technical characteristics of composite repair materials for various purposes are presented, the results of repairs of power equipment, in particular the technology for the recovery of the boarding surfaces of the diffuser rings and protection of the pumps D1250 casings are provided. The technology of the recovery pneumatic cylinder, hydraulic cylinder rod, as well as the unique technology of restoration of working surfaces of the impeller vanes of transfer pump, that had been destroyed by corrosion in conjunction with the cavitation processes and were considered as not restorable is described. The restored impeller was in operation during a year and only thereafter it was removed for restoration. Another composite material discussed in the article – diagum – makes it possible to perform a series of repairs associated with restoration of the rubber-covered surfaces of pump casings as well as with restoration of various surfaces of the conveyor belts. Taking the excellent adhesive properties of this composite into account, restoration of worn stainless steel sieve screens to remove abrasive material was fulfilled with the aid of it. The restoration was accomplished via the use of the conveyor belt which application time had expired, that was glued to a metal sieve with diagum. The use of the composites is economically justified, because the application of them in repairs reduces, firstly, terms of restoration work and, secondly, the price of repairs. Third, equipment that was damaged beyond repair is being commissioned by the use of the mentioned composites

  13. Effect of the number of thermocycles on microleakage of resin composite restorations

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    Pazinatto Flávia Bittencourt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermocycling simulates, in vitro, thermal changes that occur in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the number of cycles on microleakage. Class V cavities (1.5 mm deep, 3 mm in height and 3 mm in width were prepared in bovine teeth, restored with a Single Bond/Z250 restorative system (3M/ESPE and then divided into five groups of ten teeth each: group 1 was not thermocycled (control group, and groups 2, 3, 4 and 5 were thermocycled 500, 1,000, 2,500 and 5,000 times, respectively (5º-55º ± 2ºC, 15 s dwell time. The teeth were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin aqueous solution for 24 h, sectioned and the sections with the highest degree of microleakage were selected, scanned and the extent of dye penetration was measured by the ImageTool program. The results submitted to one-way ANOVA showed no significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05. The averages of microleakage values in millimeters were: group 1 (3.92; group 2 (3.13; group 3 (4.48; group 4 (4.33 and group 5 (3.42. Thus, it was concluded that there is no relation between the increase of the number of cycles and the increase in microleakage.

  14. 56-month clinical performance of Class I and II resin composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Bittencourt Pazinatto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the 56-month clinical performance of Class I and II resin composite restorations. Filtek P60 was compared with Filtek Z250, which are both indicated for posterior restorations but differ in terms of handling characteristics. The null hypothesis tested was that there is no difference in the clinical performance of the two resin composites in posterior teeth. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients were treated by the same operator, who prepared 48 Class I and 42 Class II cavities, which were restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z250 or Single Bond/Filtek P60 restorative systems. Restorations were evaluated by two independent examiners at baseline and after 56 months, using the modified USPHS criteria. Data were analyzed statistically using Chi-square and Fisher's Exact tests (a=0.05. RESULTS: After 56 months, 25 patients (31 Class I and 36 Class II were analyzed. A 3% failure rate occurred due to secondary caries and excessive loss of anatomic form for P60. For both restorative systems, there were no significant differences in secondary caries and postoperative sensitivity. However, significant changes were observed with respect to anatomic form, marginal discoloration, and marginal adaptation. Significant decreases in surface texture were observed exclusively for the Z250 restorations. CONCLUSIONS: Both restorative systems can be used for posterior restorations and can be expected to perform well in the oral environment.

  15. Marginal adaptation and performance of bioactive dental restorative materials in deciduous and young permanent teeth.

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeta Gjorgievska; John W. Nicholson; Snezana Iljovska; Slipper, Ian J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the adaptation of different types of restorations towards deciduous and young permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in deciduous and young permanent teeth and filled with different materials (a conventional glass-ionomer, a resin-modified glass-ionomer, a poly-acid-modified composite resin and a conventional composite resin). Specimens were aged in artificial saliva for 1, 6, 12 and 18 months, then examined b...

  16. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives.

  17. Light induced polymerization of resin composite restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blažić Larisa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dimensional stability of polymer-based dental materials is compromised by polymerization reaction of the monomer. The conversion into a polymer is accompanied by a closer packing of molecules, which leads to volume reduction called curing contraction or polymerization shrinkage. Curing contraction may break the adhesion between the adhesive system and hard tooth tissues forming micrographs which may result in marginal deterioration, recurrent caries and pulp injury. Polymerization shrinkage of resin-based restorative dental materials Polymerization of the organic phase (monomer molecules of resin-based dental materials causes shrinkage. The space occupied by filler particles is not associated with polymerization shrinkage. However, high filler loading within certain limits, can contribute to a lesser curing contraction. Polymerization shrinkage stress and stress reduction possibilities Polymerization shrinkage stress of polymer-based dental resins can be controlled in various ways. The adhesive bond in tooth-restoration interface guides the contraction forces to cavity walls. If leakage occurs, complications like secondary caries and pulpal irritation may jeopardize the longevity of a restoration. Stress relieve can be obtained by modifications of the monomer and photoinitiator, or by specially designed tooth preparation and application of bases and liners of low modulus of elasticity. The polymerization contraction can be compensated by water absorption due to oral cavity surrounding. The newest approach to stress relief is based on modulation of polymerization initiation. Conclusion This work deals with polymerization contraction and how to achieve leak-proof restoration. Restorative techniques that may reduce the negative effect of polymerization shrinkage stress need further research in order to confirm up-to-date findings.

  18. Evaluation of Microleakage in Composite-Composite and Amalgam-Composite Interfaces in Tooth with Preventive Resin Restoration (Ex-viva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Afshar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study addresses the question of whether conservative methods of restoration may be applied efficaciously in permanent posterior teeth with proximal lesions and intact occlusal preventive resin restoration (PRR. The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage at amalgam-composite interface and composite-composite interface in permanent tooth with PRR.Materials and Methods: Thirty-five premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons were selected. The occlusal surfaces were sealed as preventive resin restoration. Then the teeth were stored in incubator for 6 months. After this period, two single boxes were prepared in mesial and distal surfaces in each tooth and filled with amalgam. Another class I composite restoration was prepared in occlusal surface in contact with the first PRR. Then samples were thermocycled and marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration on sections of the restored teeth.Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests served for statistical analyses.Results: In 51.4% of amalgam-composite interfaces the dye reached the pulpal wall. The corresponded figures for amalgam-tooth and composite-composite interfaces were 31.4% and 14.3%, respectively. The differences in microleakage among the three interfaces were statistically significant (P<0.05.Conclusion: In the teeth restored with PRR technique, restoring proximal lesions with a conservative technique may lead to favorable results concerning microleakage.

  19. Microleakage of Composite Resin Restorations Using a Type of Fifth and Two Types of Seventh Generations of Adhesive Systems: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Tabari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent dentin adhesive systems etching of enamel/dentin are achieved simultaneously. The objective was to evaluate the microleakage of composite restorations using Single Bond2 (5th generation, Clearfil S3 Bond and G Bond (7th generation. Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on  45 extracted intact premolars with gingival margins at the cementoenamel junction and they were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=15 based on the type of adhesives: Single Bond2 (5th generation, Clearfil S3 Bond and G Bond (7th generation. After applying the adhesives, the cavities were filled with Z250 composite resin. The occlusal and gingival microleakage was evaluated using 2% basic fuchsin staining technique. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni corrected Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The mean rank of occlusal microleakage exhibited significant differences by comparison of G Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond and Single Bond2 (21.07, 30.67 and 17.27, respectively (P=0.005. There was a significant difference in gingival microleakage of different bonding agents (34.40, 17.83 and 16.77 for G Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond and Single Bond2, respectively (P

  20. Influence of composite resin consistency and placement technique on proximal contact tightness of Class II restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, B.A.C.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of composite resin consistency and placement technique on proximal contact tightness of Class II composite resin restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A manikin model (KaVo Dental) was used with an artificial first molar in which a standardized MO preparation was

  1. Marginal adaptation of large adhesive class IV composite restorations before and after artificial aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardu, S.; Stavridakis, M.; Feilzer, A.J.; Krejci, I.; Lefever, D.; Dietschi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test the marginal adaptation of Class IV restorations made of different composite materials designed for anterior use. Materials and Methods: Forty-two extracted caries-free human maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into 7 experimental groups - one per composite tested - for

  2. Simplified techniques for the placement of stratified polychromatic anterior and posterior direct composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jeff T

    2003-02-01

    Although many tooth-colored indirect restorative materials are available, dentists frequently employ direct composite resins as a primary tooth-colored restorative material. Direct resin systems that are suited for stratification, or layering of various opacities and colors of dental composite, offer dentists the opportunity to accurately reproduce natural teeth in ways that rival the esthetics of most indirect systems. This article presents a simplified version of the classical three-layered technique originally described by Dietschi, and demonstrates the application of a recently introduced composite resin system.

  3. Endodontic complications in teeth with vital pulps restored with composite resins: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, V S; Amjad, S; Fransson, H

    2015-07-01

    Composite resin is used extensively for restoration of teeth with vital pulps. Although cell culture studies have disclosed harmful effects on pulpal cells, any untoward clinical effects, manifest as adverse pulpal responses, have yet to be determined. This study comprises a systematic review, designed to address the question of whether the risk of endodontic complications is greater with composite resin restorations than with other restorative materials, such as amalgam. The study methodology involved (i) formulation of the research question, (ii) construction and conduct of an extensive literature search with (iii) interpretation and assessment of the retrieved literature. A search of the medical database PubMed was complemented with a search of the Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL). The initial search yielded 1043 publications, the abstracts of which were read independently by the authors. After additional searches, 10 studies were included in the review. In all the included studies, the level of evidence was assessed as low. No conclusions could therefore be drawn. The included studies reported few, if any, endodontic complications. Little or no differences emerged between teeth restored with composite resins and those restored with amalgam. To determine whether composite resin restorations of teeth with vital pulps are associated with an increased risk for development of endodontic complications such as apical periodontitis, further evidence is needed, from well-constructed studies with a large number of participants.

  4. Reducing marginal leakage of posterior composite resin restorations: a review of clinical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, G S

    1990-03-01

    It has been well established that composite resin restorations have leakage at the margins. The polymerization shrinkage of the material and its inadequate adhesion to the cavity walls are the primary causes. Unlike silver amalgam restorations, which are self-sealing with age, the gap at the composite-to-tooth interface tends to persist and invite postoperative sensitivity, adverse pulp reactions, and the development of recurrent caries. Many techniques or materials have been advocated to improve the clinical adaptation of this material and to reduce marginal leakage. They limit the effect of polymerization shrinkage and/or enhance the bonding of the composite material to the tooth structure. This article reviews the clinical techniques and materials that have been suggested and are presently available to improve the marginal quality of composite resins, with special reference to posterior restorations.

  5. Anterior makeover on fractured teeth by simple composite resin restoration

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: In daily practice dentists usually treat tooth fractures with more invasive treatments such as crown, veneer and bridges which preparation require more tooth structure removal. While currently there is trend toward minimal invasive dentistry which conserves more tooth structure. This is enhanced with the vast supply of dental materials and equipment in the market, including restorative materials. Provided with these supporting materials and equipment and greater patient’s demand f...

  6. A randomized controlled 30 years follow up of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2015-01-01

    three (one set) as similar as possible Class II restorations of moderate size.After cavity preparation, the three cavities were chosen at random to be restored with twochemical-cured (P10, Miradapt) and one light-cured resin composite (P30). A chemical-curedenamel bonding agent was applied after etching......Objective. The aim of this 30 year randomized controlled study was to evaluate, by intrain-dividual comparisons, the durability of three conventional resin composites in Class IIrestorations. Methods. Each of 30 participants, 21 female and 9 male (mean age 30 years, range 20–43),received at least...... of the enamel. The chemical-cured resincomposites were placed in bulk and the light-cured in increments. One operator placed 99restorations (33 sets). The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified USPHS crite-ria at baseline, 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 years. Statistical analyses were performed by the...

  7. Esthetic integration between ceramic veneers and composite restorations: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farronato, Davide; Mangano, Francesco; Pieroni, Stefano; Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Briguglio, Roberto; Briguglio, Francesco

    2012-07-01

    The tooth structure preservation is the best way to postpone more invasive therapies. Especially in young patients more conservative techniques should be applied. Bonded porcelain veneers and even more the direct composite restorations, are the two therapeutic procedures that require the fewer sacrifice of dental tissue, finalized to the optimal recovery of aesthetic and functional outcome.Although the two techniques require different methods and materials, is possible to achieve a correct integration of both the methods by some technical and procedural measures. In the presented case is planned a rehabilitation of the four upper incisors by ceramic veneers and direct composite restorations.Care is taken for the surface treatment of ceramic restorations, with the objective of achieving integration, not only between natural teeth and restorations, but also between the different materials in use.The purpose of this article is to show how a proper design of the treatment plan leads to obtain predictable results with both direct and indirect techniques.

  8. A study of composite restorations as a tool in forensic identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahavathi Ananthan Hemasathya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Comparing ante-mortem and post-mortem dental data is a principal method of identification in forensic odontology. Radiographic images of amalgam have been used in dental forensics for identification due to their unique appearance. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate whether radio-opaque composite restorations have a potential for identification in forensic odontology. Materials and Methods: Thirty typodont mandibular first molar teeth were prepared with Class-II (proximo-occlusal cavities and restored with a radio-opaque composite (Tetric N-Ceram. Two sets of standardized radiographs were taken from the 30 teeth, keeping the radiological parameters constant. One set of these 30 radiographs was named as SET 1. Ten randomly chosen radiographs from the other set and two other radiographs of Class-II composite restorations in typodont teeth constituted SET 2. Thirty dentally trained examiners were asked to match the 12 radiographic images of SET 2 with those of SET 1. Results: The results show that 15 examiners were able to correctly match all the 12 images. Statistical analysis was done using kappa statistical test. Conclusion: This study shows that, if the post-mortem radiographs are accurate duplicates of ante-mortem radiographs of composite restorations, then the shape of the composite restoration is unique and can be used for identification.

  9. Resistance of Bonded Composite Restorations on Fractures of Endodontically Treated Teeth

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    AR Daneshkazemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was performed to evaluate the effect of dentine bonding agents and Glass Ionomer cement beneath composite restorations and its resistance on fractures of endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: Forty sound maxillary teeth were selected; ten of them for positive control, and on the rest, RCT and MOD cavity preparations were done with standard methods. Then, the teeth were divided to four groups: 1-Sound teeth for positive control. 2-Prepared without any restoration for negative control. 3-Prepared and restored with Vitrabond(3M, USA, Single bond(3M, USA and Z100(3M, USA resin composite. 4-Prepared and restored by Single bond and Z100 resin composite. Specimens were subjected to compressive load by Instron 8502 until fracture occurred. Results: Group 1 showed the highest resistance to compressive forces followed by group 4,3&2 respectively. ANOVA, t test and Chi-square tests indicated significant difference between all the groups. Conclusion: Use of dentine bonding agents and resin composite increases resistance of endodontically treated teeth to fractures more than teeth restored with sandwich of glass ionomer cements, dentine bonding agents and resin composite.

  10. Microleakage of Posterior Composite Restorations with Fiber Inserts Using two Adhesives after Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharafeddin F.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Microleakage is one of the most frequent problems associated with resin composites, especially at the gingival margin of posterior restorations. Inser-tion of fibers in composite restorations can reduce the total amount of composite and help to decrease the shrinkage.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of polyethylene fiber inserts on gingival microleakage of class II composite restorations using two different adhe-sive systems.Materials and Method: In this experimental study, class II cavities were prepared on 60 premolars. The gingival floor was located 1.0 mm below the CEJ. Dimension of each cavity were 3 mm buccolingually and 1.5 mm in axial depth. The specimens were divided into 4 groups according to the adhesive type and fiber insert (n=4. Single bond and Clearfill SE bond and Filtek p60 were used to restore the cavities. In groups without fiber inserts composite was adapted onto cavities using layering technique. For cavities with fiber inserts, 3 mm piece of fiber insert was placed onto the composite increment and cured. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37oC for 6 months. All specimens were subjected to 3000 thermo-cycling. The tooth surfaces except for 1 mm around the restoration margins covered with two layers of nail varnish .The teeth were immersed in 2% Basic Fuchsin for 24 hours, then rinsed and sectioned mesiodistally. The microleakage was determined under a stereomicroscope (40X. Data were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (p< 0.05.Results: The Kruskal-Wallis test revealed no significant differences in mean microlea-kage scores among all groups (p= 0.281.Conclusion: Use of polyethylene fiber inserts and etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives had no effect on microleakage in class II resin composite restorations with gingival margins below the CEJ after 6- month water storage.

  11. Intraoral environment conditions and their influence on marginal leakage in composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Paula; Rocha, Viviane; Saraiva, Letícia; Cavalcanti, Andrea N; Azevedo, Juliana F; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre M S

    2010-01-01

    Color matching in the anterior superior incisor region (ASIR) is very difficult when using a rubber dam during restorative procedures. This study measured temperature/relative humidity parameters in the ASIR and evaluated the influence of the inhalation/downtime/exhalation mouth-breathing cycle on microleakage in composite resin restorations performed in the region, using three different adhesive systems. Sixty bovine incisors were randomly assigned to six groups (n=10) according to environmental conditions (laboratory environment or intraoral conditions) and the three adhesive systems being tested (Prime & Bond NT (PB), Single Bond (SB) and Clearfil SE Bond (CL)). The composite resin restored specimens were thermocycled (800 cycles, 5-55 degrees C), immersed in a 2% methylene blue-buffered solution and sectioned longitudinally The dye penetration on the margin of the restoration was evaluated and non-parametric statistical analyses were performed. The temperature and humidity parameters in the ASIR showed significant differences when compared to the laboratory environment. Restorations performed in the ASIR environment showed no increases in microleakage. As it was shown that temperature/humidity in ASIR do not affect marginal sealing in direct composite resin restorations negatively, better color matching can be safely achieved without the use of a rubber dam.

  12. Clinical strategies for esthetic excellence in anterior tooth restorations: understanding color and composite resin selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahsan, Flavia Pardo Salata; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Naufel, Fabiana Scarparo; Ueda, Julio Katuhide; Schmitt, Vera Lucia; Baseggio, Wagner

    2012-01-01

    Direct composite resin restorations have become a viable alternative for patients that require anterior restorative procedures to be integrated to the other teeth that compose the smile, especially for presenting satisfactory esthetic results and minimum wear of the dental structure. Technological evolution along with a better understanding of the behavior of dental tissues to light incidence has allowed the development of new composite resins with better mechanical and optical properties, making possible a more artistic approach for anterior restorations. The combination of the increasing demand of patients for esthetics and the capacity to preserve the dental structure resulted in the development of different incremental techniques for restoring fractured anterior teeth in a natural way. In order to achieve esthetic excellence, dentists should understand and apply artistic and scientific principles when choosing color of restorative materials, as well as during the insertion of the composite resin. The discussion of these strategies will be divided into two papers. In this paper, the criteria for color and material selection to obtain a natural reproduction of the lost dental structures and an imperceptible restoration will be addressed.

  13. Clinical strategies for esthetic excellence in anterior tooth restorations: understanding color and composite resin selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Pardo Salata Nahsan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct composite resin restorations have become a viable alternative for patients that require anterior restorative procedures to be integrated to the other teeth that compose the smile, especially for presenting satisfactory esthetic results and minimum wear of the dental structure. Technological evolution along with a better understanding of the behavior of dental tissues to light incidence has allowed the development of new composite resins with better mechanical and optical properties, making possible a more artistic approach for anterior restorations. The combination of the increasing demand of patients for esthetics and the capacity to preserve the dental structure resulted in the development of different incremental techniques for restoring fractured anterior teeth in a natural way. In order to achieve esthetic excellence, dentists should understand and apply artistic and scientific principles when choosing color of restorative materials, as well as during the insertion of the composite resin. The discussion of these strategies will be divided into two papers. In this paper, the criteria for color and material selection to obtain a natural reproduction of the lost dental structures and an imperceptible restoration will be addressed.

  14. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists' Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-04-22

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists' satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists' treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p amalgam restorations.

  15. Radiopacity of restorative composites by conventional radiography and digital images with different resolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, Raquel Venancio; Samento, Hugo Ramalho [Graduate Program in Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas (Brazil); Duarte, Rosangela Marques; Raso, Sonia Saeger Meireles Monte; De Andrade Ana Karina Maciel; Anjos-Pontual Maria Luiza Dos [Dept. of Operative Dentistry, Federal University of Paraiba, Pelotas (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    This study was performed to evaluate and compare the radiopacity of dentin, enamel, and 8 restorative composites on conventional radiograph and digital images with different resolutions. Specimens were fabricated from 8 materials and human molars were longitudinally sectioned 1.0 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The specimens and tooth sections were imaged by conventional radiograph using 4 sized intraoral film and digital images were taken in high speed and high resolution modes using a phosphor storage plate. Densitometric evaluation of the enamel, dentin, restorative materials, a lead sheet, and an aluminum step wedge was performed on the radiographic images. For the evaluation, the Al equivalent (mm) for each material was calculated. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05), considering the material factor and then the radiographic method factor, individually. The high speed mode allowed the highest radiopacity, while the high resolution mode generated the lowest values. Furthermore, the high resolution mode was the most efficient method for radiographic differentiation between restorative composites and dentin. The conventional radiograph was the most effective in enabling differentiation between enamel and composites. The high speed mode was the least effective in enabling radiographic differentiation between the dental tissues and restorative composites. The high speed mode of digital imaging was not effective for differentiation between enamel and composites. This made it less effective than the high resolution mode and conventional radiographs. All of the composites evaluated showed radiopacity values that fit the ISO 4049 recommendations.

  16. Effect of Precuring Warming on Mechanical Properties of Restorative Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Nada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of prepolymerization warming on composites' mechanical properties, three composites were evaluated: Clearfil Majesty (CM (Kuraray, Z-100 (3M/ESPE, and Light-Core (LC (Bisco. Specimens were prepared from each composite at room temperature as control and 2 higher temperatures (37∘C and 54∘C to test surface hardness (SH, compressive strength (CS, and diametral tensile strength (DTS. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Fisher's LSD tests. Results revealed that prewarming CM and Z100 specimens significantly improved their SH mean values (P<0.05. Prewarming also improved mean CS values of Z100 specimens (P<0.05. Furthermore, DTS mean value of CM prepared at 52∘ was significantly higher than that of room temperature specimens (P<0.05. KHN, CS, and DTS mean values varied significantly among the three composites. In conclusion, Prewarming significantly enhanced surface hardness of 2 composites. Prewarming also improved bulk properties of the composites; however, this improvement was significant in only some of the tested materials.

  17. Indirect composite restorations luted with two different procedures: A ten years follow up clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Alessandro; Vano, Michele; Derchi, Giacomo; Mangani, Francesco; Cerutti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate posterior indirect composite resin restoration ten years after placement luted with two different procedures. Study Design: In 23 patients 22 inlays/onlays (Group A) were luted using a dual-cured resin composite cement and 26 inlays/onlays (Group B) were luted using a light cured resin composite for a total of 48 Class I and Class II indirect composite resin inlays and onlays. The restorations were evaluated at 2 time points: 1) one week after placement (baseline evaluation) and 2) ten years after placement using the modified USPHS criteria. The Mann-Whitney and the Wilcoxon tests were used to examine the difference between the results of the baseline and 10 years evaluation for each criteria. Results: Numerical but not statistically significant differences were noted on any of the recorded clinical parameters (p>0.05) between the inlay/onlays of Group A and Group B. 91% and 94 % of Group A and B respectively were rated as clinically acceptable in all the evaluated criteria ten years after clinical function. Conclusions: Within the limits of the study the results showed after ten years of function a comparable clinical performance of indirect composite resin inlays/onlays placed with a light cure or dual cure luting procedures. Key words:Light curing composite, dual curing composite, indirect composite restoration, inlays/onlays, clinical trial. PMID:25810842

  18. Comparison of fracture resistance of teeth restored with ceramic inlay and resin composite: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti D Desai

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The fracture resistant strength of teeth restored with ceramic inlay was comparable to that of the normal intact teeth or slightly higher, while teeth restored with direct composite resin restoration showed less fracture resistant strength than that of the normal teeth.

  19. Bonding of flowable resin composite restorations to class 1 occlusal cavities with and without cyclic load stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Takatoshi; Maseki, Toshio; Nara, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    To examine the bonding of flowable resin composite restorations (F-restoration) to class 1 occlusal cavities with and without cyclic load stress, compared with that of a universal resin composite restoration (U-restoration). Two flowable composites and one universal composite (control) were applied with an adhesive system to 42 standardized class 1 occlusal cavities. The restored specimens were subjected to cyclic load stress and no stress modes. The microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) of the dentin floor was measured. The U-restoration did not show pretesting failure. The F-restorations exhibited pretesting failure, regardless of the stress mode. The μ-TBS was not significantly different among the three restorations, regardless of the stress mode. The cyclic load stress did not influence the μ-TBS of the F-restorations; however, it significantly reduced μ-TBS in the U-restoration. The bonding reliability of the F-restorations was inferior to that of the U-restoration, for both stress modes.

  20. Behaviour of general dental practitioners in Germany regarding posterior restorations with flowable composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Rainer; Pfefferkorn, Frank; Hickel, Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Because the recommendation to use flowables for posterior restorations is still a matter of debate, the objective of this study was to determine in a nationwide survey in Germany how frequently, for what indications, and for what reasons, German dentists use flowable composites in posterior teeth. In addition, the acceptance of a simplified filling technique for posterior restorations using a low stress flowable composite was evaluated. Completed questionnaires from all over Germany were returned by 1,449 dentists resulting in a response rate of 48.5%; 78.6% of whom regularly used flowable composites for posterior restorations. The most frequent indications were cavity lining (80.1%) and small Class I fillings (74.2%). Flowables were less frequently used for small Class II fillings (22.7%) or other indications (13.6%). Most frequent reasons given for the use of flowables in posterior teeth were the prevention of voids (71.7%) and superior adaptation to cavity walls (72.9%), whereas saving time was considered less important (13.8%). Based on the subjective opinion of the dentists the simplified filling technique seemed to deliver advantages compared to the methods used to date particularly with regard to good cavity adaptation and ease of use. In conclusion, resin composites are the standard material type used for posterior restorations by general dental practitioners in Germany and most dentists use flowable composites as liners.

  1. Selective removal of esthetic composite restorations with spectral guided laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ivana; Chan, Kenneth H.; Tsuji, Grant H.; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Dental composites are used for a wide range of applications such as fillings for cavities, adhesives for orthodontic brackets, and closure of gaps (diastemas) between teeth by esthetic bonding. Anterior restorations are used to replace missing, diseased and unsightly tooth structure for both appearance and function. When these restorations must be replaced, they are difficult to remove mechanically without causing excessive removal or damage to enamel because dental composites are color matched to teeth. Previous studies have shown that CO2 lasers have high ablation selectivity and are well suited for removal of composite on occlusal surfaces while minimizing healthy tissue loss. A spectral feedback guidance system may be used to discriminate between dental composite and dental hard tissue for selective ablation of composite material. The removal of composite restorations filling diastemas is more challenging due to the esthetic concern for anterior teeth. The objective of this study is to determine if composite spanning a diastema between anterior teeth can be removed by spectral guided laser ablation at clinically relevant rates with minimal damage to peripheral healthy tissue and with higher selectivity than a high speed dental handpiece.

  2. Selective removal of esthetic composite restorations with spectral guided laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ivana; Chan, Kenneth H; Tsuji, Grant H; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-13

    Dental composites are used for a wide range of applications such as fillings for cavities, adhesives for orthodontic brackets, and closure of gaps (diastemas) between teeth by esthetic bonding. Anterior restorations are used to replace missing, diseased and unsightly tooth structure for both appearance and function. When these restorations must be replaced, they are difficult to remove mechanically without causing excessive removal or damage to enamel because dental composites are color matched to teeth. Previous studies have shown that CO2 lasers have high ablation selectivity and are well suited for removal of composite on occlusal surfaces while minimizing healthy tissue loss. A spectral feedback guidance system may be used to discriminate between dental composite and dental hard tissue for selective ablation of composite material. The removal of composite restorations filling diastemas is more challenging due to the esthetic concern for anterior teeth. The objective of this study is to determine if composite spanning a diastema between anterior teeth can be removed by spectral guided laser ablation at clinically relevant rates with minimal damage to peripheral healthy tissue and with higher selectivity than a high speed dental hand-piece.

  3. The effects of glass ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of open-sandwich class II restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güray Efes, Begüm; Yaman, Batu Can; Gümüştaş, Burak; Tıryakı, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the effects of glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners on the fracture resistance of Class II amalgam and composite restorations. Group 1 cavities were restored with amalgam and Group 4 cavities with nanofill composite after the application of a dentin-bonding agent. For the remaining groups, light-cured-glass-ionomer liner was used in a gingival floor proximal box (Groups 2, 5) or flowable composite was used as a liner (Groups 3, 6), the remainder of the cavity was restored with amalgam (Groups 2, 3) or composite (Groups 5, 6). The restorations were loaded in compression to failure. The data was analyzed using Tukey's multiple comparison test. The fracture resistance was significantly higher (p0.05). Flowable composite, glass-ionomer liners increased the fracture resistance of open-sandwich Class II amalgam restorations.

  4. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Simen E. Kopperud; Frode Staxrud; Ivar Espelid; Anne Bjørg Tveit

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the de...

  5. Effects of different curing methods and microleakage and degree of conversion of composite resin restorations

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Recently, investigators have presented new methods to reduce polymerization shrinkage of composite resin restorations. It is claimed that more powerful light cure systems associated with a change in radiation patterns, lead to improved mechanical properties and reduced microleakage. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of two curing systems, known as Soft-Start, Pulse-Delay, on microleakage and degree of conversion of composite resin restorat...

  6. In vitro fracture resistance of fiber reinforced cusp-replacing composite restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Tezvergil, A.; Kuijs, R.H.; Lassila, L.V.; Kreulen, C.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Vallittu, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the fracture resistance and failure mode of fiber reinforced composite (FRC) cusp-replacing restorations in premolars. METHODS: Forty-five extracted sound upper premolars were randomly divided into three groups. Identical MOD cavities with simulated buccal cusp fracture and hei

  7. Clinical cross-polarization optical coherence tomography assessment of subsurface enamel below dental resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Patricia; Rudney, Joel; Fok, Alex; Jones, Robert S

    2014-04-01

    A newly designed intraoral swept source cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) imaging system was used to examine the integrity of the subsurface enamel below resin composite restorations placed in primary teeth. CP-OCT analysis was performed using images obtained from resin composite restoration in 62 ([Formula: see text]) pediatric subjects. Clinical examination was performed by a single examiner prior to CP-OCT imaging and analysis. CP-OCT images are presented using a unique combined intensity image, where a false color scale is overlaid on the grayscale intensity image. There was a clear difference in the distribution of the mean-backscattered intensity (mR) between restorations recently placed and those possessing frank cavitation (Student's t-test, [Formula: see text]). For mR above 15.49 dB, the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 86%. The Youden index J was 0.8 above 12.3 dB where sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 80%. CP-OCT imaging may be used to confirm the subsurface marginal integrity below resin composite restorations but with careful consideration of limitations of the imaging modality. CP-OCT imaging may be a useful adjunct to clinical visual investigation to confirm that a composite margin has a sound and well-adapted interface.

  8. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations. A 5-year randomized controlled clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    .4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4mm......Objective: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Material and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52...... as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the ormocer-based nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly...

  9. A retrospective clinical study on longevity of posterior composite and amalgam restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the longevity of class I and II amalgam and composite resin restorations placed in a general practice. METHODS: Patient records of a general practice were used for collecting the data for this study. From the files longevity and r

  10. Esthetic integration between ceramic veneers and composite restorations: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Farronato, Davide; Mangano, Francesco; Pieroni, Stefano; Giudice, Giuseppe Lo; Briguglio, Roberto; Briguglio, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The tooth structure preservation is the best way to postpone more invasive therapies. Especially in young patients more conservative techniques should be applied. Bonded porcelain veneers and even more the direct composite restorations, are the two therapeutic procedures that require the fewer sacrifice of dental tissue, finalized to the optimal recovery of aesthetic and functional outcome.

  11. Cytogenetic genotoxic investigation in peripheral blood lymphocytes of subjects with dental composite restorative filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettini, F; Savino, M; Corsalini, M; Cantore, S; Ballini, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a common dental composite material (Enamel Plus-HFO), in subjects with average 13 filled teeth with the same material, compared to a control group (subjects having neither amalgam nor composite resin fillings). Genotoxicity assessment of composite materials was carried out in vitro in human peripheral blood leukocytes using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) cytogenetic tests. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses confirmed the absence of a relationship between SCE/cell, high frequency of SCE(HFC) or CA frequencies and exposure to dental composite materials. These results indicate that composite resins used for dental restorations differ extensively in vivo in their cytotoxic and genotoxic potential and in their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair.

  12. Influence of matrix systems on proximal contact tightness of 2- and 3-surface posterior composite restorations in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirsching, E.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Klaiber, B.; Dorfer, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the influence of cavity preparation (MO/DO/MOD) and type of matrix system on proximal contact tightness of direct posterior composite restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 85 patients in need of a two- or three surface Class II direct composite restoration were randomly div

  13. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  14. Effect of Static and Cyclic Loading on Ceramic Laminate Veneers Adhered to Teeth with and Without Aged Composite Restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Kalk, Warner; Galhano, Graziela

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Existing composite restorations on teeth are often remade prior to the cementation of fixed dental prostheses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of static and cyclic loading on ceramic laminate veneers adhered to aged resin composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Eight

  15. In Vitro Fatigue Resistance of Teeth Restored With Bulk Fill versus Conventional Composite Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauber, Gabrielle Branco; Bernardon, Jussara Karina; Vieira, Luiz Clovis Cardoso; Maia, Hamilton Pires; Horn, Françoá; Roesler, Carlos Rodrigo de Mello

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fatigue resistance of restored teeth with bulk fill composite resin, conventional composite resin with incremental insertion and unprepared sound teeth. Twenty-eight extracted maxillary premolars were selected and divided into 4 groups based on composite resin and insertion technique: control (C), conventional composite resin with incremental insertion (I) and bulk fill composite resin with three (BF3) or single increment (BF1). The restored specimens were submitted to fatigue resistance test with a 5 Hz frequency. An initial application of 5,000 sinusoidal load cycles with a minimum force of 50 N and a maximum force of 200 N was used. Next, were applied stages of 30,000 load cycles with the maximum force increasing gradually: 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 N. The test was concluded when 185,000 load cycles were achieved or the specimen failed. The fatigue resistance data were recorded for comparison, using the Kaplan-Meier survival curve and analyzed by log-rank test at 0.05 significance. Fractures were classified based on the position of the failure - above or below the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Statistical analysis of the Kaplan-Meier survival curve and log-rank test showed a significant difference between groups (p=0.001). The fracture analysis demonstrated that only 28.58% of failures were below the CEJ in group C, while for groups I, BF1 and BF3 they were 42.85%, 85.71% and 85.71%, respectively. Teeth restored with composite bulk fill in both techniques present similar fatigue resistance values compared with those restored with a conventional incremental insertion of composite, while the fatigue strength values of unprepared sound teeth were higher. Furthermore, unprepared sound teeth showed a lower percentage of fractures below the CEJ.

  16. EFFECT OF PLACEMENT TECHNIQUES, FLOWABLE COMPOSITE , LINER AND FIBRE INSERTS ON MARGINAL MICROLEAKAGE OF CLASS II COMPOSITE RESTORATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupriya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM : T he aim of this study was to evaluate effect of placement techniques, flow able composite, and fiber inserts in marginal adaptation of class II composite restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS : 120 class II box cavities were prepared on both mesial and distal surfaces of extracted human molars. The prepared teeth were randomly assigned to 6 groups : 1 bulk insertion . ( S ingle increment, 2 O blique incremental placement technique, 3 Centripetal incremental placement technique . 4 S plit horizontal incremental placement technique . 5 flow able composite as gingival increment 6 ribbond fiber insert in gingival increment . The preparations were restored with a total etch adhesive (Adper Single Bond, 3M ESPE and nano composite (Z350, 3M ESPE. Specimens were isola ted with nail varnish except for a 2 - mm - wide rim around the restoration and thermocycled (1,000 thermal cycles, 5°C/55°C; 30 - second dwell time. The specimens were immersed in a solution of 2% methylene blue dye for 24 hours. The teeth were sectioned longi tudinally, observed under stereomicroscope and evaluated for microleakage using an ordinal scale of 0 to 4. The microleakage scores obtained from gingival walls were analyzed with Kruskal - Wallis and Mann Whitney nonparametric tests. RESULTS: Among all plac ement techniques split incremental technique showed least microleakage scores . The group that used flowable composite liner did not show significant reduction in microleakage and group with fiber inserts showed significant decrease in microleakage scores. CONCLUSION : None of the techniques eliminated marginal microleakage in class II composite restorations . However, the split incremental technique and group with fiber inserts showed significantly lower microleakage at gingival margin when compared to other groups

  17. Clinical evaluation of the fiber post and direct composite resin restoration for fixed single crowns on endodontically treated teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali Mohan, S.; Mahesh Gowda, E.; Shashidhar, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The restoration of an endodontically treated fractured tooth has been a challenge for restorative dentists for decades. The performance of fiber posts when used in conjunction with direct composite resin restorations have been largely unreported. This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the survival rate of endodontically treated teeth restored with adhesive bonded fiber reinforced resin posts and direct composite core with additional crown coverage. Methods Sixty patients who required endodontic treatment with post core crown were selected from outpatient department of Air Force Institute of Dental Sciences, Bangalore. Sixty-four teeth were endodontically treated and restored with fiber post and direct resin composite core restoration. Patients were evaluated immediately after restoration and reevaluated at the end of first, second and third months. After 3 months of clinical evaluation, if teeth were asymptomatic they were restored with complete coverage porcelain fused to metal restorations and evaluated immediately, and again reevaluated at the end of first, third, and sixth months. Results After 3 months of clinical evaluation, only two teeth exhibited periapical lesion with clinical symptoms and three teeth without any clinical symptoms. Five teeth exhibited slight marginal staining, three teeth showed partial loss of restoration, and two teeth exhibited complete loss of restoration with the fracture of the post. At the end of sixth month after restoration with full coverage crown, two teeth had dislodged restoration due to fracture of post and two teeth exhibited displacement of the post. Conclusion Fiber posts are the best alternative for restoration of fractured endodontically treated teeth. Fiber posts and direct composite resin core materials are strongly recommended for restoration of endodontically treated mutilated teeth among the dental establishments of Armed Forces. PMID:26288494

  18. A Randomized 10-year Prospective Follow-up of Class II Nanohybrid and Conventional Hybrid Resin Composite Restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan Wv; Pallesen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the 10-year durability of a nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations in a randomized controlled intraindividual comparison with its conventional hybrid resin composite predecessor. Materials and Methods: Each of 52 participants received at least two Class II...... restorations that were as similar as possible. The cavities were chosen at random to be restored with a nanohybrid resin composite (Excite/Tetric EvoCeram (TEC); n = 61) and a conventional hybrid (Excite/Tetric Ceram (TC); n = 61). The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified USPHS criteria...... investigated resin composites. Conclusion: The nanohybrid and the conventional hybrid resin composite showed good clinical effectiveness in extensive Class II restorations during the 10-year study....

  19. A 7-year randomized prospective study of a one-step self-etching adhesive in non-carious cervical lesions. The effect of curing modes and restorative material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical retention of a one-step self-etching adhesive system (Xeno III) in Class V non-carious cervical lesions and the effect of restorative material and curing techniques on longevity of the restorations. Material and methods: A total of 139...... Class V restorations were placed with the self-etching primer Xeno III and a resin composite (Tetric Ceram) or a poly-acid modified resin composite (Dyract AP) in non-carious cervical lesions without intentional enamel involvement. The materials were cured with a conventional continuous light, a soft...... be evaluated. No post-operative sensitivity was reported by the participants. Overall relative cumulative loss rate frequencies for the adhesive system at 6, 18 and 7 years, independent of curing technique and restorative material, were 0.8%, 6.9% and 23.0%, respectively. The self-etching adhesive fulfilled...

  20. Comparison of the marginal adaptation of direct and indirect composite inlay restorations with optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    TÜRK, Ayşe Gözde; SABUNCU, Metin; ÜNAL, Sena; ÖNAL, Banu; ULUSOY, Mübin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of the study was to use the photonic imaging modality of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to compare the marginal adaptation of composite inlays fabricated by direct and indirect techniques. Material and Methods Class II cavities were prepared on 34 extracted human molar teeth. The cavities were randomly divided into two groups according to the inlay fabrication technique. The first group was directly restored on cavities with a composite (Esthet X HD, Dentsply, Germany) after isolating. The second group was indirectly restored with the same composite material. Marginal adaptations were scanned before cementation with an invisible infrared light beam of OCT (Thorlabs), allowing measurement in 200 µm intervals. Restorations were cemented with a self-adhesive cement resin (SmartCem2, Dentsply), and then marginal adaptations were again measured with OCT. Mean values were statistically compared by using independent-samples t-test and paired samples t-test (prestorations after cementation (p=0.00008839, p=0.000000952 for direct and indirect inlays, respectively). The mean marginal discrepancy value of the direct group increased from 56.88±20.04 µm to 91.88±31.7 µm, whereas the indirect group increased from 107.54±35.63 µm to 170.29±54.83 µm. Different techniques are available to detect marginal adaptation of restorations, but the OCT system can give quantitative information about resin cement thickness and its interaction between tooth and restoration in a nondestructive manner. Conclusions Direct inlays presented smaller marginal discrepancy than indirect inlays. The marginal discrepancy values were increased for all restorations that refer to cement thickness after cementation. PMID:27556210

  1. Influence of composite restorative materials and light-curing units on diametrical tensile strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, Maria Cecília Caldas Giorgi; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Giannini, Marcelo; Santos, Alex José Souza dos; Dias, Carlos Tadeu dos Santos

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametrical tensile strength (DTS) of three light-curing photo-activated composites with two different light curing units (LCU). Three types of dental restorative composites were used in this study: micro filled A110 (3M Espe); P60 (3M Espe) for posterior restorations, and micro-hybrid Charisma (Heraeus-Kulzer). The two LCUs were: halogen light (HAL) (Degulux, Degussa) and blue light emitting diode (LED) (Ultrablue, DMC). Resin composite specimens were inserted incrementally into a Teflon split mold measuring 3 mm in depth and 6 mm in internal diameter, and cured using either LCU (n = 10). Specimens were placed into a dark bottle containing distilled water at 37 degrees C for 7 days. DTS tests were performed in a Universal Testing Machine (0.5 mm/min). Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results were (MPa): A110/HAL: 276.50 +/- 62.94a; A110/LED: 306.01 +/- 65.16a; P60/HAL: 568.29 +/- 60.77b and P60/LED: 543.01 +/- 83.65b; Charisma/HAL: 430.94 +/- 67.28c; Charisma/LED: 435.52 +/- 105.12c. Results suggested that no significant difference in DTS was obtained with LCUs for the same composite. However, resin composite restorative materials presented different DTS.

  2. Restoration of posterior teeth in clinical practice: evidence base for choosing amalgam versus composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the current use of amalgam versus resin composite in posterior restorations and the evidence-base for choosing between these two treatment options. While much research has been published on the issue of the clinical use of amalgam versus resin composite, there are several issues that limit the true evidence-base on the subject. Furthermore, while the majority of published studies on posterior composites would seem to indicate equivalent clinical performance of resin composite to amalgam restorations, the studies that should be weighted much more heavily (randomized controlled trials) do not support the slant of the rest of the literature. As part of an evidence-based approach to private practice, clinicians need to be aware of the levels of evidence in the literature and need to properly inform patients of the true clinical outcomes that are associated with the use of amalgam versus resin composite for posterior restorations, so that patients are themselves making informed decisions about their dental care.

  3. NDE of the internal hole defect of dental composite restoration using infrared lock in thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Ja Uk; Choi, Nak Sam [Hanyang Univ., Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to detect the pin hole defect of dental composite restoration using lock in thermography method. Amplitude and phase images of the composite resin specimens were analyzed according to the lock in frequency and the diameter of defect area. Through the amplitude image analysis, at lock in frequency of 0.05 Hz, defect diameters 2-5 mm exhibited the highest amplitude contrast value between defective area and sound area. The lock in frequency range of 0.3-0.5 Hz provided good phase angle contrast for contrast value. It is concluded that the infrared lock in thermography method verified the effectiveness for detecting the pin hole defect of dental composite restoration.

  4. Methods to achieve the effect of «dry shine» of composite restorative materials

    OpenAIRE

    Mekhtieva R.R.; Nelovko T.V.; Eremin O.V.; Zaitseva E.M.; Ivashchenko Y.Y.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose: to determine the most effective method and sequence of polishing systems to achieve the effect of «dry light» of the final restoration ofthevestibular surface of the incisors and molars chewing surface of the hybrid light-cured composite materials. Material and methods. Material for polishing for the restoration divided into three groups: 1. Grinding discs — firm TOR VM with three types of grit: coarse, medium, soft and super soft, firm 3M ESPE «Sof-Lex» ultrafine polishing wheel...

  5. Surface Morphology and Tooth Adhesion of a Novel Nanostructured Dental Restorative Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salerno

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a novel dental restorative composite based on nanostructured micro-fillers of anodic porous alumina has been proposed. While its bulk properties are promising thanks to decreased aging and drug delivery capabilities, its surface properties are still unknown. Here we investigated the surface morphology and the adhesion to tooth dentin of this composite as prepared. For comparison, we used two commercial composites: Tetric EVO Flow (Ivoclar and Enamel HRi Plus (Micerium. The surface morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy and the adhesion strength by tensile tests. The experimental composite is rougher than the commercial composites, with root mean square roughness of ~549 nm against 170–511 nm, and presents an adhesion strength of ~15 MPa against 19–21 MPa. These results show at the same time some proximity to the commercial composites, but also the need for optimization of the experimental material formulation.

  6. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  7. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simen E. Kopperud

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%, followed by restoration fractures (25.1%. Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01, employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS (p < 0.01 and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03. There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01. Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations.

  8. Marginal integrity of restorations produced with a model composite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Ribeiro CORREA NETTO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Marginal integrity is one of the most crucial aspects involved in the clinical longevity of resin composite restorations.Objective To analyze the marginal integrity of restorations produced with a model composite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS.Material and Methods A base composite (B was produced with an organic matrix with UDMA/TEGDMA and 70 wt.% of barium borosilicate glass particles. To produce the model composite, 25 wt.% of UDMA were replaced by POSS (P25. The composites P90 and TPH3 (TP3 were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Marginal integrity (%MI was analyzed in bonded class I cavities. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage (%VS and the polymerization shrinkage stress (Pss - MPa were also evaluated.Results The values for %MI were as follows: P90 (100% = TP3 (98.3% = B (96.9% > P25 (93.2%, (p<0.05. The %VS ranged from 1.4% (P90 to 4.9% (P25, while Pss ranged from 2.3 MPa (P90 to 3.9 MPa (B. For both properties, the composite P25 presented the worst results (4.9% and 3.6 MPa. Linear regression analysis showed a strong positive correlation between %VS and Pss (r=0.97, whereas the correlation between Pss and %MI was found to be moderate (r=0.76.Conclusions The addition of 25 wt.% of POSS in methacrylate organic matrix did not improve the marginal integrity of class I restorations. Filtek P90 showed lower polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress when compared to the experimental and commercial methacrylate composite.

  9. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Lippo V J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-12-04

    OBJECTIVES.: The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS.: Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37 degrees C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS.: Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS.: Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion

  10. Marginal and internal adaptation of class II restorations after immediate or delayed composite placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietschi, Didier; Monasevic, Manuela; Krejci, Ivo; Davidson, Carel

    2002-01-01

    Direct class II composite restorations still represent a challenge, particularly when proximal limits extend below the CEJ. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of the type of adhesive and the delay between adhesive placement and composite insertion on restoration adaptation. Direct class II MOD box-shaped composite restorations (n=8 per group) were placed on intact human third molars, with proximal margins 1mm above or under CEJ. All cavities were filled with a horizontal layering technique, immediately after adhesive placement (IP) or after a 24h delay (DP). A filled three-component adhesive (OptiBond FL: OB) and a single-bottle, unfilled one (Prime & Bond 2.1: PB) were tested. Marginal adaptation was assessed before and after each phase of mechanical loading (250000 cycles at 50 N, 250000 cycles at 75 N and 500000 cycles at 100 N); internal adaptation was evaluated after test completion. Gold-plated resin replicas were observed in the SEM and restoration quality evaluated in percentages of continuity (C) at the margins and within the internal interface, after sample section. Adaptation to beveled enamel proved satisfactory in all groups. After loading, adaptation to gingival dentin degraded more in PB-IP (C=55.1%) than PB-DP (C=86.9%) or OB-DP (C=89%). More internal defects were observed in PB samples (IP: C=79.2% and DP: C=86.3%) compared to OB samples (IP: C=97.4% and DP: C=98.3%). The filled adhesive (OB) produced a better adaptation than the 'one-bottle' brand (PB), hypothetically by forming a stress-absorbing layer, limiting the development of adhesive failures. Postponing occlusal loading (such as the indirect approach) improved also restoration adaptation.

  11. Marginal and internal adaptation of Class II ormocer and hybrid resin composite restorations before and after load cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kournetas, N; Chakmakchi, M; Kakaboura, A; Rahiotis, C; Geis-Gerstorfer, J

    2004-09-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of the conventional composite restorative materials, ormocer materials have been introduced over the past few years. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the marginal and internal adaptation of two ormocer restorative systems (Admira, Voco and Definite, Degussa) compared to a hybrid composite one (TPH Spectrum, Dentsply/ DeTrey), before and after load cycling in Class II restorations. Standardized Class II restorations with cervical margins on enamel were divided into three groups ( n=16). Teeth of each group were filled with one of the restoratives tested and its respective bonding agent. Each group was divided into two equal subgroups. The marginal and internal adaptation of the first subgroup was evaluated after 7-day water storage at room temperature and of the second after cyclic loading in a mastication simulator (1.2x10(6) cycles, 49 N, 1.6 Hz). The occlusal and cervical marginal evaluation was conducted by videomicroscope and ranked as "excellent" and "not excellent". One thin section (150 microm), in mesial-distal direction, of each restoration, was examined under metallographic microscope to determine the quality of internal adaptation. The occlusal and cervical adaptation of both ormocer restorative systems was similar and clearly worse compared with the hybrid composite restorative one before as well as after load cycling. Concerning internal adaptation, no gap-free ormocer restorations were detected, whereas all Spectrum restorations presented perfect adaptation. The bonding agents of the ormocers formed layers with unacceptable features (pores, fractures) whereas that of the hybrid composite achieved perfect bonding layer even after loading. The rheological characteristics of the bonding agents of the ormocer restorative systems are proposed to be responsible for their inferior marginal and internal quality in Class II restorations compared with the hybrid composite one.

  12. A Conservative Esthetic Approach Using Enamel Recontouring and Composite Resin Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Aline Silva

    2016-01-01

    Conservative clinical solutions, predictable esthetic, and immediate outcomes are important concepts of restorative dentistry. The aim of this case study was to recognize the selective enamel removal as an interesting conservative alternative to achieve optimal esthetic results and discuss the clinical protocol. This clinical report described an alternative esthetic and conservative treatment to transform the long and sharp aspect of the maxillary canines with a slightly aggressive aspect into features of slightly curved teeth with delicate lines. An accurate diagnostic and esthetic analysis of the smile was initially performed. The selective enamel removal was performed, and direct composite restoration was strategically placed. Clinical assessment showed good esthetic outcomes, enabling a smile harmony with an immediate, simple, and lower-cost technique. Practitioners should be exposed to conservative approaches to create esthetic smiles based on the selective enamel removal technique combined with composite resin. PMID:27812389

  13. A Conservative Esthetic Approach Using Enamel Recontouring and Composite Resin Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conservative clinical solutions, predictable esthetic, and immediate outcomes are important concepts of restorative dentistry. The aim of this case study was to recognize the selective enamel removal as an interesting conservative alternative to achieve optimal esthetic results and discuss the clinical protocol. This clinical report described an alternative esthetic and conservative treatment to transform the long and sharp aspect of the maxillary canines with a slightly aggressive aspect into features of slightly curved teeth with delicate lines. An accurate diagnostic and esthetic analysis of the smile was initially performed. The selective enamel removal was performed, and direct composite restoration was strategically placed. Clinical assessment showed good esthetic outcomes, enabling a smile harmony with an immediate, simple, and lower-cost technique. Practitioners should be exposed to conservative approaches to create esthetic smiles based on the selective enamel removal technique combined with composite resin.

  14. Quantitative microleakage of some dentinal bonding restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, T; Retief, D H

    1993-03-01

    The quantitative microleakage of class V cementum (dentin) cavities restored with six dentinal bonding restorative systems was determined in vitro. Ninety extracted human permanent first and second mandibular and maxillary premolars were used in this study. Class V preparations were made in cementum (dentin) at the root facial surfaces. The preparations were restored with 1) a dentin bonding system containing 2% HEMA and BisGMA and a light-cured microfilled composite; 2) the same materials only substituting META/MMA base and TBB catalyst monomers for the BisGMA sealer; 3) a dentin bonding system containing 35% HEMA with META/MMA base and TBB catalyst, and a light-cured hybrid composite; 5) the same dentin bonding system only substituting the 35% glycerylmethacrylate for the 35% HEMA and using the microfilled composite; and 6) the previously described system with a substitution of 0.5 mol EDTA for the 10% citric acid -3% FeCl3. Fifteen teeth were restored with each procedure. The restorations were finished with 12-bladed carbide burs 15 min after placement, the teeth were stored in saline at 37 degrees C for 24 h, finished with Sof-Lex discs and then thermocycled in 2% methylene blue solution 500 times between 50 degrees C and 8 degrees C with a dwell time of 15 s. Quantitative microleakage was determined by a spectrophotometric dye-recovery method and expressed in microgram/dye/restoration. The data were analyzed by ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The quantitative microleakage of the teeth restored with the adhesive systems containing 35% glyceryl methacrylate was significantly reduced. The bonding mechanism of glyceryl methacrylate is not known.

  15. Marginal Integrity of Bulk Versus Incremental Fill Class II Composite Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, F; Kaisarly, D; Bader, D; El Gezawi, M

    2016-01-01

    Bulk-fill composites have been introduced to facilitate the placement of deep direct resin composite restorations. This study aimed at analyzing the cervical marginal integrity of bulk-fill vs incremental and open-sandwich class II resin composite restorations after thermomechanical cycling using replica scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ranking according to the World Dental Federation (FDI) criteria. Box-only class II cavities were prepared in 91 maxillary premolars with the gingival margin placed 1 mm above and below the cemento-enamel junction. Eighty-four premolars were divided into self-etch and total-etch groups, then subdivided into six restorative subgroups (n=7): 1-Tetric Ceram HB (TC) was used incrementally and in the open-sandwich technique with 2-Tetric EvoFlow (EF) and 3-Smart Dentin Replacement (SD). Bulk-fill restoratives were 4-SonicFill (SF), 5-Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill (TN), and 6-Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TE). In subgroups 1-5, Tetric N-Bond self-etch and Tetric N-Bond total-etch adhesives were used, whereas in subgroup 6, AdheSE self-etch and ExciTE F total etch were used. One more group (n=7) was restored with Filtek P90 Low Shrink Posterior Restorative (P9) only in combination with its self-etch P90 System Adhesive. Materials were manipulated and light cured (20 seconds, 1600 mW/cm(2)), and restorations were artificially aged by thermo-occlusal load cycling. Polyvinyl-siloxane impressions were taken and poured with epoxy resin. Resin replicas were examined by SEM (200×) for marginal sealing, and percentages of perfect margins were analyzed. Moreover, samples were examined using loupes (3.5×) and explorers and categorized according to the FDI criteria. Results were statistically analyzed (SEM by Kruskal-Wallis test and FDI by chi-square test) without significant differences in either the replica SEM groups (p=0.848) or the FDI criteria groups (p>0.05). The best SEM results at the enamel margin were in TC+EF/total-etch and SF

  16. Restoration of endodontically treated anterior teeth: an evaluation of coronal microleakage of glass ionomer and composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Arnold, A M; Wilcox, L R

    1990-12-01

    A glass ionomer material was evaluated for coronal microleakage in permanent lingual access restorations of endodontically treated anterior teeth. The material was tested as a restoration, placed over a zinc oxide-eugenol base, and as a base with an acid-etched composite resin veneer and a dentinal bonding agent. Restored teeth were thermocycled, immersed in silver nitrate, developed, and sectioned to assess microleakage. Significant coronal leakage was observed with all materials used.

  17. Clinical longevity of extensive direct composite restorations in amalgam replacement : Up to 3.5 years follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This prospective clinical trial evaluated the longevity of direct resin composite (DRC) restorations made on stained dentin that is exposed upon removal of existing amalgam restorations in extensive cavities with severely reduced macro-mechanical retention for amalgam replacement. Method

  18. Resin composite restoration in primary anterior teeth using short-post technique and strip crowns: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; De Benedetto, Monique Saveriano; del Conte Zardetto, Cristina Giovannetti; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla; Correa, Maria Salete Nahás Pires

    2004-10-01

    A case report describing a technique for the restoration of endodontically treated primary maxillary incisors with resin composite short posts and celluloid strip crowns in a 3-year-old boy is presented. The technique offers the advantages of using one restorative material, improving esthetics, and reducing chairtime and costs.

  19. Contraction behaviors of dental composite restorations--finite element investigation with DIC validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shu-Fen; Chang, Chih-Han; Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of cavity configuration on the polymerization shrinkage and stress of light-cured composite restorations by combining local strain measurement and a finite element analysis (FEA). Dental mesio-occluso-distal cavities of various widths and depths (each for 2 vs. 4 mm), representing different configuration factors, were prepared on extracted molars. The displacements of the bonded tooth cusps and cavity floors, caused by polymerization shrinkage of composite restorations, were assessed utilizing a digital-image-correlation (DIC) technique. The cervical marginal microleakage was investigated by examining the resin replicas of these restorations under SEM. The local material properties of the polymerized composite along the curing depth were defined by the nanoindentation test and applied in the subsequent FEA. In the FEA, four models were generated to correspond with the experimental restorations. In the DIC measurement results, the 4(w)×4(D) mm cavity presented the greatest values of inward displacements at the cusp and floor. The cavity depth, rather than the cavity width, was found to significantly correlate to the floor deformation, the location of shrinkage centers, and also the cervical microleakage ratio. The FEA simulation results showed that the 2(w)×4(D) mm cavity presented the maximal von Mises and principal stress located respectively on the cervical margins and cavity floor. Additional safety factor analysis showed a high risk of bond failure over the cavity floor in the 4-mm deep cavity. With the experimental validation, the simulation revealed that the cavity depth was significant to the formation of contraction stress and the incidence of interfacial debonding.

  20. The effect of a fiber reinforced cavity configuration on load bearing capacity and failure mode of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM resin composite overlay restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocca, G.T.; Saratti, C.M.; Cattani-Lorente, M.; Feilzer, A.J.; Scherrer, S.; Krecji, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the fracture strength and the mode of failure of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM overlays with fiber reinforced composite build-up of the pulp chamber. Methods 40 Devitalized molars were cut over the CEJ and divided into five groups (n = 8). The pulp chambe

  1. Swept source optical coherence tomography for quantitative and qualitative assessment of dental composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Mayoral, Juan Ricardo; Hariri, Ilnaz; Bakhsh, Turki A.; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the utility of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) for quantitative evaluation of dental composite restorations. The system (Santec, Japan) with a center wavelength of around 1300 nm and axial resolution of 12 μm was used to record data during and after placement of light-cured composites. The Fresnel phenomenon at the interfacial defects resulted in brighter areas indicating gaps as small as a few micrometers. The gap extension at the interface was quantified and compared to the observation by confocal laser scanning microscope after trimming the specimen to the same cross-section. Also, video imaging of the composite during polymerization could provide information about real-time kinetics of contraction stress and resulting gaps, distinguishing them from those gaps resulting from poor adaptation of composite to the cavity prior to polymerization. Some samples were also subjected to a high resolution microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT) assessment; it was found that differentiation of smaller gaps from the radiolucent bonding layer was difficult with 3D μCT. Finally, a clinical imaging example using a newly developed dental SS-OCT system with an intra-oral scanning probe (Panasonic Healthcare, Japan) is presented. SS-OCT is a unique tool for clinical assessment and laboratory research on resin-based dental restorations. Supported by GCOE at TMDU and NCGG.

  2. Fracture Resistance of Premolars Restored by Various Types and Placement Techniques of Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horieh Moosavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To verify the fracture resistance of premolars with mesioocclusodistal preparations restored by different resin composites and placement techniques. Sixty premolars were randomly divided into two groups based on type of composite resin: Filtek P60 or Nulite F, and then each group was separated into three subgroups: bulk, centripetal, and fiber insert according to the type of placement method (n=10. Single-bond adhesive system was used as composite bonding according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were restored in Groups 1, 2, and 3 with Filtek P60 and in Groups 4, 5, and 6 with Nulite F. After being stored 24 hours at 37∘C, a 4 mm diameter steel sphere in a universal testing machine was applied on tooth buccal and lingual cusps at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Groups 3 and 6 showed higher fracture resistance than Groups 1, 2, 4, and 5. Among the placement techniques, the fiber insert method had a significant effect, but the type of composite was ineffective. The insertion technique in contrast to the type of material had a significant influence on the fracture resistance of premolar teeth.

  3. Adaptation of two different calcium hydroxide bases under a composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakou, M; Barnes, I E; Wassell, R W; McCabe, J F

    1990-10-01

    A preliminary scanning electron microscope (SEM) study was carried out to investigate how the adaptation of two calcium hydroxide bases (one chemically cured, one light cured) was affected by the polymerization contraction of a supervening light-cured composite resin restoration. Occlusal cavities were prepared in 40 sound extracted human premolars, divided into two equal groups. In the first group a chemically cured calcium hydroxide (Dycal, De Trey Dentsply, Konstanz, FRG) was placed as a base. In the second group a new light-cured calcium hydroxide product (Prisma VLC Dycal, De Trey Dentsply) was used. The restorations were completed with an acid-etched, incrementally placed composite resin. The specimens were sectioned vertically and debrided. A replica was made of each half-tooth. The interfaces between composite resin/base and base/dentine were viewed and photographed in the SEM. The marginal adaptation at these two interfaces was classified into three categories according to the extent of the gaps that were observed. Prisma VLC Dycal base was found to be pulled away from the dentine floor of the cavity as a result of an apparent adhesion to the composite resin during polymerization contraction. Dycal was better adapted to the cavity floor than Prisma VLC Dycal. Disorganization of the resin-bonded Prisma VLC Dycal was minimal even after acid etching the enamel, sectioning and ultrasonic debridement. Dycal appeared to be more friable, and occasionally exhibited marked disorganization as a result of these procedures.

  4. Direct restoration of worn maxillary anterior teeth with a combination of composite resin materials: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos José; Pizi, Eliane Cristina Gava; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Neto, Alfredo Júlio Fernandes

    2005-01-01

    Tooth loss, alterations on tooth structure, and reduced vertical dimension are known to severely compromise the stomatognathic system. This case report describes the treatment of a patient who presented with an extremely worn maxillary anterior dentition with a loss of posterior support owing to the loss of almost all the posterior teeth, except the mandibular premolars. Provisional removable partial dentures were used to create an optimum maxillomandibular relationship and to provide restorative space prior to the restoration of the remaining teeth. This restoration was accomplished with a combination of layered hybrid and microfilled composite materials, which restored the maxillary anterior teeth to optimum esthetics and function.

  5. Finite Element Analysis of the Effect of Proximal Contour of Class II Composite Restorations on Stress Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Moghaddas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of proximal contour of class II composite restorations placed with straight or contoured matrix band using composite resins with different modulus of elasticity on stress distribution by finite element method. Methods: In order to evaluate the stress distribution of class II composite restorations using finite element method, upper right first molar and second premolar were modeled. Proximal boxes were designed and restored with universal Z250 and packable P60 composite resins (3M ESPE using two matrix systems: flat Tofflemire matrix and precurved sectional matrix. Finally models were evaluated under loads of 200 and 400 Newton at 90 degrees angle and the results were graphically illustrated in the form of Von Misses stresses. Results: In general the stress obtained under 400 Newton load was significantly greater than the stress of models under 200 Newton load. Von Misses stress distribution pattern of two different Z250 and P60 composites were very similar in all modes of loading and proximal contour. In all analyzed models there was a significant difference between models restored with Tofflemire matrix with flat contour and models restored with sectional matrix with curved contour. This difference was greater in first molar than second premolar. Conclusion: Use of a contoured matrix band results in less stress in class II composite resin restorations.

  6. Finite Element Analysis of the Effect of Proximal Contour of Class II Composite Restorations on Stress Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Abachizadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of proximal contour of class II composite restorations placed with straight or contoured matrix band using composite resins with different modulus of elasticity on stress distribution by finite element method. Methods: In order to evaluate the stress distribution of class II composite restorations using finite element method, upper right first molar and second premolar were modeled. Proximal boxes were designed and restored with universal Z250 and packable P60 composite resins (3M ESPE using two matrix systems: flat Tofflemire matrix and precurved sectional matrix. Finally models were evaluated under loads of 200 and 400 Newton at 90 degrees angle and the results were graphically illustrated in the form of Von Misses stresses. Results: In general the stress obtained under 400 Newton load was significantly greater than the stress of models under 200 Newton load. Von Misses stress distribution pattern of two different Z250 and P60 composites were very similar in all modes of loading and proximal contour. In all analyzed models there was a significant difference between models restored with Tofflemire matrix with flat contour and models restored with sectional matrix with curved contour. This difference was greater in first molar than second premolar. Conclusion: Use of a contoured matrix band results in less stress in class II composite resin restorations.

  7. Effect of different placement techniques on marginal microleakage of deep class-II cavities restored with two composite resin formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aims to evaluate and compare marginal microleakage in deep class II cavities restored with various techniques using different composites. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted teeth were divided into six groups of 10 teeth each. Standardized class II cavities were made and were restored using composites of different consistencies with different placement techniques. Group 1 with Microhybrid composite, Group 2 with Packable composite, Group 3 Microhybrid composite with a flowable composite liner, Group 4 Packable composite with a flowable composite liner, Group 5 Microhybrid composite with precured composite insert in second increment and Group 6 Packable composite with precured insert in second increment. Specimens then were stored in distilled water, thermocycled and immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution. These specimens were sectioned and evaluated for microleakage at the occlusal and cervical walls separately using stereomicroscope. Results: The results demonstrated that in the occlusal wall, packable composite, showed significantly more marginal microleakage than the other groups. In the cervical wall, teeth restored with a flowable composite liner showed less marginal microleakage when compared to all other groups. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the use of flowable composite as the first increment is recommended in deep class II cavities.

  8. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vieira Caixeta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED. Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10 followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa were submitted to Student’s t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x. Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites.

  9. Clinical Investigation of a New Bulk Fill Composite Resin in the Restoration of Posterior Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Dental Restoration Failure of Marginal Integrity; Dental Caries; Unrepairable Overhanging of Dental Restorative Materials; Poor Aesthetics of Existing Restoration; Secondary Dental Caries Associated With Failed or Defective Dental Restorations; Fractured Dental Restorative Materials Without Loss of Materials; Fracture of Dental Restorative Materials With Loss of Material

  10. Acceleration and novelty: community restoration speeds recovery and transforms species composition in Andean cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah Jane; Rhemtulla, Jeanine M

    2016-01-01

    Community-based tropical forest restoration projects, often promoted as a win-win solution for local communities and the environment, have increased dramatically in number in the past decade. Many such projects are underway in Andean cloud forests, which, given their extremely high biodiversity and history of extensive clearing, are understudied. This study investigates the efficacy of community-based tree-planting projects to accelerate cloud forest recovery, as compared to unassisted natural regeneration. This study takes place in northwest Andean Ecuador, where the majority of the original, highly diverse cloud forests have been cleared, in five communities that initiated tree-planting projects to restore forests in 2003. In 2011, we identified tree species along transects in planted forests (n = 5), naturally regenerating forests (n = 5), and primary forests (n = 5). We also surveyed 120 households about their restoration methods, tree preferences, and forest uses. We found that tree diversity was higher in planted than in unplanted secondary forest, but both were less diverse than primary forests. Ordination analysis showed that all three forests had distinct species compositions, although planted forests shared more species with primary forests than did unplanted forests. Planted forests also contained more animal-dispersed species in both the planted canopy and in the unplanted, regenerating understory than unplanted forests, and contained the highest proportion of species with use value for local people. While restoring forest increased biodiversity and accelerated forest recovery, restored forests may also represent novel ecosystems that are distinct from the region's previous ecosystems and, given their usefulness to people, are likely to be more common in the future.

  11. Minimally invasive use of coloured composite resin in aesthetic restoration of periodontially involved teeth: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbi, M A; Al Sharief, H S; Tayeb, H; Bokhari, A

    2013-04-01

    Gingival recession causes not only aesthetic problems, but problems with oral hygiene, plaque accumulation, speech, and tooth sensitivity. Replacing the missing gingival tissue with composite resin, when indicated, can be a time- and cost-effective solution. Here we report the case of a 25-year-old female who presented with generalized gingival recession. Black triangles were present between the maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth due to loss of interdental tissues, caused by recent periodontal surgery. She also had slightly malposed maxillary anterior teeth. The patient elected to replace gingival tissue with pink composite resin and to alter the midline with composite resin veneers. The first treatment phase involved placement of pink gingival composite to restore the appearance of interdental papilla to her upper (16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 21, 22, 23, and 24) and lower (34, 33, 32, 31, 41, 42, 43, and 44) teeth. Phase two was to place direct composite resin bonded veneers on her upper (16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 21, 22, 23, and 24) teeth to alter the midline and achieve desired colour. The third treatment phase was to level the lower incisal edge shape by enameloplasty (31, 32, 41, and 42) to produce a more youthful and attractive smile. This case report and brief review attempt to describe the clinical obstacles and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol. Use of contemporary materials such as gingival coloured composite to restore lost gingival tissue and improve aesthetics can be a simple and cost-effective way to manage patients affected by generalized aggressive periodontitis (AgP).

  12. Marginal adaptation of heat-pressed glass-ceramic veneers to Class 3 composite restorations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christgau, M; Friedl, K H; Schmalz, G; Edelmann, K

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to compare the marginal adaptation and integrity of heat-pressed glass-ceramic veneers to adjacent class 3 composite restorations and to enamel using four dual-curing composite resin cements of different viscosity with their corresponding dentin bonding agents. Thirty-six caries-free human maxillary incisors were first restored with mesial and distal class 3 composite restorations and then prepared for facial ceramic veneers. The cavity margins of the veneers were located either in the class 3 composite restorations or in the residual enamel. Heat-pressed glass-ceramic veneers (IPS Empress) were inserted adhesively using one of the following four luting systems in nine teeth: SonoCem (SC) with EBS; Variolink Ultra (VU), Variolink High-Viscosity (VHV), and Variolink Low-Viscosity (VLV) with Syntac. The veneer margins in the region of the composite restoration and in the region apical to the composite restoration (ceramic/composite resin cement interfaces, composite resin cement/composite restoration interface, and composite resin cement/enamel interface) were evaluated before and after thermo-cycling and mechanical loading (TCML) by quantitative margin analysis under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) using an image analysis system. Furthermore, microleakage was assessed in each tooth by dye penetration after TCML. For all luting systems, SEM analysis revealed excellent marginal adaptation of the ceramic veneers to the composite restorations as well as to enamel. The median percentages of marginal gap formation were 1.1% and less before TCML and 5.1% and less after TCML. The error-rates method revealed no statistical influence of the interface or of the viscosity of the luting material. Maximal values of dye penetration showed a significantly higher microleakage at veneers cemented with VU (median: 86.4%) compared to SC (median: 13.3%). In conclusion, the present data demonstrated that existing clinically acceptable class

  13. Effects of composite restorations on nitric oxide and uric acid levels in saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgun Akgul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, and should, therefore, not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances capable of causing side effects. This study was intended to investigate the effects on salivary nitric oxide (NO and uric acid (UA levels after application of dental composite filling materials to healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: A total of 52 individuals (32 female and 20 male participated in the study. Filtek Z250 composite filling material (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA was applied to healthy volunteers. Saliva samples were collected before restoration (baseline and 1 h, 1-day, 7 days, and 30 days after restoration. NO concentrations were measured using the Griess reaction method, and UA was measured using an enzymatic method. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and the Bonferroni post-hoc test (α =5%. Results: NO values increased statistically significant after 7 days (P 0.05. There was no correlation between NO and UA levels in saliva (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Composite resins activated the antioxidant system in saliva. However, further studies are now needed to confirm our findings and to permit a definitive conclusion.

  14. Comparison of chemical composition of materials used in dental restorations 08 years after the irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, Mireia Florencio; Santos, Adimir dos, E-mail: mfmaio@ipen.b, E-mail: asantos@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marcosrf@salesiano-ata.b [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on the materials commonly used in dental restorations (amalgam, composite resin and Compomer), to mitigate the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, observed when the teeth are restored within the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to the beam of radiation from a source of cobalt-therapy, and analyzed by a X-ray fluorescence technique, by comparing the chemical composition of samples before and after irradiation. Gamma spectrometry was performed with detector of NaI and HPGe in the same samples. Then, the samples were kept in an appropriate place and after 08 years is repeated the same analysis. With these tests, it was possible to verify small changes in the composition of bodies of evidence due to the interaction 08 years after exposure to gamma radiation beams, simulating a patient who develops deleterious effects of radiation after the end radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  15. Clinical performance of Class I nanohybrid composite restorations with resin-modified glass-ionomer liner and flowable composite liner: A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhasini, Krishtipati; Madhusudhana, Koppolu; Suneelkumar, Chinni; Lavanya, Anumula; Chandrababu, K. S.; Kumar, Perisetty Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liners play a vital role in minimizing polymerization shrinkage stress by elastic bonding concept and increase the longevity and favorable outcome for composite restorations. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of nanohybrid composite restorations using resin-modified glass-ionomer and flowable composite liners. Settings and Design: A single-centered, double-blinded randomized clinical trial, with split-mouth design and equal allocation ratio that was conducted in the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics. Materials and Methods: In forty patients, a total of eighty Class I restorations were placed with resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) liner (FUJI II LC, GC America) in one group and flowable composite liner (smart dentin replacement/SDR, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA) in another group. All restorations were clinically evaluated by two examiners, immediately (baseline), 3, 6, and 12 months using US Public Health Service modified criteria. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using McNemar's test (P < 0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in the color match, marginal discoloration, surface roughness, and marginal adaptation. Restorations with RMGIC liner group show 20% Bravo scores on anatomic form at 12 months but are still clinically acceptable. Conclusion: Nanohybrid composite restorations with RMGIC (Fuji II LC) and flowable composite liner (SDR) demonstrated clinically acceptable performance after 12 months. PMID:27994310

  16. Analysis of Fracture Signals from Tooth/Composite Restoration According to AE Sensor Attachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Ja Uk; Choi, Nak Sam [Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Acoustic emission(AE) signals during the polymerization shrinkage of composite resin subjected to the LED light exposure were detected through a wave guide method and a direct sensor attachment method. For PMMA, human tooth, stainless steel substrate, data of AE hits and amplitudes were compared. For the test using the wave guide, AE amplitudes decreased because of the attenuant wave. However, AE hits and 1st peak frequency distribution were not different according to the sensor attachments. Through the experiments, wave guide could be used for a nondestructive evaluation of the marginal disintegrative fracture of dental restoration.

  17. Effects of pulp capping materials on fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cavity design and the type of pulp capping materials on the fracture resistance of Class II composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted, sound molar teeth were selected for the study. A dovetail cavity on the mesio-occlusal and a slot cavity on disto-occlusal surfaces of each tooth were prepared, and the teeth were divided 4 groups which one of them as a control group. The pulp capping materials (Ther...

  18. Effect of polishing techniques and time on surface roughness, hardness and microleakage of resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Daniela; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Camacho, Guilherme Brião; Powers, John M

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of immediate and delayed polishing on the surface roughness, microhardness and microleakage of a microfilled (Filtek A110) and a hybrid (Filtek Z250) resin composite. Standardized preparations were made on the buccal surfaces of 256 bovine teeth; half were restored with each composite (128 teeth per composite). Immediately after curing, gross finishing was carried out with #280 sandpaper. The specimens restored with each composite were divided into two subgroups. The first group (IM) was polished immediately after gross finishing, using three different systems (n=16): Sequence A, Sof-Lex; Sequence B, Flexicups and Sequence C, Flexicups + Jiffy Polishing Brush + Flexibuffs. The specimens were then stored for three weeks in saline 37 degrees C. The second group (DE) was stored for two weeks, then polished with the same systems and stored for one additional week. The controls (n=16) were analyzed without polishing. Five readings per specimen were taken for surface roughness and hardness. After immersion in basic fuchsin, microleakage was evaluated (40x) using standardized scores. The data were analyzed at a significance level of 0.05, with analysis of variance and an SNK test (surface roughness and microhardness) or with Kruskal-Wallis (microleakage). In both composites, only for the sequential technique was there an influence of delay in polishing on roughness (Ra). Flexicups exhibited the highest Ra of the three systems. The IM and Filtek Z-250 groups showed higher hardness than the DE and Filtek A-110 groups, respectively. Dentin margins showed more leakage than enamel margins; the sequential technique produced more leakage than the other techniques in dentin (pcomposite, time and polishing technique--had a significant influence on surface roughness, hardness and microleakage. Generally, immediate polishing produced no detrimental effect compared to delayed polishing.

  19. Effects of Different Light Curing Units/Modes on the Microleakage of Flowable Composite Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Yazici, A. Ruya; Celik, Cigdem; Dayangac, Berrin; Ozgunaltay, Gul

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different light curing units and modes on microleakage of flowable composite resins. Methods Eighty Class V cavities were prepared in buccal and lingual surfaces of 40 extracted human premolars with cervical wall located in dentin and the occlusal wall in enamel. These teeth were randomly assigned into two groups (n=20) and restored with different flowable composites; Group I: Esthet-X Flow, Group II: Grandio Flow. Eac...

  20. Nanoleakage Evaluation of Posterior Teeth Restored with Low Shrinkable Resin Composite- An invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Labib Mohamed; Nabih, Sameh Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The effect of nanoleakage on the integrity of resin–dentin bond has been in interest for long-term adhesion. Aim This study evaluated the nanoleakage in premolar teeth restored with low shrinkable resin composite. Materials and Methods A total of 40 human premolars were used for nanoleakage evaluation in this study. Each group was divided into four equal groups; Group A: using silorane with its adhesive system. Group B: using silorane with G-bond. Group C: using Filtek supreme composite with G-bond. Group D: using Filtek supreme composite with AdheSE adhesive. Nanoleakage analysed using Scaning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometery (EDX). Results The amount of silver present in hybrid layer depend on the adhesive used; this indicated different nanoleakage expressions in different adhesive systems. Filtek Z350 composite with G-bond showed clear silver uptake in both the adhesive and hybrid layer. Low shrinkable resin composite (silorane) with its adhesive system showed less silver penetration and slight silver peak on the elemental energy spectroscopy of energy dispersive X-Ray spectrometry (EDS) as compared to other samples. Conclusion Adhesives used between different groups, influence the location and degree of nanoleakage. There is difference in nanoleakage patterns between two-step and one-step adhesives and also among the one-step adhesives themselves. PMID:27630943

  1. Fracture Strength of Indirect Resin Composite Laminates to Teeth with Existing Restorations : An Evaluation of Conditioning Protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mese, Ayse; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the fracture strength and failure types of indirect resin-based composite laminates bonded to teeth with aged Class III composite restorations that were conditioned according to various protocols. Materials and Methods: Maxillary central incisors (N = 60) with window-ty

  2. Class I and Class II silver amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations: teaching approaches in Canadian faculties of dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Dorothy

    2005-06-01

    A 10-question survey was mailed to the 10 Canadian faculties of dentistry to determine current approaches to teaching undergraduates about silver amalgam and resin composite for posterior restorations in adults and children. Responses were received from all 10 pedodontic programs and from 8 of the 10 operative and restorative programs. The use of silver amalgam and posterior composite for restorations of primary and permanent teeth is covered in the curricula of all dental schools, but the relative emphasis on the 2 materials varies. In the operative and restorative programs, curriculum time devoted to silver amalgam is either greater than or equal to that devoted to posterior composite. Five of the 8 schools reported greater educational emphasis on silver amalgam for the permanent dentition; however, course directors noted that the preference among patients seen in clinics is tending toward composite restorations. Curricula appear designed to educate students about the optimal use of both materials. Requirements for performance of restorations during training generally do not specify the type of material; these requirements range from 60 restorations to 250 surfaces. Five of the 8 schools conduct clinical competency tests with both materials. The responses from the pedodontic programs were more diverse. The proportion of curriculum time devoted to each type of material in these programs ranged from less than 25% to more than 75%. Five schools reported more emphasis on silver amalgam, 3 schools reported equal emphasis, and 2 schools reported more emphasis on posterior composite. No clinical requirements were specified in any of the undergraduate pedodontic programs. Within some of the faculties, there were differences between the operative and restorative program and the pedodontic program with respect to emphasis on different materials for the posterior dentition.

  3. Three-year randomised clinical trial to evaluate the clinical performance, quantitative and qualitative wear patterns of hybrid composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Senthamaraiselvi; Elsen, Liesbeth; Lijnen, Inge; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Lambrechts, Paul

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the clinical performance, quantitative and qualitative wear patterns of conventional hybrid (Tetric Ceram), micro-filled hybrid (Gradia Direct Posterior) and nano-hybrid (Tetric EvoCeram, TEC) posterior composite restorations in a 3-year randomised clinical trial. Sixteen Tetric Ceram, 17 TEC and 16 Gradia Direct Posterior restorations were placed in human molars and evaluated at baseline, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months of clinical service according to US Public Health Service criteria. The gypsum replicas at each recall were used for 3D laser scanning to quantify wear, and the epoxy resin replicas were observed under scanning electron microscope to study the qualitative wear patterns. After 3 years of clinical service, the three hybrid restorative materials performed clinically well in posterior cavities. Within the observation period, the nano-hybrid and micro-hybrid restorations evolved better in polishability with improved surface gloss retention than the conventional hybrid counterpart. The three hybrid composites showed enamel-like vertical wear and cavity-size dependant volume loss magnitude. Qualitatively, while the micro-filled and nano-hybrid composite restorations exhibited signs of fatigue similar to the conventional hybrid composite restorations at heavy occlusal contact area, their light occlusal contact areas showed less surface pitting after 3 years of clinical service.

  4. Clinical evaluation of a flowable resin composite and flowable compomer for preventive resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Man; Liu, HongSheng

    2005-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the retention and caries protection of a flowable resin composite (Flow Line) and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow) used in preventive resin restorations as compared to the conventional preventive resin technique which uses a resin composite (Brilliant) and a sealant (Concise). This study observed 205 permanent molars with small carious cavities less than 1.5 mm in width, which were obtained from 165 children aged 7 to 15 years. Flowable resin composite was used to treat 75 teeth, and 71 teeth were treated with flowable compomer in both cavities and caries-free fissures. For the control group, 59 teeth were treated with resin composite in cavities and sealant in caries-free fissures. The teeth were evaluated at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24-month intervals. After three months, all 205 treated teeth were completely intact. After six months, 66 of the 71 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 65 of the 70 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 57 of the 58 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. After 12 months, 60 of the 67 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 61 of the 67 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 51 of the 55 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. After 18 months, 53 of the 61 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 54 of the 62 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 47 of the 53 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. After 24 months, 49 of the 58 teeth treated with flowable resin composite and 45 of the 57 teeth treated with flowable compomer were complete, compared to 42 of the 52 teeth treated with the conventional preventive resin technique. There were no statistically significant differences in retention rates among all groups after 3, 6, 12, 18 or 24-months (p>0.05). One tooth treated with flowable resin composite and one tooth treated with flowable

  5. The effect of Er, Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the microleakage of composite resin restorations%Er,Cr:YSGG激光制洞对光固化复合树脂边缘微渗漏的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾兴亚; 王凤艳; 刘策

    2011-01-01

    目的:比较在自酸蚀黏结剂的应用条件下,Er,Cr:YSGG激光制备与传统牙钻制备离体牙牙颈部洞对光固化复合树脂边缘微渗漏的影响.方法:将20个因正畸拔除的新鲜完整无龋损、无隐裂、无充填物的前磨牙随机分为两组(n=10),分别使用牙钻和Er,Cr:YSGG激光制备牙颈部洞.窝洞制备后均匀涂覆FL-BOND,用TPH复合树脂进行分层充填,打磨、抛光,37℃生理盐水中存放7d后,进行500次温度循环实验(5±2)℃—(55±2)℃.将上述所有样本置0.5%碱性品红液中室温浸泡24h后,沿牙体长轴通过修复体正中纵行剖开,采用染料渗入法和扫描电镜方法观察充填体微渗漏情况,运用SPSS 11.0软件包进行统计学处理.结果:牙钻制备组与激光组相比,无论(牙合)壁还是龈壁的染料渗入评分和边缘微缝隙宽度均无显著性差异(P>0.05).结论:在自酸蚀黏结剂的应用条件下,Er,Cr:YSGG激光制洞不能显著减少光固化复合树脂边缘微渗漏的发生.%AIM: To compare the microleakage of Class V resin composite restorations following Er,Cr:YS-GG laser and high -speed rotary preparation using a self-etch adhesive system. METHODS; Twenty orthodontically extracted human premolars were randomly divided into two groups (n = 10) and Class V cavities were prepared in the teeth with Er,Cr:YSGG laser or bur. The cavities were then coated with FL-BOND adhesive system and TPH resin composite was used for restoration. After finishing and polishing, the teeth were stored for seven days in distilled water at 37 t before they were subjected to thermocycling for 500 times (5 ±2℃ -55 ±2℃ ). Then they were stained in asolution of 0.5% basic fuchsion at room temperature and sectioned in a buccolingual plane through the centre of the restorations. The marginal microleakage was observed by dye penetration method and SEM. The data was analyzed with SPSS11.0 software package. RESULTS: Microleakage test and the space

  6. Porcelain laminate veneer restorations bonded with a three-liquid silane bonding agent and a dual-activated luting composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Hideo; Aida, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Yumi; Tanoue, Naomi

    2006-12-01

    This clinical report describes the fabrication and bonding of porcelain laminate veneer restorations in a patient with anterior open spaces. Laminate veneer restorations made of feldspathic porcelain were etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid, rinsed under tap water, ultrasonically cleaned with methanol, and primed with a chemically activated three-liquid silane bonding agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond). The enamel surfaces were etched with 40% phosphoric acid, rinsed with water, and primed with a two-liquid bonding agent (Clearfil New Bond) that contained a hydrophobic phosphate (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate; MDP). The restorations were bonded with a dual-activated luting composite (Clapearl DC). The veneers have been functioning satisfactorily for an observation period of one year. Combined use of the Clearfil bonding agents and Clapearl DC luting composite is an alternative to conventional materials for seating porcelain laminate veneer restorations, although the system is inapplicable to dentin bonding.

  7. Mechanistic aspects of fracture and fatigue in resin based dental restorative composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Minalben B.

    For resin based dental restorative composites, one of the major challenges is to optimize the balance between mechanical and optical properties. Although fracture is the second leading cause of dental restorative failures, very limited mechanistic understanding exists on a microscopic level. In the present study, the fracture properties and mechanisms of two commercial dental resin composites with different microstructures are examined using double notched four point beam bending and pre-cracked compact-tension, C(T), specimens. Four point bend flexural strength was also measured using un-notched beam samples. The first material is a microhybrid composite that combines a range of nano and micro scale filler particles to give an average particle size of 0.6 mum, while the second is a nanofill composite reinforced entirely with nano particles and their agglomerates. The influences of 60 days water hydration and a post-cure heat treatment were also examined. Fracture resistance curve (R-curve) experiments have demonstrated the microhybrid composite to be more fracture resistant than the nanofill composite in both as-processed and hydrated conditions. Rising fracture resistance with crack extension was observed in all specimens, independent of the environmental conditions. Compared to the as-processed condition, a significant reduction in the peak toughness was observed for the nanofill composite after 60 days of water aging. Hydration lowered flexural strength of both composites which was attributed to hydrolytic matrix degradation with additional interfacial debonding causing larger strength decrease in the nanofill. Optical and SEM observations revealed an interparticle matrix crack path promoting crack deflection as a toughening mechanism in all cases except the hydrated nanofill which showed particle-matrix debonding. Crack bridging was another observed extrinsic toughening mechanism that was believed to be responsible for the rising fracture resistance curve (R

  8. A comparative evaluation of microleakage of restorations using silorane-based dental composite and methacrylate-based dental composites in Class II cavities: An in vitro study

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    Jambai Sampath Kumar Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the microleakage of restorations using low shrinkage silorane-based dental composite and methacrylate-based dental composites in Class II cavity at the occlusal and gingival margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty mandibular molars were collected and divided into three experimental groups and one negative control group. Class II slot cavity was prepared on the mesial surface. Experimental groups were restored with Group I: silorane-based microhybrid composite, Group II: methacrylate-based nanohybrid composite, and Group III: Methacrylate-based microhybrid composite, respectively. Group IV: negative control. The samples were thermocycled, root apices were sealed with sticky wax and coated with nail varnish except 1 mm around the restoration. This was followed by immersion in 2% Rhodamine-B dye solution under vacuum at room temperature for 24 h. Then, the samples were sectioned longitudinally in the mesiodistal direction and evaluated under stereomicroscope ×40 magnification. Scoring was done according to the depth of dye penetration in to the cavity. Statistical analysis of the data was done. Results: The results were that no statistically significant difference in the microleakage at the occlusal margin for all the restorative materials, whereas at the gingival margin, silorane-based microhybrid composite showed less microleakage than the methacrylate-based nano- and micro-hybrid composites. Conclusion: In general, silorane-based microhybrid composite had less microleakage among the other materials used in this in vitro study.

  9. Adhesive analysis of voids in class II composite resin restorations at the axial and gingival cavity walls restored under in vivo versus in vitro conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purk, John H.; Dusevich, Vladimir; Glaros, Alan; Eick, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Adhesive analysis, under the scanning electron microscope of microtensile specimens that failed through the adhesive interface, was conducted to evaluate the amount of voids present at the axial versus gingival cavity walls of class II composite restorations restored under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Methods Five patients received class II resin composite restorations, under in vivo and in vitro conditions. A total of 14 premolar teeth yielded 59 (n = 59) microtensile adhesive specimens that fractured through the adhesive interface. The fractured surfaces of all specimens were examined and the % area of voids was measured. Results Voids at the adhesive joint were highly predictive of bond strengths. An increase in the number of voids resulted in a decrease in the microtensile bond strength. The area of voids at the adhesive interface was as follows: in vivo axial 13.6 ± 25.6% (n = 12); in vivo gingival 48.8 ± 29.2% (n = 12); in vitro axial 0.0 ± 0.0% (n = 19) and in vitro gingival 11.7 ± 17.6% (n = 16). Significance Composite resin may bond differently to dentin depending upon the amount of voids and the cavity wall involved. The bond to the gingival wall was not as reliable as the bond to the axial wall. An increase in the amount of surface voids was a major factor for reducing microtensile bond strengths of adhesive to dentin. PMID:16950506

  10. Indicators of the risk mechanics for Class-I and Class-II amalgam and composite resin restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Eduardo; Arroyo, Erik Dreyer; Pardo, Claudia Letelier; OLIVEIRA JUNIOR,Osmir Batista de; Cortés, Gustavo Moncada [UNESP; Casielles,Javier Martín

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine indicators of prognosis for mechanical risks of amalgam and composite resin restorations in permanent teeth. METHODS: Thirty-nine adult patients with direct clinical, photographic, radiographic and model examinations. A total of 256 restorations were classified as "not satisfactory," with Bravo or Charlie values according to the modified Ryge /USPHS criteria. The total "n" was divided into Bravo and Charlie groups according to the value obtained in the "marginal adaptation" ...

  11. [The method of esthetic crown restoration with composite resin jacket crown in primary molars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, K; Shibui, N; Suda, M; Uehara, M; Karibe, H; Kondou, K

    1990-10-01

    The term "esthetics" has recently been also used in the dental field, and a field called esthetic dentistry is increasingly being noted. The number of not only adult but also pediatric patients who visit for treatment aiming at esthetic recovery is being increased. Inpedodontics, composite resin of the coronal color is generally used in the restoration of deciduous incisors. However, the method using metal crowns for the deciduous teeth is used for the deciduous molars at present. We applied a composite resin jacket crown to the deciduous molar in a way similar to that of esthetic crown restoration for the anterior teeth. The surgical procedure before crown preparation varied slightly according to the presence or absence of pulpal treatment of vital teeth and with non-vital teeth, but the application was performed as follows: 1) Desensitization of pulp, pulpal treatment and core construction. 2) Preparation of crown. 3) Selection, trial set and occlusal equilibration of a metal crown for the deciduous tooth. 4) Precision impression with a silicone impression material. 5) Removal of the metal crown for the deciduous tooth from the impression material. 6) Making of an under-cut to the abutment tooth on the buccal lingual side. 7) Filling of the impression with chemical polymerization resin. 8) Application of pressure in the oral cavity. 9) Adjustment of edge and crown forms. Thus, the preparation method for the composite resin jacket crown was relatively simple. Since this surgery, the patient has been followed up for 1 year and 6 months, and no specifically troublesome points have been observed clinically. The patient and her parents are satisfied with the results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Curriculum time compared to clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in U.S. dental schools: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Rosalia; Nimmo, Susan; Childs, Gail S; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    Dental clinicians have an expanding range of biomaterial choices for restoring tooth structure. Scientific developments in cariology, advances in dental biomaterials, and patients' esthetic concerns have led to a reduction in amalgam restorations and an increase in composite restorations. The aim of this study was to compare teaching time with students' clinical procedures in amalgam and composite posterior restorations in dental schools across the United States. Academic deans in 60 schools were invited to complete a survey that asked for the amount of instructional time for amalgam and composite posterior restorations and the number of clinical restorations performed by their Classes of 2009, 2010, and 2011. Of these 60, 12 returned surveys with complete data, for a 20% response rate. Responses from these schools showed little change in lecture and preclinical laboratory instruction from 2009 to 2011. There was a slight increase in two-surface restorations for both amalgam and composites; however, the total number of reported composite and amalgam restorations remained the same. Of 204,864 restorations reported, 53% were composite, and 47% were amalgam. There were twice as many multisurface large or complex amalgam restorations as composites. One-surface composite restorations exceeded amalgams. Among the participating schools, there was little to no change between curriculum time and clinical procedures. Findings from this preliminary study reflect a modest increase in two-surface resin-based restorations placed by dental students from 2009 to 2011 and little change in curricular time devoted to teaching amalgam restorations. The total number of posterior composite restorations placed by students in these schools was slightly higher than amalgams.

  13. The effect of insertion and photopolymerization techniques on microleakage of Class V cavities: a quantitative evaluation Efeito de diferentes técnicas de inserção e fotopolimerização na microinfiltração de cavidades Classe V: avaliação quantitativa

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    Fabiana Mantovani Gomes França

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate by spectrophotometry the influence of the incremental technique and progressive light curing in the microleakage of Class V cavities. Forty samples were prepared with class V cylindrical cavities on the buccal root surface of bovine incisive teeth and filled with composite resin (Z250. The samples were divided into four groups: I: cavity was bulk filled and the composite was light cured for 40 seconds; Group II: cavity was bulk filled and a "soft-start" polymerization was used; Group III: cavity was filled with the incremental technique in two coats and light cured for 40 seconds; Group IV: cavity was filled with the incremental technique in two coats and light cured with "soft-start" polymerization. After the restoration, the specimens were thermally stressed for 3,000 cycles in bath at 5 ± 2°C and 55 ± 2°C, protected with nail enamel, colored with 2% methylene blue and cut into sections. These sections were triturated and the dye was recovered with PA ethanol and the supernatant was evaluated. The data were submitted to ANOVA and the results showed the following averages: bulk filled and conventional photopolymerization (I 0.06075 µg/ml; bulk filled and progressive photopolymerization (II 0.04030 µg/ml; incremental insertion and conventional photopolymerization (III 0.04648 µg/ml; incremental insertion and progressive photopolymerization (IV 0.04339 µg/ml. No significant statistic differences were observed among the mean values. The Degulux "soft-start" equipment probably emits too high initial light intensity to promote progressive photopolymerization.O objetivo deste estudo in vitro foi avaliar através de espectrofotometria a influência das técnicas de inserção incremental e de fotopolimerização progressiva na microinfiltração de cavidades Classe V. Foram preparadas 40 cavidades cilíndricas na superfície radicular vestibular de incisivos bovinos e preenchidas com resina

  14. Assessing ex vivo dental biofilms and in vivo composite restorations using cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R.; Aparicio, C.; Chityala, R.; Chen, R.; Fok, A.; Rudney, J.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-polarization 1310-nm optical coherence tomography system (CP-OCT), using a beam splitter based design, was used to assess ex vivo growth of complex multi-species dental biofilms. These biofilm microcosms were derived from plaque samples along the interface of composite or amalgam restoration in children with a history of early childhood caries. This paper presents a method of measuring the mean biofilm height of mature biofilms using CP-OCT. For our in vivo application, the novel swept source based CP-OCT intraoral probe (Santec Co. Komaki, Japan) dimensions and system image acquisition speed (20 image frames/second) allowed imaging pediatric subjects as young as 4 years old. The subsurface enamel under the interface of composite resin restorations of pediatric subjects were imaged using CP-OCT. Cavitated secondary caries is clearly evident from sound resin composite restorations.

  15. Replacement of Anterior Composite Resin Restorations Using Conservative Ceramics for Occlusal and Periodontal Rehabilitation: An 18-Month Clinical Follow-Up

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    Leonardo Fernandes da Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a patient with discolored and fractured composite resin restorations on the anterior teeth in whom substitution was indicated. After wax-up and mock-up, the composite was removed and replaced with minimally invasive ceramic laminates. An established and predictable protocol was performed using resin cement. Minimally invasive ceramic restorations are increasingly being used to replace composite restorations. This treatment improves the occlusal and periodontal aspects during the planning and restorative phases, such as anterior guides, and laterality can be restored easily with ceramic laminates. In addition, the surface smoothness and contour of ceramic restorations do not affect the health of the surrounding periodontal tissues. Here we present the outcome after 18 months of clinical follow-up in a patient in whom composite resin restorations in the anterior teeth were replaced with minimally invasive ceramic laminates.

  16. Streptococcus mutans-induced secondary caries adjacent to glass ionomer cement, composite resin and amalgam restorations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama-Teixeira, Adriana; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzeti; Elian, Silvia Nagib; Sobral, Maria Angela Pita; Luz, Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define, in vitro, the potential to inhibit secondary caries of restorative materials currently used in dental practice. Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of fifty extracted human third molars. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups, each one restored with one of the following materials: glass ionomer cement (GIC); amalgam; light-cured composite resin; ion-releasing composite; and light-cured, fluoride-containing composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled, sterilized with gamma irradiation, exposed to a cariogenic challenge using a bacterial system using Streptococcus mutans, and then prepared for microscopic observation. The following parameters were measured in each lesion formed: extension, depth, and caries inhibition area. The outer lesions developed showed an intact surface layer and had a rectangular shape. Wall lesions were not observed inside the cavities. After Analysis of Variance and Component of Variance Models Analysis, it was observed that the GIC group had the smallest lesions and the greatest number of caries inhibition areas. The lesions developed around Amalgam and Ariston pHc restorations had an intermediate size and the largest lesions were observed around Z-100 and Heliomolar restorations. It may be concluded that the restorative materials GIC, amalgam and ion-releasing composites may reduce secondary caries formation.

  17. Management of periodontal destruction caused by overhanging dental restoration

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    Misnova Misnova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal tissue inflammations are occasionally caused by positions of restoration margins, particularly if they are placed subgingivally. A 44-year old male was referred to the Dental and Mouth Hospital of Dentistry Faculty Hasanuddin University with the chief complaint of severe pain at right posterior maxillary. Clinical examinations demonstrate a 7-mm periodontal pocket at buccal aspect of 16 teeth with tooth mobility °2. Overhanging dental composite restorations of Class V were detected at the subgingival areas of 15, 16, and 17. Radiographic results show vertically and horizontally alveolar bone loss. This case report is aimed to describe the management of periodontal tissue destruction as a result of overhanging dental composite restorations. Scaling and root planing were conducted as the initial therapy. The periodontal surgery was performed a week after the initial therapy. A full-thickness flap design with sulcular incision from 14 to 18 was made before the pocket curretage and necrotic tissue debridement along with restoration recontouring. The flap was sutured with simple suture technique. Periodontal dressing was packed for a week. Antibiotics, analgetics and antiinflammatory drugs were prescribed per orally. There was no history of pain a week after the surgical procedure. Tooth mobility was decreased to °1 and the periodontal pocket was reduced to 3 mm. Overhanging dental restorations may lead to periodontal tissue destruction. The subgingivally placement of those restorations should consider the health of periodontal tissues.

  18. A retrospective clinical evaluation of success rate in endodontic-treated premolars restored with composite resin and fiber reinforced composite posts

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    Marjaneh Ghavamnasiri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the survival rate and causes of failure of quartz fiber posts used to restore endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods : Thirty-eight patients with endodontically treated premolar and anterior teeth that were then restored with a coronoradicular quartz fiber post and extensive composite resin restorations were selected for participation in the study. The age of the restorations ranged from 1 to 6 years. Survival probabilities of the restorations as well as causes of failures were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier analysis and the Logistic regression (α = 0.05. Results : The overall cumulative survival rate (48.8% was determined, while the survival probabilities after 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 years of service were 88.37%, 60.95%, 45.71%, 32.65%, and 0%, respectively. Conclusions : The survival probability of endodontically treated teeth restored with a quartz fiber post and composite restorations is associated with the dental arch.

  19. Development of caries adjacent to composite restorations after exposure to dentifrices with different fluoride concentrations

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    Dayse Andrade Romão

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the development of recurrent caries after exposure to fluoride dentifrices with different concentrations. Material and method: 48 samples of bovine incisors (4x4mm2 were exposed to pH cycling for 7 days before the preparation of the cavities (2mm deep. The samples were restored with a microhybrid resin composite. Then, the samples were exposed to thermal cycling (350 cycles and they were randomly allocated into 4 treatment groups (n = 12: Group A - non-fluoridated dentifrice (negative control; Group B - 500 ppm dentifrice; Group C - 750 ppm dentifrice; group D - 1100 ppm dentifrice (positive control. The samples were treated with solutions of each dentifrice (9.6 ml water/1.6 g dentifrice for 60 seconds and then were immersed in demineralizing (3 h and remineralizing (2 h solutions 3 times a day. Next, the samples were immersed in a remineralizing solution for 18 hours. Then, the blocks were sectioned for examination of the length of the outer caries lesion, using polarized light microscopy. The ANOVA parametric test complemented by the Tukey test with a confidence level of 95%, were used in the statistical analysis. Result: A smaller lesion length was observed in the group treated with the fluoride concentration of 1100 ppm F, but there were no differences between toothpastes with fluoride concentrations of 500 and 750 ppm F. Conclusion: The use of fluoride dentifrices (1100 ppm reduces the development of caries adjacent to dental restorations.

  20. The role of the ionomer glass component in polyacid-modified composite resin dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adusei, Gabriel O; Deb, Sanjukta; Nicholson, John W

    2004-07-01

    In order to model the processes that occur within polyacid-modified composite resin ("compomer") dental restoratives, a series of experiments has been carried out with silanated and silane-free ionomer glass G338, and silanated and silane-free unreactive glass (Raysorb T-4000). In an acid-base reaction with dental grade aqueous maleic acid-acrylic acid copolymer solution, the setting time of the silanted G338 was found to be 9 min, compared with 5 min for the silane-free glass. Inclusion of each glass in an experimental composite resin system showed that the formulations which contained G338 absorbed more water than the formulations which contained Raysorb T-4000, regardless of whether or not the glass was silanted. Biaxial flexure strength was superior for experimental composites containing Raysorb T-4000, with highest results being obtained with the silanated glass. Overall these results demonstrate that silanation of the filler is essential for optimal physical properties but that, for the ionomer glass, it inhibits the acid-base reaction. The presence of ionomer glass led to an increase in water uptake compared with the unreactive glass, regardless of the presence of silane.

  1. A new methodology for fluorescence analysis of composite resins used in anterior direct restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Liliane Motta; Abreu, Jessica Dantas; Cohen-Carneiro, Flavia; Regalado, Diego Ferreira; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use a new methodology to evaluate the fluorescence of composite resins for direct restorations. Microhybrid (group 1, Amelogen; group 2, Opallis; group 3, Filtek Z250) and nanohybrid (group 4, Filtek Z350 XT; group 5, Brilliant NG; group 6, Evolu-X) composite resins were analyzed in this study. A prefabricated matrix was used to prepare 60 specimens of 7.0 × 3.0 mm (n = 10 per group); the composite resin discs were prepared in 2 increments (1.5 mm each) and photocured for 20 seconds. To establish a control group of natural teeth, 10 maxillary central incisor crowns were horizontally sectioned to create 10 discs of dentin and enamel tissues with the same dimensions as the composite resin specimens. The specimens were placed in a box with ultraviolet light, and photographs were taken. Aperture 3.0 software was used to quantify the central portion of the image of each specimen in shades of red (R), green (G), and blue (B) of the RGB color space. The brighter the B shade in the evaluated area of the image, the greater the fluorescence shown by the specimen. One-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences between the groups. The fluorescence achieved in group 1 was statistically similar to that of the control group and significantly different from those of the other groups (Bonferroni test). Groups 3 and 4 had the lowest fluorescence values, which were significantly different from those of the other groups. According to the results of this study, neither the size nor the amount of inorganic particles in the evaluated composite resin materials predicts if the material will exhibit good fluorescence.

  2. N-stearoylethanolamine restores pancreas lipid composition in obesity-induced insulin resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onopchenko, Oleksandra V; Kosiakova, Galina V; Oz, Murat; Klimashevsky, Vitaliy M; Gula, Nadiya M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the protective effect of N-stearoylethanolamine (NSE), a bioactive N-acylethanolamine , on the lipid profile distribution in the pancreas of obesity-induced insulin resistant (IR) rats fed with prolonged high fat diet (58% of fat for 6 months). The phospholipid composition was determined using 2D thin-layer chromatography. The level of individual phospholipids was estimated by measuring inorganic phosphorus content. The fatty acid (FA) composition and cholesterol level were investigated by gas-liquid chromatography. Compared to controls, plasma levels of triglycerides and insulin were significantly increased in IR rats. The pancreas lipid composition indicated a significant reduction of the free cholesterol level and some phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho), phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn), phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) compared to controls. Moreover, the FA composition of pancreas showed a significant redistribution of the main FA (18:1n-9, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-6 and 20:4n-6) levels between phospholipid, free FA, triglyceride fractions under IR conditions that was accompanied by a change in the estimated activities of Δ9-, Δ6-, Δ5-desaturase. Administration of N-stearoylethanolamine (NSE, 50 mg/kg daily per os for 2 weeks) IR rats triggered an increase in the content of free cholesterol, PtdCho and normalization of PtdEtn, PtdSer level. Furthermore, the NSE modulated the activity of desaturases, thus influenced FA composition and restored the FA ratios in the lipid fractions. These NSE-induced changes were associated with a normalization of plasma triglyceride content, considerable decrease of insulin and index HOMA-IR level in rats under IR conditions.

  3. Microleakage and Micrographic Evaluation of Composite Restorations With Various Bases Over ZOE Layer in Pulpotomized Primary Molars

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    M. Rezamand

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE under composite restorations should be covered with a suitable material in order to prevent the harmful effect of ZOE on the composite. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate microleakage of composite restorations in pulpotomized primary molars with different bases for covering the ZOE layer and to assess the distance between different layers.Materials and Methods: Proximo-occlusal cavities were prepared in 78 extracted second primary molars. Carious lesions were removed and pulpotomy was carried out. Zinc oxide eugenol paste was placed in 2-mm thickness. The teeth were randomly divided in 6 groups and restored as follows: 1. Light-cured composite; 2. Resin-modified glass-ionomer and composite resin; 3. Glass-ionomer and composite resin; 4. Light-cured calcium hydroxide and composite resin; 5.Calcium hydroxide and composite resin; 6. Amalgam and composite resin. The restored specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles (5°C/55°C and microleakage was assessed by dye penetration technique. Three specimens from each group were processed for scanning electron microscope evaluation to determine the distance between the layers. The results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests.Results: Microleakage assessment revealed significant differences between the groups (P=0.04, with the amalgam group exhibiting the lowest microleakage values. In SEM micrographs no significant differences were observed in the distance between ZOE base layers (P=0.94 and base-composite layers (P=0.47; however, the amalgam group had the lowest distances.Conclusion: The use of amalgam over zinc oxide eugenol layer in pulpotomized primary molars decreases microleakage.

  4. Have wet meadow restoration projects in the Southwestern U.S. been effective in restoring geomorphology, hydrology, soils, and plant species composition?

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    Ramstead Karissa M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wet meadows occur in numerous locations throughout the American Southwest, but in many cases have become heavily degraded. Among other things they have frequently been overgrazed and have had roads built through them, which have affected the hydrology of these wetland ecosystems. Because of the important hydrologic and ecological functions they are believed to perform, there is currently significant interest in wet meadow restoration. Several restoration projects have been completed recently or are underway in the region, sometimes at considerable expense and with minimal monitoring. The objective of this review was to evaluate the effects of wet meadow restoration projects in the southwestern United States on geomorphology, hydrology, soils and plant species composition. A secondary objective was to determine the effects of wet meadow restoration projects on wildlife. Methods Electronic databases, internet search engines, websites and personal contacts were used to find articles of relevance to this review. Articles were filtered by title, abstract and full text. Summary information for each of the articles remaining after the filtering process was compiled and used to assess the quality of the evidence presented using two different approaches. Results Our searches yielded 48 articles, of which 25 were published in peer-reviewed journals, 14 were monitoring or project reports, and 9 were published in conference proceedings or are unpublished theses or manuscripts. A total of 26 operational-scale restoration projects were identified. A wide range of restoration techniques were employed, ranging from small-scale manipulations of stream channels (e.g., riffle structures to large scale pond-and-plug projects. Other common restoration techniques included fencing to exclude livestock (and sometimes also native ungulates, other forms of grazing management, seeding, and transplanting seedlings. Most of the articles reported that

  5. Two years survival rate of class II composite resin restorations prepared by ART with and without a chemomechanical caries removal gel in primary molars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topaloglu-Ak, A.; Eden, E.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Oncag, O.

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to test the null hypotheses that there is no difference: (1) in carious lesion development at the restoration margin between class II composite resin restorations in primary molars produced through the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) with and without a chemomechanical caries remov

  6. Evaluation of Gingival Microleakage in Class II Composite Restorations with Different Lining Techniques: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedavathi Bore Gowda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the microleakage in class II composite restorations without a liner/with resin modified glass ionomer and flowable composite liner. Method. Forty standardized MO cavities were prepared on human permanent mandibular molars extracted for periodontal reasons and then divided into 4 groups of ten specimens. The cavity preparations were etched, rinsed, blot dried, and light cured and Adper Single Bond 2 is applied. Group 1 is restored with Filtek P60 packable composite in 2 mm oblique increments. Group 2 is precure group where 1 mm Filtek Z350 flowable liner is applied and light cured for 20 sec. Group 3 is the same as Group 2, but the liner was cocured with packable composite. In Group 4, 1 mm RMGIC, Fuji Lining LC is applied and cured for 20 sec. All the teeth were restored as in Group 1. The specimens were coated with nail varnish leaving 1 mm around the restoration, subjected to thermocycling, basic fuchsin dye penetration, sectioned mesiodistally, and observed under a stereomicroscope. Results. The mean leakage scores of the individual study groups were Group 1 (33.40, Group 2 (7.85, Group 3 (16.40, and Group 4 (24.35. Group 1 without a liner showed maximum leakage. Flowable composite liner precured was the best.

  7. Influence of microleakage, surface roughness and biofilm control on secondary caries formation around composite resin restorations: an in situ evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Garcia Lima

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate in situ the influence of microleakage, surface roughness and biofilm control on caries formation around composite resin restorations. During 28 days, 12 volunteers wore palatal devices containing bovine enamel slabs restored with composite resin. Restorations were made without leakage, when the adhesive system was applied, or with leakage, when adhesive system was omitted. Half of the restorations in each group were finished and the remaining were finished and polished. In one side of the palatal device, biofilm was left to accumulate over the restored slabs, and in the other side dental slabs were brushed, to allow biofilm removal. There was an extraoral application of 20% sucrose solution (8x/day over the enamel slabs. The formation of caries lesions (white spots was evaluated by visual inspection under stereomicroscopy. Additionally, the dental slabs were sectioned and observed under polarized light microscopy. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman's correlation test at 5% significance level. Polishing and bonding were not significant factors regarding white spot formation (p>0.05. Biofilm control (brushing was associated with reduction of caries formation close to the restorations (p<0.01. Polarized light microscopy confirmed the visual inspection findings. These results suggest that while microleakage and surface roughness did not influence caries lesion formation, biofilm control may prevent the enamel demineralization.

  8. Class I and Class II restorations of resin composite: an FE analysis of the influence of modulus of elasticity on stresses generated by occlusal loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2008-01-01

    was that the marginal stresses would decrease with increasing modulus of elasticity of the restoration. METHODS: A cylindrical tooth was modelled in enamel and dentin and fitted with a Class I or a Class II restoration of resin composite. In one scenario the restoration was bonded to the tooth, in another......OBJECTIVES: It was the aim of the study to analyze by the FE method stresses generated in tooth and restoration by occlusal loading of Class I and Class II restorations of resin composite. On the basis of available information on the influence of the modulus of elasticity, the research hypothesis...

  9. A new system for posterior restorations: a combination of ceramic optimized polymer and fiber-reinforced composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, L; Trinkner, T; Pescatore, C

    1997-01-01

    Due to the need for increased strength characteristics and enhanced aesthetic expectations of the patients, metal-free, aesthetic restorative systems for the anterior and posterior dentition are currently available. A new "space-age" restorative material has been developed that is a combination of a ceramic optimized polymer (Ceromer) (Targis/Vectris, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) and a fiber-reinforced composite framework material. The purpose of this article is to discuss the qualities that render this material particularly suitable for a variety of indications, including laboratory-fabricated restorations for the stress-bearing posterior regions. The material lends itself to diversification. Its indication for inlays, onlays, full-coverage crown restorations, and conservative single pontic inlay bridges is presented.

  10. 40 CFR 144.80 - What is a Class V injection well?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... injection. (2) For enhanced recovery of oil or natural gas; and (3) For storage of hydrocarbons which are... are brought to the surface in connection with natural gas storage operations, or conventional oil or..., Class V wells are shallow wells used to place a variety of fluids directly below the land...

  11. Fracture resistance of composite resin restorations and porcelain veneers in relation to residual tooth structure in fractured incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalocco, Guido; Lee, Heeje; Ercoli, Carlo; Feng, Changyong; Malmstrom, Hans

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether there is a direct correlation between the amount of residual tooth structure in a fractured maxillary incisor and the fracture resistance of composite resin restorations or porcelain veneers after cyclic loading. Sixty human-extracted maxillary central and lateral incisors were mounted in an acrylic block with the coronal aspect of the tooth protruding from the block surface. The teeth were assigned to two groups: 2-mm incisal fracture and 4-mm incisal fracture. Then, the teeth were further divided into two different restoration subgroups, porcelain laminate veneer and composite resin restoration, therefore obtaining four groups for the study (n=15). The specimens were subjected to 1000 cycles of thermocycling and were mechanically tested with a custom-designed cyclic loading apparatus for 2×106 cycles or until they failed. The specimens that survived the cyclic loading were loaded on the incisal edge along the long axis of the tooth with a flat stainless steel applicator until they fractured using a universal testing machine to measure the failure load. Two-way anova was used to assess the significance of restoration, amount of fracture, and interaction effect (α=0.05). During the cyclic loading, for the composite resin group, two specimens with 2-mm fracture and three specimens with 4-mm fracture failed. For the porcelain veneer group, two specimens with 2-mm fracture and one specimen with 4-mm fracture failed. The 2-way anova did not show statistical significance for restoration (P=0.584), amount of fracture (P=0.357), or interaction effect (P=0.212). A composite resin restoration and a porcelain veneer could perform similarly for replacing a fractured incisor edge up to 4mm. Other factors such as esthetic and/or cost would be considerations to indicate one treatment over the other.

  12. Phytoplankton Composition and Abundance in Restored Maltanski Reservoir under the Influence of Physico-Chemical Variables and Zooplankton Grazing Pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kozak

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the effects of environmental factors and zooplankton food pressure on phytoplankton in the restored man-made Maltański Reservoir (MR. Two methods of restoration: biomanipulation and phosphorus inactivation have been applied in the reservoir. Nine taxonomical groups of phytoplankton represented in total by 183 taxa were stated there. The richest groups in respect of taxa number were green algae, cyanobacteria and diatoms. The diatoms, cryptophytes, chrysophytes, cyanobacteria, green algae and euglenophytes dominated in terms of abundance and/or biomass. There were significant changes among environmental parameters resulting from restoration measures which influenced the phytoplankton populations in the reservoir. These measures led to a decrease of phosphorus concentration due to its chemical inactivation and enhanced zooplankton grazing as a result of planktivorous fish stocking. The aim of the study is to analyse the reaction of phytoplankton to the restoration measures and, most importantly, to determine the extent to which the qualitative and quantitative composition of phytoplankton depends on variables changing under the influence of restoration in comparison with other environmental variables. We stated that application of restoration methods did cause significant changes in phytoplankton community structure. The abundance of most phytoplankton taxa was negatively correlated with large zooplankton filter feeders, and positively with zooplankton predators and concentrations of ammonium nitrogen and partly of phosphates. However, restoration was insufficient in the case of decreasing phytoplankton abundance. The effects of restoration treatments were of less importance for the abundance of phytoplankton than parameters that were independent of the restoration. This was due to the continuous inflow of large loads of nutrients from the area of the river catchment.

  13. Survival of self-etch adhesive Class II composite restorations using ART and conventional cavity preparations in primary molars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eden, E.; Topaloglu-Ak, A.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the null-hypothesis that there was no difference in the survival percentages of Class II composite restorations in primary teeth produced through either ART or conventional approaches after 2 years. METHODS: 157 children with 325 Class II cavitated dentin lesions were included in a

  14. Clinical longevity of ceramic laminate veneers bonded to teeth with and without existing composite restorations up to 40 months

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Kalk, Warner; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the survival rate of ceramic laminate veneers bonded to teeth with and without existing composite restorations (ECR). Twenty patients (mean age: 49.7 years) received 92 feldspathic ceramic laminate veneers (Shofu Vintage AL) on the maxillary teeth (intact teeth: n = 26; teeth wi

  15. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joo Hoon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  16. Restoration of the immune functions in aged mice by supplementation with a new herbal composition, HemoHIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Ran; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Yee, Sung-Tae

    2008-01-01

    The effect of a new herbal composition, HemoHIM, on immune functions was examined in aged mice, in which various immune responses had been impaired. The composition HemoHIM was prepared by adding the ethanol-insoluble fraction to the total water extract of a mixture of three edible herbs, Angelica Radix, Cnidium Rhizoma and Paeonia Radix. Supplementation to the aged mice with HemoHIM restored the proliferative response and cytokine production of splenocytes with a response to ConA. Also, HemoHIM recovered the NK cell activity which had been impaired in the aged mice. Meanwhile aging is known to reduce the Th1-like function, but not the Th2-like function, resulting in a Th1/Th2 imbalance. HemoHIM restored the Th1/Th2 balance in the aged mice through enhanced IFN-gamma and IgG2a production, and conversely a reduced IL-4 and IgG1 production. It was found that one factor for the Th1/Th2 imbalance in the aged mice was a lower production of IL-12p70. However, HemoHIM restored the IL-12p70 production in the aged mice. These results suggested that HemoHIM was effective for the restoration of impaired immune functions of the aged mice and therefore could be a good recommendation for immune restoration in elderly humans.

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Silorane and Nano-hybrid Resin Composite Restorations in Class II Cavities up to 3 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk-Bozkurt, F; Toz, T; Kara-Tuncer, A; Gözükara-Bağ, H; Özcan, M

    In this study, the clinical performance of a silorane-based resin composite (SC) vs a nano-hybrid resin composite (NHC) was evaluated in Class II cavities. From January 2012 to February 2013, a total of 29 patients (eight men, 21 women; mean age, 24 ± 5 years) received 29 pairs of restorations using both SC (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE) and NHC (Filtek Z550, 3M ESPE) materials. Patients were followed until February 2015. One operator performed all restorations using the corresponding adhesive resins according to the manufacturers' instructions. Two calibrated independent examiners evaluated the restorations at one week, six months, and then annually using the modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria for anatomic form, marginal adaptation, color match, surface roughness, marginal discoloration, secondary caries, and postoperative sensitivity. Changes in the USPHS parameters were analyzed with the McNemar test (α=0.05). The mean observation period was 31.2 months. Marginal adaptation was the only parameter that showed a significant difference and was worse for SC than NHC (p=0.012). At the final recall, 17 restorations from the SC group and five from the NHC group received a score of 1 (explorer catches). These scores were significantly different between baseline and final recall for SC (p0.05). Both NHC and SC performed similarly in Class II restorations up to three years except for marginal adaptation, for which the latter demonstrated significant deterioration at the final recall compared with baseline.

  18. In vitro evaluation of microleakage of class II packable composite resin restorations using flowable composite and resin modified glass ionomers as intermediate layers

    OpenAIRE

    Kishore Kumar Majety; Madhu Pujar

    2011-01-01

    Aim and Objectives : To evaluate the cervical marginal microleakage of class II packable composite resin restorations using flowable composite and resin modified glass ionomer as intermediate layers and whether the difference in the thickness of these intermediate layers would influence the microleakage. Materials and Methods : Standardized class II box only cavities (4 mm bucco lingual width 2 mm mesio distal depth with the gingival margin 1 mm above the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) wer...

  19. Use of temporary filling material for index fabrication in Class IV resin composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kun-Young; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Duck-Su; Choi, Kyoung-Kyu

    2013-05-01

    When a patient with a fractured anterior tooth visits the clinic, clinician has to restore the tooth esthetically and quickly. For esthetic resin restoration, clinician can use 'Natural Layering technique' and an index for palatal wall may be needed. In this case report, we introduce pre-restoration index technique on a Class IV defect, in which a temporary filling material is used for easy restoration. Chair-side index fabrication for Class IV restoration is convenient and makes a single-visit treatment possible.

  20. Influence of thermal stress on marginal integrity of restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Sérgio Cenci

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of thermal stress on the marginal integrity of restorative materials with different adhesive and thermal properties. Three hundred and sixty Class V cavities were prepared in buccal and lingual surfaces of 180 bovine incisors. Cervical and incisal walls were located in dentin and enamel, respectively. Specimens were restored with resin composite (RC; glass ionomer (GI or amalgam (AM, and randomly assigned to 18 groups (n=20 according to the material, number of cycles (500 or 1,000 cycles and dwell time (30 s or 60 s. Dry and wet specimens served as controls Specimens were immersed in 1% basic fuchsine solution (24 h, sectioned, and microleakage was evaluated under x40 magnification. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests: Thermal cycling regimens increased leakage in all AM restorations (p<0.05 and its effect on RC and GI restorations was only significant when a 60-s dwell time was used (p<0.05. Marginal integrity was more affected in AM restorations under thermal cycling stress, whereas RC and GI ionomer restoration margins were only significantly affected only under longer dwell times.

  1. The influence of the cavity preparation design on marginal accuracy of laboratory-processed resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Fernandes-Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Soares, Carlos José

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different cavity preparation designs on marginal accuracy of laboratory-processed resin composite restored teeth. Eighty mandibular human third molars were selected. There were two experimental factors, occlusal isthmus width (narrow vs wide) and cuspal coverage (inlay, one-cusp onlay, two-cusp onlay, and all-cusp onlay), resulting on eight groups (N = 10). Indirect composite restorations (SR Adoro, Ivoclar-Vivadent) were manufactured and positioned over each respective preparation. Marginal accuracy evaluation was accomplished using a stereomicroscope at three points on buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal regions with 40x magnification. The results showed significant differences (P = 0.00) with wide inlay showing the best overall marginal accuracy and narrow inlay the worst one. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences when considering the factor occlusal isthmus width (P = 0.00). In general, preparations with wide occlusal isthmus presented better results than narrow ones, except for wide all-cusp onlays; however, the test failed to show differences when considering the cuspal coverage (P = 0.42) or the interaction between both factors (P = 0.30). The effect of occlusal width extension on marginal accuracy of indirect composite resin restorations is significant, with lower values of gaps width in wide preparations, but since in a clinical situation this would mean greater removal of sound tooth structure, less-aggressive preparations combined with other restorative procedures seem to be more feasible.

  2. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on the surface of composite restoratives during in-office tooth bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Strakas, Dimitrios; Tsitrou, Effrosyni; Tolidis, Kosmas; Koumpia, Effimia

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on the surface roughness and microhardness of various composite restoratives during in-office tooth bleaching. Five highly viscous composite restoratives and three flowable composite restoratives were investigated. Thirty cylindrical specimens of each material were made using Teflon molds. The specimens of each composite were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10). Group 1 specimens did not receive bleaching treatment, group 2 received a conventional in-office bleaching treatment, and group 3 received a laser-assisted in-office bleaching treatment using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Two-way ANOVA was used to determine significant interactions between materials and bleaching methods. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test were used to compare the mean surface microhardness and roughness between materials for each treatment group (a = 0.05). Τhere were no significant differences in surface microhardness between the two bleached experimental groups for all the tested composites (p > 0.05). The reduction of surface microhardness after bleaching procedures ranged from 0.72 to 16.93 % for the specimens received conventional treatment and from 1.30 to 11.51 % for those received laser-assisted treatment. Moreover, there were no significant differences in Ra values between the experimental groups (p > 0.05) in all cases. The increase of surface roughness after the bleaching treatments was negligible and was between 0.43 and 4.78 %. The use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser during in-office tooth bleaching treatment did not affect the surface microhardness and roughness of the tested composite restorative materials.

  3. The influence of lining techniques on the marginal seal of Class II composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blixt, M; Coli, P

    1993-03-01

    Various sealing techniques using a light-curing dental adhesive (Scotchbond 2) and bulk application of a light-curing resin-bonded ceramic were examined in 203 Class II cavities. Different pretreatment procedures and lining materials were used, and in one series resin impregnation of the contraction gap was included. The presence of gaps or leakage was disclosed either by a dye or a fluorescent resin penetration technique. In many restorations, Scotchbond 2 and a light-curing glass-ionomer lining did not prevent gap formation at the cervical wall. The gap usually occurred between the liner and the dentin, with dye penetration into the dentin. Three liners, one containing polytrifluorethylene sodium fluoride and calcium fluoride, one containing polyamide resin, and one containing calcium hydroxide, did not prevent dye penetration to the dentin at all; good dentinal protection was frequently observed, however, in cavities treated with a hydrophilic shellac film prior to placement of a polystyrene liner. The best results were observed when dentinal treatment with this lining system was followed by resin impregnation of the contraction gap after the composite resin had set.

  4. Microbiological characterization and effect of resin composites in cervical lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Bonfanti; Piccinelli, Giorgio; Faus-Matoses, Vicente; Cerutti, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Non carious cervical lesions associated to muscle hyperfunctions are increasing. Microhybrid resin composites are used to restore cervical abfractions. The purpose of this study was to investigate if resin composites modify tooth plaque, inducing an increment of cariogenic microflora and evaluate their effect, in vivo and in vitro, against S. mutans. Material and Methods Eight abfractions were restored with two microhybrid resin composites (Venus, Heraeus-Kulzer® and Esthet-X, Dentsply®), after gnatological therapy, in three patients with muscle hyperfunctions. For each abfraction three samples of plaque were taken from the cervical perimeter: before the restoration, one week and three months after restoration. The samples were evaluated both by traditional microbiological methods and by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). In vitro, disk-shaped specimens of the two composites were prepared to estimate the effects against pre-cultured S. mutans, after incubation at 37°C for 24h and assessed by a turbidimetric technique. Results In vivo no differences were found in plaque growth, for all samples, before and after restoration with both composites; in vitro, instead, a significant reduction of S. mutans growth was found between specimens of two composites (Mann-Whitney U-test p>0,06). Conclusions In this study a relevant consideration was elicited: composite materials, in vivo, do not modify plaque composition of non carious cervical lesions to a potential cariogenic plaque. Key words:Abfraction, restoration, S. mutans, composite, class V. PMID:28149461

  5. Microleakage of composite resin restoration in cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser irradiation in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y; Hossain, M; Nakamura, Y; Murakami, Y; Matsumoto, K

    2002-03-01

    AIM: The purposes of this study were to investigate the surface morphology of cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser irradiation and to compare the microleakage degree after composite resin restoration with etched bur cavities in primary teeth, in vitro. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On the buccal (facial) and lingual (palatal) surfaces of 25 primary teeth, a round cavity was prepared with the Er:YAG laser system and with a high-speed diamond bur, respectively. Five cavities from each group were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The remaining cavities were filled with a composite resin and subjected to a microleakage test (0.6% rodamine B solution) under thermocycling. Only bur cavities were acid-etched before filling. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney's U test; a value of p adhesion between the restorative material and dental hard tissues; there was also no gap at the interface. DISCUSSION: The highly irregular surface or the removal of the debris-like smear layer after laser irradiation may facilitate good adhesion of composite resin with enamel or dentine, and these surfaces might play a major role in decreasing microleakage of laser cavities. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser are capable of decreasing microleakage of composite resin restorations in primary teeth, and the efficiency is similar to etched bur cavities.

  6. Comparison of the Effect of Two Incremental Composite Placement and Two Light Curing Methods on Microleakage of Composite Class I Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yarmohammadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Light curing and composite placement is effective on microleakage prevention. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of two incremental com-posite placement and two light curing methods on microleakage of composite class one resto-rations. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study 60 maxillary premolars after class one prepa-ration were assigned to 4 different groups according to light curing method (soft or full power and two incremental methods (horizontal or oblique 1. Horizontal incremental placement with full power cure 2. Horizontal incremental placement with soft star cure 3. Oblique incremental placement with full power cure and 4. Oblique incremental placement with soft start cure. After etching and bonding, teeth were restored with Tetric Ceram HB composite. Samples were thermocycled and immersed in 0.2% fuchsin solution for 48 hours. Samples were sectioned buccolingually and evaluated under stereomicroscope (40×. Micro-leakage was scored as follow; 0: No microleakage, 1: Microleakage till enamel edge, 2: Microleakage between dentin edge and floor of the cavity and 3:Microleakage extended to the floor of cavity or pulp. Data was analyzed by SPSS software version 16 using Kruscal Wallis and Mann Whitney U test at the significant level of 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference between four experimental groups, micro leakage (P=0.000. The mean micro leakage of group 1 was significantly different from groups 2, 3 and 4 (P0.05. Conclusion: Restorative material placement technique and curing mode was effective on the microleakage of class 1 composite restoration, however, curing mode was more effective on reduced composite microleakage compared to the placement technique. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (3: 177-184

  7. Evaluation of bond strength and thickness of adhesive layer according to the techniques of applying adhesives in composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Fernando Carlos Hueb; da Silva, Stella Borges; Valentino, Thiago Assunção; Oliveira, Maria Angélica Hueb de Menezes; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Conçalves, Luciano de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive restorations have increasingly been used in dentistry, and the adhesive system application technique may determine the success of the restorative procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the application technique of two adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Scotchbond MultiPurpose) on the bond strength and adhesive layer of composite resin restorations. Eight human third molars were selected and prepared with Class I occlusal cavities. The teeth were restored with composite using various application techniques for both adhesives, according to the following groups (n = 10): group 1 (control), systems were applied and adhesive was immediately light activated for 20 seconds without removing excesses; group 2, excess adhesive was removed with a gentle jet of air for 5 seconds; group 3, excess was removed with a dry microbrushtype device; and group 4, a gentle jet of air was applied after the microbrush and then light activation was performed. After this, the teeth were submitted to microtensile testing. For the two systems tested, no statistical differences were observed between groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 presented higher bond strength values compared with the other studied groups, allowing the conclusion that excess adhesive removal with a dry microbrush could improve bond strength in composite restorations. Predominance of adhesive fracture and thicker adhesive layer were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in groups 1 and 2. For groups 3 and 4, a mixed failure pattern and thinner adhesive layer were verified. Clinicians should be aware that excess adhesive may negatively affect bond strength, whereas a thin, uniform adhesive layer appears to be favorable.

  8. Two years survival rate of class II composite resin restorations prepared by ART with and without a chemomechanical caries removal gel in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaloglu-Ak, Asli; Eden, Ece; Frencken, Jo E; Oncag, Ozant

    2009-09-01

    The aim was to test the null hypotheses that there is no difference: (1) in carious lesion development at the restoration margin between class II composite resin restorations in primary molars produced through the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) with and without a chemomechanical caries removal gel and (2) in the survival rate of class II composite resin restorations between two treatment groups after 2 years. Three hundred twenty-seven children with 568 class II cavitated lesions were included in a parallel mouth study design. Four operators placed resin composite (Filtek Z 250) restorations bonded with a self-etch adhesive (Adper prompt L pop). Two independent examiners evaluated the restorations after 0.5, 1, and 2 years using the modified Ryge criteria. The Kaplan-Meier survival method was applied to estimate survival percentages. A high proportion of restorations were lost during the study period. Therefore, the first hypothesis could not be tested. No statistically significant difference was observed between the cumulative survival percentages of restorations produced by the two treatment approaches over the 2-year period (ART, 54.1 +/- 3.4%; ART with Carisolv, 46.0 +/- 3.4%). This hypothesis was accepted. ART with chemomechanical gel might not provide an added benefit increasing the survival percentages of ART class II composite resin restorations in primary teeth.

  9. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  10. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milly, Hussam [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Andiappan, Manoharan [Unit of Dental Public Health, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Banerjee, Avijit, E-mail: avijit.banerjee@kcl.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Unit of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  11. Atraumatic Restoration of Vertical Food Impaction with an Open Contact Using Flowable Composite Resin Aided by Cerclage Wire under Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan-Li; Ying Cao, Chris; Xu, Qiang-Jian; Xu, Xiao-Hua; Yin, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    To date, treating vertical food impaction with open contact effectively, especially with an atraumatic therapy, remains a challenge. In this study, we developed a simple, atraumatic, and economic therapeutic measure to treat vertical food impaction. The scientific rationale of our therapeutic technique is to restore an intact and firm proximal contact with proper location and form relationships to prevent forceful interproximal wedging of food, which in turn protects interdental papilla. We performed the procedure using flowable composite resin or composite resin cement with the aid of a cerclage wire under tension to rebuild the contact area. The reported method is especially useful for some challenging clinical cases, such as food impaction after crown and inlay on onlay restoration, and some conventional treatment methods, such as contouring the marginal ridge and developmental grooves, are ineffective.

  12. Atraumatic Restoration of Vertical Food Impaction with an Open Contact Using Flowable Composite Resin Aided by Cerclage Wire under Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Li Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, treating vertical food impaction with open contact effectively, especially with an atraumatic therapy, remains a challenge. In this study, we developed a simple, atraumatic, and economic therapeutic measure to treat vertical food impaction. The scientific rationale of our therapeutic technique is to restore an intact and firm proximal contact with proper location and form relationships to prevent forceful interproximal wedging of food, which in turn protects interdental papilla. We performed the procedure using flowable composite resin or composite resin cement with the aid of a cerclage wire under tension to rebuild the contact area. The reported method is especially useful for some challenging clinical cases, such as food impaction after crown and inlay on onlay restoration, and some conventional treatment methods, such as contouring the marginal ridge and developmental grooves, are ineffective.

  13. Atraumatic Restoration of Vertical Food Impaction with an Open Contact Using Flowable Composite Resin Aided by Cerclage Wire under Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Cao, Chris; Xu, Qiang-Jian; Xu, Xiao-Hua; Yin, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    To date, treating vertical food impaction with open contact effectively, especially with an atraumatic therapy, remains a challenge. In this study, we developed a simple, atraumatic, and economic therapeutic measure to treat vertical food impaction. The scientific rationale of our therapeutic technique is to restore an intact and firm proximal contact with proper location and form relationships to prevent forceful interproximal wedging of food, which in turn protects interdental papilla. We performed the procedure using flowable composite resin or composite resin cement with the aid of a cerclage wire under tension to rebuild the contact area. The reported method is especially useful for some challenging clinical cases, such as food impaction after crown and inlay on onlay restoration, and some conventional treatment methods, such as contouring the marginal ridge and developmental grooves, are ineffective. PMID:27579217

  14. A cost-effective treatment for severe generalized erosion and loss of vertical dimension of occlusion: laboratory-fabricated composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Michael J; Stapleton, Brandon M; Harris, Bryan T; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes preventive and restorative treatment planning for a 56-year-old female patient with severe, chronic, poorly controlled gastroesophageal reflux disease and resulting loss of vertical dimension of occlusion. First, the demineralization process was controlled through collaboration with the patient's physician, and measures were taken to restore adequate stimulated salivary flow. Then, for financial reasons, indirect laboratory-fabricated composite resin restorations were adhesively bonded to replace lost tooth structure and reestablish the patient's collapsed vertical dimension. Indirect-laboratory fabricated restorations can be a cost-effective alternative to direct composite resin or all-ceramic restorations for the treatment of chronic severe erosion, but there are no long-term clinical reports in the current literature to support or contraindicate the use of indirect composites for this type of clinical application. Therefore, careful, long-term follow-up evaluations are planned for this patient.

  15. Synthesis and functionalization of a triaryldiamine-base photoconductive/photorefractive composite, and its application to aberrated image restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yichen

    Organic phoorefractive (PR) composites have recently emerged as an important class of materials for applications including high-density data storage, optical communication, and biomedical imaging. In an effort to further improve their performance, this study focused on the utilization of functionalized semiconductor nanocrystals to photosensitize triaryamine (TPD)-based PR composites, as well as the application of TPD-based PR composites in the restoration of aberrated optical information. A novel approach to functionalize CdSe quantum dot (QCdSe) was firstly introduced where the sulfonated triarydiamine (STPD) was used as charge-transporting ligand to passivate QCdSe. TPD-based photoconductive and PR composites were photosensitized with the STPD-passivated QCdSe (SQCdSe). Due to the charge-transporting capability of STPD, the composites photosensitized with STPD-capped QCdSe exhibited superior performance relative to composites employing more traditional photosensitizers (such as fullerene C60 and trioctylphosphine-capped QCdSe), with figures-of-merit including photoconductivities in excess of 60 pS/cm, two-beam coupling gain coefficients in excess of 110 cm-1, and PR response time of less than 30 ms. In addition, the ability of TPD-based PR composites to correct aberrations associated with a laser beam was described. Here, a severely aberrated laser beam was able to be restored to a nearly unaberrated condition through the PR process, and the potential of this technique for practical applications was well explained. Based on the current experimental geometry, a PR response time of 0.5 s was observed, which is the fastest PR response time reported for a PR composite operating under experimental conditions designed for the correction of optical aberrations.

  16. Diet Composition of Mummichogs, Fundulus heteroclitus, from Restoring and Unrestricted Regions of a New England (U.S.A.) Salt Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    James-Pirri, M. J.; Raposa, K. B.; Catena, J. G.

    2001-08-01

    Diet composition of mummichogs, Fundulus heteroclitus, from three marsh habitats (creeks, pools, and marsh surface) within tidally restored and an adjacent unrestricted (reference) region of Sachuest Point salt marsh (Middletown, RI, U.S.A.) was examined. Major diet components were detritus, copepods, diatoms, insects (larvae and adults), ostracods, and chironomids. Total length, wet weight, and gut fullness of mummichogs were equivalent within habitats between the restoring and unrestricted marshes. Diet composition and percent abundance of diet items were also similar within habitats between the unrestricted and restoring marshes. However, differences in diet patterns were observed among habitats (creeks, pools, and marsh surface) within each marsh. Fish collected from creeks had fuller guts than those sampled from the marsh surface for both the restoring and unrestricted marsh. Diet composition also differed among marsh habitats, but only within the restoring marsh. In the restoring marsh, fish sampled from the creeks consumed primarily detritus, diatoms, and ostracods, whereas fish from the pools consumed mainly detritus, copepods, chironomids, and insects. Differences in diet composition among habitats were most likely a reflection of prey availability. This study provides evidence that tidally restored marshes can provide similar food resources as unrestricted marshes, in terms of consumption patterns of dominant marsh consumers, within the first year after restoration, before major shifts in dominant vegetation (i.e. from Phragmites australis to Spartina spp.) occur.

  17. Influence of flowable materials on microleakage of nanofilled and hybrid Class II composite restorations with LED and QTH LCUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi Mostafa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Class II composite restorations are more frequently being placed with margins apical to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ and margins within the dentin are prone to microleakage. Aims: This in vitro study was used to evaluate the influence of flowable composite and flowable compomer as gingival liner on microleakage in Class II composite restorations and compare a light-emitting diode (LED unit with a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH unit for light-activating composite resins. Materials and Methods: Mesioocclusal and distoocclusal Class II cavity preparations were made in 72 sound extracted premolars. The buccolingual width was 2.5 mm and the gingival margins of all the cavities were placed 1.0 mm apical to the CEJ. The boxes were prepared 1.5 mm deep axially, making 144 slot cavities. Teeth were randomly divided into the following two groups (n = 72: (I Universal Filtek Supreme XT; Universal Filtek Supreme XT + Flwable Filtek XT and Universal Filtek Supreme XT + Dyract Flow and (II Filtek Z250; Filtek Z250 + Flwable Filtek XT and Filtek Z250 + Dyract Flow. Flowable materials were injected into the gingival floor of the cavity to a thickness of 1.0 mm. Each increment was cured for 20 s. One-half of the subgroups in each group were cured with QTH and the other half with LED light curing units (LCUs. After 1 week of incubation at 37°C, the specimens were thermocycled (5-55°C, x1500, immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye for 24 h and sectioned and microleakage was evaluated at the gingival margin by two examiners using a 0-3 score scale. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The groups utilizing flowable liners had significantly less microleakage (P < 0.05. No significant difference was identified between Universal Filtek Supreme XT and Filtek Z250 composites with and without flowable materials. There was no significant between utilizing flowable composite or flowable compomer and between each

  18. A class V chitinase from Arabidopsis thaliana: gene responses, enzymatic properties, and crystallographic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohnuma, Takayuki; Numata, Tomoyuki; Osawa, Takuo;

    2011-01-01

    Expression of a class V chitinase gene (At4g19810, AtChiC) in Arabidopsis thaliana was examined by quantitative real-time PCR and by analyzing microarray data available at Genevestigator. The gene expression was induced by the plant stress-related hormones abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA......) and by the stress resulting from the elicitor flagellin, NaCl, and osmosis. The recombinant AtChiC protein was produced in E. coli, purified, and characterized with respect to the structure and function. The recombinant AtChiC hydrolyzed N-acetylglucosamine oligomers producing dimers from the non-reducing end...

  19. Mirror Lake Fish catch composition - Lower Columbia River Restoration Action Effectiveness Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 1) The purpose of this project is to measure changes in juvenile salmon habitat occurrence and health following restoration activities at the Mirror Lake Complex and...

  20. Repair of amalgam restorations with composite resin and bonded amalgam: A microleakage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Araújo Veloso Popoff

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of adhesive systems significantly affected the ability to seal the repair/ tooth interface. However, at the level of the repair/restoration interface, the bonded amalgam technique may increase microleakage.

  1. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF DIRECT & INDIRECT COMPOSITE RESTORATIONS ON RESISTANCE TO MAXILLARY PREMOLLAR TEATH FRACTURE TREATED BY ROOT CANAL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M MOUSAVINASAB

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Finding a universally approved system to restore pulpess teeth has been a goal of many of dental researches. The restorative system should have enough ability to withstand masticator forces, while preserving as much tooth structure as possible. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of light and heat curing composite with light curing composite restoration method on fracture resistance of restored teeth. Forty healthy maxillary premolar teeth were chosen, in thirty of samples endodontic treatment performed and MOD cavities were prepared as to weaken tooth structures, the specimens were divided to 4 groups containing 10 specimens as follows. Group 1: Unprepared Group2: Restored with direct light curing composite resin. Group3: Restored with light and heat curing composite resin as inlay without cementing surface treatment. Group4: Restored with light and heat curing composite resin as inlay with cementing surface treatment. All samples were subjected to compressive load by testing machine. The mean fracture load in KGF for groups 1,2,3 and 4 were 98.96, 58.72,54.04,78.36 KGF respectively. From this study it may be concluded that the use of light and heat curing methods and cementing surface treating compared with light curing and light and heat curing method without cementing surface treating will more increase fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary premolars.

  2. Effect of lining with a flowable composite on internal adaptation of direct composite restorations using all-in-one adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahagi, Chika; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Sadr, Alireza; Ikeda, Masaomi; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of lining with a flowable composite on internal adaptation of composite restorations using three all-in-one adhesive systems; Bond Force (BF), G-Bond Plus (GP), and OptiBond All-in-one (OP), and a two-step self-etching adhesive system; Clearfil SE Bond (SE). They were applied to each cylindrical cavity prepared on the human dentin. The cavity surface was lined with/without a flowable resin composite prior to filling with a resin composite (FL/NL). After water storage for 24 h, the specimens were sectioned and polished, and internal adaptation of the restorations was assessed using a confocal laser scanning microscopy. For SE, a perfect cavity adaptation was recognized in both FL and NL. For BF, GP and OP, cavity adaptation was material dependent in NL, whereas no gap formation was observed in FL. However, voids formation was observed at the composite-adhesive-dentin interface in every all-in-one adhesive system.

  3. Non-thermal Atmospheric Plasma Treatment for Deactivation of Oral Bacteria and Improvement of Dental Composite Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing Song; Li, H.; Ritts, A. C.; Yang, B.; Chen, M.; Hong, L.; Xu, C.; Yao, X.; Wang, Y.

    This paper reviews our recent research results of using non-thermal ­atmospheric plasmas for oral bacterial deactivation and for composite restoration improvement. Oral bacteria of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) with an initial bacterial population density between 1.0 × 108 and 5.0 × 108 cfu/ml were seeded on various media and their survivability with plasma exposure was examined. The plasma exposure time for a 99.9999% cell reduction was less than 15 s for S. mutans and within 5 min for L. acidophilus. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. After dental composite application and light curing, the teeth were then sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for microtensile test. Student Newman Keuls (SNK) tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment of the dentin surfaces. These findings indicated that non-thermal atmospheric plasma technology is very promising for dental clinical applications.

  4. Evaluation of gingival microleakage of class II resin composite restorations with fiber inserts: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Basavanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims/Objectives: To evaluate the effect of glass and polyethylene fiber inserts and flowable composite as a liner on the microleakage of Class II composite restorations with gingival margins on root surfaces. Materials and Methods: Class II slots were prepared on both the proximal sides of thirty freshly extracted mandibular molars and were divided into six groups, according to the type of fiber insert and use of flowable composite (Filtek Z350 as a liner. Filtek P-60 (3M/ESPE posterior composite was used to restore all cavities. The specimens were thermocycled and stained with 2% Basic Fuchsin dye, and sectioned to evaluate the dye penetration under Stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskalwallis test and Mann whitney U test. Results and Conclusion: This study showed that, fiber insert groups, with or without flowable liner, had reduced microleakage scores as compared to the control groups. However, statistically no significant difference was found between the groups with fiber inserts. Less microleakage was seen in Group IV (With flowable liner and without Fiber inserts as compared to Group I (Without flowable liner and Fiber inserts.

  5. [Black or white--Which choice for the molars? Part 2. Which does one choose for the restoration of posterior teeth: amalgam or composite?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moor, Roeland; Delmé, Katleen

    2008-01-01

    The two direct dental restorative materials most commonly used today are silver-mercury amalgam and resin-based composite. The survival of dental amalgam restorations is twice as high than for composite fillings: polymerisation shrinkage, deficient marginal adaptation, higher wear rates, defective contact points leading to food impaction, insufficiently converted composite at the bottom of the cavity are problems that cannot be underestimated when using resin-composite. This does not imply that there is no weakness for amalgam: the need for retentive cavities at the cost of healthy tooth substance, weakening of the tooth's strength by cutting through the tooth crown's ridges, the risk of fracture of remaining tooth substance (mostly buccal and lingual surfaces) as the result of the cavity design, and the lack of adhesion between amalgam and tooth substance. Retaining a tooth's strength by the replacement of amalgam by resin-composites is not always the correct solution. In this respect, it can be questioned whether it is not appropriate to repair failing (extensive) amalgam restorations as to replace them with resin-composites. Research in this respect has demonstrated that dentists still are not convinced of this treatment option. Restoring a tooth in its original build-up or structure and function within the oral cavity is the basis of the biomimetic principle: the use of composite appears to be more obvious than restoring with amalgam. In the present survey pro's and con's of amalgams and resin-composites for the restoration of posterior teeth are weighted. The conclusion demonstrates that there is still a place for dental amalgam in modern restorative dentistry when plastic filling materials are used for the direct tooth repair or restoration.

  6. The Use of Glass-fibers Ribbon and Composite for Prosthetic Restoration of Missing Primary Teeth-Laboratory and Clinical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Zilberman, Uri; Lasilla, Lippo

    2014-01-01

    Very few modalities can be used for restoring missing primary anterior teeth, although the impact of missing anterior teeth during early childhood can be harmful. In the permanent dentition the use of glass-fibers ribbon and composite materials are frequently used for restoring missing teeth with no or minimal preparation. The purpose of this study was to examine the possibility to use the glass-fibers ribbon (ever-Stick from GC Corporation, Japan) together with esthetic composite materials (...

  7. Effect of hydrogen peroxide topical application on the enamel and composite resin surfaces and interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutra Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the present study was to analyze the superficial roughness and the interface between enamel and composite resin restorations after dental bleaching procedure. Materials and Methods: Black′s class V cavities were made and restored with composite resin, and the whole set, enamel-restorative material, was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Seven procedures of 30 min each were performed. A profilometric assessment was carried out before and after the treatment of each sample, and roughness scores were obtained. Treated and untreated samples were analyzed under scanning electronic microscope and images of their surface were obtained. Results and Conclusion: The treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide caused no alteration in the interface between enamel and composite resin, Tetric Ceram, fillings and the topical application of 35% hydrogen peroxide on enamel and composite resin, Tetric Ceram, caused an alteration of their surface topography, featuring a predominance of depressions after the bleaching treatment.

  8. Mechanical restoration and failure analyses of a hydrogel and scaffold composite strategy for annulus fibrosus repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, Rose G.; Buerki, Alexander; Zysset, Philippe; Eglin, David; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Blanquer, Sebastien B. G.; Hecht, Andrew C.; Iatridis, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Unrepaired defects in the annulus fibrosus of intervertebral disks are associated with degeneration and persistent back pain. A clinical need exists for a disk repair strategy that can seal annular defects, be easily delivered during surgical procedures, and restore biomechanics with low risk of her

  9. Soil disturbance as a grassland restoration measure-effects on plant species composition and plant functional traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Schnoor

    Full Text Available Soil disturbance is recognized as an important driver of biodiversity in dry grasslands, and can therefore be implemented as a restoration measure. However, because community re-assembly following disturbance includes stochastic processes, a focus only on species richness or establishment success of particular species will not inform on how plant communities respond ecologically to disturbance. We therefore evaluated vegetation development following disturbance by quantifying species richness, species composition and functional trait composition. Degraded calcareous sandy grassland was subjected to experimental disturbance treatments (ploughing or rotavation, and the vegetation was surveyed during four subsequent years of succession. Treated plots were compared with control plots representing untreated grassland, as well as nearby plots characterized by plant communities representing the restoration target. Species richness and functional diversity both increased in response to soil disturbance, and rotavation, but not ploughing, had a persistent positive effect on the occurrence of specialist species of calcareous sandy grassland. However, no type of soil disturbance caused the plant species composition to develop towards the target vegetation. The disturbance had an immediate and large impact on the vegetation, but the vegetation developed rapidly back towards the control sites. Plant functional composition analysis indicated that the treatments created habitats different both from control sites and target sites. Community-weighted mean Ellenberg indicator values suggested that the observed plant community response was at least partially due to an increase in nitrogen and water availability following disturbance. This study shows that a mild type of disturbance, such as rotavation, may be most successful in promoting specialist species in calcareous sandy grassland, but that further treatments are needed to reduce nutrient availability. We

  10. Soil disturbance as a grassland restoration measure-effects on plant species composition and plant functional traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoor, Tim; Bruun, Hans Henrik; Olsson, Pål Axel

    2015-01-01

    Soil disturbance is recognized as an important driver of biodiversity in dry grasslands, and can therefore be implemented as a restoration measure. However, because community re-assembly following disturbance includes stochastic processes, a focus only on species richness or establishment success of particular species will not inform on how plant communities respond ecologically to disturbance. We therefore evaluated vegetation development following disturbance by quantifying species richness, species composition and functional trait composition. Degraded calcareous sandy grassland was subjected to experimental disturbance treatments (ploughing or rotavation), and the vegetation was surveyed during four subsequent years of succession. Treated plots were compared with control plots representing untreated grassland, as well as nearby plots characterized by plant communities representing the restoration target. Species richness and functional diversity both increased in response to soil disturbance, and rotavation, but not ploughing, had a persistent positive effect on the occurrence of specialist species of calcareous sandy grassland. However, no type of soil disturbance caused the plant species composition to develop towards the target vegetation. The disturbance had an immediate and large impact on the vegetation, but the vegetation developed rapidly back towards the control sites. Plant functional composition analysis indicated that the treatments created habitats different both from control sites and target sites. Community-weighted mean Ellenberg indicator values suggested that the observed plant community response was at least partially due to an increase in nitrogen and water availability following disturbance. This study shows that a mild type of disturbance, such as rotavation, may be most successful in promoting specialist species in calcareous sandy grassland, but that further treatments are needed to reduce nutrient availability. We conclude that a

  11. Randomized clinical comparison of endodontically treated teeth restored with amalgam or with fiber posts and resin composite: five-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannocci, Francesco; Qualtrough, Alison J E; Worthington, Helen V; Watson, Timothy F; Pitt Ford, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Prospective clinical studies comparing the results of different types of restorations of endodontically treated teeth are lacking. This study compared the clinical success rate of endodontically treated premolars restored with fiber posts and direct composite to the restorations of premolars using amalgam. Premolars with Class II carious lesions were selected and randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (1) restoration with amalgam or (2) restoration with fiber posts and composite. One hundred and nine teeth were included in Group 1 and 110 in Group 2. Patients were recalled after 1, 3 and 5 years. No statistically significant difference was found between the proportion of failed teeth in the two experimental groups. Significant differences were observed between the proportion of root fractures (p=0.029) and caries (p=0.047), with more root fractures and less caries observed in the teeth restored with amalgam at the five-year recall. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that restorations with fiber posts and composite were found to be more effective than amalgam in preventing root fractures but less effective in preventing secondary caries.

  12. Influence of volumetric shrinkage and curing light intensity on proximal contact tightness of class II resin composite restorations: in vitro study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Shamy, H.; Saber, M.H.; Dorfer, C.E.; El-Badrawy, W.; Loomans, B.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Proximal contact tightness of class II resin composite restorations is influenced by a myriad of factors. Previous studies investigated the role of matrix band type and thickness, consistency of resin composite, and technique of placement. However, the effect of volumetric shrinkage of

  13. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with Zirconia filler containing composite core material and fiber posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeaidi, Zaid Al

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth with a novel Zirconia (Zr) nano-particle filler containing bulk fill resin composite. Methods: Forty-five freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were endodontically treated using conventional step back preparation and warm lateral condensation filling. Post space preparation was performed using drills compatible for fiber posts (Rely X Fiber Post) on all teeth (n=45), and posts were cemented using self etch resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Samples were equally divided into three groups (n=15) based on the type of core materials, ZirconCore (ZC) MulticCore Flow (MC) and Luxacore Dual (LC). All specimens were mounted in acrylic resin and loads were applied (Universal testing machine) at 130° to the long axis of teeth, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. The loads and the site at which the failures occurred were recorded. Data obtained was tabulated and analyzed using a statistical program. The means and standard deviations were compared using ANOVA and Multiple comparisons test. Results: The lowest and highest failure loads were shown by groups LC (18.741±3.02) and MC (25.16±3.30) respectively. Group LC (18.741±3.02) showed significantly lower failure loads compared to groups ZC (23.02±4.21) and MC (25.16±3.30) (pcomposite cores was comparable to teeth restored with conventional Zr free bulk fill composites. Zr filled bulk fill composites are recommended for restoration of endodontically treated teeth as they show comparable fracture resistance to conventional composite materials with less catastrophic failures. PMID:28083048

  14. Influence of post-cure treatments on hardness and marginal adaptation of composite resin inlay restorations: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laiza Tatiana Poskus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Vickers hardness number (VHN and the in vitro marginal adaptation of inlay restorations of three hybrid composite resins (Filtek Z250, Opallis and Esthet-X subjected to two post-cure treatments. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the microhardness test, three different groups were prepared in accordance with the post-cure treatments: control group (only light cure for 40 s, autoclave group (light cure for 40 s + autoclave for 15 min at 130ºC; and microwave group (light cure for 40 s + microwave for 3 min at 450 W. To assess the marginal adaptation, the composite resin was inserted incrementally into a mesial-occlusal-distal cavity brass mold and each increment light-cured for 40 s. A previous reading in micrometers was taken at the cervical wall, using a stereomicroscope magnifying glass equipped with a digital video camera and image-analysis software. Subsequently, the specimens were subjected to the post-cure treatments (autoclave and microwave and a reading was taken again at the cervical wall. Data were compared using ANOVA for the hardness test, split-plot ANOVA for the adaptation assessment and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons. A significance level of 5% was adopted for all analyses. RESULTS: The post-cure treatments increased the hardness of conventional composites (p<0.001 and the gap values of inlay restorations (p<0.01. Filtek Z250 showed higher hardness (p<0.001 and lower gap values than Opallis and Esthet-X (p<0.05. Gap values did not exceed 90 µm for any of the experimental conditions. CONCLUSION: The post-cure treatments increased the VHN and the gap values on the cervical floor of composite resin inlays. Moreover, Filtek Z250 showed the best results, with higher hardness and lower gap values.

  15. Evaluation of the endodontic treatment influence on the bond strength of fiber posts reinforced by a restorative composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ferreira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Fiber posts are widely used to increase the mechanical strength of the restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber posts reinforced by a restorative composite to radicular dentin on its cervical, middle and apical thirds, regarding to post preparation prior or posterior to the endodontic treatment. Materials and methods: Thirty bovine incisors were used, which had their debris removed, washed in tap water, and stored frozen. The samples were divided into two groups (n = 15 – according to the treatment applied previously to the installation of the posts: Group 1 – root canal obturation followed by root canal preparation for fiber posts bonding; and Group 2 – fiber posts preparation followed by root canal obturation. The posts were cemented and the roots were cut on their cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds – for push out test application. Bond strength was calculated in MPa and data were statistically analyzed by Anova and Tukey test (p < 0.05. Results: The mean values were (MPa ± SD: G1C – 4.0 ± 6.0; G1M – 3.5 ± 2.9; G1A – 7.2 ± 6.3; G2C – 12.7 ± 8.1; G2M – 11.6 ± 10.2; G2A – 6.5 ± 8.1. The cervical and middle thirds of group 2 had the highest mean values, showing significant statistically difference compared to group 1. For apical third, no significant statistically differences were found among groups. When the cervical, middle and apical thirds were analysed separately, no significant statistically differences were found. Conclusion: The post preparation prior to root canal obturation increased the bond strength of fiber posts reinforced by a restorative composite.

  16. Composite crown-form crowns for severely decayed primary molars: a technique for restoring function and esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, D; Peretz, B

    2000-01-01

    Current developments in esthetic dentistry center around new techniques and materials that improve the ability of the clinician to provide esthetic services. This article describes a step-by-step method of placing composite crown-form crowns on severely decayed primary mandibular molars. The described technique allows for restoring, as close as possible, form and function lost to caries in an esthetic mode in cases of severely decayed primary molars that would have required stainless steel crowns had they been treated traditionally. Disadvantages of this treatment mode are that dryness may not be prevented in the proximal margins, especially where subgingival carious involvement is encountered and the margin areas may be contaminated with gingival fluid or blood. Although no long-term follow-up has been reported for the technique, when strong opposition by the parent or child to the stainless steel crown is encountered, and a desire for esthetic restoration is strongly expressed, the composite crown-form crowns may be considered as an alternative.

  17. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.T. Tauböck; A.J. Feilzer; W. Buchalla; C.J. Kleverlaan; I. Krejci; T. Attin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Re

  18. Fracture Strength of Endodontically-treated Teeth Restored with Post and Cores and Composite Cores Only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Valandro, L. F.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the fracture strength of different conditioned metallic posts, fiber-reinforced-composite posts and composite cores only in teeth without coronal tooth structure and determined failure modes after the fracture test. Post spaces were prepared in the root canals, and the teeth were

  19. Longevity of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth in Public Dental Health Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W V; Halken, Jette;

    2013-01-01

    To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service.......To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service....

  20. Microleakage of composite resin restoration in cavities prepared by Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation and etched bur cavities in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mozammal; Nakamura, Yukio; Yamada, Yoshishige; Murakami, Yoshiko; Matsumoto, Koukichi

    2002-01-01

    In this in vitro study, the surface alterations of enamel and dentin in cavities prepared by Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and compared to the microleakage degree after composite resin restoration with etched bur cavities in human primary teeth. The results confirmed that laser cavity surface facilitated a good adhesion with the restorative materials; the acid etch step can be easily avoided with the laser treatment.

  1. Polymerization shrinkage and contraction force of composite resin restorative inserted with "Megafiller".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Y; Nambu, T; Ishikawa, A; Katsuyama, S

    1993-12-01

    This study quantified the contraction force and polymerization shrinkage of composite resins with/without beta-Quartz Glass Ceramic Inserts (BQCI) as "Megafiller". The materials used for the determination included a chemically cured composite and five light-cured composites. The system for measuring contraction force consisted of a transparent teflon tube for preparing the specimen, a small load cell, a dynamic strain gauge and a pen-recorder. After the composite was packed into the teflon mold, a BQCI (Type R3) was inserted through the opening and the specimen was cured. Linear polymerization shrinkage of the composites was measured every 10 seconds from the start of mixing or irradiation to 90 minutes by the mercury bath method. Three pieces each of BQCI (Type T3) were inserted in each specimen. The results suggested that BQCI was markedly effective in reducing polymerization shrinkage, but was not always effective in reducing the contraction force during polymerization.

  2. Effect of different adhesive strategies on the post-operative sensitivity of class I composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Yildiz, Esra; Bayrak, Isil; Ozel, Sevda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the post-operative sensitivity of occlusal restorations using different dentin adhesives performed by an undergraduate and a post-doctorate dentist. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-eight molar occlusal restorations were placed in 39 patients (ages between 18 and 30) using 3 different kind of adhesive systems; Optibond FL (OBF), Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB), and iBond (IB) by a post-doctorate dentist or a fifth-year dental student according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Post-operative sensitivity to cold and air was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) after 24 hours, 30, 90, and 180 days. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U and Friedman tests (P 0.05). Conclusion: Operator skill and experience appears to play a role in determining the outcome of post-operative sensitivity of multi-step adhesive systems although the post-operative sensitivity was low. It is suggested that the less experienced clinicians (rather than experienced clinicians) should better use the self-etching dentin bonding systems with reduced application steps to minimize the potential risk of post-operative sensitivity of dental adhesives. PMID:24966741

  3. Evaluation of effects of dentin bonding agents on microleakage in composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlevan A.

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Dentin bonding agents create stronger bonding between dental composites and dentin. But, none of them can prevent the microleakage. The important factors of progressing microleakage are the stress of polymerization shrinkage of resin composite and removal of smear layer in total-etch technique. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the effect of experimental method (modifying smear layer and etching of enamel margin and comparison with the total-etch technique. In this experimental method, 60 extracted human molar teeth were disinfected. Then, class 5 cavities were prepared on the buccal surface and 1 mm above CEJ. The specimens were divided randomly to 6 groups with iO samples in each group. The specimens groups were:"n1- Scotchbond Muiti- Purpose Plus Adhesive System (S.B.M.P.P +Tetric composite"n2- S.B.M.P.P + Ariston composite"n3- Ariston liner + Ariston composite"n4- S.B.M.P.P without enamel and dentin etching + Tetric composite + rebonding with Flowable Tetric"n5- S.B.M.P.P without enamel and dentin etching + Ariston composite + rebonding with Flowable Tetric"n6- S.B.M.P.P without enamel and dentin etching + Tetric composite"nAfter finishing and polishing, the specimens were termocycled, stained with fushin, sectioned within the specimens and evaluated for dye penetration with stereomicroscope. Wilcoxon Sign and Kruskal Wallis tests were used for statistical analysis."nResults showed that group 3 had microleakage more than groups of 1, 2 and 5 (P<0.0 5 and this difference was significant. There was no significant difference among the other groups.

  4. Effect of chemical degradation followed by toothbrushing on the surface roughness of restorative composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Regina Voltarelli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of the exposure to food-simulating liquids prior to brushing simulation on the surface roughness of five composite materials (Quixfil, Filtek Supreme, Esthet-X, Filtek Z250, Tetric Ceram. Material and METHODS: Twenty cylinders (5 mm diameter and 4 mm height of each composite were randomly allocated to 4 groups (n=5, according to the food-simulating liquid in which they were immersed for 7 days at 37°C: artificial saliva, heptane, citric acid, and ethanol. After this period, the top surface of composite cylinders was submitted to 7,500 brushing cycles (200 g load. Measurements of the surface roughness (Ra, ¼m were carried out before and after the exposure to the chemicals/brushing simulation. Changes on the morphology of composite surfaces were observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM. RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA with cofactor / Tukey's test, α=5% detected a significant interaction between solutions and composite resins. Esthet-X, Filtek Z250 and Tetric Ceram were not affected by the food-simulating liquids/toothbrushing. Citric acid and ethanol increased the surface roughness of Quixfil and Filtek Supreme, respectively. SEM images corroborate the surface roughness findings, demonstrating the negative effect from chemical solutions and mechanical abrasion. CONCLUSIONS: The surface roughness of composite resin materials are differently affected by the food-simulating solutions, depending on the immersion media.

  5. Role of bonding agents in the repair of composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staxrud, Frode; Dahl, Jon E

    2011-08-01

    Six commonly used composite resin materials and recommended bonding systems were tested to assess shear bond strength at the interface between aged and new composites with and without bonding. Test specimens were aged in water for 60 d before new composite was placed. Shear bond strength was assessed after 22 ± 2 h (Test 1) and after additional ageing by thermocycling (5-55°C/5,000 cycles) (Test 2). After an additional 180 d in water, the aged specimens were randomly divided into three groups to blind the test with respect to the aged composite. New composites were placed on aged specimens (two groups with and one without bonding agent) and thermocycled (Test 3). After 24 h (Test 1), the mean shear bond strength of the test specimens was 21-26 MPa when bonding agents were used, as opposed to 10-15 MPa without bonding agents. After thermocycling (Test 2), the mean shear bond strength was 16-23 MPa with a bonding agent and 17 MPa without a bonding agent. After 180 d in water and subsequent thermocycling (Test 3), the mean shear bond strength was 9-13 MPa with bonding agent and 2-3 MPa when no bonding agent was used. The results of this study therefore indicate that the use of bonding agents significantly improves the quality of composite repair.

  6. An In-vitro Evaluation of Effects of Light and Light-Heat Curing Inlay Composite Restorations on Fracture Resistance of Pulpless Maxillary Premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mousavinasab

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The restoration of the teeth should have enough ability to withstand masticator forces while preserving as much tooth structure as possible.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of light-heat cured composite with light cured composite restorations on fracture resistance of the restored teeth.Materials and Methods: Forty healthy maxillary premolar teeth were chosen, endodontic treatment performed in 30 of them. MOD cavities were prepared in all of them to weaken tooth structures. Then, they were divided into 3 groups each of which contains 10 specimens. The groups were as follows:Group 1: unprepared teeth (sound teeth acted as controlGroup 2: restored teeth with direct light cured composite resin.Group 3: restored teeth with light-heat cured composite resin as inlay without any cementing surface treatmentGroup 4: restored teeth with light-heat cured composite resin inlays with cementing surface treatment.Finally all samples were subjected to compressive load by testing machine. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan tests.Results: There was a significant difference in fracture resistance between 4 groups (P<0.001 except groups 2 and 3. The mean fracture load for groups 1,2,3 and 4 were 98.96±16.05, 58.72±15.33, 54.04±15.56 and 78.36±9.83 kgf respectively.Conclusion: Using light-heat curing method and cementing surface treating of composite resin will increase fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary premolars.

  7. Global Ecosystem Restoration Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Miguel; Garcia, Monica; Fernandez, Nestor

    2015-01-01

    The Global ecosystem restoration index (GERI) is a composite index that integrates structural and functional aspects of the ecosystem restoration process. These elements are evaluated through a window that looks into a baseline for degraded ecosystems with the objective to assess restoration...

  8. Restorative dentistry for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donly, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses contemporary pediatric restorative dentistry. Indications and contraindications for the choice of different restorative materials in different clinical situations, including the risk assessment of the patient, are presented. The specific use of glass ionomer cement or resin-modified glass ionomer cement, resin-based composite, and stainless steel crowns is discussed so that preparation design and restoration placement is understood.

  9. Marginal microleakage of resin-modified glass-ionomer and composite resin restorations: Effect of using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Previous studies have shown that dental adhesives increase the bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI restorative materials to dentin. This in vitro study has evaluated the effect of etch-and-rinse and self-etch bonding systems v/s cavity conditioner, and in comparison to similar composite resin restorations on maintaining the marginal sealing of RMGI restorations. Materials and Methods: 98 rectangular cavities (2.5×3×1.5 mm were prepared on buccal and palatal aspects of 49 human maxillary premolars, randomly divided into 7 groups (N=14. The cavities in groups 1, 2 and 3 were restored using a composite resin (APX. The cavities in groups 4, 5, 6 and 7 were restored using a resin-modified glass-ionomer (Fuji II LC. Before restoring, adhesive systems (Optibond FL = OFL, three-step etch-and-rinse; One Step Plus = OSP, two-step etch-and-rinse; Clearfil Protect Bond = CPB, two-step self-etch were used as bonding agents in groups 1-6 as follow: OFL in groups 1 and 4, OSP in groups 2 and 5, and CPB in groups 3 and 6, respectively. The specimens in group 7 were restored with GC cavity conditioner and Fuji II LC. All the specimens were thermo-cycled for 1000 cycles. Microleakage scores were determined using dye penetration method. Statistical analyzes were carried out with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α=0.05. Results: There were significant differences in microleakage scores at both enamel and dentinal margins between the study groups (P<0.05. The lowest microleakage scores at enamel and dentin margins of RMGI restorations were observed in group 6. Conclusion: Use of two-step self-etch adhesive, prior to restoring cervical cavities with RMGIC, seems to be more efficacious than the conventional cavity conditioner in decreasing marginal microleakage.

  10. Evaluation of microleakage in hybrid composite restoration with different intermediate layers and curing cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan R Sakri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the impact of bulk or incremental curing of hybrid composite resin with different intermediate layers on interfacial microleakage. Materials and Methods: The recently extracted, sixty noncarious human mandibular molars were selected for the study. The standardized mesio-occluso-distal cavity with the occlusal cavity of 2 mm depth, 3 mm buccolingual width and proximal box dimension of 4 mm buccolingual width and 2 mm depth was prepared on all experimental teeth. The samples were divided into six groups of ten each. Group I was without an intermediate layer. Group II and III had 1 mm flowable composite liner, with incremental and bulk curing cycle, respectively. The Group IV, V, and VI had a self-cure composite liner with incremental and bulk curing. The teeth subjected to thermocycling and kept in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye for 24 h. The teeth were sectioned and observed under a stereomicroscope to grade them according to the extent of microleakage. The obtained data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal–Wallis and post hoc comparison test to understand the difference between the groups. Results: The Group II with flowable composite along incremental curing showed the least microleakage at both enamel (0.30 and cementum surface (0.50. The groups with self-cure composite liner were less effective than flowable composite. The microleakage at the enamel interface was less compared cementum interface across the groups. The groups with bulk curing were more prone to microleakage than incremental curing cycle. Conclusions: Within the limitation of the study, it was concluded that intermediate flowable composite with incremental curing was better suited to reduce microleakage.

  11. Evaluation of the theoretical and clinical methods for reducing marginal leakage in resin-based composite restorative materials: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Keshvad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resin-based composite restorative materials  have a substantial share in dental treatments. Their esthetic has made them patients’ first choice as restorative materials. Marginal leakage is one of their problems which leads to recurrent caries and post-operative hypersensitivity. Our aim was to evaluate the theoretical and clinical methods that have been proposed in the dental literature. Around 50 articles from Pubmed, SCOPUS and google scholar were selected and categorized in 4 groups based on the selected keywords. All the studies discussed in this paper have emphasized that there is no way to eliminate the microleakage but it can be reduced by means of some approaches. On the other hand, due to the multifactorial nature and difference of oral environment and laboratory conditions, there isn’t any certain way to define precisely. It seems that there is an absolute need for more research in this field to make the relation of theoretical results and clinical findings possible.

  12. The Nanomechanical and Tribological Properties of Restorative Dental Composites after Exposure in Different Types of Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yi Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various acidic solutions on the surface mechanical properties of commercial resin composites with different microstructures (Filtek Z350 XT, TPH3, Durafill, and Superlux. Specimens were immersed in orange juice, cola, and distilled water for 5 days and the nanohardness, elastic modulus, and wear behavior of the samples were determined via the nanoindentation test and a reciprocating nanoscratch test. The nanoscratch morphology was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the wear depth was recorded by scanning probe microscopy (SPM. The results indicate that the nanofilled resin composites had the greatest hardest and highest elastic modulus, whereas the microfilled composites exhibited the lowest nanohardness and elastic modulus values. SEM observations showed that all resin composites underwent erosion and surface degradation after immersion in acidic solutions. Furthermore, the wear resistance was influenced by the composition of the acidic solution and was correlated with the nanohardness and elastic modulus. The dominant wear mechanism changed from plastic deformation to delamination after immersion in acidic solutions.

  13. 流动树脂衬垫对树脂充填二类洞临床效果影响%Effects of intermediate layer of flowable resin composite on Class Ⅱ hybrid resin composite restorations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙岩

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class Ⅱ restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite.Methods 65 participants received at least two Class Ⅱ restorations of the hybrid resin composite.One resin composite restoration of each pair was chosen at random to be restored without an intermediary layer (group A) (n =65).The other was restored with an intermediary layer with flowable resin composite (group B) (n =65).The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria during 6 months,1 year and 2 years.Results Three drop outs were registered during the 2-year follow up.Five restorations were not acceptable in clinical,3 in group A and 2 in group B.The failure rate after 2 years was 4.8% (3/62) for group A,3.2% (2/62) for group B.No statistical difference was seen between restorations restored with and without flowable layer.Conclusion The hybrid resin composite shows a good clinical performance in Class Ⅱ restorations.The use of flowable resin composite as an intermediate layer does not result in improved effectiveness of the Class Ⅱ restoration.%目的 探讨流动树脂衬垫在树脂充填后牙二类洞中的作用.方法 选择65例口内同时存在两颗后牙需要二类洞修复的患者,采用自身对照研究,分为A、B两组各65例修复体,A组直接树脂充填,B组流动树脂对邻面龈壁进行洞衬后再树脂充填.6个月、1年、2年进行临床随访.结果 2年随访每组各有3名患者失访;5例修复体失败(A组3例,B组2例),失败率A组为4.8%(3/62),B组为3.2%(2/62),两组的临床效果比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 复合树脂修复后牙二类洞可以取得满意的临床效果,流动树脂进行邻面龈壁的洞衬没有明显提高修复效果.

  14. Effect of Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride (APF on the Mcroleakage of Composite Flow and Fssure Sealant Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Poorsattar Bejeh Mir

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: A large number of investigations have revealed that physical and chemical alterations and weight loss could occur in composite materials exposed to acidic phosphate fluoride (APF gel. The purpose of this study was to assess the microleakage of a fissure sealant and a flow composite exposed to acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF gel. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 60 intact human extracted premolar teeth were used. After preparing the occlusal groove, the teeth were divided into two groups (n=30. Teeth were filled with either Helioseal fissure sealant (Vivadent, Germany or Tetric flow composite (Vivadent, Germany. After that, each group was divided into two subgroups (n=15: 1.23% APF gel (Sultan, U.S.A was applied in the case subgroups, while control subgroups were preserved in normal saline solution. All of teeth were covered with 2 layers of nail varnish except for the filling zone and 1mm around the border of filling. After submerging in 0.5% fushin solution, specimens were sectioned bucco-lingually. Then dye penetration through the filling and fissure sealant was assessed by means of a stereo-microscope. The depth of dye penetration was scored. The data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and Levene test. Results: The mean values of dye penetration were 1.26±1.09, 1.4±1.05, 1.2±1.37, and 1.4±1.35 for fissure sealant+gel, composite+gel, composite+normal saline, and normal saline groups, respectively. No significant difference was found in inter-groups (P=0.96. Conclusion: Considering the result of the present research, APF gel had no significant effect on the microleakage of Tetric flow composite filling and Helioseal fissure sealant and thus, it can be applied for routine usage.

  15. Shifts in species composition constrain restoration of overgrazed grassland using nitrogen fertilization in Inner Mongolian steppe, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Hooper, David U; Lin, Shan

    2011-03-01

    Long-term livestock over-grazing causes nitrogen outputs to exceed inputs in Inner Mongolia, suggesting that low levels of nitrogen fertilization could help restore grasslands degraded by overgrazing. However, the effectiveness of such an approach depends on the response of production and species composition to the interactive drivers of nitrogen and water availability. We conducted a five-year experiment manipulating precipitation (NP: natural precipitation and SWP: simulated wet year precipitation) and nitrogen (0, 25 and 50 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) addition in Inner Mongolia. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would increase forage production when water availability was relatively high. However, the extent to which nitrogen would co-limit production under average or below average rainfall in these grasslands was unknown.Aboveground net primary production (ANPP) increased in response to nitrogen when precipitation was similar to or higher than the long-term average, but not when precipitation was below average. This shift in limitation was also reflected by water and nitrogen use efficiency. Belowground live biomass significantly increased with increasing water availability, but was not affected by nitrogen addition. Under natural precipitation (NP treatment), the inter-annual variation of ANPP was 3-fold greater than with stable water availability (CV(ANPP) = 61±6% and 17±3% for NP and SWP treatment, respectively) and nitrogen addition increased CV(ANPP) even more (89±14%). This occurred in part because fertilizer nitrogen left in the soil in dry years remained available for uptake during wet years and because of high production by unpalatable annual species in wet years in the NP treatment. In summary, plant growth by residual fertilizer nitrogen could lead to sufficient yields to offset lack of additional production in dry years. However, the utility of fertilization for restoration may be constrained by shifts in species composition and the lack of

  16. Shifts in species composition constrain restoration of overgrazed grassland using nitrogen fertilization in Inner Mongolian steppe, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chen

    Full Text Available Long-term livestock over-grazing causes nitrogen outputs to exceed inputs in Inner Mongolia, suggesting that low levels of nitrogen fertilization could help restore grasslands degraded by overgrazing. However, the effectiveness of such an approach depends on the response of production and species composition to the interactive drivers of nitrogen and water availability. We conducted a five-year experiment manipulating precipitation (NP: natural precipitation and SWP: simulated wet year precipitation and nitrogen (0, 25 and 50 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1 addition in Inner Mongolia. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would increase forage production when water availability was relatively high. However, the extent to which nitrogen would co-limit production under average or below average rainfall in these grasslands was unknown.Aboveground net primary production (ANPP increased in response to nitrogen when precipitation was similar to or higher than the long-term average, but not when precipitation was below average. This shift in limitation was also reflected by water and nitrogen use efficiency. Belowground live biomass significantly increased with increasing water availability, but was not affected by nitrogen addition. Under natural precipitation (NP treatment, the inter-annual variation of ANPP was 3-fold greater than with stable water availability (CV(ANPP = 61±6% and 17±3% for NP and SWP treatment, respectively and nitrogen addition increased CV(ANPP even more (89±14%. This occurred in part because fertilizer nitrogen left in the soil in dry years remained available for uptake during wet years and because of high production by unpalatable annual species in wet years in the NP treatment. In summary, plant growth by residual fertilizer nitrogen could lead to sufficient yields to offset lack of additional production in dry years. However, the utility of fertilization for restoration may be constrained by shifts in species composition and

  17. Influence of immediate dentin sealing techniques on cuspal deflection and fracture resistance of teeth restored with composite resin inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, L; Mota, E G; Borges, G A; Burnett, L H; Spohr, A M

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY This research evaluated the influence of immediate dentin sealing (IDS) techniques on cuspal deflection and fracture resistance of teeth restored with composite resin inlays. Forty-eight maxillary premolars were divided into four groups: G1, sound teeth (control); G2, without IDS; G3, IDS with Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); and G4, IDS with CSE and Protect Liner F. The teeth from groups 2, 3, and 4 received mesio-distal-occlusal preparations. The impressions were made with vinyl polysiloxane, followed by provisional restoration and storage in water for seven days. The impressions were poured using type IV die stone, and inlays with Filtek Z250 composite resin were built over each cast. The inlays were luted with Panavia F. After storage in water for 72 hours, a 200-N load was applied on the occlusal surface using a metal sphere connected to a universal testing machine, and the cuspal deflection was measured with a micrometer. The specimens were then submitted to an axial load until failure. The following mean cuspal deflection (μm) and mean fracture resistance (N) followed by the same lowercase letter represent no statistical difference by analysis of variance and Tukey (p<0.05): cuspal deflection: G1, 3.1 ± 1.5(a); G2, 10.3 ± 4.6(b); G3, 5.5 ± 1.8(ac); and G4, 7.7 ± 5.1(bc); fracture resistance: G1, 1974 ± 708(a); G2, 1162 ± 474(b); G3, 700 ± 280(b); and G4, 810 ± 343(b). IDS with CSE allowed cuspal deflection comparable with that associated with sound teeth. The application of Protect Liner F did not contribute to a decrease in cuspal deflection. The IDS techniques did not influence the fracture resistance of teeth.

  18. Fracture frequency and longevity of fractured resin composite, polyacid-modified resin composite, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement class IV restorations: an up to 14 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture frequency and longevity of fractured class IV resin composite (RC), polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer; PMRC), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) restorations in a longitudinal long-term follow-up. Eighty-five class IV RC (43...

  19. 40 CFR 144.83 - Do I need to notify anyone about my Class V injection well?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... limited to: (i) Perform ground water monitoring and periodically submit your monitoring results; (ii... Class V injection well? 144.83 Section 144.83 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAM Requirements for Owners...

  20. A new shading concept based on natural tooth color applied to direct composite restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Dietschi, Didier; Ardu, Stefano; Krejci, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Patient demands have prompted manufacturers to improve intrinsic optical properties of resin composites and clinicians to refine application procedures. The aim of this study is to present a shading concept based on colorimetric L*a*b* and contrast ratio data of human dentin and enamel.

  1. Microcomputed Tomography Evaluation of Polymerization Shrinkage of Class I Flowable Resin Composite Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, C S; Chiu, K-J; Farrokhmanesh, E; Janal, M; Puppin-Rontani, R M; Giannini, M; Bonfante, E A; Coelho, P G; Hirata, R

    The present study aimed to characterize the pattern and volume of polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin composites, including one conventional, two bulk fill, and one self-adhesive. Standardized class I preparations (2.5 mm depth × 4 mm length × 4 mm wide) were performed in 24 caries-free human third molars that were randomly divided in four groups, according to the resin composite and adhesive system used: group 1 = Permaflo + Peak Universal Bond (PP); group 2 = Filtek Bulk Fill + Scotchbond Universal (FS); group 3 = Surefil SDR + XP Bond (SX); and group 4 = Vertise flow self-adhering (VE) (n=6). Each tooth was scanned three times using a microcomputed tomography (μCT) apparatus. The first scan was done after the cavity preparation, the second after cavity filling with the flowable resin composite before curing, and the third after it was cured. The μCT images were imported into three-dimensional rendering software, and volumetric polymerization shrinkage percentage was calculated for each sample. Data were submitted to one-way analysis of variance and post hoc comparisons. No significant difference was observed among PP, FS, and VE. SX bulk fill resin composite presented the lowest values of volumetric shrinkage. Shrinkage was mostly observed along the occlusal surface and part of the pulpal floor. In conclusion, polymerization shrinkage outcomes in a 2.5-mm deep class I cavity were material dependent, although most materials did not differ. The location of shrinkage was mainly at the occlusal surface.

  2. INFLUENCE OF IRRADIATION EXPOSURE TIME ON THE DEPTH CURE OF RESTORATIVE RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fabiano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the degree of conversion by the hardness measurements of a commercial resin composite. The specimens were prepared according to ISO 4049 and photo-activated for 20s – 40s – 60s with a light-emitting diodes (LEDs. To establish the optimal increment technique mono-layers 1 mm and 2 mm thick were tested. The ratio bottom-to-top was assessed for the mono-layers groups. Vickers hardness profiles were measured for mono-layer, bi-layer and tri-layer along the cross-section. The microhardness map showed difference in the mechanical characteristic of overlying resin confirmed by SEM images analysis of the fracture mechanics. Curing effectiveness of resin composite is not only dependent on the curing light unit but also from thickness of the resin composite and the duration of the exposure. The data suggest that an exposure time of 40 s or higher is required to provide composites with a homogeneous and high hardness, moreover, a 1 mm buildup multi-layering technique results in adequate curing of the bottom layer and better mechanical properties.

  3. Effect of thermal cycling and filling technique on leakage of composite resin restorations Efeito da termociclagem e da técnica de inserção na infiltração de restaurações em resina composta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Kenshima

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect on leakage of two incremental filling techniques and two composite resins with different elastic modulus and similar polymerization shrinkage. Eighty Class V cavities (4x4x2mm were prepared in bovine incisors and were randomly restored with Z-250 (Z or Durafill VS (D + Single Bond in axial (a or oblique (o increments. The restorations were divided into two groups: Not Aged - N (4-hour-storage in water at 37ºC and Aged - A (1-week storage in water at 37ºC + 1000 x - 5º-55ºC / 1-min dwell time. The specimens were covered with 2 coats of nail varnish so that only the restoration margins were exposed to silver nitrate 50% (2h and developed under fluorescent light (8h. After they were sectioned twice in buccal-lingual direction, the four exposed surfaces were digitized (Vidcap and the silver nitrate penetration was measured (ImageLab at the incisal and gingival walls. Data were analyzed by a 3-way ANOVA (Resin, Filling Technique and Aging separately for incisal and gingival walls (alpha=0.05. Resin and Aging were statistically significant either for the incisal and the gingival walls. The microfill composite resin infiltrated more than the hybrid composite. The thermal cycling caused an overall increase in silver nitrate penetration. The filling technique affected leakage depending on the composite resin and aging regimen.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito de duas técnicas incrementais de inserção na infiltração de restaurações de resinas compostas com módulos de elasticidade distintos e contração de polimerização semelhante. Para isto, foram preparadas 80 cavidades Classe V (4x4x2 mm em incisivos bovinos que foram restauradas de modo aleatório com Z-250 (Z ou Durafill VS (D + Single Bond em incrementos axiais (a ou oblíquos (o. As restaurações foram divididas em dois grupos: Não Envelhecidas - N (4 h em água destilada a 37º C e Envelhecidas - E (1 semana

  4. Microbiota transplantation restores normal fecal bile acid composition in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Alexa R; Chen, Chi; Bobr, Aleh; Yao, Dan; Lu, Yuwei; Nelson, Valerie M; Sadowsky, Michael J; Khoruts, Alexander

    2014-02-15

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as a highly effective therapy for refractory, recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), which develops following antibiotic treatments. Intestinal microbiota play a critical role in the metabolism of bile acids in the colon, which in turn have major effects on the lifecycle of C. difficile bacteria. We hypothesized that fecal bile acid composition is altered in patients with recurrent CDI and that FMT results in its normalization. General metabolomics and targeted bile acid analyses were performed on fecal extracts from patients with recurrent CDI treated with FMT and their donors. In addition, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to determine the bacterial composition of pre- and post-FMT fecal samples. Taxonomic bacterial composition of fecal samples from FMT recipients showed rapid change and became similar to the donor after the procedure. Pre-FMT fecal samples contained high concentrations of primary bile acids and bile salts, while secondary bile acids were nearly undetectable. In contrast, post-FMT fecal samples contained mostly secondary bile acids, as did non-CDI donor samples. Therefore, our analysis showed that FMT resulted in normalization of fecal bacterial community structure and metabolic composition. Importantly, metabolism of bile salts and primary bile acids to secondary bile acids is disrupted in patients with recurrent CDI, and FMT corrects this abnormality. Since individual bile salts and bile acids have pro-germinant and inhibitory activities, the changes suggest that correction of bile acid metabolism is likely a major mechanism by which FMT results in a cure and prevents recurrence of CDI.

  5. Two-year randomized controlled clinical study of a one step universal adhesive and a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II resin composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a randomized clinical evaluation the 2-year clinical durability of a one-step universal adhesive bonding system and compare it intraindividually with a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II restorations. Materials and Methods: Each of 57 participants (mean age 58.3 yr......) success rates (p>0.05). Annual failure rates were 1.8% and 2.6%, respectively.The main reason for failure was resin composite fracture. Conclusion: Class II resin composite restorations placed with a one-step universal adhesive showed good short time effectiveness.......) received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class II restorations. The cavities in each of the 60 individual pairs of cavities were randomly distributed to the 1-step universal adhesive (All Bond Universal: AU) and the control 2-step self-etch adhesive (Optibond XTR: OX). A low shrinkage resin...

  6. Influence of different composite materials and cavity preparation designs on the fracture resistance of mesio-occluso-distal inlay restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekçe, Neslihan; Pala, Kansad; Demirci, Mustafa; Tuncer, Safa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study to evaluate the fracture resistance of a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and three indirect composite materials for three different mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) inlay cavity designs. A total of 120 mandibular third molar were divided into three groups: (G1) non-proximal box, (G2) 2-mm proximal box, and (G3) 4-mm proximal box. Each cavity design received four composite materials: Estenia, Epricord (Kuraray, Japan), Tescera (Bisco, USA), and Cerasmart CAD/CAM blocks (GC, USA). The specimens were subjected to a compressive load at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data was analyzed using the two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc test (p<0.05). Estenia exhibited significantly higher fracture strength than Epricord and Cerasmart in G1. In G2 and G3, there was no significant difference among the four materials. Using a non-proximal box design for the cavity can improve the fracture resistance of the inlay restoration.

  7. Randomized controlled clinical trial of the 24-months survival of composite resin restorations after one-step incomplete and complete excavation on primary teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franzon, R.; Opdam, N.J.; Guimaraes, L.F.; Demarco, F.F.; Casagrande, L.; Haas, A.N de; Araujo, F.B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This randomized clinical trial aimed to compare the 24-months survival of composite restorations in primary molars after partial caries removal (PCR) and total caries removal (TCR). METHODS: Forty-eight children aged 3-8 years with at least one molar with a deep carious lesion were includ

  8. A six-year prospective randomized study of a nano-hybrid and a conventional hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this 6 year prospective randomized equivalence trial was to evaluate the long-term clinical performance of a new nano-hybrid resin composite (RC) in Class II restorations in an intraindividual comparison with its well-established conventional hybrid RC predecessor....

  9. A prospective 8-year follow-up of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth of children and adolescents in Public Dental Health Service: reasons for replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W.V.; Halken, Jette

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: the aim of the study was to investigate reasons for replacement and repair of posterior resin composite (RC) restorations placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service in Denmark. Material and method: all posterior RC placed consecutively...

  10. Human pulp response to acid pretreatment of dentin and to composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H R; Going, R E; Chauncey, H H

    1975-10-01

    The newer composites, although free of methacrylic acid and of a neutral pH, were still found to be toxic to the pulp. The intensity of response was increased after acid pretreatment procedures; this indicates an increase in dentin permeability. When the remaining dentin thickness was 1.0 mm or less, regardless of whether the dentin was primary dentin or primary and reparative dentin, the percentage of teeth with abscess formations increased. Use of calcium hydroxide bases or liners to coat the dentin before acid pretreatment of enamel is therefore highly recommended.

  11. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing Posterior Teeth: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Vallittu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-reinforced composite inlay-onlay FPD was used for a single posterior tooth replacement in a patient refusing implant for psychological reasons. The FRC-FPD was made of pre-impregnated E-glass fibers (everStick, StickTeck, Turku, Finland embedded in a resin matrix (Stick Resin, StickTeck, Turku, Finland. The unidirectional glass fibers were used to make a framework structure with high volume design placed in the pontic (edentulous region. To reproduce the morphology of natural teeth, the framework structure was then veneered with Gradia (GC, Tokyo, Japan.

  12. Comparison of microleakage from stainless steel crowns margins used with different restorative materials: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Derafshi, Reza; Razavi, Mahshid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obtaining optimal marginal adaption with prefabricated stainless steel crowns (SSCs) is difficult, especially after removing dental caries or defects in cervical areas. This situation requires the use of an SSC after tooth reconstruction. This study evaluated microleakage and material loss with five restorative materials at SSC margins. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty primary molar teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n = 20). Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of the teeth in groups 1-5. Cavities were restored with amalgam, resin-based composite, glass ionomer (GI), zinc phosphate, or reinforced zinc oxide eugenol (Zonalin). Group 6 without cavity preparation was used as a control. Restorations with SSCs were prepared according to standard methods. Then, SSCs were fitted so that the crown margins overlaid the restorative materials and cemented with GI. After thermocycling, the specimens were placed in 0.5% fuchsin and sectioned. The proportions of mircoleakage and material loss were evaluated with a digital microscope. Statistical analysis was performed with Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: The groups differed significantly (P < 0.001). Amalgam and GI showed the least microleakage. Amalgam restorations had significantly less microleakage than the other materials (P < 0.05). Microleakage was greatest with resin-based composite, followed by Zonalin. Material loss was greater in samples restored with Zonalin and zinc phosphate. Conclusion: When SSC margins overlaid the restoration materials, cavity restoration with amalgam or GI before SSC placement led to less microleakage and material loss. Regarding microleakage and material loss, resin-based composite, zinc phosphate, and Zonalin were not suitable options. PMID:26962309

  13. Development of a novel oxirane-acrylate composite restorative resin material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripathi Panditaradhyula, Anuhya

    The need for resin with a long clinical life can be satiated through the novel formulation of varying concentrations of oxirane and acrylate monomers with an increase in filler loading in the sample, which will allow the creation of a resin that is less susceptible to chemical degradation along with improved mechanical properties. Various concentrations of oxirane and acrylate monomers with a three-component photoinitiation system, which is capable of both free radical (acrylate) and cationic (oxirane) initiation, are used. The resin composites were placed in the Speedmixer for 30 seconds and gravitation convection oven for one minute, repeated 5-7 times. The resin composites were used to create a 9.525 mm diameter * 1.5875 mm thick resin mold. The mold was then photocured for twenty seconds on both sides using VALO blue LED light. The Rockwell hardness and shore D durometer hardness served as relative measures of bonding between the monomers. The ideal formulation of oxirane and acrylate concentrations were used to perform the Instron 3 point bend test, as well as contact angle determination. The goal is to identify a resin with a clinical life twice that of the resins being used in practice. Potential findings include ideal oxirane and acrylate concentrations with the highest shore D durometer hardness, Rockwell hardness, contact angle values, and Instron 3 point bend test values. Ideal color, transparency and properties of the resin are taken into account. Optimization of oxirane and acrylate monomers, impact while using various filler components (salination, number of fillers), filler particle size variations and variations in using different filler concentrations are observed. Results of using micro and nano-sized monomers are also studied. Addition of fluorinated acrylate monomer to the micro and nano composite was the next goal. A comparison of all the above stated compositions to the control group 70/30 BisTEG was done. A study on the degradation behavior

  14. Quantitative evaluation of microleakage in class V cavities using one-bottle and self-etching adhesive systems Avaliação quantitativa da microinfiltração em cavidades classe V utilizando sistemas adesivos de frasco único ou autocondicionante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Mantovani Gomes França

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate quantitatively the microleakage in class V cavities restored with one-bottle and self-etching adhesive systems with and without previous acid etching. Two one-bottle adhesive systems (Single Bond and Prime & Bond 2.1 and one self-etching adhesive system (Clearfil Mega Bond were used in this study. One hundred and twenty sound human premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups, and 20 class V restorations were prepared in the root dentin to test each bonding system. Each bonding system was used with and without acid etching. Specimens were prepared, dyed with 2% methylene blue, sectioned, triturated, and evaluated with an absorbance spectrophotometer test in order to quantify the infiltrated dye. Results were statistically evaluated by ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test. No statistically significant differences were found among the adhesive systems when no etching agent was used. However, the Single Bond adhesive system showed statistically significant lower microleakage means than Clearfil Mega Bond and Prime & Bond 2.1 when 37% phosphoric acid was used. Single Bond and Clearfil Mega Bond adhesive systems presented similar behavior when the manufacturers' instructions were followed.O objetivo deste estudo in vitro foi avaliar quantitativamente a microinfiltração em cavidades classe V restauradas com a utilização de sistemas adesivos de frasco único e autocondicionante com e sem a realização de condicionamento ácido prévio. Dois sistemas adesivos de frasco único, Single Bond e Prime & Bond 2.1, e um sistema adesivo autocondicionante, Clearfil Mega Bond, foram utilizados. Cento e vinte pré-molares humanos hígidos foram divididos em seis grupos, e vinte restaurações classe V foram preparadas na dentina radicular para avaliar cada sistema adesivo. Cada sistema adesivo foi utilizado com e sem condicionamento ácido. Os espécimes foram preparados, corados com azul de metileno a 2

  15. Comparison of the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with prefabricated posts and composite resin cores with different post lenghts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accácio Lins do Valle

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the fracture strengths of endodontically treated teeth restored with prefabricated posts with different post lengths. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty freshly extracted canines were endodontically treated. They were randomly divided into groups of 10 teeth and prepared according to 3 experimental protocols, as follows; Group 1/3 PP: teeth restored with prefabricated post and composite resin core (Z250 with post length of 5.0mm; Group 1/2 PP and Group 2/3 PP: teeth restored with prefabricated post and composite resin core (Z250 with different combinations of post length of 7.5mm and 10mm, respectively. All teeth were restored with full metal crowns. The fracture resistance (N was measured in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed 0.5mm/min at 45 degrees to the tooth long axis until failure. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (alpha=.05. RESULTS: The one-way analysis of variance demonstrated no significant difference among the different post lengths (P>.05 (Groups 1/3 PP = 405.4 N, 1/2 PP = 395.6 N, 2/3 PP = 393.8 N. Failures occurred mainly due to core fracture. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study showed that an increased post length in teeth restored with prefabricated posts did not significantly increase the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth.

  16. Effect of polishing on the microleakage of two different restorative materials in primary teeth: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyashree Salunkhe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of polishing on the microleakage of silorane based Composite (Filtek Z350XT and Resin modified GIC (Vitremer restorations in primary teeth. The objectives were to compare the microleakage with and without polishing, and compare the same between the two materials. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on 28 retained deciduous anterior teeth, after they were extracted. The prepared teeth were randomly divided into two groups and restored with the respective materials. The restored teeth were then divided into two subgroups (polished and not polished of seven each. Finishing and polishing for the designated subgroup was done using the Shofu polishing kit. The teeth were then thermocycled and subjected to 1% methylene blue dye penetration, and sectioned buccolingually. Microleakage was evaluated by observing degree of dye penetration under a stereomicroscope, and data subjected to statistical analysis. Statistical analysis was done using Mann-Whitney U test. Results: The results showed that polishing decreased the microleakage in Composite restorations (P0.05. Intergroup comparison of the microleakage without polishing was not significant (P>0.05 while the intergroup comparison after polishing was significant (P<0.05, with polished composite showing comparatively less microleakage. Conclusions: The conclusions of the study were that unpolished restorations with both materials did not show any significant difference in the microleakage scores. Composite restorations, after polishing, showed significantly less microleakage in primary teeth, while with Resin Modified GIC restorations, there wasn′t any difference in microleakage, with or without polishing.

  17. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC or composite resin (CR restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control: cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm2; G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF. The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations.

  18. Marginal adaptation and performance of bioactive dental restorative materials in deciduous and young permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeta Gjorgievska

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the adaptation of different types of restorations towards deciduous and young permanent teeth. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Class V cavities were prepared in deciduous and young permanent teeth and filled with different materials (a conventional glass-ionomer, a resin-modified glass-ionomer, a poly-acid-modified composite resin and a conventional composite resin. Specimens were aged in artificial saliva for 1, 6, 12 and 18 months, then examined by SEM. RESULTS: The composite resin and the polyacid-modified composite had better marginal adaptation than the glass-ionomers, though microcracks developed in the enamel of the tooth. The glass-ionomers showed inferior marginal quality and durability, but no microcracking of the enamel. The margins of the resin-modified glass-ionomer were slightly superior to the conventional glass-ionomer. Conditioning improved the adaptation of the composite resin, but the type of tooth made little or no difference to the performance of the restorative material. All materials were associated with the formation of crystals in the gaps between the filling and the tooth; the quantity and shape of these crystals varied with the material. CONCLUSIONS: Resin-based materials are generally better at forming sound, durable margins in deciduous and young permanent teeth than cements, but are associated with microcracks in the enamel. All fluoride-releasing materials give rise to crystalline deposits.

  19. Effect of Bleaching on Color Change and Surface Topography of Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Pruthi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effect of 15% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on color change and surface topography of different composite veneering materials (Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, Esthet X (Dentsply India, and Admira (Voco, Germany. Methods. 30 samples were fabricated for evaluation of color change using CIELAB color system and Gonioreflectometer (GK 311/M, ZEISS. 45 disc-shaped specimens were made for evaluation of surface topography after bleaching (Nupro White Gold; Dentsply using SEM. Statistical analysis. One way ANOVA and Multiple comparison tests were used to analyze the data. Statistical significance was declared if the P value was .05 or less. Results and conclusion. All the specimens showed significant discoloration (ΔE>3.3 after their immersion in solutions representing food and beverages. The total color change after bleaching as compared to baseline color was significant in Filtek Z350 (P=.000 and Esthet X (P=.002, while it was insignificant for Admira (P=.18. Esthet X showed maximum surface roughness followed by Admira and Filtek Z350. Bleaching was effective in reducing the discoloration to a clinically acceptable value in all the three groups (ΔE<3.3.

  20. Survival of Composite Resin Restorations of severely Decayed Primary Anterior Teeth retained by Glass Fiber Posts or Reversed-orientated Metal Posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjkesh, Bahram; Lovschall, Henrik; Erfanparast, Leila; Jafarabadi, Mohammad A; Oskouei, Sina Ghertasi; Isidor, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the survival of composite resin restorations retained by glass fiber posts or reversed-orientated (upside-down) metal posts in severely decayed primary anterior teeth after 6, 12, and 18 months. Materials and methods: A total of forty-four 3- to 5-year-old children with bilateral severely decayed primary maxillary canines were included. Patients were treated under general anesthesia. After pulpectomy, an intracanal post was seated in the primary maxillary canine on each side: either a glass fiber post or a metallic post in reversed orientation and teeth restored with light-cured composite. Survival rate of each technique was evaluated at predetermined follow-ups and data were analyzed with McNemar’s test (α = 0.05). Results: The difference in survival of restorations retained by two types of posts was not statistically significant in clinical and radiographical evaluations after 6, 12, and 18 months. The survival rate of reversed-orientated metal and glass fiber posts after 18 months was 81.1 and 67.6% respectively (p = 0.14). Conclusion: Reversed-orientated metal post did not show lower clinical survival compared with glass fiber posts in 18-month follow-up. Hence, reversed-orientated metal post can be considered as a potential method to obtain retention for composite restorations in severely decayed primary anterior teeth. How to cite this article: Vafaei A, Ranjkesh B, L0vschall H, Erfanparast L, Jafarabadi MA, Oskouei SG, Isidor F. Survival of Composite Resin Restorations of severely Decayed Primary Anterior Teeth retained by Glass Fiber Posts or Reversed-orientated Metal Posts. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):109-113. PMID:27365929

  1. Root canal filling: fracture strength of fiber-reinforced composite-restored roots and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, Marília Pivetta; Santini, Manuela Favarin; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of root canal filling techniques on root fracture resistance and to analyze, by finite element analysis (FEA), the expansion of the endodontic sealer in two different root canal techniques. Thirty single-rooted human teeth were instrumented with rotary files to a standardized working length of 14 mm. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin using plastic cylinders as molds, and allocated into 3 groups (n=10): G(lateral) - lateral condensation; G(single-cone) - single cone; G(tagger) - Tagger's hybrid technique. The root canals were prepared to a length of 11 mm with the #3 preparation bur of a tapered glass fiber-reinforced composite post system. All roots received glass fiber posts, which were adhesively cemented and a composite resin core was built. All groups were subjected to a fracture strength test (1 mm/min, 45°). Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. FEA was performed using two models: one simulated lateral condensation and Tagger's hybrid technique, and the other one simulated the single-cone technique. The second model was designed with an amount of gutta-percha two times smaller and a sealer layer two times thicker than the first model. The results were analyzed using von Mises stress criteria. One-way ANOVA indicated that the root canal filling technique affected the fracture strength (p=0.004). The G(lateral) and G(tagger) produced similar fracture strength values, while G(single-cone) showed the lowest values. The FEA showed that the single-cone model generated higher stress in the root canal walls. Sealer thickness seems to influence the fracture strength of restored endodontically treated teeth.

  2. Influence of method and period of storage on the microtensile bond strength of indirect composite resin restorations to dentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ribeiro Santana

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of the method and period of storage on the adhesive bond strength of indirect composite resin to bovine dentin. Ninety bovine incisors were stored in three different solutions: 0.2% thymol, 10% formalin, and 0.2% sodium azide, during 3 periods of storage: 7 days, 30 days and 6 months, resulting in 9 groups (n = 10. The roots were cut off and the buccal surface was ground with #600-grit silicon carbide paper. The surface was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and a composite resin restoration (TPH Spectrum was fixed using a one-bottle adhesive system (Adper Single Bond and a dual-cured resinous cement (Rely X ARC under a load of 500 g for 5 minutes. The samples were serially cut perpendicular to the bonded interface to obtain slices of 1.2 mm in thickness. Each slab was trimmed with a cylindrical diamond bur resulting in an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1 mm². The microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing was performed in a testing machine (EMIC 2000 DL at a 0.5 mm/minute crosshead-speed until failure. After fracture, the specimens were examined under SEM to analyze the mode of fracture. μTBS Means were expressed in MPa and the data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (3X3 and the Tukey test (α = 0.05. The storage times of 7 and 30 days produced no significant difference irrespective of the solution type. The formalin and thymol solutions, however, did have a negative influence on bond strength when the teeth were stored for 6 months.

  3. Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray micro-computed tomography reveals dental bur debris under dental composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Assem; Nagy, Nicole; Packota, Garnet; Monteith, Judy; Allen, Darcy; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Zhu, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Dental burs are used extensively in dentistry to mechanically prepare tooth structures for restorations (fillings), yet little has been reported on the bur debris left behind in the teeth, and whether it poses potential health risks to patients. Here it is aimed to image dental bur debris under dental fillings, and allude to the potential health hazards that can be caused by this debris when left in direct contact with the biological surroundings, specifically when the debris is made of a non-biocompatible material. Non-destructive micro-computed tomography using the BioMedical Imaging & Therapy facility 05ID-2 beamline at the Canadian Light Source was pursued at 50 keV and at a pixel size of 4 µm to image dental bur fragments under a composite resin dental filling. The bur's cutting edges that produced the fragment were also chemically analyzed. The technique revealed dental bur fragments of different sizes in different locations on the floor of the prepared surface of the teeth and under the filling, which places them in direct contact with the dentinal tubules and the dentinal fluid circulating within them. Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis of the dental bur edges revealed that the fragments are made of tungsten carbide-cobalt, which is bio-incompatible.

  4. Resistance to fracture of endodontically treated premolars restored with glass ionomer cement or acid etch composite resin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ranga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Due to the weakness of endodontically treated posterior teeth requires more strengthened restoration to withstand occlusal forces. The purpose of the present study was to determine and compare the resistance to fracture of endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars restored with different materials in mesio-occluso-distal (MOD cavity preparations. Materials and Methods: MOD cavity preparations in 80 endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars were restored using four different methods. Fiber rings were filled with stone plaster and the teeth were placed into the plaster up to the level of cemento-enamel junction. The teeth were grouped according to restorative method, mounted in an Instrom T.T. machine, and the buccal walls subjected to a slowly increasing compressive force until fracture occurred. Result: The force of fracture of the walls of each tooth was recorded and the results in the various groups compared. All teeth fractured in a similar manner irrespective of the restorative method used. Conclusion: The resistance to the fracture of the teeth was the same when they were stored with glass ionomer cement as a base over which composite resin was placed. When the entire cavities were filled with glass ionomer cement, the resistance to fracture of the teeth decreased significantly compared with the acid etch resin technique.

  5. Analysis of microleakage of temporary restorative materials in primary teeth

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    Geórgia Linhares dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the coronal microleakage of restorative materials used between sessions of endodontic treatment in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Forty healthy primary canines were chosen and randomly allocated to four groups: Group 1 - Cimpat Branco ® (n = 10, Group 2 - Bioplic ® (n = 10, Group 3 - Maxxion R ® glass ionomer cement (n = 10, and Group 4 (control - Z350 ® composite resin (n = 10. Class V cavities were created and fillings carried out following the manufacturer′s instructions. The teeth were submitted to thermocycling, sealed, and immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin solution for 24 h. The teeth were split along their long axis in the vestibulolingual direction and the tooth-restorative material interface was photographed. The percentage of microleakage was calculated using the ImageJ program. Data were analyzed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA F-test and Bonferroni′s t-test, with a 5% level of significance. Results: The following mean percentages of microleakage were found: Group 1 = 16.08%, Group 2 = 46.98%, Group 3 = 47.93%, and Group 4 = 11.03%. Statistically, significant differences were found in the comparison of Groups 1 and 4 to Groups 2 and 3. Conclusion: Cimpat Branco ® had a lower percentage of microleakage in comparison to Bioplic ® and Maxxion R ® glass ionomer cement.

  6. Properties of Polymer-Composite Used as Fills of Asian Lacquerware: Issues on Restoration Processes of Lacquered Objects from Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Solenn Le Hô

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the common problems encountered in lacquerware issued from cultural heritage is the appearance of lifting areas and some losses of material. Composite systems made of commercial polymer and different fills were tested as filling agents for the cracking, splitting, and losses compensation of Asian lacquer. For that purpose, the stability of traditional and modern commercially available materials usually used in the restoration practice of historical lacquerware was assessed. Their thermomechanical and chemical properties and surface state were evaluated by a set of techniques (TGA, DMA, mechanical test, contact angle value, and microtopography. There is a drastic change of the behavior of the interface between fill and Asian lacquer, dependent on the nature of the composite fillers. So the evaluation of materials and processes for the restoration of Asian lacquer were emphasized. The commercial Paraloid B72 used with glass microspheres as additives appeared to be the most stable of all of the investigated fillers.

  7. Dentin Pre-Treatment to Suppress Microleakage of Amalgam Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosi Kusuma Eriwati Arianto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diminished microleakage of amalgam-to-dentin preparations would benefit large populations in public health facilities. Prior studies demonstrated less microleakage for bonded amalgams than similarly bonded advanced composites among 30 different composite/bonding agent/storage conditions, Haller et al. showed that a combination of formaldehyde pre-treatment and glutaraldehyde-containing Syntac adhesive minimized microleakage. In the current study, CLass V restorations (groups of 10 formaldehyde-treated non carious human molars were filled with Valiant (Ivoclar NA amalgam after application of one of three liners: Copalite varnish; Amalagambond Plus with microfiber; and Syntac/Variolink. The control group used no liner material. After 24 hours at 37°C/100% RH, samples were thermocycled (1000 eyeles in water at 5°C and 60°C (15 second dwell time in each. Samples were immersed in 5% methylene blue solution (4 hrs and observed under a stereomicroscope; interfaces also were examined by SEM. Krsukal Wallis ANOVA by ranks (P<0.01 and Mann Whitney U Tests (P<0.05 of the data indicate improvements (equivalent among the 3 different liners tested here over unlined amalgam preparations. Liner/aldehyde-crosslinked dentin interphases, without technique-sensitive composites, may minimize microleakage by improving amalgam contact (physical bonding.

  8. Biomechanical considerations for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth: a systematic review of the literature-Part 1. Composition and micro- and macrostructure alterations

    OpenAIRE

    Dietschi, Didier; Duc, Olivier; Krejci, Ivo; Sadan, Avishai

    2007-01-01

    The specific biomechanical alterations related to vitality loss or endodontic procedures are confusing issues for the practitioner and have been controversially approached from a clinical standpoint. The aim of part 1 of this literature review is to present an overview of the current knowledge about composition changes, structural alterations, and status following endodontic therapy and restorative procedures. The basic search process included a systematic review of the PubMed/Medline databas...

  9. Long-term evaluation of extensive restorations in permanent teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieuwenhuysen, J.-P. van; D'hoore, W.D.; Carvalho, J.;

    2003-01-01

    Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry......Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry...

  10. 体外模型中3种光固化树脂充填体边缘微渗漏实验研究%Experiment on Gingival Marginal Microleakage of Three Kinds of Composite Restorations in Artificial Model. DONG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董世涛

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the degree of marginal microleakage of three kinds of composites in vitro model.Methods: Thirty-six premolars neck cavities were randomly assigned to 3 experimerimental groups in vitro, 12 of each. Class V cavities were prepared on labial side of each tooth. Composite Valur Plus, liquid nanocomposite resin Z350 and resin composite Esthet XTM were used respectively to each group, with twelve cavities for every kind of composite. After thermal cycling(x600,4-60℃), the teeth were immersed in 1% basic fuchsin dye for 24hours at room temperature. All teeth were cut labial- lingual direction and the penetration of dye along the wall of cavities were observed under stereoscopic microscope. Results: Restorative nanoleucite composite resins Z350 is a lesser microleakage material. Significant differences were observed between nanoleucite composite resins Z350 and other two materials(P<0.01) . No statistically significant differences in microleakage were noted between other two groups.Conclusion: Liquid nanocomposite resin Z350 is a better clinical material for filling the buccal neck carity.%目的:比较3种光固化充填材料在体外模型中充填体边缘的微渗漏程度.方法:在36颗离体的前磨牙颊侧颈部备洞.随机分为3组,每组12颗牙.分别充填3M 前后牙通用树脂Valux Plus、流动性纳米复合树脂Z350、登士柏 Esthet.XTM复合树脂.样本经温度循环,采用10 g/L碱性品红染色后,颊舌向沿长轴连续切开,在体式显微镜下观察修复体与牙体洞壁间染料渗漏情况.结果:3种材料中流动性纳米复合树脂Z350微渗漏最小.前后牙通用树脂Valux Plus微渗漏最大.流动性纳米复合树脂Z350与其他两组相比有显著性差异(P<0.01).结论:流动性纳米复合树脂Z350是临床上充填颊侧颈部窝洞的较好材料.

  11. The effect of flowable materials on the microleakage of Class II composite restorations that extend apical to the cemento-enamel junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Lynch, Christopher D

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the effects of a thin layer of flowable composite or compomer on microleakage occurring in Class II packable and nanofilled composite restorations that extend apical to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The current study also investigated any differences in microleakage that occur between restorations light-cured using a light-emitting diode (LED) and a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light-curing unit. Standardized Class II "slot" cavity preparations were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 72 extracted, unrestored, non-carious premolars (n = 144). The gingival margins were placed 1 mm apical to the CEJ. The teeth were divided into two groups (n = 72) and restored with a "packable composite" (Filtek P60) or a "nano-filled composite" (Universal Filtek Supreme XT) with or without flowable composite (Flowable Filtek Supreme XT) or flowable composite (Dyract Flow) as gingival liners placed with thicknesses of 1.0 mm. Each increment was cured for 20 seconds before adding the next. One-half of the samples in each group was cured with QTH (Coltolux 75) and the other half with LED (Coltolux LED) LCUs. After a two-week incubation period at 37 degrees C, the specimens were thermocycled (5 degrees C-55 degrees C x 1500), immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours, sectioned and the microleakage was then evaluated at the gingival margin by two examiners using a 0-3 score scale. Within the current study, when flowable liners were used, both the packable (Filtek P60) and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme XT Universal Restorative) composite materials had significantly less microleakage than when flowable liners were not used (p flowable liners (Flowable Filtek Supreme XT and Dyract Flow) resulted in a significant reduction of the microleakage occurring under both types of composite materials at the gingival floors ( p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between them. The choice of light curing technology (LED vs QTH) had no

  12. Crystal structures and inhibitor binding properties of plant class V chitinases: the cycad enzyme exhibits unique structural and functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Naoyuki; Kanda, Yuka; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Osawa, Takuo; Numata, Tomoyuki; Sakuda, Shohei; Taira, Toki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2015-04-01

    A class V (glycoside hydrolase family 18) chitinase from the cycad Cycas revoluta (CrChiA) is a plant chitinase that has been reported to possess efficient transglycosylation (TG) activity. We solved the crystal structure of CrChiA, and compared it with those of class V chitinases from Nicotiana tabacum (NtChiV) and Arabidopsis thaliana (AtChiC), which do not efficiently catalyze the TG reaction. All three chitinases had a similar (α/β)8 barrel fold with an (α + β) insertion domain. In the acceptor binding site (+1, +2 and +3) of CrChiA, the Trp168 side chain was found to stack face-to-face with the +3 sugar. However, this interaction was not found in the identical regions of NtChiV and AtChiC. In the DxDxE motif, which is essential for catalysis, the carboxyl group of the middle Asp (Asp117) was always oriented toward the catalytic acid Glu119 in CrChiA, whereas the corresponding Asp in NtChiV and AtChiC was oriented toward the first Asp. These structural features of CrChiA appear to be responsible for the efficient TG activity. When binding of the inhibitor allosamidin was evaluated using isothermal titration calorimetry, the changes in binding free energy of the three chitinases were found to be similar to each other, i.e. between -9.5 and -9.8 kcal mol(-1) . However, solvation and conformational entropy changes in CrChiA were markedly different from those in NtChiV and AtChiC, but similar to those of chitinase A from Serratia marcescens (SmChiA), which also exhibits significant TG activity. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the TG reaction and the molecular evolution from bacterial chitinases to plant class V chitinases.

  13. Flow regime in a restored wetland determines trophic links and species composition in the aquatic macroinvertebrate community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Ortegón, E., E-mail: quique.gonzalezortegon@andaluciajunta.es [School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor University, Menai Bridge LL59 5AB (United Kingdom); IFAPA Centro El Toruño, Camino Tiro de Pichón s/n, 11500 El Puerto de Santa María (Spain); Walton, M.E.M.; Moghaddam, B. [School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor University, Menai Bridge LL59 5AB (United Kingdom); Vilas, C.; Prieto, A. [IFAPA Centro El Toruño, Camino Tiro de Pichón s/n, 11500 El Puerto de Santa María (Spain); Kennedy, H.A. [School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor University, Menai Bridge LL59 5AB (United Kingdom); Pedro Cañavate, J. [IFAPA Centro El Toruño, Camino Tiro de Pichón s/n, 11500 El Puerto de Santa María (Spain); Le Vay, L. [School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor University, Menai Bridge LL59 5AB (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    In a restored wetland (South of Spain), where different flow regimes control water exchange with the adjacent Guadalquivir estuary, the native Palaemon varians coexists with an exotic counterpart species Palaemon macrodactylus. This controlled m/acrocosm offers an excellent opportunity to investigate how the effects of water management, through different flow regimes, and the presence of a non-native species affect the aquatic community and the trophic niche (by gut contents and C-N isotopic composition) of the native shrimp Palaemon varians. We found that increased water exchange rate (5% day{sup −1} in mixed ponds vs. 0.1% day{sup −1} in extensive ponds) modified the aquatic community of this wetland; while extensive ponds are dominated by isopods and amphipods with low presence of P. macrodactylus, mixed ponds presented high biomass of mysids, corixids, copepods and both shrimp species. An estuarine origin of nutrients and primary production might explain seasonal and spatial differences found among ponds of this wetland. A combined analysis of gut contents and isotopic composition of the native and the exotic species showed that: (1) native P. varians is mainly omnivorous (2) while the non-native P. macrodactylus is more zooplanktivorous and (3) a dietary overlap occurred when both species coexist at mixed ponds where a higher water exchange and high abundance of mysids and copepods diversifies the native species' diet. Thus differences in the trophic ecology of both species are clearly explained by water management. This experimental study is a valuable tool for integrated management between river basin and wetlands since it allows quantification of wetland community changes in response to the flow regime. - Highlights: • Flow regimen is a major determinant of physicochemical habitat of a wetland. • Water exchanges wetland-estuary modify its aquatic community and trophic links. • Omnivory and physiological tolerance key in the resistance of a

  14. The effect of polishing systems on microleakage of tooth coloured restoratives: Part 1. Conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, A U; Tan, S; Teh, T Y

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of polishing systems on the microleakage of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements. Class V cavities were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction of 80 freshly extracted posterior teeth. The prepared teeth were randomly divided into two groups and restored with conventional or resin-modified glass-ionomer cements. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week after removal of excess restorative with diamond finishing burs. The restored teeth were then divided into four groups of 10 and finished and polished using the following systems: Two Striper MFS; Sof-Lex XT; Enhance Composite Finishing and Polishing System; Shofu Composite Finishing Kit. The finished restorations were subjected to dye penetration testing. Results showed that the microleakage at dentin margins of conventional glass-ionomer cements and enamel margins of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements are significantly affected by the different polishing systems.

  15. A 13-year clinical evaluation of two three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives in non-carious class-V lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Marleen; De Munck, Jan; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Poitevin, Andre; Lambrechts, Paul; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2012-02-01

    This 13-year randomized clinical trial compared the clinical effectiveness of two three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives in combination with a hybrid, stiffer composite versus a micro-filled, more flexible composite. The influence of composite stiffness on the clinical performance of one of the adhesives was assessed as well. One hundred and forty-two non-carious cervical lesions were restored with composites with contrasting stiffness. Seventy-one patients randomly received two cervical restorations placed following two out of three adhesive procedures: (1) the three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive Permaquick applied with the stiff micro-hybrid composite Amelogen Hybrid (PMQ-H, Ultradent), (2) Permaquick applied with the more flexible micro-filled Amelogen Microfill (PMQ-M, Ultradent), or (3) the "gold-standard" three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive Optibond FL applied with the micro-hybrid composite Prodigy (OFL-P, Kerr). The restorations were evaluated after 6 months, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 13 years of clinical service regarding their retention, marginal integrity and discoloration, caries occurrence, preservation of tooth vitality, and post-operative sensitivity. Retention loss, severe marginal defects, and/or discoloration that needed intervention (repair or replacement) and the occurrence of caries were considered as clinical failures. The recall rate at 13 years was 77%. Bond degradation after 13 years was mainly characterized by a further increase in the presence of small but clinically acceptable marginal defects and superficial marginal discoloration. Twelve percent of the OFL-P restorations were clinically unacceptable. In the PMQ group, 22% of the PMQ-M restorations and 26% of the PMQ-H restorations needed repair or replacement. Regarding the clinical failure rate, Optibond FL scored significantly better than Permaquick (McNemar; p = 0.015). No statistically significant differences were found between the micro-filled and the hybrid composite for each of the

  16. Clinical performance of a resin-modified glass-ionomer and two polyacid-modified resin composites in cervical lesions restorations: 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinelatti, M A; Ramos, R P; Chimello, D T; Palma-Dibb, R G

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical performance of a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Vitremer) and two polyacid-modified resin composites (F2000 and Freedom) over 1 year. Nineteen patients with at least three cervical lesions were selected, providing an initial sample size of 87 restorations (29 per material), being 78 to non-carious and nine to carious lesions. Restorations were evaluated at baseline, 6 months and 1 year after placement, using modified US Public Health Service criteria: colour match, marginal discoloration, caries, anatomical form, marginal integrity and surface texture. At baseline, restorations were considered as acceptable for all criteria. At 1-year recall, 21 restorations per material were re-examined. Freedom was rated Bravo or Charlie for all the examined criteria and Vitremer earned an Alfa rating solely for the criterion caries. On the contrary, F2000 showed the best overall results, although presenting significant alteration in colour match. Statistical analysis of data was performed using chi-square and Mc Nemar tests. As to the evaluated periods, significant difference was observed solely between baseline and 1-year recall. Freedom and Vitremer were statistically different (P < 0.01) as to anatomical form and surface texture. For F2000, significant difference (P < 0.05) was noticed as to colour match and anatomical form. After 1-year follow-up, F2000 showed the most acceptable results as to the analysed criteria.

  17. A plant class V chitinase from a cycad (Cycas revoluta): biochemical characterization, cDNA isolation, and posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Toki; Hayashi, Hiroko; Tajiri, Yoshiko; Onaga, Shoko; Uechi, Gen-ichiro; Iwasaki, Hironori; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2009-12-01

    Chitinase-A (CrChi-A) was purified from leaf rachises of Cycas revoluta by several steps of column chromatography. It was found to be a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 40 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.6. CrChi-A produced mainly (GlcNAc)(3) from the substrate (GlcNAc)(6) through a retaining mechanism. More interestingly, CrChi-A exhibited transglycosylation activity, which has not been observed in plant chitinases investigated so far. A cDNA encoding CrChi-A was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and polymerase chain reaction procedures. It consisted of 1399 nucleotides and encoded an open reading frame of 387-amino-acid residues. Sequence analysis indicated that CrChi-A belongs to the group of plant class V chitinases. From peptide mapping and mass spectrometry of the native and recombinant enzyme, we found that an N-terminal signal peptide and a C-terminal extension were removed from the precursor (M1-A387) to produce a mature N-glycosylated protein (Q24-G370). This is the first report on a plant chitinase with transglycosylation activity and posttranslational modification of a plant class V chitinase.

  18. A comparative evaluation of fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth, with variable marginal ridge thicknesses, restored with composite resin and composite resin reinforced with Ribbond: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Kalburge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anatomic shape of maxillary premolars show a tendency towards separation of their cusps during mastication after endodontic treatment. Preservation of the marginal ridge of endodontically treated and restored premolars can act as a strengthening factor and improve the fracture resistance. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of varying thickness of marginal ridge on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary premolars restored with composite and Ribbond reinforced composites. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty, freshly extracted, non carious human mature maxillary premolars were selected for this experimental in vitro study. The teeth were randomly assigned in to twelve groups ( n = 10. Group 1 received no preparation. All the premolars in other groups were root canal treated. In subgroups of 3 and 4, DO cavities were prepared while MOD cavities were prepared for all subgroups of group 2, the dimensions of the proximal boxes were kept uniform. In group 3 and 4 the dimensions of the mesial marginal ridge were measured using a digital Vernier caliper as 2 mm, 1.5 mm, 1 mm and 0.5 mm in the respective subgroups. All samples in groups 2.2 and all the subgroups of 3 were restored with a dentin bonding agent and resin composite. The teeth in group 2.3 and all subgroups of 4 were restored with composite reinforced with Ribbond fibers. The premolars were submitted to axial compression up to failure at 45 degree angle to a palatal cusp in universal testing machine. The mean load necessary to fracture was recorded in Newtons and the data was analysed. Results: There was a highly significant difference between mean values of force required to fracture teeth in group 1 and all subgroups of group 2, 3 and 4 (i.e., P < 0.01 Conclusion: On the basis of static loading, preserving the mesial marginal ridge with thicknesses of mm, 1.5 mm, 1 mm and 0.5 mm, composite restored and Ribbond reinforced composite restored

  19. Effect of Extension and Type of Composite-Restored Class II Cavities on Biomechanical Properties of Teeth: A Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Valian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Controversy exists regarding cavity preparation for restoration of interproximal caries in posterior teeth in terms of preserving the tooth structure and suitable stress distribution. This study aimed to assess the effect of extension and type of class II cavities and the remaining tooth structure in maxillary premolars restored with composite resin on the biomechanical properties of teeth using finite element method (FEM.Using FEM, eight three-dimensional (3D models of class II cavities in maxillary premolars with variable mesiodistal (MD dimensions, variable thickness of the residual wall in-between the mesial and distal cavities and different locations of the wall were designed. Other dimensions were the same in all models. Cavities were restored with composite resin. A load equal to the masticatory force (200N was applied to the teeth. Finite element analysis (FEA was used to calculate the von Mises stress.Stress in the enamel margin increased by increasing the MD dimensions of the cavities. Deviation of the residual wall between the mesial and distal cavities from the tooth center was found to be an important factor in increasing stress concentration in the enamel. Increasing the MD dimensions of the cavity did not cause any increase in stress concentration in dentin.Increasing the MD dimensions of the cavities, decreasing the thickness of the residual wall between the mesial and distal cavities and its deviation from the tooth center can increase stress concentration in the enamel but not in dentin.

  20. Evaluation of the temperature rise in pulp chamber during class V preparation with Er:YAG laser; Avaliacao da temperatura na camara pulpar durante preparo classe V com laser de Erbio:YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picinini, Leonardo Santos

    2001-07-01

    One of the major concerns regarding laser irradiation in the dentistry field is the overheating in dental tissue, specially pulpal tissue. A temperature raise over 5.5 deg C is considered to be harmful to its vitality. The current study evaluated the temperature increase in the pulp chamber, during class V preparation, performed with the laser Er:YAG in 36 bovine incisive extracted teeth. The samples were eroded on the outer side of the vestibular wall to obtain the dentinal thickness of 2.0 mm (group I), 1.0 mm (group II) and 0.5 mm (group III). Thermocouples were fixed to the inner part of the vestibular wall using thermal paste, through the palatine opening of the samples. Class V cavities were prepared in the vestibular side only in 1 mm{sup 2} thick dentins. Irradiation parameters used were: 500 mJ/10 Hz, 850 mJ/10 Hz and 1 000 mJ/10 Hz for all the groups. The results were processed by a microcomputer. This study showed that the temperature increased into the pulpal cavity reached around 3 deg C for the groups I (2,0 mm thick dentine) and II (1.0 mm thick dentine). In the group III (0.5 mm thick) temperature was around 5.5 deg C. Thus, the parameters used for cavity preparation, using Er:YAG laser, were safe in relation to the temperature raise for dentinal thickness of 1,0 and 2,0 mm; in 0.5 mm thick dentins, temperature increase reached 5.5 deg C and an appropriate correction in the laser parameters was necessary. (author)

  1. Assessment of Microleakage of a Composite Resin Restoration in Primary Teeth Following Class III Cavity Preparation Using Er, Cr: YSGG laser: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Priya; Pandey, Annu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Marginal seal integrity is important for a successful adhesive dental restoration. Alterations caused by laser irradiation in the enamel and dentin surface can affect the marginal integrity of adhesive restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of a composite resin restoration in primary teeth following laser irradiation of enamel and dentin. Methods: Forty freshly extracted sound human primary maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth were used in this study. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups (I and II), with 20 teeth in each. In group I, proximal cavities (Class III) were prepared using an airotor hand –piece and diamond bur. The cavities were etched for 15 seconds with 35% phosphoric acid gel, rinsed with water for 15 seconds, air dried and a bonding agent was applied onto the cavity surfaces and light cured for 20 seconds. The cavities were restored with composite resin and light cured for 40 seconds. In group II, proximal (Class III) cavities were prepared using Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) (Er,Cr:YSGG) (Biolaseiplus, wave length 2.78 μm). The cavity was then rinsed, air dried and without etching, a bonding agent was applied and light cured for 20 seconds. The cavities were restored in the same manner as that of group I. The treated teeth were mounted on acrylic resin blocks and were subjected to a thermocycling regimen. Following, the teeth were immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 hours. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally in a bucco-lingual direction using a diamond disc at slow speed. The sections of all the groups were examined under a stereomicroscope for micro-leakage. Results: The mean scores for microleakage in group I was 1.95 ± 1.31 and in group II it was 1.4 ± 1.27. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.882). Conclusion: No significant difference in microleakage was noticed between the composite resin bonded to lased enamel and

  2. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. Clinical relevance: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations.......Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer......-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years...

  3. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer......-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years...... and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. Clinical relevance: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations....

  4. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer-based nan......Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer......-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years...... and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. Clinical relevance: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations....

  5. The atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach for the management of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smales, Roger J; Yip, Hak-Kong

    2002-06-01

    There is worldwide interest in and increasing usage of the conservative atraumatic restorative treatment technique or approach for the restoration of primary and permanent teeth. However, most published data on the clinical performance of the newer, high-strength esthetic conventional glass-ionomer restorative cements marketed for the procedure have been derived from short-term studies. There have been very few reports comparing different types of restorative materials and methods of cavity preparation. In primary teeth, after 1 year, success rates have been approximately 80% to 95% for Class I and Class V single-surface restorations, 55% to 75% for Class II multisurface restorations, and 35% to 55% for Class III and Class IV restorations. In permanent teeth, after 2 to 3 years, success rates have been approximately 90% for Class I and Class V single-surface restorations, but little data have been reported for other restoration classes. Failures usually result from restoration losses, fractures, and wear. Further improvements in the design of hand instruments and in the mechanical properties of the newer glass-ionomer cements are required. Currently, use of the atraumatic restorative treatment approach should be restricted to restoration of single-surface caries lesions, especially in permanent teeth, and to sealing of occlusal fissures in selected teeth.

  6. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  7. BACE1 RNAi restores the composition of phosphatidylethanolamine-derivates related to memory improvement in aged 3xTg-AD mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Gustavo Villamil

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available β-amyloid (Aβ is produced by the β-secretase 1 (BACE1-mediated enzymatic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein through the amyloidogenic pathway, making BACE1 a therapeutic target against Alzheimer’s Disease (AD. Alterations in lipid metabolism are a risk factor for AD by an unknown mechanism. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of RNA interference against BACE1 (shBACEmiR on the phospholipid profile in hippocampal CA1 area in aged 3xTg-AD mice after 6 and 12 months of treatment compared to aged PS1KI mice. The shBACEmiR treatment induced cognitive function recovery and restored mainly the fatty acid composition of lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE and etherphosphatidylethanolamine (ePE, reduced the cPLA2’s phosphorylation, down-regulated the levels of arachidonic acid (AA and COX2 in the hippocampi of 3xTg-AD mice. Together, our findings suggest, for the first time, that BACE1 silencing restores phospholipids composition which could favor the recovery of cellular homeostasis and cognitive function in the hippocampus of triple transgenic AD mice.

  8. BACE1 RNAi Restores the Composition of Phosphatidylethanolamine-Derivates Related to Memory Improvement in Aged 3xTg-AD Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamil-Ortiz, Javier G.; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Piedrahita, Diego; Velásquez-Rodríguez, Claudia M.; Arias-Londoño, Julian D.; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.

    2016-01-01

    β-amyloid (Aβ) is produced by the β-secretase 1 (BACE1)-mediated enzymatic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein through the amyloidogenic pathway, making BACE1 a therapeutic target against Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Alterations in lipid metabolism are a risk factor for AD by an unknown mechanism. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of RNA interference against BACE1 (shBACEmiR) on the phospholipid profile in hippocampal CA1 area in aged 3xTg-AD mice after 6 and 12 months of treatment compared to aged PS1KI mice. The shBACEmiR treatment induced cognitive function recovery and restored mainly the fatty acid composition of lysophosphatidylethanolamine and etherphosphatidylethanolamine, reduced the cPLA2’s phosphorylation, down-regulated the levels of arachidonic acid and COX2 in the hippocampi of 3xTg-AD mice. Together, our findings suggest, for the first time, that BACE1 silencing restores phospholipids composition which could favor the recovery of cellular homeostasis and cognitive function in the hippocampus of triple transgenic AD mice. PMID:27891075

  9. Randomized 3-year Clinical Evaluation of Class I and II Posterior Resin Restorations Placed with a Bulk-fill Resin Composite and a One-step Self-etching Adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan Wv; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    ). Each patient received at least two extended Class I or Class II restorations that were as similar as possible. In all cavities, a one-step self-etching adhesive (XenoV+) was applied. One of the cavities of each pair was randomly assigned to receive the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR......PURPOSE: To evaluate the 3-year clinical durability of the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR in Class I and Class II restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight pairs of Class I and 62 pairs of Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female patients (mean age 52.4 years...... evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then annually for 3 years. Caries risk and bruxing habits of the participants were estimated. RESULTS: No post-operative sensitivity was reported. At the 3-year follow-up, 196 restorations - 74 Class I and 122 Class II - were evaluated. Seven...

  10. Selective enamel etching: effect on marginal adaptation of self-etch LED-cured bond systems in aged Class I composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, E J; Prieto, L T; Araújo, C T P; Paulillo, L A M S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of previous enamel etch and light emitting diode (LED) curing on gap formation of self-etch adhesive systems in Class I composite restorations after thermomechanical aging (TMA). Thus, on 192 human molars, a box-shaped Class I cavity was prepared maintaining enamel margins. Self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE and Clearfil S3) were used to restore the preparation with a microhybrid composite. Before application of the adhesives, half of the teeth were enamel etched for 15 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid; the other half were not etched. For the photoactivation of the adhesives and composite, three light-curing units (LCUs) were used: one polywave (Ultra-Lume LED 5, UL) and two single-peak (FlashLite 1401, FL and Radii-cal, RD) LEDs. After this, epoxy resin replicas of the occlusal surface were made, and the specimens were submitted to TMA. New replicas were made from the aged specimens for marginal adaptation analysis by scanning electron microscopy. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests (α=0.05). Before TMA, when enamel was etched before the application of S3, no gap formation was observed; however, there were gaps at the interface for the other tested conditions, with a statistical difference (p≤0.05). After TMA, the selective enamel etching previous to the S3 application, regardless of the LCU, promoted higher marginal adaptation compared to the other tested groups (p≤0.05). Prior to TMA, higher marginal integrity was observed, in comparison with specimens after TMA (p≤0.05). With regard to Clearfil SE and Clearfil Tri-S cured with FL, no differences of gap formation were found between before and after aging (5.3 ± 3.8 and 7.4 ± 7.5, respectively), especially when the Clearfil Tri-S was used in the conventional protocol. When cured with RD or UL and not etched, Clearfil Tri-S presented the higher gap formation. In conclusion, additional enamel etching promoted better marginal integrity

  11. Allergic contact stomatitis from bisphenol-a-glycidyl dimethacrylate during application of composite restorations: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Dexton A; Hemaraj, Sajna; Varoli, Ramesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Composite resins have revolutionized the field of esthetic dentistry. They are safe to use and usually do not cause any untoward reactions. Allergies to composites are rare, but they do occasionally occur as patients are briefly exposed to the resin before it is polymerized and becomes non-allergenic. Here, we present a case of allergic contact stomatitis due to bis-GMA.

  12. Effects of resin luting agents and 1% NaOCl on the marginal fit of indirect composite restorations in primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia Sanches Borges

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to provide information regarding the marginal adaptation of composite resin onlays in primary teeth previously treated with 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl (pulp irrigant using two different resin luting agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty extracted sound primary molars had their crowns prepared in a standardized machine and were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10: G1 (1% NaOCl irrigation+EnForce; G2 (EnForce; G3 (1% NaOCl irrigation+Rely X; G4 (Rely X. The onlays were made with Z250 composite resin on plaster models. After luting, the tooth/restoration set was stored in 100% relative humidity at 37ºC for 24 h and finished with Soflex discs. Caries Detector solution was applied at the tooth/restoration interface for 5 s. The specimens were washed and four digital photos of each tooth were then taken. The extents of the gaps were measured with Image Tool 3.0 software. The percentage data were submitted to a Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05. The Relative Risk test analyzed the chance of a gap presence correlated to each group. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05 among the groups. The relative risk test revealed that some groups were more apt to have a presence of gaps than others. CONCLUSION: Neither the 1% NaOCl treatment nor the resin luting agents caused any alterations in the dental substrate that could have influenced the marginal adaptation of composite onlays in primary teeth.

  13. Estudo comparativo da infiltração marginal em restaurações de classe V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARIAS Débora Gonçalves de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o comportamento laboratorial de adesivos dentinários, cimentos ionoméricos modificados por resina e resinas compostas modificadas por poliácidos, no selamento das margens gengivais de cavidades de classe V preparadas na junção amelocementária. Quarenta cavidades foram executadas nas faces vestibular e palatina/lingual de 20 terceiros molares humanos extraídos, e restauradas com os seguintes materiais: grupo 1 (G1- Vitremer (3M; grupo 2 (G2- Vitremer (3M e Syntac Sprint/Tetric Ceram (Vivadent; grupo 3 (G3- Syntac Sprint/Tetric Ceram (Vivadent; grupo 4 (G4- Prime & Bond 2.1/Variglass (Dentsply. Após termociclagem em corante azul de metileno, os espécimes foram seccionados longitudinalmente e analisados em lupa estereoscópica para avaliação do grau de infiltração marginal. Os resultados após teste estatístico de Mann-Whitney revelaram melhor vedamento marginal para o grupo 1, quando comparado com o grupo 4 (p = 0,05, mas não foram demonstradas diferenças significantes entre os demais grupos. Nas condições desse experimento, o material Vitremer ofereceu melhor vedamento marginal que o sistema Prime & Bond 2.1/Variglass.

  14. Diosmectite-zinc oxide composite improves intestinal barrier restoration and modulates TGF-β1, ERK1/2, and Akt in piglets after acetic acid challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Z-H; Ke, Y-L; Xiao, K; Jiao, L-F; Hong, Q-H; Hu, C-H

    2015-04-01

    The present study evaluated the beneficial effect of diosmectite-zinc oxide composite (DS-ZnO) on improving intestinal barrier restoration in piglets after acetic acid challenge and explored the underlying mechanisms. Twenty-four 35-d-old piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire), with an average weight of 8.1 kg, were allocated to 4 treatment groups. On d 1 of the trial, colitis was induced via intrarectal injection of acetic acid (10 mL of 10% acetic acid [ACA] solution for ACA, DS-ZnO, and mixture of diosmectite [DS] and ZnO [DS+ZnO] groups) and the control group was infused with saline. Twenty-four hours after challenged, piglets were fed with the following diets: 1) control group (basal diet), 2) ACA group (basal diet), 3) DS-ZnO group (basal diet supplemented with DS-ZnO), and 4) DS+ZnO group (mixture of 1.5 g diosmectite [DS]/kg and 500 mg Zn/kg from ZnO [equal amount of DS and ZnO in the DS-ZnO treatment group]). On d 8 of the trial, piglets were sacrificed. The results showed that DS-ZnO supplementation improved (P acetic acid-induced colitis by improving mucosa barrier restoration, inhibiting apoptosis, and improving intestinal epithelial cells proliferation and modulation of TGF-β1 and ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathway.

  15. Comparative study of the influence of cavity preparation with high-speed rotation or Er:YAG laser on infiltration of aesthetic restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, D. P. T. S.; Beatrice, L. C. S.; Guerra, L. S. C.; Ribeiro, M. A.; Zanin, F. A. A.; Queiroga, A. S.; Limeira Júnior, F. A.; Gerbi, M. E. M. M.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare marginal infiltration in Class V cavities prepared on extracted human premolars with either high-speed rotation or a Er:YAG laser. Class V cavities were executed on the vestibular and lingual faces of twelve premolars, with high-speed rotation or a Er:YAG laser (300 mJ, 4 Hz, and 3 W), and cavity surfaces were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid combined with laser treatment (80 mJ, 5 Hz, 3 W) or without laser treatment in the following manner: G1—high-speed rotation + conditioning with phosphoric acid; G2—high-speed rotation + conditioning with laser and phosphoric acid; G3—laser + conditioning with phosphoric acid; and G4—laser + conditioning with laser and phosphoric acid. Specimens were restored with the composite resin, thermocycled and immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 h. Specimens were then cross-cut and analyzed using a stereoscopic magnifying glass. Evaluations were submitted to the Kruskall-Wallis statistical test. No significant differences were found between the averages of the groups ( p > 0.05). High-speed rotation and Er:YAG laser for the confection of cavity preparation exhibited a similar performance with regard to marginal infiltration.

  16. Cytolocalization of the class V chitin synthase in the yeast, hyphal and sclerotic morphotypes of Wangiella (Exophiala) dermatitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramczyk, Dariusz; Park, Changwon; Szaniszlo, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Wangiella (Exophiala) dermatitidis is a polymorphic fungus that produces polarized yeast and hyphae, as well as a number of non-polarized sclerotic morphotypes. The phenotypic malleability of this agent of human phaeohyphomycosis allows detailed study of its biology, virulence and the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the transitions among the morphotypes. Our prior studies have demonstrated the existence of seven chitin synthase structural genes in W. dermatitidis, each of which encodes an isoenzyme of a different class. Among them, the class V chitin synthase (WdChs5p) is most unique in terms of protein structure, because it has an N-terminal myosin motor-like domain with a P-loop (MMD) fused to its C-terminal chitin synthase catalytic domain (CSCD). However, the exact role played by WdChs5p in the different morphotypes remains undefined beyond the knowledge that it is the only single chitin synthase required for sustained cell growth at 37 degrees C and consequently virulence. This report describes the expression in Escherichia coli of a 12kDa polypeptide (WdMyo12p) of WdChs5p, which was used to raise in rabbits a polyclonal antibody that recognized exclusively its MMD region. Results from the use of the antibody in immunocytolocalization studies supported our previous findings that WdChs5p is critically important at infection temperatures for maintaining the cell wall integrity of developing yeast buds, elongating tips of hyphae, and random sites of expansion in sclerotic forms. The results also suggested that WdChs5p localizes to the regions of cell wall growth in an actin-dependent fashion.

  17. Influence of the LED curing source and selective enamel etching on dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Araújo, Cíntia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the LED curing unit and selective enamel etching on dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) for self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations. On 96 human molars, box-shaped class I cavities were made maintaining enamel margins. Self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE - CSE and Clearfil S(3) - S3) were used to bond a microhybrid composite. Before adhesive application, half of the teeth were enamel acid-etched and the other half was not. Adhesives and composites were cured with the following light curing units (LCUs): one polywave (UltraLume 5 - UL) and two single-peak (FlashLite 1401 - FL and Radii Cal - RD) LEDs. The specimens were then submitted to thermomechanical aging and longitudinally sectioned to obtain bonded sticks (0.9 mm(2)) to be tested in tension at 0.5 mm/min. The failure mode was then recorded. The μTBS data were submitted to a three-way ANOVA and Tukey's (α = 0.05). For S3, the selective enamel-etching provided lower μTBS values (20.7 ± 2.7) compared to the non-etched specimens (26.7 ± 2.2). UL yielded higher μTBS values (24.1 ± 3.2) in comparison to the photoactivation approach with FL (18.8 ±3.9) and RD (19.9 ±1.8) for CSE. The two-step CSE was not influenced by the enamel etching (p ≥ 0.05). Enamel acid etching in class I composite restorations affects the dentin μTBS of the one-step self-etch adhesive Clearfil S(3), with no alterations for Clearfil SE bond strength. The polywave LED promoted better bond strength for the two-step adhesive compared to the single-peak ones.

  18. The influence of fatigue loading on the quality of the cement layer and retention strength of carbon fiber post-resin composite core restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Peter; de Gee, Anton; Feilzer, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that endodontically treated teeth restored with short posts or deficient ferrules show a high failure risk. This study. evaluated the influence of fatigue loading on the quality of the cement layer between prefabricated quartz coated carbon fiber posts with restricted length and the root canal wall in maxillary pre-molars. Two adhesive resin composite cements, chemical-cured Panavia 21 (Group 1) and dual-cured RelyX-ARC (Group 2), and one resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, chemical-cured RelyX (Group 3), delta were selected for this study. Post- and-core restorations were made on single-rooted human maxillary premolars from which the coronal sections were removed at the level of the proximal cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Following endodontic treatment, a post-and-core restoration with 6-mm post length was prepared for each tooth. The posts were directly cemented into the root canal and, after applying an adhesive (Clearfil Photo Bond), they were built up with a core build-up composite (Clearfil Photo Core). For each group (n=8), half of the specimens were exposed to fatigue loading (10(6) load cycles) almost perpendicular to the axial axis (85 degrees), while the other half were used as the control. Three parallel, transverse root sections, 1.5-mm thick, were cut from each specimen at the apical, medial and coronal location. These sections were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to evaluate the integrity of the cement layer, while the retention strength of the cemented post sections was determined with the push-out test. The multivariate results of MANOVA showed that the condition main effect (fatigue or control) was not significant (p=0.059); the two other main effects, type of cement and section location, were significant (p=0.001 and p=0.008). For both the push-out strength and SEM evaluation of the cement layer integrity, the results significantly improved from RelyX to RelyX-ARC to Panavia 21 and also from apical to

  19. The effect of polishing technique on 3-D surface roughness and gloss of dental restorative resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, N S; Oweis, Y G; Eliades, G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare surface roughness and gloss of resin composites polished using different polishing systems. Five resin composites were investigated: Filtek Silorane (FS), IPS Empress Direct (IP), Clearfil Majesty Posterior (CM), Premise (PM), and Estelite Sigma (ES). Twenty-five disk specimens were prepared from each material, divided into five groups, each polished with one of the following methods: Opti1Step (OS), OptiDisc (OD), Kenda CGI (KD), Pogo (PG), or metallurgical polishing (ML). Gloss and roughness parameters (Sa, Sz, Sq, and St) were evaluated by 60°-angle glossimetry and white-light interferometric profilometry. Two-way analysis of variance was used to detect differences in different materials and polishing techniques. Regression and correlation analyses were performed to examine correlations between roughness and gloss. Significant differences in roughness parameters and gloss were found according to the material, type of polishing, and material/polishing technique (ppolishing procedure and the type of composite can have significant impacts on surface roughness and gloss of resin composites.

  20. Changes in species composition and diversity in the restoration process of sub-alpine dark brown coniferous forests in western Sichuan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangming MA; Shirong LIU; Zuomin SHI; Yuandong ZHANG; Bing KANG; Baoyu CHEN

    2008-01-01

    By adopting the concept of space as a substi-tute for time, we analyzed the dynamics of species com-position and diversity of different restoration sequences (20, 30, 40, 50 years) in two secondary forest types in western Sichuan Province, distributed in a northerly or northwesterly direction. The analysis was based on the results of measurements of 50 plots located at elevations between 3100-3600 m. The forests originated from nat-ural regeneration in combination with reforestation of spruce when the old-growth bamboo-dark brown con-iferous forests and moss-dark brown coniferous old growth forests were harvested. Similar old-growth dark brown coniferous forests at ages ranging between 160 and 200 years were selected as the reference forests for comparisons. We recorded 167 species of vascular plants from 44 families and 117 genera. There was no significant difference in terms of the number of species among secondary forests. But the importance values of dominant species varied during the restoration pro-cesses. The dominant species in the secondary forests is Betula albo-sinensis, while Abiesfaxoniana is the dom-inant species in old-growth dark brown coniferous for-ests. Species richness increased significantly with restoration processes. It increased quickly in secondary forests during the period from 30 to 40 years, but decreased significantly in the old-growth dark brown coniferous forests. The species richness among growth forms decreased in the following order: herb layer> sh-rub layer > tree layer. The maximum value of the even-ness index occurred in secondary forests at age 40 and remained relatively stable in the bamboo-birch forests, but the evenness index tended to decrease in moss-birch forests and slightly increased in the old-growth moss-dark brown coniferous forests. There was a statistically significant difference in the evenness index between the tree and shrub layers as well as between the tree layer and the herb layer, but there was no

  1. Restoring forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Douglass F.; Oliet, Juan A.; Aronson, James;

    2015-01-01

    Forest loss and degradation is occurring at high rates but humankind is experiencing historical momentum that favors forest restoration. Approaches to restoration may follow various paradigms depending on stakeholder objectives, regional climate, or the degree of site degradation. The vast amount...

  2. Voice restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgers, F.J.M.; Balm, A.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Tan, I.B.; Remacle, M.; Eckel, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical prosthetic voice restoration is the best possible option for patients to regain oral communication after total laryngectomy. It is considered to be the present "gold standard" for voice rehabilitation of laryngectomized individuals. Surgical prosthetic voice restoration, in essence, is alwa

  3. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe3+ additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe–catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives. PMID:26176305

  4. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Bae; González-Cabezas, Carlos; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2015-08-10

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe(3+) additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe-catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives.

  5. Restoring proximal caries lesions conservatively with tunnel restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu CH

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Hung Chu1, May L Mei,1 Chloe Cheung,1 Romesh P Nalliah2 1Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Restorative Dentistry and Biomaterials Sciences, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The tunnel restoration has been suggested as a conservative alternative to the conventional box preparation for treating proximal caries. The main advantage of tunnel restoration over the conventional box or slot preparation includes being more conservative and increasing tooth integrity and strength by preserving the marginal ridge. However, tunnel restoration is technique-sensitive and can be particularly challenging for inexperienced restorative dentists. Recent advances in technology, such as the contemporary design of dental handpieces with advanced light-emitting diode (LED and handheld comfort, offer operative dentists better vision, illumination, and maneuverability. The use of magnifying loupes also enhances the visibility of the preparation. The advent of digital radiographic imaging has improved dental imaging and reduced radiation. The new generation of restorative materials has improved mechanical properties. Tunnel restoration can be an option to restore proximal caries if the dentist performs proper case selection and pays attention to the details of the restorative procedures. This paper describes the clinical technique of tunnel restoration and reviews the studies of tunnel restorations. Keywords: operative, practice, tunnel preparation, composite, amalgam, glass ionomer

  6. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of marginal adaptation of composite resines to enamel after using of standard and gradual photopolimerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dačić Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bonding between composite and hard dental tissue is most commonly assessed by measuring bonding strength or absence of marginal gap along the restoration interface. Marginal index (MI is a significant indicator of the efficiency of the bond between material and dental tissue because it also shows the values of width and length of marginal gap. Objective. The aim of this investigation was to estimate quantitative and qualitative features of the bond between composite resin and enamel and to determine the values of MI in enamel after application of two techniques of photopolymerization with two composite systems. Methods. Forty Class V cavities on extracted teeth were prepared and restored for scanning electron microscope (SEM analysis of composite bonding to enamel. Adhesion to enamel was achieved by Adper Single Bond 2 - ASB (3M ESPE, or by Adper Easy One - AEO (3M ESPE. Photopolymerization of Filtek Ultimate - FU (3M ESPE was performed using constant halogen light (HIP or soft start program (SOF. Results. Quantitative and qualitative analysis, showed better mikromorphological bonding with SOF photopolymerization and ASB/FU composite system. Differences in MI between different photopolymerization techniques (HIP: 0.6707; SOF: 0.2395 were statistically significant (p<0.001, as well as differences between the composite systems (ASB/FU: 0.0470; AEO/ FU: 0.8651 (p<0.001 by two-way ANOVA test. Conclusion. Better marginal adaptation of composite to enamel was obtained with SOF photopolymerization in both composite systems.

  7. In vitro quantitative evaluation of marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with a glass ionomer cement and two composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIJELLA Maria Fernanda Borro

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with the glass ionomer cement Vitremer and with the composite resins Ariston pHc and P-60. The aims of the study were to assess the effect of thermocycling on those materials and to evaluate two methods utilized in the analysis of dye penetration. Sixty premolars divided in three groups were utilized; the teeth had proximal cavities whose cervical walls were located 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction. Half of the test specimens from each group underwent thermocycling; the other half remained in deionized water, at 37ºC. The specimens were immersed, for 24 hours, in a basic 0.5% fuchsin solution at 37ºC. For the analysis of microleakage, the specimens were sectioned in a mesio-distal direction, and the observation was carried out with the software Imagetools. The results were evaluated through the 2-way ANOVA and through the Tukey?s test. All groups presented marginal microleakage. The smallest values were obtained with Vitremer, followed by those obtained with the composite resins P-60 and Ariston pHc. There was no statistically significant difference caused by thermocycling, and the method of maximum infiltration was the best for detecting the extension of microleakage.

  8. Four-year clinical evaluation of Class II nano-hybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the 4-year clinical performance of an ormocer-based nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X; Dentsply/DeTrey) in Class II restorations placed with a one-step self-etch (Xeno III; Dentsply/DeTrey) and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive...

  9. Assessment of radiopacity of restorative composite resins with various target distances and exposure times and a modified aluminum step wedge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejeh Mir, Arash Poorsattar [Dentistry Student Research Committee (DSRC), Dental Materials Research Center, Dentistry School, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bejeh Mir, Morvarid Poorsattar [Private Practice of Orthodontics, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-09-15

    ANSI/ADA has established standards for adequate radiopacity. This study was aimed to assess the changes in radiopacity of composite resins according to various tube-target distances and exposure times. Five 1-mm thick samples of Filtek P60 and Clearfil composite resins were prepared and exposed with six tube-target distance/exposure time setups (i.e., 40 cm, 0.2 seconds; 30 cm, 0.2 seconds; 30 cm, 0.16 seconds, 30 cm, 0.12 seconds; 15 cm, 0.2 seconds; 15 cm, 0.12 seconds) performing at 70 kVp and 7 mA along with a 12-step aluminum stepwedge (1 mm incremental steps) using a PSP digital sensor. Thereafter, the radiopacities measured with Digora for Windows software 2.5 were converted to absorbencies (i.e., A=-log (1-G/255)), where A is the absorbency and G is the measured gray scale). Furthermore, the linear regression model of aluminum thickness and absorbency was developed and used to convert the radiopacity of dental materials to the equivalent aluminum thickness. In addition, all calculations were compared with those obtained from a modified 3-step stepwedge (i.e., using data for the 2nd, 5th, and 8th steps). The radiopacities of the composite resins differed significantly with various setups (p<0.001) and between the materials (p<0.001). The best predicted model was obtained for the 30 cm 0.2 seconds setup (R2=0.999). Data from the reduced modified stepwedge was remarkable and comparable with the 12-step stepwedge. Within the limits of the present study, our findings support that various setups might influence the radiopacity of dental materials on digital radiographs.

  10. Clinical evaluation of gingival composite resin restoring cervical defects in anterior teeth%应用龈色树脂修复前牙颈部缺损的临床评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵奇; 薛世华; 吴艳; 王世明

    2011-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate the clinical effects of gingival composite resin used for restoring cervical defects in anterior teeth. Methods: Eighty cervical defects of anterior teeth were involved. Firstly, they were restored with simulated restorations using only tooth colored composite resin. Then, the simulated restorations were removed and the defects were restored with simulated restorations using gingival composite resin combined with tooth colored composite resin. Visual analogue scale ( VAS) was employed to survey the patient satisfaction with the esthetic results of the two methods. The defects were filled with gingival composite resin and tooth colored composite resin. Then, longitudinal clinical evaluation were made at 1-week, 6-month, 1-year and 2-year recalls respectively using modified United States Public Health Service ( USPHS) criteria. Results : Simulated restorations made of gingival composite resin and tooth colored composite resin obtained more satisfaction in overall impression, gingival position and tooth contour than simulated restorations simply made of tooth colored composite resin ( P < 0. 1 ) . In the longitudinal clinical evaluation, no significant differences among the recalls were found in color match , restoration morphology, marginal adaptation, marginal discoloration, secondary caries or pulp sensitivity ( P > 0. 1 ) . Conclusion : Using gingival composite resin in restoring cervical defects in anterior teeth achieved not only satisfactory treatment effect but also ideal esthetic results.%目的:评价采用龈色树脂修复前牙颈部缺损的临床效果.方法:选择北京大学口腔医院第一门诊部 2007年6月至2008年10月前牙唇侧颈部缺损患者80例,先单纯使用牙色树脂模拟充填,然后用龈色树脂配合牙色树脂按照前牙美学标准模拟充填.采用视觉模拟评分法,由患者从整体印象、龈位置和牙齿轮廓3个方面对两种充填方法的美学效果满意度分别进行

  11. 2种复合树脂磨牙充填修复的临床评价%Clinical evaluation of two posterior composite resin restorations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何治一; 张蓉; 张平虎; 赵信义

    2016-01-01

    目的:用混合评价法比较通用型复合树脂(Z350 XT)和磨牙复合树脂(P60)的临床效果及耐磨耗性能。方法:用Z350 XT和P60随机修复66个磨牙牙合面、邻牙合面缺损,于修复后1、6个月按照改良US-PHS标准对修复体进行评价;同时,用硅橡胶印模材料制取印模,灌制环氧树脂模型用于扫描电镜下观察其表面微形貌,灌制石膏模型用于三维形貌扫描并计算磨耗量。结果:复合树脂修复后1、6个月,Z350 XT 组色泽匹配和表面粗糙度均优于 P60组(P<0.05)。6个月时,修复体表面平均磨耗深度 Z350 XT、P60组分别为(40.84±14.95)μm、(35.03±13.03)μm(P>0.05),磨耗体积分别为(1.20±0.62)mm3、(0.68±0.43)mm3(P>0.05)。扫描电镜观察显示,1、6个月时P60组表面暴露出较大的填料颗粒,导致表面较粗糙。结论:通用型复合树脂Z350 XT色泽匹配性和表面粗糙度优于磨牙复合树脂P60,6个月时2种复合树脂的临床耐磨耗性无显著差异。%AIM:To compare the clinical performance and wear resistance of an universal composite and a posterior composite by a mixed -method approach.METHODS:Z350 XT and P60 composite resin were randomly placed in 66 ClassⅠandⅡcavities respectively in molars(n=33).The restorations were evaluated after 1 -and 6-month according to modified USPHS criteria.Meanwhile,impressions of the restorations were taken using a polyvinyl siloxane impression material and then epoxy resin replicas and stone replicas were prepared for the obseruation of sur-face microstructure under SEMand 3D scanning image to quantify the wear.RESULTS:Z350 XT showed better color matching and surface roughness than P60 (P0.05),and volume los-ses were(1.20 ±0.62)mm3 and(0.68 ±0.43)mm3 respectively(P>0.05).After 1 -and 6-month,the surface of P60 exposed largefillers,resulting ina rougher surfacethan Z350 XT.CONCLUSION:Of Z350

  12. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  13. Effect of five commercial mouth rinses on the microhardness of a nanofilled resin composite restorative material: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K N Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    Results: Significant reduction in the mean VHN (Vicker′s micro hardness number was observed in all the groups after exposure to the tested mouth rinses (P<0.01 and the reduction in mean VHN values were as follows: Group I 12.09, Group II 3.42, Group II 1.51, Group IV 1.03, Group V 0.57. Inter group comparison showed statistically significant reduction in micro hardness in Groups I and II compared to all other groups with P<0.001. There was no significant difference between Groups III, IV and V. Conclusion: All the mouth rinses showed a reduction in the microhardness of nanofilled resin composite material with listerine (Group I containing maximum amount of alcohol, showing highest reduction in micro hardness value.

  14. Restoration and Archiving of Data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to complete the archiving of energetic (10 eV/epsilon - 18 keV/epsilon) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite, using a particular data format that had previously been approved by NASA and the NSSDC. That same format, a combination of ion velocity moments and differential flux spectra, had been used in 1991 to archive, at the NSSDC, the first 28 months (the "Prime" period of ISEE investigations) of data from the Lockheed instrument under NASA Contract NAS5-33047. With the completion of this project, the almost 4 1/2-year time span of these unique data is now covered by a very compact set, approximately 1 gigabyte in total, of electronic files with physical quantities, all in ASCII. The files are organized by data type and time of data acquisition, in Universal Time, and named according to year and day of year. Each calendar day has five separate files (five types of data), the lengths of which vary from day to day, depending on the instrument mode of operation. The data format and file structure are described in detail in appendices 1 and 2. The physical medium consists of high-density (6250 cpi) 9-track magnetic tapes, complemented by a set of hardcopy line plots of certain plasma parameters. In this case there are five tapes, to be added to the six previous ones from 1991, and 25 booklets of plots, one per month, to be added to the previous 28. The tapes, including an extra standard-density (1600 cpi) tape with electronic versions of the Data User's Guide and self-guiding VAX/VMS command files, and the hardcopy plots are being boxed for shipment to the NSSDC.

  15. Restoration and Archiving of Data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this project has been to complete the archiving of energetic (10 eV/epsilon - 18 keV/epsilon) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite, using a particular data format that had previously been approved by NASA and the NSSDC. That same format, a combination of ion velocity moments and differential flux spectra, had been used in 1991 to archive, at the NSSDC, the first 28 months (the "Prime" period of ISEE investigations) of data from the Lockheed instrument under NASA Contract NAS5-33047. With the completion of this project, the almost 4 1/2-year time span of these unique data is now covered by a very compact set, approximately 1 gigabyte in total, of electronic files with physical quantities, all in ASCII. The files are organized by data type and time of data acquisition, in Universal Time, and named according to year and day of year. Each calendar day has five separate files (five types of data), the lengths of which vary from day to day, depending on the instrument mode of operation. The data format and file structure are described in detail in appendices 1 and 2. The physical medium consists of high-density (6250 cpi) 9-track magnetic tapes, complemented by a set of hardcopy line plots of certain plasma parameters. In this case there are five tapes, to be added to the six previous ones from 1991, and 25 booklets of plots, one per month, to be added to the previous 28. The tapes, including an extra standard-density (1600 cpi) tape with electronic versions of the Data User's Guide and self-guiding VAX/VMS command files, and the hardcopy plots are being boxed for shipment to the NSSDC.

  16. Effect of different curing modes on the degree of conversion and the microhardness of different composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Ali Ajaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different curing units and modes on the degree of conversion (DC and microhardness (MH of two different resin composites [ESTELITE ∑ QUICK (EQ, and Z350 XT (Z3]. Materials and Methods: One hundred (100 discs of each tested material were made and divided into two subgroups (n = 50 according to the discs′ dimensions: 5 mm diameter × 2 mm thickness, and 2 mm diameter × 2 mm thickness. Each subgroup was further subdivided into the following five classes (n = 10: I cured with halogen light curing-unit; II cured with light-emitting diode (LED unit; III cured with argon laser; IV cured with halogen light-curing unit for 5 s, 10 s rest followed by 20 s curing; and V cured with halogen light-curing unit for 10 s, then 10 s rest, followed by 10 s curing. The first subgroup was tested for MH using the Vickers Microhardness tester and the second subgroup was tested for DC using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s post hoc test P < 0.05. Results: Specimens in class IV showed the highest mean DC and MH, followed by class III, then class II. Class I showed significantly lower mean values for both DC and MH. On the other hand, Z3 showed statistically significantly higher mean DC and MH than EQ. Conclusion: Although the two tested composites did not perform similarly under the test conditions, curing with halogen unit for 5 s, then 10 s rest, followed by 10 s curing improved the DC and the MH of both the tested materials.

  17. A comparison of microhardness of indirect composite restorative materials Estudo comparativo da microdureza de materiais resinosos indiretos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Baptista Miranda

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the microhardness of four indirect composite resins. Forty cylindrical samples were prepared according to the manufacturer’s recommendations using a Teflon mold. Ten specimens were produced from each tested material, constituting four groups (n=10 as follows: G1 - Artglass; G2 - Sinfony; G3 - Solidex; G4 - Targis. Microhardness was determined by the Vickers indentation technique with a load of 300g for 10 seconds. Four indentations were made on each sample, determining the mean microhardness values for each specimen. Descriptive statistics data for the experimental conditions were: G1 - Artglass (mean ±standard deviation: 55.26 ± 1.15HVN; median: 52.6; G2 - Sinfony (31.22 ± 0.65HVN; 31.30; G3 - Solidex (52.25 ± 1.55HVN; 52.60; G4 - Targis (72.14 ± 2.82HVN; 73.30. An exploratory data analysis was performed to determine the most appropriate statistical test through: (I Levene's for homogeneity of variances; (II ANOVA on ranks (Kruskal-Wallis; (III Dunn's multiple comparison test (0.05. Targis presented the highest microhardness values while Sinfony presented the lowest. Artglass and Solidex were found as intermediate materials. These results indicate that distinct mechanical properties may be observed at specific materials. The composition of each material as well as variations on polymerization methods are possibly responsibles for the difference found in microhardness. Therefore, indirect composite resin materials that guarantee both good esthetics and adequate mechanical properties may be considered as substitutes of natural teeth.O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a microdureza de 4 resinas compostas indiretas. Quarenta amostras cilíndricas foram obtidas com o auxílio de uma matriz de teflon, seguindo-se as recomendações dos fabricantes. Foram obtidas 10 amostras para cada material testado, contituindo-se 4 grupos (n=10 como se segue: G1-Artglass; G2-Sinfony; G3-Solidex; G4-Targis. A

  18. Direct digital radiography for the detection of defects in a standard aluminium test object through composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubow, N A; Farman, A G; von Fraunhofer, J A; Kelly, M S

    1994-05-01

    While the RVG 32000 (Trophy Radiologie, Vincennes, France) is in wide use for direct digital intraoral radiography in dentistry, there is a dearth of information in the literature concerning the system's sensitivity to small changes in radiographic density consistent with initial and recurrent dental caries. A standardized 7 mm aluminium test block was used as a phantom for perceptibility testing of density changes, both with and without the superimposition of composite resin sheets of various thicknesses. Defects in the block were randomly positioned and varied from 0.1 to 1.5 mm. Thermal prints were used for evaluation. Standard linear images, with no enhancement, were compared with three enhanced modes, standard mode with gradient enhancement (enhanced standard), standard X-function and zoom high resolution (ZHR). Sensitivity improved in the following sequence: standard 0.58 < enhanced standard 0.75 < X-function 0.94 < ZHR 0.95. Accuracy improved in the following sequence: standard 0.45 < enhanced standard 0.58 < X-function 0.73 < ZHR 0.74. Specificity was 1.0 both for X-function and for ZHR. These two modes both proved significantly better (P < 0.05) for the detection of 0.1 mm defects than the other two modes tested. No significant difference was found between X-function and ZHR. As ZHR requires four times the radiation exposure as standard exposures with the X-function, the latter is preferred for the task described in this study.

  19. Fracture resistance, two point bending strength and morphological characteristics of pulpless teeth restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Tibúrcio Nunes Pires

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fiber-reinforced composite posts (FRC posts have been used for tooth reinforcement after endodontic treatment. The mechanical characteristics of FRC posts can influence the clinical prognostic. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength and fracture resistance of commercially available FRC posts Material and methods: Fourteen human single-rooted premolars with completely formed apices were selected and received endodontic treatment. The specimens were divided into two groups related to the post system: i Group A – cylindrical-conical fiber-reinforced post (White post DC, FGM, and ii group B – conical fiber-reinforced post (EXACTO, Angelus. The fracture resistance was evaluated and two point bending tests were carried out. The glass fiber characteristics and the tag penetration of the luting material into the radicular dentin structure were evaluated through scanning electronic microscopy in an illustrative way. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test (α = 0.05 were applied. Results: The values obtained for fracture resistance and two point bending test were, respectively, 399.29 N and 109.5 N for group A, and 386.25 N and 119.5 N for group B. No significant differences in strength values among the groups were found. Conclusion: There were no significant statistical differences between the two post groups regarding to fracture strength and two point bending strength. It can be concluded that the posts selected for this study performed satisfactorily in terms of mechanical properties so that they can be used for tooth reinforcement after endodontic treatment.

  20. ramic restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish R Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of a patient with severely worn dentition after restoring the vertical dimension is a complex procedure and assessment of the vertical dimension is an important aspect in these cases. This clinical report describes the full mouth rehabilitation of a patient who was clinically monitored to evaluate the adaptation to a removable occlusal splint to restore vertical dimension for a period 1 month and provisional restorations to determine esthetic and functional outcome for a period of 3 months. It is necessary to recognizing that form follows function and that anterior teeth play a vital role in the maintenance of oral health. Confirmation of tolerance to changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO is of paramount importance. Articulated study casts and a diagnostic wax-up can provide important information for the evaluation of treatment options. Alteration of the VDO should be conservative and should not be changed without careful consideration.

  1. One-year clinical evaluation of compomer restorations in cervical lesions of different aetiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premović Milica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this one-year prospective clinical study was to evaluate the treatment results of compomer restorations (Dyract® eXtra/ Dentsply/De Trey, Konstanz, Germany with a single step self-etching dental adhesive (Xeno® III Dentsply/De Trey, Konstanz, Germany used for restoring class V lesions (non-carious and primary carious cervical lesions. Material and Methods. A total number of 62 class V restorations (n = 62 were placed by one dentist in 30 patients on incisors, canines and premolars. The fillings were placed due to different indications: non-carious cervical defects (n = 32 and primary carious lesions (n = 30. The restorations were evaluated by a single-blind design, according to the Modified United States Public Health Service system 6 and 12 months following the placement. The following were evaluated: retention, marginal integrity, marginal discoloration, wear, postoperative sensitivity and secondary caries. The statistical analysis compared the ratings of each criteria between materials using the Pearson chi-square or Fisher’s exact test at a level of significance of 5% (p<0.05. Results. Two restorations of the non-carious lesion group were lost after 6 months, and after 12 months one restoration was lost in the group of primary carious lesions. There were no statistically significant differences between restorations for all evaluated criteria in both groups. Conclusion. The compomer restorations in combination with a single step self-etching dental adhesive showed acceptable clinical performance in Class V lesions after one year of clinical service.

  2. Ormocer: An aesthetic direct restorative material; An in vitro study comparing the marginal sealing ability of organically modified ceramics and a hybrid composite using an ormocer-based bonding agent and a conventional fifth-generation bonding agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Kalra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives : To compare the marginal sealing ability of ormocer with a hybrid composite using an ormocer based bonding agent and a conventional fifth generation bonding agent. Materials and Methods : Fifty four human premolars were randomly distributed into four test groups of 12 teeth each and two control groups of 3 teeth each. Class I occlusal preparation of 1.5 mm depth were made in each tooth. These were restored using the adhesive and restorative material according to the group. The restorations were finished using a standard composite finishing and polishing kit. Thermocycling between 5 o C and 55 o C was carried out. Having blocked the root apex and the entire tooth surface except 1 mm around the restoration margin, the teeth were immersed in 2% methylene blue for 48 hours, after which the dye penetration through the margins of each sample was studied under a stereomicroscope. Results and Discussion : Group IV (Admira with Admira Bond showed the minimum marginal leakage with a mean of 0.200 mm. Four samples in this group showed no microleakage at all and a maximum of 0.400 mm was seen in one sample. Group II (Spectrum TPH with Admira Bond showed the maximum leakage with a mean of 0.433 mm. One sample showed as much as 1.00 mm of microleakage. Admira when used with Admira Bond showed lesser microleakage than Spectrum TPH used with Prime & Bond NT, the difference being statistically insignificant.

  3. A Meta analysis of flowable composite and flowable compomer in preventive resin restoration of permanent teeth%流动树脂及流动复合体用于恒牙预防性充填的Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康翠平

    2016-01-01

    目的:全面系统评价流动树脂/流动复合体用于预防性树脂充填术的临床疗效,为临床应用提供科学依据。方法:检索Pubmed等数据库,纳入国内外相关文献,资料提取和方法学质量评价后,采用Stata11.0软件对纳入文献进行Meta分析,通过漏斗图和Begg秩相关方法检验是否存在发表偏倚,同时进行敏感性分析。结果:纳入文献20篇,分析结果显示采用流动树脂/流动复合体与其他材料相比,在成功率和完全保留率方面,有显著性差异;在继发龋发生率方面,能显著降低发生率。结论:采用流动树脂/流动复合体用于预防性树脂充填治疗恒牙窝沟龋的修复效果显著优于其他材料,可以在临床中积极加以应用。%Objective: This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of flowable composite or compomer in preventive resin restoration of pit and fissure caries in permanent teeth by Meta analysis, and provide scientific guide for the clinical application of them. Methods: Studies about flowable composite or flowable compomer used in preventive resin restoration to fill the pit and fissure caries of permanent teeth were identified from the follows: Pub Med, Cochrane library, OVID, Science Direct, CNKI, CBM and VIP databases. Meta analyses were performed by Stata software11.0. Results: Compared with other restoration materials, flowable composite or flowable compomer in preventive resin restoration improve the complete retention rate and the success rate significantly. Flowable composite or flowable compomer in preventive resin restoration reduce the incidence of secondary caries. Conclusion: The flowable composite or flowable compomer in preventive resin restoration is a clinical effective technology to fill pit and fissure caries of permanent teeth.

  4. Composite resin fillings and inlays: An 11-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, U.; Qvist, V.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth......Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth...

  5. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2001-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of the Site Restoration Department of SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and activities related to the management of decommissioning projects. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations.

  6. Restorative neuroscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, Robert H; Meyer, Morten; Ducray, Angélique D

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the search for therapeutic options for diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS), for which currently no effective treatment strategies are available. Replacement of damaged cells and restoration of function can be accomplished by transplantation of...

  7. Environmental Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaert, T.; Vanmarcke, H

    1998-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's programme on environmental restoration are (1) to optimize and validate models for the impact assessment from environmental, radioactive contaminations, including waste disposal or discharge; (2) to support the policy of national authorities for public health and radioactive waste management. Progress and achievements in 1997 are reported.

  8. The effect of load cycling on microleakage of low shrinkage methacrylate base composite compared with silorane base composite and SEM evaluation of marginal integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kermanshah

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Marginal seal in class V cavity and determination of the best restorative material in reducing microleakage is of great concern in operative dentistry. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of load cycling on the microleakage of low shrinkage composites compared with methacrylate-based composites with low shirinkage rate in class V cavity preparation. Marginal integrity of these materials was assessed using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, class V cavity preparations were made on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 48 human premolars and molars (96 cavities. The specimens were divided into four groups each containing 12 teeth (24 cavities: group 1 (Kalore-GC+ G-Bond , group 2 (Futurabond NR+Grandio, group 3(All Bond SE+ Aelite LS Posterior, group 4 (LS System Adhesive Primer & Bond+Filtek P90. All the specimens were thermocycled for 2000 cycles (5-50oC. In each group, half of the specimens (n=12 were subjected to 200,000 cycles of loading at 80 N. Epoxy resin replicas of 32 specimens (4 restorations in each subgroup were evaluated using SEM and the interfacial gaps were measured. Finally, the teeth were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours at 370C, then sectioned and observed under stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests and the comparison between occlusal and gingival microleakage was made with Wilcoxon test. Results: Within unloaded or loaded specimens, there were no significant differences in microleakage among four groups on the occlusal margins (P>0.05. But there were statistically significant differences in microleakage between silorane and Aelite on the gingival margins (P0.05. Conclusion: Silorane did not perform better than the conventional low shrinkage methacrylate-based composite in terms of sealing ability (except Aelite. Cyclic loading did not increase the extent of leakage in any groups.

  9. Avaliação clínica de restaurações classe v restauradas com a técnica direta e semidireta

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Patrícia Silva Hamester

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: O Objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar clinicamente no período de 6 meses restaurações classe V em resina composta (Glacier) e cimento de ionômero de vidro (Riva selfcure) pela técnica direta, e restaurações com cerômero pela técnica semidireta cimentadas com cimento resinoso autoadesivo (SeT) e com condicionamento total (RelyX ARC).Material e método: Cento e vinte restaurações foram realizadas por um único operador em 30 pacientes. Cada paciente recebeu uma restauração de resina com...

  10. Avaliação quantitativa da microinfiltração em cavidades de classe V restauradas com materiais hibridos de ionomero de vidro/resina composta

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Salami de Magalhães

    1997-01-01

    Resumo: O objetivo deste estudo "in vitro" foi avaliar quantitativamente a microinfiltração em cavidades de classe V restauradas com materiais híbridos de ionômero de vidro/resina composta, comparando-os com um cimento de ionômero de vidro e com um sistema de resina composta/adesivo dentinário. Foram preparadas cavidades cilíndricas na superfície radicular de 105 dentes humanos extraídos, a cerca de 4 mm da junção amelo-cemeotária. Os dentes foram divididos aleatoriamente em cinco grupos, cad...

  11. [Pulp response to restorative materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advokaat, J G

    1990-03-01

    Restorations may affect the pulp negatively, rather due to microleakage than to toxic properties of the materials used. Hyperalgesia occurs more frequently after restoration with composite resins than with amalgam, though the resins in contrast to amalgam may be bonded to the enamel margins. A number of recommendations are presented in order to minimize the marginal gap between cavity walls and amalgam and to prevent marginal fracture.

  12. Clinical observation of effects of composite resin inlays on the restoration of children's first permanent molars%复合树脂嵌体修复儿童第一恒磨牙缺损的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周铸民; 丁桂聪; 陈晶; 宋宁; 王骥

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effects of composite resin inlays on the restoration of the children's first permanent molars. Methods Children between 8 and 11 years old who had dental caries in the first permanent molars were enrolled. About 153 molars were randomly assigned to two groups,75 molars in group A and 78 molars in group B. The molars in group A were restored with composite resin inlays. The molars in group B was restored with composite resin directly. All these cases were followed up one year after restoration. The long term effects were evaluated by modified USPHS-criteria, Results The clinical success rates of composite resin inlays in group A in retention,marginal adaptation,the secondary caries and gingival indexes were higher than those of composite resin in group B. Also there were significant differences between two groups (P 0.05) . Conclusions The clinical effects of composite resin inlays in group A were better than those of composite resin in group B.%目的 观察复合树脂嵌体修复儿童第一恒磨牙牙体缺损的临床效果.方法 对儿童第一恒磨牙牙体缺损分别采用复合树脂嵌体技术和复合树脂直接充填术,复合树脂嵌体技术组75颗,复合树脂直接充填组78颗,1年后复诊检查,评价标准采用改良USPHS评价标准.结果 复合树脂嵌体技术组的临床成功率在固位情况、边缘密合度、继发龋、牙龈指教指标上高于复合树脂直接充填修复组,并且存在显著差异(P<0.05).在色泽协调性和磨耗程度指标上,临床成功率虽高于复合树脂直接充填修复组,但统计学上无显著差异(P>0.05).结论 复合树脂嵌体修复术组临床效果优于复合树脂直接充填术.

  13. Materials for chairside CAD/CAM restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2010-01-01

    Chairside computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems have become considerably more accurate, efficient, and prevalent as the technology has evolved in the past 25 years. The initial restorative material option for chairside CAD/CAM restorations was limited to ceramic blocks. Restorative material options have multiplied and now include esthetic ceramics, high-strength ceramics, and composite materials for both definitive and temporary restoration applications. This article will review current materials available for chairside CAD/CAM restorations.

  14. The influence of finishing/polishing time and cooling system on surface roughness and microhardness of two different types of composite resin restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminedi, Raja Rajeswari; Penumatsa, Narendra Varma; Priya, Tulasi; Baroudi, Kusai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of finishing time and polishing time on surface roughness and microhardness of nanofilled and hybrid resin composites. Materials and Methods: Hundred disk composite specimens from micro hybrid composite and nanohybrid composite were prepared, 50 for each type of composite. The specimens were divided into five groups according to the time of finishing and polishing (immediate, 15 min, 24 h and dry). Composite under the Mylar strip wit...

  15. Does the use of a novel self-adhesive flowable composite reduce nanoleakage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abo El Naga A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abeer Abo El Naga,1 Mohammed Yousef,1 Rasha Ramadan,2,3 Sherif Fayez Bahgat,4,5 Lana Alshawwa6 1Operative Dentistry Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Operative Dentistry Department, Modern Science and Arts University, Cairo, Egypt; 3Operative Dentistry Department, Dentistry Program, Batterjee Medical College, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Fixed Prosthodontics Department, Modern Science and Arts University, Cairo, Egypt; 5Fixed Prosthodontics Department, Dentistry Program, Batterjee Medical College, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 6Medical Education Department, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Objective: The aim of the study reported here was to evaluate the performance of a self-adhesive flowable composite and two self-etching adhesive systems, when subjected to cyclic loading, in preventing the nanoleakage of Class V restorations. Methods: Wedge-shape Class V cavities were prepared (4×2×2 mm [length × width × depth] on the buccal surfaces of 90 sound human premolars. Cavities were divided randomly into three groups (n=30 according to the used adhesive (Xeno® V [self-etching adhesive system] and BOND-1® SF (solvent-free self-etching adhesive system in conjunction with Artiste® Nano Composite resin, and Fusio™ Liquid Dentin (self-adhesive flowable composite, consecutively. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (n=10: (A control, (B subjected to occlusal cyclic loading (90N for 5,000 cycles, and (C subjected to occlusal cyclic loading (90N for 10,000 cycles. Teeth then were coated with nail polish up to 1 mm from the interface, immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution for 24 hours and tested for nanoleakage using the environmental scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis X-ray analysis. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests (P≤0.05. Results: The Fusio Liquid Dentin group showed

  16. Smooth surface glass ionomer restoration for primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, C M; Croll, T P

    1991-01-01

    Glass ionomer restorative cement offers the clinician an alternative to bonded composite resin for restoration of certain lesions in primary teeth. This article details a step-by-step procedure for restoration of a smooth surface carious lesion in a primary incisor using an encapsulated glass ionomer restorative material and reviews advantages and limitations of the cement. A light-hardened glass ionomer liner/base that has proven useful as an enamel and dentin restorative is also described.

  17. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2002-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of SCK-CEN's Site Restoration Department for 2001 are described. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and the management of spent fuel and the flow of dismantled materials and the recycling of materials from decommissioning activities based on the smelting of metallic materials in specialised foundries. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations and performs R and D on new techniques including processes for the treatment of various waste components including the reprocessing of spent fuel, the treatment of tritium, the treatment of liquid alkali metals into cabonates through oxidation, the treatment of radioactive organic waste and the reconditioning of bituminised waste products.

  18. Restoration of a fractured primary incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, M; Saez, M; Cabrerizo, C

    2001-01-01

    Esthetic restoration on primary teeth has been a special challenge to pediatric dentists. Composite restorations are the most often used treatment for decay and fractures of primary teeth, however, there are other possible alternatives. We present a case in which we have used an acrylic crown to treat a fractured primary incisor in a 1.8 years old child.

  19. 应用显微CT观测Ⅴ类洞修复体边缘渗漏初探%Detection of marginal leakage of Class Ⅴ restorations in vitro by micro-CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古林娟; 赵信义; 李石保

    2012-01-01

    目的 评价显微CT测定V类洞复合树脂充填修复体边缘渗漏的可靠性和优势.方法 离体人磨牙制备V类洞,用粘接剂及复合树脂充填修复.将样本牙浸入氨化硝酸银溶液12 h及显影液8h.显微CT扫描后测定充填物(猞)壁及龈壁的银渗漏深度,重建洞壁银渗漏三维图像.正中纵向切开充填物及样本牙,光学显微镜下测量剖面窝洞牙熙(猞)壁及龈壁的银渗漏深度,采用配对秩和检验比较显微CT与光学显微镜测定的渗漏深度差异.结果 显微CT和光学显微镜测量的龈壁渗漏深度(中位数分别为0.78和0.74 mm)差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),显微CT测量的(猞)壁渗漏深度(中位数0.40 mm)显著小于光学显微镜(0.72 mm) (P <0.01);洞壁渗漏的形态呈多样性,部分渗漏存在明显的渗漏通道.结论 显微CT能精确测定窝洞龈壁部位的银渗漏程度,并能建立银渗漏三维形态,(猞)壁部位显微CT测定的渗漏深度不能反映实际渗漏深度.%Objective To evaluate the reliability and superiority of micro-CT in marginal leakage assessment of Class V restorations. Methods Class V preparations with gingival margins in dentin and occlusal in enamel were made in sixteen extracted non-carious human molars and restored with dental bonding agents and composite resin.All teeth were then immersed in 50% ammonia-silver nitrate solution for 12 hours,followed by developing solution for 8 hours. Each restoration was scanned by a micro-CT and silver leakage was measured and three-dimensional image of the silver leakage alone cavity wall were reconstructed. Afterward, all restorations were sectioned and examined for leakage depth using a microscope. The silver leakage depth of each restoration obtained by micro-CT and microscope were compared for equivalency. Results The silver leakage depths in gingival wall obtained with micro-CT (0.78 mm) and microscope (0.74 mm) showed no significant difference (P > 0.05 ),while

  20. EFFECTS OF POLISHING TIME AND THERMALCYCLINGON THE MICROLEAKAGE OF FOUR TOOTH –COLOURED DIRECT RESTORATIVE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V MORTAZAVI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introdaction. Microleakage has been recognized as a major clinical problem with direct filled dental restorations.The purpose of this study was to investigate and to compare the microleakage of four direct filled tooth-coloured materials, evaluation the effects of polishing time and thermocycling on the microleakage of these materials. Methods. Wedge-shaped class V cavities were prepared on buccal and lingual surfaces of 96 intact extracted human molar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three treatment groups and four subgroups. The cavities of each subgroup were filled using one of these materials: a conventional glass ionomer; a resin modified glass ionomer; a composite resin and a compomer. Polishing in the teeth of group 1 was done immediately after placement of restorations and in group 2 one week later. In group 3 delayed polishing and thermocycling (X100 was done. All of the teeth were stored in distilled water for one week and then stained with dye, sectioned, and scored for microleakage on occlusal and cervical edges. Results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal wallis and Mann whitney tests. Results. There was a statistically difference between the microleakage scores of four materials (P < 0.001. Immediately polished glass ionomer and compomer groups have significantly more microleakage than delayed polished groups (P < 0.001. Thermocycting could infulence the microleakage of composite on cervical edges (P < 0.05. Discussion. The precense of differences between the nature of materials and also the surface treatment such as primer or etchant application could influence the microleakage. The prescence of differences in reaction rate between the materials and the time that they reach to their adequate mechanical strength and adhesive bond strength lead to presence of differences between the effect of polishing time on the microleakage scores of materials.

  1. Clinical Application of Light-cured Composite Resin Restoration in Clinical Oral Beauty%光固化复合树脂在临床口腔美容修复中的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓剑兰; 查伯涛

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨光固化复合树脂在临床口腔美容修复中的疗效。方法:选取氟斑牙患者65例98颗、牙体缺损患者及牙体畸形患者68例100颗,均采用光固化复合树脂进行口腔修复,比较疗效。结果:光固化复合树脂治疗氟斑牙的总有效率为92.9%,对牙体缺损及牙体畸形总有效率为78.0%。结论:光固化复合树脂对口腔美容修复具有较高的实际应用价值,值得临床推广使用。%Objective To investigate the efficacy of light-cured composite resin restoration in the clinical oral beauty. Methods 65 patients with dental fluorosis(98 teeth)and 68 patients with malformations(100 teeth)were carried by light-cured dental composite resin and the efficacy were compared. Results The total efficiency rate of the light-cured composite resin for the treatment of dental fluorosis was 92.9%,and for dental defects and tooth abnormalities 78.0%,respectively. Conclusion Light-cured composite resin for dental cosmetic restoration has high practical value and is worthy of clinical use.

  2. New nano-sized Al2O3-BN coating 3Y-TZP ceramic composites for CAD/CAM-produced all-ceramic dental restorations. Part I. Fabrication of powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Se Fei; Yang, Li Qiang; Jin, Zhi Hao; Guo, Tian Wen; Wang, Lei; Liu, Hong Chen

    2009-06-01

    Partially sintered 3 mol % yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconium dioxide (ZrO(2), zirconia) polycrystal (3Y-TZP) ceramics are used in dental posterior restorations with computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques. High strength is acquired after sintering, but shape distortion of preshaped compacts during their sintering is inevitable. The aim of this study is to fabricate new machinable ceramic composites with strong mechanical properties that are fit for all-ceramic dental restorations. Aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3))-coated 3Y-TZP powders were first prepared by the heterogeneous precipitation method starting with 3Y-TZP, Al(NO(3))(3) . 9H(2)O, and ammonia, then amorphous boron nitride (BN) was produced and the as-received composite powders were coated via in situ reaction with boric acid and urea. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze the status of Al(2)O(3)-BN on the surface of the 3Y-TZP particles. TEM micrographs show an abundance of Al(2)O(3) particles and amorphous BN appearing uniformly on the surface of the 3Y-TZP particles after the coating process. The size of the Al(2)O(3) particles is about 20 nm. The XRD pattern shows clearly the peak of amorphous BN among the peaks of ZrO(2).

  3. In vitro evaluation of marginal and internal adaptation after occlusal stressing of indirect class II composite restorations with different resinous bases

    OpenAIRE

    Dietschi, Didier; Olsburgh, Steven; Krejci, Ivo; Davidson, Carel

    2003-01-01

    Composite inlays are indicated for large cavities, which frequently extend cervically into dentin. The purpose of this study was to compare in vitro the marginal and internal adaptation of class II fine hybrid composite inlays (Herculite, Kerr) made with or without composite bases, having different physical properties. Freshly extracted human molars were used for this study. The base extended up to the cervical margins on both sides and was made from Revolution (Kerr), Tetric flow (Vivadent),...

  4. [Effects of composite resin materials on gingiva and pulp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, S; Ishikawa, I; Masunaga, H; Matsue, M; Matsue, I

    1989-09-01

    Composite resin materials are now widely used for dental therapy. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of composite resins on gingiva and pulp in case of application of them for temporally splint in periodontal treatment. 60 teeth in 6 female dogs ranging between 1 and 2 years of age with healty teeth and gingiva were divieded to 4 groups; (1) 12 teeth, controls; (2) 12 teeth, self-cured composite resin (Clearfil F II, CF II); (3) 18 teeth, light-cured resin (Belfel LX, BLX), curing time 20 sec. and (4) 18 teeth, BLX, 40 sec., and then 48 class V composite resins were restored supragingivally. The experimental procedure were carried out for 5 days and 30 days. Histopathological observations of 60 teeth inclusive of controls were made by applying to specimens with Hematoxylin eosin staining. For the materials and time periods in this study it was found that; 1. Light-cured composite resin was superior to self-cured composite resin on handlings. 2. There were no significant differences in periodontium between the experimentals (BLX, CF II) and controls in 5 days. At the 30 days the histologic score showed more gingivitis for the experimental teeth than for the controls (BLX-40 greater than BLX-20 greater than CF II greater than Cont.). 3. At 5 days hyperemia occurred in some cases of experimentals (both BLX and CF II). The appearance of predentin and changes of odontblastic layer were observed slightly in 30 days. But there were no significant differences between BLX and CF II. 4. The result suggested that applying to composite resin materials for temporally splint, both gingiva and pulp have to be protected.

  5. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Cue Rondo is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound/video files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample, or the visuals will not appear at all...

  6. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Strategies are open compositions to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them in full...

  7. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2010-01-01

    New Year is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. It is included in "From the Danish Seasons" (see under this title). See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You...

  8. Effects of 10%sodium ascorbate on microleakage of composite resin restorations after external bleaching%10%抗坏血酸钠对外漂白后复合树脂充填体微渗漏的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩艳彦; 杜嵘; 朱亚琴

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of 10%sodium ascorbate, 10%sodium ascorbate com-bined with a surfactan(Tween,0.2%) on the microleakage of composite resin restorations after external tooth bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. Methods Fifty extracted human premolars, intact and health, were randomly divided into five groups:group 1, direct composite resin filling without bleaching;group 2, composite resin filling immediately after bleaching with 10%carbamide peroxide;group 3, immersed in artificial saliva for three weeks after bleaching, then filled by composite resin;group 4, cavity treated with 10%sodium ascorbate after bleaching and then filled by composite resin;group 5, cavity treated with 10%sodium ascorbate combined with 0.2%Tween after bleaching and then filled by composite resin. After 2000 thermal cycles, teeth were immersed in 2%methylene blue for 24 hours, then the microleakage at resin/deatin interface was observed under stereomicro-scope. Results Group 1 displayed the least amount of microleakage, while group 2 showed the greatest amount of microleakage, group 3 and group 4 behaved similarly to group 2, having great amount of microleakage, show-ing no significant difference (P>0.05);the microleakage of group 5 decreased significantly (P0.05);第5组渗漏值较第2组及第4组显著下降(P<0.05)。结论10%过氧化脲外漂白致复合树脂充填体边缘微渗漏明显增加,含0.2%Tween的10%抗坏血酸钠处理窝洞可以有效减少该微渗漏的增加,延迟充填和单纯使用抗坏血酸钠均不能有效减少微渗漏。

  9. 排龈技术在牙体缺损修复中的应用%Clinical performance of using gingival retraction cord and composite resin for dental restoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜醒; 陈榕凯; 赵月香; 王海亮

    2009-01-01

    目的 观察排龈对3MZ250复合树脂修复牙体缺损疗效的影响.方法 选择31例120颗唇颊面牙颈部龋缺损牙,随机分为实验组和对照组,每组60颗,经窝洞预备后,实验组排龈线排龈后3MZ250复合树脂修复,对照组直接树脂修复,随访2年,评价修复体保存、继发龋以及边缘密合状况.结果 充填后1周复查,使用排龈线组修复后悬突的发生率低于对照组,差异有显著性(P<0.01).充填后0.5年复查两组脱落率无明显差异;1年及2年后复查实验组充填体的脱落率明显低于对照组(P<0.05).结论 排龈可提高3MZ250复合树脂修复牙体缺损的修复体保存率,可以作为一项常规使用措施.%Objective To study the clinical performance by using gingival retraction cord and complex resin for dental restoration after two years.Methods One hundred and twenty teeth with dental caries or defects of 31 patients were selected. The teeth were divided into 2 groups randomly. In group 1, dental caries were removed and cavities were prepared routinely, and filled with composite resin after using retraction cord to retract gingival. In group 2, caries were removed and filled directly. The marginal adaptation, retention and the presence of secondary caries after six months, one year and two years were evaluated.Results One week after restoration, the incidence of overhanging dental restorations by using retraction cord to retract gingival were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.01). After 6 months, statistical analysis showed no differences between the two groups in the retention of restorations (P>0.05). However, after 1 year and 2 years , the retention of restorations in the control group was significantly lower than that of using retraction cord (P<0.05).Conclusion Gingival retraction cord has high successful rate of composite resin for restoration of dental caries or defects.

  10. Glassfiber Post: An Alternative for Restoring Grossly Decayed Primary Incisors

    OpenAIRE

    Mehra, Manjul; Grover, Rashu

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Restoration of primary incisors, which have been severely damaged by rampant caries or trauma, is a difficult task for the pediatric dentist. With the introduction of new adhesive systems and restorative materials, alternative approaches for treating these teeth have been proposed. This paper discusses the restoration of carious primary maxillary incisors using composite resin restoration reinforced with fiberglass post. Two case reports are presented here to describe the procedure. ...

  11. In vitro evaluation of marginal and internal adaptation after occlusal stressing of indirect class II composite restorations with different resinous bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietschi, Didier; Olsburgh, Steven; Krejci, Ivo; Davidson, Carel

    2003-02-01

    Composite inlays are indicated for large cavities, which frequently extend cervically into dentin. The purpose of this study was to compare in vitro the marginal and internal adaptation of class II fine hybrid composite inlays (Herculite, Kerr) made with or without composite bases, having different physical properties. Freshly extracted human molars were used for this study. The base extended up to the cervical margins on both sides and was made from Revolution (Kerr), Tetric flow (Vivadent), Dyract (Detrey-Dentsply) or Prodigy (Kerr), respectively. Before, during and after mechanical loading (1 million cycles, with a force varying from 50 to 100 N), the proximal margins of the inlay were assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Experimental data were analysed using non-parametric tests. The final percentages of marginal tooth fracture varied from 30.7% (no base) to 37.6% (Dyract). In dentin, percentages of marginal opening varied from 9.2% (Tetric Flow) to 30.1% (Prodigy), however, without significant difference between base products. Mean values of opened internal interface with dentin varied from 11.06% (Tetric Flow) to 28.15% (Prodigy). The present results regarding dentin adaptation confirmed that the physical properties of a base can influence composite inlay adaptation and that the medium-rigid flowable composite Tetric Flow is a potential material to displace, in a coronal position, proximal margins underneath composite inlays.

  12. Transglycosylation reaction catalyzed by a class V chitinase from cycad, Cycas revoluta: a study involving site-directed mutagenesis, HPLC, and real-time ESI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Toki; Fujiwara, Maho; Dennhart, Nicole; Hayashi, Hiroko; Onaga, Shoko; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Letzel, Thomas; Sakuda, Shohei; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2010-04-01

    Class V chitinase from cycad, Cycas revoluta, (CrChi-A) is the first plant chitinase that has been found to possess transglycosylation activity. To identify the structural determinants that bring about transglycosylation activity, we mutated two aromatic residues, Phe166 and Trp197, which are likely located in the acceptor binding site, and the mutated enzymes (F166A, W197A) were characterized. When the time-courses of the enzymatic reaction toward chitin oligosaccharides were monitored by HPLC, the specific activity was decreased to about 5-10% of that of the wild type and the amounts of transglycosylation products were significantly reduced by the individual mutations. From comparison between the reaction time-courses obtained by HPLC and real-time ESI-MS, we found that the transglycosylation reaction takes place under the conditions used for HPLC but not under the ESI-MS conditions. The higher substrate concentration (5 mM) used for the HPLC determination is likely to bring about chitinase-catalyzed transglycosylation. Kinetic analysis of the time-courses obtained by HPLC indicated that the sugar residue affinity of +1 subsite was strongly reduced in both mutated enzymes, as compared with that of the wild type. The IC(50) value for the inhibitor allosamidin determined by real-time ESI-MS was not significantly affected by the individual mutations, indicating that the state of the allosamidin binding site (from -3 to -1 subsites) was not changed in the mutated enzymes. We concluded that the aromatic side chains of Phe166 and Trp197 in CrChi-A participate in the transglycosylation acceptor binding, thus controlling the transglycosylation activity of the enzyme.

  13. [Marginal leakage in composite resin restorations in posterior teeth. Effect of material, cavity preparation and enamel conditioning at the cervical level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta Araujo, R; da Silva Filho, F P; Dias Mendes, A J

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this "in vitro" study was to investigate the cervical marginal leakage in class II restorations with chemically cured resin (P10) and light-cured resin (P30) in two types of cavities: conventional and adhesive. The effect of acid-etching in this area was also observed. Dentine adhesive Scotchbond was used in all experimental groups. Leakage was evidenced by Rodamina B dye penetration after thermocycling procedure between 10 degrees C and 50 degrees C temperature and analysed by using Zeiss Stereoscopic Magnifying Glass (10 X). According to the results obtained marginal leakage occurred in all experimental groups, with lower percentage for adhesives cavities when enamel acid-etching and light-cured resin P30 was used.

  14. Training, simulation, restoration expert system for power grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The paper introduces some technology for training, simulation, restoration expert system of power grid, the structure of the system including function composition, hardware and software composition are discussed, knowledge representation and the method to establish device graphical library for expert system are given, the fault setting and diagnosis for training and simulation as well as restoration technology with deep first searching arithmetic and heuristic inference are presented. The research provides a good base for developing the training, simulation, restoration system of power companies.

  15. 直接树脂修复与间接树脂嵌体的临床应用比较%Clinical comparison on restoring posterior teeth with composite resin fillings and indirect resin inlays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪席超; 文静; 于世德

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical performance of resin fillings and inlays in restoring the posterior teeth.Methods 46 posterior teeth were filled with composite resin directly and 50 posterior teeth were restored with indirect resin inlays.Each restoration was evaluated at baseline,after 1 year and 2 years,according to the modified USPHS criteria.Results There was significant difference in marginal discoloration,marginal integrity,secondary carries and wear-resistance between these two groups (P<0.05).The achievement ratio of direct resin fillings was 72.2% and the achievement ratio of indirect resin inlays was 91.3% Conclusion Indirect resin inlays can be suitable for restorations of posterior teeth with more physical property,with less irritation or microleakage.%目的 比较复合树脂及树脂嵌体用于修复后牙缺损的临床治疗效果.方法 选择82例患者,共96颗后牙,临床完成直接树脂修复46个,树脂嵌体50个,术后即刻、1年及2年,参考改良USPHS标准,观察其临床效果.结果 直接树脂修复和间接树脂嵌体修复在边缘着色、边缘密合、继发龋、耐磨性等方面差异有显著性(P<0.05),直接树脂修复成功率为72.2%(26/36),间接树脂嵌体成功率为91.3%(42/ 46).结论 树脂嵌体具有更好的边缘密合性、抗磨损和抗折裂能力,同时对牙髓的刺激更小.

  16. Clinical survey on type of restoration in deciduous teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Tatsuro; Oda, Shinya; Yamashita, Haruto; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Yakushiji, Masashi

    2008-02-01

    This study was conducted in 533 children with 1,634 treated teeth who visited the Pediatric Dentistry Department at the Chiba Hospital of Tokyo Dental College between January and December, 2003. Restorations on deciduous tooth were categorized by age of patient and tooth type. The following observations were made: Children aged 4 (17.9%) visited the clinic most frequently and this group had the highest number of deciduous restorations (21.3%). Among the 1,634 deciduous teeth restored, metal inlays were provided in 29.4% of total teeth restored, composite resin restorations in 27.2%, stainless-steel crowns in 25.7%, composite resin full crowns in 7.7%, glass-ionomer cement restorations in 6.6%, and amalgam restorations in 3.4%. By age, composite resin was most frequently used in children aged 1 to 3. In children aged 5 to 9, metal inlay was most frequently used. Those aged 4 received mostly stainless-steel crowns. Composite resin restorations were used mostly in anterior deciduous teeth, and metal inlays mostly in deciduous molars. Previous research indicated an increasing trend towards composite resin restorations and composite resin full crowns. The present study also confirmed such a trend. While the use of metal inlays and stainless-steel crowns tended to increase until 1987, the present study indicated a trend to decrease.

  17. Influence of composite restorative materials and light-curing units on diametrical tensile strength Influência do material restaurador e de aparelhos fotoativadores na resistência à tração diametral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Caldas Giorgi Tolosa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametrical tensile strength (DTS of three light-curing photo-activated composites with two different light curing units (LCU. Three types of dental restorative composites were used in this study: micro filled A110 (3M Espe; P60 (3M Espe for posterior restorations, and micro-hybrid Charisma (Heraeus-Kulzer. The two LCUs were: halogen light (HAL (Degulux, Degussa and blue light emitting diode (LED (Ultrablue, DMC. Resin composite specimens were inserted incrementally into a Teflon split mold meas-uring 3 mm in depth and 6 mm in internal diameter, and cured using either LCU (n = 10. Specimens were placed into a dark bottle containing distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. DTS tests were performed in a Universal Testing Machine (0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results were (MPa: A110/HAL: 276.50 ± 62.94ª; A110/LED: 306.01 ± 65.16ª; P60/HAL: 568.29 ± 60.77b and P60/LED: 543.01 ± 83.65b; Charisma/HAL: 430.94 ± 67.28c; Charisma/LED: 435.52 ± 105.12c. Results suggested that no significant difference in DTS was obtained with LCUs for the same composite. However, resin composite restorative materials presented different DTS.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a resistência à tração diametral (DTS de três compósitos fotoativados com dois aparelhos de fotoativação (LCU. Os compósitos utilizados neste estudo foram: resina de micropartículas A110 (3M Espe; P60 (3M Espe, indicada para restaurações posteriores, e micro-híbrida Charisma (Heraeus-Kulzer. As fontes de luz foram: halógena (HAL - Degulux (Degussa e luz emitida por diodos (LED - Ultrablue (DMC. As amostras foram confeccionadas através de dois incrementos inseridos em uma matriz de Teflon bipartida medindo 3 mm de profundidade e 6 mm de diâmetro interno e foram fotoativadas pelas LCUs (n = 10. As amostras foram armazenadas dentro de recipientes escuros contendo água destilada a 37°C por 7 dias. O

  18. Long-term melatonin administration reduces hyperinsulinemia and improves the altered fatty-acid compositions in type 2 diabetic rats via the restoration of Delta-5 desaturase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Shigeru; Segawa, Toshiko; Murai, Ichiro; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term melatonin administration on plasma levels of triglycerides, insulin and leptin, and on the fatty-acid metabolism of plasma and hepatic lipids in type 2 diabetic rats. Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, an animal model of type 2 diabetes mellitus, were divided into two groups: one untreated (n=6), and one implanted with time-releasing melatonin pellets (1.1 mg/day for 30 wk) under the abdominal skin (n=6). Age-matched Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats (n=6) were used as healthy controls. The untreated diabetic rats had the increased plasma levels of triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin and leptin at 35 wk, as compared with the healthy control rats (n=6). The diabetic rats also had augmented ratios of 20:3n-6/20:4n-6 fatty acids, owing to diminished activity of Delta-5 desaturase, an insulin-permissive enzyme, in the liver. Melatonin administration to OLETF rats reduced the hypertriglyceridemia (-39%, P melatonin-releasing pellet thus resulted in improved lipid metabolism in diabetic rats, probably through restored insulin resistance.

  19. [Studies on the pre-treatment of dental alloy for adhesive restorations. 4. Adhesive durability of adhesive resin to various dental alloys treated with composite plating].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y; Yamashita, A; Suzuki, K; Omura, I; Yamauchi, J I

    1989-07-01

    In this study, the durability of adhesion between an adhesive resin (Panavia EX) and dental alloys (gold or Ni-Cr) were examined in regard to thermal cycling, immersion, either in water (70 degrees C or 100 degrees C) or in sodium chloride solutions (pH was 3, 7 and 9). An favourable adhesive strength, such as 450-500 kgf/cm2, was obtained even after 24 hours immersion in 37 degrees C water, when the surface pre-treatment of the alloy was done with either Sn- or composite (TMSAC/Sn or PVC/Sn)-plating. However, during the durability test, the adhesive strength has decreased to such on extent, that about 60% of early strength with Sn-plating and 80% with TMSAC/Sn composite plating. But, with PVC/Sn composite-plating, more than 90% of the early strength was maintained. In regard to the pH of the corrosive solution, no apparent difference was observed regarding the above mentioned adhesive characteristics.

  20. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  1. Restoring primary anterior teeth: updated for 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, William F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the current literature associated with the techniques and materials for the restoration of primary anterior teeth and make clinical recommendations based upon the available literature. A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available to utilize for restoring primary incisors. Awareness of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material can enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are either some type of stainless steel or zirconia crown. There is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, the amount of tooth structure remaining, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables that affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative solution is chosen.

  2. Effects of resin luting agents and 1% NaOCl on the marginal fit of indirect composite restorations in primary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to provide information regarding the marginal adaptation of composite resin onlays in primary teeth previously treated with 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) (pulp irrigant) using two different resin luting agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty extracted sound primary molars had their crowns prepared in a standardized machine and were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10): G1 (1% NaOCl irrigation+EnForce); G2 (EnForce); G3 (1% NaOCl irrigation+Rely X); G4 (...

  3. Body composition and menstrual status in adults with a history of anorexia nervosa-At what fat percentage is the menstrual cycle restored?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Laura Al-Dakhiel; Frølich, Jacob Stampe; Schulpen, Maya

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between body composition measures and menstrual status in a large sample of adult patients with a history of anorexia nervosa and to calculate the predicted probability of resumption of menstrual function. Furthermore, to establish whether fat percentage...... is superior to body mass index in predicting the resumption of menses. METHOD: One hundred and thirteen adult women with a history of anorexia nervosa underwent a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan and completed questionnaires regarding medication prescription and menstrual function. RESULTS: Fifty...

  4. Clinical evaluation of resin composite restorations used to treat localised posterior tooth wear%后牙病理性磨损树脂修复的临床效果探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江琴; 童锦发; 戴杰

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察用直接树脂充填法和间接树脂充填法修复后牙病理性磨损的临床效果.方法:选择后牙(牙合)面有病理性磨损且具有充填空间的患者48例,患牙144颗,其中有牙本质过敏症状者38例98颗牙.患者按门诊顺序随机分为直接法修复组和间接法修复组2组各24例,在不备洞的情况下分别采用可乐丽菲露复合树脂直接或间接修复,比较治疗3个月及1年后树脂充填的临床效果、牙本质敏感情况和咀嚼效率改变情况.结果:治疗后3个月时复查,直接法和间接法两组患牙树脂充填体A级率无显著性差异(卡方检验,P>O.05);治疗1年后复查,间接法组患牙树脂充填体A级率优于直接法组,两组差异有统计学意义(卡方检验,P<0.05).间接法组牙本质敏感治疗总有效率优于直接法组,两组差异有统计学意义(卡方检验,P<0.05).治疗3个月及治疗1年后,间接法组的咀嚼效率高于直接法,两组差异有统计学意义(t检验,P<0.01).结论:间接树脂法比直接树脂充填法修复后牙病理性磨损有较好的临床效果.%Objective: To evaluate the clinical performance of direct and indirect resin composite restorations used to treat localized posterior tooth wear. Methods: A total of 144 pathological wore posterior teeth with restorable space in oc-clusal surface in 48 patients, 98 of which in 38 patients with dentin sensitive symptom, were randomized block designed into two groups. The control group: 69 posterior teeth wear in 24 patients were filled with Clearfil AP-X resin composite directly, the experimental group: 75 posterior teeth wear in 24 patients were filled with Clearfil AP-X resin composite indirectly. The restorations were evaluated according to the modified the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criterion after 3 months and 1 year. The patients'clinical symptom and masticatory efficiency were also compared before and after treatment. Results: There was no

  5. Glassfiber post: an alternative for restoring grossly decayed primary incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Manjul; Grover, Rashu

    2012-05-01

    Restoration of primary incisors, which have been severely damaged by rampant caries or trauma, is a difficult task for the pediatric dentist. With the introduction of new adhesive systems and restorative materials, alternative approaches for treating these teeth have been proposed. This paper discusses the restoration of carious primary maxillary incisors using composite resin restoration reinforced with fiberglass post. Two case reports are presented here to describe the procedure. Over a 1 year period, the crowns have demonstrated good retention and esthetic results. How to cite this article: Mehra M, Grover R. Glassfiber Post: An Alternative for Restoring Grossly Decayed Primary Incisors. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):159-162.

  6. Comparing the reinforcing effects of a resin modified glassionomer cement, Flowable compomer, and Flowable composite in the restoration of calcium hydroxide-treated immature roots in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Prathibha Rani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and sixty human permanent central incisors were enlarged to a 120 file size after crown removal procedure to simulate immature teeth. The root canals were filled with calcium hydroxide and stored for 15 days (phase I, 30 days (phase II, 90 days (phase III, and 180 days (Phase IV. At the end of these selected time periods, calcium hydroxide was cleaned off the root canals of forty teeth that were randomly selected and obturated with gutta-percha points in the apical 2 mm of the root canals with a sealer. The specimens were further equally divided into four groups. Unrestored Group I served as control and the root canals of teeth in the other three group specimens were reinforced with resin modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC (Group II, Flowable Compomer (Group III, and Flowable Composite (Group IV, respectively, using a translucent curing post. All specimens were subjected to compressive force using an Instron Testing machine, until fracture occurred. All the materials evaluated substantially reinforced the root specimens compared to the control. At the end of 180 days, Flowable composites showed maximum reinforcement compared to the other groups; however, no significant differences were found between the reinforcement capabilities of Flowable Compomer and RMGIC.

  7. Comparing the reinforcing effects of a resin modified glassionomer cement, Flowable compomer, and Flowable composite in the restoration of calcium hydroxide-treated immature roots in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathibha, Rani S

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and sixty human permanent central incisors were enlarged to a 120 file size after crown removal procedure to simulate immature teeth. The root canals were filled with calcium hydroxide and stored for 15 days (phase I), 30 days (phase II), 90 days (phase III), and 180 days (Phase IV). At the end of these selected time periods, calcium hydroxide was cleaned off the root canals of forty teeth that were randomly selected and obturated with gutta-percha points in the apical 2 mm of the root canals with a sealer. The specimens were further equally divided into four groups. Unrestored Group I served as control and the root canals of teeth in the other three group specimens were reinforced with resin modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC) (Group II), Flowable Compomer (Group III), and Flowable Composite (Group IV), respectively, using a translucent curing post. All specimens were subjected to compressive force using an Instron Testing machine, until fracture occurred. All the materials evaluated substantially reinforced the root specimens compared to the control. At the end of 180 days, Flowable composites showed maximum reinforcement compared to the other groups; however, no significant differences were found between the reinforcement capabilities of Flowable Compomer and RMGIC.

  8. Incorporating climate change projections into riparian restoration planning and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Laura G.; Lindsay V. Reynolds,; Beechie, Timothy J.; Collins, Mathias J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and associated changes in streamflow may alter riparian habitats substantially in coming decades. Riparian restoration provides opportunities to respond proactively to projected climate change effects, increase riparian ecosystem resilience to climate change, and simultaneously address effects of both climate change and other human disturbances. However, climate change may alter which restoration methods are most effective and which restoration goals can be achieved. Incorporating climate change into riparian restoration planning and design is critical to long-term restoration of desired community composition and ecosystem services. In this review, we discuss and provide examples of how climate change might be incorporated into restoration planning at the key stages of assessing the project context, establishing restoration goals and design criteria, evaluating design alternatives, and monitoring restoration outcomes. Restoration planners have access to numerous tools to predict future climate, streamflow, and riparian ecology at restoration sites. Planners can use those predictions to assess which species or ecosystem services will be most vulnerable under future conditions, and which sites will be most suitable for restoration. To accommodate future climate and streamflow change, planners may need to adjust methods for planting, invasive species control, channel and floodplain reconstruction, and water management. Given the considerable uncertainty in future climate and streamflow projections, riparian ecological responses, and effects on restoration outcomes, planners will need to consider multiple potential future scenarios, implement a variety of restoration methods, design projects with flexibility to adjust to future conditions, and plan to respond adaptively to unexpected change.

  9. 不同抛光时机对复合树脂边缘微渗漏的影响%Effect of different polishing time on microleakage of resin composite restorations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪轶; 柳娟; 朱铭颐; 韩俊力

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of different polishing time on microleakage of different resin composite restorations (Filtek Z350 and Filtek Z250). METHODS: Standardized preparation (the box-type cavities, 3 mm in length and width,2 mm in depth) was performed at the cemento-enamel junction on buccal surface of 80 premolars.They were randomly divided into two groups ,and restored with composite resin ( Filtek Z350 or Filtek Z250). According to polishing time, the specimens of each group were randomly classified into four subgroups. They were the subgroups of no polishing, polishing immediately after restoring, polishing after 10 minutes and polishing after 24 hours. All of the restorations were polished with Sof-lex discs. After thermal circulation and soaked for 24 hours in 2% methyl blue solution, the specimens were cut through the midline of the restoration, the microleakage at the occlusal margin and the gingival margin were observed under a stereomicroscope and the leakage depth was measured with Spot version 4.6 software package. The microleakage degree and microleakage depth of different groups were analyzed with SPSS 17.0 software package for Mann -Whitney U test and Kruskal - Wallis test. RESULTS: The microleakage depth of Filtek Z350 groups were (0.655 ± 0.486)mm,(0.626±0.497)mm,(0.648±0.370)mm and (0.639±0.453)mm,respectively. The microleakage depths of Filtek Z250 groups were (0.785±0.553)mm, (0.763±0.491 )mm, (0.749±0.608)mm and (0.715±0.588)mm,respectively. No significant differences (P>0.05) of microleakage was found among the different groups and subgroups. CONCLUSION: The polishing system of Sof-lex discs have no significant influence on microleakage of resin composite restorations at different polishing time. Supported by Research Fund of Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (08DZ2271100,08JC1414500) and Innovation Program of Shanghai Municipal Education Commission (09ZZ116).%目的:评价不同抛光时机对不

  10. 流动性复合树脂洞衬对Ⅰ类洞洞壁收缩应力的影响%Efficacy of flowable composite resin as stress-absorbing liners in Class I cavity restorations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵信义; 张文彦; 李石保; 李雅萍; 龚旭

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of flowable composite resin (FCR) as stressabsorbing liners in Class I cavity restorations in vitro.Methods Thirty Class Ⅰ cavities of 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth were prepared in polycarbonate(PC) plates and divided into three groups,ten each.After application of an adhesive,cavities in each group were restored using one of the following methods:A:restored with Charisma without any lining of FCR; B:lined with Revolution Formula 2 twice before restoration with Charisma; C:lined with Teric Flow twice before restoration with Charisma.All cavities were observed under a photoelastic microscope and photoelastic images were recorded at 3 min and 24 h after curing and the shrinkage stresses on the cavity wall were calculated.The polymerization shrinkage(v%) of the three composite resins was measured using bonded discs method and their elastic moduli were measured according to ISO standard.Results The shrinkage stresses at 3 min and 24 h of the three methods were as follows,A:(4.93 ± 0.28),(5.87 ± 0.40) MPa,B:(4.90 ± 0.30),(5.84 ± 0.33)MPa,and C:(4.76 ± 0.28),(5.83 ± 0.37) MPa.No significant difference was found in results among different groups.The polymerization shrinkage(v%) in group A,B,and C were (2.63 ±0.04)%,(4.56 ±0.06)%,and (3.98 ±0.02)%.The elastic modulus in group A,B,and C were (9.59 ±0.65),(4.25 ±0.51),and (5.41 ±0.79) GPa.Conclusions Under present study condition,using a FCR as stressabsorbing liner under composite resin restoration does not significantly decrease the polymerization shrinkage stresses at the cavity wall.%目的 观察流动性复合树脂洞衬对普通复合树脂充填Ⅰ类洞洞壁收缩应力的影响,为流动性复合树脂的临床应用提供参考.方法 在聚碳酸酯板上制备直径4 mm、深2 mm的窝洞30个,使用粘接剂后将窝洞分为3组(每组10个)进行充填修复.无洞衬组:直接充填复合树脂A(Charisma);洞衬1组:

  11. 不同因素影响复合树脂边缘微渗漏的体外研究%In vitro study of the effects of different factors on microleakage of resin composite restorations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晨; 李纾

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of adhesive systems, lining materials and the resin matrices on the marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations. METHODS: Class II cavities were prepared on 100 freshly extracted molars. The molars were then randomly divided into 5 groups (re =20) and the cavities were filled with 3M Adper Easy One + 3M Z250 (Group A) , 370g/L phosphoric acid + 3M Adper Single Bond 2 + 3M Z250 (Group B) , 3M Adper Easy One +3M Light Cure Glass Ionomer + 3M Z250 (Group C) , 3M Adper Easy One + 3M Flow-able Restorative + 3M Z250 (Group D) and 3M P90 system adhesive + 3M P90 (Group E). After thermocycling and Indian ink dyeing, all specimens were sectioned in mesio-distal direction. The dye penetration depth was observed and measured under stereomicroscope. RESULTS: The mean microleakage of group E was significantly less than that of the other groups ( P 0 05). CONCLUSION: The microleakage of P90 restoration is low. Lining by light-cured glass ionomer can decrease the microleakage of composite resin. Total-etch adhesive and self-etch adhesives have no significantly different effects on the microleakage of composite resin.%目的:观察不同粘结系统、不同垫底材料,不同树脂基质对复合树脂边缘微渗漏的影响.方法:按标准在100个新鲜离体磨牙制备邻(牙合)面洞后,随机分为5组(n=20),分别用3M自酸蚀粘结剂+3MZ250复合树脂充填(A组);370 g/L磷酸酸蚀剂+3M全酸蚀粘结剂+3M Z250复合树脂充填(B组);3M自酸蚀粘结剂+3M光固化玻璃离子垫底+3M Z250复合树脂充填(C组);3M自酸蚀粘结剂+3M流动树脂垫底+3M Z250复合树脂充填(D组);3M P90粘结系统+3M P90复合树脂充填(E组).所有试件经过冷热循环、印度墨水染色,近远中向切片后,在体视显微镜下观察测量染料渗透深度.结果:E组(P90)的微渗漏均数明显小于其余各组(P<0.05);C组的微渗漏均数明显小于A组、B组和D组(P<0.05);A、B、D3组间两

  12. Macroinvertebrate community assembly in pools created during peatland restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee E; Ramchunder, Sorain J; Beadle, Jeannie M; Holden, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Many degraded ecosystems are subject to restoration attempts, providing new opportunities to unravel the processes of ecological community assembly. Restoration of previously drained northern peatlands, primarily to promote peat and carbon accumulation, has created hundreds of thousands of new open water pools. We assessed the potential benefits of this wetland restoration for aquatic biodiversity, and how communities reassemble, by comparing pool ecosystems in regions of the UK Pennines on intact (never drained) versus restored (blocked drainage-ditches) peatland. We also evaluated the conceptual idea that comparing reference ecosystems in terms of their compositional similarity to null assemblages (and thus the relative importance of stochastic versus deterministic assembly) can guide evaluations of restoration success better than analyses of community composition or diversity. Community composition data highlighted some differences in the macroinvertebrate composition of restored pools compared to undisturbed peatland pools, which could be used to suggest that alternative end-points to restoration were influenced by stochastic processes. However, widely used diversity metrics indicated no differences between undisturbed and restored pools. Novel evaluations of restoration using null models confirmed the similarity of deterministic assembly processes from the national species pool across all pools. Stochastic elements were important drivers of between-pool differences at the regional-scale but the scale of these effects was also similar across most of the pools studied. The amalgamation of assembly theory into ecosystem restoration monitoring allows us to conclude with more certainty that restoration has been successful from an ecological perspective in these systems. Evaluation of these UK findings compared to those from peatlands across Europe and North America further suggests that restoring peatland pools delivers significant benefits for aquatic fauna by

  13. Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John G.

    The Composites market is arguably the most challenging and profitable market for phenolic resins aside from electronics. The variety of products and processes encountered creates the challenges, and the demand for high performance in critical operations brings value. Phenolic composite materials are rendered into a wide range of components to supply a diverse and fragmented commercial base that includes customers in aerospace (Space Shuttle), aircraft (interiors and brakes), mass transit (interiors), defense (blast protection), marine, mine ducting, off-shore (ducts and grating) and infrastructure (architectural) to name a few. For example, phenolic resin is a critical adhesive in the manufacture of honeycomb sandwich panels. Various solvent and water based resins are described along with resin characteristics and the role of metal ions for enhanced thermal stability of the resin used to coat the honeycomb. Featured new developments include pultrusion of phenolic grating, success in RTM/VARTM fabricated parts, new ballistic developments for military vehicles and high char yield carbon-carbon composites along with many others. Additionally, global regional market resin volumes and sales are presented and compared with other thermosetting resin systems.

  14. Composite resin inlay in the restoration of enamel defects in deciduous molars%复合树脂嵌体修复乳磨牙缺损的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周铸民; 丁桂聪; 陈晶; 宋宁; 石培荔

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of composite resin inlay in the restoration of enamel defects in deciduous molars.Methods 203 deciduous molars with enamel defects were randomly assigned to receive composite resin inlay ( 99 molars,resin-inlay group ),or direct composite resin filing ( 104 molars,resin-filling group ).All the molars were examined one year after restoration; and the modified USPHS-criteria was used for assessment.Results The clinical success rate differed significantly between the resin-inlay group and the resin-filling group in retention,marginal adaptation,secondary caries,gingival index,reaction of the pulp,and abrasion level ( 94.9%,92.9%,90.9%,92.9%,94.9%,and 88.9% in the former group; P< 0.05 ).Although the clinical success rate of color match was higher in the group with resin-inlay ( 87.9% ) than in the group with resin-filling,but there was no significant difference between the two groups ( P > 0.05 ).Conclusion Composite resin inlay is more efficacious than direct composite resin filling.%目的 观察复合树脂嵌体修复乳磨牙牙体缺损的临床效果.方法 对乳磨牙牙体缺损分别采用复合树脂嵌体技术和复合树脂直接充填修复,复合树脂嵌体技术组99例,复合树脂直接充填修复104例;1年后复诊检查,评价标准采用改良USPHS评价标准.结果 复合树脂嵌体技术组的临床成功率在固位情况(94.9%)、边缘密合度(92.9%)、继发龋(90.9%)、牙龈指数(92.9%)、牙髓反应(94.9%)、磨耗程度(88.9%)指标上高于复合树脂直接充填修复组,并且差异有显著性(P< 0.05).在色泽协调性指标上,临床成功率(87.9%)虽高于复合树脂直接充填修复组,但统计学上差异无显著性(P> 0.05).结论 复合树脂嵌体修复术组临床效果优于复合树脂直接充填组.

  15. Wearproof composition coatings on the basis of SiC-AL2O3 for restoration and reiforcement of the components of aircraft ground support equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. П. Уманський

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available On the ground of research of a contact interaction of the melts of the system Ni–Al with the ceramics of SiC–Al2O3 content, the possibility of wearproof coating deposition of the system SiC–Al2O3–Ni–Al by gas-flame techniques has been proved. Technological features of their acquisition also have been studied. The structure of coatings from composition material that contains the SiC–Al2O3 wearproof component and Ni–Al metallic binder, deposited by the method of high velocity air fuel deposition (HVAF on medium-carbon steel steels has been researched. Tribotechnical descriptions of the deposited coatings under the conditions of friction without lubricating materials in the air environment in wide range of speed-load modes of the “pin–on–disk” layout have been studied. The features and regularities of their wear mechanisms retaining the constant speed and constant load have been determined

  16. Restoring the worn dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, R L; Ouellet, D F

    1992-01-01

    Strong dental materials and dental porcelains are providing dentists with restorative opportunities that are more conservative because they require less destruction of healthy tooth structure and yield a more esthetic result. In cases of severe wear due to attrition, abrasion, and erosion, this process can be stopped, restoring the esthetics and function by using proper techniques and materials. The case report described in this article demonstrates the conservative restoration of severe wear due to attrition and erosion. Teeth were lengthened, wear was restored, and further wear was ceased by using a combination of bonded porcelain, a heat, light, and self-cure resin system, and a new glass-ionomer restorative material. The result was a strong, durable restoration (that required no anesthesia) with high esthetics.

  17. Watershed Restoration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

    2007-09-27

    In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

  18. Microhardness evaluation around composite restorations using fluoride-containing adhesive systems Avaliação da microdureza ao redor de restaurações de compósito confeccionadas com sistemas adesivos contendo fluoretos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Silami de Magalhães

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microhardness of dental enamel around composite restorations bonded with fluoride-containing adhesive systems (FCAS, after thermo- and pH-cycling protocols. Standardized cylindrical cavities were prepared on enamel surfaces of 175 dental fragments, which were randomly assigned into seven experimental groups (n=25. Four groups used FCAS: Optibond Solo (OS; Prime&Bond 2.1 (PB; Syntac Sprint (SS and Tenure Quick (TC. Other groups consisted of "Sandwich" technique restoration (STR (glass ionomer liner + hydrophobic adhesive resin /restorative composite or used Single Bond with (SB or without (SBWC cycling protocols. Adhesive systems were applied according to manufacturers' instructions and cavities were restored with a microfilled composite (Durafill VS. After finishing and polishing, all groups were submitted to 1,000 thermal cycles (5 ºC and 55 ºC and to demineralization (pH 4.3 and remineralization (pH 7.0 cycling protocols, except for SBWC group. The Knoop microhardness of enamel surfaces were measured around restorations. Indentations were recorded at 150, 300 and 450-mm from the cavity wall. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Duncan's Test (a=0.05%. Means ± SD of enamel microhardness for the groups were (Kg/mm²: SBWC: 314.50 ± 55.93ª ; SB: 256.78 ± 62.66b; STR: 253.90 ± 83.6b; TQ: 243.93 ± 68.3b; OS: 227.97 ± 67.1c; PB: 213.30 ± 91.3d; SS: 208.73 ± 86.6d. Means ± SD of microhardness for the distances 150, 300, 450mm from the cavity wall were, respectively: 234.46 ± 77.81ª; 240.24 ± 85.12ª; 262.06 ± 79.46b. SBWC group, which was not submitted to thermo- and pH-cycling protocols, showed the highest enamel microhardness mean value and the FCAS resulted in lower microhardness values. At 450 mm from the cavity wall, the enamel microhardness increased significantly.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a microdureza do esmalte dental ao redor de restaurações em compósito que

  19. A Simplified Method for the Restoration of Severely Decayed Primary Incisors

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Talebi; Iman Parisay; Fatemeh Khorakian; Elham Nik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Caries and dental trauma are common reasons for primary anterior teeth restorations in children. This non-control clinical trial was designed to eva- luate crown restorations reinforced with a sectioned file post for the restoration of severely damaged primary maxillary incisors.Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight primary maxillary incisors of 12 children (3-5 years old) with early childhood caries (ECC) received composite restorations with a custom made post. The restorations wer...

  20. Evaluation of the dental structure loss produced during maintenance and replacement of occlusal amalgam restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Sardenberg; Clarissa Calil Bonifácio; Mariana Minatel Braga; José Carlos Pettorossi Imparato; Fausto Medeiros Mendes

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate four different approaches to the decision of changing or not defective amalgam restorations in first primary molar teeth concerning the loss of dental structure. Ditched amalgam restorations (n = 11) were submitted to four different treatments, as follows: Control group - polishing and finishing of the restorations were carried out; Amalgam group - the ditched amalgam restorations were replaced by new amalgam restorations; Composite resin group -...

  1. Smooth coronal surface, resin restoration and microleakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanikoğlu, F; Türkmen, C; Kartal, N; Başaran, B

    1997-09-01

    The space between the resin and the cavity walls has always become interesting to search. The aim of this study was to evaluate any differences on leakage values of Class 5 type resin restorations prepared on surrounding surfaces of the tooth crown. Ninety human teeth were prepared as Class 5 cavities on buccal, lingual, mesial and distal surfaces and were randomly divided into groups for bevelling, groove preparation and as control. The subgroups were arranged as fluoride gel and/or sealant applications. Fluoride gel was applied following the cavity preparations. Sealant was applied over composite resin restorations. Treated teeth were thermocycled and immersed into dye solution for 96 hours. The restorations were evaluated in a stereo-microscope following the sectioning. Bevelling of the cavosurfaces and/or preparation of a groove addition to cavity procedures did not make any difference on the microleakage scores of the restorations done on either surfaces statistically.

  2. Color stability of esthetic restorative material after topical fluoride application

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Present study was conducted to compare the effect of topical fluoride agents on color change of three aesthetic restorative materials. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Restorative material used were Ketac Fill type II (GIC), Filtek Z350(Composite) and Beuttifull II (Giomer). Topical Fluorides used were Pascal (1.23% APF gel) and Fluoride Varnish (Bifluoride). 24 samples of each restorative material were prepared, which were divided into 8 each, among three groups. Treatment of Group A with APF gel,...

  3. Influence of light curing units on failure of directcomposite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Jadhav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Light polymerizable tooth colored restorative materials are most widely preferred for advantages such as esthetics, improved physical properties and operator′s control over the working time. Since the introduction of these light polymerizable restorative materials, there has been a concern about the depth of appropriate cure throughout the restoration. Photopolymerization of the composite is of fundamental importance because adequate polymerization is a crucial factor for optimization of the physical and mechanical properties and clinical results of the composite material. Inadequate polymerization results in greater deterioration at the margins of the restoration, decreased bond strength between the tooth and the restoration, greater cytotoxicity, and reduced hardness. Therefore, the dentist must use a light curing unit that delivers adequate and sufficient energy to optimize composite polymerization. Varying light intensity affects the degree of conversion of monomer to polymer and depth of cure.

  4. Biological properties of nanohydroxyapatite composite for dental restoration%纳米羟基磷灰石牙体修复材料的生物性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄涛; 陈汉

    2016-01-01

      结果与结论:①体外实验结果:不同浓度的纳米羟基磷灰石材料浸提液与细胞发生直接接触之后,细胞毒性在0至1级之间,未发生细胞毒性;②体内实验结果:随着时间的延长,3组新生骨所占视野总面积比例均不断上升,实验组不同时间点的新生骨多于对照组、空白对照组(P OBJECTIVE:To observe the effect of nanohydroxyapatite composite materials in the repair of alveolar bone defect in animal models by detectingits cytotoxicity. METHODS:(1)In vitroexperiment: nanohydroxyapatite extracts with concentrations of 10%, 50%, 100% (or hydroxyapatite leaching extracts) were used to culture periodontal ligament fibroblast-like cels and L-929 cels for 7 days, respectively, folowed by cel cytotoxicity analysis. (2)In vivoexperiment: 45 adult rabbits were used to make animal models of alveolar bone defects and then were randomized into three groups: experimental group implanted with nanohydroxyapatite, control groupwith hydroxyapatite, and blank control group with no implant material. New bone formation was observed at 1, 2 and 3 weeks after operation. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:(1)In vitroexperiment: after directly cultured with 10%, 50%, 100%nanohydroxyapatite extracts, the cel cytotoxicity was graded 0 to 1, indicating no presence of cytotoxicity. (2)In vivoexperiment: in the three groups, the percentage of new bone area accounting for the total visual field was gradualy in a rise over time. Moreover, the amount of new bone tissues was higher in the experimental group than the other two groups at different time (P< 0.05). These findings demonstrate that the nanohydroxyapatite materials have no cytotoxicity that can be used to promote the repair of alveolar bone defects.

  5. Ghost suppression in image restoration filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    An optimum image restoration filter is described in which provision is made to constrain the spatial extent of the restoration function, the noise level of the filter output and the rate of falloff of the composite system point-spread away from the origin. Experimental results show that sidelobes on the composite system point-spread function produce ghosts in the restored image near discontinuities in intensity level. By redetermining the filter using a penalty function that is zero over the main lobe of the composite point-spread function of the optimum filter and nonzero where the point-spread function departs from a smoothly decaying function in the sidelobe region, a great reduction in sidelobe level is obtained. Almost no loss in resolving power of the composite system results from this procedure. By iteratively carrying out the same procedure even further reductions in sidelobe level are obtained. Examples of original and iterated restoration functions are shown along with their effects on a test image.

  6. Evaluation of Microleakage of RMGIC and Flowable Composite Immersed in Soft Drink and Fresh Fruit Juice: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C Maganur, Prabha Devi; Prabhakar, A R; S, Sugandhan; Namineni, Srinivas

    2010-01-01

    Aim : The objective of the study was to evaluate and compare the effect of a soft drink and a fresh fruit juice on the microleakage of flowable composite and resin modified glass lonomer cement (RMGIC). Methods and materials : 70 non-carious human premolars were collected and stored in saline until further use. Class-V cavities were prepared and restored with RMGIC on the buccal surface and flowable composite on the lingual surface for evaluating microleakage. The experimental groups (Group I and II ) comprised of 60 teeth, while the remaining 10 formed the control group (Group III-Water). The experimental groups were further divided into 2 groups (Group I-Cola drink and Group II-Fresh orange fruit juice) of 30 teeth each. Each group was then further divided into 3 subgroups (Short, Medium and Long-immersion) containing 10 teeth as shown in flow chart. Immersion regime was followed according to Maupome G et al and microleakage was evaluated by using Rhodamine B dye and examined under stereomicroscope. Results : Microleakage data obtained was statistically analyzed by Chi-square test. The teeth showed statistically significant microleakage as the immersion regime increased. Interpretation and Conclusion : Low pH soft drink caused highly significant microleakage at the tooth and restorative material interface in medium and high immersion regimes signifying that the leakage pattern was directly proportional to the number of immersions. Thus, the study conclusively proves that the 'sipping habit' associated with commonly available low pH beverages is detrimental to the longevity of restorations.

  7. Toponymic Restoration in Irkutsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Snarsky

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the discussion on restoration of historical names of public spaces in Irkutsk. It also reviews different approaches to the problem that appeared in the historical science and publicism. The author says about the necessity of a strictly historical approach to the toponymic restoration.

  8. Guiding Restoration Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    restoration of important ecosystem functions requires reintegrating landscapes or restorating the func- tional aspects of landscapes ( Risser 1992...51-64. Risser , P. G. 1992. Landscape ecology approach to ecosystem rehabilitation. Pages 37-46 in M. L. Wali (ed.), Ecosystem Rehabilitation

  9. Sealing occlusal caries lesions in adults referred for restorative treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakhshandeh, Azam; Qvist, Vibeke; Ekstrand, Kim R

    2012-01-01

    treatment by senior lecturers at School of Dentistry, Copenhagen, Denmark were included. In case the patient had more than one occlusal caries lesion, randomization between sealing and restoration was made; otherwise, the lesion was sealed. In total, 60 resin sealants and 12 composite restorations were made...

  10. Comparison of marginal microleakage of class Ⅱ restoration with four composite resins%4种复合树脂充填Ⅱ类窝洞边缘微渗漏研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史婷; 刘进

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare marginal microleakage of class II restoration with four composite resins under in vitro con-ditions.Methods 30 molars without caries were selected.In each tooth,4 cavities of class Ⅱ were prepared and filled with 4 composite resins:Filtek Z350 Flowable,Filtek Z350,SDR and TetricN-Ceram Bulk Fill.All filled teeth were thermocycled for 500 times and were then immersed in basic fuchsine solusion for 24 h.The depth of methylene penetration was measured under stereomicroscope.Results Marginal microleakage value of SDR was smallest,followed by Filtek Z350 Flowable,TetricN-Ce-ram Bulk Fill,Filtek Z350,and the differences were statistically significant(P<0. 05 ).Conclusion Compared with the other composites,SDR showed significantly less marginal microleakage.%目的:比较4种不同类型复合树脂充填Ⅱ类窝洞后的边缘微渗漏情况。方法选择30颗无龋的磨牙,每个牙齿的4个轴面制备Ⅱ类洞型,并分别充填Filtek Z350流动树脂、Filtek Z350树脂、SDR流动树脂、TetricN-Ceram Bulk Fill树脂。所有充填过的样本镜温度循环500次后,浸入品红溶液中24 h,体式显微镜观察并对各组微渗漏进行评价。结果 SDR的微渗漏值最小,Z350流动树脂、TetricN-Ceram Bulk Fill和Z350树脂3种树脂的微渗漏值依次增大,组间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论相较于其他树脂,SDR复合树脂充填后的窝洞边缘微渗漏较少。

  11. Evaluation of efficacy of restorative dental treatment provided under general anesthesia at hospitalized pediatric dental patients of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eshghi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Stainless steel crown restorations had significantly better results vs other posterior restorations. The failure rates of stainless steel crown and anterior composite resin build-up restorations did not correlate with the time of follow-up in comparison of other restorations.

  12. Influence of filler existence on microleakage of a self-etch adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmohammadi, H.; Khosravi, K.; Kashani, K.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the effect of filler existence in self-etch adhesive resin on the marginal leakage of a class V restoration. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared and restored with a resin composite on the buccal surfaces of 48 premolars lined with unfilled or filled adhesi

  13. PcchiB1, encoding a class V chitinase, is affected by PcVelA and PcLaeA, and is responsible for cell wall integrity in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerewerd, Jens; Zadra, Ivo; Kürnsteiner, Hubert; Kück, Ulrich

    2011-11-01

    Penicillin production in Penicillium chrysogenum is controlled by PcVelA and PcLaeA, two components of the regulatory velvet-like complex. Comparative microarray analysis with mutants lacking PcVelA or PcLaeA revealed a set of 62 common genes affected by the loss of both components. A downregulated gene in both knockout strains is PcchiB1, potentially encoding a class V chitinase. Under nutrient-depleted conditions, transcript levels of PcchiB1 are strongly upregulated, and the gene product contributes to more than 50 % of extracellular chitinase activity. Functional characterization by generating PcchiB1-disruption strains revealed that PcChiB1 is responsible for cell wall integrity and pellet formation in P. chrysogenum. Further, fluorescence microscopy with a DsRed-labelled chitinase suggests a cell wall association of the protein. An unexpected phenotype occurred when knockout strains were grown on media containing N-acetylglucosamine as the sole C and N source, where, in contrast to the recipient, a penicillin producer strain, the mutants and an ancestral strain show distinct mycelial growth. We discuss the relevance of this class V chitinase for morphology in an industrially important fungus.

  14. 流动树脂垫衬联合高强度流动树脂修复牙邻(牙合)面洞的疗效分析%High-intensity Flowable Composite after Lining with Flowable Composite in Restoring Class ⅡCavi ty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪磊

    2015-01-01

    【目的】探讨流动树脂垫衬联合高强度流动树脂在牙邻(牙合)面洞修复治疗中的疗效。【方法】选取接受牙邻(牙合)面洞修复的患者164例,根据修复方法不同分为观察组与对照组,观察组采用流动树脂垫衬联合高强度流动树脂修复,对照组采用“三明治”技术修复。两组治疗后6个月及1年采用改良的USPHS临床修复体质量评估疗效并比较。【结果】修复6个月及12个月后观察组患者