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Sample records for class-iii conditions review

  1. Early orthodontic treatment for Class III malocclusion: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, See Choong; Thiruvenkatachari, Badri

    2017-01-01

    Class III malocclusion affects between 5% and 15% of our population. The 2 most common dilemmas surrounding Class III treatment are the timing of treatment and the type of appliance. A number of appliances have been used to correct a Class III skeletal discrepancy, but there is little evidence available on their effectiveness in the long term. Similarly, early treatment of Class III malocclusion has been practiced with increasing interest. However, there has been no solid evidence on the benefits in the long term. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of orthodontic/orthopedic methods used in the early treatment of Class III malocclusion in the short and long terms. Several sources were used to identify all relevant studies independently of language. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Embase (Ovid), and MEDLINE (Ovid) were searched to June 2016. The selection criteria included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective controlled clinical trials (CCTs) of children between the ages of 7 and 12 years on early treatment with any type of orthodontic/orthopedic appliance compared with another appliance to correct Class III malocclusion or with an untreated control group. The primary outcome measure was correction of reverse overjet, and the secondary outcomes included skeletal changes, soft tissue changes, quality of life, patient compliance, adverse effect, Peer Assessment Rating score, and treatment time. The search results were screened for inclusion, and the data extracted by 2 independent authors. The data were analyzed using software (version 5.1, Review Manager; The Nordic Cochrane Centre, The Cochrane Collaboration; Copenhagen, Denmark). The mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were expressed for the continuous data. Random effects were carried out with high levels of clinical or statistical heterogeneity and fixed affects when the heterogeneity was low

  2. Sinus lifting before Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy: a suitable method for oral rehabilitation of edentulous patients with skelettal class-III conditions: review of the literature and report of a case

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    Meyer Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional rehabilitation of patients afflicted with severe mandibular and maxillary alveolar atrophy might be challenging especially in malformed patients. Methods Treatment planning using sinus lifting and implant placement before Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy in a patient with severe mandibular and posterior maxillary alveolar atrophy and skelettal class-III conditions due to cleft palate are described. Results A full functional and esthetic rehabilitation of the patient was achieved by a stepwise surgical approach performed through sinus lifting as the primary approach followed by implant placement and subsequent Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy to correct the maxillo-mandibular relation. Conclusion Stabilisation of the maxillary complex by a sinus lifting procedure in combination with computer aided implant placement as preorthodontic planning procedure before Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy seems to be suitable in order to allow ideal oral rehabilitation especially in malformed patients.

  3. Effectiveness of interceptive treatment of class III malocclusions with skeletal anchorage: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Jorge Rodríguez de Guzmán-Barrera

    Full Text Available Recently, new strategies for treating class III malocclusions have appeared. Skeletal anchorage appears to reduce the dentoalveolar effects while maximising the orthopaedic effect in growing patients. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to examine the effectiveness of bone anchorage devices for interceptive treatment of skeletal class III malocclusions. Searches were made in the Pubmed, Embase, Scopus and Cochrane databases, as well as in a grey literature database, and were complemented by hand-searching. The criteria for eligibility were: patients who had undergone orthodontic treatment with skeletal anchorage (miniplates and miniscrews. Patients with syndromes or craniofacial deformities or who had undergone maxillofacial surgery were excluded. The following variables were recorded for each article: author, year of publication, type of study, sample size, dropouts, demographic variables, treatment carried out, radiographic study (2D or 3D, follow-up time, and quality of the articles on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The means and confidence intervals of the following variables were employed: Wits, overjet, ANB, SNA and SNB. Initially, 239 articles were identified. After removing the duplicates and applying the selection criteria, 9 were included in the qualitative synthesis and 7 in the quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis. It may be concluded that skeletal anchorage is an effective treatment for improving skeletal Class III malocclusion, but when compared with other traditional treatments such as disjunction and face mask, there is no clear evidence that skeletal anchorage improves the results.

  4. Bone- and dentoalveolar-anchored dentofacial orthopedics for Class III malocclusion: new approaches, similar objectives? : a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Fernández, Marta; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Yañez-Vico, Rosa Maria; Mendoza-Mendoza, Asuncion; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    To analyze the scientific literature and compare in the results of conventional orthopedic appliances with those obtained from recent bone-anchored orthopedics for Class III malocclusion. The literature was systematically reviewed using PubMed/Medline, Scopus, and Scirus databases up to January 2012. Articles were selected by two different researchers (kappa index  =  0.83), based on established inclusion/exclusion criteria. Methodologic quality was classified as high, medium, or low quality. The search strategy identified 1020 titles. Thirty studies were selected after applying the criteria (high quality  =  9, medium quality  =  21). Protraction rates differed within a range of one- to twofold between bone-anchored and dentoalveolar therapies (P orthopedics (P orthopedics.

  5. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

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    Fadia M. Al-Hummayani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month.

  6. Stability of maxillary protraction therapy in children with Class III malocclusion: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yifan; Guo, Runzhi; Hou, Liyu; Fu, Zhen; Li, Weiran

    2018-02-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the stability of treatment effects of maxillary protraction therapy in Class III children. Multiple electronic databases were searched from 01/1996 to 10/2016. Randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical trials, and cohort studies with untreated Class III controls and a follow-up over 2 years were considered for inclusion. The methodological quality of the studies and publication bias were evaluated. Mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of six variables (SNA, SNB, ANB, mandibular plane angle, overjet, and lower incisor angle) were calculated. Ten studies were included in the qualitative analysis, and four studies were included in the quantitative analysis. Compared with the control group, after treatment, the treated group showed significant changes: SNA +1.79° (95% CI: 1.23, 2.34), SNB -1.16° (95% CI -2.08, -0.24), ANB +2.92° (95% CI 2.40, 3.44), mandibular plane angle +1.41° (95% CI 0.63, 2.20), overjet +3.94 mm (95% CI 2.17, 5.71) and lower incisor angle -3.07° (95% CI -4.92, -1.22). During follow-up, the changes in five variables reflected significant relapse. Overall, the treated group showed significant changes only in ANB +1.66° (95% CI 0.97, 2.35) and overjet +2.41 mm (95% CI 1.60, 3.23). Maxillary protraction can be a short-term effective therapy and might improve sagittal skeletal and dental relationships in the medium term. But some skeletal and dental variables showed significant relapse during the follow-up period. Long-term studies are still required to further evaluate its skeletal benefits. The study evaluated the medium-term stability of skeletal and dental effects of maxillary protraction in Class III children and discussed whether the therapy can reduce the need for orthognathic surgery.

  7. Gait and Function in Class III Obesity

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    Catherine Ling

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Walking, more specifically gait, is an essential component of daily living. Walking is a very different activity for individuals with a Body Mass Index (BMI of 40 or more (Class III obesity compared with those who are overweight or obese with a BMI between 26–35. Yet all obesity weight classes receive the same physical activity guidelines and recommendations. This observational study examined the components of function and disability in a group with Class III obesity and a group that is overweight or has Class I obesity. Significant differences were found between the groups in the areas of gait, body size, health condition, and activity capacity and participation. The Timed Up and Go test, gait velocity, hip circumference, and stance width appear to be most predictive of activity capacity as observed during gait assessment. The findings indicate that Class III-related gait is pathologic and not a normal adaptation.

  8. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    M R Yelampalli; M R Rachala

    2012-01-01

    Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of p...

  9. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Yelampalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of premature occlusal contacts causing forward functional shift of the mandible, which is known as pseudo class III malocclusion. These cases, if not treated at the initial stage of development, interfere with normal growth of the jaw bases and may result in severe facial deformities. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. This paper deals with the selection of an appropriate appliance from the various current options available for early intervention in developing class III malocclusion through two case reports.

  10. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelampalli, M R; Rachala, M R

    2012-01-01

    Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of premature occlusal contacts causing forward functional shift of the mandible, which is known as pseudo class III malocclusion. These cases, if not treated at the initial stage of development, interfere with normal growth of the jaw bases and may result in severe facial deformities. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. This paper deals with the selection of an appropriate appliance from the various current options available for early intervention in developing class III malocclusion through two case reports.

  11. Gender differences in Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Reyes, Brian C; McNamara, James A

    2005-07-01

    This study evaluated gender differences in the cephalometric records of a large-scale cross-sectional sample of Caucasian subjects with Class III malocclusion at different developmental ages. The purpose also was to provide average age-related and sex-related data for craniofacial measures in untreated Class III subjects that are used as reference in the diagnostic appraisal of the patient with Class III disharmony. The sample examined consisted of 1094 pretreatment lateral cephalometric records (557 female subjects and 537 male subjects) of Caucasian Class III individuals. The age range for female subjects was between three years six months and 57 years seven months. The male subject group ranged from three years three months to 48 years five months. Twelve age groups were identified. Skeletal maturity at different age periods also was determined using the stage of cervical vertebral maturation. Gender differences for all cephalometric variables were analyzed using parametric statistics. The findings of the study indicated that Class III malocclusion is associated with a significant degree of sexual dimorphism in craniofacial parameters, especially from the age of 13 onward. Male subjects with Class III malocclusion present with significantly larger linear dimensions of the maxilla, mandible, and anterior facial heights when compared with female subjects during the circumpubertal and postpubertal periods.

  12. O tratamento da Classe III: revisão sistemática - Parte I. Magnitude, direção e duração das forças na protração maxilar The treatment of Class III: systematic review - Part I. Magnitude, direction and duration of the forces in the maxillary protraction

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    Anna Paula Rocha Perrone

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: para o tratamento da Classe III durante o crescimento, a protração maxilar é a terapia mais relatada na literatura. Durante o tratamento, é requerida especial atenção à mecânica utilizada para a correção do problema. OBJETIVO: sintetizar as informações relativas à magnitude, direção e tempo diário da aplicação das forças, por meio de uma revisão sistemática. MÉTODOS: estudos foram identificados a partir de uma pesquisa eletrônica no Medline database - Entrez PubMed (178 artigos e Bireme (550 artigos, no período de janeiro de 1983 a dezembro de 2008. Após um criterioso processo de inclusão e exclusão, 56 estudos primários foram selecionados e submetidos a um segundo processo de seleção, restando 39 artigos. Foram calculados a média e o desvio-padrão, bem como os valores mínimos e máximos para a magnitude, a direção e a quantidade de horas de uso das forças de protração maxilar. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÃO: as médias de magnitude, direção e duração das forças de protração maxilar foram de, respectivamente, 447,8 gramas, 27,5 graus de inclinação em relação ao Plano Oclusal, e 15,2 horas por dia.INTRODUCTION: For the treatment of Class III during growth, maxillary protraction therapy is the most reported in the literature. During the treatment is required special attention to the mechanics used to fix the problem. AIM: To synthesize informations about the magnitude, direction and time of daily application of forces, through a systematic review. METHODS: Studies were identified from an electronic search on Medline database - Entrez PubMed (178 articles and Bireme (550 articles, from January 1983 until December 2008. After rigorous process of inclusion and exclusion 56 primary studies were selected and subjected to a second selection process, remaining 39 articles. It was calculated the average and standard deviation, and the minimum and maximum values for magnitude, direction and usage

  13. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels, one...

  14. Early cephalometric characteristics in Class III malocclusion

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    Vanessa Costa Farias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early identification of craniofacial morphological characteristics allows orthopedic segmented interventions to attenuate dentoskeletal discrepancies, which may be partially disguised by natural dental compensation. To investigate the morphological characteristics of Brazilian children with Class III malocclusion, in stages I and II of cervical vertebrae maturation and compare them with the characteristics of Class I control patients. METHODS: Pre-orthodontic treatment records of 20 patients with Class III malocclusion and 20 control Class I patients, matched by the same skeletal maturity index and sex, were selected. The craniofacial structures and their relationships were divided into different categories for analysis. Angular and linear measures were adopted from the analyses previously described by Downs, Jarabak, Jacobson and McNamara. The differences found between the groups of Class III patients and Class I control group, both subdivided according to the stage of cervical vertebrae maturation (I or II, were assessed by analysis of variance (ANOVA, complemented by Bonferroni's multiple mean comparisons test. RESULTS: The analysis of variance showed statistically significant differences in the different studied groups, between the mean values found for some angular (SNA, SNB, ANB and linear variables (Co - Gn, N - Perp Pog, Go - Me, Wits, S - Go, Ar - Go. CONCLUSION: Assessed children displaying Class III malocclusion show normal anterior base of skull and maxilla, and anterior positioning of the mandible partially related to increased posterior facial height with consequent mandibular counterclockwise rotation.

  15. Early cephalometric characteristics in Class III malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Farias,Vanessa Costa; Tesch,Ricardo de Souza; Denardin,Odilon Victor Porto; Ursi,Weber

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Early identification of craniofacial morphological characteristics allows orthopedic segmented interventions to attenuate dentoskeletal discrepancies, which may be partially disguised by natural dental compensation. To investigate the morphological characteristics of Brazilian children with Class III malocclusion, in stages I and II of cervical vertebrae maturation and compare them with the characteristics of Class I control patients. METHODS: Pre-orthodontic treatment records of 2...

  16. Correction of a severe Class III malocclusion.

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    Arslan, Seher Gündüz; Kama, Jalan Devecioglu; Baran, Sedat

    2004-08-01

    The success of early orthopedic treatment in patients with Class III anomalies depends on facial skeletal development and type of treatment. This case report describes the treatment of a 12.6-year-old girl who had a severe Class III malocclusion with a 6-mm anterior crossbite, a deep overbite, a narrow maxilla, and unerupted maxillary canines. The treatment plan included rapid palatal expansion to expand the maxilla, reverse headgear to correct the maxillary retrognathia, a removable anterior inclined bite plane to correct the anterior crossbite and the deep overbite, and fixed edgewise appliances to align the teeth. One canine was brought into alignment, but the other was placed in occlusion in its transposed position. Ideal overjet and overbite relationships were established, and the final esthetic result was pleasing.

  17. Contemporary solutions for managing Class III malocclusion

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    Nathamuni Rengarajan Krishnaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although patients with Class III malocclusions constitute a small percentage of the average orthodontic practice, providing them with optimal treatment is a daunting task. The treatment approach is dependent upon the growth status of the individual and the severity of the skeletal dysplasia. For growing individuals, facemask therapy to protract the maxilla is ineffective because of its dependence on dental anchorage to bring forth skeletal correction. Orthodontic camouflage in nongrowing mild skeletal Class III individuals is met with limited success because of the anatomical boundaries and the conventional biomechanics. Orthognathic surgery to correct the maxillomandibular relations is time-consuming, and the facial esthetics is compromised during the orthodontic decompensation period. Contemporary solutions to overcome these limitations are now viable with the use of temporary anchorage devices and by performing surgery prior to orthodontic decompensation. The rationale for employing these contemporary approaches will be discussed in this study with illustrative cases.

  18. [Early treatment of Class III malocclusion].

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    Le Gall, Michel; Philip, Camille; Salvadori, André

    2011-09-01

    Optimum treatment timing for orthodontic problems continues to be one of the more controversial topics in orthodontics. Especially regarding the correction of Class III malocclusion, there is little consensus as to proper timing or methods for correcting these problems. The orthopedic approach for growth modification is usually limited to children with growth remaining subjected to non hereditary pattern. If the skeletal malocclusion is within the range of an orthodontic treatment, fixed orthodontic appliances with dentoalveolar compensation mechanism can achieve a normal occlusion. Otherwise in patients with a severe skeletal discrepancy, it will be necessary to consider a combined surgical and orthodontic approach. The purpose of this study was to describe treatment planning according to the age and to the initial diagnosis. The management of skeletal Class III malocclusion is still a challenge to orthodontists especially because of relapse due to the late growth of the mandible. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2011.

  19. 25 CFR 502.4 - Class III gaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Class III gaming. 502.4 Section 502.4 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.4 Class III gaming. Class III gaming means all forms of gaming that are not class I gaming or class...

  20. 25 CFR 522.12 - Revocation of class III gaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Revocation of class III gaming. 522.12 Section 522.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.12 Revocation of class III...

  1. Evolution and expression of class III peroxidases.

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    Mathé, Catherine; Barre, Annick; Jourda, Cyril; Dunand, Christophe

    2010-08-01

    Class III peroxidases are members of a large multigenic family, only detected in the plant kingdom and absent from green algae sensu stricto (chlorophyte algae or Chlorophyta). Their evolution is thought to be related to the emergence of the land plants. However class III peroxidases are present in a lower copy number in some basal Streptophytes (Charapyceae), which predate land colonization. Gene structures are variable among organisms and within species with respect to the number of introns, but their positions are highly conserved. Their high copy number, as well as their conservation could be related to plant complexity and adaptation to increasing stresses. No specific function has been assigned to respective isoforms, but in large multigenic families, particular structure-function relations can be expected. Plant peroxidase sequences contain highly conserved residues and motifs, variable domains surrounded by conserved residues and present a low identity level among their promoter regions, further suggesting the existence of sub-functionalization of the different isoforms. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Three-dimensional mandibular motion in skeletal Class III patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, Alessandro; Mapelli, Andrea; Segù, Marzia; Zago, Matteo; Codari, Marina; Sforza, Chiarella

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the characteristics and changes in mandibular condylar motion in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion. Using a 3D motion analyzer, mandibular movements were recorded in 9 patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion and 22 control subjects with Angle Class I jaw relationships. Class III patients had a similar interincisor point displacement but a significantly reduced displacement of both condyles on the sagittal and frontal planes, with smaller translation paths than control subjects (right -9.4 mm; left -4.8 mm). The overall condylar rotation component was larger in Class III patients (right +8.8%; left +7.3%). The largest inter-group significant differences were observed in the first 10% of mouth opening, in which Class III patients had a larger rotating component than control subjects (+20%, p Class III patients, in particular in the translational path.

  3. Expansion/Facemask Treatment of an Adult Class III Malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Gregory W.; Kravitz, Neal D.

    2014-01-01

    The orthodontic treatment of class III malocclusion with a maxillary deficiency is often treated with maxillary protraction with or without expansion. Skeletal and dental changes have been documented which have combined for the protraction of the maxilla and the correction of the class III malocclusion. Concerning the ideal time to treat a developing class III malocclusion, studies have reported that, although early treatment may be the most effective, face mask therapy can provide a viable o...

  4. Cranial-Base Morphology in Children with Class III Malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Po Chang; Tsau-Mau Chou

    2005-01-01

    The association between cranial-base morphology and Class III malocclusion is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphologic characteristics of the cranial base in children with Class III malocclusion. Lateral cephalograms from 100 children with Class III malocclusion were compared with those from 100 subjects with normal occlusion. Ten landmarks on the cranial base were identified and digitized. Cephalometric assessment using seven angular and 18 linear me...

  5. Class III Malocclusion Surgical-Orthodontic Treatment

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    Bruna Alves Furquim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present case report is to describe the orthodontic-surgical treatment of a 17-year-and-9-month-old female patient with a Class III malocclusion, poor facial esthetics, and mandibular and chin protrusion. She had significant anteroposterior and transverse discrepancies, a concave profile, and strained lip closure. Intraorally, she had a negative overjet of 5 mm and an overbite of 5 mm. The treatment objectives were to correct the malocclusion, and facial esthetic and also return the correct function. The surgical procedures included a Le Fort I osteotomy for expansion, advancement, impaction, and rotation of the maxilla to correct the occlusal plane inclination. There was 2 mm of impaction of the anterior portion of the maxilla and 5 mm of extrusion in the posterior region. A bilateral sagittal split osteotomy was performed in order to allow counterclockwise rotation of the mandible and anterior projection of the chin, accompanying the maxillary occlusal plane. Rigid internal fixation was used without any intermaxillary fixation. It was concluded that these procedures were very effective in producing a pleasing facial esthetic result, showing stability 7 years posttreatment.

  6. Early treatment of class III malocclusion with facemask.

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    Smyth, Robert S D; Ryan, Fiona S

    2017-12-22

    Data sourcesThe Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Embase, Medline and the ClinicalTrials.gov databases.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) of children aged 7-12 years with class III malocclusion undergoing fixed or removable orthodontic treatment for early correction were included.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers independently selected studies, abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used for RCTs and the Downs and Black and the Newcastle-Ottawa scales for CCTs. The primary outcome was correction of reverse overjet. Mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated and a random effects meta-analysis conducted.ResultsFifteen studies (nine RCTs, six CCTs) were included. Only three of the RCTs were considered to be at low risk of bias, all six CCTs were at high risk of bias.Three RCTs (141 patients) compared protraction facemask and untreated control. The results for reverse overjet (MD = 2.5 mm; 95% CI, 1.21-3.79) and ANB angle (MD = 3.90˚; 95% CI, 3.54-4.25) were statistically significant favouring the facemask group. All CCTs demonstrated a statistically significant benefit in favour of the use of each appliance. However, the studies had high risk of bias.ConclusionsThere is a moderate amount of evidence to show that early treatment with a facemask results in positive improvement for both skeletal and dental effects in the short term. However, there was lack of evidence on long-term benefits. There is some evidence with regard to the chincup, tandem traction bow appliance and removable mandibular retractor, but the studies had a high risk of bias. Further high-quality, long-term studies are required to evaluate the early treatment effects for Class III malocclusion patients.

  7. The Clinical effectiveness of sequential treatment of skeletal class III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To assess the dentofacial changes induced by the sequential treatment in the skeletal class III malocclusion with maxillary retrognathism. Study design: Controlled clinical trial assessing the effectiveness of sequential treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion. Materials and Methods: The treated group consisted of 30 ...

  8. Expansion/Facemask Treatment of an Adult Class III Malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory W. Jackson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The orthodontic treatment of class III malocclusion with a maxillary deficiency is often treated with maxillary protraction with or without expansion. Skeletal and dental changes have been documented which have combined for the protraction of the maxilla and the correction of the class III malocclusion. Concerning the ideal time to treat a developing class III malocclusion, studies have reported that, although early treatment may be the most effective, face mask therapy can provide a viable option for older children as well. But what about young adults? Can the skeletal and dental changes seen in expansion/facemask therapy in children and adolescents be demonstrated in this age group as well, possibly eliminating the need for orthodontic dental camouflage treatment or orthognathic surgery? A case report is presented of an adult class III malocclusion with a Class III skeletal pattern and maxillary retrusion. Treatment was with nonextraction, comprehensive edgewise mechanics with slow maxillary expansion with a bonded expander and protraction facemask.

  9. Cranial-base morphology in children with class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hong-Po; Hsieh, Shu-Hui; Tseng, Yu-Chuan; Chou, Tsau-Mau

    2005-04-01

    The association between cranial-base morphology and Class III malocclusion is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphologic characteristics of the cranial base in children with Class III malocclusion. Lateral cephalograms from 100 children with Class III malocclusion were compared with those from 100 subjects with normal occlusion. Ten landmarks on the cranial base were identified and digitized. Cephalometric assessment using seven angular and 18 linear measurements was performed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The results revealed that the greatest between-group differences occurred in the posterior cranial-base region. It was concluded that shortening and angular bending of the cranial base, and a diminished angle between the cranial base and mandibular ramus, may lead to Class III malocclusion associated with Class III facial morphology. The association between cranial-base morphology and other types of malocclusion needs clarification. Further study of regional changes in the cranial base, with geometric morphometric analysis, is warranted.

  10. Expansion/Facemask Treatment of an Adult Class III Malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Gregory W; Kravitz, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    The orthodontic treatment of class III malocclusion with a maxillary deficiency is often treated with maxillary protraction with or without expansion. Skeletal and dental changes have been documented which have combined for the protraction of the maxilla and the correction of the class III malocclusion. Concerning the ideal time to treat a developing class III malocclusion, studies have reported that, although early treatment may be the most effective, face mask therapy can provide a viable option for older children as well. But what about young adults? Can the skeletal and dental changes seen in expansion/facemask therapy in children and adolescents be demonstrated in this age group as well, possibly eliminating the need for orthodontic dental camouflage treatment or orthognathic surgery? A case report is presented of an adult class III malocclusion with a Class III skeletal pattern and maxillary retrusion. Treatment was with nonextraction, comprehensive edgewise mechanics with slow maxillary expansion with a bonded expander and protraction facemask.

  11. Comparative evaluation of slot versus dovetail design in class III composite restorations in primary anterior teeth

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    Arun Rathnam

    2010-01-01

    It was concluded from the results that the both slot and dovetail types of cavity preparations were equally effacious when clinically reviewed for a period of 12 months. Hence the use of slot type of cavity preparation with reduced loss of the tooth structure is indicated for class III cavities in primary anterior teeth.

  12. Semilongitudinal cephalometric study of craniofacial growth in untreated Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Ann E Zionic; McNamara, James A; Franchi, Lorenzo; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2009-06-01

    Class III growth in white subjects is poorly characterized because of the low prevalence of the disharmony and the clinical tendency to treat this condition early. The purpose of this study was to investigate craniofacial growth changes by using longitudinal cephalometric records of white subjects with untreated Class III malocclusions to provide comparison data for studies of Class III treatment outcomes. Longitudinal records of 103 subjects were analyzed. Annual incremental growth changes in craniofacial variables from early childhood to late adolescence were examined for each sex. Inferential statistics were applied to changes in mandibular length, midfacial length, and lower anterior facial height of each sex (Wilcoxon tests) and between sexes (Mann-Whitney U tests). In the girls, the adolescent spurt in mandibular growth occurred between the ages of 10 and 12 years. In the boys, the adolescent mandibular growth spurt was between 12 and 15 years. Statistically significant growth changes in the average increments of growth of these linear measurements occurred in both sexes between 12 and 15 years. Adolescent peaks in midfacial growth were at prepubertal ages in both sexes. During childhood (5-7 years), much craniofacial growth occurred. Moreover, there was considerable mandibular growth relative to the maxilla in Class III subjects after the adolescent growth spurt. White Class III subjects showed definite worsening of the relative mandibular prognathism and sagittal skeletal discrepancy between the jaws with growth. The growth pattern of 3 fundamental cephalometric measurements (lower anterior face height, midfacial length, and mandibular length) exhibited differences between Class III male and female subjects in both the timing and the size of average growth increments in the adolescent growth spurt.

  13. DIAGNOSTIC GUIDANCE AND EARLY INTERVENTION IN CLASS III MALOCCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinandri Charea Runizar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Timing of orthodontic treatment for Class III malocclusion has always been somewhat controversial. Many orthodontic pioneers like Angle, Tweed, and Graber have advocated early interception of class II malocclusion because this kind of skeletal discrepancy once established, would usually progress rapidly. What kind of early treatment would be appropriate for this malocclusion? Would this approach be effective and promises a stable result? Early orthodontic treatment is defined as a treatment that is initiated during the primary or mixed dentition stage to enhance skeletal and dental development. It is usually done in two phases. The first phase is intended to correct skeletal discrepancy by taking advantage of growth and development period. The second phase followed to improve occlusal relationship. Early treatment of Class III malocclusion is a possible alternative to improve skeletal discrepancy or at the very east may serve to prevent a worsening malocclusion. Principles of Class III early treatment depend on whether it is dental Class III, functional Class III, or skeletal Class III. Practitioners should consider positive and negative factors of a patient before initiating treatment. Likewise, they should understand factors that affect prognosis and stability of the results.

  14. Improving Clinical Outcomes for Patients With Class III Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Melissa; Bires, Angela Macci; Waterstram-Rich, Kristen; Cline, Thomas W

    Heart failure (HF) is a serious medical problem in the United States and is placing a financial strain on the health care system. It is the leading cause of mortality and as the overall incidence continues to increase, so does the economic impact on the health care system. Innovative treatment options, in the form of disease management programs and implantable cardiac devices, such as the CorVue capable implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) pacemaker, offer the promise of an enhanced quality of life and reduced mortality. Even with these advances, HF continues to be a challenge. Studies reviewing HF management programs have shown promising results. However, more studies are needed to determine which combination of HF management interventions has the greatest financial impact and yields the best patient outcomes. The objective of the research study was to compare 30-day readmission rates of patients implanted with the CorVue capable ICD pacemaker with patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) with no implanted device. The aim of the research focused on the usefulness of intrathoracic impedance monitoring alerts in guiding empirical treatment of patients with CHF to prevent HF readmissions. Methodology included a retrospective medical chart review, comparing 30-day readmission events among patients with class III CHF who received home health intervention with similar patients implanted with the CorVue ICD.

  15. Cranial-Base Morphology in Children with Class III Malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Po Chang

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The association between cranial-base morphology and Class III malocclusion is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphologic characteristics of the cranial base in children with Class III malocclusion. Lateral cephalograms from 100 children with Class III malocclusion were compared with those from 100 subjects with normal occlusion. Ten landmarks on the cranial base were identified and digitized. Cephalometric assessment using seven angular and 18 linear measurements was performed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The results revealed that the greatest between-group differences occurred in the posterior cranial-base region. It was concluded that shortening and angular bending of the cranial base, and a diminished angle between the cranial base and mandibular ramus, may lead to Class III malocclusion associated with Class III facial morphology. The association between cranialbase morphology and other types of malocclusion needs clarification. Further study of regional changes in the cranial base, with geometric morphometric analysis, is warranted.

  16. Conservative treatment of Angle Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Hélder Ferreira de Aguiar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by anteroposterior dental discrepancy which might be associated or not with skeletal changes. Class III molar relationship is associated with vertical or lingually tipped mandibular incisors and a usually concave profile. These characteristics seriously affect facial esthetics and most frequently are the reason why patients seek orthodontic treatment. This case was presented to the committee of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as part of the requisites to become a BBO Diplomate.

  17. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or until...

  18. Interdisciplinary orthognathic treatment of high angle class III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-30

    Jul 30, 2014 ... interdisciplinary approach of a skeletal Class III malocclusion with increased vertical facial dimension, occlusal cant, extracted posterior ... The treatment was finalized in a straight profile with stable occlusion and good smile characteristics .... nasal cavity, as a result, of superior positioning of the maxilla.

  19. A benefit-risk assessment of class III antiarrhythmic agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brendorp, Bente; Pedersen, Oledyg; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2002-01-01

    disease, and class IV drugs are avoided in heart failure. Unfortunately, arrhythmias are a growing problem due to an increase in the incidence of atrial fibrillation and sudden death. The population is becoming older and more patients survive for a longer time period with congestive heart failure, which....... This class of drugs is developed for treatment of both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. Amiodarone, sotalol, dofetilide, and ibutilide are examples of class III drugs that are currently available. Amiodarone and sotalol have other antiarrhythmic properties in addition to pure class III action...... prevention of ventricular arrhythmias and in treatment of atrial fibrillation or flutter. Based on existing evidence there is no routine indication for antiarrhythmic drug therapy other than beta-blockers in patients at high risk of sudden death. Subgroup analyses of trials with amiodarone and dofetilide...

  20. Surgical-orthodontic correction of a Class III dentofacial deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Devanna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the surgical-orthodontic treatment of a 26-year-old post-pubertal male patient with a Class III dentofacial deformity. In the pre-surgical orthodontic phase of treatment, a reverse overjet of 5.5 mm was created and arch compatibility was obtained. A mandibualr set back with BSSO was performed during surgery to restore ideal overjet, overbite, occlusion and optimal esthetics. After 1 year of treatment, the results remained stable.

  1. [Class III surgical patients facilitated by accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia-qi; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Zou, Wei; Bai, Yun-yang; Jiang, Jiu-hui

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the treatment time and the anterior and posterior teeth movement pattern as closing extraction space for the Class III surgical patients facilitated by accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatment. There were 10 skeletal Class III patients in accelerated osteogenic orthodontic group (AOO) and 10 patients in control group. Upper first premolars were extracted in all patients. After leveling and alignment (T2), corticotomy was performed in the area of maxillary anterior teeth to accelerate space closing.Study models of upper dentition were taken before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after space closing (T3). All the casts were laser scanned, and the distances of the movement of incisors and molars were digitally measured. The distances of tooth movement in two groups were recorded and analyzed. The alignment time between two groups was not statistically significant. The treatment time in AOO group from T2 to T3 was less than that in the control group (less than 9.1 ± 4.1 months). The treatment time in AOO group from T1 to T3 was less than that in the control group (less than 6.3 ± 4.8 months), and the differences were significant (P 0.05). Accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatment could accelerate space closing in Class III surgical patients and shorten preoperative orthodontic time. There were no influence on the movement pattern of anterior and posterior teeth during pre-surgical orthodontic treatment.

  2. Vertical control in the Class III compensatory treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Costa Sobral

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compensatory orthodontic treatment, or simply orthodontic camouflage, consists in an important alternative to orthognathic surgery in the resolution of skeletal discrepancies in adult patients. It is important to point that, to be successfully performed, diagnosis must be detailed, to evaluate, specifically, dental and facial features, as well as the limitations imposed by the magnitude of the discrepancy. The main complaint, patient's treatment expectation, periodontal limits, facial pattern and vertical control are some of the items to be explored in the determination of the viability of a compensatory treatment. Hyperdivergent patients who carry a Class III skeletal discrepancy, associated with a vertical facial pattern, with the presence or tendency to anterior open bite, deserve special attention. In these cases, an efficient strategy of vertical control must be planned and executed. OBJECTIVE: The present article aims at illustrating the evolution of efficient alternatives of vertical control in hiperdivergent patients, from the use, in the recent past, of extra-oral appliances on the lower dental arch (J-hook, until nowadays, with the advent of skeletal anchorage. But for patients with a more balanced facial pattern, the conventional mechanics with Class III intermaxillary elastics, associated to an accentuated curve of Spee in the upper arch and a reverse Curve of Spee in the lower arch, and vertical elastics in the anterior region, continues to be an excellent alternative, if there is extreme collaboration in using the elastics.

  3. A benefit-risk assessment of class III antiarrhythmic agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brendorp, Bente; Pedersen, Oledyg; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2002-01-01

    With beta-blockers as the exception, increasing doubt is emerging on the value of antiarrhythmic drug therapy following a series of trials that have either shown no mortality benefit or even an excess mortality. Vaughan Williams class I drugs are generally avoided in patients with structural heart...... disease, and class IV drugs are avoided in heart failure. Unfortunately, arrhythmias are a growing problem due to an increase in the incidence of atrial fibrillation and sudden death. The population is becoming older and more patients survive for a longer time period with congestive heart failure, which......, which differentiates them from the others. However, all have potential serious adverse events. Proarrhythmia, especially torsade de pointes, is a common problem making the benefit-risk ratio of these drugs a key question. Class III drugs have been evaluated in different settings: primary and secondary...

  4. Cephalometric characteristics of Korean children with Class III malocclusion in the deciduous dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Yoo, Seung Eun; Kwon, Jang-Hyuk; Park, Kitae

    2010-01-01

    To compare the cephalometric characteristics of children with Class III malocclusion to those of children with normal occlusion during the deciduous dentition phase. Cephalometric measurements of 27 children (mean age: 5.03 years) diagnosed with Class III malocclusion were compared with 32 children (mean age: 4.85 years) diagnosed with normal occlusion in the following four categories: sagittal skeletal analysis, vertical skeletal analysis, dentoalveolar analysis, and soft tissue analysis. Significant differences were seen in all categories except vertical skeletal analysis. Sagittal skeletal measurements included ANB (Class III group: -0.91 +/- 1.60; normal group: 5.28 +/- 1.29), facial convexity (Class III group: 0.47 +/- 4.32; normal group: 13.65 +/- 3.44), Wits appraisal (Class III group: -5.54 +/- 2.36; normal group: -0.84 +/- 1.91), and A to N-perpendicular (Class III group: -2.94 +/- 3.05; normal group: 0.78 +/- 2.53). Dentoalveolar measurements included U1 to NA (Class III group: 11.98 +/- 5.25; normal group: 8.12 +/- 5.43), IMPA (Class III group: 81.34 +/- 7.40; normal group: 86.57 +/- 5.67), and interincisal angle (Class III group: 152.65 +/- 8.82; normal group: 145.03 +/- 7.34). Soft tissue measurements included soft tissue convexity (Class III group: 2.47 +/- 4.20; normal group: 12.71 +/- 3.95), nasofacial angle (Class III group: 22.68 +/- 4.22; normal group: 26.24 +/- 3.84), and upper lip to esthetic plane (Class III group: -0.65 +/- 2.74; normal group: 3.07 +/- 1.90). There are significant differences between the craniofacial patterns of normal children and those of children with Class III malocclusion that can be identified with cephalometric analysis as early as the deciduous dentition phase.

  5. Risk of cesarean delivery among pregnant women with class III obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesi, Yves; Labreuche, Julien; Duhamel, Alain; Pigeyre, Marie; Deruelle, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    To identify factors associated with cesarean delivery among women with class III obesity attempting vaginal delivery. In a retrospective study, medical charts were reviewed for women aged 18 years or older with a singleton pregnancy of at least 37 weeks and a body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters) of 40 or higher who were eligible to attempt vaginal delivery at a maternity hospital in Lille, France, between 1999 and 2012. Among 345 eligible women, 301 (87.2%) attempted vaginal delivery; 211 (70.1%) were successful and 90 (29.9%) delivered by cesarean. The frequency of nulliparity was higher among those undergoing cesarean after a trial of labor (64 [71.1%]) than among those who delivered vaginally (57 [27.0%]; Pcesarean (61 [67.8%] vs 96 [45.5%]; Pcesarean among women attempting vaginal delivery (odds ratio [OR] 2.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25-4.22), whereas history of vaginal delivery was protective (OR 0.08, 95% CI 0.04-0.17). Nulliparous women with class III obesity attempting a vaginal delivery should be warned of the high risk of cesarean delivery, especially if they require induction. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  6. Decision making in the treatment of class III furcation: resective therapy? Extraction? Implant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Wilson Sallum

    Full Text Available The presence of furcation lesions is associated with bone resorption and lack of insertion in the inter-radicular space, and is a condition that considerably increases the risk of dental loss, particularly in the absence of adequate treatment. In this context, the object of some of the therapies is to keep teeth with furcation lesions that are important to dental planning, to re-establish an anatomy that enables the patient to remove dental biofilm from the compromised area. However, the long term maintenance and treatment of molars with Class III furcation lesions continues to be a challenge to dentists during periodontal therapy, since the anatomy of the inter-radicular region makes it difficult for both professionals and patients to gain access to perform adequate and efficient control of dental biofilm. The impossibility of obtaining appropriate decontamination of the area involved during the root scraping process, including by means of surgical access, demands thatdentists have adequate knowledge to determine the correct therapeutic approach during the treatment of teeth with advance inter-radicularbone loss. The aim of the present study was to discuss the treatments available for Class III furcation lesions and relate clinical procedures that could be performed for the treatment of this type of defect.

  7. Pressure from the lips and the tongue in children with class III malocclusion*

    OpenAIRE

    Ruan, Wen-hua; Su, Ji-mei; Ye, Xiao-wei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To discuss possible relationships between class III malocclusion and perioral forces by measuring the pressure from the lips and the tongue of children with class III malocclusion. Methods: Thirty-one children with class III malocclusion were investigated and their perioral forces were measured at rest and during swallowing under natural head position by a custom-made miniperioral force computer measuring system. Results: The resting pressures exerted on the labial side and palatin...

  8. Early class III management in deciduous dentition using reverse twin block

    OpenAIRE

    S S Sargod; N Shetty; A Shabbir

    2013-01-01

    Class III malocclusion poses a challenging dilemma for the clinician because these children have of growth patterns that differ from that of children with class I malocclusion. The mandible grows more rapidly than the maxilla, exacerbating the class III malocclusion as the child go through adolescence. Ever since Clark described a version of the twin block, it has steadily gained popularity in the management of early class III malocclusion in children. However, not many cases are reported in ...

  9. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under either...

  10. Early treatment of Class III malocclusion by RME and modified Tandem appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhi Ansar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a skeletal Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency can be treated successfully using a combined protraction facemask and alternate rapid maxillary expansions and contractions (Alt-RAMEC. However, due to poor patient compliance during facemask therapy there has been growing interest in intraoral appliances for correcting Class III malocclusion. The tandem traction bow appliance (TTBA is an intraoral appliance which has been used successfully for the treatment of growing Class III patients. This case report describes the management of a 10-year-old boy with a Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency treated with modified TTBA appliance.

  11. Oropharyngeal airway in children with Class III malocclusion evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tomonori; Hayasaki, Haruaki; Takemoto, Yoshihiko; Kanomi, Ryuzo; Yamasaki, Youichi

    2009-09-01

    Upper airway size is increasingly recognized as an important factor in malocclusion. However, children with Class III malocclusion are somewhat neglected compared with those with a Class II skeletal pattern. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish the characteristic shape of the oropharyngeal airway (OA) in children with Class III malocclusion. The sample comprised 45 children (average age, 8.6 +/- 1.0 years) divided into 2 groups: 25 with Class I and 20 with Class III malocclusions. OA size of each group was evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography. Cluster analysis, based on OA shape, redivided the subjects into wide, square, and long types. The distributions of Class I and Class III subjects were compared among the types. The Class III group showed statistically larger OA area and width compared with the Class I group. Area was positively correlated with Class III severity. The square type included 84% of the Class I malocclusions but only 30% of the Class III malocclusions, indicating that the OA in Class III malocclusion tends to be flat. The Class III malocclusion is associated with a large and flat OA compared with the Class I malocclusion.

  12. Tongue volume in adults with skeletal Class III dentofacial deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihan Hren, N; Barbič, U

    2016-03-22

    The size of the tongue is implicated as an essential etiological factor in the development of malocclusions. The aim of our study was to assess tongue size in skeletal Class III (SCIII) patients in comparison to adults with normal occlusion, using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. The SCIII group consisted of 54 subjects; 34 females and 20 males and the control group contained 36 subjects, 18 from each gender with Class I relationship. 3D ultrasound images of the tongues were acquired, and then the tongues' volumes were assessed. The males in both the SCIII and control groups had significantly larger tongue volumes than the female subjects (mean SCIII 100.8 ± 6.3 and control 92.4 ± 9.8 cm(3) in males vs. SCIII 77.4 ± 10.2 and control 67.2 ± 5.6 cm(3) in females). The highly significantly larger tongue volumes were in SCIII patients of both genders (p were less than 0.01 for female and 0.03 for male). The tongue volumes within the whole SCIII group were significantly larger with more negative Wits values. The tongue volumes are significantly bigger in SCIII subjects than normal. Larger tongues correlate with more severe SCIII. The clinical importance of this data is that limited mandibular setback planning is necessary to prevent narrowing of respiratory airways.

  13. Substrate specificity determinants of class III nucleotidyl cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharambe, Nikhil G; Barathy, Deivanayaga V; Syed, Wajeed; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Colaςo, Melwin; Misquith, Sandra; Suguna, Kaza

    2016-10-01

    The two second messengers in signalling, cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, are produced by adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases respectively. Recognition and discrimination of the substrates ATP and GTP by the nucleotidyl cyclases are vital in these reactions. Various apo-, substrate- or inhibitor-bound forms of adenylyl cyclase (AC) structures from transmembrane and soluble ACs have revealed the catalytic mechanism of ATP cyclization reaction. Previously reported structures of guanylyl cyclases represent ligand-free forms and inactive open states of the enzymes and thus do not provide information regarding the exact mode of substrate binding. The structures we present here of the cyclase homology domain of a class III AC from Mycobacterium avium (Ma1120) and its mutant in complex with ATP and GTP in the presence of calcium ion, provide the structural basis for substrate selection by the nucleotidyl cyclases at the atomic level. Precise nature of the enzyme-substrate interactions, novel modes of substrate binding and the ability of the binding pocket to accommodate diverse conformations of the substrates have been revealed by the present crystallographic analysis. This is the first report to provide structures of both the nucleotide substrates bound to a nucleotidyl cyclase. Coordinates and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank with accession numbers: 5D15 (Ma1120 CHD +ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0E (Ma1120 CHD +GTP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0H (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0G (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+GTP.Ca 2+ ). Adenylyl cyclase (EC number: 4.6.1.1). © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. 77 FR 48167 - Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an approval of the gaming compact between the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians...

  15. [Occlusal planes of Angle's class III malocclusion impact by anterior overbite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Xiao, Danna; Cang, Song; Gao, Hui

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the correlation between Angle's class III patients' occlusion plane and anterior overbite by controlling the changes in occlusion plane during orthodontic treatment. In total, 90 Angle's class III adult orthodontic patients were selected as the experimental group, and 30 normal adults were selected as the control group. According to the overbite, the class III patients were divided into three groups, and 14 indicators were measured. ANOVA and multiple comparison analysis were used to analyze the difference between class III patients, and linear analysis was used to analyze the correlation between anterior overbite and anterior-posterior occlusion plane. In class Ill patients, posterior occlusion plane and anterior overbite size were negatively correlated (r = -0.24, P overbite size were positive correlated (r = 0.23, P overbite patients. During orthodontic treatment in different overbite class III patients, the vertical height of the posterior teeth and the rotation of the occlusion plane should be controlled.

  16. Prosthetic rehabilitation of severe Siebert′s Class III defect with modified Andrews bridge system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Rathee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic dentistry involves the replacement of missing and contiguous tissues with artificial substitutes to restore and maintain the oral functions, appearance, and health of the patient. The treatment of edentulous areas with ridge defects poses a challenging task for the dentist. Management of such cases involves a wide range of treatment options comprising mainly of surgical interventions and non surgical techniques such as use of removable, fixed or fixed- removable partial dentures. But each treatment plan undertaken should be customized according to patient needs. A variety of factors such as quality and quantity of existing contiguous hard and soft tissues, systemic condition and economic status of the patient play an important role in treatment planning, clinical outcome and prognosis. This case report presents the restoration of a Seibert′s Class III ridge defect by an economical modification of Andrews Bridge in a 32 Year old patient.

  17. Complex networks for data-driven medicine: the case of Class III dentoskeletal disharmony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scala, A; Auconi, P; Scazzocchio, M; Caldarelli, G; McNamara, JA; Franchi, L

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the availability of innovative algorithms derived from complexity theory has inspired the development of highly detailed models in various fields, including physics, biology, ecology, economy, and medicine. Due to the availability of novel and ever more sophisticated diagnostic procedures, all biomedical disciplines face the problem of using the increasing amount of information concerning each patient to improve diagnosis and prevention. In particular, in the discipline of orthodontics the current diagnostic approach based on clinical and radiographic data is problematic due to the complexity of craniofacial features and to the numerous interacting co-dependent skeletal and dentoalveolar components. In this study, we demonstrate the capability of computational methods such as network analysis and module detection to extract organizing principles in 70 patients with excessive mandibular skeletal protrusion with underbite, a condition known in orthodontics as Class III malocclusion. Our results could possibly constitute a template framework for organising the increasing amount of medical data available for patients’ diagnosis. (paper)

  18. Management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with unilateral crossbite on a growing patient using facemask-bonded rapid palatal expander and fixed appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinnie Effendy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Facemask (FM and bonded rapid palatal expander (RPE are part of growth modification treatments for correcting skeletal Class III pattern with retrognathic maxilla. This orthopaedic treatment is usually preceded by fixed appliances to achieve aesthetic dental alignment and improve interdigitation. This case report reviews treatment of Class III malocclusion with unilateral crossbite in a 12-year-old boy using FM and bonded RPE, followed by fixed appliances. Choice of FM and bonded RPE was in line with indication which was mild Class III malocclusion with retrognathic maxilla. Execution of treatment was made considering treatment biomechanics and patient cooperation. This orthopaedic treatment was followed by orthodontic treatment specifically aimed to correct unilateral crossbite, canine relationship yet to reach Class I, lower midline shift, as well as unintended dental consequences of using bonded RPE, namely posterior open bite and deepening curve of spee. Posttreatment facial profile and smile are more esthetic. Occlusion is significantly improved both functionally and aesthetically.

  19. Craniofacial changes in Class III malocclusion as related to skeletal and dental maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Reyes, Brian C; McNamara, James A

    2007-08-01

    In this large cross-sectional study, we aimed to analyze growth trends in white subjects with Class III malocclusion using both skeletal and dental maturation staging. The sample consisted of 1091 pretreatment lateral cephalometric records of Class III patients (560 female, 531 male). Cephalometric dentoskeletal measurements were compared at subsequent stages in cervical vertebral maturation and Hellman's categorization of dental development by means of ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc tests in both sexes separately. The findings indicated that, in Class III malocclusion, the pubertal peak in mandibular growth occurs between stages 3 and 4 of cervical vertebral maturation, with average increases in total mandibular length of about 8 and 5.5 mm in Class III boys and girls, respectively. Significant changes in total mandibular length occur until young adulthood (18 years on average), with increases between late maturation stages (4 through 6) that were twice as large as in subjects with normal occlusion for the Class III females, and 3 times as large as in subjects with normal occlusion for the Class III males. Growth trends toward accentuated Class III profile and increased vertical dimension of the face also become apparent at late developmental stages (corresponding with complete eruption of the second and third molars).

  20. The biowaiver extension for BCS class III drugs: the effect of dissolution rate on the bioequivalence of BCS class III immediate-release drugs predicted by computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-08-02

    The Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) guidance issued by the FDA allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release (IR) solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I drugs. However, a number of drugs within BCS class III have been proposed to be eligible for biowaivers. The World Health Organization (WHO) has shortened the requisite dissolution time of BCS class III drugs on their Essential Medicine List (EML) from 30 to 15 min for extended biowaivers; however, the impact of the shorter dissolution time on AUC(0-inf) and C(max) is unknown. The objectives of this investigation were to assess the ability of gastrointestinal simulation software to predict the oral absorption of the BCS class I drugs propranolol and metoprolol and the BCS class III drugs cimetidine, atenolol, and amoxicillin, and to perform in silico bioequivalence studies to assess the feasibility of extending biowaivers to BCS class III drugs. The drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted using physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of test drugs provided by GastroPlus (version 6.0). Virtual trials with a 200 mL dose volume at different drug release rates (T(85%) = 15 to 180 min) were performed to predict the oral absorption (C(max) and AUC(0-inf)) of the above drugs. Both BCS class I drugs satisfied bioequivalence with regard to the release rates up to 120 min. The results with BCS class III drugs demonstrated bioequivalence using the prolonged release rate, T(85%) = 45 or 60 min, indicating that the dissolution standard for bioequivalence is dependent on the intestinal membrane permeability and permeability profile throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The results of GastroPlus simulations indicate that the dissolution rate of BCS class III drugs could be prolonged to the point where dissolution, rather than permeability, would control the overall absorption. For BCS class III drugs with intestinal absorption patterns

  1. Invisible treatment of a Class III female adult patient with severe crowding and cross-bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, T; Tsuruta, M

    2002-12-01

    This article reports on the treatment for a 24 year 9 month adult female patient with severe skeletal Class III and crowding. As the patient wanted to wear an invisible appliance treatment we provided treatment with lingual brackets.

  2. Early class III occlusal tendency in children and its selective management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e., true class III malocclusion, or as a result of premature occlusal contacts causing forward functional shift of the mandible, which is known as pseudo class III malocclusion. These cases, if not treated at the initial stage of development, interfere with normal growth of the skeletal bases and may result in severe facial deformities. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible with the aim of permitting normal growth. This paper deals with the selection of an appropriate treatment approach from the various current options available for early intervention in children developing class III occlusal tendencies; the different clinical features are depicted in the three case reports.

  3. Reverse twin block for interceptive management of developing class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Meenu; Singh, Harpreet; Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Poonam

    2017-01-01

    Early correction of developing class III malocclusions remains a complex challenge. Treatment approaches for these young patients have been directed at growth modification. Encouraging outcomes have been reported with the use of Class III functional appliances including reverse twin block (RTB) appliance. The present paper tries to provide an insight into RTB appliance used for successful interceptive management of developing class III malocclusion in two children. RTBs were fabricated with bite registered in the position of maximum possible retrusion of mandible with interincisal clearance of 2 mm and vertical clearance of 5 mm in the buccal segments. Anterior crossbite was corrected, and there was a marked improvement in facial appearance of the children. RTB can be a viable and effective functional appliance treatment modality for early management of developing class III malocclusion.

  4. Reverse twin block for interceptive management of developing class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Mittal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early correction of developing class III malocclusions remains a complex challenge. Treatment approaches for these young patients have been directed at growth modification. Encouraging outcomes have been reported with the use of Class III functional appliances including reverse twin block (RTB appliance. The present paper tries to provide an insight into RTB appliance used for successful interceptive management of developing class III malocclusion in two children. RTBs were fabricated with bite registered in the position of maximum possible retrusion of mandible with interincisal clearance of 2 mm and vertical clearance of 5 mm in the buccal segments. Anterior crossbite was corrected, and there was a marked improvement in facial appearance of the children. RTB can be a viable and effective functional appliance treatment modality for early management of developing class III malocclusion.

  5. Craniofacial changes in patients with Class III malocclusion treated with the RAMPA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Yasushi; Banabilh, Saeed M; Singh, G Dave

    2010-01-01

    The underlying etiology of Class III malocclusion may be associated with cranial base morphology. The aim of this study is to test the efficacy of a Right-Angled Maxillary Protraction Appliance (RAMPA) System in Asian subjects with Class III malocclusions. 27 homologous landmarks were digitized from lateral cephalographs for 10 pre-pubertal Japanese children (mean age 95 months) with skeletal Class III malocclusion prior to and after RAMPA treatment. The mean, pre- and post-treatment craniofacial configurations were computed using Procrustes superimposition, and subjected to principal components analysis (PCA), and finite-element analysis (FEA). The mean treatment time was 22.5 months. All patients showed significant craniofacial change with correction of anterior and/or posterior crossbite. The mean, pre- and post-treatment craniofacial configurations were statistically different when tested using PCA (p Class III malocclusions.

  6. Early class III management in deciduous dentition using reverse twin block

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    S S Sargod

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Class III malocclusion poses a challenging dilemma for the clinician because these children have of growth patterns that differ from that of children with class I malocclusion. The mandible grows more rapidly than the maxilla, exacerbating the class III malocclusion as the child go through adolescence. Ever since Clark described a version of the twin block, it has steadily gained popularity in the management of early class III malocclusion in children. However, not many cases are reported in the literature on its use in deciduous dentition. This article tries to provide an insight into the reverse twin block appliance and reports two cases of early class III malocclusion treated using reverse twin block.

  7. Má oclusão Classe III de Angle com discrepância ântero-posterior acentuada Angle Class III malocclusion with severe anteroposterior disharmony

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    Marcos Alan Vieira Bittencourt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A má oclusão Classe III de Angle é caracterizada por uma discrepância dentária ântero-posterior, que pode ou não estar acompanhada por alterações esqueléticas. Em geral, o aspecto facial fica bastante comprometido, sendo justamente esse fator, na maioria das vezes, que motiva o paciente a procurar pelo tratamento. Este caso foi apresentado à Diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, representando a categoria 4, ou seja, uma má oclusão com discrepância ântero-posterior acentuada, Classe III, com ANB menor ou igual a -2º, como parte dos requisitos para a obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by an anteroposterior dental discrepancy which may or may not be accompanied by skeletal changes. In general, distressed by a significantly compromised facial aspect, patients tend to seek treatment. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO, as representative of Category 4, i.e., a malocclusion with severe anteroposterior discrepancy, Class III, and ANB Angle equal to or smaller than -2º, as part of the requirements for obtaining the BBO Diploma.

  8. 25 CFR 291.3 - When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... III gaming procedures? 291.3 Section 291.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.3 When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures? An Indian tribe may ask the Secretary to issue Class III...

  9. 25 CFR 291.12 - Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Class III gaming procedures? 291.12 Section 291.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.12 Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures? The Indian tribe and the State may have an agreement...

  10. Non-surgical Management of Skeletal Class III Malocclusion with Bilateral Posterior Crossbite: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari, Lalima; Nayan, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old female patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion and bilateral posterior cross bite complaining of difficulty in chewing was treated orthodontically without surgery (camouflage treatment). The treatment comprised of fixed orthodontic treatment with MBT prescription (0.022˝×0.028˝ slot) using quad helix appliance for bilateral expansion of maxillary arch and Class III elastics for occlusal correction. Post-treatment records showed normal overbite and overjet with acceptable oc...

  11. Abdominal Contouring Outcomes in Class III Obesity: Analysis of the ACS-NSQIP Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlQattan, Husain T; Mundra, Leela S; Rubio, Gustavo A; Thaller, Seth R

    2018-02-01

    Obesity may increase the risk of complications following abdominal contouring. The aim of this study is to evaluate panniculectomy outcomes in patients with class III obesity (BMI > 40 kg/m 2 ). The American College of Surgeon's National Surgical Quality Improvement Program ACS-NSQIP (2010-2014) was used to identify patients who underwent panniculectomy. Class III obesity patients were identified. Demographics, comorbidities and postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Risk-adjusted multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess impact of class III obesity on panniculectomy outcomes. A total of 4497 panniculectomies were identified. Of these, 545 (12.1%) were performed in patients with class III obesity. This group was older (mean age 50.3 vs. 45.9, p Class III obesity group also had higher rates of comorbidities (p class III obesity patients experienced much higher rates of wound complications (17.8 vs. 6.8%), sepsis (3.3 vs. 0.8%), venous thromboembolism (1.5 vs. 0.7%) and medical complications (6.4 vs. 1.8%), p class III obesity was independently associated with increased risk of wound complications (OR 2.22, p Class III obesity patients are at significantly increased risk of adverse outcomes following abdominal contouring. Plastic surgeons should consider these risks for counseling and preoperative risk optimization. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  12. Morphometric Analysis of the Mandible in Subjects with Class III Malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Yun Pan; Szu-Ting Chou; Hong-Po Chang; Pao-Hsin Liu

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the deformations that contribute to Class III mandibular configuration, employing geometric morphometric analysis. Lateral cephalograms of male and female groups of 100 young adults and 70 children with Class III malocclusion were compared to those of counterparts with normal occlusion. The sample included an equal number of both genders. The cephalographs were traced, and 12 homologous landmarks were identified and digitized. Average mandibular geometries were generated ...

  13. Maxillary protraction using skeletal anchorage and intermaxillary elastics in Skeletal Class III patients

    OpenAIRE

    Esenlik, El?in; A?larc?, Cahide; Albayrak, Gayem Ero?lu; F?nd?k, Yavuz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the treatment of a patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion with maxillary retrognathia using skeletal anchorage devices and intermaxillary elastics. Miniplates were inserted between the mandibular lateral incisor and canine teeth on both sides in a male patient aged 14 years 5 months. Self-drilling mini-implants (1.6 mm diameter, 10 mm length) were installed between the maxillary second premolar and molar teeth, and Class III elastics were used ...

  14. Interplay of auxin, KANADI and Class III HD-ZIP transcription factors in vascular tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilegems, Michael; Douet, Véronique; Meylan-Bettex, Marlyse; Uyttewaal, Magalie; Brand, Lukas; Bowman, John L; Stieger, Pia A

    2010-03-01

    Class III HD-ZIP and KANADI gene family members have complementary expression patterns in the vasculature and their gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutants have complementary vascular phenotypes. This suggests that members of the two gene families are involved in the establishment of the spatial arrangement of phloem, cambium and xylem. In this study, we have investigated the role of these two gene families in vascular tissue differentiation, in particular their interactions with the plant hormone auxin. We have analyzed the vasculature of plants that have altered expression levels of Class III HD-ZIP and KANADI transcription factors in provascular cells. Removal of either KANADI or Class III HD-ZIP expression in procambium cells led to a wider distribution of auxin in internal tissues, to an excess of procambium cell recruitment and to increased cambium activity. Ectopic expression of KANADI1 in provascular cells inhibited procambium cell recruitment due to negative effects of KANADI1 on expression and polar localization of the auxin efflux-associated protein PIN-FORMED1. Ectopic expression of Class III HD-ZIP genes promoted xylem differentiation. We propose that Class III HD-ZIP and KANADI transcription factors control cambium activity: KANADI proteins by acting on auxin transport, and Class III HD-ZIP proteins by promoting axial cell elongation and xylem differentiation.

  15. Glenoid fossa position in Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Cristina; Giuntini, Veronica; Defraia, Efisio; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2009-04-01

    Our aim in this study was to investigate the position of the glenoid fossa in subjects with Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion to better clarify the role of this craniofacial component in Class III skeletal disharmony. A sample of 30 subjects, aged 8 years +/- 6 months, with skeletal and dental Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion, normal skeletal vertical relationships, and normal mandibular dimensions, was compared with a control group of 33 subjects with skeletal and dental Class I relationships. The comparisons between the Class III group and the control group on the cephalometric measures for the assessment of glenoid fossa position were performed with the Mann-Whitney U test at P <0.05. Subjects with Class III malocclusion had a significantly more mesial position of the glenoid fossa, when compared with the control group as measured with 3 parameters. An anterior position of the glenoid fossa is a possible diagnostic anatomic feature of Class III malocclusion associated with mandibular protrusion. An effective measurement to evaluate glenoid fossa position in craniofacial relationships is the cephalometric distance from the glenoid fossa to the frontomaxillary-nasal suture.

  16. Duration of the pubertal peak in skeletal Class I and Class III subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuc-Michalska, Małgorzata; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-01-01

    To estimate and compare the duration of the pubertal growth peak in Class I and Class III subjects. The data examined consisted of pretreatment lateral cephalometric records of 218 skeletal Class I or Class III subjects (93 female and 125 male subjects) of white ancestry. The duration of the pubertal peak was calculated from the average chronological age intervals between stages CS3 and CS4 of the cervical vertebral maturation in Class I vs Class III groups (t-test). In skeletal Class I subjects, the pubertal peak had a mean duration of 11 months, whereas in Class III subjects it lasted 16 months. The average difference (5 months) was statistically significant (P < .001). The growth interval corresponding to the pubertal growth spurt (CS3-CS4) was longer in Class III subjects than in subjects with normal skeletal relationships; the larger increases in mandibular length during the pubertal peak reported in the literature for Class III subjects may be related to the longer duration of the pubertal peak.

  17. Morphometric Analysis of the Mandible in Subjects with Class III Malocclusion

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    Jin-Yun Pan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the deformations that contribute to Class III mandibular configuration, employing geometric morphometric analysis. Lateral cephalograms of male and female groups of 100 young adults and 70 children with Class III malocclusion were compared to those of counterparts with normal occlusion. The sample included an equal number of both genders. The cephalographs were traced, and 12 homologous landmarks were identified and digitized. Average mandibular geometries were generated by means of Procrustes analysis. Thin-plate spline analysis was then applied to mandibular configurations to determine local form differences in male and female groups of adults and children with normal occlusion and Class III malocclusion. The mandibular morphology was significantly different between these two groups of male and female adults, and children (p < 0.0001. This spline analysis revealed an anteroposterior elongation of the mandible along the condylion-gnathion axis, showing an extension in the regions of the mandibular condyle and ramus, and of the anteroinferior portion of the mandibular symphysis in Class III groups. More extension was evident in Class III adults. The deformations in subjects with Class III malocclusion may represent a developmental elongation of the mandible anteroposteriorly, which leads to the appearance of a prognathic mandibular profile.

  18. Cephalometric Evaluation of Dentofacial Features of Class III Malocclusion in Adults of Mashhad, Iran

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    Maryam Pousti

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Class III malocclusions are considered as one of the most complex orthodontic problems to diagnose and treat. Numerous studies have been conducted to determine the morphologic characteristics of craniofacial complex in patients with this malocclusion. The aim of this study was to determine the dentofacial characteristics of Class III malocclusion in Mashhadian adults.

    Materials and Methods. This cross-sectional descriptive study consisted of 114 cephalograms including 57 individuals with Class III malocclusion (28 males and 29 females with mean age of 19.28 years as the case group, and 57 adults with uncrowded Class I occlusion (28 males and 29 females with mean age of 17.2 years as the control group. Cephalometric evaluation was performed by measuring nine angular and nine linear measurements and the dentofacial characteristics of two groups were compared by Student’s t-test.

    Results. SNA angle, the distance from A point to Nasion perpendicular and the maxillary effective length was significantly lower in Class III group, while SNB and SN-Pog angles were significantly higher compared to control group. Mandibular effective length did not differ in two groups. Maxillary incisor protrusion and mandibular incisor retrusion in Class III subjects was also observed. From the vertical aspect, only mandibular plane angle showed an increase in Class III group (P < 0.05.

    Conclusion. Maxillary deficiency, mandibular prognathism, maxillary incisors protrusion and mandibular incisors retrusion are present in individuals with Class III malocclusion, but mandibular effective length does not differ significantly from Class I patients.

  19. Long-term outcomes of Class III treatment with mandibular cervical headgear followed by fixed appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Rey, Diego; Oberti, Giovanni; Stahl, Franka; McNamara, James A

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the stability of the outcomes of mandibular cervical headgear (MCH) and fixed appliance-treated Class III patients at a long-term posttreatment (5 years) observation, compared with well-matched untreated Class III controls, following a previous report on the short-term outcomes of this protocol. The treated group consisted of 20 patients with dentoskeletal Class III malocclusions treated with a two-phase protocol consisting of MCH and fixed appliances, while the control group comprised 18 untreated subjects with similar dentoskeletal Class III malocclusion. Lateral cephalograms of both patients and controls were analyzed at two time points: posttreatment (PT), after two-phase treatment; and long term (LT). All patients were at a postpubertal stage of skeletal maturity at PT, and they showed CS6 at LT, thus revealing completion of pubertal craniofacial growth. In the long term, the treatment group showed significantly smaller values for mandibular length (Co-Gn), SNB angle, maxillomandibular differential, and molar relation. When compared with the controls, the treated patients exhibited also greater values for ANB angle, Wits appraisal, and overjet at LT. No significant difference between the two groups was found for the changes occurring from PT to LT. Favorable dentoskeletal outcomes induced by MCH and fixed appliances remained stable in the long term; untreated Class III malocclusion did not show any tendency toward self-improvement during the postpubertal interval.

  20. Early treatment of Class III malocclusion with a tandem traction bow appliance

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    Sneha Basaveshwar Valgadde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since Class III malocclusion is progressive in nature, the facial growth of Class III malocclusion worsens with age. Class III malocclusion is associated with a deviation in the sagittal relationship of the maxilla and the mandible, characterized by a deficient maxilla, retrognathic mandible, or a combination of both. The early orthopedic treatment of Class III malocclusions, at the end of primary dentition or the beginning of mixed dentition, prior to growth spurt, allows the accomplishment of successful results, providing facial balance, modifying the maxillofacial growth and development, and in many instances, preventing a future surgical treatment by increasing the stability. Many treatment approaches can be found in the literature regarding orthopedic and orthodontic treatment of Class III malocclusion, including intra- and extra-oral appliances. The major problem with extraoral anchorage has been of patient compliance due to its physical appearance. The case report presents an intraoral modified tandem appliance for maxillary protraction that has been used clinically to achieve successful results without relying much on patient co-operation.

  1. Cephalometric evaluation of Class III patients treated with facemask: 12 months follow-up (Clinical trial

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    Sahar Ghodsi Bushehri

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Skeletal class III malocclusions are considered as one of the most complex and difficult orthodontic problems to diagnose and treat. Facial appearance and occlusion problems make the patients to seek treatment as soon as possible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of early treatment with facemask compared to the patients who had no treatment.   Materials and Methods: For this retrospective study, 38 growing patients (mean age, 8.5 years old with class III dentoskeletal malocclusion were divided into 2 groups. 23 patients were treated with facemask and 15 patients who did not receive any treatment were assigned as control group. Lateral cephalograms were taken before and after treatment and dentoskeletal changes were estimated. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed ranks test.   Results: The results revealed statistically significant forward displacement of maxillary bone and upper incisors (P<0.001, and downward-backward rotation of mandible in facemask group (P<0.001. Increased lower facial height was seen in both treatment and untreated groups. However, in untreated group some measurements revealed forward displacement of maxillary complex as well.   Conclusion: It seems that in class III patients treating with facemask is a better choice than ChinCap and decision making for early treatment in class III patients should be considered seriously. Moreover, specific attention to the type of patient’s skeletal discrepancy is necessary. In class III patients, facemask might be a better option than other appliances.

  2. Pressure from the lips and the tongue in children with class III malocclusion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Wen-hua; Su, Ji-mei; Ye, Xiao-wei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To discuss possible relationships between class III malocclusion and perioral forces by measuring the pressure from the lips and the tongue of children with class III malocclusion. Methods: Thirty-one children with class III malocclusion were investigated and their perioral forces were measured at rest and during swallowing under natural head position by a custom-made miniperioral force computer measuring system. Results: The resting pressures exerted on the labial side and palatine side of the upper left incisor, as well as the labial side and lingual side of the lower left incisor, were 0 g/cm2, 0 g/cm2, 0.57 g/cm2 and 0.23 g/cm2, respectively. Correspondingly, the swallowing forces were 2.87 g/cm2, 5.97 g/cm2, 4.09 g/cm2 and 7.89 g/cm2, respectively. No statistical difference between muscular pressure and gender existed. During swallowing, the lingual forces were significantly higher than the labial forces (Pchildren with class III malocclusion had lower perioral forces. The upper labial resting forces (Pclass III malocclusion and normal occlusion. Conclusion: Patients with class III malocclusion have lower perioral forces and this muscle hypofunction may be secondary to the spatial relations of the jaws. The findings support the spatial matrix hypothesis. PMID:17542055

  3. Cephalometric assessment of maxillary length in Serbian children with skeletal class III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Zdenka; Nikolić, Predrag; Nikodijević, Angelina; Milić, Jasmina; Stojanović, Branislav

    2013-07-01

    Malocclusion of skeletal class III is a complex irregularity of sagittal inter-jaw relationship, which is due to irregularities of sagittal position of one or both of the jaw bones, which is often associated with disproportionate ratio of their length. The aim of this study was to determine whether the length of the jaw of children with skeletal class III in the period of mixed dentition was changed. Fifty children with skeletal class III and the same number of those with skeletal class I, of both sexes, have been selected on the basis of cephalometric analysis of profile tele-x-ray of the head. All the children aged 6-12 had mixed dentition, and were divided according to sex and age into three subgroups within each group. The length of maxilla, mandible and cranial base were measured. Proportions among the lengths measured within each group were found and difference significance in the measured lengths and their proportions among groups and subgroups were evaluated. The children with skeletal class III, compared with the findings in the control group, had significantly lower values of maxillary length, total maxillary length, as well as lower values of their lengths in proportion to lengths of the front or the total length of cranial base and in proportion to mandibular lengths (p children with skeletal class III have significantly shorter maxilla than those with skeletal class I.

  4. Pressure from the lips and the tongue in children with class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Wen-hua; Su, Ji-mei; Ye, Xiao-wei

    2007-05-01

    To discuss possible relationships between class III malocclusion and perioral forces by measuring the pressure from the lips and the tongue of children with class III malocclusion. Thirty-one children with class III malocclusion were investigated and their perioral forces were measured at rest and during swallowing under natural head position by a custom-made miniperioral force computer measuring system. The resting pressures exerted on the labial side and palatine side of the upper left incisor, as well as the labial side and lingual side of the lower left incisor, were 0 g/cm(2), 0 g/cm(2), 0.57 g/cm(2) and 0.23 g/cm(2), respectively. Correspondingly, the swallowing forces were 2.87 g/cm(2), 5.97 g/cm(2), 4.09 g/cm(2) and 7.89 g/cm(2), respectively. No statistical difference between muscular pressure and gender existed. During swallowing, the lingual forces were significantly higher than the labial forces (Pchildren with class III malocclusion had lower perioral forces. The upper labial resting forces (Pclass III malocclusion and normal occlusion. Patients with class III malocclusion have lower perioral forces and this muscle hypofunction may be secondary to the spatial relations of the jaws. The findings support the spatial matrix hypothesis.

  5. Mandibular condyle dimensions in Peruvian patients with Class II and Class III skeletal patterns.

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    Hugo Zegarra-Baquerizo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare condylar dimensions of young adults with Class II and Class III skeletal patterns using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Materials and methods: 124 CBCTs from 18-30 year-old patients, divided into 2 groups according to skeletal patterns (Class II and Class III were evaluated. Skeletal patterns were classified by measuring the ANB angle of each patient. The anteroposterior diameter (A and P of the right and left mandibular condyle was assessed from a sagittal view by a line drawn from point A (anterior to P (posterior. The coronal plane allowed the evaluation of the medio-lateral diameter by drawing a line from point M (medium to L (lateral; all distances were measured in mm. Results: In Class II the A-P diameter was 9.06±1.33 and 8.86±1.56 for the right and left condyles respectively, in Class III these values were 8.71±1.2 and 8.84±1.42. In Class II the M-L diameter was 17.94±2.68 and 17.67±2.44 for the right and left condyles respectively, in Class III these values were 19.16±2.75 and 19.16±2.54. Conclusion: Class III M-L dimensions showed higher values than Class II, whereas these differences were minimal in A-P.

  6. [Limiting factors in the class III camouflage treatment: a potential protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaques Asensi, José

    2016-06-01

    The Class III skeletal malocclusion has been traditionally treated with a combined approach of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery or with a strategy of orthodontic camouflage. Some severe cases can be identified as ideal candidates for a surgical treatment whereas some others can be handled with orthodontics alone, with a reasonable expectation of an acceptable result. However, the problem remains for the borderline patient. In fact, limited information is available in the literature regarding the identification of the factors that can help in establishing the limits for one treatment modality or the other. Furthermore, the quantification of some of these factors, for practical purposes, is practically missing or very seldom suggested. Therefore, the decision making process remains a subjective reflection based on the "good clinical sense" of the orthodontist or just reduced to an "educated guess". In order to add some information, hopefully useful in deciding the most suitable treatment option for the individual patient, we propose a clinical protocol based on four different factors. Namely: the skeletal discrepancy, the occlusal discrepancy, the periodontal condition and facial aesthetics. For each one of these factors several parameters will be evaluated and, for some of them, an attempt to provide some reference numerical values will be made. Finally, clinical examples will be presented to illustrate the concepts discussed and the treatment alternatives, final treatment plan and treatment outcome will be analyzed for each one of them. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2016.

  7. Treatment of Class III malocclusion: the key role of the occlusal plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Jean-Louis; Matern, Olivier; Grollemund, Bruno; Bacon, William

    2010-01-01

    Patients with a Class III malocclusion generally present with a counterclockwise inclination of the occlusal plane, converging with Camper's line towards the front. This slope has an effect on mandibular movement (forward posture) and on chewing mechanisms in general. As dysfunctional mastication is likely to influence facial growth and inter-arch stability negatively, early orthopedic therapy of the occlusal unbalance concurrent with Class III malocclusion is justified. The aim of this article is to present a method of Class III treatment based on a correct re-orientation of the occlusal plane in order to achieve an optimal masticatory mechanism, essential for stability of early treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2010 Società Italiana di Ortodonzia (SIDO). Published by Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonsurgical treatment with rapid mandibular canine retraction via periodontal ligament distraction in an adult with a Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, John E

    2005-09-01

    A woman with a Class III malocclusion was a poor candidate for orthognathic surgery. An orthodontic treatment plan was developed that incorporated a relatively new and rapid process of canine distraction. The mandibular first premolars were extracted, correcting the anterior crossbite, the Class III canine relationship, and the Class III facial appearance. The canines were distracted, through the periodontal ligament, into the extraction sites. Dental distraction is a breakthrough for orthodontics, especially for adults with critical anchorage requirements.

  9. Obwegeser II osteotomy (transoral angle osteotomy) for open bite with skeletal class III deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Tae-Geon; Na, KwangMyung; Lee, Sang-Han

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated postoperative stability after Obwegeser II osteotomy (transoral angle osteotomy, first reported by Obwegeser 1973) for severe open bite with mandibular prognathism. This retrospective study reviewed 20 consecutive patients who underwent only mandibular Obwegeser II osteotomy to correct open bite and mandibular prognathism. Lateral cephalograms were evaluated preoperatively (T1), immediate postoperatively (T2) and at least 6 months after the surgery (T3). Surgical and postsurgical changes in cephalometric measurements were evaluated statistically. Open bite with skeletal class III malocclusion was corrected by the Obwegeser II osteotomy alone. After an average of 9.9 ± 5.2 mm of mandibular setback with open bite closure (T2-T1, over-bite change, 5.7 ± 2.4 mm) by counter-clockwise rotation of the mandible, the patients showed 0.8 ± 1.7 mm of horizontal relapse (p > 0.05), 1.1 ± 1.7 mm of vertical relapse at the B point (p = 0.011) and -0.2 ± 1.6 mm of over-bite change postoperatively (T3-T2). With the adequate control of the condylar position with rigid internal fixation, Obwegeser II osteotomy showed acceptable stability after the correction of open bite with mandibular prognathism without a simultaneous maxillary osteotomy. An isolated Obwegeser II osteotomy can be considered a reliable option in cases with moderate to severe open bite with mandibular prognathism when the maxillary osteotomy is not needed if the patients have a well-positioned maxilla. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lateral open bite and crossbite correction in a Class III patient with missing maxillary first premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun; Yu, Joseph; Chae, Jong-Moon

    2017-07-01

    Posterior and Class III elastics were used to correct lateral open bite and anterior crossbite in a 29-year-old man. His occlusion, smile esthetics, and soft tissue profile were significantly improved after 25 months of active orthodontic treatment combined with 4 anterior restorations. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Soft Tissue Characteristics and Gender Dimorphism in Class III Malocclusion: a Cephalometric Study in Adult Greeks

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    Kavvadia Smaragda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Class III malocclusion case are considered complex problems associated with unacceptable esthetics. The purpose of the present study was to assess the characteristics of the soft tissue profile and investigate the possible gender differences in adult Greeks with Class III malocclusion. Material and Methods: The material of the study comprised of 57 pretreatment lateral cephalograms of adult patients with Class III malocclusion aged 18 to 39 years. Eleven variables were assessed. The variables were measured and the mean, minimum and maximum and standard deviations were calculated. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used to compare males and females patients. Results: The total sample was characterized by concave skeletal profile. Male patients exhibited greater nose prominence and superior sulcus depth, longer distance from subnasale to the harmony line, more concave profile, thicker upper lip and larger upper lip strain. Conclusions: Many significant differences were noted in soft tissue characteristics between males and females with skeletal Class III malocclusion, suggesting possible gender dimorphism.

  12. Inheritance of craniofacial features in Colombian families with class III malocclusion

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    L Otero

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available L Otero, L Quintero, D Champsaur, E SimancaPontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, ColombiaIntroduction: The inheritance of class III malocclusion has been well documented, but the inheritance of craniofacial structures in Colombian families with this malocclusion has been not yet reported.Patients and methods: The study sample of 25 families comprised 186 untreated orthodontic individuals from 8 to 60 years old. Pedigrees were drawn using Cyrillic software. Complete family histories for each proband were ascertained and the affection status of relatives was confirmed by lateral cephalograms and facial and dental photographs. Analysis of variance and odds ratio test for each parameter was performed to estimate inheritance from parents to offspring and to determine similar phenotypic features in relatives.Results: The analysis of the pedigrees suggests autosomal dominant inheritance. The craniofacial characteristics that showed more resemblance between parents and offspring were middle facial height, shorter anterior cranial base and mandibular prognathism. In contrast the protrusion of upper lip and maxillary retrusion were the phenotypic features that contributed to class III in the majority of families.Conclusion: Knowledge of the inheritance of craniofacial phenotypes in class III malocclusion will enable the design of new therapies to treat this malocclusion.Keywords: inheritance, craniofacial, phenotype, class III malocclusion

  13. Guide to preemption of state-law claims against Class III PMA medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    There is a perception that the express preemption holding of the Supreme Court in Riegel v. Medtronic, 552 U.S. 312(2008), immunizes medical device manufacturers from common law personal injury actions involving Class III devices that received FDA clearance under a premarket approval application (PMA). In the aftermath of Riegel, many lawsuits involving Class III PMA devices have been dismissed by district courts applying the new heightened pleading standard of Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544 (2007). Other lawsuits involving Class III PMA devices premised on fraud-on-FDA have been dismissed based on the implied preemption holding of the Supreme Court in Buckman v. Plaintiffs' Legal Comm., 531 U.S. 341 (2001). When these decisions are carefully analyzed together with Medtronic, Inc. v. Lohr, 518 U.S. 470 (1996), which found no preemption regarding a Class III device receiving FDA clearance through the 510(k) mechanism, it is apparent that the preemption defense does not apply universally to Class III PMA devices. The overall methodology for framing a non-preempted claim is to first identify conduct which violated the PMA or other specific requirements related to safety or efficacy. If such conduct can also be stated in terms of a breach of a parallel common law duty (e.g, failure to warn under strict liability or negligence, manufacturing defect or breach of warranty), then it would appear the claim is not preempted. Alternatively, regardless of a specific violation, common law remedies are not preempted by general CGMP requirements.

  14. Osteopontin and osteocalcin in maxilla tissue of skeletal Class III patients.

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    Jankovska, Iveta; Pilmane, Mara; Urtane, Ilga

    2009-01-01

    Bone extracellular matrix proteins osteopontin and osteonectin have important function during embryonic osteogenesis and are active in bone remodeling process. Knowledge about bone extracellular matrix proteins explores the mechanisms of craniofacial development and helps to understand better morphopathogenesis of severe dentofacial anomalies. Aim of the current study was to investigate an expression of osteopontin and osteocalcin in maxilla tissue in skeletal Class III patients. The study group included 10 skeletal Class III patients to whom combined orthodontic and surgical treatment was recommended. Samples of tuber maxillae tissue from ten skeletal Class III malocclusion patients were collected due the orthognatic surgery procedure. The routine histological method was followed and samples were stained by hematoxyline-eosine. Tissue samples were stained according the standard immunohistochemical methods and expression of osteocalcin and osteopontin in maxilla tissue was examined. Distribution of these factors was evaluated semiquantitetively by counting the positive structures in visual field. The trabecules of bone contained parallel located collagen fibers and irregular bone mineralization. Connective tissue proliferation in osteon channels was observed. Quantity of cells positive to osteopontin was higher than quantity of cells containing osteocalcin in all patterns extracted of maxilla tissue in patients with skeletal Class III. In few cases osteocalcin positive cells were located near the border with soft tissue - close to osteogenic cells zone, but no osteocalcin was observed deeper in bone. The intensity of osteocalcin expression was variable, and differs individually despite the relatively regular osteopontin distribution in all patterns. There were pronounced osteopontin, but not osteocalcin-containing cells with approximately similar intensity of protein expression in tuber maxillae in skeletal Class III patients.

  15. An Eectromyographic Ccomparison Between the Activities of Temporal and Masseter Muscles in Class III Skeletal

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    T Hossein-Zadeh-Nik

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Electromyographic (EMG investigations about the activities of the muscles have been the focus of attention for many years. In the field of orthodontics, investigators, among other things, tried to evaluate correlation between EMG activity, occlusal relationships and craniofacial morphology to analyze the effect of muscular activity, as an etiological factor in malocclusion. The purpose of the present investigation is to analyze the effect of EMG activity of temporal and masseter muscles quantitatively in skeletal class III malocclusion. 26 patients (9 to If years old, with class III malocclusion were selected and their EMG activity of temporal and masseter muscles in rest position, centric occlusion, clenching, mastication and swallowing were compared with 20 normal children at the same age range. Then the statistical correlation between 13 cephalometric parameters and EMG activities were analyzed and then the regression analysis was performed and the results were as follows:1- The mean amplitude of masseter and temporal muscles activity in rest position, centric occlusion, mastication, and clenching in class III samples were greater than normal group (PO.05.2- The mean duration of masseter and temporal muscles activity in rest position and centric occlusion in class III samples were more than normal group (PO.05.3- According to regression analysis, a linear correlation was observed between ANB angle and temporal muscle activity in rest and centric occlusion that was not observed in other cases.The findings of this study showed that difference in temporal muscle activity in class III malocclusion, in comparison with the normal group, is correlated with skeletal morphology of the face, but according to other investigations it is not ture for the masseter muscle.

  16. Cephalometric assessment of maxillary length in Serbian children with skeletal class III

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    Stojanović Zdenka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Malocclusion of skeletal class III is a complex irregularity of sagittal inter-jaw relationship, which is due to irregularities of sagittal position of one or both of the jaw bones, which is often associated with disproportionate ratio of their length. The aim of this study was to determine whether the length of the jaw of children with skeletal class III in the period of mixed dentition was changed. Methods. Fifty children with skeletal class III and the same number of those with skeletal class I, of both sexes, have been selected on the basis of cephalometric analysis of profile tele-x-ray of the head. All the children aged 6-12 had mixed dentition, and were divided according to sex and age into three subgroups within each group. The length of maxilla, mandible and cranial base were measured. Proportions among the lengths measured within each group were found and difference significance in the measured lengths and their proportions among groups and subgroups were evaluated. Results. The children with skeletal class III, compared with the findings in the control group, had significantly lower values of maxillary length, total maxillary length, as well as lower values of their lengths in proportion to lengths of the front or the total length of cranial base and in proportion to mandibular lengths (p < 0.05. Among the patients of different sexes, both in the test and the control group, a significant difference in the values of the measured lengths was found. Conclusion. The children with skeletal class III have significantly shorter maxilla than those with skeletal class I.

  17. The Populus Class III HD ZIP transcription factor POPCORONA affects cell differentiation during secondary growth of woody stems

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    Juan Du; Eriko Miura; Marcel Robischon; Ciera Martinez; Andrew Groover

    2011-01-01

    The developmental mechanisms regulating cell differentiation and patterning during the secondary growth of woody tissues are poorly understood. Class III HD ZIP transcription factors are evolutionarily ancient and play fundamental roles in various aspects of plant development. Here we investigate the role of a Class III HD ZIP transcription factor, ...

  18. Camouflage of moderate Class III malocclusions with extraction of lower second molars and mandibular cervical headgear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Diego Rey; Oberti, Giovanni; Ealo, Martha; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2007-01-01

    Orthodontic camouflage in patients with slight or moderate skeletal Class III malocclusions, can be obtained through different treatment alternatives. The purpose of this paper is to present a treatment that has not been described in the literature and which consists of the extraction of lower second molars and distal movement of the posterior segments by means of mandibular cervical headgear (MCH) and fixed appliances as a camouflage alternative. The force applied by the MCH was 250 gr per side (14hr/day). The total treatment time was 1 1/2 years. the extraction of lower second molars along with the use of mandibular cervical headgear is a good treatment alternative for camouflage in moderate Class III patients in order to obtain good occlusal relationships without affecting facial esthetics or producing marked dental compensations.

  19. Management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with face mask therapy and comprehensive orthodontic treatment

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    Kirthika Muthukumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion in a growing patient is crucial as it can circumvent future surgical procedures. Further, as surgery is done only at a later stage, early treatment helps to avoid the detrimental effects produced by the facial disfigurement on the patient's social life. This case report describes the treatment of a child aged 9 years 6 months who had a skeletal Class III malocclusion. The treatment plan involved the use of a reverse pull headgear (facemask and multibracket appliance therapy resulting in successful correction of the malocclusion. The treatment results were highly satisfactory resulting in improved facial esthetics, a skeletal Class I with a Dental Class I molar and canine relationship, an ideal overjet and overbite. Thus, dentoalveolar camouflage, if done in properly selected cases, alleviates the need for surgical intervention. The patient is being monitored until the end of growth to ensure the stability of treatment results.

  20. Correction of class III malocclusion using modified tandem appliance-two case reports

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    J Jeevarathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal discrepancies in growing children can have great physical and psychological impact on their appearance. These deformities require orthopedic correction at an appropriate age to avoid future extensive management. Managing a midfacial deficiency or true mandibular prognathism is perhaps the most challenging situation for the clinician. Many orthopedic appliances like chin cup, facemask, and so on have been advocated to correct class III malocclusion. The major problems with these appliances are physical appearance, skin irritation from the anchorage pads and hence, less patient compliance. We present management of class III malocclusion in two children with modified tandem appliance (MTA, which is an intraoral appliance, with no extraoral anchorage, and has better patient compliance and cooperation.

  1. Correction of class III malocclusion using modified tandem appliance-two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarathan, J; Koora, Kiran; Sudhakar, V; Muthu, M S; Prabhu, Rathna V

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal discrepancies in growing children can have great physical and psychological impact on their appearance. These deformities require orthopedic correction at an appropriate age to avoid future extensive management. Managing a midfacial deficiency or true mandibular prognathism is perhaps the most challenging situation for the clinician. Many orthopedic appliances like chin cup, facemask, and so on have been advocated to correct class III malocclusion. The major problems with these appliances are physical appearance, skin irritation from the anchorage pads and hence, less patient compliance. We present management of class III malocclusion in two children with modified tandem appliance (MTA), which is an intraoral appliance, with no extraoral anchorage, and has better patient compliance and cooperation.

  2. A pilot clinical study of Class III surgical patients facilitated by improved accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, JiaQi; Jiang, Jiu-Hui; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Bai, YunYang; Zou, Wei

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate if the improved accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (IAOO) procedure could speed Class III surgical patients' preoperative orthodontic treatment duration and, if yes, to what extent. This study was also designed to determine whether or not an IAOO procedure affects the tooth-moving pattern during extraction space closure. The samples in this study consisted of 24 Class III surgical patients. Twelve skeletal Class III surgery patients served as an experimental group (group 1) and the others as a control group (group 2). Before treatment, the maxillary first premolars were removed. For group 1, after the maxillary dental arch was aligned and leveled (T2), IAOO procedures were performed in the maxillary alveolar bone. Except for this IAOO procedure in group 1, all 24 patients experienced similar combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment. Study casts of the maxillary dentitions were made before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after extraction space closure (T3). All of the casts were laser scanned, and the amount of movement of the maxillary central incisor, canine, and first molar, as well as arch widths, were digitally measured and analyzed by using the three-dimensional model superimposition method. The time durations T3-T2 were significantly reduced in group 1 by 8.65 ± 2.67 months and for T3-T1 were reduced by 6.39 ± 2.00 months (P teeth movement in the sagittal, vertical, and transverse dimensions between the two groups (P > .05). The IAOO can reduce the surgical orthodontic treatment time for the skeletal Class III surgical patient by more than half a year on average. The IAOO procedures do not save anchorage.

  3. Transparent aligners: An invisible approach to correct mild skeletal class III malocclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezdani, A. Arif

    2015-01-01

    This case report highlights the treatment of a mild skeletal class III malocclusion with an invisible thermoplastic retainer. A 15-year-old female patient presented with a mild skeletal class III malocclusion with a retrognathic maxilla, orthognathic mandible, a low mandibular plane angle with Angle's class III malocclusion with maxillary lateral incisors in anterior cross-bite with crowding of maxillary anteriors, imbricated and rotated mandibular incisors and deep bite. Accurate upper and lower impressions and a bite registration were taken with polyvinyl siloxane rubber base impression material. This was then sent to the lab for the processing of a series of ClearPath aligners. The ClearPath virtual set-up sent from the lab provided the treatment plan and interproximal reduction estimation complete with posttreatment results. This enabled the clinician to actively participate in the treatment plan and provide the necessary suggestions. The ClearPath three-dimensional aligner was found to have effectively corrected the anterior cross-bite and crowding of the maxillary anteriors. PMID:26015738

  4. Treatment and posttreatment effects of mandibular cervical headgear followed by fixed appliances in Class III malocclusion.

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    Rey, Diego; Angel, David; Oberti, Giovanni; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2008-03-01

    In this cephalometric investigation, we compared the treatment and posttreatment effects on patients undergoing an initial phase of mandibular cervical headgear (MCH) therapy followed later by comprehensive edgewise therapy with untreated Class III controls. The treated sample consisted of 21 patients treated consecutively with MCH before the pubertal growth spurt (average age, 10 years 2 months at the beginning of treatment). At the final observation period (average age, 15 years 3 months), all patients were in decelerative growth phases as determined by the cervical vertebral maturation method. Active treatment and posttreatment effects were evaluated in the treated group with nonparametric statistical analysis for paired samples. The treated sample was compared with a nonparametric statistical test for independent samples with 20 untreated Class III subjects who were matched for malocclusion, sex, and stage of cervical vertebral maturation to the treatment group. MCH therapy followed by fixed appliances was shown to be an effective treatment for the correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion at postpubertal observation. The favorable skeletal effects consisted mainly of smaller increases in mandibular length and advancement with respect to the controls, with the final outcome of significant improvements in the sagittal skeletal (+4 mm for the Wits appraisal) and dental (+2.7 mm for overjet, -4.4 mm for molar relationship) parameters. This treatment protocol also induced significant downward rotation of the mandible (2.8 degrees ).

  5. Evaluation of temporomandibular disorders in Class III patients treated with mandibular cervical headgear and fixed appliances.

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    Rey, Diego; Oberti, Giovanni; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2008-03-01

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in Class III patients treated with mandibular cervical headgear (MCH) and fixed appliances. The sample of 75 patients included 25 patients with no previous orthodontic treatment, 25 Class I patients who had undergone orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and without extractions, and 25 patients with dentoskeletal Class III disharmonies treated with MCH and fixed appliances. The Helkimo index was used to test the prevalence of TMD symptoms in the 3 groups. The prevalence rates of the Helkimo index in the 3 groups were compared with the z score on proportions. No statistically significant differences in the prevalence rates of the Helkimo index scores in the 3 groups were found (P = .367). Most subjects in the 3 groups had an Helkimo index of zero (66.7%). Subjects with Class III malocclusions treated with MCH and fixed appliances do not have greater prevalence of TMD symptoms than do Class I subjects treated with fixed appliances or untreated subjects.

  6. Prevalence of class III malocclusion and crossbite among children and adolescents with craniomandibular dysfunction.

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    Popovic, Nenad; Drinkuth, Nicole; Toll, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have been devoted to the causes of craniomandibular dysfunction (CMD). This investigation addressed the effect of class III malocclusion and crossbite on CMD based on a sample of 115 prepubertal and adolescent patients of both sexes. Although class III malocclusion only accounted for 12.2% of the total sample, thus, being the smallest group, the percentage of crossbite (71.4%) among these patients was disproportionately higher than among the other classes. Of the total sample, the prevalence of crossbite was 30.4%. We compared these findings to a large-scale (n=4727) study by Thilander et al. (2002), who reported a strikingly high percentage of class I patients compared to our findings (72.7% versus 27.8%) and a lower percentage of crossbite cases (8.0% versus 30.4%). In accordance with the "orthodontic risk child" concept by Grabowski et al. (2007) and Stahl et al. (2007), we conclude that class III malocclusion and crossbite are keys in the pathogenesis of CMD.

  7. The effects of two methods of Class III malocclusion treatment on temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Hanefi; Alioğlu, Ceylan; Karayazgan, Banu; Tuncer, Necat; Kılıçoğlu, Hülya

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate, within a controlled clinical study, the effects of a Delaire-type facemask or a modified Jasper Jumper (JJ) used in the treatment of children with Class III malocclusions due to maxillary retrognathia on temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Forty-six patients with Class III malocclusions referred for orthodontic treatment were divided into two groups, a test and a control. The test group comprised 33 randomly chosen patients (15 females, 18 males) aged 8-11 years. The control group included 13 patients (eight females, five males) with similar features. TMD assessment was performed before and after treatment using a two-axis questionnaire, the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMDs). Qualitative data were evaluated using chi-square and McNemar tests. No statistically significant differences related to the presence of TMD were observed pre- or post-treatment (P > 0.05). The most commonly encountered diagnosis was arthralgia in the JJ group both before and after treatment. Evaluation of joint and muscle regions showed decreased symptoms, apart from the diagnosed discomforts, in the JJ group (P Class III malocclusion treatment did not result in TMD.

  8. Management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with reverse pull headgear in a growing individual

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    Ambreen Afzal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal Class III malocclusion is considered to be one of the most difficult orthodontic problems to treat. This malocclusion is associated with the retrognathic maxilla or prognathic mandible or sometimes a combination of both. The treatment of such cases requires an integrated approach and a comprehensive treatment plan including growth modification, dental camouflage, or orthognathic surgery. In a growing patient, orthopedic correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion with the help of a reverse pull headgear is crucial as it can reduce the chances of further surgical treatment to correct the skeletal discrepancy. This case report describes the management of skeletal Class III malocclusion in a 12-year-old female child with a retrognathic maxilla. The patient did not have any other genetic abnormality or significant known comorbidity. The treatment plan involved fixed orthodontic appliance therapy in combination with a reverse pull headgear for an orthopedic effect. This treatment was continued for 3 years, and well-aligned dental arches with a positive over jet were achieved at the conclusion of treatment. Using facemask therapy in conjunction with fixed orthodontic appliances has been a successful treatment option in growing children. Treatment should be carried out as early as possible to correct the skeletal discrepancy nonsurgically and achieve better results.

  9. Modified tandem traction bow appliance compared with facemask therapy in treating Class III malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortop, Tuba; Kaygisiz, Emine; Gencer, Deniz; Yuksel, Sema; Atalay, Zeynep

    2014-07-01

    To compare the effects of the modified tandem traction bow appliance (MTTBA) and the facemask in treating patients with Class III malocclusion. The material consisted of the pre-post treatment\\pre-post observation lateral cephalograms of 65 subjects with skeletal and dental Class III malocclusion. In the first group 21 patients (mean age: 10 years, 6 months) were treated with a Delaire-type facemask (FM). In the second group 22 patients treated (mean age: 10 years) with MTTBA. The remaining 22 children (mean age: 9 years, 7 months) were observed without treatment for 11 months. Increase in SNA, N-FH ⊥ A, and ANB angles were significantly greater in the treatment groups compared to the control group. However, ANB angle showed a significantly greater increase in the FM group (2.8 ± 0.30°) than in the MTTBA group (2.0 ± 0.18°). The overjet and molar relation increased significantly in both treatment groups, but in the FM group (5.2 ± 0.40 mm) increase in overjet was significantly greater than in the MTTBA group (4.0 ± 0.27 mm). Mesial movement of upper molar and incisor were found to be greater in the FM group compared to the modified TTBA group. Both appliances were found to be effective in the treatment of Class III malocclusion. Their skeletal and dental effects showed differences due to their design.

  10. Potentiators (specific therapies for class III and IV mutations) for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay; Sinha, Ian P; Dwan, Kerry; Echevarria, Carlos; Schechter, Michael; Southern, Kevin W

    2015-03-26

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common inherited life-shortening illness in Caucasians and caused by a mutation in the gene that codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR), which functions as a salt transporter. This mutation most notably affects the airways of people with cystic fibrosis. Excess salt absorption by defective CFTR dehydrates the airway lining and leads to defective mucociliary clearance. Consequent accumulation of thick, sticky mucus makes the airway prone to chronic infection and progressive inflammation; respiratory failure often ensues. Additionally, abnormalities with CFTR lead to systemic complications like malnutrition, diabetes and subfertility.Since the discovery of the causative gene, our understanding of the structure and function of CFTR and the impact of different mutations has increased and allowed pharmaceutical companies to design new mutation-specific therapies targeting the underlying molecular defect. Therapies targeting mutation classes III and IV (CFTR potentiators) aim to normalise airway surface liquid and help re-establish mucociliary clearance, which then has a beneficial impact on the chronic infection and inflammation that characterizes lung disease in people with cystic fibrosis. These therapies may also affect other mutations. To evaluate the effects of CFTR potentiators on clinically important outcomes in children and adults with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews. Last search: 05 March 2015.We searched the EU Clinical Trials Register, clinicaltrials.gov (US Clinical Trials Register) and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). Last search of clinical trial registries: 06 February 2014. Randomised controlled trials of parallel design comparing CFTR potentiators to

  11. Orthodontic treatment for prominent lower front teeth (Class III malocclusion) in children.

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    Watkinson, Simon; Harrison, Jayne E; Furness, Susan; Worthington, Helen V

    2013-09-30

    Prominent lower front teeth (termed reverse bite; under bite; Class III malocclusion) may be due to a combination of the jaw or tooth positions or both. The upper jaw (maxilla) can be too far back or the lower jaw (mandible) too far forward, or both. Prominent lower front teeth can also occur if the upper front teeth (incisors) are tipped back or the lower front teeth are tipped forwards, or both. Various treatment approaches have been described to correct prominent lower front teeth in children and adolescents. To assess the effects of orthodontic treatment for prominent lower front teeth in children and adolescents. We searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 7 January 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 7 January 2013), and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 7 January 2013). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) recruiting children or adolescents or both (aged 16 years or less) receiving any type of orthodontic treatment to correct prominent lower front teeth (Class III malocclusion). Orthodontic treatments were compared with control groups who received either no treatment, delayed treatment or a different active intervention. Screening of references, identification of included and excluded studies, data extraction and assessment of the risk of bias of the included studies was performed independently and in duplicate by two review authors. The mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for continuous data. Meta-analysis was only undertaken when studies of similar comparisons reported comparable outcome measures. A fixed-effect model was used. The I2 statistic was used as a measure of statistical heterogeneity. Seven RCTs with a total of 339 participants were included in this review. One study was assessed as at low risk of bias, three studies were at high risk of bias, and in the remaining three studies risk of bias

  12. Three-dimensional evaluation of facial morphology in children aged 5-6 years with a Class III malocclusion.

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    Krneta, Bojana; Primožič, Jasmina; Zhurov, Alexei; Richmond, Stephen; Ovsenik, Maja

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate facial morphology in 25 Class III and 46 non-Class III children aged 5-6 years using three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging; 3D facial images were obtained, two average facial templates were constructed for the non-Class III male and female groups, each individual face was superimposed on the corresponding average template and group comparisons were evaluated (facial height, facial convexity, mandibular position and facial surface morphology). Differences between parameters were evaluated by using an analysis of variance and colour deviation maps. The results showed that Class III children had less mid-face prominence and a concave facial profile when compared to non-Class III children (P = 0.002 and P = 0.018). The position of the pg point in the z-axis just failed to reach statistical significance when comparing the two groups (P = 0.051). A vertical analysis showed no statistical significance between the groups, when evaluating middle (n-sn) and lower (sn-pg) facial height. Coincidence of the Class III faces to normal templates with a tolerance set as 0.5 mm was low (less than 30%). The soft tissue characteristics of a Class III face differ significantly from the non-Class III face in the mid-face region and in the facial profile. A 3D laser imaging method evaluated and identified morphological characteristics of Class III children in deciduous dentition, which could in the future become an important diagnostic tool in small children. The most important clinical advantage of this study is the non-invasiveness of the method.

  13. Early orthopedic correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion using combined reverse twin block and face mask therapy

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    Vinay Kumar Chugh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6-year 8-month-old girl presented with a moderate Class III malocclusion characterized by mid-face deficiency and an anterior cross bite. In the first phase, the patient was treated with combination of reverse twin block and facemask therapy. In phase two, fixed appliances were placed in the permanent dentition. The post treatment results were good and a favorable growth tendency could be observed. The correction of the Class III malocclusion occurred by a combination of skeletal and dental improvements. This report shows successful correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion in the early transitional dentition using combination therapy.

  14. Class III / short line system inventory to determine 286,000 lb (129,844 kg) railcar operational status in Kansas : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The rail industrys recent shift towards larger and heavier railcars has influenced Class III/short line railroad operation and track maintenance costs. Class III railroads earn less than $38.1 million in annual revenue and generally operate first ...

  15. Class III / short line system inventory to determine 286,000 lb (129,844 kg) railcar operational status in Kansas : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The rail industrys recent shift towards larger and heavier railcars has influenced Class III/short line railroad operation and track maintenance costs. Class III railroads earn less than $38.1 million in annual revenue and generally operate first ...

  16. [Analysis of variation of sagittal position of the jaw bones in skeletal Class III malocclusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Zdenka; Nikolić, Predrag; Nikodijević, Angelina; Milić, Jasmina; Duka, Milos

    2012-12-01

    Skeletal Class III malocclusion is a discrepancy in the sagittal jaw relationship, due to imbalances in their development and/or position, resulting in the dominant appearance of the lower jaw in facial profile. The aim of this study was to determine variations in the sagittal position of the jaw bones to the cranial base in subjects with skeletal Class III, for the earliest possible diagnosis of malocclusion. Fifty children and as many adults with skeletal Class III, both sexes, were examined and selected, based on the findings of sagittal interjaw relationship (ANB) children aged 6-12 years, and another group, of adults aged 18-26 years. We measured the angles of maxillary prognathism (SNA), mandibular prognathism (SNB) and ANB. Based on these results, within the respective groups subclassification into the subgroups was done, among which a significant difference measured values was evaluated. In both groups a significant correlation of the determined values was evaluated. An average SNA angle ranged 77.36 +/- 3.58 in children and 77.32 +/- 4.88 in adults, while an average SNB angle was 79.46 +/- 3.91 in the group of children and 81.12 +/- 3.76 in adults. An average ANB angle was -2.10 +/- 2.07 in children, and -4.00 +/- 2.34 in adults. In both groups, a significant correlation between the measured values and a significant difference in the values of all the measured parameters were found between patients from different subgroups (p children and adults. Sagittal position of the lower jaw in most of the adults was prognathic, while mandible prognathism in the children was less present.

  17. [Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 by Postnikov appliance, face mask and bracket system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikov, M A; Trunin, D A; Pankratova, N V; Nesterov, A M; Sadykov, M I; Ostankov, S A

    2018-01-01

    The diagnostics and treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 is an vital problem in orthodontics. Method of orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients with the help of improved and patented orthodontic construction - 'Postnikov appliance' - and face mask and bracket system is analysed in the article. Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III was examined in 24 patients aged 6-12 by the suggested method. All patients were examined clinically and with the help af additional diagnostic methods: head cephalometry in lateral position with further data analysis in Dolphin Imaging (USA). The use of computer technologies in Dolphin Imaging helps to controll the process of correction of dentition correlation in different stages of treatment, to reduce the period of treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 and to improve face esthetics and life quality ratio.

  18. Treatment Effects of Occipitomental Anchorage Appliance of Maxillary Protraction Combined with Chincup Traction in Children with Class III Malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Chien Lin

    2007-05-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that the OMA orthopedic appliance can correct the mesial jaw relationship and negative incisal overjet. This appliance is effective for correcting skeletal Class III malocclusion with both midface deficiency and Mn prognathism in growing children.

  19. Management of a severe Class III malocclusion with extreme dentoalveolar compensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehra, Karan; Sharma, Vineet; Mitra, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a 21-year-old woman with a severe Class III malocclusion, 9-mm anterior crossbite, extremely proclined maxillary anterior incisors associated with decreased buccolingual alveolar width, and a malformed supernumerary tooth. The treatment plan included fixed appliances to align and level the teeth, en masse retraction of maxillary anterior incisors after a labial and palatal corticotomy using temporary anchorage devices, high Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy for maxillary advancement, and bilateral sagittal split osteotomy for mandibular setback. Ideal overjet and overbite relationships were established, and the final esthetic result was pleasing. Occlusal stability was excellent in the 1-year follow-up.

  20. Management of skeletal Class III malocclusion due to mandibular prognathism coexisting with vertical maxillary excess

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    Praveen Kumar Neela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes combined orthodontic and orthognathic management of skeletal Class III malocclusion in a female patient presenting with prognathic mandible, increased maxillary height, severe hyperdivergence, gummy smile, and upper anterior proclination. Presurgical orthodontics involved extraction of maxillary first premolars and decompensating the proclined upper incisors. Orthognathic surgery involving differential maxillary impaction, mandibular bilateral sagittal split osteotomy setback, and sliding genioplasty. Postsurgical orthodontics was initiated one month after the surgery to finish the case in Class II molar relationship and Class I canine relationship with proper intercuspation. The outcome had acceptable results with good esthetics and occlusion.

  1. Size of lower jaw as an early indicator of skeletal class III development

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    Stojanović Zdenka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Malocclusion of skeletal class III is a complex abnormality, with a characteristic sagital position of the lower jaw in front of the upper one. A higher level of prognatism of the lower jaw in relation to the upper one can be the consequence of its excessive length. The aim of this study was to find the differences in the length of the lower jaw in the children with skeletal class III and the children with normal sagital interjaw relation (skeletal class I in the period of mixed dentition. Methods. After clinical and x-ray diagnostics, profile tele-x-rays of the head were analyzed in 60 examinees with mixed dentition, aged from 6 to 12 years. The examinees were divided into two groups: group 1 - the children with skeletal class III and group 2 - the children with skeletal class I. The length of the lower jaw, upper jaw and cranial base were measured. The proportional relations between the lengths measured within each group were established and the level of difference in the lengths measured and their proportions between the groups were estimated. Results. No significant difference between the groups was found in the body length, ramus and the total length of the lower jaw. Proportional relation between the body length and the length of the lower jaw ramus and proportional relation between the forward cranial base and the lower jaw body were not significantly different. A significant difference was found in proportional relations of the total length of the lower jaw with the total lengths of cranial base and the upper jaw and proportional relation of the length of the lower and upper jaw body. Conclusion. Of all the analyzed parameters, the following were selected as the early indicators of the development of skeletal class III on the lower jaw: greater total length of the lower jaw, proportional to the total lengths of cranial base and the upper jaw, as well as greater length of the lower jaw body, proportional to the length of

  2. Correction of transverse maxillary deficiency and anterior open bite in an adult Class III skeletal patient

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    Prerna Hoogan Teja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transverse maxillary deficiency may be associated with sagittal or vertical problems of the maxilla or mandible. It may contribute to unilateral or bilateral posterior crossbite, anterior dental crowding, and unesthetic black buccal corridors on smiling. An adequate transverse dimension is important for stable and proper functional occlusion. Surgically, assisted rapid palatal expansion has been the treatment of choice to resolve posterior crossbite in skeletally mature patients. The following case report presents an adult Class III skeletal patient with an anterior open bite and bilateral posterior crossbite which was treated by surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion with satisfactory outcomes.

  3. Treatment Effects of Occipitomental Anchorage Appliance of Maxillary Protraction Combined with Chincup Traction in Children with Class III Malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiang-Chien Lin; Hong-Po Chang; Hsin-Fu Chang

    2007-01-01

    Little information related to the treatment effects of the occipitomental anchorage (OMA) appliance of maxillary (Mx) protraction combined with chincup traction is available. The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment effects of the OMA orthopedic appliance on patients with Class III malocclusion. Methods: Pretreatment and post-treatment cephalometric records of 20 consecutively treated patients with Class III malocclusions were evaluated and compared with a matched sample of u...

  4. Assessment of temporomandibular disorder and occlusion in treated class III malocclusion patients

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    Karyna Valle-Corotti

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to compare the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD in individuals submitted to either orthodontic or ortho-surgical Class III malocclusion treatment and to assess the influence of occlusal aspects on TMD severity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 50 individuals divided into two groups, according to the type of treatment (orthodontic or orthodontic with orthognathic surgery. The presence of signs and symptoms of TMD was evaluated by an anamnestic questionnaire and a clinical examination, including TMJ and muscle palpation, active mandibular range of motion, joint noises and occlusal examination. RESULTS: Based on the anamnestic questionnaire, 48% had no TMD, 42% had mild TMD and 10% had moderate TMD. The presence and severity of TMD did not show any relationship with the type of orthodontic treatment (p>0.05. The chi-square test showed a positive association (p<0.05 between TMD and non-working side occlusal interferences. CONCLUSION: Based on the methodology used and the results obtained, it may be concluded that Class III orthodontic treatment was not associated with the presence of TMD signs and symptoms and the non-working side contacts can be occlusal factors of risk. There was no significant difference in TMD prevalence between the studied groups (orthodontically treated patients and patients treated with orthodontics followed by orthognathic surgery.

  5. Surgical-orthodontic treatment of Class III malocclusion with agenesis of lateral incisor and unerupted canine

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    Bruno Boaventura Vieira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Orthodontic-surgical treatment was performed in patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion due to exceeding mandibular growth. Patient also presented upper and lower dental protrusion, overjet of -3.0 mm, overbite of -1.0 mm, congenital absence of tooth #22, teeth #13 and supernumerary impaction, tooth #12 with conoid shape and partly erupted in supraversion, prolonged retention of tooth #53, tendency to vertical growth of the face and facial asymmetry. The discrepancy on the upper arch was -2.0 mm and -5.0 mm on the lower arch. METHODS: The pre-surgical orthodontic treatment was performed with extractions of the teeth #35 and #45. On the upper arch, teeth #53, #12 and supernumerary were extracted to accomplish the traction of the impacted canine. The spaces of the lower extractions were closed with mesialization of posterior segment. After aligning and leveling the teeth, extractions spaces closure and correct positioning of teeth on the bone bases, the correct intercuspation of the dental arch, with molars and canines in Angle's Class I, coincident midline, normal overjet and overbite and ideal torques, were evaluated through study models. The patient was submitted to orthognathic surgery and then the post-surgical orthodontic treatment was finished. RESULTS: The Class III malocclusion was treated establishing occlusal and facial normal standards.

  6. Mandibular cervical headgear vs rapid maxillary expander and facemask for orthopedic treatment of Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Rey, Diego; Angel, David; Oberti, Giovanni; McNamara, James A

    2007-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of the rapid maxillary expander and facemask (RME/ FM) and mandibular cervical headgear (MCH) protocols when followed by fixed appliances and evaluated at a postpubertal observation in patients with dentoskeletal Class III malocclusion. The sample treated with the RME/FM followed by fixed appliances included 32 patients (12 boys and 20 girls). The sample treated with the MCH followed by fixed appliances included 26 patients (eight boys and 18 girls). Cephalometric analysis was performed at T(1) (before treatment) and T(2) (after the first phase of orthopedic therapy and the second phase of fixed appliances). T(1)-T(2) changes were evaluated by means of t-tests. Midfacial length, mandibular length, and the sagittal position of the chin all showed significantly smaller increases in the MCH group than in the RME/FM group. The amount of increase in the overjet was also significantly smaller in the MCH group, whereas the amount of molar correction was greater. The upper incisors were significantly less proclined and the lower incisors were significantly less retroclined in the MCH group when compared with the RME/FM group. RME/FM therapy appears to be indicated in Class III patients with a component of maxillary retrusion, whereas MCH therapy is preferable in patients with mandibular prognathism.

  7. Orthodontic decompensation in class III patients by means of distalization of upper molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Villegas B; Giovanni, Oberti; Diego, Rey; Angela, Sierra; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2009-01-01

    Pre-surgical orthodontic treatments have the objective of establishing harmony between the dental arches by moving the teeth to ideal positions in relation to their bony bases, in order to achieve adequate antero-posterior occlusal and transverse relationships at the moment of surgery. Among the typical requirements in terms of dental compensations presented by Class III patients that require surgery, the inclination of anterior teeth must be changed in most cases by proclination of the lower incisors and retroclination of upper incisors. To achieve the inclination of the upper incisors, many different alternatives have been proposed, such as inter-proximal reduction, extractions, or distalization of upper molars, which has not been widely reported in the literature as a means to decompensate Class III malocclusion prior to surgery. This article describes the Bone Supported Pendulum (BSP) as an efficient therapeutic option to distalize molars through the use of an appliance stabilized to the palate by mini-implants, thus avoiding extractions and providing good interdigitation and coordination of the dental arches.

  8. Skeletal Class III malocclusion with thin symphyseal bone: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikida, Eriko; Tanikawa, Chihiro

    2012-11-01

    To describe the management of a severe skeletal Class III patient with thin symphyseal bone and alveolar bone covering the mandibular incisors. A 24 year-old female presented with a skeletal Class III malocclusion characterised by thin alveolar bone in a mildly crowded, mandibular incisor region. Computerised tomography (CT) assisted in the determination of possible tooth movement within the anterior mandibular alveolar bone. The finalised treatment plan aimed to align the maxillary and mandibular dental arches following the extraction of the maxillary right first premolar and the mandibular right permanent lateral incisor. The surgical repositioning of the maxilla and mandible with a LeFort I osteotomy and a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) would follow. After treatment, an acceptable facial profile and a solid intercuspation of the teeth were obtained. Significant root resorption was not observed. The occlusion remained stable with normal overjet and overbite after two years of retention. CT examination provided an assessment of the three-dimensional morphological characteristics of anterior alveolar bone which enabled an evaluation of possible tooth movement.

  9. Intravenous Vancomycin Associated With the Development of Nephrotoxicity in Patients With Class III Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yookyung Christy; Saw, Stephen; Soliman, Daniel; Bingham, Angela L; Pontiggia, Laura; Hunter, Krystal; Chuang, Linda; Siemianowski, Laura A; Ereshefsky, Benjamin; Hollands, James M

    2017-11-01

    A consensus statement recommends initial intravenous (IV) vancomycin dosing of 15-20 mg/kg every 8- 24 hours, with an optional 25- to 30-mg/kg loading dose. Although some studies have shown an association between weight and the development of vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity, results have been inconsistent. To evaluate the correlation between incidence of nephrotoxicity associated with weight-based IV vancomycin dosing strategies in nonobese and obese patients. This retrospective cohort study evaluated hospitalized adult patients admitted who received IV vancomycin. Patients were stratified into nonobese (body mass index [BMI] obesity class I and II (BMI 30-39.9kg/m 2 ), and obesity class III (BMI≥40 kg/m 2 ) groups; patients who were overweight but not obese were excluded. Incidence of nephrotoxicity and serum vancomycin trough concentrations were evaluated. Of a total of 62 documented cases of nephrotoxicity (15.1%), 13 (8.7%), 23 (14.3%), and 26 (26.3%) cases were observed in nonobese, obesity class I and II, and obesity class III groups, respectively ( P=0.002). Longer durations of therapy ( P20 mg/L ( Pobesity were 3-times as likely to develop nephrotoxicity when compared with nonobese patients (odds ratio [OR]=2.99; CI=1.12-7.94) and obesity class I and II patients (OR=3.14; CI=1.27-7.75). Obesity and other factors are associated with a higher risk of vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity.

  10. Achados clínicos e polissonográficos em pacientes com obesidade classe III Clinical and polysomnographic findings in class III obese patients

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    Rodrigo de Paiva Tangerina

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome da apnéia/hipopnéia obstrutiva do sono (SAHOS apresenta estreita correlação com a obesidade, porém não está estabelecida uma relação linear de gravidade principalmente em relação aos extremos como na obesidade mórbida. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os achados clínicos e polissonográficos em pacientes com obesidade classe III e correlacionar esses achados com a presença da SAHOS. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram selecionados consecutivamente 45 pacientes com índice de massa corpórea superior a 40Kg/m2. Todos foram submetidos a anamnese, exame físico antropométrico e polissonografia. Os achados foram comparados entre os pacientes com e sem SAHOS. RESULTADOS: 68,9% dos pacientes eram do sexo feminino e 31,1% do masculino. A idade média foi de 46,5 DP 10,8 anos, a média do IMC foi 49 DP 7Kg/m2 e a média da circunferência cervical foi 43,4 DP 5,1cm. Todos os pacientes eram roncadores habituais e 48,9% tinham queixa de hipersonolência diurna. Os achados polissonográficos mostraram que 77,8% apresentaram índice de apnéia/hipopnéia superior a cinco. Apresentaram correlação com a presença da SAHOS: idade mais jovem (p=0,02 e maior circunferência cervical (p=0,004. CONCLUSÃO: A prevalência de SAHOS foi elevada, ressaltando a importância da sua investigação em pacientes referenciados para cirurgia bariátrica. O principal marcador da SAHOS foi a circunferência cervical.The Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hipopnea Syndrome (OSAHS is closely related to obesity; a linear relation, however, has not been established, particularly in morbid obesity patients. AIM: To evaluate clinical and polysomnographic findings in a group of class III obese patients, and to relate these findings with the presence or absence of OSAHS. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Forty five patients with body mass indexex (BMI over 40Kg/m2 were selected consecutively. A clinical history, the anthropometric examination and polysomnography were undertaken in all patients. The

  11. Base of the skull morphology and Class III malocclusion in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate

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    Mariana Maciel Tinano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to determine the morphological differences in the base of the skull of individuals with cleft lip and palate and Class III malocclusion in comparison to control groups with Class I and Class III malocclusion. METHODS: A total of 89 individuals (males and females aged between 5 and 27 years old (Class I, n = 32; Class III, n = 29; and Class III individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate, n = 28 attending PUC-MG Dental Center and Cleft Lip/Palate Care Center of Baleia Hospital and PUC-MG (CENTRARE were selected. Linear and angular measurements of the base of the skull, maxilla and mandible were performed and assessed by a single calibrated examiner by means of cephalometric radiographs. Statistical analysis involved ANCOVA and Bonferroni correction. RESULTS: No significant differences with regard to the base of the skull were found between the control group (Class I and individuals with cleft lip and palate (P > 0.017. The cleft lip/palate group differed from the Class III group only with regard to CI.Sp.Ba (P = 0.015. Individuals with cleft lip and palate had a significantly shorter maxillary length (Co-A in comparison to the control group (P < 0.001. No significant differences were found in the mandible (Co-Gn of the control group and individuals with cleft lip and palate (P = 1.000. CONCLUSION: The present findings suggest that there are no significant differences in the base of the skull of individuals Class I or Class III and individuals with cleft lip and palate and Class III malocclusion.

  12. Analysis of variation of sagittal position of the jaw bones in skeletal class III malocclusion

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    Stojanović Zdenka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Skeletal Class III malocclusion is a discrepancy in the sagittal jaw relationship, due to imbalances in their development and/or position, resulting in the dominant appearance of the lower jaw in facial profile. The aim of this study was to determine variations in the sagittal position of the jaw bones to the cranial base in subjects with skeletal Class III, for the earliest possible diagnosis of malocclusion. Methods. Fifty children and as many adults with skeletal Class III, both sexes, were examined and selected, based on the findings of sagittal interjaw relationship (ANB ≤ 0° from the cephalometric analysis of tele-x-ray profile head shots. The subjects were grouped according to age. The first group consisted of children aged 6-12 years, and another group, of adults aged 18-26 years. We measured the angles of maxillary prognathism (SNA, mandibular prognathism (SNB and ANB. Based on these results, within the respective groups subclassification into the subgroups was done, among which a significant difference measured values was evaluated. In both groups a significant correlation of the determined values was evaluated. Results. An average SNA angle ranged 77.36 ± 3.58 in children and 77.32 ± 4.88 in adults, while an average SNB angle was 79.46 ± 3.91 in the group of children and 81.12 ± 3.76 in adults. An average ANB angle was -2.10 ± 2.07 in children, and -4.00 ± 2.34 in adults. In both groups, a significant correlation between the measured values and a significant difference in the values of all the measured parameters were found between patients from different subgroups (p < 0.01. Conclusion. The most common morphological variation of sagittal position of the upper jaw is its retrognatism, which is equally present in both children and adults. Sagittal position of the lower jaw in most of the adults was prognathic, while mandible prognathism in the children was less present.

  13. Dofetilide: a class III anti-arrhythmic drug for the treatment of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, C; Brendorp, B; Køber, L

    2000-01-01

    of dofetilide. After pharmacological or electrical conversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm in these studies, the probability of remaining in sinus rhythm during the following year was 75%. Dofetilide has a single significant side effect: risk of developing torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia......Dofetilide is a class III anti-arrhythmic drug that has been approved for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Two clinical studies, which enrolled 996 patients, demonstrated pharmacological conversion to sinus rhythm to occur in 30% of patients. Following pharmacological or electrical conversion...... and beta-blockers. Other anti-arrhythmic drugs, as well as drugs that interfere with the renal elimination or the metabolism of dofetilide, must be avoided. Dofetilide is an option when persistent atrial fibrillation is a clinical problem. In the setting of severe heart failure and large myocardial...

  14. Natural Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composite for Ballistic Armor Against Class III-A Ammunition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fabio Cassiano; Holanda, Luane Isquerdo Ferreira; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Gomes, Alaelson Vieira; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2017-10-01

    Epoxy matrix composites reinforced with up to 30 vol pct of continuous and aligned natural mallow fibers were for the first time ballistic tested as personal armor against class III-A 9 mm FMJ ammunition. The ballistic efficiency of these composites was assessed by measuring the dissipated energy and residual velocity after the bullet perforation. The results were compared to those in similar tests of aramid fabric (Kevlar™) commonly used in vests for personal protections. Visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy analysis of impact-fractured samples revealed failure mechanisms associated with fiber pullout and rupture as well as epoxy cracking. As compared to Kevlar™, the mallow fiber composite displayed practically the same ballistic efficiency. However, there is a reduction in both weight and cost, which makes the mallow fiber composites a promising material for personal ballistic protection.

  15. Compensatory orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite

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    José Valladares Neto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of an adult patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion and anterior crossbite. A short cranial base led to difficulties in establishing a cephalometric diagnosis. The patient's main complaint comprised esthetics of his smile and difficulties in mastication. METHODS: The patient did not have the maxillary first premolars and refused orthognathic surgery. Therefore, the treatment chosen was orthodontic camouflage and extraction of mandibular first premolars. For maxillary retraction, the vertical dimension was temporarily increased to avoid obstacles to orthodontic movement. RESULTS: At the end of the treatment, ideal overjet and overbite were achieved. CONCLUSION: Examination eight years after orthodontic treatment revealed adequate clinical stability. This case report was submitted to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as part of the requirements to become a BBO diplomate.

  16. Feasibility of biowaiver extension to biopharmaceutics classification system class III drug products: cimetidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantratid, Ekarat; Prakongpan, Sompol; Amidon, Gordon L; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2006-01-01

    The extension of biowaivers (drug product approval without a pharmacokinetic bioequivalence study) to drugs belonging to Class III of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) is currently a subject of much discussion. To assess the relationship between in vitro dissolution characteristics and in vivo absorption performance of immediate-release (IR) products containing cimetidine, a BCS Class III compound, in human subjects. To evaluate the feasibility and appropriateness of an extension of the biowaiver concept to BCS Class III compounds. BCS-conform dissolution tests were carried out on ten marketed cimetidine products from Thailand and Germany, as well as cimetidine tablet formulations containing cimetidine 400mg manufactured by direct compression using methacrylate copolymer (Eudragit) RS PO) as a release-retarding agent to yield three batches with significantly different release profiles. Twelve healthy male subjects were enrolled in a randomised, open-label, single-dose schedule based on a five-way Williams' design balanced for carryover effects. Subjects received the following treatments, with 1-week washout periods between: (i) Tagamet 400mg tablet; (ii) 7.5% methacrylate copolymer cimetidine tablet; (iii) 15% methacrylate copolymer cimetidine tablet; (iv) 26% methacrylate copolymer cimetidine tablet; and (v) Tagamet (300 mg/ 2 mL) intravenous injection. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 hours (AUC(12)) and AUC from time zero to infinity (AUC(infinity)), peak plasma concentration (C(max)), absolute bioavailability (F) and mean residence time (MRT) were evaluated and statistically compared among formulations. In vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) analysis was then applied to elucidate the overall absorption characteristics of each tablet formulation. The release properties of the ten marketed cimetidine products were shown to comply with current US FDA criteria for rapidly dissolving drug products. As expected, the in

  17. Segmental LeFort I osteotomy for treatment of a class III malocclusion with temporomandibular disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Janson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the case of a 19-year-old young man with Class III malocclusion and posterior crossbite with concerns about temporomandibular disorder (TMD, esthetics and functional problems. Surgical-orthodontic treatment was carried out by decompensation of the mandibular incisors and segmentation of the maxilla in 4 pieces, which allowed expansion and advancement. Remission of the signs and symptoms occurred after surgical-orthodontic intervention. The maxillary dental arch presented normal transverse dimension. Satisfactory static and functional occlusion and esthetic results were achieved and remained stable. Three years after the surgical-orthodontic treatment, no TMD sign or symptom was observed and the occlusal results had not changed. When vertical or horizontal movements of the maxilla in the presence of moderate maxillary constriction are necessary, segmental LeFort I osteotomy can be an important part of treatment planning.

  18. Dentofacial effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction: a controlled study of consecutively treated Class III patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clerck, Hugo; Cevidanes, Lucia; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-11-01

    In this cephalometric investigation, we analyzed the treatment effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) with miniplates in the maxilla and mandible connected by Class III elastics in patients with Class III malocclusion. The treated sample consisted of 21 Class III patients consecutively treated with the BAMP protocol before the pubertal growth spurt (mean age, 11.10 ± 1.8 years) and reevaluated after BAMP therapy, about 1 year later. The treated group was compared with a matched control group of 18 untreated Class III subjects. Significant differences between the treated and control groups were assessed with independent-sample t tests (P <0.05). Sagittal measurements of the maxilla showed highly significant improvements during active treatment (about 4 mm more than the untreated controls), with significant protraction effects at orbitale and pterygomaxillare. Significant improvements of overjet and molar relationship were recorded, as well as in the mandibular skeletal measures at Point B and pogonion. Vertical skeletal changes and modifications in incisor inclination were negligible, except for a significant proclination of the mandibular incisors in the treated group. Significant soft-tissue changes reflected the underlying skeletal modifications. Compared with growth of the untreated Class III subjects, the BAMP protocol induced an average increment on skeletal and soft-tissue advancement of maxillary structures of about 4 mm, and favorable mandibular changes exceeded 2 mm. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationships among nasal resistance, adenoids, tonsils, and tongue posture and maxillofacial form in Class II and Class III children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tomonori; Sato, Hideo; Suga, Hokuto; Takemoto, Yoshihiko; Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Kakuno, Eriko; Kanomi, Ryuzo; Yamasaki, Youichi

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationships between upper airway factors (nasal resistance, adenoids, tonsils, and tongue posture) and maxillofacial forms in Class II and III children. Sixty-four subjects (mean age, 9.3 years) with malocclusion were divided into Class II and Class III groups by ANB angles. Nasal resistance was calculated using computational fluid dynamics from cone-beam computed tomography data. Adenoids, tonsils, and tongue posture were evaluated in the cone-beam computed tomography images. The groups were compared using Mann-Whitney U tests and Student t tests. The Spearman rank correlations test assessed the relationships between the upper airway factors and maxillofacial form. Nasal resistance of the Class II group was significantly larger than that of the Class III group (P = 0.005). Nasal resistance of the Class II group was significantly correlated with inferior tongue posture (P Class III group was significantly correlated with anterior tongue posture (P Class III group was significantly correlated with mandibular protrusion. The relationships of upper airway factors differ between Class II and Class III children. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment effects of occipitomental anchorage appliance of maxillary protraction combined with chincup traction in children with Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiang-Chien; Chang, Hong-Po; Chang, Hsin-Fu

    2007-05-01

    Little information related to the treatment effects of the occipitomental anchorage (OMA) appliance of maxillary (Mx) protraction combined with chincup traction is available. The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment effects of the OMA orthopedic appliance on patients with Class III malocclusion. Pretreatment and post-treatment cephalometric records of 20 consecutively treated patients with Class III malocclusions were evaluated and compared with a matched sample of untreated Class III control subjects. The OMA appliance is effective for correcting skeletal Class III malocclusion in growing children. The treatment effects of this orthopedic appliance were considered to be from both skeletal and dentoalveolar changes. The skeletal effects were mainly obtained by stimulating forward growth of the Mx complex with negligible rotation of the Mx plane and restraining forward advancement of the mandible (Mn) with backward and downward rotation of the Mn plane. The observed dentoalveolar effects were mostly due to the labial tipping movement of the Mx incisors. Our results suggest that the OMA orthopedic appliance can correct the mesial jaw relationship and negative incisal over jet. This appliance is effective for correcting skeletal Class III malocclusion with both midface deficiency and Mn prognathism in growing children.

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with Class III malocclusion: involvement of the PHOX2B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzi, Anna Maria; Casale, Valentina; Oneda, Roberta; Gioventù, Silvia; Matturri, Luigi; Farronato, Giampietro

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study is to provide new molecular approaches to the children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by evaluating the possible involvement of the PHOX2B gene, notoriously associated to congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), in Class III malocclusion. Fifty subjects with Class III malocclusion, aged from 8 to 14 years, and with history of sleep apneic episodes, and 20 age-matched controls were submitted to genomic DNA examination from oral cells to specifically analyze the PHOX2B genotype. Point "silent" mutations affecting different nucleotides of the PHOX2B gene were observed in 32 % of patients with Class III malocclusion and never in controls (0 %). The genetic data obtained in this study in children with Class III malocclusion and sleep-related breathing disorders provide new information useful to the genetic characterization of this pathology. The PHOX2B gene silent mutations can lead to structural and functional modification of their product providing to a group of children with Class III malocclusion similar features to those of CCHS (sleep apnea episodes and craniofacial malformations).

  2. Diagnosis of Class III malocclusion in 7- to 8-year-old children--a 3D evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krneta, Bojana; Zhurov, Alexei; Richmond, Stephen; Ovsenik, Maja

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize facial and jaw morphology of children with Class III malocclusion in early mixed dentition. This study was conducted on 7- to 8-year-old Caucasian children, 48 children with Class III malocclusion and 91 children with normal occlusion. Surface images of faces and study casts were obtained using laser scanning. Two average facial templates were constructed for the males and females in the control group. The facial images were superimposed on the corresponding average templates. Facial parameters, palatal volumes, and gingival surface areas were measured and group differences were quantified. The analysis of variance was used for statistical evaluation of the measured parameters. The results revealed shorter lower face height (P Class III group compared to the control group. There were no differences between the groups in upper face height, restricted areas of the upper and lower face, palatal volume, and gingival surface area of the mandible (P > 0.05). Regardless of the fact that the prevalence of Class III malocclusion is rather small, the sample size could be larger. Class III subjects show clinically relevant facial and jaws characteristics in pre-pubertal growth period. A comprehensive diagnosis should include transverse dimension analysis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Nonsurgical and nonextraction treatment of a skeletal class III adult patient with severe prognathic mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Etsuko; Arai, Shiho

    2005-01-01

    A patient with a skeletal Class III malocclusion, prognathic mandible, anterior open bite, large tongue, and temporomandibular disorders is presented. Treatment objectives included establishing a stable occlusion with normal respiration, eliminating temporomandibular disorder symptoms, and improving facial esthetics through nonextraction and nonsurgical treatment by creating a favorable perioral environment, restoring the harmony to the tongue and perioral environment, improving masticatory muscle function, and creating adequate tongue space for establishment of normal respiration. The patient was a Japanese adult male, who had previously been advised to have orthognathic surgery, with tongue-size reduction. An expansion plate was used to expand the maxillary dentoalveolar arch. Distalization of the mandibular arch was achieved by reduced excessive posterior vertical dimension, through uprighting and intruding the mandibular posterior teeth and rotating the mandible slightly counter-clockwise. The height of the maxillary alveolar process and the vertical height of symphysis were increased slightly. The functional occlusal plane was reconstructed by uprighting and intruding the posterior teeth with a full-bracket appliance, combined with a maxillary expansion plate, with short Class III and vertical elastics in the anterior area. Myofunctional therapy involved sugarless chewing gum exercises. The excessive posterior vertical occlusal dimension was reduced slightly, creating a small clearance between the posterior maxilla and mandible. At the same time, the interferences in the posterior area were eliminated by the expansion of the maxillary dentoalveolar arch. As a result, the laterally displaced mandible moved to a more favorable jaw relationship, with distalization of the mandibular arch. The functional occlusal plane was reconstructed and an almost-normal overjet and overbite were created. Adequate tongue space for normal respiration was established during the

  4. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Relationship with Metabolic Syndrome in Class III Obesity Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cordeiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Obesity is represented mainly by abdominal obesity and insulin resistance (IR, both present in most individuals diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MS. IR is the key risk factor in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Objective. To relate NAFLD to MS in class III obese individuals. Methodology. A descriptive cross-sectional study with class III obese individuals, aged ≥ 20–60 years. Blood pressure measurement, weight, height, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC and blood glucose, insulin, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, and triglycerides data were obtained. HOMA-IR (homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance calculation was carried out with a cutoff value of 2.71 for IR evaluation. The diagnosis of NAFLD was performed by liver biopsy and the diagnosis of MS was performed in accordance with the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEPATP III. Results. Of the 50 individuals evaluated, 86% were women and BMI means were 45.4 ± 3.6 Kg/m2. The overall individuals had NAFLD, 70% steatosis, and 30% steatohepatitis. The diagnosis of MS occurred in 56% but showed no significant association with NAFLD (P=0.254. Triglycerides (178 ± 65.5 mg/dL and insulin (28.2 ± 22.6 mcU/mL mean values were significantly higher in steatohepatitis (P=0.002 and P=0.042, resp. compared to individuals with steatosis. IR was confirmed in 76% and showed a relationship with NAFLD severity. Conclusion. NAFLD was not related to MS; however, MS components, evaluated in isolation, as well as IR, were related to the presence and severity of NAFLD.

  5. Establishing the customized occlusal plane in systemized surgical treatment objectives of class III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Hak; Ahn, Hyo-Won; Yang, Sang-Duck; Choi, Jin-Young

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a new approach for establishing the customized occlusal plane for an individual patient in systemized surgical treatment objective of class III cases. After the correction of incisor inclination to occlusal planes (U1-MxOP and L1-MnOP), the intermaxillary relationship can be established with normal overbite/overjet and maximum intercuspation. The anterior limits of the maxilla and the mandible can be positioned according to A to N perpendicular, Frankfort horizontal (FH) to AB plane angle, and upper incisor display. The vertical level of the upper first molar can then be determined in relation to the Y plane (an imaginary arch drawn using the distance between the lower incisor edge point and the rotation center point of the condylar head as a radius) and a triangle projected by the upper and lower limits of the FH to the occlusal plane (FH-OP triangle). Soft-tissue facial balance can be checked with the lip/chin projection in relation to the true vertical line at subnasale and the lower third facial height ratio. Appropriate superior impaction of the posterior part of the maxilla in relation to the Y plane and FH-OP triangle in case 1 produced significant improvement of the facial profile and occlusion. However, case 2 showed that the amount of superior impaction of the posterior part of the maxilla was not enough to produce a significant setback of the mandible and retraction of the lip and chin. The systemized surgical treatment objective flowchart that could set the customized occlusal plane for an individual patient might provide a useful guideline for obtaining optimal aesthetics and functional occlusion in class III cases.

  6. Mode of delivery in women with class III obesity: planned cesarean compared with induction of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Akila; Jauk, Victoria Chapman; Goss, Amy Reed; Alvarez, Mitchell Dean; Reese, Crystal; Edwards, Rodney Kirk

    2014-12-01

    To compare maternal and neonatal outcomes between planned cesarean delivery and induction of labor in women with class III obesity (body mass index ≥40 kg/m(2)). In this retrospective cohort study, we identified all women with a body mass index ≥40 kg/m(2) who delivered a singleton at our institution from January 2007 to February 2013 via planned cesarean or induction of labor (regardless of eventual delivery route) at 37-41 weeks. Patients in spontaneous labor were excluded. The primary outcome was a composite of maternal morbidity including death as well as operative, infection, and thromboembolic complications. The secondary outcome was a neonatal morbidity composite. Additional outcomes included individual components of the composites. Student t, χ(2), and Fisher exact tests were used for statistical analysis. To calculate adjusted odds ratios, covariates were analyzed via multivariable logistic regression. There are 661 mother-infant pairs that met enrollment criteria-399 inductions and 262 cesareans. Groups were similar in terms of prepregnancy weight, pregnancy weight gain, and delivery body mass index. Of the 399 inductions, 258 had cervical ripening (64.7%) and 163 (40.9%) had a cesarean delivery. After multivariable adjustments, there was no significant difference in the maternal morbidity composite (adjusted odds ratio, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.77) or in the neonatal morbidity composite (adjusted odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-1.77) between the induction and cesarean groups. In term pregnant women with class III obesity, planned cesarean does not appear to reduce maternal and neonatal morbidity compared with induction of labor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinematic analysis of mandibular motion before and after orthognathic surgery for skeletal Class III malocclusion: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, Alessandro; Mapelli, Andrea; Segù, Marzia; Galante, Domenico; Sidequersky, Fernanda V; Sforza, Chiarella

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to detect the changes in 3D mandibular motion after orthognathic surgery for skeletal Class III malocclusion. Using a 3D motion analyzer, free mandibular border movements were recorded in nine patients successfully treated for skeletal Class III malocclusion and in nine patients scheduled for orthognathic surgery. Data were compared using Mann-Whitney non-parametric U-test. The results showed no differences between the groups in the total amount of mouth opening, protrusion, and in lateral excursions, but the percentage of mandibular movement explained by condylar translation was significantly increased after surgery (20% vs. 23.6%). During opening, the post-surgery patients showed a more symmetrical mandibular interincisal point and condylar path than pre-surgery patients (p < 0.01). Patients treated with orthognathic surgery for skeletal Class III malocclusion recover a good and symmetric temporomandibular joint function.

  8. Skeletal stability of surgery-first bimaxillary orthognathic surgery for skeletal class III malocclusion, using standardized criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K-H; Sandor, G K; Kim, Y-D

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative stability following bimaxillary surgery performed either with or without preoperative orthodontic treatment, in class III malocclusion patients. These patients were enrolled using standardized inclusion criteria. Forty patients with a class III malocclusion were included in this retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were class III malocclusion with and without premolar extraction, stability. With respect to postsurgical changes, significant differences were observed in the changes for the vertical reference plane to the posterior nasal spine, horizontal reference plane to B-point, and occlusal plane angle in both groups. No statistically significant differences in the relapse rates were observed between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the postoperative stability. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molar heights and incisor inclinations in adults with Class II and Class III skeletal open-bite malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola-Guillén, Luis Ernesto; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this research was to compare maxillary and mandibular molar heights and incisor inclinations in patients with skeletal open-bite Class II, patients with skeletal open-bite Class III, and an untreated control group. Pretreatment lateral cephalograms of 70 orthodontic patients (34 men, 36 women) between 16 and 40 years of age were examined. The sample was divided into 3 groups according to facial growth pattern and overbite. The control group (n = 25) included normodivergent Class I subjects with adequate overbite; the skeletal open-bite Class II group (n = 25) and the skeletal open-bite Class III group (n = 20) included hyperdivergent Class II or Class III subjects with negative overbite. Measurements considered were ANB angle, palatal and mandibular plane angles, maxillary incisor palatal plane angulation, and mandibular incisor mandibular plane angulation, as well as the distance from the palatal or the mandibular plane to the mesial cusp of the molars. Multivariate analysis of covariance and multivariate analysis of variance tests were used to determine the differences between the groups, followed by the Tukey post-hoc test. Additionally, the Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskall-Wallis test were performed. Significant differences in molar height were found (P open-bite and control groups was found. Mandibular molar height was greater in the skeletal open-bite Class II group (P open-bite Class III group by approximately 6°. Mandibular incisor to mandibular plane angulation was 10° more lingual in the skeletal open-bite Class III group (P open-bite groups had greater molar heights than did the control group. The skeletal open-bite Class II group had more eruption of the mandibular molars. The maxillary incisors were more proclined and the mandibular incisors were more lingual in the skeletal open-bite Class III group. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-term stability of an adult Class III open-bite malocclusion treated with multiloop edgewise archwire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chun Kuo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the treatment of a 17-year-old girl with an anterior open- bite and Class III malocclusion, who had a history of thumb-sucking habit in childhood. The multiloop edgewise archwire technique was used on the mandibular arch to facilitate uprighting of the mandibular posterior teeth, change the cant of occlusal plane, close the anterior open-bite, and correct the Class III malocclusion. At the end of treatment, Class I occlusion and correction of the anterior open-bite had been achieved. An examination 8 years 8 months after treatment revealed long-term stability of the treatment results.

  11. Reductions in knee joint forces with weight loss are attenuated by gait adaptations in class III obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVita, Paul; Rider, Patrick; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-03-01

    A consensus exists that high knee joint forces are a precursor to knee osteoarthritis and weight loss reduces these forces. Because large weight loss also leads to increased step length and walking velocity, knee contact forces may be reduced less than predicted by the magnitude of weight loss. The purpose was to determine the effects of weight loss on knee muscle and joint loads during walking in Class III obese adults. We determined through motion capture, force platform measures and biomechanical modeling the effects of weight loss produced by gastric bypass surgery over one year on knee muscle and joint loads during walking at a standard, controlled velocity and at self-selected walking velocities. Weight loss equaling 412 N or 34% of initial body weight reduced maximum knee compressive force by 824 N or 67% of initial body weight when walking at the controlled velocity. These changes represent a 2:1 reduction in knee force relative to weight loss when walking velocity is constrained to the baseline value. However, behavioral adaptations including increased stride length and walking velocity in the self-selected velocity condition attenuated this effect by ∼50% leading to a 392 N or 32% initial body weight reduction in compressive force in the knee joint. Thus, unconstrained walking elicited approximately 1:1 ratio of reduction in knee force relative to weight loss and is more indicative of walking behavior than the standard velocity condition. In conclusion, massive weight loss produces dramatic reductions in knee forces during walking but when patients stride out and walk faster, these favorable reductions become substantially attenuated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Populus class III HD ZIP, popREVOLUTA, influences cambium initiation and patterning of woody stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robischon, Marcel; Du, Juan; Miura, Eriko; Groover, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    The secondary growth of a woody stem requires the formation of a vascular cambium at an appropriate position and proper patterning of the vascular tissues derived from the cambium. Class III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD ZIP) transcription factors have been implicated in polarity determination and patterning in lateral organs and primary vascular tissues and in the initiation and function of shoot apical meristems. We report here the functional characterization of a Populus class III HD ZIP gene, popREVOLUTA (PRE), that demonstrates another role for class III HD ZIPs in regulating the development of cambia and secondary vascular tissues. PRE is orthologous to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) REVOLUTA and is expressed in both the shoot apical meristem and in the cambial zone and secondary vascular tissues. Transgenic Populus expressing a microRNA-resistant form of PRE presents unstable phenotypic abnormalities affecting both primary and secondary growth. Surprisingly, phenotypic changes include abnormal formation of cambia within cortical parenchyma that can produce secondary vascular tissues in reverse polarity. Genes misexpressed in PRE mutants include transcription factors and auxin-related genes previously implicated in class III HD ZIP functions during primary growth. Together, these results suggest that PRE plays a fundamental role in the initiation of the cambium and in regulating the patterning of secondary vascular tissues.

  13. Treatment and post-treatment effects of facemask therapy on the sagittal pharyngeal dimensions in Class III subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Mucedero, Manuela; Cozza, Paola

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this cephalometric study was to analyse the treatment and post-treatment craniofacial effects of a facemask (FM) combined with a bite block (BB) with specific regard to the sagittal pharyngeal dimensions in subjects with a Class III malocclusion when compared with an untreated Class III control group. The FM/BB group (22 subjects, 12 females and 10 males) had a mean age pre-treatment (T1) of 8.9 +/- 1.5 years, at the end of active treatment (T2) of 10.5 +/- 1.3 years, and post-treatment (T3) of 12.6 +/- 1.9 years. The treated group was compared with a control group of 14 subjects (6 females and 8 males) with untreated Class III malocclusions that matched the FM/BB group as to age at T1, T2, and T3, observation periods and skeletal maturation. Comparisons of the T2-T1 and T3-T1 changes between the two groups were analysed with the Mann-Whitney test. Significant favourable skeletal changes in the maxilla and mandible were observed in the treated group both after Ts2 and T3. No significant short- or long-term changes in the sagittal oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal airway dimensions were induced by maxillary protraction in subjects with a Class III malocclusion when compared with untreated controls.

  14. Class III β-tubulin in advanced NSCLC of adenocarcinoma subtype predicts superior outcome in a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    Platinum-based doublets are the cornerstone of treatment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and often include vinorelbine or taxanes. A predictive biomarker is greatly needed to select chemotherapy-sensitive patients for these microtubule-interfering agents. Class III β-tubulin (TUBB3...

  15. Class III β-tubulin in advanced NSCLC of adenocarcinoma subtype predicts superior outcome in a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    Platinum-based doublets are the cornerstone of treatment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and often include vinorelbine or taxanes. A predictive biomarker is greatly needed to select chemotherapy-sensitive patients for these microtubule-interfering agents. Class III ß-tubulin (TUBB3...

  16. Mandibular dimensions of subjects with asymmetric skeletal class III malocclusion and normal occlusion compared with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, HyoYeon; Bayome, Mohamed; Kim, Seong-Hun; Kim, Ki Beom; Behrents, Rolf G; Kook, Yoon-Ah

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use cone-beam computed tomography to compare mandibular dimensions in subjects with asymmetric skeletal Class III malocclusion and those with normal occlusion. Cone-beam computed tomography scans of 38 subjects with normal occlusion and 28 patients with facial asymmetry were evaluated and digitized with Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, Calif). Three midsagittal and 13 right and left measurements were taken. The paired t test was used to compare the right and left sides in each group. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the midsagittal variables and the differences between the 2 sides of the group with normal occlusion with those of asymmetry patients. The posterior part of the mandibular body showed significant differences between the deviated and nondeviated sides in asymmetric Class III patients. The difference of the asymmetry group was significantly greater than that of the normal occlusion group for the mediolateral ramal and the anteroposterior condylar inclinations (P = 0.007 and P = 0.019, respectively). The asymmetric skeletal Class III group showed significant differences in condylar height, ramus height, and posterior part of the mandibular body compared with the subjects with normal occlusion. These results might be useful for diagnosis and treatment planning of asymmetric Class III patients. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Proteomics computational analyses suggest that the bornavirus glycoprotein is a class III viral fusion protein (γ penetrene

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    Garry Robert F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Borna disease virus (BDV is the type member of the Bornaviridae, a family of viruses that induce often fatal neurological diseases in horses, sheep and other animals, and have been proposed to have roles in certain psychiatric diseases of humans. The BDV glycoprotein (G is an extensively glycosylated protein that migrates with an apparent molecular mass of 84,000 to 94,000 kilodaltons (kDa. BDV G is post-translationally cleaved by the cellular subtilisin-like protease furin into two subunits, a 41 kDa amino terminal protein GP1 and a 43 kDa carboxyl terminal protein GP2. Results Class III viral fusion proteins (VFP encoded by members of the Rhabdoviridae, Herpesviridae and Baculoviridae have an internal fusion domain comprised of beta sheets, other beta sheet domains, an extended alpha helical domain, a membrane proximal stem domain and a carboxyl terminal anchor. Proteomics computational analyses suggest that the structural/functional motifs that characterize class III VFP are located collinearly in BDV G. Structural models were established for BDV G based on the post-fusion structure of a prototypic class III VFP, vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV G. Conclusion These results suggest that G encoded by members of the Bornavirdae are class III VFPs (gamma-penetrenes.

  18. The Populus Class III HD ZIP, popREVOLUTA, influences cambium initiation and patterning of woody stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel Robischon; Juan Du; Eriko Miura; Andrew Groover

    2011-01-01

    The secondary growth of a woody stem requires the formation of a vascular cambium at an appropriate position and proper patterning of the vascular tissues derived from the cambium. Class III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD ZIP) transcription factors have been implicated in polarity determination and patterning in lateral organs and primary vascular tissues and in the...

  19. Immunolocalization of a class III chitinase in two muskmelon cultivars reacting differently to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldé, José Alage; Francisco, Rita; Queiroz, Alvaro; Regalado, Ana Paula; Ricardo, Cândido Pinto; Veloso, Maria Manuela

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis is a highly specialized fungus that attacks the root system of melon (Cucumis melo L.). In this work the presence of a class III chitinase was examined by immunological techniques in the root and stem base of a susceptible (cv. Galia) and a resistant (cv. Bredor) melon during the infection process. By immunolocalization it was not possible to detect the constitutive presence of class III chitinase in any of the cultivars. However, the immunolabelling appeared in the root tissues of both cultivars as a consequence of wounding and of infection by F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis. Distinct patterns of chitinase detection were observed in the roots of the two cultivars as the infection progressed. Furthermore, by western blotting distinct class III chitinase isoforms were detected, which responded differently to the F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis infection. Our results strongly indicate that a relationship exists between class III chitinase and melon resistance to Fusarium infection, and that the resistance is associated with certain isoforms of this enzyme.

  20. Expression of a cucumber class III chitinase and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia class I glucanase genes in transgenic potato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moravcikova, J.; Matusikova, I.; Libantova, J.; Bauer, M.; Mlynarova, L.

    2004-01-01

    The genes encoding for a cucumber class III chitinase and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia class I glucanase were co-introduced into Slovak potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) breeding line 116/86 using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. For both transgenes the number of integrated copies and level of RNA expression

  1. Regulation of MIR165/166 by class II and class III homeodomain leucine zipper proteins establishes leaf polarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merelo, Paz; Ram, Hathi; Caggiano, Monica Pia

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of plant leaves is their flattened shape. This shape depends on an antagonism between the genes that specify adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) tissue identity; however, the molecular nature of this antagonism remains poorly understood. Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD...

  2. Association of MHC class-III gene polymorphisms with ER-positive breast cancer in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Q; Ning, Y; Chen, L Z; Zhang, S; Liu, Z Z; Yang, X X; Wei, W; Wei, H; Li, Q G; Yue, H N; Wang, J X

    2012-12-17

    Polymorphisms of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have been linked to many diseases, especially autoimmune disorders. Previous studies have shown that genetic variants in MHC class III are associated with breast cancer. To determine if there is an association between MHC class III and breast cancer risk in the Chinese Han population, we carried out a hospital-based case-control study in Guangdong and Jiangsu Provinces, including 216 histologically confirmed breast cancer patients and 216 healthy controls. Nine SNP markers distributed in the class III-coding region were detected using the Sequenom MassARRAY(®) iPLEX System. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed for seven SNPs. There was no significant association between these seven SNP variants and breast cancer in these Chinese women (unconditional logistic regression analysis). However, chr6_31697494 at BAT2, one of the seven SNPs, was found to be significantly associated with both ER- and PR-positive breast cancer. In addition, both chr6_31911109 at C6orf48 and chr6_31975605 at ZBTB12, another two of the seven SNPs, show relevance with ER-positive breast cancer. In conclusion, this is the first evidence that genetic polymorphisms in the MHC class III region are significantly associated with ER-positive breast cancer in the Han Chinese population.

  3. Class III orthognathic surgical cases facilitated by accelerated osteogenic orthodontics: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, JiaQi; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Jiang, JiuHui

    2015-11-01

    To describe a multidisciplinary treatment approach that includes corticotomy, orthodontic force and orthognathic surgery for the management of skeletal Class III surgical cases. The main advantage of the combined techniques is a reduction in treatment time for young adult patients. Accelerated Osteogenic Orthodontics (AOO) was delivered to three young adult patients during their pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. After aligning and levelling the dental arches, a piezosurgical corticotomy was performed to the buccal aspect of the alveolar bone. Bone graft materials were used to cover the decorticated area and soft tissue flaps were replaced. The mean time for extraction space closure was 5.4 ± 1.3 months and the mean time for pre-surgical orthodontic treatment was 12.0 ± 0.9 months. The average total treatment time was 20.4 ± 2.4 months. A pre-existing bony fenestration in the buccal cortex adjacent to the right lateral incisor root apex of Case 1 was corrected. The facial aesthetics of three patients improved following multidisciplinary treatment. This approach may be an efficient method for the orthognathic patient who desires a reduced treatment time, but further clinical research is required.

  4. The Quantum Mixed-Spin Heme State of Barley Peroxidase: A Paradigm for Class III Peroxidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howes, B.D.; Ma, J.; Marzocchi, M.P.; Schiodt, C.B.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Smulevich, G.; Welinder, K.G.; Zhang, J.

    1999-03-23

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values both at room temperature and 20 K are . reported, together with EPR spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species co-exists with 6- and 5-cHS heroes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the presently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling maybe necessary for the QS state.

  5. Correction of a Class III malocclusion with over 20 mm of space to close in the maxilla by using miniscrews for extra anchorage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuning, K.H.

    2008-01-01

    Unilateral closure of maxillary extraction spaces in patients with Class III malocclusion can be challenging. This case report describes the closure of first premolar and first molar extraction spaces in a patient with a Class III dental relationship. Two miniscrews were used for intraoral skeletal

  6. Investigation into the prediction accuracy of photocephalometry for skeletal Class III adult female patients treated with two-jaw surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Shiung Lin

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: In this study predictions were generally accurate in skeletal Class III adult female patients treated with two-jaw surgery. Compared to surgical outcomes, the predictions tended to locate the nasal base more inferior and the lower lip in a more superior position. Prediction inaccuracies and large individual variations found in this report were associated with difficulties in manual photographic manipulation and weak correlations in the vertical direction between the hard tissues and their corresponding soft tissues.

  7. Orthodontic correction of Class III malocclusion in a young patient with the use of a simple fixed appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Anterior crossbites are one of the most common orthodontic problems we observe in growing children. The first step in treating an anterior crossbite is to determine whether the crossbite is dental or skeletal in nature. To determine a precise diagnosis, a thorough clinical, radiographic and model analysis is required. This article shows the treatment of Class III malocclusion by correcting anterior dental crossbite with the use of a simple fixed appliance.

  8. [Radiographic cephalometry assessment of the linear and angular parameters on cranial base in children with skeletal class III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Zdenka M; Milić, Jasmina; Nikolić, Predrag

    2007-09-01

    In malocclusion of skeletal class III, mandible is located in front of maxilla in sagital plain, which is manifested by a lower value of the sagital inter-jaw angle than in skeletal class I, where the jaw sagital relation is normal. Apart from the deformities on mandible and/or maxilla, in skeletal class III deformities are also frequent on the cranial base. The aim of this research was to find the differences in the parameter values on the cranial base among the children with skeletal class III and the children with skeletal class I in the period of mixed dentition. After clinical examination and orthopan-tomography, profile radiography of the head was analyzed in 60 examinees, aged from 6-12 years. The examinees were divided into two groups: group 1--the children with skeletal class III; group 2--the children with skeletal class I. Both linear and angular parameters on the cranial base were measured, as well as the angles of maxillary and mandible prognatism and the angle of sagital inter-jaw relation. The level of difference in the parameter values between the groups was estimated and the degree of correlation of the main angle of the cranial base with the angles of sagital position of the jaws in each of the two groups was established. A significant difference between the groups was found only in the average values of the angles of maxillary prognatism and sagital inter-jaw relation. In the group 1, the main angle of the cranial base was in a significant correlation with the angles of sagital positions of the jaws, while in the group 2, such significance was not found. There were no significant differences in the parameter values on the cranial base between the groups. There was a significant correlation of the main angle of the cranial base with the angles of sagital position of the jaws in the group 1 only.

  9. Radiographic cephalometry assessment of the linear and angular parameters on cranial base in children with skeletal class III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zdenka M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In malocclusion of skeletal class III, mandible is located in front of maxilla in sagital plain, which is manifested by a lower value of the sagital inter-jaw angle than in skeletal class I, where the jaw sagital relation is normal. Apart from the deformities on mandible and/or maxilla, in skeletal class III deformities are also frequent on the cranial base. The aim of this research was to find the differences in the parameter values on the cranial base among the children with skeletal class III and the children with skeletal class I in the period of mixed dentition. Methods. After clinical examination and orthopan-tomography, profile radiography of the head was analyzed in 60 examinees, aged from 6−12 years. The examinees were divided into two groups: group 1 - the children with skeletal class III; group 2 - the children with skeletal class I. Both linear and angular parameters on the cranial base were measured, as well as the angles of maxillary and mandible prognatism and the angle of sagital inter-jaw relation. The level of difference in the parameter values between the groups was estimated and the degree of correlation of the main angle of the cranial base with the angles of sagital position of the jaws in each of the two groups was established. Results. A significant difference between the groups was found only in the average values of the angles of maxillary prognatism and sagital interjaw relation. In the group 1, the main angle of the cranial base was in a significant correlation with the angles of sagital positions of the jaws, while in the group 2, such significance was not found. Conclusion. There were no significant differences in the parameter values on the cranial base between the groups. There was a significant correlation of the main angle of the cranial base with the angles of sagital position of the jaws in the group 1 only. .

  10. Oral Rehabilitation With Orthognathic Surgery After Dental Implant Placement for Class III Malocclusion With Skeletal Asymmetry and Posterior Bite Collapse.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohba, Seigo; Nakatani, Yuya; Kawasaki, Takako; Tajima, Nobutaka; Tobita, Takayoshi; Yoshida, Noriaki; Sawase, Takashi; Asahina, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of older patients are seeking orthognathic surgery to treat jaw deformity. However, orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment is difficult in cases without occlusal vertical stop. A 55-year-old man presented with Class III malocclusion and mandibular protrusion including esthetic problems and posterior bite collapse. He underwent dental implant treatment to reconstruct an occlusal vertical stop before orthognathic surgery. His occlusal function and esthetic problems i...

  11. Class III antiarrhythmic drugs amiodarone and dronedarone impair KIR2.1 backward trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuan; Takanari, Hiroki; Qile, Muge; Nalos, Lukas; Houtman, Marien J C; Romunde, Fee L; Heukers, Raimond; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Vos, Marc A; van der Heyden, Marcel A G

    2017-10-01

    Drug-induced ion channel trafficking disturbance can cause cardiac arrhythmias. The subcellular level at which drugs interfere in trafficking pathways is largely unknown. K IR 2.1 inward rectifier channels, largely responsible for the cardiac inward rectifier current (I K 1 ), are degraded in lysosomes. Amiodarone and dronedarone are class III antiarrhythmics. Chronic use of amiodarone, and to a lesser extent dronedarone, causes serious adverse effects to several organs and tissue types, including the heart. Both drugs have been described to interfere in the late-endosome/lysosome system. Here we defined the potential interference in K IR 2.1 backward trafficking by amiodarone and dronedarone. Both drugs inhibited I K 1 in isolated rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes at supraclinical doses only. In HK-KWGF cells, both drugs dose- and time-dependently increased K IR 2.1 expression (2.0 ± 0.2-fold with amiodarone: 10 μM, 24 hrs; 2.3 ± 0.3-fold with dronedarone: 5 μM, 24 hrs) and late-endosomal/lysosomal K IR 2.1 accumulation. Increased K IR 2.1 expression level was also observed in the presence of Na v 1.5 co-expression. Augmented K IR 2.1 protein levels and intracellular accumulation were also observed in COS-7, END-2, MES-1 and EPI-7 cells. Both drugs had no effect on K v 11.1 ion channel protein expression levels. Finally, amiodarone (73.3 ± 10.3% P KIR 2.1 upon 24-hrs treatment, whereas dronedarone tended to increase I KIR 2.1 and it did not reach significance (43.8 ± 5.5%, P = 0.26 at -120 mV; 2 μM). We conclude that chronic amiodarone, and potentially also dronedarone, treatment can result in enhanced I K 1 by inhibiting K IR 2.1 degradation. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  12. The Populus Class III HD ZIP transcription factor POPCORONA affects cell differentiation during secondary growth of woody stems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Du

    Full Text Available The developmental mechanisms regulating cell differentiation and patterning during the secondary growth of woody tissues are poorly understood. Class III HD ZIP transcription factors are evolutionarily ancient and play fundamental roles in various aspects of plant development. Here we investigate the role of a Class III HD ZIP transcription factor, POPCORONA, during secondary growth of woody stems. Transgenic Populus (poplar trees expressing either a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA or a synthetic miRNA targeting POPCORONA were used to infer function of POPCORONA during secondary growth. Whole plant, histological, and gene expression changes were compared for transgenic and wild-type control plants. Synthetic miRNA knock down of POPCORONA results in abnormal lignification in cells of the pith, while overexpression of a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA results in delayed lignification of xylem and phloem fibers during secondary growth. POPCORONA misexpression also results in coordinated changes in expression of genes within a previously described transcriptional network regulating cell differentiation and cell wall biosynthesis, and hormone-related genes associated with fiber differentiation. POPCORONA illustrates another function of Class III HD ZIPs: regulating cell differentiation during secondary growth.

  13. The Populus Class III HD ZIP transcription factor POPCORONA affects cell differentiation during secondary growth of woody stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Miura, Eriko; Robischon, Marcel; Martinez, Ciera; Groover, Andrew

    2011-02-28

    The developmental mechanisms regulating cell differentiation and patterning during the secondary growth of woody tissues are poorly understood. Class III HD ZIP transcription factors are evolutionarily ancient and play fundamental roles in various aspects of plant development. Here we investigate the role of a Class III HD ZIP transcription factor, POPCORONA, during secondary growth of woody stems. Transgenic Populus (poplar) trees expressing either a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA or a synthetic miRNA targeting POPCORONA were used to infer function of POPCORONA during secondary growth. Whole plant, histological, and gene expression changes were compared for transgenic and wild-type control plants. Synthetic miRNA knock down of POPCORONA results in abnormal lignification in cells of the pith, while overexpression of a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA results in delayed lignification of xylem and phloem fibers during secondary growth. POPCORONA misexpression also results in coordinated changes in expression of genes within a previously described transcriptional network regulating cell differentiation and cell wall biosynthesis, and hormone-related genes associated with fiber differentiation. POPCORONA illustrates another function of Class III HD ZIPs: regulating cell differentiation during secondary growth.

  14. The segmented arch approach: a method for orthodontic treatment of a severe Class III open-bite malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinar-Escalona, Eduardo; Barrera-Mora, José María; Llamas-Carreras, José María; Ruiz-Navarro, María Belén

    2013-02-01

    An open bite is a common malocclusion, and it is generally associated with several linked etiologic factors. When establishing the treatment plan, it is essential to consider every aspect of the various etiologic causes and their evolution; this will help to correct it. This article reports the case of a girl aged 10.7 years with a skeletal Class III malocclusion and an open bite. The treatment mechanics were based on compensatory dental changes performed to close the bite and correct the skeletal Class III malocclusion. The patient had a deep maxillary deficiency, and the lower facial third was severely enlarged. In this article, we aimed to describe a simple mechanical approach that will close the bite through changes in the occlusal plane (segmentation of arches). It is an extremely simple method that is easily tolerated by the patient. It not only closes the bite effectively but also helps to correct the unilateral or bilateral lack of occlusal interdigitation between the dental arches. A Class III patient with an anterior open bite is shown in this article to illustrate the effectiveness of these treatment mechanics. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Perceived changes by peer group of social impact associated with combined orthodontic-surgical correction of class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesani, Aliza; DiBiase, Andrew T; Cobourne, Martyn T; Newton, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    Whereas the psychosocial benefits of orthognathic treatment for the individual patient are established, there is little data relating to social perceptions in relation to changes in facial appearance as a result of combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment. This study aimed to investigate the social impact of combined orthodontic-orthognathic surgical correction for class III malocclusion in Caucasian subjects. This cross-sectional study compared perceptions of facial appearance prior to and after orthognathic correction of class III malocclusion. Eighty undergraduate students were shown photographs of four Caucasian subjects (2 male and 2 female) pre- and post-orthognathic class III correction. Observers were asked to rate these subjects in relation to four different outcomes: (i) social competence (SC); (ii) intellectual ability (IA); (iii) psychological adjustment (PA); (iv) attractiveness. A mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) was calculated to determine the effect of each variable. Statistically significant differences were found in ratings of the same face before and after treatment. After treatment, faces were rated as more psychologically adjusted, more sociable, more likely to be successful and more attractive; with the mean psychological adjustment rating being associated with the most change (before treatment=8.06 [SD 2.30]; after treatment=6.64 [SD 2.03], t=2.04, pclass III malocclusion in Caucasians, individuals are rated by young adults as being better adjusted both psychologically and socially, more likely to be successful and more attractive. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure of putrescine aminotransferase from Escherichia coli provides insights into the substrate specificity among class III aminotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyung Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Rojviriya, Catleya; Kim, Yeon-Gil

    2014-01-01

    YgjG is a putrescine aminotransferase enzyme that transfers amino groups from compounds with terminal primary amines to compounds with an aldehyde group using pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. Previous biochemical data show that the enzyme prefers primary diamines, such as putrescine, over ornithine as a substrate. To better understand the enzyme's substrate specificity, crystal structures of YgjG from Escherichia coli were determined at 2.3 and 2.1 Å resolutions for the free and putrescine-bound enzymes, respectively. Sequence and structural analyses revealed that YgjG forms a dimer that adopts a class III PLP-dependent aminotransferase fold. A structural comparison between YgjG and other class III aminotransferases revealed that their structures are similar. However, YgjG has an additional N-terminal helical structure that partially contributes to a dimeric interaction with the other subunit via a helix-helix interaction. Interestingly, the YgjG substrate-binding site entrance size and charge distribution are smaller and more hydrophobic than other class III aminotransferases, which suggest that YgjG has a unique substrate binding site that could accommodate primary aliphatic diamine substrates, including putrescine. The YgjG crystal structures provide structural clues to putrescine aminotransferase substrate specificity and binding.

  17. Assessment of pain and discomfort during early orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion using the Removable Mandibular Retractor Appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M; Hajeer, M Y; Al-Jundi, A

    2013-06-01

    To determine the degree of pain and discomfort during the orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion using the Removable Mandibular Retractor (RMR). The sample consisted of 33 skeletal Class III patients (17 males and 16 females; average age: 7.5 ± 1.33 years) who had been assigned to the RMR treatment group in a randomised controlled trial comparing this treatment versus a control group of no treatment at the Orthodontic Department, University of Al-Baath Dental School in Syria. Pain and discomfort were assessed using standardised questionnaires at the following assessment times: 7 days (T1), 14 days (T2), 6 weeks (T3), 3 months (T4) and 6 months (T5) after appliance insertion. Levels of pain and discomfort decreased gradually by time in general. No significant changes in the levels of pain, tooth sensitivity and soft tissues tension were detected, whereas a significant decrease in the levels of pressure, impaired speech, impaired swallowing and lack of confidence in public was observed two weeks following appliance insertion. Mandibular constraint feeling required three months to decrease significantly. No difference was found between males and females with regard to acceptance. The RMR is well accepted by Class III patients in the early mixed dentition.

  18. [Nursing workloads and working conditions: integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoeller, Roseli; Trindade, Letícia de Lima; Neis, Márcia Binder; Gelbcke, Francine Lima; de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires

    2011-06-01

    This study reviews theoretical production concerning workloads and working conditions for nurses. For that, an integrative review was carried out using scientific articles, theses and dissertations indexed in two Brazilian databases, Virtual Health Care Library (Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde) and Digital Database of Dissertations (Banco Digital de Teses), over the last ten years. From 132 identified studies, 27 were selected. Results indicate workloads as responsible for professional weariness, affecting the occurrence of work accidents and health problems. In order to adequate workloads studies indicate some strategies, such as having an adequate numbers of employees, continuing education, and better working conditions. The challenge is to continue research that reveal more precisely the relationships between workloads, working conditions, and health of the nursing team.

  19. Comparison of double-plate appliance/facemask combination and facemask therapy in treating class III malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencer, Deniz; Kaygisiz, Emine; Yüksel, Sema; Tortop, Tuba

    2015-03-01

    To compare the treatment effects of double-plate appliance/facemask (DPA-FM) combined therapy and facemask (FM) therapy in treating Class III malocclusions. The material consisted of lateral cephalometric radiographs of 45 children with skeletal and dental Class III malocclusion. The first treatment group comprised 15 patients (mean age  =  11 years) treated with FM. The second treatment group comprised 15 patients (mean age  = 10 years 9 months) treated with DPA-FM. The third group comprised 15 patients (mean age  =  10 years 5 months) used as controls. The paired t-test was used to evaluate the treatment effects and changes during the treatment and observation period in each group. Differences between the groups were determined by variance analysis and the Duncan test. With the DPA-FM and FM appliances, the SNA and ANB angles increased significantly. These changes were statistically different compared with the control group. Lower facial height showed a greater increase in both treatment groups than in the control group. Molar relation showed a greater increase in the DPA-FM group than in the FM group. The increase in U6/ANS-PNS angle in the FM group was significantly different from the DPA-FM and control groups. The L1/NB angle and Pg-T increased significantly only in the FM group, but no significant difference was found between the treatment groups. In the treatment of Class III malocclusion, both appliances were effective. The significant sagittal changes in the lower incisors and pogonion in the FM group compared with the nonsignificant changes in the DPA-FM group might be due to the restriction effect of acrylic blocks in the DPA-FM group.

  20. Is early Class III protraction facemask treatment effective? A multicentre, randomized, controlled trial: 15-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandall, Nicky; DiBiase, Andrew; Littlewood, Simon; Nute, Spencer; Stivaros, Nadia; McDowall, Ross; Shargill, Inderjit; Worthington, Helen; Cousley, Richard; Dyer, Fiona; Mattick, Rye; Doherty, Barbara

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of early class III protraction facemask treatment in children under 10 years of age. Multicentre, randomized controlled trial. Eight UK hospital orthodontic units. Seventy-three patients were randomly allocated, stratified for gender, into an early class III protraction facemask group (PFG) (n = 35) and a control/no treatment group (CG) (n = 38). Dentofacial changes from lateral cephalograms and occlusal changes using the peer assessment rating (PAR). Self-esteem was assessed using the Piers-Harris children's self-concept scale, and the psychosocial impact of malocclusion with an oral aesthetic subjective impact scores (OASIS) questionnaire. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) signs and symptoms were also recorded. The time points for data collection were at registration (DC1) and 15 months later (DC2). The following mean skeletal and occlusal changes occurred from the class III starting point: SNA, PFG moved forwards 1.4 degrees (CG forward 0.3 degrees; P = 0.018); SNB, PFG moved backwards -0.7 degrees (CG forward 0.8 degrees; Pdifference in ANB between PFG and CG of 2.6 degrees in favour of early protraction facemask treatment. The overjet improved +4.4 mm in the PFG and marginally changed +0.3 mm in the CG (Pself-esteem (Piers-Harris score) for treated children compared with controls (P = 0.22). However, there was a reduced impact of malocclusion (OASIS score) for the PFG compared with the CG (P = 0.003), suggesting treatment resulted in slightly less concern about the tooth appearance. TMJ signs and symptoms were very low at DC1 and DC2 and none were reported during active facemask treatment. Early class III orthopaedic treatment, with protraction facemask, in patients under 10 years of age, is skeletally and dentally effective in the short term and does not result in TMJ dysfunction. Seventy per cent of patients had successful treatment, defined as achieving a positive overjet. However, early treatment does not seem to confer a

  1. Retrospective 25-year follow-up of treatment outcomes in Angle Class III patients : Success versus failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendl, Brigitte; Kamenica, A; Droschl, H; Jakse, N; Weiland, F; Wendl, T; Wendl, M

    2017-03-01

    Despite recommendations for early treatment of hereditary Angle Class III syndrome, late pubertal growth may cause a relapse requiring surgical intervention. This study was performed to identify predictors of successful Class III treatment. Thirty-eight Class III patients treated with a chincup were retrospectively analyzed. Data were collected from the data archive, cephalograms, and casts, including pretreatment (T0) and posttreatment (T1) data, as well as long-term follow-up data collected approximately 25 years after treatment (T2). Each patient was assigned to a success or a failure group. Data were analyzed based on time (T0, T1, T2), deviations from normal (Class I), and prognathism types (true mandibular prognathism, maxillary retrognathism, combined pro- and retrognathism). Compared to Class I normal values, the data obtained in both groups yielded 11 significant parameters. The success group showed values closer to normal at all times (T0, T1, T2) and vertical parameters decreased from T0 to T2. The failure group showed higher values for vertical and horizontal mandibular growth, as well as dentally more protrusion of the lower anterior teeth and more negative overjet at all times. In adittion, total gonial and upper gonial angle were higher at T0 and T1. A prognostic score-yet to be evaluated in clinical practice-was developed from the results. The failure group showed greater amounts of horizontal development during the years between T1 and T2. Treatment of true mandibular prognathism achieved better outcomes in female patients. Cases of maxillary retrognathism were treated very successfully without gender difference. Failure was clearly more prevalent, again without gender difference, among the patients with combined mandibular prognathism and maxillary retrognathism. Crossbite situations were observed in 44% of cases at T0. Even though this finding had been resolved by T1, it relapsed in 16% of the cases by T2. The failure rate increased in cases of

  2. The Removable Mandibular Retractor vs the Bone-anchored Intermaxillary Traction in the Correction of skeletal class III Malocclusion in children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majanni, Abdulmalek Mr; Hajeer, Mohammad Y

    2016-05-01

    No randomized controlled trial has tried to compare early class III treatment outcomes between the removable mandibular retractor (RMR) and the bone-anchored intermaxillary traction (BAIMT). The objective of this study was to evaluate skeletal, dental, and soft-tissue changes following early class III treatment with these two treatment modalities. A parallel group randomized controlled trial was conducted on patients with class III malocclusion, treated at the University ofAl-Baath Dental School in Hamah, Syria. Ninety-three children with skeletal class III malocclusion were evaluated and 41 children fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Randomization was performed using computer-generated tables; allocation was concealed using sequentially numbered opaque and sealed envelopes. Thirty-eight participants were analyzed (mean age 11.46 ± 1.28 years). They were randomly distributed into two groups receiving either the RMR or the BAIMT technique with 19 children in each (1:1 allocation ratio). The primary outcome measure was the horizontal movement of points A, B, and Pogonion. Point A showed greater anterior movement in the BAIMT group (x = 1.69 mm) than in the RMR group (x = 1.05 mm; p class III malocclusion in growing patients. Bone-anchored intermaxillary elastics appears to be a promising solution for class III growing patients with mild to moderate degrees of skeletal discrepancy.

  3. Orthodontic decompensation in skeletal Class III malocclusion: redefining the amount of movement assessed by Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellozza, José Antonio Zuega; Guedes, Fabio Pinto; Nary, Hugo; Capelozza, Leopoldino; Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is essential for tridimensional planning of orthognathic surgery, as it allows visualization and evaluation of bone structures and mineralized tissues. Tomographic slices allow evaluation of tooth inclination and individualization of movement performed during preoperative decompensation. The aim of this paper was to assess maxillary and mandibular incisors inclination pre and post orthodontic decompensation in skeletal Class III malocclusion. Methods: The study was conducted on six individuals with skeletal Class III malocclusion, surgically treated, who had Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic scans obtained before and after orthodontic decompensation. On multiplanar reconstruction view, tomographic slices (axial, coronal and sagittal) were obtained on the long axis of each incisor. The sagittal slice was used for measurement taking, whereas the references used to assess tooth inclination were the long axis of maxillary teeth in relation to the palatal plane and the long axis of mandibular teeth in relation to the mandibular plane. Results: There was significant variation in the inclination of incisors before and after orthodontic decompensation. This change was of greater magnitude in the mandibular arch, evidencing that natural compensation is more effective in this arch, thereby requiring more intensive decompensation. Conclusion: When routinely performed, the protocols of decompensation treatment in surgical individuals often result in intensive movements, which should be reevaluated, since the extent of movement predisposes to reduction in bone attachment levels and root length. PMID:26560818

  4. Three-dimensional changes in the temporomandibular joint after maxillary protraction in children with skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju; Son, Woo-Sung; Kwak, Chun; Kang, Eun-Hee; Kim, Seong-Sik; Park, Soo-Byung; Kim, Yong-Il

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated 3-dimensional changes in the temporomandibular joints of children with skeletal Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency after facemask therapy for maxillary protraction. Eighteen children with anterior crossbite and a Class III molar relationship underwent facemask therapy for maxillary protraction, after which they exhibited positive overjet and a Class II molar relationship. Three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography images of the patients were obtained before (T1) and after (T2) facemask protraction, and the 3-dimensional coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in T1 and T2 images were compared. After facemask therapy, the mandibular condyles of the patients were displaced outside, upward, and backward. Additionally, the anterior and posterior walls of the glenoid fossa had negative values for anteroposterior change. Three-dimensional analysis of the temporomandibular joint showed that facemask therapy resulted in bone apposition (to the anterior wall) and bone resorption (of the posterior wall) in the glenoid fossa. This bone remodeling resulted in upward and backward displacement of the condyle.(J Oral Sci 58, 501-508, 2016).

  5. [Effect of maxillary protraction with or without rapid palatal expansion in treating early skeletal Class III malocclusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wen-Sheng; Lu, Hai-Yan; Dong, Fu-Sheng; Hu, Xiao-Ying; Li, Xing-Chao

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with maxillary protraction with or without rapid palatal expansion (RPE) for skeletal Class III malocclusion in mixed dentition. A total of 31 children with Class III malocclusion in mixed dentition were selected, and 15 (group A) received maxillary protraction treatment with RPE, the other 16 (group B) received maxillary protraction without RPE. Cephalometric films were taken before and after treatment, and traditional and Pancherz analysis were used. The average duration of treatment was 10.14 months in group A and 9.77 months in group B respectively (P>0.05). According to Pancherz analysis, maxillary basal bone moved forwards by 2.99 mm in group A and 3.33 mm in group B respectively (P>0.05), mandibular basal bone moved backwards by 0.07 mm in group A, while forwards by 0.80 mm in group B (P>0.05), the overjet increased by 4.51 mm in group A and 6.37 mm in group B respectively (P0.05). The effects were clinically satisfactory in the both groups. Lower molar moved forwards by 1.18 mm in basal bone in group A, while backwards by 1.20 mm in group B (PClass III malocclusion.

  6. Is early Class III protraction facemask treatment effective? A multicentre, randomized, controlled trial: 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne Mandall, Nicky; Cousley, Richard; DiBiase, Andrew; Dyer, Fiona; Littlewood, Simon; Mattick, Rye; Nute, Spencer; Doherty, Barbara; Stivaros, Nadia; McDowall, Ross; Shargill, Inderjit; Ahmad, Amreen; Walsh, Tanya; Worthington, Helen

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of early class III protraction facemask treatment in children under 10 years of age at 3-year follow-up. Multicentre randomized controlled trial. Seventy-three patients were randomly allocated, stratified for gender, into early class III protraction facemask group (PFG) (n = 35) and a control/no treatment group (CG) (n = 38). Dentofacial changes were assessed from lateral cephalograms and occlusal changes using the peer assessment rating (PAR). Self-esteem was assessed using the Piers-Harris children's self-concept scale, and the psychosocial impact of malocclusion with oral aesthetic subjective impact score (OASIS) questionnaire. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) signs and symptoms were also recorded. The time points for data collection were at registration (DC1), 15 months later (DC2) and 3 years post-registration (DC3). The following mean skeletal and occlusal changes occurred from the class III starting point to DC3 (3-year follow-up): SNA, PFG moved forwards +2·3° (CG forward +1·6°; P = 0·14); SNB, PFG moved forwards +0·8° (CG forward +1·5°, P = 0·26); ANB, PFG class III base improved +1·5° (CG stayed about the same at +0·1°; P = 0·001). This contributed to an overall difference in ANB between PFG and CG of +1·4° in favour of early protraction facemask treatment. The overjet was still improved by +3·6 mm in the PFG and changed a small amount +1·1 mm in the CG (P = 0·001). A 21% improvement in PAR was shown in the PFG and the CG worsened by 8·4% (P = 0·02). There was no increase in self-esteem (Piers-Harris score) for PFG compared with the CG (P = 0·56) and no statistically significant difference in the impact of malocclusion (OASIS) between groups in terms of the changes from DC1 to DC3 (P = 0·18). TMJ signs and symptoms were very low at DC1 and DC3. The favourable effect of early class III protraction facemask treatment undertaken in patients under 10 years of age, is

  7. Comparison of staples vs subcuticular suture in class III obese women undergoing cesarean: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Mary N; Wing, Deborah A; McNulty, Jennifer A

    2018-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for infectious morbidity and wound complications after cesarean delivery. There are currently insufficient data to determine optimal skin closure technique for cesarean delivery, specifically for those women with class III obesity, defined as a body mass index ≥40 kg/m 2 . We sought to compare stainless steel staples vs subcuticular suture for skin closure for cesarean delivery in class III obese women with body mass index ≥40 kg/m 2 . We conducted a randomized controlled trial at 2 teaching hospitals from 2015 through 2016 in which women with body mass index ≥40 kg/m 2 undergoing cesarean delivery were randomly assigned to stainless steel staples or subcuticular suture skin closure. The primary outcome was composite wound complication defined as superficial or deep separation and infection occurring up to 6 weeks following delivery. Secondary outcomes included operative time, and patient pain and satisfaction scores. A total of 242 women were enrolled. In all, 119 in the staples group and 119 in the subcuticular suture group were analyzed. Maternal demographics and characteristics were similar in both groups. The composite wound complication frequency was 19.3% in the staples group and 17.6% in the subcuticular suture group (P = .74) with an overall wound complication incidence of 18.5% in the entire study cohort. There were also no differences in the frequencies of infection, or in superficial or deep wound separation between the 2 study groups. In a univariate analysis of predictors of wound complications, only current tobacco use was a significant predictor of wound complications (relative risk, 4.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.37-18.03; P = .02). Fewer women with staple closure would choose the same method with a future delivery (P = .01), however, self-reported pain and concern about wound healing were equal between the 2 groups. In class III obese women undergoing cesarean delivery, there was no difference in composite wound

  8. Combined Orthodontic-surgical Treatment for Skeletal Class III Malocclusion with Multiple Impacted Permanent and Supernumerary Teeth: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Dai Juan And Feng

    2014-01-01

    In this report we describe a combined orthodontic and surgical treatment for a 14-year-old boy with severe skeletal class III deformity and dental problem. His upper posterior primary teeth in the left side were over-retained and 6 maxillary teeth (bilateral central incisors and canines, left first and second premolars) were impacted, together with 5 supernumerary teeth in both arches. The treatment protocol involved extraction of all the supernumerary and deciduous teeth, surgical exposure and orthodontic traction of the impacted teeth, a bimaxillary orthognathic approach including Lefort I osteotomy. Bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO) and genioplasty was performed to correct skeletal problem. After treatment, all of the impacted teeth were brought to proper alignment in the maxillary arch. A satisfied profile and good posterior occlusion was achieved. Treatment mechanics and consideration during different stages are discussed.

  9. Surgery-first approach using a three-dimensional virtual setup and surgical simulation for skeletal Class III correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Joon; Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Ji Yeon; Kim, Moon Key; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2014-11-01

    A 19-year-old woman presented to our dental clinic with anterior crossbite and mandibular prognathism. She had a concave profile, long face, and Angle Class III molar relationship. She showed disharmony in the crowding of the maxillomandibular dentition and midline deviation. The diagnosis and treatment plan were established by a three-dimensional (3D) virtual setup and 3D surgical simulation, and a surgical wafer was produced using the stereolithography technique. No presurgical orthodontic treatment was performed. Using the surgery-first approach, Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy and mandibular bilateral intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy setback were carried out. Treatment was completed with postorthodontic treatment. Thus, symmetrical and balanced facial soft tissue and facial form as well as stabilized and well-balanced occlusion were achieved.

  10. Evaluation depth of the curve of Spee in class I, class II, and class III malocclusion: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Occlusal plane is an essential consideration when multiple long-span posterior restorations are designed. When restorations are added to an existing tooth arrangement characterized by rotated, tipped, or extruded teeth, excursive interferences may be incorporated, resulting in detrimental squeal. The curve of Spee, which exists in the ideal natural dentition, allows harmony to exist between the anterior tooth and condylar guidance. This curve exists in the sagittal plane and is the best viewed from a lateral aspect. It permits total posterior disclusion on mandibular protrusion, given proper anterior tooth guidance. It is unclear that whether the curve of Spee is a description of the occlusal surface of each arch separately or in maximal intercuspation. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in the depth of curve of Spee between the class I, class II, class III and to investigate the relationship of depth of curve of Spee with over jet, over-bite.

  11. Novel three dimensional position analysis of the mandibular foramen in patients with skeletal class III mandibular prognathism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Kim, Yeon Ho; Won, Yu Jin; Kim, Moon Key [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To analyze the relative position of the mandibular foramina (MnFs) in patients diagnosed with skeletal class III malocclusion. Computed tomography (CT) images were collected from 85 patients. The vertical lengths of each anatomic point from the five horizontal planes passing through the MnF were measured at the coronoid process, sigmoid notch, condyle, and the gonion. The distance from the anterior ramus point to the posterior ramus point on the five horizontal planes was designated the anteroposterior horizontal distance of the ramus for each plane. The perpendicular distance from each anterior ramus point to each vertical plane through the MnF was designated the horizontal distance from the anterior ramus to the Mn F. The horizontal and vertical positions were examined by regression analysis. Regression analysis showed the heights of the coronoid process, sigmoid notch, and condyle for the five horizontal planes were significantly related to the height of the MnF, with the highest significance associated with the MnF-mandibular plane (coefficients of determination (R2): 0.424, 0.597, and 0.604, respectively). The horizontal anteroposterior length of the ramus and the distance from the anterior ramus point to the MnF were significant by regression analysis. The relative position of the MnF was significantly related to the vertical heights of the sigmoid notch, coronoid process, and condyle as well as to the horizontal anteroposterior length of the ascending ramus. These findings should be clinically useful for patients with skeletal class III mandibular prognathism.

  12. Accelerated decompensation of mandibular incisors in surgical skeletal class III patients by using augmented corticotomy: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyo-Won; Lee, Dong-Yeol; Park, Young-Guk; Kim, Seong-Hun; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Nelson, Gerald

    2012-08-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate the amount of decompensation of the mandibular incisors and the change of periodontal support around them after corticotomy with bone augmentation before orthognathic surgery. Before orthognathic surgery for 15 skeletal Class III patients, orthodontic treatment was combined with corticotomy and bone augmentation labially to the anterior mandibular roots. Lateral cephalograms were taken before orthodontic treatment and before surgery (completion of preoperative orthodontic treatment). The amounts of mandibular incisor proclination, alveolar bone thickness, and periodontal support (gingival margin levels and augmentation pattern) were evaluated. Significant proclination of the mandibular incisors was shown after decompensation (P <0.001; incisor mandibular plane angle, 10.45°; incisor symphyseal plane angle, 10.74°). The incisor edge moved labially by 3.47 mm. The alveolar bone thickness increased by 1.56 mm at the root apex and 1.98 mm at the level of B-point (P <0.001). There was no gingival recession irrespective of the degree of proclination of the mandibular incisiors. Two types of bone augmentation pattern were evident. One was characterized by alveolar bone proclination proportional to the labial tipping of the mandibular incisors. Buccal alveolar bone at the cervical area was well maintained (60%, 9 subjects). The other showed greater increases in alveolar thickness at B-point than at the cervical area (40%, 6 subjects). The augmented corticotomy provided effective decompensation of the mandibular incisors in skeletal Class III patients while maintaining labial bone thickness and with no periodontal side effects. This technique reduces or eliminates the risk of moving the roots through the labial plate during decompensation with the associated risk of gingival recession. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Saliva versus Plasma Relative Bioavailability of Tolterodine in Humans: Validation of Class III Drugs of the Salivary Excretion Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, N; Najib, N; Salem, I I; Najib, O

    2016-06-01

    Relative bioavailability study of tolterodine in healthy human volunteers was done using saliva and plasma matrices in order to investigate the robustness of using saliva instead of plasma as a surrogate for bioavailability and bioequivalence of class III drugs according to the salivary excretion classification system (SECS). Saliva and plasma samples were collected up to 16 h after 2 mg oral dose. Saliva and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non compartmental analysis using Kinetica program V5. Human effective intestinal permeability was optimized by SimCYP program V13. Tolterodine falls into class III (High permeability/Low fraction unbound to plasma proteins) and hence was subjected to salivary excretion. A high pearsons correlation coefficient of 0.97 between mean saliva and plasma concentrations, and saliva/plasma concentrations ratio of 0.33 were observed. In addition, correlation coefficients and saliva/plasma ratios of area under curve and maximum concentration were 0.98, 0.95 and 0.42, 0.34 respectively. On the other hand, time to reach maximum concentration was higher in saliva by 2.37 fold. In addition, inter subject variability values in saliva were slightly higher than plasma leading to need for slightly higher number of subjects to be used in saliva studies (55 vs. 48 subjects). Non-invasive saliva sampling instead of invasive plasma sampling method can be used as a surrogate for bioavailability and bioequivalence of SECS class I drugs when adequate sample size is used. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Mechanistic investigation of food effect on disintegration and dissolution of BCS class III compound solid formulations: the importance of viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Asma; Amidon, Gordon L; Langguth, Peter

    2012-10-01

    A negative food effect, i.e. a decrease in bioavailability upon the co-administration of compounds together with food, has been attributed particularly with high solubility/low permeability compounds (BCS class III). Different mechanisms have been proposed including intestinal dilution leading to a lower concentration gradient across the intestinal wall as well as binding of the active pharmaceutical ingredient to food components in the intestine and thereby decreasing the fraction of the dose available for absorption. These mechanisms refer primarily to the compound and not to the dosage form. An increase in viscosity of the dissolution fluid will in particular affect the absorption of BCS type III compounds with preferential absorption in the upper small intestine if the API release is delayed from the dosage form. The present study demonstrated that the increase in viscosity of the dissolution medium, following ingestion of a solid meal, may drastically reduce disintegration and dissolution. For that purpose the viscosity of the standard FDA meal was determined and simulated by solutions of HPMC in buffer. As model formulations, three commercially available tablets containing trospium chloride, a BCS class III m-cholinoreceptor antagonist was used. Trospium chloride drug products have been described to undergo a negative food effect of more than 80% following ingestion with food. The tablets showed prolonged disintegration times and reduced dissolution rates in viscous media, which could be attributed to changes in the liquid penetration rates. The effect was particularly significant for film-coated tablets relative to uncoated dosage forms. The results show the necessity of considering media viscosity when designing in vitro models of drug release for BCS type III drug formulations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Apriori feasibility testing of randomized clinical trial design in patients with cleft deformities and Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvaine, Elizabeth; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lane, Christianne J; Azen, Stanley P; Yen, Stephen L-K

    2014-05-01

    To assess the feasibility of randomizing treatment (surgical vs. non-surgical) for correction of a Class III malocclusion (underbite) resulting from an earlier repair of cleft lip and palate. Surveys about willingness to accept randomized treatment during adolescence were mailed to the parents of cleft lip and palate patients under the care of Children's Hospital Los Angeles between 2005 and 2010. The inclusion criteria were patients with cleft lip and palate, Class III malocclusion due to maxillary deficiency, and absence of medical and cognitive contraindications to treatment. Out of 287 surveys, 82 (28%) were completed and returned; 47% of the subjects held a strong treatment preference (95% CI, 35-58%), while 30% were willing to accept randomization (95% CI, 20-41%). Seventy-eight percent would drop out of a randomized trial if dissatisfied with the assigned treatment (95% CI, 67-86%). The three most commonly cited reasons for being unwilling to accept random treatment assignment were 1) the desire for doctors to choose the best treatment, 2) the desire for parents to have input on treatment, and 3) the desire to correct the underbite as early as possible. Based on this study, parents and patients would be unwilling to accept a randomly assigned treatment and would not remain in an assigned group if treatment did not meet expectations. This highlight the limitations associated with randomization trials involving surgical modalities and provide justification for other research models (e.g., cohort studies) to compare two treatment options when randomization is not feasible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aesthetic and functional outcomes using a multiloop edgewise archwire for camouflage orthodontic treatment of a severe Class III open bite malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón-Vásquez, Guido Artemio; Soldevilla Galarza, Luciano Carlos; Tolentino Solis, Freddy Antonio; Wilson, Cliff; Romano, Fábio Lourenço

    2017-09-01

    Occasionally, orthodontists will be challenged to treat malocclusions and skeletal disharmonies, which by their complexity one might think that the only treatment alternative is the surgical-orthodontic approach. A male patient, aged 17 years old, was diagnosed with a skeletal Class III malocclusion, anterior open bite and negative overjet. An unpleasant profile was the patient's 'chief complaint' showing interest in facial aesthetics improvement. Nevertheless, the patient and his parents strongly preferred a non-surgical treatment approach. He was treated with a multiloop edgewise archwire to facilitate uprighting and distal en-masse movement of lower teeth, correct the Class III open bite malocclusion, change the inclination of the occlusal plane and obtain the consequent morphological-functional adaptation of the mandible. The Class III malocclusion was corrected and satisfactory changes in the patient's profile were obtained. Active treatment was completed in 2 years, and facial result remained stable at 2 years 6 months after debonding.

  17. Alternative treatment for open bite Class III malocclusion in a child with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Giovanni Modesto; Franco, Eduardo Jacomino; da Rocha, Denise Falcão Pinheiro; de Oliveira, Laudimar Alves; Amorim, Rivadávio Fernandes Batista

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a rare genetic condition that affects approximately 1 in every 20,000 - 50,000 live births. WBS children have specific skeletal deformities, dental malformations and rare lingual muscle dysfunction. The need for orthodontic and orthognathic therapy has arisen and has been considered a real clinical challenge even for experienced professionals, once it requires a complex and individualized treatment plan. This study reports a case of orthopedic expansion of the maxilla, in which a modified facial mask was used for protraction of the maxillary complex associated with clockwise rotation of the maxilla. In addition, special considerations about treatment time and orthopedic outcomes are discussed.

  18. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Jee [Department of Ophthalmology, National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jin Won [Department of Biology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon H., E-mail: joonhlee@konyang.ac.kr [Konyang University Myunggok Medical Research Institute, Kim' s Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  19. Expression of ERCC1, p53, and class III β-tubulin do not reveal chemoresistance in endometrial cancer: results from an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenput, Ingrid; Capoen, An; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Verbist, Godelieve; Moerman, Philippe; Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frédéric

    2011-08-01

    In non-small cell lung cancer, expression of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) and p53 correlates with platinum resistance and class III β-tubulin with resistance to taxanes. The potential to personalize treatment in endometrial cancer remains uninvestigated. Patients received platinum-based chemotherapy, with or without paclitaxel. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group A (n = 33) consisted of patients with early-stage endometrial cancer treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Group B (n = 116) included cases with primary advanced or recurrent disease. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze the expression of ERCC1 and p53, for all cases, and class III β-tubulin for cases treated with paclitaxel. The findings were correlated with response according to Response Criteria in Solid Tumors; recurrence-free, disease-specific survival; and established prognostic markers. The mean age of 149 patients was 64 years (range, 31-84 years). Distribution of histopathologic subtypes was as follows: 44 endometrioid (30%), 92 serous/clear cell (62%), and 13 carcinosarcomas (8%).In group A, 11 (33%) and 19 patients (58%) showed expression for ERCC1 and p53, respectively. Seven (78%) of nine patients receiving paclitaxel were positive for class III β-tubulin. There was no correlation between expression of ERCC1, p53, or class III β-tubulin and recurrence or survival. In group B, 25 (22%) and 61 patients (64%) were positive for ERCC1 and p53, respectively. Fifty-two (74%) of seventy patients receiving paclitaxel were positive for class III β-tubulin. Only p53 expression correlated with survival (P = 0.01). In contrast to theoretical assumptions, the current study did not reveal evidence that the expression of ERCC1 and class III β-tubulin predicts response to cytotoxic treatment and patient outcome in endometrial cancer.

  20. Alternative treatment for open bite Class III malocclusion in a child with Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Modesto Vieira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS is a rare genetic condition that affects approximately 1 in every 20,000 - 50,000 live births. WBS children have specific skeletal deformities, dental malformations and rare lingual muscle dysfunction. The need for orthodontic and orthognathic therapy has arisen and has been considered a real clinical challenge even for experienced professionals, once it requires a complex and individualized treatment plan. This study reports a case of orthopedic expansion of the maxilla, in which a modified facial mask was used for protraction of the maxillary complex associated with clockwise rotation of the maxilla. In addition, special considerations about treatment time and orthopedic outcomes are discussed.

  1. Class III obesity and its relationship with the nutritional status of vitamin A in pre- and postoperative gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Silvia; Saboya, Carlos; Chaves, Gabriela; Ramalho, Andréa

    2009-06-01

    Epidemiological findings have shown the rise of the prevalence of obesity in several segments of the world population, and more recent evidences point to a possible association with vitamin A deficiency (VAD). The aim of this study was to investigate vitamin A nutritional status in individuals with class III obesity in the preoperative period and 30 and 180 days after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, correlating these findings with lipid profile and body mass index (BMI). The sample was composed of class III obese individuals, males and females, in the preoperative period (T1) and 30 (T2) and 180 days (T3) after bariatric surgery with 5,000 IU of supplementation of retinol acetate. Vitamin A nutritional status was assessed through biochemical indicators (retinol and beta-carotene serum levels), which were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography with an inadequacy cutoff of or=40 microg/dL, respectively. Out of the 114 assessed patients, the mean age was 36.9+/-11.6 years and BMI was >or=40 kg/m2. The prevalence of VAD was 14%, being 37.5% in T1, 50.8% and 67.8% in T2, and 52.9% and 67% in T3, according to retinol and serum beta-carotene, respectively. A decrease of retinol and beta-carotene serum levels was observed with BMI increase in T1. An increase of very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDLc) and triglycerides was verified with the increase of retinol, being VLDLc in T3 and triglycerides in T1 and T2. In T1, high-dense lipoprotein cholesterol presented a positive and significant correlation with beta-carotene and a negative and significant correlation in T3. High prevalence of VAD in the preoperative period and in 30 and 180 postoperative days, even during supplementation, with higher inadequacy of beta-carotene in all the three studied time periods, probably occurred because of its bioconversion to retinol due to the increased demand to which those individuals were exposed. It is suggested that the oral intake supplementation does not present the

  2. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III genetics in two Amerindian tribes from southern Brazil: the Kaingang and the Guarani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weg-Remers, S; Brenden, M; Schwarz, E; Witzel, K; Schneider, P M; Guerra, L K; Rehfeldt, I R; Lima, M T; Hartmann, D; Petzl-Erler, M L; de Messias, I J; Mauff, G

    1997-10-01

    Population genetic studies of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region, comprising C2, BF and C4 phenotypes, and molecular genetic data are rarely available for populations other than Caucasoids. We have investigated three Amerindian populations from Southern Brazil: 131 Kaingang from Ivaí (KIV), 111 Kaingang (KRC) and 100 Guarani (GRC) from Rio das Cobras. Extended MHC haplotypes were derived after standard C2, BF, C4 phenotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with TaqI, together with HLA data published previously by segregation analysis. C2 and BF frequencies corresponded to other Amerindian populations. C4B*Q0 frequency was high in the GRC (0.429) but low in the Kaingang. Unusual C4 alleles were found, viz. C4A*58, A*55 and C4B*22 (presumably non-Amerindian) and aberrant C4A*3 of Amerindian origin occurring with a frequency of 0.223 in the GRC. C4A*3 bands of homo- and heterozygous individuals carrying this variant were Rodgers 1 positive and Chido 1,3 positive, showed a C4A specific lysis type and a C4A like alpha-chain. Polymerase chain reaction studies and sequencing showed that this is based on a C4A*3 duplication with a regular C4A*3 and a partially converted C4A*0304 carrying the C4B specific epitopes Ch 6 and Ch 1,3. Associations of class III haplotypes with particular RFLP patterns were similar to those reported for Caucasoids. The previously described association between combined C4A and CYP21P deletions and the 6.4 kb TaqI fragment was not seen in these Amerindians. This fragment occurred within a regular two locus gene structure in the Kaingang, representing a "short" gene at C4 locus I. C4 and CYP21 duplications were frequently observed. The distribution of extended MHC haplotypes provides evidence for a close relationship between the KIV and KRC and a larger genetic distance between the two Kaingang groups and the GRC.

  3. Expression of Class III Beta-tubulin Predicts Prognosis in Patients with Cisplatin-resistant Bladder Cancer Receiving Paclitaxel-based Second-line Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Matsuo, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Yuichiro; Yasuda, Takuji; Ohba, Kojiro; Takehara, Kosuke; Sakai, Hideki

    2018-03-01

    Class III beta-tubulin (TUBB3) expression is recognized as a predictive marker for chemosensitivity to cisplatin- and taxane-based chemotherapies in various malignancies. The aim of this study was to clarify the predictive value of TUBB3 expression for the anticancer effects of first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy and second-line paclitaxel-based chemotherapy in patients with urothelial cancer (UC). We reviewed 116 patients with UC (90 with bladder cancer and 27 with upper urinary tract cancer) treated with first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Among them, 42 patients received a paclitaxel-based regimen as second-line chemotherapy for advanced cisplatin-resistant UC. TUBB3 expression was evaluated using immunohistochemistry, and survival analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis. TUBB3 was mainly detected in the cytoplasm of cancer cells, and 64 patients (55.2%) were judged as having positive TUBB3 expression. TUBB3 expression was significantly associated with tumour grade (pcisplatin-based chemotherapy. However, positive expression of TUBB3 was significantly associated with unfavourable overall survival in patients receiving second-line paclitaxel-based chemotherapy (p=0.021). In addition, a multivariate analysis model including T-stage and metastasis at the beginning of second-line therapy and regimen showed that TUBB3 expression was an independent predictor of poorer survival (hazard ratio(HR)=3.44, 95% confidential interval(CI)=1.15-10.33, p=0.027). TUBB3 expression was identified as a useful predictive factor for survival after second-line paclitaxel-based therapy in patients with cisplatin-resistant UC. Our results are useful for determining treatment strategies for such patients. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  4. The Populus Class III HD ZIP, popREVOLUTA, Influences Cambium Initiation and Patterning of Woody Stems1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robischon, Marcel; Du, Juan; Miura, Eriko; Groover, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The secondary growth of a woody stem requires the formation of a vascular cambium at an appropriate position and proper patterning of the vascular tissues derived from the cambium. Class III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD ZIP) transcription factors have been implicated in polarity determination and patterning in lateral organs and primary vascular tissues and in the initiation and function of shoot apical meristems. We report here the functional characterization of a Populus class III HD ZIP gene, popREVOLUTA (PRE), that demonstrates another role for class III HD ZIPs in regulating the development of cambia and secondary vascular tissues. PRE is orthologous to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) REVOLUTA and is expressed in both the shoot apical meristem and in the cambial zone and secondary vascular tissues. Transgenic Populus expressing a microRNA-resistant form of PRE presents unstable phenotypic abnormalities affecting both primary and secondary growth. Surprisingly, phenotypic changes include abnormal formation of cambia within cortical parenchyma that can produce secondary vascular tissues in reverse polarity. Genes misexpressed in PRE mutants include transcription factors and auxin-related genes previously implicated in class III HD ZIP functions during primary growth. Together, these results suggest that PRE plays a fundamental role in the initiation of the cambium and in regulating the patterning of secondary vascular tissues. PMID:21205615

  5. No increased susceptibility to breast cancer from combined CHEK2 1100delC genotype and the HLA class III region risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Mirjam; Nolte, Ilja; te Meerman, Gerhardus; van der Graaf, WTA; Oosterom, E; Bruinenberg, M; van der Steege, G; Oosterwijk, JC; van der Hout, Annemarie; Boezen, HM; Schaapveld, M; Kleibeuker, JH; de Vries, EGE

    CHEK2 is low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility gene. The 1100delC mutation may interact with variants/mutations in other breast cancer susceptibility loci. We identified a risk haplotype in the HLA class III region in breast cancer patients [de Jong MM, Nolte IM, de Vries EGE, et al. The HLA

  6. IBO Case Report: Management of Skeletal Class III Malocclusion with Combined Rapid Maxillary Expansion: Facemask Therapy and 5-Year Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Surana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with maxillary deficiency in an adolescent girl, using combined rapid maxillary expansion-facemask approach, followed by comprehensive fixed appliance mechanotherapy. Excellent long-term stability is demonstrated up to 5 years post-treatment.

  7. Preventing an identity crisis: unexpected co-expression of class III beta-tubulin and glial fibrillary acidic protein in human fetal astrocytes in culture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Dráberová, Eduarda; Del Valle, L.; Bertrand, L.; Agamanolis, D.P.; de Chadarévian, J.-P.; Legido, A.; Dráber, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 11 (2007), s. 107-107 ISSN 0364-5134 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR GA204/05/2375 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : class III beta-tubulin * fetal glia Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Genotype versus phenotype: conflicting results in mapping a lung tumor susceptibility locus to the G7c recombination interval in the mouse MHC class III region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooij, M.; de Groot, K.; van Vugt, H.; Aten, J.; Snoek, M.

    2001-01-01

    Susceptibility to chemically induced lung tumorigenesis has previously been mapped to a genomic interval of 27 kb in the MHC class III region of the mouse using two H2 (a/b) intra- H2 recombinants, B10.A(1R) and B10.A(2R). Three genes are located within this interval, G7e (encoding a viral envelope

  9. Accuracy of Dolphin visual treatment objective (VTO) prediction software on class III patients treated with maxillary advancement and mandibular setback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Robert J; Jiang, Shuying; Johe, Rene; Mukherjee, Padma M

    2016-12-01

    Dolphin® visual treatment objective (VTO) prediction software is routinely utilized by orthodontists during the treatment planning of orthognathic cases to help predict post-surgical soft tissue changes. Although surgical soft tissue prediction is considered to be a vital tool, its accuracy is not well understood in tow-jaw surgical procedures. The objective of this study was to quantify the accuracy of Dolphin Imaging's VTO soft tissue prediction software on class III patients treated with maxillary advancement and mandibular setback and to validate the efficacy of the software in such complex cases. This retrospective study analyzed the records of 14 patients treated with comprehensive orthodontics in conjunction with two-jaw orthognathic surgery. Pre- and post-treatment radiographs were traced and superimposed to determine the actual skeletal movements achieved in surgery. This information was then used to simulate surgery in the software and generate a final soft tissue patient profile prediction. Prediction images were then compared to the actual post-treatment profile photos to determine differences. Dolphin Imaging's software was determined to be accurate within an error range of +/- 2 mm in the X-axis at most landmarks. The lower lip predictions were most inaccurate. Clinically, the observed error suggests that the VTO may be used for demonstration and communication with a patient or consulting practitioner. However, Dolphin should not be useful for precise treatment planning of surgical movements. This program should be used with caution to prevent unrealistic patient expectations and dissatisfaction.

  10. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant plant class III chitinase from the pitcher of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishisaki, Kana; Arai, Sachiko; Hamada, Tatsuro; Honda, Yuji

    2012-11-01

    A class III chitinase belonging to the GH18 family from Nepenthes alata (NaCHIT3) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme exhibited hydrolytic activity toward colloidal chitin, ethylene glycol chitin, and (GlcNAc)(n) (n=5 and 6). The enzyme hydrolyzed the fourth glycosidic linkage from the non-reducing end of (GlcNAc)(6). The anomeric form of the products indicated it was a retaining enzyme. The colloidal chitin hydrolytic reaction displayed high activity between pH 3.9 and 6.9, but the pH optimum of the (GlcNAc)(6) hydrolytic reaction was 3.9 at 37 °C. The optimal temperature for activity was 65 °C in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer (pH 3.9). The pH optima of NaCHIT3 and NaCHIT1 might be related to their roles in chitin degradation in the pitcher fluid. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of the Tumor-Suppressor Function of the Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Complex by Ubiquitin and SUMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reidick, Christina; El Magraoui, Fouzi; Meyer, Helmut E.; Stenmark, Harald; Platta, Harald W.

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of cancer is often associated with a dysfunction in one of the three central membrane-involution processes—autophagy, endocytosis or cytokinesis. Interestingly, all three pathways are controlled by the same central signaling module: the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-III) complex and its catalytic product, the phosphorylated lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P). The activity of the catalytic subunit of the PI3K-III complex, the lipid-kinase VPS34, requires the presence of the membrane-targeting factor VPS15 as well as the adaptor protein Beclin 1. Furthermore, a growing list of regulatory proteins associates with VPS34 via Beclin 1. These accessory factors define distinct subunit compositions and thereby guide the PI3K-III complex to its different cellular and physiological roles. Here we discuss the regulation of the PI3K-III complex components by ubiquitination and SUMOylation. Especially Beclin 1 has emerged as a highly regulated protein, which can be modified with Lys11-, Lys48- or Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains catalyzed by distinct E3 ligases from the RING-, HECT-, RBR- or Cullin-type. We also point out other cross-links of these ligases with autophagy in order to discuss how these data might be merged into a general concept

  12. Abundant class III acidic chitinase homologue in tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seed serves as the major storage protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Devavratha H; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2008-03-26

    The phyla Leguminosae contains protease inhibitors, lectins, chitinases, and glycohydrolases as major defense proteins in their seeds. Electrophoretic analysis of the seed proteins of tamarind ( Tamarindus indica L.), an agri-waste material, indicated the unusual presence of two major proteins comparable to overexpression of recombinant proteins. These proteins were identified by amino-terminal analysis to be (1) Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor and (2) class III endochitinase (34000 Da). These two proteins were purified to apparent homogeneity by a single-step chitin bead affinity chromatography and characterized. The Kunitz inhibitor was specific toward inhibiting trypsin with a stoichiometry of 1:1. The 33000 +/- 1000 Da protein, accounting for >50% of the total seed protein, is an acidic glycoprotein exhibiting a very low endotype hydrolytic activity toward chitin derivatives. SDS-PAGE followed by densitometry of tamarind seed germination indicates the disappearance of the chitinase with the concomitant appearance of a cysteine endopeptidase. On the basis of its abundance, accumulation without any pathogenesis-related stimulus, temporal regulation, amino acid composition, and very low enzyme activity, this 34000 Da protein designated "tamarinin" physiologically serves as the major storage protein.

  13. Regulation of the Tumor-Suppressor Function of the Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Complex by Ubiquitin and SUMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidick, Christina [Biochemie Intrazellulärer Transportprozesse, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44801 (Germany); El Magraoui, Fouzi; Meyer, Helmut E. [Biomedical Research, Human Brain Proteomics II, Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS, Dortmund 44139 (Germany); Stenmark, Harald [Department of Biochemistry, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Montebello, Oslo 0310 (Norway); Platta, Harald W., E-mail: harald.platta@rub.de [Biochemie Intrazellulärer Transportprozesse, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44801 (Germany)

    2014-12-23

    The occurrence of cancer is often associated with a dysfunction in one of the three central membrane-involution processes—autophagy, endocytosis or cytokinesis. Interestingly, all three pathways are controlled by the same central signaling module: the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-III) complex and its catalytic product, the phosphorylated lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P). The activity of the catalytic subunit of the PI3K-III complex, the lipid-kinase VPS34, requires the presence of the membrane-targeting factor VPS15 as well as the adaptor protein Beclin 1. Furthermore, a growing list of regulatory proteins associates with VPS34 via Beclin 1. These accessory factors define distinct subunit compositions and thereby guide the PI3K-III complex to its different cellular and physiological roles. Here we discuss the regulation of the PI3K-III complex components by ubiquitination and SUMOylation. Especially Beclin 1 has emerged as a highly regulated protein, which can be modified with Lys11-, Lys48- or Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains catalyzed by distinct E3 ligases from the RING-, HECT-, RBR- or Cullin-type. We also point out other cross-links of these ligases with autophagy in order to discuss how these data might be merged into a general concept.

  14. PCSK1 rs6232 is associated with childhood and adult class III obesity in the Mexican population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisela Villalobos-Comparán

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Common variants rs6232 and rs6235 in the PCSK1 gene have been associated with obesity in European populations. We aimed to evaluate the contribution of these variants to obesity and related traits in Mexican children and adults. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Rs6232 and rs6235 were genotyped in 2382 individuals, 1206 children and 1176 adults. Minor allele frequencies were 0.78% for rs6232 and 19.99% for rs6235. Rs6232 was significantly associated with childhood obesity and adult class III obesity (OR = 3.01 95%CI 1.64-5.53; P = 4 × 10⁻⁴ in the combined analysis. In addition, this SNP was significantly associated with lower fasting glucose levels (P = 0.01 and with increased insulin levels and HOMA-B (P = 0.05 and 0.01, respectively only in non-obese children. In contrast, rs6235 showed no significant association with obesity or with glucose homeostasis parameters in any group. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Although rs6232 is rare in the Mexican population, it should be considered as an important risk factor for extreme forms of obesity.

  15. Class III Restoration of Anterior Primary Teeth: In Vitro Retention Comparison of Conventional, Modified and Air-abrasion Treated Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Asl Aminabadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Anterior esthetic restoration is challenging in pediatric dentistry, due to limited durability and poor retention of the restoration.This study assessed the effect of air abrasion on tensile failure load of composite class III restorations using different preparation techniques. Materials and methods. 100 extracted human anterior primary teeth were divided, based on the preparation methods, into four groups each consisting of 25 subjects : conventional (A, labial surface bevel (B, conventional + air abrasion (C, and labial surface bevel + air abrasion (D. After restoring cavities, tensile failure load of samples was measured in Newton by Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm per minute. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests using SPSS software. Results. There were statistically significant differences between groups A and C (P = 0.003, groups A and B (P < 0.001, groups A and D (P < 0.001, groups B and C (P = 0.028, groups B and D (P = 0.027, and also groups C and D (P < 0.001. Group D demonstrated the highest mean tensile failure load. Conclusion. Labial surface bevel treated by air abrasion showed significantly more retention of composite restoration.

  16. The influence of INS VNTR class III allele on auxological parameters, glucose, insulin, lipids, and adipocytokines secretion in prepubertal children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawerska, Renata; Szałapska, Małgorzata; Borowiec, Maciej; Antosik, Karolina; Młynarski, Wojciech; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The insulin gene variable number of tandem repeats (INS VNTR) class III allele has been implicated in lower birth weight, obesity, and insulin resistance. We assessed its influence on birth weight in the Polish population and on the current body mass and metabolic profile in prepubertal children born small for gestational age (SGA). DNA for genotyping of INS VNTR was available for 123 subjects born SGA and 132 born appropriate for gestational age (AGA). We identified two alleles: class I and class III. Next, in 112 prepubertal (aged: 6.8 ± 1.38 years) SGA children, the auxological measurements, fasting serum C-peptide, triglycerides, cholesterol, ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, resistin, cortisol, and insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I) concentrations, as well as glucose and insulin during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), were assessed and insulin resistance indices were calculated. The results were analysed depending on INS VNTR variants. The occurrence of individual INS VNTR variants were similar in the SGA and AGA groups. In prepubertal SGA children, we did not observe any statistical differences as regards birth weight, body mass, lipids, or adipocytokine concentrations among I/I, I/III, and III/III class groups. The concentration of insulin in 120' of OGTT was significantly higher in class III homozygous than in class I homozygous individuals. Variant INS VNTR class III was shown not to be associated in any essential way with birth weight in the Polish population. Among prepubertal SGA children, the presence of INS VNTR class III is related to higher insulin secretion during OGTT. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (6): 585-591).

  17. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles (mi)) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the ''Management Plan

  18. Nasal changes after orthognathic surgery for patients with prognathism and Class III malocclusion: analysis using three-dimensional photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worasakwutiphong, Saran; Chuang, Ya-Fang; Chang, Hsin-Wen; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Lin, Pei-Ju; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2015-02-01

    Orthognathic surgery alters the position of maxilla and mandible, and consequently changes the nasal shape. The nasal change remains a concern to Asian patients. The aim of this study was to measure the nasal changes using a novel three-dimensional photographic imaging method. A total of 38 patients with Class III malocclusion and prognathism were enrolled. All patients underwent two-jaw surgery with the standard technique. A nasal alar cinching suture was included at the end of procedure. Facial landmarks and nasal morphology were defined and measured from pre- and postoperative three-dimensional photographic images. Intra-rater errors on landmark identification were controlled. Patient's reports of perceptual nasal changes were recorded. The average width of the alar base and subalare remained similar after surgery. Alar width was increased by 0.74 mm. Nasal height and length remained the same. Nasolabial angle increased significantly. The area of nostril show revealed a significant increase and was correlated with a decrease of columella inclination. Nasal tip projection decreased significantly, by 1.99 mm. Preoperative nasal morphology was different between patients with and without cleft lip/palate, but most nasal changes were concordant. In the self-perception, 37% of patients reported improved nasal appearance, 58% reported no change, and 5% were not satisfied with the nasal changes. After the surgery, characteristic nasal changes occurred with an increase of nasolabial angle and nostril show, but a preserved nasal width. The majority of patients did not perceive adverse nasal changes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Accuracy of Dolphin visual treatment objective (VTO prediction software on class III patients treated with maxillary advancement and mandibular setback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Peterman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dolphin® visual treatment objective (VTO prediction software is routinely utilized by orthodontists during the treatment planning of orthognathic cases to help predict post-surgical soft tissue changes. Although surgical soft tissue prediction is considered to be a vital tool, its accuracy is not well understood in tow-jaw surgical procedures. The objective of this study was to quantify the accuracy of Dolphin Imaging’s VTO soft tissue prediction software on class III patients treated with maxillary advancement and mandibular setback and to validate the efficacy of the software in such complex cases. Methods This retrospective study analyzed the records of 14 patients treated with comprehensive orthodontics in conjunction with two-jaw orthognathic surgery. Pre- and post-treatment radiographs were traced and superimposed to determine the actual skeletal movements achieved in surgery. This information was then used to simulate surgery in the software and generate a final soft tissue patient profile prediction. Prediction images were then compared to the actual post-treatment profile photos to determine differences. Results Dolphin Imaging’s software was determined to be accurate within an error range of +/− 2 mm in the X-axis at most landmarks. The lower lip predictions were most inaccurate. Conclusions Clinically, the observed error suggests that the VTO may be used for demonstration and communication with a patient or consulting practitioner. However, Dolphin should not be useful for precise treatment planning of surgical movements. This program should be used with caution to prevent unrealistic patient expectations and dissatisfaction.

  20. Functional characterization of a class III acid endochitinase from the traps of the carnivorous pitcher plant genus, Nepenthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottloff, Sandy; Stieber, Regina; Maischak, Heiko; Turini, Florian G; Heubl, Günther; Mithöfer, Axel

    2011-08-01

    Carnivory in plants is an adaptation strategy to nutrient-poor environments and soils. Carnivorous plants obtain some additional mineral nutrients by trapping and digesting prey; the genus Nepenthes is helped by its specialized pitcher traps. To make the nutrients available, the caught prey needs to be digested, a process that requires the concerted activity of several hydrolytic enzymes. To identify and investigate the various enzymes involved in this process, fluid from Nepenthes traps has been analysed in detail. In this study, a novel type of Nepenthes endochitinase was identified in the digestion fluid of closed pitchers. The encoding endochitinase genes have been cloned from eight different Nepenthes species. Among these, the deduced amino acid sequence similarity was at least 94.9%. The corresponding cDNA from N. rafflesiana was heterologously expressed, and the purified protein, NrChit1, was biochemically characterized. The enzyme, classified as a class III acid endochitinase belonging to family 18 of the glycoside hydrolases, is secreted into the pitcher fluid very probably due to the presence of an N-terminal signal peptide. Transcriptome analyses using real-time PCR indicated that the presence of prey in the pitcher up-regulates the endochitinase gene not only in the glands, which are responsible for enzyme secretion, but at an even higher level, in the glands' surrounding tissue. These results suggest that in the pitchers' tissues, the endochitinase as well as other proteins from the pitcher fluid might fulfil a different, primary function as pathogenesis-related proteins. © 2011 The Author(s).

  1. A Brief Review of Helmholtz Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Nigam, Kushagra; Banerjee, Kinjal

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the equations of motion obtained from Newtons second law of motion can be obtained from a Lagrangian via the Euler-Lagrangian formulation if and only if the equations of motion satisfy the Helmholtz conditions. In this pedagogical article we give a simple proof of the above statement and show its application to simple mechanical and dissipative systems.

  2. [Morphological analysis of alveolar bone of anterior mandible in high-angle skeletal class II and class III malocclusions assessed with cone-beam computed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Jiang, J H

    2018-02-18

    To evaluate the difference of features of alveolar bone support under lower anterior teeth between high-angle adults with skeletal class II malocclusions and high-angle adults presenting skeletal class III malocclusions by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Patients who had taken the images of CBCT were selected from the Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology between October 2015 and August 2017. The CBCT archives from 62 high-angle adult cases without orthodontic treatment were divided into two groups based on their sagittal jaw relationships: skeletal class II and skeletal class III. vertical bone level (VBL), alveolar bone area (ABA), and the width of alveolar bone were measured respectively at the 2 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) level and at the apical level. After that, independent samples t-tests were conducted for statistical comparisons. The ABA of the mandibular alveolar bone in the area of lower anterior teeth was significantly thinner in the patients of skeletal class III than those of skeletal class II, especially in terms of the apical ABA, total ABA on the labial and lingual sides and the ABA at 6 mm below CEJ level on the lingual side (Pclass III than those of skeletal class II, especially regarding the apical level on the labial and lingual side and at the level of 4 mm, 6 mm below CEJ level on the lingual side (Pclass III adult patients with high-angle when compared with the sample of high-angle skeletal class II adult cases. We recommend orthodontists to be more cautious in treatment of high-angle skeletal class III patients, especially pay attention to control the torque of lower anterior teeth during forward and backward movement, in case that the apical root might be absorbed or fenestration happen in the area of lower anterior teeth.

  3. 40 CFR Figure C-2 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-2 to Subpart C of Part 53... Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-2 Figure C-2 to Subpart C of Part 53—Illustration...

  4. Class III beta-tubulin is constitutively coexpressed with glial fibrillary acidic protein and nestin in midgestational human fetal astrocytes: implications for phenotypic identity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráberová, Eduarda; Del Valle, L.; Gordon, J.; Marková, Vladimíra; Šmejkalová, Barbora; Bertrand, L.; de Chadarévian, J.-P.; Agamanolis, D.P.; Legido, A.; Khalili, K.; Dráber, Pavel; Katsetos, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 4 (2008), s. 341-354 ISSN 0022-3069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR GA204/05/2375 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : astrocytes * class III beta-tubulin * fetal glia Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.140, year: 2008

  5. Un aparato sencillo para el tratamiento funcional de la clase III A simple apparatus for the class III functional treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria M Marín Manso

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available El prognatismo mandibular es una anomalía que afecta la estética y la siquis del paciente, y necesita en la mayoría de los casos la intervención quirúrgica para su correcto tratamiento. Existen múltiples aparatos funcionales para el tratamiento precoz de esta anomalía, entre los que se encuentran el activador abierto elástico, el Frankel III, las pistas planas de clase III y los bloques gemelos invertidos, entre otros. El objetivo de este trabajo es explicar los componentes y modo de acción del aparato diseñado por el Dr. Buño, al que llamó retropulsor-estimulador (RE 1 ó pequeño gigante, para el tratamiento de esta anomalía, del cual no contamos en nuestro país con ninguna referencia bibliográfica. El aparato es muy sencillo y de fácil construcción, favorece la función y la estética e impide la instauración de anomalías de peor pronóstico y de mayor complejidad en el tratamiento. Si se eliminan desde edades tempranas los trastornos funcionales y las trabas de la oclusión, tales como la oclusión invertida anterior, que obligan a adoptar una posición adelantada de la mandíbula, serán menos los adultos afectados.Mandibular prognatism is an abnormality affecting the aesthetics and psyche of the patient. In most of the cases, the surgical procedure is necessary for its correct treatment. If the functional disorders and the obstacles for occlusion, such as the anterior inverted occlusion that obliges to adopt an advanced position of the mandible, are eliminated at early ages, the affected adults will be less. There are multiple functional apparatuses for the premature treatment of this abnormality, such as the Elastic Open Activator, Frankle III, the class III Flat Tracks and the Inverted Twin Blocks, among others. Dr. Buño designed an apparatus called Retropulsator-Stimulator (R.S. 1 or Little Giant for the treatment of this abnormality. As we don’t have any bibliographic reference of this apparatus in our country

  6. [Preliminary evaluation on 3-demension changes of facial soft tissue with structure light scanning technique before and after orthognathic surgery of Class III deformities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ju-xiang; Jiang, Jiu-hui; Zhao, Yi-jiao; Wang, Yong; Li, Ze; Wang, Ning-ning; Feng, Zhi-min

    2015-02-18

    To evaluate facial soft tissue 3-deminsion changes of skeletal Class III malocclusion patients after orthognathic surgery using structure light scanning technique. Eight patients [3 males and 5 females, aged (27.08 ± 4.42) years] with Class III dentoskeletal relationship who underwent a bimaxillary orthognathic surgical procedure involving advancement of the maxilla by Le Fort I osteotomy and mandibular setback by bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSO) and genioplasty to correct deformity were included. 3D facial images were obtained by structure light scanner for all the patients 2 weeks preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. The facial soft tissue changes were evaluated in 3-dimension. The linear distances and angulation changes for facial soft tissue landmarks were analyzed. The soft tissue volumetric changes were assessed too. There were significant differences in the sagittal and vertical changes of soft tissue landmarks. The greatest amount of soft tissue change was close to lips. There were more volumetric changes in the chin than in the maxilla, and fewer in the forehead. After biomaxillary surgery, there were significant facial soft tissue differences mainly in the sagittal and vertical dimension for skeletal Class III patients. The structure light 3D scanning technique can be accurately used to estimate the soft tissue changes in patients who undergo orthognathic surgery.

  7. Effects of a novel magnetic orthopedic appliance (MOA-III) on the dentofacial complex in mild to moderate skeletal class III children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Feng, Jing; Hu, Zheng; Chen, Rongjing; Shen, Gang

    2015-10-14

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the changes of skeletal and dental structures in mild to moderate skeletal Class III children following the use of a new magnetic orthopedic appliance (MOA-III). A total of 36 patients (14 boys and 22 girls, mean age 9 years and 5 months) who presented with a mild to moderate skeletal Class III jaw discrepancy were treated with MOA-III. Another group of 20 untreated patients (9 boys and 11 girls, mean age 9 years and 2 months) with the same level of deformity served as the control group. The average treatment time was 6.6 months. Radiographs were taken at the same time intervals for both groups. A paired t test was used to determine the significant differences before and after treatment, and a two-sample t test was used to analyze the differences between the treatment and control groups. The anterior crossbite in all subjects was corrected after MOA-III therapy. The maxillomandibular relationship showed favorable changes (ANB, Wits, overjet increased significantly, P  0.05). Significant upper incisor proclination and lower incisor retroclination were observed (UI-NA increased, P III appliance compared to the untreated group. The MOA-III was effective for the early treatment of a mild to moderate Class III malocclusion in children.

  8. Association between class III obesity (BMI of 40-59 kg/m2 and mortality: a pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cari M Kitahara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of class III obesity (body mass index [BMI]≥40 kg/m2 has increased dramatically in several countries and currently affects 6% of adults in the US, with uncertain impact on the risks of illness and death. Using data from a large pooled study, we evaluated the risk of death, overall and due to a wide range of causes, and years of life expectancy lost associated with class III obesity.In a pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies from the United States, Sweden, and Australia, we estimated sex- and age-adjusted total and cause-specific mortality rates (deaths per 100,000 persons per year and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for adults, aged 19-83 y at baseline, classified as obese class III (BMI 40.0-59.9 kg/m2 compared with those classified as normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2. Participants reporting ever smoking cigarettes or a history of chronic disease (heart disease, cancer, stroke, or emphysema on baseline questionnaires were excluded. Among 9,564 class III obesity participants, mortality rates were 856.0 in men and 663.0 in women during the study period (1976-2009. Among 304,011 normal-weight participants, rates were 346.7 and 280.5 in men and women, respectively. Deaths from heart disease contributed largely to the excess rates in the class III obesity group (rate differences = 238.9 and 132.8 in men and women, respectively, followed by deaths from cancer (rate differences = 36.7 and 62.3 in men and women, respectively and diabetes (rate differences = 51.2 and 29.2 in men and women, respectively. Within the class III obesity range, multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for total deaths and deaths due to heart disease, cancer, diabetes, nephritis/nephrotic syndrome/nephrosis, chronic lower respiratory disease, and influenza/pneumonia increased with increasing BMI. Compared with normal-weight BMI, a BMI of 40-44.9, 45-49.9, 50-54.9, and 55-59.9 kg/m2 was associated with an estimated 6.5 (95% CI: 5.7-7.3, 8

  9. 42 CFR 482.30 - Condition of participation: Utilization review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... circumstances: (1) A Utilization and Quality Control Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) has assumed binding... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Basic Hospital Functions § 482.30 Condition of participation: Utilization review. The hospital must have in...

  10. A Cephalometric Study on the Relationship Between the Occlusal Plane, Ala-Tragus and Camper's Lines in Subjects with Angle's Class I, Class II and Class III Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahori, Manesh; Nagrath, Rahul; Malik, Niti

    2013-12-01

    Considering the importance of the occlusal plane orientation in complete denture prostheses, a study was conducted on the relationship between this plane with ala-tragus and Camper's lines in soft tissue among individuals with class I, class II and class III occlusion. The aim of the present study was to define the best soft tissue index by which the location and inclination of the occlusal plane in complete dentures could be established. A total of 60 subjects were selected for the study. Lateral cephalograms of these subjects were obtained. Tracings and analysis was done to confirm to the skeletal relationship of subjects to be class I (normal), class II (prognathic maxilla) and class III (retrognathic maxilla). 20 Subjects of each group were screened for further analysis. Radiopaque markers were attached to the intended points on soft tissue and then standard lateral cephalograms were obtained from each subject. The angles between the following lines were measured: Occlusal line, Camper's line (ala-porion), AT1 (ala-superior border of tragus), AT2 (ala-mid-tragus) and AT3 (ala-inferior border of tragus). The mean values and standard deviations were calculated for all the groups. The mean values calculated were subjected to repeated ANOVA test and significance was evaluated. Comparison of the results by the ANOVA test exhibited a significant difference. In class I subjects, it was evaluated that in 75 % individuals, the posterior reference point was found to be the mid-tragus; of class II subjects, in 60 % individuals, the posterior reference point was found to be the mid-tragus; and of class III subjects, in 75 % individuals, the posterior reference point was found to be the inferior border of tragus.

  11. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  12. Comparison of Incisor, Molar and Anterior Facial Height in Normal, Angle Class II Division 1 and Class III Malocclusion: A Cephalometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Deoghare

    2012-01-01

    Results: After studying specific landmarks and planes in the cephalograms, it was concluded that anterior facial height is significantly small in Class II Div 1, compared to normal and Class III. A fair degree of constancy of upper and lower face heights has been found in the study. It was also found that the upper molar height is contributory to increase and decrease in vertical proportions of face. Lower molar height can be related to the degree of overbite in Class II Div 1 case.

  13. Treatment of an adult with a normodivergent, mild skeletal Class III pattern, and a Bolton′s discrepancy using a single mandibular incisor extraction plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunjay Suri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 34½-year-old pathologist with active social and professional interaction sought orthodontic solutions for severe esthetic and functional impairment. She felt due to spaced and protruding maxillary incisors, but had not got treatment previously as she did not want to wear metallic appliances. The diagnosis revealed a skeletal Class III normodivergent pattern with relative mandibular excess tooth material. Treatment with multibracket fixed appliances using ceramic brackets, extraction of a mandibular central incisor, maxillary incisor crown recontouring with interproximal reduction, and using gentle space closure mechanics ameliorated the problems and provided an esthetically pleasing, functionally adequate occlusion with good intercuspation.

  14. Remote monitoring of pulmonary artery pressures with cardiomems in patients with chronic heart failure and nyha class III: First experiences in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Brugts, Jasper; Manintveld, Olivier; Mieghem, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    textabstractWe report the first patient experiences with the CardioMEMS device in the Erasmus MC Thorax Center in the Netherlands. In line with clinical trial evidence, the device is applicable in patients with chronic heart failure in functional New York Heart Association class III with at least 1 admission for heart failure in the past 12 months. CardioMEMS has been shown to be safe and reliable, and effective in reducing the number of hospitalisations for heart failure by guided therapy ba...

  15. Performance of antioxidative compounds under frying conditions: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladedunye, Felix; Przybylski, Roman; Matthaus, Bertrand

    2017-05-24

    Although much study has been done assessing activity of antioxidants at ambient and accelerated storage temperatures, the results cannot correctly depict their performance under frying conditions. Due to the stringent conditions imposed, most conventional antioxidative compounds failed under frying conditions, suggesting the need for a continuous modification to improve their effectiveness. Although syntheses and performance evaluation of over a hundred (semi)synthetic antioxidants have been reported in literature, only a small fraction have been specifically designed and/or evaluated under frying conditions. Here, the performance under frying conditions of major natural and synthetic antioxidants is reviewed. The recent trend in the designing of antioxidants for frying applications is also reviewed with the view of stimulating further study in this direction.

  16. Apresentação de um caso clínico de Classe III de Angle, tratado com o aparelho extrabucal basculante inferior de ação reversa, proposto por Baptista Apresentation of a Angle Class III clinic case, treated with lower headgear of reverse action appliance, suggested by Baptista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvio Gonçalves Filho

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available As más oclusões de Classe III são as de menor incidência em nossas clínicas. Porém, a intervenção precoce têm-se mostrado muito importante para que não haja um agravamento do quadro, influenciando o comportamento psicossocial do paciente. Neste artigo serão demonstrados os resultados com um aparelho muito simples de usar, com boa colaboração dos pacientes e resultados animadores.Early treatment in patients with Class III maloclusion can avoid psychological disordes.The effects of orthopedic therapy an mandibular growth with Batista’s reverse arch is showd in this case, indicating that is possible to solve this maloclusion with efficacy.

  17. Augmented corticotomy combined with accelerated orthodontic forces in class III orthognathic patients: morphologic aspects of the mandibular anterior ridge with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, Giuseppe; Coscia, Vincenzo; Peluso, Vincenzo; Addabbo, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    This study used cone-beam computed tomography to evaluate morphologic changes of the mandibular anterior ridge after using augmented corticotomy plus accelerated orthodontia to decompensate mandibular incisors in patients with surgical skeletal Class III. Fourteen patients (8 men, 6 women; mean age, 26.14 yr) with skeletal Class III were treated before orthognathic surgery with a technique that combined corticotomy, bone grafting, and accelerated orthodontic forces to decompensate the lower incisors. Three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomograms were taken before treatment (T0) and at the completion of presurgical orthodontic treatment (T1). Measurements of the amount of vertical alveolar bone changes and horizontal bone thickness at the midroot and root apex levels of the mandibular incisors were evaluated. All patients showed significant proclination of the mandibular incisors at T1. The mean alveolar bone thickness from T0 to T1 increased buccally at the midroot and apex levels, showing statistically significant horizontal bone augmentation at the labial side of the lower anterior mandibular teeth (P orthodontics, such as marginal bone loss and gingival recession. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Occlusal plane change after intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth by microimplants to avoid maxillary surgery with skeletal Class III orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo-Sang; Kim, Ji-Yeun; Kwon, Tae-Geon

    2010-11-01

    To increase stability and mandibular setback movement, surgical maxillary impaction is normally performed with mandibular setback surgery in treating adult skeletal Class III patients. This article demonstrates the use of microimplants for anchorage to intrude molars and the resultant rotation of the maxillary occlusal plane clockwise to increase the surgical mandibular setback and reduce the posterior vertical dimension instead of maxillary surgical impaction. A 21-year-old man with mandibular prognathism was treated with mandibular setback surgery that included orthodontic treatment for decompensation. Microimplants placed into the palatal alveolar bone between the maxillary first and second molars were used to intrude the maxillary posterior teeth and change the occlusal plane clockwise. This produced 4 mm more of distal movement of the chin during mandibular setback surgery compared with the surgical prediction with no change in the occlusal plane. These results were similar to those of 2-jaw surgery with maxillary posterior impaction. The intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth with microimplants might prevent the need for maxillary surgery in adult skeletal Class III patients. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of cephalometric changes in patients with class III malocclusion in mixed dentition period following face mask therapy and slow maxillary expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Akhondi MS.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Among different treatments of patients with Class III malocclusion , orthopedic protraction of maxilla has been known as an effective method in mixed dentition period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cephalometric changes of Cl III patients in mixed dentition period following face mask therapy and slow maxillary expansion. "nMaterials and Methods: This was a before-after study which was conducted on 10 children in mixed dentition period, who had class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency according to the Stiener and Mc Namara's analysis. The patients were all treated by protraction face mask and slow maxillary expansion. The cephalometric changes of maxilla , mandible and dental relations during the treatment were analyzed by Paired sample T Test. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significant. "nResults: The overjet increasement was 1.7mm. Co. ANS distance improvement was 5.6mm, Ptm.ANS distance increasing was 3mm, and ultimately improvement of Gf.s distance was 1.5mm which were all statistically significant (p<0.05. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, face mask therapy with slow maxillary expansion is able to improve the horizotal position of maxilla, in patients with Cl III malocclusion , in mixed dentition period.

  20. [The effect of two different methods of rapid maxillary expansion on treatment results of skeletal Class III malocclusion patients with maxillary protraction in early permanent dentition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi-hua; Xie, Xing-qian

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the effect of single rapid maxillary expansion and repetitive rapid expansion and constriction with maxillary protraction in treating early permanent skeletal Class III patients. Twenty children with skeletal Class III malocclusion were randomly divided into two groups.Ten patients received 1 week of rapid expansion,followed by maxillary protraction(group A) and the other ten patients received 5 weeks of repetitive rapid expansion and constriction followed by maxillary protraction (group B).Cephalometric analysis was performed before and after treatment. The data was analyzed with SPSS 13.0 software package for paired t test. Significant changes in cranio-maxillofacial structures were observed in both groups after 6 months of treatment.Point A moved forward. SNA, ANB, UL-EP, U1-PP, SN-MP, ANS-Me/N-Me, Wit's value increased. L1-MP, LL-EP decreased. Significant differences were found in SNA,ANB,UL-EP between the two groups(PClass III malocclusion patients.

  1. Orthopedic treatment of Class III malocclusion with rapid maxillary expansion combined with a face mask: a cephalometric assessment of craniofacial growth patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Torres Tagawa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective study was to assess potential changes in the cephalometric craniofacial growth pattern of 17 children presenting Angle Class III malocclusion treated with a Haas-type expander combined with a face mask. METHODS: Lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken at beginning (T1 and immediately after removal of the appliances (T2, average of 11 months of treatment. Linear and angular measurements were used to evaluate the cranial base, dentoskeletal changes and facial growth pattern. RESULTS: The length of the anterior cranial base experienced a reduction while the posterior cranial base assumed a more vertical position at T1. Some maxillary movement occurred, there was no rotation of the palatal plane, there was a slight clockwise rotation of the mandible, although not significant. The ANB angle increased, thereby improving the relationship between the jaws; dentoalveolar compensation was more evident in the lower incisors. Five out of 12 cases (29.41% showed the following changes: In one case the pattern became more horizontal and in four cases more vertical. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded after a short-term assessment that treatment with rapid maxillary expansion (RME associated with a face mask was effective in the correction of Class III malocclusion despite the changes in facial growth pattern observed in a few cases.

  2. Systematic Review of Nondrug, Nonsurgical Treatment of Shoulder Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Cheryl; Minkalis, Amy L; Khorsan, Raheleh; Daniels, Clinton J; Homack, Dennis; Gliedt, Jordan A; Hartman, Julie A; Bhalerao, Shireesh

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of conservative nondrug, nonsurgical interventions, either alone or in combination, for conditions of the shoulder. The review was conducted from March 2016 to November 2016 in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), and was registered with PROSPERO. Eligibility criteria included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, or meta-analyses studying adult patients with a shoulder diagnosis. Interventions qualified if they did not involve prescription medication or surgical procedures, although these could be used in the comparison group or groups. At least 2 independent reviewers assessed the quality of each study using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network checklists. Shoulder conditions addressed were shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS), rotator cuff-associated disorders (RCs), adhesive capsulitis (AC), and nonspecific shoulder pain. Twenty-five systematic reviews and 44 RCTs met inclusion criteria. Low- to moderate-quality evidence supported the use of manual therapies for all 4 shoulder conditions. Exercise, particularly combined with physical therapy protocols, was beneficial for SIS and AC. For SIS, moderate evidence supported several passive modalities. For RC, physical therapy protocols were found beneficial but not superior to surgery in the long term. Moderate evidence supported extracorporeal shockwave therapy for calcific tendinitis RC. Low-level laser was the only modality for which there was moderate evidence supporting its use for all 4 conditions. The findings of this literature review may help inform practitioners who use conservative methods (eg, doctors of chiropractic, physical therapists, and other manual therapists) regarding the levels of evidence for modalities used for common shoulder conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Human fear conditioning and extinction in neuroimaging: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Sehlmeyer

    Full Text Available Fear conditioning and extinction are basic forms of associative learning that have gained considerable clinical relevance in enhancing our understanding of anxiety disorders and facilitating their treatment. Modern neuroimaging techniques have significantly aided the identification of anatomical structures and networks involved in fear conditioning. On closer inspection, there is considerable variation in methodology and results between studies. This systematic review provides an overview of the current neuroimaging literature on fear conditioning and extinction on healthy subjects, taking into account methodological issues such as the conditioning paradigm. A Pubmed search, as of December 2008, was performed and supplemented by manual searches of bibliographies of key articles. Two independent reviewers made the final study selection and data extraction. A total of 46 studies on cued fear conditioning and/or extinction on healthy volunteers using positron emission tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging were reviewed. The influence of specific experimental factors, such as contingency and timing parameters, assessment of conditioned responses, and characteristics of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli, on cerebral activation patterns was examined. Results were summarized descriptively. A network consisting of fear-related brain areas, such as amygdala, insula, and anterior cingulate cortex, is activated independently of design parameters. However, some neuroimaging studies do not report these findings in the presence of methodological heterogeneities. Furthermore, other brain areas are differentially activated, depending on specific design parameters. These include stronger hippocampal activation in trace conditioning and tactile stimulation. Furthermore, tactile unconditioned stimuli enhance activation of pain related, motor, and somatosensory areas. Differences concerning experimental factors may partly explain the variance

  4. 77 FR 31302 - Review of Federal Permit Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    .... Intention To Work With Other Agencies It is the Federal Coordinator's intention to work closely with other... conditions early and either avoid a formal review process or conclude it expeditiously. B. Definitions (1..., right-of-way or other authorization. It was the Office of the Federal Coordinator's intention to include...

  5. Social conditions for human happiness: A review of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenhoven, Ruut

    2015-10-01

    Empirical research on happiness took off in the 1970s and accelerated after the emergence of positive psychology by 2000. Today this has resulted in some 23,000 research findings. In this article, I take stock of the findings on social conditions for happiness and distinguish between conditions at the macro level of society, the meso level of organisations and the micro level of individual conditions. A new review technique is applied, an online findings archive is used, in which research findings on happiness are described in a uniform way and sorted by subject. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  6. Dental compensation for skeletal Class III malocclusion by isolated extraction of mandibular teeth. Part 1: Occlusal situation 12 years after completion of active treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Bernd; Schenk-Kazan, Sarah

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to statistically evaluate the outcomes achieved by isolated extraction of mandibular teeth (second premolars or first molars) for Class III compensation. Part A of the study dealt with the quality of outcomes at the end of active treatment, using weighted Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores determined on the basis of casts for 25 (14 female and 11 male) consecutive patients aged 16 ± 1.7 years at the time of debonding. These results were compared to the scores in a randomly selected control group of 25 (14 female and 11 male) patients who were 14.7 ± 1.9 years old at debonding. Part B evaluated the long-term stability of the outcomes based on 12 (all of them female) patients available for examination after a mean of 11.8 years. The mean weighted PAR scores obtained in both study parts were analyzed for statistical differences using a two-tailed paired Student's t-test at a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Mean weighted PAR scores of 4.76 ± 3.94 and 3.92 ± 3.44 were obtained in the Class III extraction group and the control group, respectively, at the end of active treatment. This difference was not significant (p = 0.49). Among the 12 longitudinal patients, the mean score increased from 4 ± 3.46 at debonding to 6.25 ± 3.67 by the end of the 11.8-year follow-up period. This difference was significant (p = 0.0008). Treatment of Class III anomalies by isolated extraction of lower premolars or molars can yield PAR scores similar to those achieved by standard therapies. These scores, while increasing significantly, remained at a clinically acceptable level over 11.8 years. Hence this treatment modality--intended for cases that border on requiring orthognathic surgery--may also be recommended from a long-term point of view.

  7. Use of mini-implants to avoid maxillary surgery for Class III mandibular prognathic patient: a long-term post-retention case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Hee-Yeon; Lee, Shin-Jae; Park, Heung Sik

    2014-11-01

    Because of the potential morbidity and complications associated with surgical procedures, limiting the extent of orthognathic surgery is a desire for many orthodontic patients. An eighteen-year-old woman had a severe Class III malocclusion and required bi-maxillary surgery. By changing the patient's maxillary occlusal plane using orthodontic mini-implants, she was able to avoid the maxillary surgery; requiring only a mandibular setback surgery. To accurately predict the post-surgery outcome, we applied a new soft tissue prediction method. We were able to follow and report the long-term result of her combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment. The changes to her occlusal plane continue to appear stable over 6 years later.

  8. [Alveolar bone thickness and root length changes in the treatment of skeletal Class III patients facilitated by improved corticotomy: a cone-beam CT analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiaqi; Jiang, Jiuhui; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Li, Cuiying; Xu, Xiao

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the alveolar bone thickness and root length changes of anterior teeth with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT scans were taken for 12 skeletal Class III patients who accepted the improved corticotomy (IC) procedures during pre-surgical orthodontics. The CBCT data in T1 (the maxillary dental arch was aligned and leveled) and T2 (extraction space closure) were superimposed and the alveolar bone thickness at root apex level and root length measurements were done. From T1 to T2, the buccal alveolar bone thickness for the upper lateral incisors increased from (1.89±0.83) to (2.47±1.02) mm (Pteeth of 72 was located in Grade 1, two teeth in Grade 2, one tooth in Grade 3. The improved corticotomy had the potential to increase the buccal alveolar bone thickness and the root resorption in most teeth was in Grade 1 according to Sharpe grading system.

  9. A systematic review of systematic reviews on interventions for caregivers of people with chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corry, Margarita; While, Alison; Neenan, Kathleen; Smith, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to support caregivers of people with selected chronic conditions. Informal caregivers provide millions of care hours each week contributing to significant healthcare savings. Despite much research evaluating a range of interventions for caregivers, their impact remains unclear. A systematic review of systematic reviews of interventions to support caregivers of people with selected chronic conditions. The electronic databases of PubMed, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, PsycINFO, Social Science Index (January 1990-May 2014) and The Cochrane Library (Issue 6, June 2014), were searched using Medical Subject Heading and index term combinations of the keywords caregiver, systematic review, intervention and named chronic conditions. Papers were included if they reported a systematic review of interventions for caregivers of people with chronic conditions. The methodological quality of the included reviews was independently assessed by two reviewers using R-AMSTAR. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers using a pre-designed data extraction form. Narrative synthesis of review findings was used to present the results. Eight systematic reviews were included. There was evidence that education and support programme interventions improved caregiver quality of life. Information-giving interventions improved caregiver knowledge for stroke caregivers. Education, support and information-giving interventions warrant further investigation across caregiver groups. A large-scale funded programme for caregiver research is required to ensure that studies are of high quality to inform service development across settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Prevalence of class-I, class-II and class-III obesity in Australian adults between 1995 and 2011-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Catherine; Backholer, Kathryn; Gearon, Emma; Stevenson, Christopher; Swinburn, Boyd; Moodie, Marj; Carter, Rob; Peeters, Anna

    2015-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of class-I, II and III obesity in Australian adults between 1995, 2007-08 and 2011-12. Prevalence data for adults (aged 18+ years) were sourced from customised data from the nationally representative National Nutrition Survey (1995), the National Health Survey (2007-08), and the Australian Health Survey (2011-12) conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Obesity classifications were based on measured height and weight (class-I body mass index: 30.0-34.9 kg/m(2), class-II: 35.0-39.9 kg/m(2) and class-III: ≥ 40.0 kg/m(2)). Severe obesity was defined as class-II or class-III obesity. Between 1995 and 2011-12, the prevalence of obesity (all classes combined) increased from 19.1% to 27.2%. During this 17 year period, relative increases in class I, II and III obesity were 1.3, 1.7 and 2.2-fold respectively. In 2011-12, the prevalence of class I, II and III obesity was 19.4, 5.9 and 2.0 per cent respectively in men, and 16.1, 6.9 and 4.2 per cent respectively in women. One in every ten people was severely obese, increasing from one in twenty in 1995, and women were disproportionally represented in this population. Obesity prevalence increased with increasing levels of area-level socioeconomic disadvantage, particularly for the more severely obese classes. Severe obesity affected 6.2% and 13.4% in the least and most disadvantaged quintiles respectively. Over the last two decades, there have been substantial increases in the prevalence of obesity, particularly the more severe levels of obesity. This study highlights high risk groups who warrant targeted weight gain prevention interventions. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical evaluation of Class II and Class III gingival recession defects of maxillary posterior teeth treated with pedicled buccal fat pad: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, D; Arun Kumar, K V

    2018-01-01

    Buccal fat pad (BFP) is a specialized vascular tissue adequately present in buccal space and is close to the maxillary posterior quadrant. The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the utility of pedicled BFP (PBFP) in the treatment of Class II and III gingival recession. Ten systemically healthy patients with age ranging from 35 to 55 years with Class II and Class III gingival recession in the maxillary molars were selected. Before the surgical phase, patients were enrolled in a strict maintenance program including oral hygiene instructions and scaling and root planing. A horizontal incision of 1-1.5 cm was made in the buccal sulcus of the maxillary molar region; buccinator muscle was separated bluntly to expose the BFP. The fat was then teased out from its bed and spread to cover defects adequately. It was then secured and sutured without tension. Clinical parameters such as probing depth, recession width, recession length (RL), and width of keratinized gingiva were recorded at baseline and at 6 months postoperatively, and weekly assessment was done at 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, and after 4 weeks for observations during the postoperative healing. Treated recession defects healed successfully without any significant postoperative complications. Decreased gingival recession horizontal width values from 4.65 ± 0.4327 to 0.94 ± 1.350 and RL from 6.4 ± 1.075 to 0.7 ± 0.6750 were observed postoperatively ( P Class II and Class III gingival recession of maxillary posterior teeth.

  12. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-08-05

    The NTS is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. NNSA/NSO is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and NSTec is the Management & Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The U10C Disposal Site is located in the northwest corner of Area 9 at the NTS (Figure 1) and is located in a subsidence crater created by two underground nuclear events, one in October 1962 and another in April 1964. The disposal site opened in 1971 for the disposal of rubbish, refuse, pathological waste, asbestos-containing material, and industrial solid waste. A Notice of Intent form to operate the disposal site as a Class II site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 26, 1994, and was acknowledged in a letter to the DOE on February 8, 1994. It operated as a state of Nevada Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS) until it closed on October 5, 1995, for retrofit as a Class III SWDS. The retrofit consisted of the installation of a minimum four-foot compacted soil layer to segregate the different waste types and function as a liner to inhibit leachate and water flow into the lower waste zone. Five neutron monitoring tubes were installed in this layer to monitor possible leachate production and water activity. Upon acceptance of the installed barrier and approval of an Operating Plan by NDEP/BFF, the site reopened in January 1996 as a Class III SWDS for the disposal of industrial solid waste and other inert waste.

  13. Molecular cloning of class III chitinase gene from Avicennia marina and its expression analysis in response to cadmium and lead stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Ying; Wang, You-Shao; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Mangrove species have high tolerance to heavy metal pollution. Chitinases have been widely reported as defense proteins in response to heavy metal stress in terrestrial plants. In this study, a full-length cDNA sequence encoding an acidic and basic class III chitinase (AmCHI III) was cloned by using RT-PCR and RACE methods in Avicennia marina. AmCHI III mRNA expression in leaf of A. marina were investigated under Cd, Pb stresses on using real-time quantitative PCR. The deduced AmCHI III protein consists of 302 amino acids, including a signal putative peptide region, and a catalytic domain. Homology modeling of the catalytic domain revealed a typical molecular structure of class III plant chitinases. Results further demonstrated that the regulation of AmCHI III mRNA expression in leaves was strongly dependent on Cd, Pb stresses. AmCHI III mRNA expressions were significantly increased in response to Cd, Pb, and peaked at 7 days Cd-exposure, 7 days Pb-exposure, respectively. AmCHI III mRNA expression exhibited more sensitive to Pb stress than Cd stress. This work was the first time cloing chitinase from A. marina, and it brought evidence on chitinase gene involving in heavy metals (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) resistance or detoxification in plants. Further studies including the promoter and upstream regulation, gene over-expression and the response of mangrove chitinases to other stresses will shed more light on the role of chitinase in mangrove plants.

  14. Solar-Driven Air-Conditioning Cycles: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abu-Zour

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Most conventional cooling/refrigeration systems are driven by fossil fuel combustion, and therefore give rise to emission of environmentally damaging pollutants. In addition, many cooling systems employ refrigerants, which are also harmful to the environment in terms of their Global Warming Potential (GWP and Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP. Development of a passive or hybrid solar-driven air-conditioning system is therefore of interest as exploitation of such systems would reduce the demand for grid electricity particularly at times of peak load. This paper presents a review of various cooling cycles and summarises work carried out on solar-driven air-conditioning systems.

  15. Weak evidence supports the short-term benefits of orthopaedic treatment for Class III malocclusion in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Jian, Fan; Lai, Wenli

    2014-03-01

    Data sources The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline and Embase. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of orthodontic treatment to correct prominent lower front teeth were included. Study screening, risk of bias assessment and data extraction were carried out independently by two reviewers. The mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for continuous data. Meta-analysis was undertaken when studies of similar comparisons reported comparable outcome measures. A fixed-effect model was used. The l(2) statistic was used as a measure of statistical heterogeneity. Seven RCTs (339 patients) were included in this review. One study was assessed as at low risk of bias, three at high risk of bias and three at unclear risk. Four studies reported on the use of a facemask, two on the chin cup, one on the tandem traction bow appliance and one on mandibular headgear.One study reported on both the chin cup and mandibular headgear appliances. One study (n = 73, low quality evidence), comparing a facemask to no treatment, reported a mean difference (MD) in overjet of 4.10 mm (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.04 to 5.16; P value children is effective when compared to no treatment on a short-term basis. However, in view of the general poor quality of the included studies, these results should be viewed with caution. Further randomised controlled trials with long follow-up are required.

  16. Radioactive sodium waste treatment and conditioning. Review of main aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This publication reviews the main aspects relating to the treatment and conditioning of radioactive sodium waste. This waste arises from the operation of liquid metal fast reactors (LMFRs). In this type of reactor, sodium (Na) or sodium-potassium alloys (NaK) are used as a low-effect neutron moderating coolant medium for extracting and transferring thermal energy from the core and they represent a significant technical and safety challenge during operation and decommissioning. This publication provides the reader with technologically oriented information on the present status of sodium waste management approaches and recent achievements related to treatment and conditioning, with the objective of facilitating planning and preparatory work for the decommissioning of LMFRs. This publication provides a comprehensive review of the hazards associated with sodium waste management. Given the large quantities of sodium waste arising during decommissioning or reactor refurbishment, as well as the challenges and varied techniques associated with removal of 100% of all sodium and NaK bulk quantities and residues during decommissioning, a hazards review and analysis is a critical component in planning the dismantling and waste management activities. Roughly half of this publication focuses on sodium waste generating, handling and treatment processes. This includes draining sodium and NaK from plant systems; in situ treatment of residual sodium; cutting techniques for pumps, valves, piping and other components; cleaning of components; potential reuse of sodium; and removal of selected radionuclides from sodium waste with the objective of reducing the waste classification or converting it to exempt waste. The focus is on proven techniques and technologies, and each discussed method includes a review of the associated principle or theory, practical applications, advantages and disadvantages, limitations, industry experience, and final waste products. A review is provided of final

  17. Classical Conditioning Differences Associated With Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, Daniel S; Moseley, G Lorimer; Hillier, Susan L; Meulders, Ann

    2017-08-01

    Prominent clinical models of chronic pain propose a fundamental role of classical conditioning in the development of pain-related disability. If classical conditioning is key to this process, then people with chronic pain may show a different response to pain-related conditioned stimuli than healthy control subjects. We set out to determine whether this is the case by undertaking a comprehensive and systematic review of the literature. To identify studies comparing classical conditioning between people with chronic pain and healthy control subjects, the databases MEDLINE, PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, Scopus, and CINAHL were searched using key words and medical subject headings consistent with 'classical conditioning' and 'pain.' Articles were included when: 1) pain-free control and chronic pain groups were included, and 2) a differential classical conditioning design was used. The systematic search revealed 7 studies investigating differences in classical conditioning between people with chronic pain and healthy control participants. The included studies involved a total of 129 people with chronic pain (fibromyalgia syndrome, spinal pain, hand pain, irritable bowel syndrome), and 104 healthy control participants. Outcomes included indices of pain-related conditioning such as unconditioned stimulus (US) expectancy and contingency awareness, self-report and physiological measures of pain-related fear, evaluative judgements of conditioned stimulus pleasantness, and muscular and cortical responses. Because of variability in outcomes, meta-analyses included a maximum of 4 studies. People with chronic pain tended to show reduced differential learning and flatter generalization gradients with respect to US expectancy and fear-potentiated eyeblink startle responses. Some studies showed a propensity for greater muscular responses and perceptions of unpleasantness in response to pain-associated cues, relative to control cues. The review revealed preliminary evidence that people

  18. Phoning while driving II: a review of driving conditions influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, C; Guillot, A; Petit, C

    2010-05-01

    The first paper examined how the variables related to driving performance were impacted by the management of holding a phone conversation. However, the conditions under which this dual task is carried out are dependent upon a set of factors that may particularly influence the risk of crash. These conditions are defined by several independent variables, classified into five main categories: i) legislation; ii) phone type (hands-free or hand-held); iii) drivers' features regarding age, gender, personal individual profile and driving experience; iv) conversation content (casual or professional) and its context (held with passengers or with a cell (mobile) phone); v) driving conditions (actual or simulated driving, road type, traffic density and weather). These independent variables determine the general conditions. The way in which these factors are combined and interact one with another thus determines the risk that drivers undergo when a cell phone is used while driving. Finally, this review defined the general conditions of driving for which managing a phone conversation is likely to elicit a high risk of car crash or, conversely, may provide a situation of lower risk, with sufficient acceptance to ensure safety.

  19. Biology of biomechanics: Finite element analysis of a statically determinate system to rotate the occlusal plane for correction of a skeletal Class III open-bite malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W Eugene; Viecilli, Rodrigo F; Chang, Chris; Katona, Thomas R; Paydar, Nasser H

    2015-12-01

    In the absence of adequate animal or in-vitro models, the biomechanics of human malocclusion must be studied indirectly. Finite element analysis (FEA) is emerging as a clinical technology to assist in diagnosis, treatment planning, and retrospective analysis. The hypothesis tested is that instantaneous FEA can retrospectively simulate long-term mandibular arch retraction and occlusal plane rotation for the correction of a skeletal Class III malocclusion. Seventeen published case reports were selected of patients treated with statically determinate mechanics using posterior mandible or infrazygomatic crest bone screw anchorage to retract the mandibular arch. Two-dimensional measurements were made for incisor and molar movements, mandibular arch rotation, and retraction relative to the maxillary arch. A patient with cone-beam computed tomography imaging was selected for a retrospective FEA. The mean age for the sample was 23.3 ± 3.3 years; there were 7 men and 10 women. Mean incisor movements were 3.35 ± 1.55 mm of retraction and 2.18 ± 2.51 mm of extrusion. Corresponding molar movements were retractions of 4.85 ± 1.78 mm and intrusions of 0.85 ± 2.22 mm. Retraction of the mandibular arch relative to the maxillary arch was 4.88 ± 1.41 mm. Mean posterior rotation of the mandibular arch was -5.76° ± 4.77° (counterclockwise). The mean treatment time (n = 16) was 36.2 ± 15.3 months. Bone screws in the posterior mandibular region were more efficient for intruding molars and decreasing the vertical dimension of the occlusion to close an open bite. The full-cusp, skeletal Class III patient selected for FEA was treated to an American Board of Orthodontics Cast-Radiograph Evaluation score of 24 points in about 36 months by en-masse retraction and posterior rotation of the mandibular arch: the bilateral load on the mandibular segment was about 200 cN. The mandibular arch was retracted by about 5 mm, posterior rotation was about 16.5°, and molar intrusion was about 3

  20. 78 FR 68905 - Agency Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... Number: 2900-NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New data... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration...- NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER...

  1. 78 FR 68908 - Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ...: 2900--NEW (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New data collection... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration...-- NEW (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER...

  2. In vitro Comparative Evaluation of Various Restorative Materials used for restoring Class III Cavities in Deciduous Anterior Teeth: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyank, Harsh; Verma, Ankita; Gupta, Komal; Chaudhary, Esha; Khandelwal, Deepak; Nihalani, Shweta

    2016-12-01

    Beauty standards in today's modernized world scenario are formed by well-aligned and well-designed bright white teeth. One of the major reasons behind patients reporting to dental clinics is pain. Caries in the anterior primary teeth forms one of the major concerns from a restorative point of view. Very few studies are quoted in literature which stresses on the follow-up of anterior restorations in primary teeth. Hence, we evaluated and compared the efficacy of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RGIC) for class III restorations in primary anterior teeth. The present study was conducted in the pediatric dental wing and included a total of 80 patients aged 3 to 5½ years who reported with the chief complaint of carious lesions in the primary anterior teeth. Patients having minimal of a pair of similar appearing small carious lesions on the same proximal surfaces of the deciduous maxillary incisors were included for the study. All the patients were randomly divided into two groups: One in which RGIC restoration was done and other in which composite restoration was done. Cavity preparation was done and filling of the cavity with the restorative materials was carried out. Assessment of the restorations was done at 4, 8, and 12 months time following criteria given by Ryge et al. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Mann-Whitney test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to evaluate the level of significance; p value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. For composite and RGIC restorations, the mean score for anatomic shape was 1.21 and 1.10 respectively. While comparing the clinical parameters, nonsignificant results were obtained between composite and RGIC restorative materials at 4-, 8-, and 12-month interval. On comparing the clinical parameters for individual restorative materials at different time intervals, statistically significant results were obtained only for

  3. Frontal soft tissue analysis using a 3 dimensional camera following two-jaw rotational orthognathic surgery in skeletal class III patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Woo; Lee, Jang Yeol; Oh, Tae-Suk; Kwon, Soon Man; Yang, Sung Joon; Koh, Kyung Suk

    2014-04-01

    Although two dimensional cephalometry is the standard method for analyzing the results of orthognathic surgery, it has potential limits in frontal soft tissue analysis. We have utilized a 3 dimensional camera to examine changes in soft tissue landmarks in patients with skeletal class III dentofacial deformity who underwent two-jaw rotational setback surgery. We assessed 25 consecutive Asian patients (mean age, 22 years; range, 17-32 years) with skeletal class III dentofacial deformities who underwent two-jaw rotational surgery without maxillary advancement. Using a 3D camera, we analyzed changes in facial proportions, including vertical and horizontal dimensions, facial surface areas, nose profile, lip contour, and soft tissue cheek convexity, as well as landmarks related to facial symmetry. The average mandibular setback was 10.7 mm (range: 5-17 mm). The average SNA changed from 77.4° to 77.8°, the average SNB from 89.2° to 81.1°, and the average occlusal plane from 8.7° to 11.4°. The mid third vertical dimension changed from 58.8 mm to 57.8 mm (p = 0.059), and the lower third vertical dimension changed from 70.4 mm to 68.2 mm (p = 0.0006). The average bigonial width decreased from 113.5 mm to 109.2 mm (p = 0.0028), the alar width increased from 34.7 mm to 36.1 mm (p-value = 0.0002), and lip length was unchanged. Mean mid and lower facial surface areas decreased significantly, from 171.8 cm(2) to 166.2 cm(2) (p = 0.026) and from 71.23 cm(2) to 61.9 cm(2) (p analysis for orthognathic surgery, and enabled quantitative analysis of changes in frontal soft tissue landmarks and facial proportions that were not possible with conventional 2D cephalometric analysis. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Verificação da atividade condilar em pacientes com padrão esquelético classe III por intermédio da cintilografia óssea Skeletal scintigraphy for assessment of condylar uptake in class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Perales Bittencourt

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Utilizar a cintilografia óssea facial para identificar o crescimento esquelético mandibular, através do metabolismo ósseo condilar de indivíduos com crescimento craniofacial equilibrado, e compará-lo à atividade condilar daqueles com crescimento mandibular excessivo. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Quarenta e sete indivíduos, de ambos os sexos, entre 18 e 28 anos de idade, foram divididos em grupo controle - classe I (n = 13 - e grupo caso - classe III (n = 34. As imagens foram obtidas duas horas após injeção intravenosa de 200 µCi/kg de 99mTc-MDP. Foram realizadas incidências laterais do crânio e posterior da coluna lombar e a taxa de contagem foi determinada pela obtenção da média de contagem dos côndilos e da quarta vértebra lombar utilizando 300.000 contagens. RESULTADOS: Não foram encontradas captações condilares assimétricas em ambos os grupos, e apesar da ausência de significância estatística, os valores médios de captação condilar foram maiores no grupo caso. CONCLUSÃO: A média de captação aumentada indicou maior metabolismo ósseo condilar nos indivíduos classe III, sugerindo um provável crescimento mandibular residual. Mais estudos estão sendo realizados para aumentar esta amostragem.OBJECTIVE: To use skeletal scintigraphy to detect mandibular growth through the analysis of bone metabolism in individuals with normal craniofacial growth, and to compare the findings with those seen in individuals with excessive craniofacial growth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-seven male and female patients between 18 to 28 years of age were divided in two groups - class I, control (n = 13, and class III, case (n = 34. Images were obtained two hours after intravenous injection of 99mTc-MDP (200 µCi/kg. Right and left side views of the mandible were obtained as well as a posterior view of the lumbar spine. The count rate was determined by the mean values of the count of the condyles and of the fourth lumbar vertebra

  5. Osteopathic manipulative treatment for pediatric conditions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, Paul; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ernst, Edzard

    2013-07-01

    Most osteopaths are trained in pediatric care, and osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) is available for many pediatric conditions. The objective of this systematic review was to critically evaluate the effectiveness of OMT as a treatment of pediatric conditions. Eleven databases were searched from their respective inceptions to November 2012. Only randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included, if they tested OMT against any type of control in pediatric patients. Study quality was critically appraised by using the Cochrane criteria. Seventeen trials met the inclusion criteria. Five RCTs were of high methodological quality. Of those, 1 favored OMT, whereas 4 revealed no effect compared with various control interventions. Replications by independent researchers were available for 2 conditions only, and both failed to confirm the findings of the previous studies. Seven RCTs suggested that OMT leads to a significantly greater reduction in the symptoms of asthma, congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (posttreatment), daily weight gain and length of hospital stay, dysfunctional voiding, infantile colic, otitis media, or postural asymmetry compared with various control interventions. Seven RCTs indicated that OMT had no effect on the symptoms of asthma, cerebral palsy, idiopathic scoliosis, obstructive apnea, otitis media, or temporomandibular disorders compared with various control interventions. Three RCTs did not perform between-group comparisons. The majority of the included RCTs did not report the incidence rates of adverse effects. The evidence of the effectiveness of OMT for pediatric conditions remains unproven due to the paucity and low methodological quality of the primary studies.

  6. A Review: The Probiotic Bacteria Viability under Different Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Florina CALINOIU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review summarized the current knowledge on probiotics and on the effects that different conditions have under this type of bacteria. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the survival rate/resistance or viability of different probiotic bacteria under several conditions, such as: processing, food composition, storage, freezing, thawing, refrigeration, temperature, oxygen, pH, gastrointestinal environment and package. Nowadays, the demand on probiotic functional foods is increasing rapidly, as the consumers became more aware about the potential health benefits, due to the fact that probiotics help in maintaining the balance and composition of intestinal flora and protect it from pathogens. A daily ingestion of 108–109 CFU ml−1 probiotic microorganisms is crucial in order to be able to demonstrate an effect in our organism, considering the dose and the effect of storage/gastrointestinal environments on the probiotic viability. Microencapsulation of probiotics in different polysaccharides was proven to be an ideal way to preserve and protect the cells from detrimental factors during processing, storage or resistance in the gastrointestinal transit, as many studies demonstrate it. There is a general interest in the improvement of the physical and mechanical stability of the polymers used in probiotics encapsulation, to ensure high population of probiotics not only in food during storage, but also after gastrointestinal digestion. Also, the carrier plays a very important role and should be carefully examined.

  7. Reliability of conditioned pain modulation: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Donna L.; Kemp, Harriet I.; Ridout, Deborah; Yarnitsky, David; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A systematic literature review was undertaken to determine if conditioned pain modulation (CPM) is reliable. Longitudinal, English language observational studies of the repeatability of a CPM test paradigm in adult humans were included. Two independent reviewers assessed the risk of bias in 6 domains; study participation; study attrition; prognostic factor measurement; outcome measurement; confounding and analysis using the Quality in Prognosis Studies (QUIPS) critical assessment tool. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) less than 0.4 were considered to be poor; 0.4 and 0.59 to be fair; 0.6 and 0.75 good and greater than 0.75 excellent. Ten studies were included in the final review. Meta-analysis was not appropriate because of differences between studies. The intersession reliability of the CPM effect was investigated in 8 studies and reported as good (ICC = 0.6-0.75) in 3 studies and excellent (ICC > 0.75) in subgroups in 2 of those 3. The assessment of risk of bias demonstrated that reporting is not comprehensive for the description of sample demographics, recruitment strategy, and study attrition. The absence of blinding, a lack of control for confounding factors, and lack of standardisation in statistical analysis are common. Conditioned pain modulation is a reliable measure; however, the degree of reliability is heavily dependent on stimulation parameters and study methodology and this warrants consideration for investigators. The validation of CPM as a robust prognostic factor in experimental and clinical pain studies may be facilitated by improvements in the reporting of CPM reliability studies. PMID:27559835

  8. Failure of resin ionomers in the retention of multi-rooted teeth with Class III furcation involvement: a rebuttal case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, E B; Breault, L G

    2001-08-01

    Severe periodontal furcation invasion has long been a treatment dilemma for the clinician. Many techniques have been advocated in the treatment of multi-rooted posterior teeth ranging from conventional scaling and root planing (SRP), apically positioned flaps, root amputations, root resections, tunnel procedures, guided tissue regeneration, and restorations. The keys to success depend on the clinician's ability to access the furcation to remove local factors and create an environment that enhances the patient's own hygiene efforts. Long-term success in treating teeth with furcation invasion depends upon tooth retention and arresting the destructive processes within the furcation area. A Class III furcation invasion in a mandibular molar was treated by surgical access for SRP along with obliterating the furcation utilizing a resin ionomer restoration. Initially, the patient was asymptomatic. Within 3 months of treatment, the patient presented with suppuration that was refractory to local efforts. Radiographs taken only 5 months postsurgery demonstrated advanced bone loss apical to the restoration. The tooth ultimately was extracted because mobility increased and the tooth became symptomatic. The clinician must consider the multi-factorial etiology of periodontal breakdown within a furcation. For this patient, the technique of sealing off the exposed furcation with restorative material appeared to have resulted in progressive bone loss and accelerate tooth loss. This single case report is presented as a rebuttal to recently published articles, which have demonstrated excellent results when treating furcations with ionomer restorations.

  9. Expression and characterization of a class III alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Gluconobacter frateurii in the presence of methanol during glyceric acid production from glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shun; Morita, Naoki; Kitamoto, Dai; Habe, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Some acetic acid bacteria have been shown to produce large amounts of glyceric acid (GA) from glycerol, which is a by-product of biodiesel fuel (BDF) production. Previously, a Gluconobacter strain was found that produced decreased amounts of GA from glycerol in the presence of methanol, a major ingredient of raw glycerol derived from the BDF industry. Thus, a comparative transcriptome analysis of Gluconobacter frateurii NBRC103465 was performed to investigate changes in gene expression during GA production from glycerol in the presence of methanol. Cells grown with methanol showed upregulated expression of a class III alcohol dehydrogenase homolog (adhC(Gf)) and decreased GA production. adhC(Gf) was cloned and expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli, and the presence of an additional protein with an approximate molecular mass of 39 kDa in the cytosol of the recombinant E. coli cells was identified by SDS-PAGE. Activity measurements of the cytosol revealed that the translational product of adhC(Gf) exhibited formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and glutathione. Gluconobacter frateurii cells grown in 1% methanol-containing glycerol were found to have fivefold higher formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity than cells grown without methanol, suggesting that adhC(Gf) in G. frateurii cells functions in the dissimilation of methanol-derived formaldehyde.

  10. The Use of Invisalign® System in the Management of the Orthodontic Treatment before and after Class III Surgical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Renato; Signorino, Fabrizio; Poli, Pier Paolo; Manzini, Pietro; Panisi, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The approach to skeletal dysmorphisms in the maxillofacial area usually requires an orthodontic treatment by means of fixed appliances, both before and after the surgical phase. Since its introduction, Invisalign system has become a popular treatment choice for the clinicians because of the aesthetics and comfort of the removable clear aligners compared with the traditional appliances. Therefore, the aim of the present report was to illustrate the management of a malocclusion by means of Invisalign system associated with the traditional surgical technique. The present paper shows a case of a 23-year-old male patient characterized by a Class III malocclusion with lateral deviation of the mandible to the left side and cross-bite on teeth 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4. Invisalign system was used during the pre- and postsurgical phases rather than fixed appliances. The posttreatment cephalometric analysis emphasized the stability of the dental and skeletal symmetry corrections, occlusion and functional balance, over a 6-year follow-up. The results achieved at the end of the treatment showed how Invisalign can be effective in the management of the orthodontic phases in orthognathic surgery. The follow-up after 6 years emphasizes the stability of the treatment over time.

  11. The Use of Invisalign® System in the Management of the Orthodontic Treatment before and after Class III Surgical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Pagani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The approach to skeletal dysmorphisms in the maxillofacial area usually requires an orthodontic treatment by means of fixed appliances, both before and after the surgical phase. Since its introduction, Invisalign system has become a popular treatment choice for the clinicians because of the aesthetics and comfort of the removable clear aligners compared with the traditional appliances. Therefore, the aim of the present report was to illustrate the management of a malocclusion by means of Invisalign system associated with the traditional surgical technique. The present paper shows a case of a 23-year-old male patient characterized by a Class III malocclusion with lateral deviation of the mandible to the left side and cross-bite on teeth 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4. Invisalign system was used during the pre- and postsurgical phases rather than fixed appliances. The posttreatment cephalometric analysis emphasized the stability of the dental and skeletal symmetry corrections, occlusion and functional balance, over a 6-year follow-up. The results achieved at the end of the treatment showed how Invisalign can be effective in the management of the orthodontic phases in orthognathic surgery. The follow-up after 6 years emphasizes the stability of the treatment over time.

  12. Skin irritation from a facial mask in Class III malocclusion: evaluation of individual silicone chin cups in a group of 100 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardo, Gaetano; Luzzi, Valeria; Vozza, Iole; Polimeni, Antonella; Bossù, Maurizio

    2018-04-01

    Reverse headgear (a facial mask) is one of the most frequently used interceptive orthodontic devices in patients with Class III malocclusion. It is a simple device but may present some drawbacks related to pressure on the skin generated by the forehead and chin supports linked to the maxillary intraoral appliance by elastics. This can cause injury to the chin and lips. Patients between 7 and 8 years of age were selected from the Unit of Pediatric Dentistry. Orthopedic therapy with a rapid palatal expander and reverse headgear was prescribed for all subjects. The patients were divided into two groups: those who used a facial mask without a silicone chin cup and those who used a facial mask with a silicone chin cup. Two-hundred subjects including 90 male patients and 110 female patients were enrolled. The groups that used a facial mask with and without a silicone chin cup included 100 patients each. The percentage of subjects without irritation was significantly greater in the group with a silicone chin cup than in the group without a silicone chin cup. The authors propose a simple and effective solution to prevent skin irritation on the chin caused by a facial mask. A chin mask is a custom solution that can prevent injury to the chin during treatment when coupled with facial mask therapy.

  13. Foot Conditions among Homeless Persons: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Matthew J.; Brothers, Thomas D.; Van Zoost, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Foot problems are common among homeless persons, but are often overlooked. The objectives of this systematic review are to summarize what is known about foot conditions and associated interventions among homeless persons. Methods A literature search was conducted on MEDLINE (1966–2016), EMBASE (1947–2016), and CINAHL (1982–2016) and complemented by manual searches of reference lists. Articles that described foot conditions in homeless persons or associated interventions were included. Data were independently extracted on: general study characteristics; participants; foot assessment methods; foot conditions and associated interventions; study findings; quality score assessed using the Downs and Black checklist. Results Of 333 articles screened, 17 articles met criteria and were included in the study. Prevalence of any foot problem ranged from 9% to 65% across study populations. Common foot-related concerns were corns and calluses, nail pathologies, and infections. Foot pathologies related to chronic diseases such as diabetes were identified. Compared to housed individuals across studies, homeless individuals were more likely to have foot problems including tinea pedis, foot pain, functional limitations with walking, and improperly-fitting shoes. Discussion Foot conditions were highly prevalent among homeless individuals with up to two thirds reporting a foot health concern, approximately one quarter of individuals visiting a health professional, and one fifth of individuals requiring further follow-up due to the severity of their condition. Homeless individuals often had inadequate foot hygiene practices and improperly-fitting shoes. These findings have service provision and public health implications, highlighting the need for evidence-based interventions to improve foot health in this population. An effective interventional approach could include optimization of foot hygiene and footwear, provision of comprehensive medical treatment, and

  14. Foot Conditions among Homeless Persons: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Matthew J; Brothers, Thomas D; Van Zoost, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Foot problems are common among homeless persons, but are often overlooked. The objectives of this systematic review are to summarize what is known about foot conditions and associated interventions among homeless persons. A literature search was conducted on MEDLINE (1966-2016), EMBASE (1947-2016), and CINAHL (1982-2016) and complemented by manual searches of reference lists. Articles that described foot conditions in homeless persons or associated interventions were included. Data were independently extracted on: general study characteristics; participants; foot assessment methods; foot conditions and associated interventions; study findings; quality score assessed using the Downs and Black checklist. Of 333 articles screened, 17 articles met criteria and were included in the study. Prevalence of any foot problem ranged from 9% to 65% across study populations. Common foot-related concerns were corns and calluses, nail pathologies, and infections. Foot pathologies related to chronic diseases such as diabetes were identified. Compared to housed individuals across studies, homeless individuals were more likely to have foot problems including tinea pedis, foot pain, functional limitations with walking, and improperly-fitting shoes. Foot conditions were highly prevalent among homeless individuals with up to two thirds reporting a foot health concern, approximately one quarter of individuals visiting a health professional, and one fifth of individuals requiring further follow-up due to the severity of their condition. Homeless individuals often had inadequate foot hygiene practices and improperly-fitting shoes. These findings have service provision and public health implications, highlighting the need for evidence-based interventions to improve foot health in this population. An effective interventional approach could include optimization of foot hygiene and footwear, provision of comprehensive medical treatment, and addressing social factors that lead to increased risk

  15. Body mass index and the visceral adipose tissue expression of IL-6 and TNF-alpha are associated with the morphological severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in individuals with class III obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Antônio Sérgio Barcala; Andrade, João Marcus Oliveira; Paraíso, Alanna Fernandes; Jorge, Gislaine Candida Batista; Silveira, Christine Mendes; de Souza, Ludmilla Regina; Santos, Erivelton Pereira; Guimaraes, André Luiz Sena; Santos, Sérgio Henrique Sousa; De-Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista

    To analyze the mRNA expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the liver and white adipose tissue samples of individuals with class III obesity (body mass index ≥40.0kg/m 2 ) with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This cross-sectional study included patients with class III obesity exhibiting early or late morphological presentation of NAFLD (non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis [NAFL], n=8 and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH], n=13, respectively). All patients underwent bariatric surgery and peripheral blood, liver, and visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) samples were collected. Socio-demographic, anthropometric, clinical, plasma biochemical, and nutritional characteristics of each study subject were assessed and compared between patients presenting with NAFL and NASH. IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression in the liver and WAT samples were measured by using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Individuals with class III obesity and NASH showed higher body mass index (BMI) and higher IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression in the WAT compared to that of patients with NAFL (p=0.01, for all associations). Individuals with class III obesity with higher morphological severity of NAFLD exhibited higher BMI and higher IL-6 and TNF-α expression in the WAT. Future prospective studies are warranted to determine how BMI, IL-6, and TNF-α affect the progression of NAFLD in individuals with class III obesity. Copyright © 2016 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic studies of human neuropathic pain conditions: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorina-Lichtenwalter, Katerina; Parisien, Marc; Diatchenko, Luda

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Numerous studies have shown associations between genetic variants and neuropathic pain disorders. Rare monogenic disorders are caused by mutations of substantial effect size in a single gene, whereas common disorders are likely to have a contribution from multiple genetic variants of mild effect size, representing different biological pathways. In this review, we survey the reported genetic contributors to neuropathic pain and submit them for validation in a 150,000-participant sample of the U.K. Biobank cohort. Successfully replicated association with a neuropathic pain construct for 2 variants in IL10 underscores the importance of neuroimmune interactions, whereas genome-wide significant association with low back pain (P = 1.3e-8) and false discovery rate 5% significant associations with hip, knee, and neck pain for variant rs7734804 upstream of the MAT2B gene provide evidence of shared contributing mechanisms to overlapping pain conditions at the molecular genetic level. PMID:29240606

  17. Surface and subsurface conditions in permafrost areas - a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidstrand, Patrik

    2003-02-01

    This report contains a summary of some of the information within existing technical and scientific literature on permafrost. Permafrost is viewed as one of the future climate driven process domains that may exist in Scandinavia, and that may give rise to significantly different surface and subsurface conditions than the present. Except for changes in the biosphere, permafrost may impact hydraulic, mechanical, and chemical subsurface processes and conditions. Permafrost and its influences on the subsurface conditions are thus of interest for the performance and safety assessments of deep geological waste repositories. The definition of permafrost is 'ground that stays at or below 0 deg C for at least two consecutive years'. Permafrost will effect the geological subsurface to some depth. How deep the permafrost may grow is a function of the heat balance, thermal conditions at the surface and within the ground, and the geothermal heat flux from the Earth's inner parts. The main chapters of the report summaries the knowledge on permafrost evolution, occurrence and distribution, and extracts information concerning hydrology and mechanical and chemical impacts due to permafrost related conditions. The results of a literature review are always dependent on the available literature. Concerning permafrost there is some literature available from investigations in the field of long-term repositories and some from mining industries. However, reports of these investigations are few and the bulk of permafrost literature comes from the science departments concerned with surficial processes (e.g. geomorphology, hydrology, agriculture, etc) and from engineering concerns, such as foundation of constructions and pipeline design. This focus within the permafrost research inevitably yields a biased but also an abundant amount of information on localised surficial processes and a limited amount on regional and deep permafrost characteristics. Possible conclusions are that there is

  18. Surface and subsurface conditions in permafrost areas - a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidstrand, Patrik [Bergab, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2003-02-01

    This report contains a summary of some of the information within existing technical and scientific literature on permafrost. Permafrost is viewed as one of the future climate driven process domains that may exist in Scandinavia, and that may give rise to significantly different surface and subsurface conditions than the present. Except for changes in the biosphere, permafrost may impact hydraulic, mechanical, and chemical subsurface processes and conditions. Permafrost and its influences on the subsurface conditions are thus of interest for the performance and safety assessments of deep geological waste repositories. The definition of permafrost is 'ground that stays at or below 0 deg C for at least two consecutive years'. Permafrost will effect the geological subsurface to some depth. How deep the permafrost may grow is a function of the heat balance, thermal conditions at the surface and within the ground, and the geothermal heat flux from the Earth's inner parts. The main chapters of the report summaries the knowledge on permafrost evolution, occurrence and distribution, and extracts information concerning hydrology and mechanical and chemical impacts due to permafrost related conditions. The results of a literature review are always dependent on the available literature. Concerning permafrost there is some literature available from investigations in the field of long-term repositories and some from mining industries. However, reports of these investigations are few and the bulk of permafrost literature comes from the science departments concerned with surficial processes (e.g. geomorphology, hydrology, agriculture, etc) and from engineering concerns, such as foundation of constructions and pipeline design. This focus within the permafrost research inevitably yields a biased but also an abundant amount of information on localised surficial processes and a limited amount on regional and deep permafrost characteristics. Possible conclusions are that

  19. Review of common conditions associated with periodontal ligament widening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review a group of lesions associated with periodontal ligament (PDL) widening. An electronic search was performed using specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, and Scopus to find relevant studies by using keywords such as “periodontium”, “periodontal ligament”, “periodontal ligament space”, “widened periodontal ligament”, and “periodontal ligament widening”. Out of nearly 200 articles, about 60 were broadly relevant to the topic. Ultimately, 47 articles closely related to the topic of interest were reviewed. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 entities were identified: occlusal/orthodontic trauma, periodontal disease/periodontitis, pulpo-periapical lesions, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, progressive systemic sclerosis, radiation-induced bone defect, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis, and osteomyelitis. Although PDL widening may be encountered by many dentists during their routine daily procedures, the clinician should consider some serious related conditions as well

  20. Review of common conditions associated with periodontal ligament widening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam [Dept. of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this article is to review a group of lesions associated with periodontal ligament (PDL) widening. An electronic search was performed using specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, and Scopus to find relevant studies by using keywords such as “periodontium”, “periodontal ligament”, “periodontal ligament space”, “widened periodontal ligament”, and “periodontal ligament widening”. Out of nearly 200 articles, about 60 were broadly relevant to the topic. Ultimately, 47 articles closely related to the topic of interest were reviewed. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 entities were identified: occlusal/orthodontic trauma, periodontal disease/periodontitis, pulpo-periapical lesions, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, progressive systemic sclerosis, radiation-induced bone defect, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis, and osteomyelitis. Although PDL widening may be encountered by many dentists during their routine daily procedures, the clinician should consider some serious related conditions as well.

  1. Análise da deflexão, do comprimento anterior e posterior da base do crânio, em indivíduos dolicofaciais, com má oclusão de Classe III esquelética Analysis of deflection, anterior and posterior length of cranial base in dolichofacial individuals, with skeletal Class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antonio Gonçalves

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar três grandezas cefalométricas: S-N.S-Ar (ângulo sela, S-N e S-Ar, segundo a análise de Jarabak. METODOLOGIA: foram utilizadas telerradiografias cefalométricas em norma lateral de 12 indivíduos dolicofaciais com má oclusão esquelética de Classe III, sendo seis indivíduos do gênero masculino e seis do gênero feminino, com média de idade de 27,2 anos. Os resultados foram comparados com os intervalos considerados normais para cada grandeza. Para a análise estatística foi utilizado o teste t de Student, com nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: embora os resultados não apresentassem diferenças estaticamente significantes, mostraram uma tendência de valores mais baixos que o intervalo considerado normal, para o ângulo sela e para S-N.AIM: to evaluate three cephalometric measures: S-N.S-Ar, S-N and S-Ar, according to Jarabak's analysis. METHODS: using cephalometric teleradiographies in a lateral pattern in 12 dolichofacial individuals with skeletal Class III malocclusion, being six individuals of male gender and six of female gender, having a mean age of 27,2 years. The results have been compared to the intervals considered normal for each measure. For the statistical analysis, it was used the Student's "t" test, with a significance level set on 5%. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: although the results would have not showed statistically significant differences, S-N.S-Ar and S-N have showed a trend of more low values than the interval considered normal.

  2. Estudo cefalométrico das características tegumentares de pacientes com má oclusão de Classe III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Marques Ferreira

    Full Text Available Introdução: A má oclusão de Classe III é uma discrepância anteroposterior, que pode ser caracterizada por crescimento mandibular excessivo e/ou retrusão maxilar. Objetivo: Avaliar as características tegumentares de pacientes Classe III na cidade de Mossoró, Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, além de apontar se há associação entre as variáveis cefalométricas e o gênero. Material e método: Foi selecionada uma amostra retrospectiva de 52 telerradiografias em norma lateral de indivíduos adultos, com perfil facial côncavo e valores de ANB e AOBO negativos. As telerradiografias selecionadas foram analisadas no programa Radiocef Studio 2. Posteriormente, realizou-se uma análise descritiva das variáveis, calculando-se média, desvio-padrão, mínimo e máximo. O teste t para dados independentes foi utilizado para detectar diferenças entre os gêneros. Resultado: O perfil facial apresentou valor médio de 176,9°±5,9; o ângulo nasolabial, 91,9°±13,1; o sulco mentolabial, 137,9°±13,3, e a projeção nasal, 16,2 mm±4,5. Os terços faciais superior e inferior apresentaram as seguintes médias: 60,7 mm±14,3 e 70,5 mm±19. Para as espessuras labiais superior e inferior, obtiveram-se as médias 13,4 mm±5,1 e 13,9 mm±4,8, respectivamente. A protrusão labial superior revelou como média 3,3 mm±2,7 e a inferior, 4 mm±3,1. Conclusão: As principais características cefalométricas encontradas foram: perfil facial côncavo; ângulo nasolabial normal; sulco mentolabial pouco profundo e projeção nasal normal. Quanto aos terços faciais, apenas o inferior apresentou-se aumentado. Ambos os lábios mostraram-se espessos, mas somente o inferior revelou-se protruso. Tais características não foram diferentes entre os gêneros e demonstraram maior participação mandibular no perfil. Porém, para melhor conhecimento do tema, são necessários mais estudos, com amostras maiores e desenhos metodológicos mais sofisticados.

  3. Foot-and-mouth disease virus induces autophagosomes during cell entry via a class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Stephen; Brooks, Elizabeth; Burman, Alison; Hawes, Philippa; Roberts, Rebecca; Netherton, Christopher; Monaghan, Paul; Whelband, Matthew; Cottam, Eleanor; Elazar, Zvulun; Jackson, Terry; Wileman, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular pathway that can contribute to innate antiviral immunity by delivering viruses to lysosomes for degradation or can be beneficial for viruses by providing specialized membranes for virus replication. Here, we show that the picornavirus foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) induces the formation of autophagosomes. Induction was dependent on Atg5, involved processing of LC3 to LC3II, and led to a redistribution of LC3 from the cytosol to punctate vesicles indicative of authentic autophagosomes. Furthermore, FMDV yields were reduced in cells lacking Atg5, suggesting that autophagy may facilitate FMDV infection. However, induction of autophagosomes by FMDV appeared to differ from starvation, as the generation of LC3 punctae was not inhibited by wortmannin, implying that FMDV-induced autophagosome formation does not require the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) activity of vps34. Unlike other picornaviruses, for which there is strong evidence that autophagosome formation is linked to expression of viral nonstructural proteins, FMDV induced autophagosomes very early during infection. Furthermore, autophagosomes could be triggered by either UV-inactivated virus or empty FMDV capsids, suggesting that autophagosome formation was activated during cell entry. Unlike other picornaviruses, FMDV-induced autophagosomes did not colocalize with the viral 3A or 3D protein. In contrast, ∼50% of the autophagosomes induced by FMDV colocalized with VP1. LC3 and VP1 also colocalized with the cellular adaptor protein p62, which normally targets ubiquitinated proteins to autophagosomes. These results suggest that FMDV induces autophagosomes during cell entry to facilitate infection, but not to provide membranes for replication.

  4. Class III PI3K Positively Regulates Platelet Activation and Thrombosis via PI(3)P-Directed Function of NADPH Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Hu, Mengjiao; Luo, Dongjiao; Yue, Ming; Wang, Shuai; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Yangfan; Wang, Yi; Cai, Yanchun; Hu, Xiaolan; Ke, Yuehai; Yang, Zhongzhou; Hu, Hu

    2017-11-01

    Class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase, also known as VPS34 (vacuolar protein sorting 34), is a highly conserved enzyme regulating important cellular functions such as NADPH oxidase (NOX) assembly, membrane trafficking, and autophagy. Although VPS34 is expressed in platelets, its involvement in platelet activation remains unclear. Herein, we investigated the role of VPS34 in platelet activation and thrombus formation using VPS34 knockout mice. Platelet-specific VPS34-deficient mice were generated and characterized. VPS34 deficiency in platelets did not influence tail bleeding time. In a ferric chloride-induced mesenteric arteriolar thrombosis model, VPS34 -/- mice exhibited a prolonged vessel occlusion time compared with wild-type mice (42.05±4.09 versus 18.30±2.47 minutes). In an in vitro microfluidic whole-blood perfusion assay, thrombus formation on collagen under arterial shear was significantly reduced for VPS34 -/- platelets. VPS34 -/- platelets displayed an impaired aggregation and dense granule secretion in response to low doses of collagen or thrombin. VPS34 deficiency delayed clot retraction but did not influence platelet spreading on fibrinogen. We also demonstrated that VPS34 deficiency altered the basal level of autophagy in resting platelets and hampered NOX assembly and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling during platelet activation. Importantly, we identified the NOX-dependent reactive oxygen species generation as the major downstream effector of VPS34, which in turn can mediate platelet activation. In addition, by using a specific inhibitor 3-methyladenine, VPS34 was found to operate through a similar NOX-dependent mechanism to promote human platelet activation. Platelet VPS34 is critical for thrombosis but dispensable for hemostasis. VPS34 regulates platelet activation by influencing NOX assembly. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. A Cephalometric Study on the Relationship between the Occlusal Plane, Ala-Tragus and Camper’s Lines, in Patients with Angle’s Class III Malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rostamkhani

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Considering the importance of the occlusal plane orientation in complete denture prostheses, a study was conducted on the relationship between this plane with ala-tragus and Camper’s lines in soft tissue among individuals with class IIImalocclusion, in Mashhad School of Dentistry.Purpose: The aim of the present study was to define the best soft tissue index by which the location and inclination of the occlusal plane in complete dentures could be established.Materials and methods: The participants consisted of 13 males with Angle’s class III occlusal relationship. Radiopaque markers were attached to the intended points on soft tissue and then standard lateral cephalograms were obtained from each subject.The angles between the following lines were measured: Occlusal line (OL, Camper's line (ala-porion, AT1 (ala-superior border of tragus, AT2 (ala- mid-tragus and AT3 (ala-inferior border of tragus.Results: The mean values and standard deviations calculated from the measured variables are as follows: OL-^AT1, 5.65 (3.95 degrees; OL- ^AT2, 3.19 (2.45 degrees;OL- ^AT3, 2.92 (2.42 degrees and OL- ^Camper, 8.5 (3.83 degrees. Comparison of the results by the ANOVA test exhibited a significant difference (F=3.7, P=0.05. Asthe OL^-AT3 angle had the lowest value, the occlusal line had a stronger tendency to be parallel to the AT3 line.Conclusion: According to the present study, the inferior border of the tragus is suggested as the posterior point for ala-tragus line orientation.

  6. Skeletal and dental variables related to the stability of orthognathic surgery in skeletal Class III malocclusion with a surgery-first approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Lin, Shao Cheng; Chen, Yu Ray; Huang, Chiung Shing

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of the study were to identify the parameters related to skeletal stability after orthognathic surgery in skeletal Class III malocclusion using a surgery-first approach and to analyze the factors correlated with surgical relapse. Forty-five consecutive patients were included. Serial cephalometric radiographs were traced and superimposed to investigate surgical stability at the initial examination, 1 week postoperatively, and after orthodontic debonding (12.22 mo after surgery). Patient grouping was based on the amount of horizontal relapse at the innermost point of the contour of the mandible between the incisor tooth and the bony chin, the B point (less stable group, n = 15; highly stable group, n = 18). Parameters, such as presurgical skeletal and dental variables, the amount of surgical setback, and total treatment duration, were compared between groups and analyzed for correlations with surgical stability. The mean setback at the innermost point of the contour of the mandible between the incisor tooth and the bony chin was 11.19 mm, and the mean relapse rate was 12.46%. The amount of surgical setback, overbite (positive values), overjet, depth of the curve of Spee, and lower anterior facial height showed statistically significant differences between groups. The amount of surgical setback, overbite (positive values), overjet, and depth of the curve of Spee showed statistically significant correlations with the amount of relapse. Skeletal relapse of the mandible increased significantly as the overbite increased. The factors for instability in the surgery-first approach include a larger overbite, a deeper curve of Spee, a greater negative overjet, and a greater mandibular setback. The initial overbite may be an indicator to predict possible skeletal relapse of mandibular setback. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 40 CFR Figure C-3 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10−2.5 Candidate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10â2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-3 to Subpart C of Part... Candidate Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-3 Figure C-3 to Subpart C of Part 53...

  8. Effect of transcutaneous electrical stimulation treatment on lower urinary tract symptoms after class III radical hysterectomy in cervical cancer patients: study protocol for a multicentre, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiu-Li; Wang, Hai-Bo; Wang, Zhi-Qi; Cao, Ting-Ting; Yang, Xin; Han, Jing-Song; Wu, Yang-Feng; Reilly, Kathleen H; Wang, Jian-Liu

    2017-06-15

    Class III radical hysterectomy (RH III)_plus pelvic lymphadenectomy is the standard surgery for early stage cervical cancer (CC) patients, the 5 year survival rate is about 90%, but pelvic floor disorders especially bladder dysfunction are common due to damaged vessels and nerve fibers following surgery. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) treatment has been used to treat bladder disorders for many years, but its effect on cervical cancer patients, the best treatment time point and stimulated protocol, had never been assessed. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of TENS treatment on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) after RH III in CC patients. The study will be conducted as a clinical, multicentre, randomised controlled trial with balanced randomisation (1:1). The planned sample size is 208 participants (at 1:1 ratio, 104 subjects in each group). At 5-7 days after RH III, patients are screened according to operative and pathological findings. Enrolled participants are randomised into an intervention group (TENS plus conventional clinical care) or control group (conventional clinical care), with stratification by menopausal status (menopause vs. non-menopause) and surgical modality (laparoscopic RH or abdominal RH). Participants in both groups will be followed up at 14 days, 21 days, 28 days, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months after surgery. The primary endpoint is improvement rate of urination function which is defined as recovery (residual urine ≤50 ml) or improvement (residual urine 50-100 ml). Secondary endpoints include urodynamic parameter, urinary incontinence, anorectal function, pelvic function, quality of life (QOL), disease-free survival and adverse events. Primary endpoint analyses will be carried out by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests taking into center effect. To our knowledge this is the first trial to investigate the effect of TENS treatment on bladder function recovery after RH III among

  9. Inhibition of IK,ACh current may contribute to clinical efficacy of class I and class III antiarrhythmic drugs in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Niels; Rozmaritsa, Nadiia; Trausch, Anne; Zimniak, Thomasz; Christ, Torsten; Wettwer, Erich; Matschke, Klaus; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ravens, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Inward rectifier potassium currents I(K1) and acetylcholine activated I(K,ACh) are implicated in atrial fibrillation (AF) pathophysiology. In chronic AF (cAF), I(K,ACh) develops a receptor-independent, constitutively active component that together with increased I(K1) is considered to support maintenance of AF. Here, we tested whether class I (propafenone, flecainide) and class III (dofetilide, AVE0118) antiarrhythmic drugs inhibit atrial I(K1) and I(K,ACh) in patients with and without cAF. I(K1) and I(K,ACh) were measured with voltage clamp technique in atrial myocytes from 58 sinus rhythm (SR) and 35 cAF patients. The M-receptor agonist carbachol (CCh; 2 microM) was employed to activate I(K,ACh). In SR, basal current was not affected by either drug indicating no effect of these compounds on I(K1). In contrast, all tested drugs inhibited CCh-activated I(K,ACh) in a concentration-dependent manner. In cAF, basal current was confirmed to be larger than in SR (at -80 mV, -15.2 +/- 1.2 pA/pF, n = 88/35 vs. -6.5 +/- 0.4 pA/pF, n = 194/58 [myocytes/patients]; P ACh) was smaller (-4.1 +/- 0.5 pA/pF vs. -9.5 +/- 0.6 pA/pF; P ACh) contributes to increased basal current, which was reduced by flecainide and AVE0118 only. This may be due to inhibition of constitutively active I(K,ACh) channels. In cAF, all tested drugs reduced CCh-activated I(K,ACh). We conclude that in cAF, flecainide and AVE0118 reduce receptor-independent, constitutively active I(K,ACh), suggesting that they may block I(K,ACh) channels, whereas propafenone and dofetilide likely inhibit M-receptors. The efficacy of flecainide to terminate AF may in part result from blockade of I(K,ACh).

  10. Impact of different protocols of nutritional supplements on the status of vitamin A in class III obese patients after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Silvia; Saboya, Carlos; Ramalho, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the nutritional status of vitamin A (VA) using biochemical and functional indicators in subjects with class III obesity, before and after RYGB, supplemented with three protocols. The sample comprised 90 patients, with BMI ≥40 kg/m(2), divided into three groups: G1 that received routine supplementation containing 5,000 IU of retinol daily; G2 that received 10,000 IU of retinol daily; and G3 that received routine supplementation plus complementary of 50,000 IU of retinol intramuscularly every month. The status of VA was evaluated before (T0), 30 days (T1), and 180 days (T2) after surgery. The vitamin A deficiency (VAD) in G1, G2, and G3 was respectively 20.7, 21.2, and 20.2 % as regards retinol and 37.8, 63.3, and 40 % as regards β-carotene in T0; 26.7, 10, and 23.4 % as regards retinol and 68, 37, and 32 % as regards β-carotene in T1; and 21, 8.7, and 20.2 % as regards retinol and 63.3, 20, and 32 % as regards β-carotene in T2. A reduction of retinol and β-carotene with increasing BMI and waist circumference was observed in T0. The prevalence of night blindness (XN) in groups 1, 2, and 3 was respectively 23.3, 26.7, and 16.7 % in T0; 56.7, 40, and 60 % in T1; and 70, 43, and 63.3 % in T2. The study showed high prevalence of VAD. Among the supplementation protocols used, the one containing 10,000 IU of retinol showed the best impact. However, in cases of more severe VAD, intramuscular supplementation should be considered. The prevalence of XN, justifies attention to this segment of population.

  11. Estudo cefalométrico das alterações no perfil facial em pacientes Classe III dolicocefálicos submetidos à cirurgia ortognática bimaxilar Cephalometric study of the facial profile changes in Class III patients submitted to bimaxillary orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hewerson Santos Tavares

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo avaliou as modificações no perfil facial de 15 pacientes portadores de má oclusão Classe III esquelética que foram submetidos a tratamento ortodôntico pré-cirúrgico e cirurgia ortognática bimaxilar estabilizada com fixação rígida. Oito pacientes foram submetidos à mentoplastia. Foram utilizadas telerradiografias pré-cirúrgicas (T1 e pós-cirúrgicas (T2 com um intervalo mínimo de 6 meses. Foram analisados deslocamentos horizontais e verticais em pontos do tecido ósseo e tecido mole. Foi realizada uma comparação entre os casos tratados com e sem mentoplastia (teste t mostrando não haver diferenças entre os grupos. A regressão linear múltipla evidenciou uma correlação significante no sentido horizontal para os pontos Pg e Pgm e vertical para os pontos Me e Mem. Foi encontrada baixa correlação para movimentos no sentido horizontal nos pontos Sena e A, e para os pontos Pn, Sn e Ph. No sentido vertical, os deslocamentos mais evidentes foram entre os pontos Pg, Gn e Me e Sena e A, porém com correlações de baixa intensidade.The present study evaluated the facial profile modifications in 15 skeletal Class III patients that were submitted to presurgical orthodontic treatment and orthognathic bimaxillary surgery stabilized with a rigid fixation. Eight of the patients have undergone to genioplastic surgery. Presurgical (T1 and late postsurgical (T2 radiographs taken apart with a minimum of 6 month interval had been used. The horizontal and vertical displacement of skeletal and soft tissue profile points were analyzed. The comparison of the cases submitted or not to a genioplastic surgery (t Test showed no differences for the displacement of the skeletal and soft tissue points. The multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant correlation for horizontal movements of the Pg and Pgm points and for vertical movements of the Me and Mem points. A low correlation was found for the horizontal movements of

  12. CONDITIONING METHODS FOR ANIMALS IN AGRICULTURE: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Abramson, Charles Ira; Kieson, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article briefly describes different conditioning techniques used to help understand learning in farm livestock and economically important animals. A basic overview of conditioning is included along with the importance of different conditioning methods, associative and non-associative learning, and how these principles apply to chickens, horses, cows, goats, pigs, and sheep. Additional information on learning theory specific for each animal is also provided. Resumo Este artigo...

  13. Manipulative therapy for pregnancy and related conditions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorsan, Raheleh; Hawk, Cheryl; Lisi, Anthony J; Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate the evidence on the effects of Spinal Manipulative Therapy (SMT) on back pain and other related symptoms during pregnancy. A literature search was conducted using Pubmed, Manual, Alternative and Natural Therapy Index System, Cumulated Index to Nursing and Allied Health, Index to Chiropractic Literature, the Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. In addition hand searches and reference tracking were also performed, and the citation list was assessed for comprehensiveness by content experts. This review was limited to peer-reviewed manuscripts published in English from 1966 until September 2008. The initial search strategy yielded 140 citations of which 12 studies were reviewed for quality. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed independently using quality checklists of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and Council on Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters. The review indicates that the use of SMT during pregnancy to reduce back pain and other related symptoms is supported by limited evidence. Overall, this body of evidence is best described as emergent. However, since effective treatments for pregnancy-related back pain are limited, clinicians may want to consider SMT as a treatment option, if no contraindications are present. Obstetricians & Gynecologists, Family Physicians After completion of this article, the reader should be able to describe the concepts of spinal manipulative therapy and types of symptoms for which it might be considered in pregnancy, explain the quality of available research on the use of spinal manipulative therapy, and plan to discuss this therapy with interested pregnant patients.

  14. Factors affecting working conditions in public hospitals: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zodwa M. Manyisa

    2017-01-01

    Findings: Workload, HIV/AIDS epidemic, shift work, long working hours, poor infrastructure, inadequate resources and shortage of staff were found to be the main factors attributed to poor working conditions.

  15. The prevesical space: anatomical review and pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S W; Kim, H C; Yang, D M; Min, G E

    2013-07-01

    The prevesical space is the largest potential space within the pelvic extraperitoneal space. Located anterosuperior to the bladder, it has complex communications with the adjacent pelvic extraperitoneal spaces, rectus sheath, and retroperitoneum. The prevesical space is also the site of various pathological processes, and can act as a conduit for the spread of these conditions. Therefore, awareness of the detailed anatomy and potential routes of communication may help radiologists in making accurate diagnoses of pathological conditions involving the prevesical space. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Conditional political budget cycles : a review of recent evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, J.; Klomp, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, most research on political budget cycles was based on the (often implicit) presumption that these cycles do not differ across countries. However, more recent studies focus on heterogeneity. This paper surveys studies examining the factors conditioning the occurrence and strength of

  17. Review of paediatric neurological conditions seen in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral palsy {CP}, predominantly the spastic quadriplegic type, accounted for majority (43.7%) of cases. Traumatic sciatic nerve palsy was the cause of physiotherapy attendance in 35.5% of cases while Obstetric brachial plexus injury accounted [10.8%) of cases. Other conditions were Central Nervous System Infections, ...

  18. Taurodontism: a review of the condition and endodontic treatment challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, H; Azarpazhooh, A; Mayhall, J T

    2008-05-01

    Taurodontism can be defined as a change in tooth shape caused by the failure of Hertwig's epithelial sheath diaphragm to invaginate at the proper horizontal level. An enlarged pulp chamber, apical displacement of the pulpal floor, and no constriction at the level of the cementoenamel junction are the characteristic features. Although permanent molar teeth are most commonly affected, this change can also be seen in both the permanent and deciduous dentition, unilaterally or bilaterally, and in any combination of teeth or quadrants. Whilst it appears most frequently as an isolated anomaly, its association with several syndromes and abnormalities has also been reported. The literature on taurodontism in the context of endodontics up to March 2007 was reviewed using PubMed, MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature. Despite the clinical challenges in endodontic therapy, taurodontism has received little attention from clinicians. In performing root canal treatment on such teeth, one should appreciate the complexity of the root canal system, canal obliteration and configuration, and the potential for additional root canal systems. Careful exploration of the grooves between all orifices particularly with magnification, use of ultrasonic irrigation; and a modified filling technique are of particular use.

  19. Associação entre doença hepática gordurosa não alcoólica e marcadores de lesão/função hepática com componentes da síndrome metabólica em indivíduos obesos classe III Association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver function/injury markers with metabolic syndrome components in class III obese individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Villaça Chaves

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar a associação entre doença hepática gordurosa não alcoólica (DHGNA e os marcadores de lesão e função hepática com os componentes da síndrome metabólica (SM em indivíduos obesos classe III. MÉTODOS: A população estudada foi constituída por 144 pacientes com obesidade classe III (IMC > a 40 kg/m². A SM foi identificada segundo o critério do NCEP ATP III, por meio da determinação do perfil lipídico, glicemia e insulina basal. Foram quantificados ainda os marcadores de função e lesão hepática. A resistência à insulina (RI foi verificada pelo índice HOMA-IR e o diagnóstico da DHGNA por ressonância magnética. Os cálculos estatísticos foram realizados pelo programa estatístico SPSS na versão 13.0. A associação foi verificada pelo teste Mann-Whitney e qui-quadrado, com nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: Foi encontrada associação significativa entre o diagnóstico de SM e DHGNA (χ² = 6,84; p = 0,01. Quanto aos componentes diagnósticos para SM, constatou-se associação positiva e significativa entre HDL-c (p = 0,05, circunferência da cintura (p OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and liver function/injury markers with components of metabolic syndrome (MS in class III obese individuals. METHODS: The study population consisted of 144 patients with class III obesity (body mass index [BMI] > 40 kg/m². MS was diagnosed according to the National Cholesterol Education Program - Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III criteria, by determining the lipid profile, blood glucose and basal insulin. Liver function/injury markers were also quantified. Insulin resistance (IR was measured by HOMA-IR and NAFLD diagnosis was established by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Statistical calculations were performed by SPSS version 13.0. The association was assessed by the Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests, with a level of significance set at 5

  20. Relação entre o estado nutricional de vitamina a e a regressão da esteatose hepática após gastroplastia em Y- de- Roux para tratamento da obesidade classe III Relationship of the nutritional status of vitamin a and the regression of hepatic steatosis after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery for treatment of class III obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gustavo de Oliveira e Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: A vitamina A participa de várias funções primordiais no organismo humano e as suas concentrações séricas podem estar diminuídas nas doenças crônicas não transmissíveis. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a relação entre o estado nutricional da vitamina A, e a regressão da esteatose hepática em indivíduos submetidos à gastroplastia em Y-de-Roux para tratamento da obesidade classe III. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 30 pacientes obesos classe III, de ambos os sexos, com esteatose hepática, submetidos à gastroplastia em Y-de-Roux. Seis meses após a operação, os pacientes foram submetidos à ultrassonografia abdominal e distribuídos em dois grupos: grupo 1 - pacientes com esteatose detectada na ultrassonografia e grupo 2 - pacientes sem esteatose detectada na ultrassonografia. No pré-operatório e seis meses após a operação foram realizadas análises antropométricas e exames bioquímicos: insulina basal, glicemia, Homeostasis Model Assessment Index (HOMA IR, colesterol, HDL, LDL, triglicerídeos, AST, ALT, Gama-GT, albumina, bilirrubina total, retinol, e beta caroteno. RESULTADOS: A média de perda de peso foi de 35,05 + 10,47 (pBACKGROUND: Vitamin A participates in several essentials functions in the human body and their serum concentrations may be decreased in non-transmissible diseases. AIM: To assess the relationship of the nutritional status of Vitamin A through the serum concentrations of retinol and beta carotene, with regression of hepatic steatosis in individuals who undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery for treatment of class III obesity. METHODS: Were included 30 individuals, male and female, submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for treatment of class III obesity, who were diagnosed through an abdominal ultrasonography as presenting hepatic steatosis. From the result of an ultrasonography screened six months after the surgical procedure those subjects were divided into two groups: group 1 - patients with steatosis

  1. Wikipedia vs peer-reviewed medical literature for information about the 10 most costly medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasty, Robert T; Garbalosa, Ryan C; Barbato, Vincenzo A; Valdes, Pedro J; Powers, David W; Hernandez, Emmanuel; John, Jones S; Suciu, Gabriel; Qureshi, Farheen; Popa-Radu, Matei; San Jose, Sergio; Drexler, Nathaniel; Patankar, Rohan; Paz, Jose R; King, Christopher W; Gerber, Hilary N; Valladares, Michael G; Somji, Alyaz A

    2014-05-01

    Since its launch in 2001, Wikipedia has become the most popular general reference site on the Internet and a popular source of health care information. To evaluate the accuracy of this resource, the authors compared Wikipedia articles on the most costly medical conditions with standard, evidence-based, peer-reviewed sources. The top 10 most costly conditions in terms of public and private expenditure in the United States were identified, and a Wikipedia article corresponding to each topic was chosen. In a blinded process, 2 randomly assigned investigators independently reviewed each article and identified all assertions (ie, implication or statement of fact) made in it. The reviewer then conducted a literature search to determine whether each assertion was supported by evidence. The assertions found by each reviewer were compared and analyzed to determine whether assertions made by Wikipedia for these conditions were supported by peer-reviewed sources. For commonly identified assertions, there was statistically significant discordance between 9 of the 10 selected Wikipedia articles (coronary artery disease, lung cancer, major depressive disorder, osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, back pain, and hyperlipidemia) and their corresponding peer-reviewed sources (P<.05) and for all assertions made by Wikipedia for these medical conditions (P<.05 for all 9). Most Wikipedia articles representing the 10 most costly medical conditions in the United States contain many errors when checked against standard peer-reviewed sources. Caution should be used when using Wikipedia to answer questions regarding patient care.

  2. 42 CFR 485.641 - Condition of participation: Periodic evaluation and quality assurance review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... participation: Periodic evaluation and quality assurance review. (a) Standard: Periodic evaluation—(1) The CAH... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Periodic evaluation and quality assurance review. 485.641 Section 485.641 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES...

  3. Review of Randomised Controlled Trials of Internet Interventions for Mental Disorders and Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Kathleen M.; Christensen, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Self-help Internet interventions have the potential to enable consumers to play a central role in managing their own health. This paper contains a systematic review of 15 randomised controlled trials of the effectiveness of self-help Internet interventions for mental disorders and related conditions. Conditions addressed by the interventions…

  4. Class III antiarrhythmic agents in cardiac failure: lessons from clinical trials with a focus on the Grupo de Estudio de la Sobrevida en la Insuficiencia Cardiaca en Argentina (GESICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doval, H C

    1999-11-04

    The results of previous clinical trials, in a variety of clinical settings, showed that class I agents may consistently increase mortality in sharp contrast to the effects of beta blockers. Attention has therefore shifted to class III compounds for potential beneficial effects on long-term mortality among patients with underlying cardiac disease. Clinical trials with d-sotalol, the dextro isomer (devoid of beta blockade) of sotalol, showed increased mortality in patients with low ejection fraction after myocardial infarction and in those with heart failure; whereas in the case of dofetilide, the impact on mortality was neutral. Because of the complex effects of its actions as an alpha-adrenergic blocker and a class III agent, the impact on mortality of amiodarone in patients with heart failure is of particular interest. A meta-analysis of 13 clinical trials revealed significant reductions in all-cause and cardiac mortality among patients with heart failure or previous myocardial infarction. Among these were 5 controlled clinical trials that investigated the effects of amiodarone on mortality among patients with heart failure. None of these trials was large relative to the beta-blocker trials in the postinfarction patients. However, the larger 2 of the 5 amiodarone trials produced discordant effects on mortality, neutral in one and significantly positive in the other. Some of the differences may be accounted for by the differences in eligibility criteria and baseline characteristics. Future trials that may be undertaken to resolve the discrepancies may need to allow for the newer findings on the effects of concomitant beta blockers, implantable devices, and possibly, spironolactone. All these modalities of treatment have been shown in controlled clinical trials to augment survival in patients with impaired ventricular function or manifest heart failure. Additional trials, some of which are currently in progress, compare amiodarone with implantable devices and other

  5. The Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Class III Complex Containing TcVps15 and TcVps34 Participates in Autophagy in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoijet, Alejandra C; Sternlieb, Tamara; Alonso, Guillermo D

    2017-05-01

    Autophagy is a degradative process by which eukaryotic cells digest their own components to provide aminoacids that may function as energy source under nutritional stress conditions. There is experimental evidence for autophagy in parasitic protists belonging to the family Trypanosomatidae. However, few proteins implicated in this process have been characterized so far in these parasites. Moreover, it has been shown that autophagy is involved in Trypanosoma cruzi differentiation and thus might have a role in pathogenicity. Here, we report the cloning and biochemical characterization of TcVps15. In addition, we demonstrate that TcVps15 interact with the PI3K TcVps34 and that both proteins associate with cellular membranes. Under nutritional stress conditions, TcVps15 and TcVps34 modify their subcellular distribution showing a partial co-localization in autophagosomes with TcAtg8.1 and using an active site TcVps15-mutated version (TcVps15-K219D-HA) we demonstrated that this relocalization depends on the TcVps15 catalytic activity. Overexpression of TcVps15-HA and TcVps15-K219D-HA also leads to increased accumulation of monodansylcadaverine (MDC) in autophagic vacuoles under nutritional stress conditions compared to wild-type cells. In addition, the MDC-specific activity shows to be significantly higher in TcVps15-HA overexpressing cells when compared with TcVps15-K219D-HA. Our results reveal for the first time a role of TcVps15 as a key regulator of TcVps34 enzymatic activity and implicate the TcVps15-Vps34 complex in autophagy in T. cruzi, exposing a new key pathway to explore novel chemotherapeutic targets. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  6. Global Postural Reeducation for patients with musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Giovanni E.; Barreto, Rodrigo G. P.; Robinson, Caroline C.; Plentz, Rodrigo D. M.; Silva, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To systematically review randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) on patient-reported outcomes in conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Method An electronic search of MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and SciELO was performed from their inception to June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that analyzed pain and patient-reported outcomes were included in this review. The Cochrane Collaboration’s Ri...

  7. The role of cystectomy for non-malignant bladder conditions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Julio T; Dolat, MaryEllen T; Klausner, Adam P; Dragoescu, Ema; Hampton, Lance J

    2014-10-01

    Few studies have adequately addressed the indications, efficacy, and quality-of-life for cystectomy performed for non-malignant bladder conditions. Patients with debilitating non-malignant bladder conditions who have failed all previous conservative therapies may undergo various forms of cystectomy, including partial, simple or radical cystectomy. We provide a review of the current literature and recommendations for cystectomy for various non-malignant bladder conditions. A systematic review of MEDLINE was conducted to find prospective and retrospective studies using the keywords "cystectomy", "benign", and `non-malignant`. Articles were reviewed and triaged, background articles were added as supplements, leaving a final review of 67 papers. Data from the final review suggests that common benign indications for cystectomy are interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS), neurogenic bladder, hemorrhagic/radiation cystitis, infectious diseases of the bladder and miscellaneous conditions of the bladder such as endometriosis and total refractory incontinence. The most common perioperative complications include urinary tract and wound infections. Efficacy of cystectomy in patients with IC/PBS is greater than 80%, while efficacy in patients with neurogenic bladder is greater than 90%. Finally, improved urinary quality-of-life has been demonstrated in patients with neurogenic bladder post-cystectomy. Cystectomy for non-malignant conditions can be considered for patients who have failed previous conservative therapy. The limited data in existence suggests fertility can be adequately preserved after cystectomy in younger males. The data regarding the forms of urinary diversion suggests no significant advantage between any of the major forms of urinary diversion. Finally, while newer pharmacologics and technological advances are widely used in the treatment of various benign urological conditions, their role in preventing or treating refractory benign bladder

  8. Study of energy transfer by different light curing units into a class III restoration as a function of tilt angle and distance, using a MARC Patient Simulator (PS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konerding, Katharina L; Heyder, Markus; Kranz, Stefan; Guellmar, Andre; Voelpel, Andrea; Watts, David C; Jandt, Klaus D; Sigusch, Bernd W

    2016-05-01

    The MARC Patient Simulator (MARC PS) enables researchers to observe the influence of handling errors on the radiant exposure that is delivered by light curing units (LCUs). Changes in the tilt angle and distance of the light guide exit face in relation to the surface of the composite increment have a distinct effect on the total amount of light delivered during polymerization and may cause insufficient conversion of the material. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the influence of the tilt angle and distance of irradiance on the efficiency of light application by recording the total amount of energy using the anterior tooth sensor of the MARC PS. The influence of the tilt angle and distance of the light guide to the sensor surface on the delivered radiant exposure was examined for three different LCUs (Celalux 2 [C2], Bluephase [BP] and Translux Powerblue [TPB]). The measurements were performed for 20 s each with five different tilt angles (α=0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°) and nine different distances (L=1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 mm). For all LCUs, a distinct influence of the tilt angle on the delivered amount of fluence was found. At 0° tilt the C2 delivered a total light energy of 38.55 J/cm(2). By increasing the tilt of the light guide the amount of energy applied significantly decreased. At 20° tilt a reduction by 31.2% of the original light fluence was recorded. However, the C2 was the most powerful LCU measured. Even under optimum measurement conditions, the BP delivered a fluence of only 14.8 J/cm(2). At a tilt angle of 20°, though, the light sensor still registered 92.7% of the original output power. Under the same conditions, the TPB delivered 81.4%. With increasing distance of the light guide exit face to the surface of the sensor all LCUs showed a significant loss in delivered light energy. At a distance of 2mm the C2 showed a reduction by 46.7%, whereas total fluence of BP and TPB were reduced by 3.8% and 4.8%, respectively. The

  9. A Review of Healthcare Service and Education Provision of Autism Spectrum Condition in Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang; Allison, Carrie; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Brayne, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the current situation regarding Autism Spectrum Conditions in mainland China. Electronic databases and bibliographies were searched to identify literature on service provision for ASC in both English and Chinese databases. 14 studies and 6 reports were reviewed. The findings of identified papers on service provision were…

  10. Condition Assessment of Ferrous Water Transmission and Distribution Systems State of Technology Review Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This White Paper was developed to serve as the basis for discussion at a Technology Forum on Condition Assessment of Water Transmission and Distribution Systems that was held on September 9 and 10, 2008, at Edison, NJ. It was distributed to the Forum participants for review in a...

  11. Prevalence of Chronic Health Conditions in Children with Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Dijkstra, Geke J.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Jansen, Danielle E. M. C.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review of the prevalence rates of chronic health conditions in populations of children with intellectual disability was provided. We identified 2,994 relevant studies by searching Medline, Cinahl, and PsycINFO databases from 1996 to 2008. We included the 31 studies that had sufficient methodological quality. The 6 most prevalent…

  12. Differences in peri-implant conditions between fully and partially edentulous subjects : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, Yvonne C. M.; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Winkel, Edwin G.

    Aim The aim of this study was to compare peri-implant conditions between fully edentulous (FES) and partially edentulous subjects (PES). Material and methods A systematic review was conducted. The MEDLINE, EMBASE and COCHRANE databases were searched for publications up to January 1st 2012. Studies

  13. Hospital Admissions for Physical Health Conditions for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kirsty; Hughes-McCormack, Laura; Cooper, Sally-Ann

    2018-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities may have inequalities in hospital admissions compared with the general population. The present authors aimed to investigate admissions for physical health conditions in this population. Methods: The present authors conducted a systematic review, searching six databases using terms on intellectual…

  14. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Primary and Preventive Care Review Summary: Common Dermatologic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorsand, Kate O; Iyer, Jayasri G; Abson, Kim Gittere

    2018-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ in the human body, and as such, cutaneous problems constitute a common component of visits to medical professionals. The skin functions as a physiologic barrier and a major organ of homeostasis. The practicing obstetrician-gynecologist can play an important role in identifying skin diseases and initiating management. Additionally, the skin often reflects internal disease states. An astute health care provider can identify systemic conditions early, with the goal of improving management. This monograph reviews common cutaneous conditions, both benign and malignant, hair and nail disorders, and skin conditions unique to the adult woman.

  15. conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkatesulu

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of initial value problems associated with a pair of ordinary differential systems (L1,L2 defined on two adjacent intervals I1 and I2 and satisfying certain interface-spatial conditions at the common end (interface point are studied.

  16. Physicians' Psychosocial Work Conditions and Quality of Care: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Angerer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physician jobs are associated with adverse psychosocial work conditions. We summarize research on the relationship of physicians' psychosocial work conditions and quality of care. Method: A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and PsycINFO. All studies were classified into three categories of care quality outcomes: Associations between physicians' psychosocial work conditions and (1 the physician-patient-relationship, or (2 the care process and outcomes, or (3 medical errors were examined. Results: 12 publications met the inclusion criteria. Most studies relied on observational cross-sectional and controlled intervention designs. All studies provide at least partial support for physicians’ psychosocial work conditions being related to quality of care. Conclusions: This review found preliminary evidence that detrimental physicians’ psychosocial work conditions adversely influence patient care quality. Future research needs to apply strong designs to disentangle the indirect and direct effects of adverse psychosocial work conditions on physicians as well as on quality of care.Keywords: psychosocial work conditions, physicians, quality of care, physician-patient-relationship, hospital, errors, review, work stress, clinicians

  17. Effects of unsteady conditions on propulsion generated by the hand's motion in swimming: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Lara Elena; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of swimming propulsion is a key factor in the improvement of performance in this sport. Propulsive forces have been quantified under steady conditions since the 1970s, but actual swimming involves unsteady conditions. Thus, the purpose of the present article was to review the effects of unsteady conditions on swimming propulsion based on studies that have compared steady and unsteady conditions while exploring their methods, their limitations and their results, as well as encouraging new studies based on the findings of this systematic review. A multiple database search was performed, and only those studies that met all eligibility criteria were included. Six studies that compared steady and unsteady conditions using physical experiments or numerical simulations were selected. The selected studies verified the effects of one or more factors that characterise a condition as unsteady on the propulsive forces. Consequently, much research is necessary to understand the effect of each individual variable that characterises a condition as unsteady on swimming propulsion, as well as the effects of these variables as a whole on swimming propulsion.

  18. Chiropractic manipulation in pediatric health conditions – an updated systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotlib Allan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Our purpose was to review the biomedical literature from January 2004 to June 2007 inclusive to determine the extent of new evidence related to the therapeutic application of manipulation for pediatric health conditions. This updates a previous systematic review published in 2005. No critical appraisal of the evidence is undertaken. Data Sources We searched both the indexed and non-indexed biomedical manual therapy literature. This included PubMed, MANTIS, CINAHL, ICL, as well as reference tracking. Other resources included the Cochrane Library, CCOHTA, PEDro, WHO ICTRP, AMED, EMBASE and AHRQ databases, as well as research conferences and symposium proceedings. Results The search identified 1275 citations of which 57 discrete citations met the eligibility criteria determined by three reviewers who then determined by consensus, each citation's appropriate level on the strength of evidence scale. The new evidence from the relevant time period was 1 systematic review, 1 RCT, 2 observational studies, 36 descriptive case studies and 17 conference abstracts. When this additional evidence is combined with the previous systematic review undertaken up to 2003, there are now in total, 2 systematic reviews, 10 RCT's, 3 observational studies, 177 descriptive studies, and 31 conference abstracts defining this body of knowledge. Summary There has been no substantive shift in this body of knowledge during the past 3 1/2 years. The health claims made by chiropractors with respect to the application of manipulation as a health care intervention for pediatric health conditions continue to be supported by only low levels of scientific evidence. Chiropractors continue to treat a wide variety of pediatric health conditions. The evidence rests primarily with clinical experience, descriptive case studies and very few observational and experimental studies. The health interests of pediatric patients would be advanced if more rigorous scientific

  19. Liposuction for chronic medical diseases and noncosmetic conditions: review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy Abuelhassan El-Khatib

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this systematic literature review was to evaluate the safety of liposuction techniques and to identify the cosmetic and noncosmetic application of liposuction. Liposuction can be used to improve the quality-of-life in patients with disabling medical conditions in addition to its use for cosmetic rejuvenation. An online search of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, and SciELO were conducted. Forty-seven original articles reported from 1982 to February 2014 were included in this review. The articles reported on the use as well as the limitations of liposuction for treatment of noncosmetic and disabling medical conditions. The criteria used for selection of articles were: large sample size and originality. The case reports were excluded. There was a broad agreement about the applicability and the efficacy of the liposuction for treatment of these chronic medical conditions, such as multiple systemic lipomatosis, dercum's disease, chronic lymphedema, and axillary hyperhidrosis. Literatures review confirmed that Liposuction technique has provided significant and stable cure for these chronic medical conditions. Liposuction is the most frequent esthetic procedure for adipose tissue reduction and treatment of lipedema worldwide. Apart from esthetic indications, liposuction can also be used to treat chronic medical diseases and noncosmetic conditions.

  20. On the use of temperature for online condition monitoring of geared systems - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touret, T.; Changenet, C.; Ville, F.; Lalmi, M.; Becquerelle, S.

    2018-02-01

    Gear unit condition monitoring is a key factor for mechanical system reliability management. When they are subjected to failure, gears and bearings may generate excessive vibration, debris and heat. Vibratory, acoustic or debris analyses are proven approaches to perform condition monitoring. An alternative to those methods is to use temperature as a condition indicator to detect gearbox failure. The review focuses on condition monitoring studies which use this thermal approach. According to the failure type and the measurement method, it exists a distinction whether it is contact (e.g. thermocouple) or non-contact temperature sensor (e.g. thermography). Capabilities and limitations of this approach are discussed. It is shown that the use of temperature for condition monitoring has a clear potential as an alternative to vibratory or acoustic health monitoring.

  1. Multimedia psychoeducational interventions to support patient self-care in degenerative conditions: A realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Peter; Scott, David; Reid, Joanne; Porter, Sam

    2015-10-01

    Multimedia interventions are increasingly used to deliver information in order to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions. We carried out a realist review of the literature to investigate how the characteristics of multimedia psychoeducational interventions combine with the contexts in which they are introduced to help or hinder their effectiveness in supporting self-care for patients with degenerative conditions. Electronic databases (Medline, Science Direct, PSYCHinfo, EBSCO, and Embase) were searched in order to identify papers containing information on multimedia psychoeducational interventions. Using a realist review approach, we reviewed all relevant studies to identify theories that explained how the interventions work. Ten papers were included in the review. All interventions sought to promote self-care behaviors among participants. We examined the development and content of the multimedia interventions and the impact of patient motivation and of the organizational context of implementation. We judged seven studies to be methodologically weak. All completed studies showed small effects in favor of the intervention. Multimedia interventions may provide high-quality information in an accessible format, with the potential to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions, if the patient perceives the information as important and develops confidence about self-care. The evidence base is weak, so that research is needed to investigate effective modes of delivery at different resource levels. We recommend that developers consider how an intervention will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence in self-care, as well as the impact of the context in which it will be employed.

  2. 241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2013-11-19

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

  3. 241-AZ Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-30

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102. The construction history of the 241-AZ tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AZ tank farm, the second DST farm constructed, both refractory quality and tank and liner fabrication were improved.

  4. 241-AY-101 Tank Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.

    2013-08-26

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tank 241-AY-101. The construction history of tank 241-AY-101 has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In tank 241-AY-101, the second double-shell tank constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction reoccurred. The overall extent of similary and affect on tank 241-AY-101 integrity is described herein.

  5. 241-AP Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2014-04-04

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AP tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AP tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AP tank farm, the sixth double-shell tank farm constructed, tank bottom flatness, refractory material quality, post-weld stress relieving, and primary tank bottom weld rejection were improved.

  6. 241-SY Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-25

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The construction history of the 241-SY tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank 241-AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank 241-AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-SY tank farm, the third DST farm constructed, refractory quality and stress relief were improved, while similar tank and liner fabrication issues remained.

  7. Hip Musculoskeletal Conditions and Associated Factors that Influence Squat Performance: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Scott W; Stull, Kyle R; Fantigrassi, Mike; Montel, Ian

    2017-03-14

    The squat is a fundamental movement for weight lifting and sports performance. Both unilateral and bilateral squats are also used to assess transitional and dynamic lower extremity control. Common lower extremity conditions can have an influence on squat performance. Of interest, are the effects of hip musculoskeletal conditions and associated factors such as hip muscle pain, fatigue, and tightness on squat performance. Currently, there has been no appraisal of the evidence regarding the association of these conditions and associated factors on squat performance. This study evaluated the current evidence regarding common hip musculoskeletal conditions and associated factors such as hip muscle pain, fatigue, and tightness on squat performance. A systematic review was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, SportDiscus, Proquest, and Google Scholar ® was conducted in October, 2016 using the following keywords alone and in combination: hip, joint, arthritis, pain, range of motion (ROM), fatigue, tightness, pathology, condition, muscle, intraarticular, extraarticular, femoral acetabular impingement, single leg, bilateral, squat, performance, and technique. The grading of studies was conducted using the PEDro scale. We identified 35 citations, 15 of which met the inclusion criteria. The qualifying studies yielded a total of 542 subjects (men-160, women-382) (mean age 29.3 ± 5.9 years) and measured performance with either the barbell squat, step down, bilateral, or single leg squat. Femoral acetabular impingement and hip arthroscopy were the only hip conditions found that affected the squat. Associated factors such as muscle pain, fatigue, and tightness also influenced squat performance. This review found that common hip conditions and associated factors and their effects on squat performance to be under investigated. Future research should focus on the association between common hip conditions and squat performance.

  8. Online tools for individuals with depression and neurologic conditions: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukmanji, Sara; Pham, Tram; Blaikie, Laura; Clark, Callie; Jetté, Nathalie; Wiebe, Samuel; Bulloch, Andrew; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Macrodimitris, Sophia; Mackie, Aaron; Patten, Scott B

    2017-08-01

    Patients with neurologic conditions commonly have depression. Online tools have the potential to improve outcomes in these patients in an efficient and accessible manner. We aimed to identify evidence-informed online tools for patients with comorbid neurologic conditions and depression. A scoping review of online tools (free, publicly available, and not requiring a facilitator) for patients with depression and epilepsy, Parkinson disease (PD), multiple sclerosis (MS), traumatic brain injury (TBI), or migraine was conducted. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials were searched from database inception to January 2017 for all 5 neurologic conditions. Gray literature using Google and Google Scholar as well as app stores for both Android and Apple devices were searched. Self-management or self-efficacy online tools were not included unless they were specifically targeted at depression and one of the neurologic conditions and met the other eligibility criteria. Only 4 online tools were identified. Of these 4 tools, 2 were web-based self-management programs for patients with migraine or MS and depression. The other 2 were mobile apps for patients with PD or TBI and depression. No online tools were found for epilepsy. There are limited depression tools for people with neurologic conditions that are evidence-informed, publicly available, and free. Future research should focus on the development of high-quality, evidence-based online tools targeted at neurologic patients.

  9. Outcomes in Cochrane systematic reviews addressing four common eye conditions: an evaluation of completeness and comparability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J Saldanha

    Full Text Available Choice of outcomes is critical for clinical trialists and systematic reviewers. It is currently unclear how systematic reviewers choose and pre-specify outcomes for systematic reviews. Our objective was to assess the completeness of pre-specification and comparability of outcomes in all Cochrane reviews addressing four common eye conditions.We examined protocols for all Cochrane reviews as of June 2013 that addressed glaucoma, cataract, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, and diabetic retinopathy (DR. We assessed completeness and comparability for each outcome that was named in ≥ 25% of protocols on those topics. We defined a completely-specified outcome as including information about five elements: domain, specific measurement, specific metric, method of aggregation, and time-points. For each domain, we assessed comparability in how individual elements were specified across protocols.We identified 57 protocols addressing glaucoma (22, cataract (16, AMD (15, and DR (4. We assessed completeness and comparability for five outcome domains: quality-of-life, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, disease progression, and contrast sensitivity. Overall, these five outcome domains appeared 145 times (instances. Only 15/145 instances (10.3% were completely specified (all five elements (median = three elements per outcome. Primary outcomes were more completely specified than non-primary (median = four versus two elements. Quality-of-life was least completely specified (median = one element. Due to largely incomplete outcome pre-specification, conclusive assessment of comparability in outcome usage across the various protocols per condition was not possible.Outcome pre-specification was largely incomplete; we encourage systematic reviewers to consider all five elements. This will indicate the importance of complete specification to clinical trialists, on whose work systematic reviewers depend, and will indirectly encourage comparable outcome choice to

  10. Ischemic Conditioning as a Hemostatic Intervention in Surgery and Cardiac Procedures: A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Andreas Engel; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic conditioning induced by nonlethal cycles of tissue ischemia and reperfusion attenuates ischemia–reperfusion injury. The objective of this study is to systematically review the effects of local and remote ischemic conditioning on laboratory parameters of hemostasis and the clinical outcomes...... of thromboembolism or bleeding in patients undergoing surgery or cardiac procedures. PubMed and Embase were searched for relevant human trials published in English between January 1, 1986, and September 7, 2016, and additional studies were identified from reference lists. Data on laboratory parameters of hemostasis...

  11. Online peer support interventions for chronic conditions: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munce, Sarah Elizabeth Patricia; Shepherd, John; Perrier, Laure; Allin, Sonya; Sweet, Shane N; Tomasone, Jennifer R; Nelson, Michelle L A; Guilcher, Sara J T; Hossain, Saima; Jaglal, Susan

    2017-09-24

    Peer support is receiving increasing attention as both an effective and cost-effective intervention method to support the self-management of chronic health conditions. Given that an increasing proportion of Canadians have internet access and the increasing implementation of web-based interventions, online peer support interventions are a promising option to address the burden of chronic diseases. Thus, the specific research question of this scoping review is the following: What is known from the existing literature about the key characteristics of online peer support interventions for adults with chronic conditions? METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will use the methodological frameworks used by Arksey and O'Malley as well as Levac and colleagues for the current scoping review. To be eligible for inclusion, studies must report on adults (≥18 years of age) with one of the Public Health Agency of Canada chronic conditions or HIV/AIDS. We will limit our review to peer support interventions delivered through online formats. All study designs will be included. Only studies published from 2012 onwards will be included to ensure relevance to the current healthcare context and feasibility. Furthermore, only English language studies will be included. Studies will be identified by searching a variety of databases. Two reviewers will independently screen the titles and abstracts identified by the literature search for inclusion (ie, level 1 screening), the full text articles (ie, level 2 screening) and then perform data abstraction. Abstracted data will include study characteristics, participant population, key characteristics of the intervention and outcomes collected. This review will identify the key features of online peer support interventions and could assist in the future development of other online peer support programmes so that effective and sustainable programmes can be developed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  12. Mapping ergonomics application to improve SMEs working condition in industrially developing countries: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermawati, Setia; Lawson, Glyn; Sutarto, Auditya Purwandini

    2014-01-01

    In industrially developing countries (IDC), small and medium enterprises (SMEs) account for the highest proprotion of employment. Unfortunately, the working conditions in SMEs are often very poor and expose employees to a potentially wide range of health and safety risks. This paper presents a comprehensive review of 161 articles related to ergonomics application in SMEs, using Indonesia as a case study. The aim of this paper is to investigate the extent of ergonomics application and identify areas that can be improved to promote effective ergonomics for SMEs in IDC. The most urgent issue found is the need for adopting participatory approach in contrast to the commonly implemented top-down approach. Some good practices in ergonomics application were also revealed from the review, e.g. a multidisciplinary approach, unsophisticated and low-cost solutions, and recognising the importance of productivity. The review also found that more work is still required to achieve appropriate cross-cultural adaptation of ergonomics application.

  13. Impact of the environmental conditions and substrate pre-treatment on whey protein hydrolysis: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheison, Seronei Chelulei; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2017-01-22

    Proteins in solution are subject to myriad forces stemming from interactions with each other as well as with the solvent media. The role of the environmental conditions, namely pH, temperature, ionic strength remains under-estimated yet it impacts protein conformations and consequently its interaction with, and susceptibility to, the enzyme. Enzymes, being proteins are also amenable to the environmental conditions because they are either activated or denatured depending on the choice of the conditions. Furthermore, enzyme specificity is restricted to a narrow regime of optimal conditions while opportunities outside the optimum conditions remain untapped. In addition, the composition of protein substrate (whether mixed or single purified) have been underestimated in previous studies. In addition, protein pre-treatment methods like heat denaturation prior to hydrolysis is a complex phenomenon whose progression is influenced by the environmental conditions including the presence or absence of sugars like lactose, ionic strength, purity of the protein, and the molecular structure of the mixed proteins particularly presence of free thiol groups. In this review, we revisit protein hydrolysis with a focus on the impact of the hydrolysis environment and show that preference of peptide bonds and/or one protein over another during hydrolysis is driven by the environmental conditions. Likewise, heat-denaturing is a process which is dependent on not only the environment but the presence or absence of other proteins.

  14. Interactive media for parental education on managing children chronic condition: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaim, Ali; Lassiter, Mia; Viera, Anthony J; Ferris, Maria

    2015-12-03

    Although some research has examined the use of games for the education of pediatric patients, the use of technology for parental education seems like an appropriate application as it has been a part of the popular culture for at least 30 years. The main objective of this systematic review is to examine the literature for research evaluating the use of interactive media in the education of parents of children with chronic conditions. We searched the MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane database of systematic reviews and EMBASE databases from 1986 to 2014 seeking original investigations on the use of interactive media and video games to educate parents of children with chronic conditions. Cohort studies, randomized control trials, and observational studies were included in our search of the literature. Two investigators reviewed abstracts and full texts as necessary. The quality of the studies was assessed using the GRADE guidelines. Overall trend in the results and the degree of certainty in the results were considered when assessing the body of literature pertaining to our focused questions. Our initial search identified 4367 papers, but only 12 fulfilled the criterion established for final analysis, with the majority of the studies having flaws that reduced their quality. These papers reported mostly positive results supporting the idea that parent education is possible through interactive media. We found limited evidence of the effectiveness of using serious games and or interactive media to educate parents of children with chronic conditions.

  15. MPPT Schemes for PV System under Normal and Partial Shading Condition: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Sameeullah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The photovoltaic system is one of the renewable energy device, which directly converts solar radiation into electricity. The I-V characteristics of PV system are nonlinear in nature and under variable Irradiance and temperature, PV system has a single operating point where the power output is maximum, known as Maximum Power Point (MPP and the point varies on changes in atmospheric conditions and electrical load. Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT is used to track MPP of solar PV system for maximum efficiency operation. The various MPPT techniques together with implementation are reported in literature. In order to choose the best technique based upon the requirements, comprehensive and comparative study should be available. The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of various MPPT techniques for uniform insolation and partial shading conditions. Furthermore, the comparison of practically accepted and widely used techniques has been made based on features, such as control strategy, type of circuitry, number of control variables and cost. This review work provides a quick analysis and design help for PV systems. Article History: Received March 14, 2016; Received in revised form June 26th 2016; Accepted July 1st 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Sameeullah, M. and Swarup, A. (2016. MPPT Schemes for PV System under Normal and Partial Shading Condition: A Review. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(2, 79-94. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.2.79-94 

  16. How is symptom flare defined in musculoskeletal conditions: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nathalia; Ferreira, Manuela L; Cross, Marita; Makovey, Joanna; Hodges, Paul W

    2018-01-31

    To systematically review the definitions for "flare" in musculoskeletal conditions, the derivation processes, and validation of definitions for the 12 most burdensome musculoskeletal conditions. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PsycInfo and Lilacs to identify studies that investigated derivation or validation of a flare definition, which we considered as a phrase or group of domains. Reports of derivation of flare definitions were identified for 9/12 musculoskeletal conditions. Validation of flare definitions was initiated for 4/12. For each condition, different derivation and validation methods have been used, with variable levels of consumer involvement, and in some cases different groups have worked on the process in parallel. Although some flare definitions began simply as "symptom worsening" or "change in treatment", most evolved into multidimensional definitions that include: pain, impact on function, joint symptoms, and emotional elements. Frequently initial attempts to create phrase to define the term flare evolved into consensus on the breadth of domains involved. Validation has compared flare definitions/domains against measures of disease activity, clinicians' diagnosis, response to drug therapy, or a combination. This review suggests that greater characterisation and definition of flares in musculoskeletal conditions are linked to the inclusion of multiple perspectives, multifaceted domains and compound comparators for their validation. Further work is required to optimise and test the derived definitions for most musculoskeletal conditions. As some elements are disease-specific, flare definitions cannot be extrapolated to other conditions. Research regarding flare in back pain (most burdensome disease) is limited. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hanford Double-Shell Tank Extent-of-Condition Construction Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venetz, Theodore J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Gunter, Jason R.; Barnes, Travis J.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2013-01-01

    During routine visual inspections of Hanford double-shell waste tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102), anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. Following a formal leak assessment in October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. The formal leak assessment, documented in RPP-ASMT-53793,Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Report, identified first-of-a-kind construction difficulties and trial-and-error repairs as major contributing factors to tank failure. To determine if improvements in double-shell tank (DST) construction occurred after construction of tank AY-102, a detailed review and evaluation of historical construction records were performed for the first three DST tank farms constructed, which included tanks 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101, 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The review for these six tanks involved research and review of dozens of boxes of historical project documentation. These reviews form a basis to better understand the current condition of the three oldest Hanford DST farms. They provide a basis for changes to the current tank inspection program and also provide valuable insight into future tank use decisions. If new tanks are constructed in the future, these reviews provide valuable 'lessons-learned' information about expected difficulties as well as construction practices and techniques that are likely to be successful

  18. Hanford Double-Shell Tank Extent-of-Condition Construction Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venetz, Theodore J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Gunter, Jason R.; Barnes, Travis J.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2013-11-14

    During routine visual inspections of Hanford double-shell waste tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102), anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. Following a formal leak assessment in October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. The formal leak assessment, documented in RPP-ASMT-53793,Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Report, identified first-of-a-kind construction difficulties and trial-and-error repairs as major contributing factors to tank failure. To determine if improvements in double-shell tank (DST) construction occurred after construction of tank AY-102, a detailed review and evaluation of historical construction records were performed for the first three DST tank farms constructed, which included tanks 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101, 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The review for these six tanks involved research and review of dozens of boxes of historical project documentation. These reviews form a basis to better understand the current condition of the three oldest Hanford DST farms. They provide a basis for changes to the current tank inspection program and also provide valuable insight into future tank use decisions. If new tanks are constructed in the future, these reviews provide valuable "lessons-learned" information about expected difficulties as well as construction practices and techniques that are likely to be successful.

  19. The impact of environmental conditions on human performance: A critical review of the literature. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverria, D.; Barnes, V.; Bittner, A.

    1994-09-01

    The Battelle Human Affairs Research Centers (HARC) conducted a comprehensive review of the technical literature regarding the impact of environmental conditions on human performance applicable to nuclear power plant workers. The environmental conditions considered were vibration, noise, heat, cold, and light. Research staff identified potential human performance deficits along a continuum of increasing occupational exposure, ranging from deficits that occur at low exposures to deficits that occur at high exposures. Specific deficits were included in the review if scientists demonstrated the exposure caused an effect, using sound methodology. The levels associated with each deficit were then compared to the protection afforded by existing occupational exposure standards. Volume 2 presents several conclusions regarding the applicability of the research literature to environmental conditions in nuclear power plants. The findings presented suggest that occupational standards for vibration, noise, and heat, which were developed to protect health, are inadequate for preventing deficits in cognitive or motor performance in tasks likely to be performed in nuclear power plants. Also, there is little information in the literature on simultaneous conditions; for example, the effects of simultaneous exposure to heat and noise on cognition require more research. As many exposures in nuclear power plants will be simultaneous, this limitation should be kept in mind when using Volume 1

  20. Systematic mapping review about costs and economic evaluations of skin conditions and diseases in the aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichterfeld-Kottner, Andrea; Hahnel, Elisabeth; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Skin conditions and dermatological diseases associated with advanced age (e.g. fungal infection, dry skin and itch) receive increasingly attention in clinical practice and research. Cost and economic evaluations are important sources to inform priority setting and ressource allocation decisions in healthcare. The economics of skin conditions in aged populations has not been systematically reviewed so far. The aim of this mapping review was to summarize the economic evidence of selected skin conditions in the aged (65 + years). A mapping literature review and evidence summary was conducted. Searches were conducted in data bases Medline and Embase via OVID. Cinahl was searched using EBSCO. References lists of potential eligible studies, reviews, guidelines or other sources were screened for additional literature. For evaluation of methodological quality of full economic analyses the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC) checklist was used. Database searches resulted in 1388 records. A total of 270 articles were read in full-text. Thirty-five publications were finally included in the data analysis reporting 38 economic analyses. Ten cost of illness analyses and 26 cost-effectiveness analyses reporting about pressure ulcers, skin tears, pressure ulcers, incontinence associated dermatitis and intertrigo/contact dermatitis/candidiasis treatment and prevention and onychomycosis testing were identified. Limited evidence indicated that low air loss beds were more cost effective than standard beds for prevention of pressure ulcers. Standardized skin care regimens seem to lower the incidence of pressure ulcers, skin tears and IAD but a cost saving effect was not always observed. Findings of this mapping review indicate that there is a paucity of high quality evidence regarding the economic impact of age-associated skin conditions and diseases. Substantial heterogeneity in terms of study design, evaluation perspective, time period, and way of cost estimation was

  1. Inspiratory muscle training: integrative review of use in conditions other than COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Cynthia A; Yeaw, Evelyn

    2007-01-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IM training) is a technique that is designed to improve the performance of the respiratory muscles (RMs) that may be impaired in a variety of conditions. Interest in IM training has expanded over the past two decades, and IM training has been used in an increasingly wide range of clinical conditions. However, the benefits of IM training continue to be debated, primarily because of methodological limitations of studies conducted to date. The focus of this article is to provide a critical review of IM training research in conditions other than chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for which it has been used, including asthma, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis, pre- and postsurgery, ventilator weaning, neuromuscular diseases, and chronic heart failure. Emphasis is placed on what has been learned, remaining questions, future applications, and significance to practice.

  2. Conditions-Based Learning Theory as a Framework for Comparative-Effectiveness Reviews: A Worked Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Liam; Leong, Jessica; Chatterly, Patricia

    2018-02-16

    Phenomenon: An evidence-informed era of medical education encourages the generation and use of comparative-effectiveness reviews, yet the reviews often conclude, curiously, that all instructional approaches are equally effective. We used a conditions-based learning theory to structure a review of the comparative-effectiveness literature on electrocardiogram instruction. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE (Ovid), ERIC (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), and CINAHL (EBSCO) from inception to June 2016. We selected prospective studies that examined the effect of instructional interventions on participants' knowledge and skill with electrocardiogram interpretation. Two reviewers extracted information on the quality of the studies, the effect of instruction on the acquisition of knowledge and skill, and instructional quality. Instructional quality is an index of the extent to which instruction incorporates 4 practices of Gagne's conditions-based learning theory: presenting information, eliciting performance, providing feedback, and assessing learning. Twenty-five studies (3,286 participants) evaluating 47 instructional interventions were synthesized. The methodological quality of most studies was moderate. Instructional quality varied: All interventions presented information and assessed learning, but fewer than half elicited performances or provided feedback. Instructional interventions that incorporated all 4 components improved trainees' abilities considerably more than those that incorporated 3 or fewer; respectively, standardized mean difference (SMD) = 2.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) [2.05, 3.55], versus SMD = 1.44, 95% CI [1.18, 1.69]. Studies that compared "innovative" to "traditional" types of instruction did not yield a significant pooled effect: SMD = 0.18, 95% CI [-0.09, 0.45]. Insights: The use of a conditions-based learning theory to organize the comparative-effectiveness literature reveals differences in the instructional impact of different instructional approaches. It

  3. Co-delivery of Se nanoparticles and pooled SiRNAs for overcoming drug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein and class III β-tubulin in drug-resistant breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjing; Yin, Tiantian; Chen, Qingchang; Qin, Xiuying; Huang, Xiaoquan; Zhao, Shuang; Xu, Taoyuan; Chen, Lanmei; Liu, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Drug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and class III β-tubulin (β-tubulin III) is a major barrier in microtubule-targeting cancer chemotherapy. In this study, layered double hydroxide nanoparticles (LDHs) were employed to simultaneously deliver selenium (Se) and pooled small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to achieve therapeutic efficacy. LDH-supported Se nanoparticles (Se@LDH) were compacted with siRNAs (anti-P-gp and anti-β-tubulin III) via electrostatic interactions, which could protect siRNA from degradation. Se@LDH showed excellent abilities to deliver siRNA into cells, including enhancing siRNA internalization, and promoting siRNA escape from endosomes. siRNA transfection experiments further confirmed a higher gene silencing efficiency of Se@LDH than LDH. Interestingly, we found Se@LDH may be a microtubule (MT) stabilizing agent which could inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle at G2/M phase, disrupting normal mitotic spindle formation and inducing cell apoptosis. When complexed with different specific siRNAs, Se@LDH/siRNA nanoparticles, especially the Se@LDH-pooled siRNAs, exhibit an efficient gene-silencing effect that significantly downregulate the expression of P-gp and β-tubulin III. Moreover, Se@LDH-pooled siRNAs could induce cell apoptosis, change cell morphology and increase cellular ROS levels through change the expression of Bcl-2/Bax, activation of caspase-3, PI3K/AKT/mTOR and MAPK/ERK pathways. These results suggested that co-delivery of Se and pooled siRNAs may be a promising strategy for overcoming the drug resistance mediated by P-gp and β-tubulin III in drug-resistant breast cancers. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Veterinary homeopathy: systematic review of medical conditions studied by randomised placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathie, Robert T; Clausen, Jürgen

    2014-10-18

    A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of veterinary homeopathy has not previously been undertaken. Using Cochrane methods, this review aims to assess risk of bias and to quantify the effect size of homeopathic intervention compared with placebo for each eligible peer-reviewed trial. Judgement in seven assessment domains enabled a trial's risk of bias to be designated as low, unclear or high. A trial was judged to comprise reliable evidence if its risk of bias was low or was unclear in specified domains. A trial was considered to be free of vested interest if it was not funded by a homeopathic pharmacy. The 18 eligible RCTs were disparate in nature, representing four species and 11 different medical conditions. Reliable evidence, free from vested interest, was identified in two trials: homeopathic Coli had a prophylactic effect on porcine diarrhoea (odds ratio 3.89, 95 per cent confidence interval [CI], 1.19 to 12.68, P=0.02); and individualised homeopathic treatment did not have a more beneficial effect on bovine mastitis than placebo intervention (standardised mean difference -0.31, 95 per cent CI, -0.97 to 0.34, P=0.35). Mixed findings from the only two placebo-controlled RCTs that had suitably reliable evidence precluded generalisable conclusions about the efficacy of any particular homeopathic medicine or the impact of individualised homeopathic intervention on any given medical condition in animals. British Veterinary Association.

  5. Review of experimental data for modelling LWR fuel cladding behaviour under loss of coolant accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    Extensive range of experiments has been conducted in the past to quantitatively identify and understand the behaviour of fuel rod under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors (LWRs). The obtained experimental data provide the basis for the current emergency core cooling system acceptance criteria under LOCA conditions for LWRs. The results of recent experiments indicate that the cladding alloy composition and high burnup effects influence LOCA acceptance criteria margins. In this report, we review some past important and recent experimental results. We first discuss the background to acceptance criteria for LOCA, namely, clad embrittlement phenomenology, clad embrittlement criteria (limitations on maximum clad oxidation and peak clad temperature) and the experimental bases for the criteria. Two broad kinds of test have been carried out under LOCA conditions: (i) Separate effect tests to study clad oxidation, clad deformation and rupture, and zirconium alloy allotropic phase transition during LOCA. (ii) Integral LOCA tests, in which the entire LOCA sequence is simulated on a single rod or a multi-rod array in a fuel bundle, in laboratory or in a tests and results are discussed and empirical correlations deduced from these tests and quantitative models are conferred. In particular, the impact of niobium in zirconium base clad and hydrogen content of the clad on allotropic phase transformation during LOCA and also the burst stress are discussed. We review some recent LOCA integral test results with emphasis on thermal shock tests. Finally, suggestions for modelling and further evaluation of certain experimental results are made.

  6. Conditions and consequences of medical futility--from a literature review to a clinical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfmark, R; Nilstun, T

    2002-04-01

    To present an analysis of "futility" that is useful in the clinical setting. Literature review. According to Medline more than 750 articles have been published about medical futility. Three criteria (language, time period, and the authors expressed their own opinions) singled out 43 of them. The authors' opinions about futility were analysed using the scheme: "If certain conditions are satisfied, then a particular measure is futile" and "If a particular measure is futile, then certain moral consequences are implied". Regarding conditions, most authors stated that judgments about futility should be made by physicians. The measure was usually some kind of medical treatment, and the goals related to quality of life, physiological improvement, or prolongation of life. The probability of success in reaching the goal was in most cases described in semiquantitative terms. Regarding consequences, the authors stated that health care professionals may (sometimes ought or should) withhold or withdraw a futile measure, most often after a dialogue with the patient (29 articles), but sometimes without informing the patient (nine articles), or with one-way information (four articles). Over time more and more articles recommend that the patient should be involved in joint decision making. Based on this literature review a clinical model was developed. The model, requiring that conditions and consequences should be made explicit, may, in "futility situations", facilitate both the collection of the necessary information and make the moral implications visible. It also makes communication about measures considered to be futile possible without using such ambiguous terms as "futile".

  7. The use of haemoglobin concentrations to assess physiological condition in birds: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Total blood haemoglobin concentration is increasingly being used to assess physiological condition in wild birds, although it has not been explicitly recognized how reliably this parameter reflects different components of individual quality. Thus, I reviewed over 120 published studies linking variation in haemoglobin concentrations to different measures of condition and other phenotypic or ecological traits. In most of the studied avian species, haemoglobin concentrations were positively correlated with other commonly used indices of condition, such as body mass and fat loads, as well as with quality of the diet. Also, chick haemoglobin concentrations reliably reflected the intensity of nest infestation by parasitic arthropods, and haemoglobin was suggested to reflect parasitism by haematophagous ectoparasites much more precisely than haematocrit. There was also some evidence for the negative effect of helminths on haemoglobin levels in adult birds. Finally, haemoglobin concentrations were found to correlate with such fitness-related traits as timing of arrival at breeding grounds, timing of breeding, egg size, developmental stability and habitat quality, although these relationships were not always consistent between species. In consequence, I recommend the total blood haemoglobin concentration as a relatively robust indicator of physiological condition in birds, although this parameter is also strongly affected by age, season and the process of moult. Thus, researchers are advised to control fully for these confounding effects while using haemoglobin concentrations as a proxy of physiological condition in both experimental and field studies on birds.

  8. A review of skin conditions in modern warfare and peacekeeping operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Ari B; Norton, Scott A; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2015-01-01

    Skin is the most exposed organ of the body, and military personnel face many external skin threats. As a result, skin disease is an important source of morbidity among military personnel deployed on combat or peacekeeping operations. This article reviews the most common conditions seen by deployed military dermatologists. A PubMed search was used to identify articles in English, written between 1965 and 2014, using medical subject headings "military medicine" AND "skin disease" or "military personnel" AND "skin disease." The five most common reasons for physician consultation for skin conditions in wartime since the Vietnam War were warts (10.7%), fungal infections (10.4%), acne (9.0%), nonspecific eczematous conditions (7.1%), and sexually transmitted diseases (6.1%). There was a significant difference in the skin conditions seen in the hot and humid climates of Vietnam and East Timor, where bacterial and fungal infections were more common reasons for consultation, and the dry climates of Bosnia and Iraq, where eczematous conditions made up a larger part of the dermatologic caseload. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  9. The psychopharmacological management of RLS in psychiatric conditions: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Norma G

    2012-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a movement disorder treated with dopamine agonists. RLS is often diagnosed as a comorbid condition with psychiatric disorders, which are treated with dopamine antagonists or antidepressants resulting in onset or exacerbation of RLS symptoms. The objectives of this article are to provide a review of the literature to (a) describe the comorbidity of psychiatric disorders associated with RLS, (b) identify the treatment of psychiatric disorders that cause or exacerbate symptoms of RLS, and (c) provide clinical recommendations for psychiatric health care providers. A review of the literature of English articles included the databases of Medline, Pubmed, PsychINFO, and CINAHL for "Restless Legs Syndrome" with major psychiatric disorders including mood disorders (depression and bipolar), schizophrenia, and anxiety disorders (anxiety, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder). The PRISMA guidelines were used to improve the reporting of the review of the literature. There were 61 articles that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria identified for the review of the literature, including RLS with mood disorders (n = 36), schizophrenia (n = 9), and anxiety disorders (n = 16). Clinical trials are lacking on the best treatment for persons with RLS and psychiatric disorders; the most rigorous research found in the literature related to depression and anxiety. Studies lack evidence to document the best practice for persons with RLS and comorbid psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric health care providers should be aware of RLS, which is influenced by psychiatric medications.

  10. Undocumented migrants in Canada: a scope literature review on health, access to services, and working conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Lilian; Carrasco, Christine; Gastaldo, Denise

    2010-02-01

    It is estimated that there are 30-40 million undocumented workers worldwide. Although undocumented migration has become an issue of high international relevance, it has been strikingly understudied in Canada, especially with respect to its impact on health. The purpose of this study is to explore the concept of undocumentedness in Canada through a scoping review of peer-reviewed and grey literature written in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish between 2002 and 2008. The specific aims are to: (i) summarize and disseminate current academic and community-based findings on the health, service access and working conditions of undocumented migrants in Canada; (ii) examine the sources and use of evidence; (iii) identify significant gaps in existing knowledge; (iv) set recommendations for policy and research, including considerations on transnationalism, ethics, interdisciplinary approaches, gender differences, resilience, and impact on the children of non-status parents.

  11. Common and Uncommon Conditions of Breast Disease in Children and Adolescents: A Pictorial Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyoun; Kim, Kyu Soon; Kim, Da Mi [Dept. of f Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, You Me [Dept. of Radiology, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to review various breast diseases in children and adolescents and to illustrate the sonographic findings. We reviewed the cases at our institution in order to identify breast disease in children and adolescent patients who underwent sonography and mammography. Breast disease in children and adolescents included developmental disturbance, infection, benign tumors and inherent defects. In contrast to adults, the radiologic findings of malignant breast conditions in pediatric populations have rarely been reported; however, we show ductal carcinoma in situ with juvenile fibroadenoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. During childhood and adolescence, the recognition and correct identification of physiologic breast development and specific lesions in breast entities on radiologic findings is most helpful in identifying and characterizing abnormalities and in guiding further investigation.

  12. Causal inference regarding infectious aetiology of chronic conditions: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Orrskog

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The global burden of disease has shifted from communicable diseases in children to chronic diseases in adults. This epidemiologic shift varies greatly by region, but in Europe, chronic conditions account for 86% of all deaths, 77% of the disease burden, and up to 80% of health care expenditures. A number of risk factors have been implicated in chronic diseases, such as exposure to infectious agents. A number of associations have been well established while others remain uncertain. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We assessed the body of evidence regarding the infectious aetiology of chronic diseases in the peer-reviewed literature over the last decade. Causality was assessed with three different criteria: First, the total number of associations documented in the literature between each infectious agent and chronic condition; second, the epidemiologic study design (quality of the study; third, evidence for the number of Hill's criteria and Koch's postulates that linked the pathogen with the chronic condition. We identified 3136 publications, of which 148 were included in the analysis. There were a total of 75 different infectious agents and 122 chronic conditions. The evidence was strong for five pathogens, based on study type, strength and number of associations; they accounted for 60% of the associations documented in the literature. They were human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, Helicobacter pylori, hepatitis B virus, and Chlamydia pneumoniae and were collectively implicated in the aetiology of 37 different chronic conditions. Other pathogens examined were only associated with very few chronic conditions (≤ 3 and when applying the three different criteria of evidence the strength of the causality was weak. CONCLUSIONS: Prevention and treatment of these five pathogens lend themselves as effective public health intervention entry points. By concentrating research efforts on these promising areas, the human, economic, and societal

  13. Use of videoconferencing for physical therapy in people with musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovo Grona, Stacey; Bath, Brenna; Busch, Angela; Rotter, Thomas; Trask, Catherine; Harrison, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Physical therapists are key players in the management of musculoskeletal conditions, which are common in rural and remote communities. There are few physical therapists in rural regions compared to potential need, so care is either not provided or must be sought in urban centers, requiring travel and time away from work and family to access services. Telerehabilitation strategies, such as real-time videoconferencing, are emerging as possible solutions to address shortages in rural physical therapy services. Objectives This review will: (1) determine the validity and the reliability of secure videoconferencing for physical therapy management of musculoskeletal conditions; (2) determine the health, system, and process outcomes when using secure videoconferencing for physical therapy management of musculoskeletal conditions. Methods A protocol-driven systematic review of four databases was carried out by two independent reviewers. Study criteria included English language articles from January 2003 to December 2016, on physical therapy management using secure videoconferencing, pertaining to adults 18-80 years with chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Randomized controlled trials, pre-experimental studies, and case-control studies were included. Quality analysis was performed utilizing standardized tools specific for the study designs. Results and conclusions Validity and reliability studies were identified as having high risk of bias. Intervention studies were of moderate quality, and found positive impact on health outcomes and satisfaction. Two studies evaluated costs, with evidence of cost savings in one study. More robust research is required to evaluate long-term effects of telerehabilitation for physical therapy management of musculoskeletal disorders, including cost-benefit analyses.

  14. Review and proposal for heat transfer predictions at supercritical water conditions using existing correlations and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Wadim, E-mail: wadim.jaeger@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, DE-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sanchez Espinoza, Victor Hugo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, DE-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hurtado, Antonio [Technical University of Dresden, Institute of Power Engineering, DE-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Implementation of heat transfer correlations for supercritical water into TRACE. > Simulation of several heat transfer experiments with modified TRACE version. > Most correlations are not able to reproduce the experimental results. > Bishop, Sandberg and Tong correlation is most suitable for TRACE applications. - Abstract: This paper summarizes the activities of the TRACE code validation at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology related to supercritical water conditions. In particular, the providing of the thermo physical properties and its appropriate use in the wall-to-fluid heat transfer models in the frame of the TRACE code is the object of this investigation. In a first step, the thermo physical properties of the original TRACE code were modified in order to account for supercritical conditions. In a second step, existing Nusselt correlations were reviewed and implemented into TRACE and available experiments were simulated to identify the most suitable Nusselt correlation(s).

  15. Review and proposal for heat transfer predictions at supercritical water conditions using existing correlations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, Wadim; Sanchez Espinoza, Victor Hugo; Hurtado, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Implementation of heat transfer correlations for supercritical water into TRACE. → Simulation of several heat transfer experiments with modified TRACE version. → Most correlations are not able to reproduce the experimental results. → Bishop, Sandberg and Tong correlation is most suitable for TRACE applications. - Abstract: This paper summarizes the activities of the TRACE code validation at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology related to supercritical water conditions. In particular, the providing of the thermo physical properties and its appropriate use in the wall-to-fluid heat transfer models in the frame of the TRACE code is the object of this investigation. In a first step, the thermo physical properties of the original TRACE code were modified in order to account for supercritical conditions. In a second step, existing Nusselt correlations were reviewed and implemented into TRACE and available experiments were simulated to identify the most suitable Nusselt correlation(s).

  16. Web-Based Mindfulness Interventions for People With Physical Health Conditions: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivonen, Kirsti I; Zernicke, Kristin; Carlson, Linda E

    2017-08-31

    Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) are becoming increasingly popular for helping people with physical health conditions. Expanding from traditional face-to-face program delivery, there is growing interest in Web-based application of MBIs, though Web-based MBIs for people with physical health conditions specifically have not been thoroughly reviewed to date. The objective of this paper was to review Web-based MBIs for people with physical health conditions and to examine all outcomes reported (eg, efficacy or effectiveness for physical changes or psychological changes; feasibility). Databases PubMed, PsycINFO, Science Direct, CINAHL Plus, and Web of Science were searched. Full-text English papers that described any Web-based MBI, examining any outcome, for people with chronic physical health conditions were included. Randomized, nonrandomized, controlled, and uncontrolled trials were all included. Extracted data included intervention characteristics, population characteristics, outcomes, and quality indicators. Intervention characteristics (eg, synchronicity and guidance) were examined as potential factors related to study outcomes. Of 435 publications screened, 19 published papers describing 16 studies were included. They examined Web-based MBIs for people with cancer, chronic pain or fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), epilepsy, heart disease, tinnitus, and acquired brain injury. Overall, most studies reported positive effects of Web-based MBIs compared with usual care on a variety of outcomes including pain acceptance, coping measures, and depressive symptoms. There were mixed results regarding the effectiveness of Web-based MBIs compared with active control treatment conditions such as cognitive behavioral therapy. Condition-specific symptoms (eg, cancer-related fatigue and IBS symptoms) targeted by treatment had the largest effect size improvements following MBIs. Results are inconclusive regarding physical variables. Preliminary evidence suggests

  17. Life cycle management, design review, and condition assessment of feedwater heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammage, D.; Idvorian, N.

    2012-01-01

    OPEX from both the Nuclear and Fossil Power Generation Industries shows that Feedwater Heaters (FWHs) are subject to several degradation mechanisms and that this degradation commonly leads to replacement of these vessels in order to ensure reliable, efficient operation of the plants. Loss of feedwater heating will impact plant thermal performance. In response to inspection results showing on-going degradation as well as other factors, B&W Canada completed a project in conjunction with a US PWR utility to review the design, condition, and Life Cycle Management of their FWHs. This project involved a multi-disciplinary approach in order to consider all aspects of the FWHs in order to provide insight into the Life Cycle Management Plan (LCMP) so that the FWHs can be operated reliably into the future and so that adequate inspections can be conducted in order to produce a detailed condition assessment. The utility was interested in evaluating their FWH LCMP to determine if it was adequate in its requirements to enable reliable, leak-free operation of their FWH equipment. As inputs to this evaluation, it was required that B&W Canada evaluate both confirmed and plausible degradation mechanisms. They also required that the thermal hydraulic and functional design be evaluated for their particular FWHs. It was important to also incorporate industry OPEX in order to provide proper trending information for tube plugging. Out of this evaluation there were several findings and recommendations that could be used to update the utilities’ LCMP as it was apparent that the current version may not be truly reflective of the current condition of the equipment or of current industry OPEX of such FWHs. Several recommendations came from this evaluation, the most significant were: • Performing thermal/hydraulic, FIV (flow-induced vibration), and tube/shell interaction calculations to determine how the FWHs operate and how their performance can change over time as a function of tube

  18. The effectiveness of neural mobilizations in the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, Annalie; Olivier, Benita; Ellis, Richard; Coppieters, Michel; Stewart, Aimee; Mudzi, Witness

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of neural mobilization techniques in various neuro-musculoskeletal conditions. Outcomes will be analyzed in terms of subgroups such as low back pain, cervico-brachial pain and carpal tunnel syndrome. Musculoskeletal disorders were ranked as the second largest contributor to disability worldwide in a study on the global burden of disease. Low back pain and neck pain contributed to 70% of disability in this comprehensive population-based study. Low back pain and neck pain are multifactorial, with heterogeneous populations. It has been proposed that targeting subgroups of patients may result in better treatment outcomes. Neck pain associated with upper limb pain is prevalent. These patients are more disabled than patients with neck pain alone. Similarly, low back pain with leg pain is a common phenomenon and is acknowledged as a predictor for chronicity.Neuropathic pain is often associated with musculoskeletal complaints including low back pain, whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and acute or chronic radiculopathy, and can be a feature of syndromes such as cervico-brachial pain syndrome. According to the International Association for the Study of Pain, neuropathic pain can be described as "pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system." Leg pain associated with back pain can be caused by central sensitization, denervation, nerve sensitization or somatically referred pain. In patients with WAD, neck pain is the most common symptom, but upper limb pain, weakness, paraesthesia and anesthesia are often present. Other conditions in which neural tissue is thought to contribute to the clinical picture are, for instance, lateral epicondalalgia and carpal tunnel syndrome.Management strategies for back pain and neck pain are often multimodal. However, the evidence for effective treatment of nerve related pain is lacking. Neural mobilizations are often used to affect the neural structures in

  19. Fracture Strength of Indirect Resin Composite Laminates to Teeth with Existing Restorations : An Evaluation of Conditioning Protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mese, Ayse; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the fracture strength and failure types of indirect resin-based composite laminates bonded to teeth with aged Class III composite restorations that were conditioned according to various protocols. Materials and Methods: Maxillary central incisors (N = 60) with

  20. Achieving better energy-efficient air conditioning – A review of technologies and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, K.J.; Chou, S.K.; Yang, W.M.; Yan, J.

    2013-01-01

    Air conditioning is essential for maintaining thermal comfort in indoor environments, particularly for hot and humid climates. Today, air conditioning, comprising cooling and dehumidification, has become a necessity in commercial and residential buildings and industrial processes. It accounts for a major share of the energy consumption of a building or facility. In tropical climates, the energy consumed by heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) can exceed 50% of the total energy consumption of a building. This significant figure is primarily due to the heavy duty placed on cooling technologies to remove both sensible and latent heat loads. Therefore, there is tremendous potential to improve the overall efficiency of the air-conditioning systems in buildings. Based on today’s practical technology for cooling, the major components of a chiller plant are (1) compressors, (2) cooling towers, (3) pumps (chilled and cooling water) and (4) fans in air handling units. They all consume mainly electricity to operate. When specifying the kW/R ton of a plant, there are two levels of monitoring cooling efficiency: (1) at the efficiency of the chiller machines or the compressors which consume a major amount of electricity; and (2) at the overall efficiency of cooling plants which include the cooling towers, pumps for moving coolant (chilled and cooling water) to all air-handling units. Pragmatically, a holistic approach is necessary towards achieving a low energy input per cooling achieved such as 0.6 kW/R ton cooling or lower by considering all aspects of the cooling plant. In this paper, we present a review of recent innovative cooling technology and strategies that could potentially lower the kW/R ton of cooling systems – from the existing mean of 0.9 kW/R ton towards 0.6 kW/R ton or lower. The paper, broadly divided into three key sections (see Fig. 2), begins with a review of the recent novel devices that enhances the energy efficiency of cooling systems at

  1. Vibro-acoustic condition monitoring of Internal Combustion Engines: A critical review of existing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvecchio, S.; Bonfiglio, P.; Pompoli, F.

    2018-01-01

    This paper deals with the state-of-the-art strategies and techniques based on vibro-acoustic signals that can monitor and diagnose malfunctions in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs) under both test bench and vehicle operating conditions. Over recent years, several authors have summarized what is known in critical reviews mainly focused on reciprocating machines in general or on specific signal processing techniques: no attempts to deal with IC engine condition monitoring have been made. This paper first gives a brief summary of the generation of sound and vibration in ICEs in order to place further discussion on fault vibro-acoustic diagnosis in context. An overview of the monitoring and diagnostic techniques described in literature using both vibration and acoustic signals is also provided. Different faulty conditions are described which affect combustion, mechanics and the aerodynamics of ICEs. The importance of measuring acoustic signals, as opposed to vibration signals, is due since the former seem to be more suitable for implementation on on-board monitoring systems in view of their non-intrusive behaviour, capability in simultaneously capturing signatures from several mechanical components and because of the possibility of detecting faults affecting airborne transmission paths. In view of the recent needs of the industry to (-) optimize component structural durability adopting long-life cycles, (-) verify the engine final status at the end of the assembly line and (-) reduce the maintenance costs monitoring the ICE life during vehicle operations, monitoring and diagnosing system requests are continuously growing up. The present review can be considered a useful guideline for test engineers in understanding which types of fault can be diagnosed by using vibro-acoustic signals in sufficient time in both test bench and operating conditions and which transducer and signal processing technique (of which the essential background theory is here reported) could be

  2. Soil conditions and cereal root system architecture: review and considerations for linking Darwin and Weaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Sarah M; Watt, Michelle

    2013-03-01

    Charles Darwin founded root system architecture research in 1880 when he described a root bending with gravity. Curving, elongating, and branching are the three cellular processes in roots that underlie root architecture. Together they determine the distribution of roots through soil and time, and hence the plants' access to water and nutrients, and anchorage. Most knowledge of these cellular processes comes from seedlings of the model dicotyledon, Arabidopsis, grown in soil-less conditions with single treatments. Root systems in the field, however, face multiple stimuli that interact with the plant genetics to result in the root system architecture. Here we review how soil conditions influence root system architecture; focusing on cereals. Cereals provide half of human calories, and their root systems differ from those of dicotyledons. We find that few controlled-environment studies combine more than one soil stimulus and, those that do, highlight the complexity of responses. Most studies are conducted on seedling roots; those on adult roots generally show low correlations to seedling studies. Few field studies report root and soil conditions. Until technologies are available to track root architecture in the field, soil analyses combined with knowledge of the effects of factors on elongation and gravitropism could be ranked to better predict the interaction between genetics and environment (G×E) for a given crop. Understanding how soil conditions regulate root architecture can be effectively used to design soil management and plant genetics that best exploit synergies from G×E of roots.

  3. Integrative review of research on general health status and prevalence of common physical health conditions of women after childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Li, Qing

    2008-01-01

    Postpartum mothers experience certain physical health conditions that may affect their quality of life, future health, and health of their children. Yet, the physical health of postpartum mothers is relatively neglected in both research and practice. The purpose of this review is to describe the general health status and prevalence of common physical health conditions of postpartum mothers. The review followed standard procedures for integrative literature reviews. Twenty-two articles were reviewed from searches in scientific databases, reference lists, and an up-to-date survey. Three tables were designed to answer review questions. In general, postpartum mothers self-rate their health as good. They experience certain physical conditions such as fatigue/physical exhaustion, sleep-related problems, pain, sex-related concerns, hemorrhoids/constipation, and breast problems. Despite a limited number of studies, the findings provide a glimpse of the presence of a number of physical health conditions experienced by women in the 2 years postpartum. In the articles reviewed, physical health conditions and postpartum period were poorly defined, no standard scales existed, and the administration of surveys varied widely in time. Those disparities prevented systematic comparisons of results and made it difficult to gain a coherent understanding of the physical health conditions of postpartum mothers. More longitudinal research is needed that focuses on the etiology, predictors, and management of the health conditions most prevalent among postpartum mothers. Instruments are needed that target a broader range of physical conditions in respect to type and severity.

  4. Review of Thawing Time Prediction Models Depending on Process Conditions and Product Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter E. L. Spiess

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining thawing times of frozen foods is a challenging problem as the thermophysical properties of the product change during thawing. A number of calculation models and solutions have been developed. The proposed solutions range from relatively simple analytical equations based on a number of assumptions to a group of empirical approaches that sometimes require complex calculations. In this paper analytical, empirical and graphical models are presented and critically reviewed. The conditions of solution, limitations and possible applications of the models are discussed. The graphical and semi-graphical models are derived from numerical methods. Using the numerical methods is not always possible as running calculations takes time, whereas the specialized software and equipment are not always cheap. For these reasons, the application of analytical-empirical models is more useful for engineering. It is demonstrated that there is no simple, accurate and feasible analytical method for thawing time prediction. Consequently, simplified methods are needed for thawing time estimation of agricultural and food products. The review reveals the need for further improvement of the existing solutions or development of new ones that will enable accurate determination of thawing time within a wide range of practical conditions of heat transfer during processing.

  5. Global Postural Reeducation for patients with musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni E. Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives To systematically review randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of Global Postural Reeducation (GPR on patient-reported outcomes in conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Method An electronic search of MEDLINE (via PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and SciELO was performed from their inception to June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that analyzed pain and patient-reported outcomes were included in this review. The Cochrane Collaboration’s Risk of Bias Tool was used to evaluate risk of bias, and the quality of evidence was rated following the GRADE approach. There were no language restrictions. Results Eleven trials were included totaling 383 patients. Overall, the trials had high risk of bias. GPR was superior to no treatment but not to other forms of treatment for pain and disability. No placebo-controlled trials were found. Conclusion GPR is not superior to other treatments; however, it is superior to no treatment. Due to the lack of studies, it is unknown if GPR is better than placebo. The quality of the available evidence ranges from low to very low, therefore future studies may change the effect estimates of GPR in musculoskeletal conditions.

  6. Global Postural Reeducation for patients with musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Giovanni E.; Barreto, Rodrigo G. P.; Robinson, Caroline C.; Plentz, Rodrigo D. M.; Silva, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To systematically review randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) on patient-reported outcomes in conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Method An electronic search of MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and SciELO was performed from their inception to June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that analyzed pain and patient-reported outcomes were included in this review. The Cochrane Collaboration’s Risk of Bias Tool was used to evaluate risk of bias, and the quality of evidence was rated following the GRADE approach. There were no language restrictions. Results Eleven trials were included totaling 383 patients. Overall, the trials had high risk of bias. GPR was superior to no treatment but not to other forms of treatment for pain and disability. No placebo-controlled trials were found. Conclusion GPR is not superior to other treatments; however, it is superior to no treatment. Due to the lack of studies, it is unknown if GPR is better than placebo. The quality of the available evidence ranges from low to very low, therefore future studies may change the effect estimates of GPR in musculoskeletal conditions. PMID:27437710

  7. Global Postural Reeducation for patients with musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Giovanni E; Barreto, Rodrigo G P; Robinson, Caroline C; Plentz, Rodrigo D M; Silva, Marcelo F

    2016-04-01

    To systematically review randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) on patient-reported outcomes in conditions of the musculoskeletal system. An electronic search of MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and SciELO was performed from their inception to June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that analyzed pain and patient-reported outcomes were included in this review. The Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias Tool was used to evaluate risk of bias, and the quality of evidence was rated following the GRADE approach. There were no language restrictions. Eleven trials were included totaling 383 patients. Overall, the trials had high risk of bias. GPR was superior to no treatment but not to other forms of treatment for pain and disability. No placebo-controlled trials were found. GPR is not superior to other treatments; however, it is superior to no treatment. Due to the lack of studies, it is unknown if GPR is better than placebo. The quality of the available evidence ranges from low to very low, therefore future studies may change the effect estimates of GPR in musculoskeletal conditions.

  8. A review of Small Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS advantages as a tool in condition survey works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat Yasin Mohd Fadzil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoption of new technology in building inspection works has proven to be very crucial and has improved efficiency and effectiveness in this regards. Tools and techniques in building inspection and condition survey continuously evolved trough times. The tools and techniques adopted mostly first has been successfully applied by others technical field such as civil engineering, manufacturing etc.. As UAS has been successfully adopted by many technical professions such as geotechnical engineering, land surveying, civil engineering etc. a practical use of UAV for building surveying and facilities management yet to explored. The present paper intend to explore the viability of UAS application for building inspection with the advantage it has especially in inspecting and collecting data at difficult to reach area such as roof, ceiling, gutter and recording data for large building complex. With the accurate and comprehensive inspection data collected, perhaps it could guide building surveyors or facilities managers in diagnosing building defect effectively, suggesting possible remedies, solving issues and making decision precisely. The present paper provides a comprehensive review of possible application of small UAS in building inspection and facilities management related uses by reviewing the similar application and identifying their features that suits facilities management’s nature of practice. Challenges faced by building and facilities management organisation to apply UAS in their building condition survey routine that are identifying suitable tools other than normal visual tools to be attached, finalising arrangement on site during inspection and limited skill of existing personnel to deal with the equipments.

  9. A systematic review of thrust manipulation for non-surgical shoulder conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkalis, Amy L; Vining, Robert D; Long, Cynthia R; Hawk, Cheryl; de Luca, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Although many conservative management options are available for patients with non-surgical shoulder conditions, there is little evidence of their effectiveness. This review investigated one manual therapy approach, thrust manipulation, as a treatment option. A systematic search was conducted of the electronic databases from inception to March 2016: PubMed, PEDro, ICL, CINAHL, and AMED. Two independent reviewers conducted the screening process to determine article eligibility. Inclusion criteria were manuscripts published in peer-reviewed journals with human participants of any age. The intervention included was thrust, or high-velocity low-amplitude, manipulative therapy directed to the shoulder and/or the regions of the cervical or thoracic spine. Studies investigating secondary shoulder pain or lacking diagnostic confirmation procedures were excluded. Methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro scale and the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. The initial search rendered 5041 articles. After screening titles and abstracts, 36 articles remained for full-text review. Six articles studying subacromial impingement syndrome met inclusion criteria. Four studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 were uncontrolled clinical studies. Five studies included 1 application of a thoracic spine thrust manipulation and 1 applied 8 treatments incorporating a shoulder joint thrust manipulation. Statistically significant improvements in pain scores were reported in all studies. Three of 4 RCTs compared a thrust manipulation to a sham, and statistical significance in pain reduction was found within the groups but not between them. Clinically meaningful changes in pain were inconsistent; 3 studies reported that scores met minimum clinically important difference, 1 reported scores did not, and 2 were unclear. Four studies found statistically significant improvements in disability; however, 2 were RCTs and did not find statistical significance between the active and sham

  10. A Review of Critical Conditions for the Onset of Nonlinear Fluid Flow in Rock Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyuan Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Selecting appropriate governing equations for fluid flow in fractured rock masses is of special importance for estimating the permeability of rock fracture networks. When the flow velocity is small, the flow is in the linear regime and obeys the cubic law, whereas when the flow velocity is large, the flow is in the nonlinear regime and should be simulated by solving the complex Navier-Stokes equations. The critical conditions such as critical Reynolds number and critical hydraulic gradient are commonly defined in the previous works to quantify the onset of nonlinear fluid flow. This study reviews the simplifications of governing equations from the Navier-Stokes equations, Stokes equation, and Reynold equation to the cubic law and reviews the evolutions of critical Reynolds number and critical hydraulic gradient for fluid flow in rock fractures and fracture networks, considering the influences of shear displacement, normal stress and/or confining pressure, fracture surface roughness, aperture, and number of intersections. This review provides a reference for the engineers and hydrogeologists especially the beginners to thoroughly understand the nonlinear flow regimes/mechanisms within complex fractured rock masses.

  11. Hanford Double-Shell Tank Extent-of-Condition Review - 15498

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J. M.; Baide, D. D.; Barnes, T. J.; Boomer, K. D.; Gunter, J. R.; Venetz, T. J.

    2014-11-19

    During routine visual inspections of Hanford double-shell waste tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102), anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. Following a formal leak assessment in October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. A formal leak assessment, documented in RPP-ASMT-53793, Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Report, identified first-of-a-kind construction difficulties and trial-and-error repairs as major contributing factors to tank failure.1 To determine if improvements in double-shell tank (DST) construction occurred after construction of tank AY-102, a detailed review and evaluation of historical construction records was performed for Hanford’s remaining twenty-seven DSTs. Review involved research of 241 boxes of historical project documentation to better understand the condition of the Hanford DST farms, noting similarities in construction difficulties/issues to tank AY-102. Information gathered provides valuable insight regarding construction difficulties, future tank operations decisions, and guidance of the current tank inspection program. Should new waste storage tanks be constructed in the future, these reviews also provide valuable lessons-learned.

  12. Do people with existing chronic conditions benefit from telephone coaching? A rapid review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Sarah M; Harris, Mark; Lloyd, Jane; Powell Davies, Gawaine; Faruqi, Nighat; Zwar, Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    To examine the effectiveness of telephone-based coaching services for the management of patients with chronic diseases. A rapid scoping review of the published peer reviewed literature, using Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsychNet and Scopus. We included studies involving people aged 18 years or over with one or more of the following chronic conditions: type 2 diabetes, congestive cardiac failure, coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension. Patients were identified as having multi-morbidity if they had an index chronic condition plus one or more other chronic condition. To be included in this review, the telephone coaching had to involve two-way conversations by telephone or video phone between a patient and a provider. Behaviour change, goal setting and empowerment are essential features of coaching. The review found 1756 papers, which was reduced to 30 after screening and relevance checks. Most coaching services were planned, as opposed to reactive, and targeted patients with complex needs who had one or more chronic disease. Several studies reported improvements in health behaviour, self-efficacy, health status and satisfaction with the service. More than one-third of the papers targeted vulnerable people and telephone coaching was found to be effective for these people. Telephone coaching for people with chronic conditions can improve health behaviour, self-efficacy and health status. This is especially true for vulnerable populations who had difficulty accessing health services. There is less evidence for improvements in quality of life and patient satisfaction with the service. The evidence for improvements in health service use was limited. This rapid scoping review found that telephone-based coaching can enhance the management of chronic disease, especially for vulnerable groups. Further work is needed to identify what models of telephone coaching are most effective according to patients' level of risk and co-morbidity. What

  13. A review of health utilities across conditions common in paediatric and adult populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopkins Robert B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cost-utility analyses are commonly used in economic evaluations of interventions or conditions that have an impact on health-related quality of life. However, evaluating utilities in children presents several challenges since young children may not have the cognitive ability to complete measurement tasks and thus utility values must be estimated by proxy assessors. Another solution is to use utilities derived from an adult population. To better inform the future conduct of cost-utility analyses in paediatric populations, we reviewed the published literature reporting utilities among children and adults across selected conditions common to paediatric and adult populations. Methods An electronic search of Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library up to November 2008 was conducted to identify studies presenting utility values derived from the Health Utilities Index (HUI or EuroQoL-5Dimensions (EQ-5D questionnaires or using time trade off (TTO or standard gamble (SG techniques in children and/or adult populations from randomized controlled trials, comparative or non-comparative observational studies, or cross-sectional studies. The search was targeted to four chronic diseases/conditions common to both children and adults and known to have a negative impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Results After screening 951 citations identified from the literature search, 77 unique studies included in our review evaluated utilities in patients with asthma (n = 25, cancer (n = 23, diabetes mellitus (n = 11, skin diseases (n = 19 or chronic diseases (n = 2, with some studies evaluating multiple conditions. Utility values were estimated using HUI (n = 33, EQ-5D (n = 26, TTO (n = 12, and SG (n = 14, with some studies applying more than one technique to estimate utility values. 21% of studies evaluated utilities in children, of those the majority being in the area of oncology. No utility values for children were reported in skin

  14. Segmental dependent transport of low permeability compounds along the small intestine due to P-glycoprotein: the role of efflux transport in the oral absorption of BCS class III drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of P-gp efflux in the in vivo intestinal absorption process of BCS class III P-gp substrates, i.e. high-solubility low-permeability drugs. The in vivo permeability of two H (2)-antagonists, cimetidine and famotidine, was determined by the single-pass intestinal perfusion model in different regions of the rat small intestine, in the presence or absence of the P-gp inhibitor verapamil. The apical to basolateral (AP-BL) and the BL-AP transport of the compounds in the presence or absence of various efflux transporters inhibitors (verapamil, erythromycin, quinidine, MK-571 and fumitremorgin C) was investigated across Caco-2 cell monolayers. P-gp expression levels in the different intestinal segments were confirmed by immunoblotting. Cimetidine and famotidine exhibited segmental dependent permeability through the gut wall, with decreased P(eff) in the distal ileum in comparison to the proximal regions of the intestine. Coperfusion of verapamil with the drugs significantly increased the permeability in the ileum, while no significant change in the jejunal permeability was observed. Both drugs exhibited significantly greater BL-AP than AP-BL Caco-2 permeability, indicative of net mucosal secretion. Concentration dependent decrease of this secretion was obtained by the P-gp inhibitors verapamil, erythromycin and quinidine, while no effect was evident by the MRP2 inhibitor MK-571 and the BCRP inhibitor FTC, indicating that P-gp is the transporter mediates the intestinal efflux of cimetidine and famotidine. P-gp levels throughout the intestine were inversely related to the in vivo permeability of the drugs from the different segments. The data demonstrate that for these high-solubility low-permeability P-gp substrates, P-gp limits in vivo intestinal absorption in the distal segments of the small intestine; however P-gp plays a minimal role in the proximal intestinal segments due to significant lower P-gp expression levels

  15. Multidimensional indices of clinical oral conditions from a population perspective: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Daniela de Rossi; Bastos, João Luiz; Silva, Luciana; Peres, Karen Glazer

    2016-04-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the literature on indices that assess different clinical oral conditions simultaneously from a population perspective. A search of the literature was carried out considering articles indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, and LILACS, using search queries containing free and controlled vocabulary. The search included validity and reproducibility studies on the development of indices that assessed, simultaneously, at least two of the following oral morbidities: dental caries, periodontal status, and occlusal conditions, regardless of their indication for specific age or age groups. Of the 2240 studies identified, 21 were considered eligible to be included in this study. Most studies (70% n = 14) were published between the 1960s and the 1990s. Eight indices were identified and half of these originated from the United States. For most indices, the minimum age indicated was 19 years and above. All the indices evaluated dental caries, and more than 2/3 evaluated periodontal status. None evaluated need for prosthesis and one included need for treatment. Interobserver and intra-observer reliability values were 0.7 or above. Most studies only presented content validity. Although few normative oral health indices and validation studies were developed after the 1990s, the reliability values of all the reviewed studies were satisfactory; however, they did not present a refinement in terms of validity. This evidence suggests that further studies are needed to demonstrate the validity and/or reproducibility of multidimensional measures of clinical oral conditions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Historical Review of Uncommanded Lateral-Directional Motions at Transonic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Joseph R.; Hall, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey of past experiences with uncommanded lateral-directional motions at transonic speeds during specific military aircraft programs. The effort was undertaken to provide qualitative and quantitative information on past airplane programs that might be of use to the participants in the joint NASA/Navy/Air Force Abrupt Wing Stall (AWS) Program. The AWS Program was initiated because of the experiences of the F/A-l8E/F development program, during which unexpected, severe wing-drop motions were encountered by preproduction aircraft at transonic conditions. These motions were judged to be significantly degrading to the primary mission requirements of the aircraft. Although the problem was subsequently solved for the production version of the F/A-l8E/F, a high-level review panel emphasized the poor understanding of such phenomena and issued a strong recommendation to: "Initiate a national research effort to thoroughly and systematically study the wing drop phenomena." A comprehensive, cooperative NASA/Navy/Air Force AWS Program was designed to respond to provide the required technology requirements. As part of the AWS Program, a work element was directed at a historical review of wing-drop experiences in past aircraft development programs at high subsonic and transonic speeds. In particular, information was requested regarding: specific aircraft configurations that exhibited uncommanded motions and the nature of the motions; geometric characteristics of the air- planes; flight conditions involved in occurrences; relevant data, including wind-tunnel, computational, and flight sources; figures of merit used for analyses; and approaches used to alleviate the problem. An attempt was also made to summarize some of the more important lessons learned from past experiences, and to recommend specific research efforts. In addition to providing technical information to assist the AWS research objectives, the study produced fundamental

  17. Historical Review of Uncommanded Lateral-Directional Motions At Transonic Conditions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Joseph R.; Hall, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey of past experiences with uncommanded lateral-directional motions at transonic speeds during specific military aircraft programs. The effort was undertaken to provide qualitative and quantitative information on past airplane programs that might be of use to the participants in the joint NASA/Navy/Air Force Abrupt Wing Stall (AWS) Program. The AWS Program was initiated because of the experiences of the F/A-18E/F development program, during which unexpected, severe wing-drop motions were encountered by preproduction aircraft at transonic conditions. These motions were judged to be significantly degrading to the primary mission requirements of the aircraft. Although the problem was subsequently solved for the production version of the F/A-l8E/F, a high-level review panel emphasized the poor understanding of such phenomena and issued a strong recommendation to: Initiate a national research effort to thoroughly and systematically study the wing drop phenomena. A comprehensive, cooperative NASA/Navy/Air Force AWS Program was designed to respond to provide the required technology requirements. As part of the AWS Program, a work element was directed at a historical review of wing-drop experiences in past aircraft development programs at high subsonic and transonic speeds. In particular, information was requested regarding: specific aircraft configurations that exhibited uncommanded motions and the nature of the motions; geometric characteristics of the air- planes; flight conditions involved in occurrences; relevant data, including wind-tunnel, computational, and flight sources; figures of merit used for analyses; and approaches used to alleviate the problem. An attempt was also made to summarize some of the more important lessons learned from past experiences, and to recommend specific research efforts. In addition to providing technical information to assist the AWS research objectives, the study produced fundamental information

  18. The epidemiology of skin conditions in the aged: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Elisabeth; Lichterfeld, Andrea; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2017-02-01

    The human population is aging. A systematic summary of the epidemiology of skin diseases in the aged is lacking. A systematic review was conducted including electronic database searches in MEDLINE, Embase, SCOPUS and Web of Science. The eligibility criteria were primary incidence and prevalence studies or secondary data analysis, English or German language, subjects being 65+ years and reported skin problems or diseases. Data extraction was conducted using a standardized data collection form and the methodological quality of included studies was assessed. After screening of 1491 records, 74 records were included reporting data for more than 20 skin conditions. The majority of prevalence and incidence figures was identified for hospital and long-term care settings. The most prevalent skin diseases were fungal infections (14.3%-64%), dermatitis (1%-58.7%), xerosis (5.4%-85.5%) and benign skin tumors (1.7%-74.5%). Additionally, pressure ulcer prevalence ranged from 0.3% to 46% and incidence from 0.8% to 34%. Skin conditions and diseases in aged populations are frequent. Health care practitioners should pay attention to those, although skin conditions might not be the primary reason for seeking care. Epidemiological data are lacking especially for home care and community settings although this can be regarded as the most important from a public health and prevention point of view. The methodological quality and reporting of epidemiological studies in the aged populations must be improved. CRD42014014553 (PROSPERO). Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Weather conditions and Bell's palsy: five-year study and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milionis Haralampos J

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climatic or meteorological condition changes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy (BP. We evaluate the influence of meteorological parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure, and their variation and covariation on the incidence of BP and present a review of the literature on the effect of meteorological conditions on facial nerve function. Methods A total of 171 cases of BP admitted to our Department over a five-year period were studied. The meteorological database included daily values of 13 distinct parameters recorded at the meteorological station of the University of Ioannina during this period. A relationship between each meteorological variable and the incidence of BP was investigated by applying (Χ2 test on data from 13 contingency tables. In addition, the influence of different weather types on the incidence of BP was also investigated. For this purpose Cluster Analysis was used to create eight clusters (weather types for the Ioannina prefecture and (Χ2 test was applied on the contingency tables consisting of the days of BP cases for each cluster. Results No significant correlation was found either between BP and each distinct meteorological parameter or between BP and any specific weather. Conclusions Meteorological conditions, such as those dominating in the Northwestern Greece, and/or their changes have little effect on the incidence of BP. Multicenter studies taking into account atmospheric pollution, and climatic differences between countries, are necessary to scrutinize the environmental effects on facial nerve function.

  20. Fuel performance under normal PWR conditions: A review of relevant experimental results and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, M.; Lemaignan, C.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments conducted at Grenoble (CEA/DRN) over the past 20 years in the field of nuclear fuel behaviour are reviewed. Of particular concern is the need to achieve a comprehensive understanding of and subsequently overcome the limitations associated with high burnup and load-following conditions (pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), fission gas release (FGR), water-side corrosion). A general view is given of the organization of research work as well as some ecperimental details (irradiation, postirradiation examination - PIE). Based on various experimental programmes (Cyrano, Medicis, Anemone, Furet, Tango, Contact, Cansar, Hatac, Flog, Decor), the main contributions of the thermomechanical behaviour of a PWR fuel rod are described: thermal conductivity, in-pile densification, swelling, fission gas release in steady state and moderate transient conditions, gap thermal conductance, formation of primary and secondary ridges under PCI conditions. Specific programmes (Gdgrif, Thermox, Grimox) are devoted to the behaviour of particular fuels (gadolinia-bearing fuel, MOX fuel). Moreover, microstructure-based studies have been undertaken on fission gas release (fine analysis of the bubble population inside irradiated fuel samples), and on cladding behaviour (PCI related studies on stress-corrosion cracking (SCC), irradiation effects on ziraloy microstructure). (orig.)

  1. A review of irradiation induced creep in graphite under CAGR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocklehurst, J.E.; Kelly, B.T.

    1989-06-01

    Graphite irradiation induced creep data have been reviewed in detail and compared with the existing model used for stress calculations under Commercial Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor conditions. The relationship between creep and elastic modulus is well established and allows the creep behaviour of any graphite in any orientation to be predicted. The model predicts the initial build up of creep strain in different graphites extremely well. However, there are differences between prediction and experiment in creep at high doses; a creep test on a pre-irradiated specimen showed rather more creep ductility than predicted, whilst in experiments under a constant stress applied for the whole period of irradiation, the creep rates decreased to lower values than predicted. It is suggested that to obtain better estimates of brick stresses future irradiation experiments should aim to generate creep data under realistic variations in applied stress level, or rather creep strain history. (author)

  2. HVAC (heating, ventilation, air conditioning) literature in Japan: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hane, G.J.

    1988-02-01

    Japanese businessmen in the heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVACandR) industry consider the monitoring of technical and market developments in the United States to be a normal part of their business. In contrast, efforts by US businessmen to monitor Japanese HVAC and R developments are poorly developed. To begin to redress this imbalance, this report establishes the groundwork for a more effective system for use in monitoring Japanese HVAC and R literature. Discussions of a review of the principal HVAC and R publications in Japan and descriptions of the type of information contained in each of those publications are included in this report. Since the Japanese HVAC and R literature is abundant, this report also provides practical suggestions on how a researcher or research manager can limit the monitoring effort to the publications and type of information that would most likely be of greatest value.

  3. A Review on the Assessment of Stress Conditions for Simultaneous Production of Microalgal Lipids and Carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhas, Amritpreet K.; Hodgson, Peter; Barrow, Colin J.; Adholeya, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal species are potential resource of both biofuels and high-value metabolites, and their production is growth dependent. Growth parameters can be screened for the selection of novel microalgal species that produce molecules of interest. In this context our review confirms that, autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms have demonstrated a dual potential, namely the ability to produce lipids as well as value-added products (particularly carotenoids) under influence of various physico-chemical stresses on microalgae. Some species of microalgae can synthesize, besides some pigments, very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VL-PUFA,>20C) such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, those have significant applications in food and health. Producing value-added by-products in addition to biofuels, fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and lipids has the potential to improve microalgae-based biorefineries by employing either the autotrophic or the heterotrophic mode, which could be an offshoot of biotechnology. The review considers the potential of microalgae to produce a range of products and indicates future directions for developing suitable criteria for choosing novel isolates through bioprospecting large gene pool of microalga obtained from various habitats and climatic conditions. PMID:27199903

  4. The impact of different environmental conditions on cognitive function: a focused review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee eTaylor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive function defines performance in objective tasks that require conscious mental effort. Extreme environments, namely heat, hypoxia, and cold can all alter human cognitive function due to a variety of psychological and/or biological processes. The aims of this Focused Review were to discuss; 1 the current state of knowledge on the effects of heat, hypoxic and cold stress on cognitive function, 2 the potential mechanisms underpinning these alterations, and 3 plausible interventions that may maintain cognitive function upon exposure to each of these environmental stressors. The available evidence suggests that the effects of heat, hypoxia and cold stress on cognitive function are both task and severity dependent. Complex tasks are particularly vulnerable to extreme heat stress, whereas both simple and complex task performance appear to be vulnerable at even at moderate altitudes. Cold stress also appears to negatively impact both simple and complex task performance, however, the research in this area is sparse in comparison to heat and hypoxia. In summary, this focused review provides updated knowledge regarding the effects of extreme environmental stressors on cognitive function and their biological underpinnings. Tyrosine supplementation may help individuals maintain cognitive function in very hot, hypoxic, and/or cold conditions. However, more research is needed to clarify these and other postulated interventions.

  5. Patient-level costs of major cardiovascular conditions: a review of the international literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Gina; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Halbert, Ronald J; Richhariya, Akshara; Nordyke, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Robust cost estimates of cardiovascular (CV) events are required for assessing health care interventions aimed at reducing the economic burden of major adverse CV events. This review synthesizes international cost estimates of CV events. MEDLINE database was searched electronically for English language studies published during 2007-2012, with cost estimates for CV events of interest - unstable angina, myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, and CV revascularization. Included studies provided at least one estimate of patient-level direct costs in adults for any identified country. Information on study characteristics and cost estimates were collected. All costs were adjusted for inflation to 2013 values. Across the 114 studies included, the average cost was US $6,466 for unstable angina, $11,664 for acute myocardial infarction, $11,686 for acute heart failure, $11,635 for acute ischemic stroke, $37,611 for coronary artery bypass graft, and $13,501 for percutaneous coronary intervention. The ranges for cost estimates varied widely across countries with US cost estimate being at least twice as high as European Union costs for some conditions. Few studies were found on populations outside the US and European Union. This review showed wide variation in the cost of CV events within and across countries, while showcasing the continuing economic burden of CV disease. The variability in costs was primarily attributable to differences in study population, costing methodologies, and reporting differences. Reliable cost estimates for assessing economic value of interventions in CV disease are needed.

  6. Bullous impetigo and pregnancy: Case report and review of blistering conditions in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2016-04-18

     Bullous impetigo results from Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) release of exfoliative toxins type A and type B thatresults in flaccid, easily ruptured, bullae in the upper layers of the epidermis.  Physiologic, gestation-associated, and incidental skin changes can occur in pregnancy.  Blisters in pregnant women can occur secondary to either common skin disorders orspecific dermatoses of pregnancy.  To describe a pregnant woman with bullous impetigo and review bullous conditions in pregnant women.  PubMed was used to search the following terms, separately and in combination:  blister, blistering, bullous, gestationis, herpes, herpetiformis, impetigo, pemphigoid, pregnancy, pregnant, psoriasis, pustular, virus. All papers were reviewed and relevant manuscripts, along with their reference citations, were evaluated.  Flaccid, easily rupturing, pustules, which developed into superficial annular erosions with peripheral scale and central healing appeared in a woman of 7-weeks gestation and allergy to penicillin on her lower abdomen, suprapubic region, perineum, buttocks, and proximal legs.  A bacterial culture subsequently isolated methicillin-susceptible S. aureus.  All of the lesions resolved after treatment with clindamycin.  Bullous impetigo should be considered in the differential diagnosis of common skin diseases presenting as blistersin pregnant women.

  7. Clostridium Bacteria and Autism Spectrum Conditions: A Systematic Review and Hypothetical Contribution of Environmental Glyphosate Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora Argou-Cardozo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there seems to be a consensus about the multifactorial nature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD. The literature provides hypotheses dealing with numerous environmental factors and genes accounting for the apparently higher prevalence of this condition. Researchers have shown evidence regarding the impact of gut bacteria on neurological outcomes, altering behavior and potentially affecting the onset and/or severity of psychiatric disorders. Pesticides and agrotoxics are also included among this long list of ASD-related environmental stressors. Of note, ingestion of glyphosate (GLY, a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide, can reduce beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract microbiota without exerting any effects on the Clostridium population, which is highly resistant to this herbicide. In the present study, (i we performed a systematic review to evaluate the relationship between Clostridium bacteria and the probability of developing and/or aggravating autism among children. For that purpose, electronic searches were performed on Medline/PubMed and Scielo databases for identification of relevant studies published in English up to December 2017. Two independent researches selected the studies and analyzed the data. The results of the present systematic review demonstrate an interrelation between Clostridium bacteria colonization of the intestinal tract and autism. Finally, (ii we also hypothesize about how environmental GLY levels may deleteriously influence the gut–brain axis by boosting the growth of Clostridium bacteria in autistic toddlers.

  8. Clostridium Bacteria and Autism Spectrum Conditions: A Systematic Review and Hypothetical Contribution of Environmental Glyphosate Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argou-Cardozo, Isadora; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares

    2018-04-04

    Nowadays, there seems to be a consensus about the multifactorial nature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The literature provides hypotheses dealing with numerous environmental factors and genes accounting for the apparently higher prevalence of this condition. Researchers have shown evidence regarding the impact of gut bacteria on neurological outcomes, altering behavior and potentially affecting the onset and/or severity of psychiatric disorders. Pesticides and agrotoxics are also included among this long list of ASD-related environmental stressors. Of note, ingestion of glyphosate (GLY), a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide, can reduce beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract microbiota without exerting any effects on the Clostridium population, which is highly resistant to this herbicide. In the present study, (i) we performed a systematic review to evaluate the relationship between Clostridium bacteria and the probability of developing and/or aggravating autism among children. For that purpose, electronic searches were performed on Medline/PubMed and Scielo databases for identification of relevant studies published in English up to December 2017. Two independent researches selected the studies and analyzed the data. The results of the present systematic review demonstrate an interrelation between Clostridium bacteria colonization of the intestinal tract and autism. Finally, (ii) we also hypothesize about how environmental GLY levels may deleteriously influence the gut-brain axis by boosting the growth of Clostridium bacteria in autistic toddlers.

  9. Effects of Exercise on Select Biomarkers and Associated Outcomes in Chronic Pain Conditions: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawi, Jennifer; Lukkahatai, Nada; Inouye, Jillian; Thomason, Diane; Connelly, Kirsten

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is highly prevalent. Current management is challenged by lack of validated objective measures like biological markers. Clinical pain studies employing exercise interventions have evaluated biomarkers; however, it is unclear how exercise impacts biomarkers involved in pain pathways and whether these markers are associated with relevant pain-related outcomes. This systematic review evaluates data from clinical studies employing exercise interventions in chronic musculoskeletal nonmalignant pain conditions in which biomarkers in pain pathways were measured. Published research studies from several databases were examined using the Jadad Scale for assessing the quality of clinical studies. Twelve research studies were reviewed. Jadad scores ranged from 5 to 11 out of 13 points. Inflammatory markers were most commonly measured followed by neurotransmitter-related genes and metabolite-detecting genes. After exercise interventions, changes in biomarkers involved in neurotransmission and inflammation suggest a hypoalgesic exercise effect. Significant biomarker associations were found with pain intensity, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. However, there were varying methodologies in the studies reviewed. It remains a question whether biomarkers can be used as objective measures for risk assessment, diagnosis, or evaluation or as surrogate endpoints in chronic pain. Adequate sample sizes, optimal exercise dose determination, study replications, and longitudinal research studies with consistent methodologies are warranted. Regardless, the potential translational value of biomarkers in chronic pain is evident. Advancing nursing research in biomarkers is vital for moving the nursing discipline and clinical chronic pain practice forward. Developing a biobehavioral perspective in chronic pain is also necessary for comprehensive management. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Veterinary homeopathy: systematic review of medical conditions studied by randomised trials controlled by other than placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathie, Robert T; Clausen, Jürgen

    2015-09-15

    No systematic review has previously been carried out on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of veterinary homeopathy in which the control group was an intervention other than placebo (OTP). For eligible peer-reviewed RCTs, the objectives of this study were to assess the risk of bias (RoB) and to quantify the effect size of homeopathic intervention compared with an active comparator or with no treatment. Our systematic review approach complied fully with the PRISMA 2009 Checklist. Cochrane methods were applied to assess RoB and to derive effect size using standard meta-analysis methods. Based on a thorough and systematic literature search, the following key attributes of the published research were distinguished: individualised homeopathy (n = 1 RCT)/non-individualised homeopathy (n = 19); treatment (n = 14)/prophylaxis (n = 6); active controls (n = 18)/untreated controls (n = 2). The trials were highly diverse, representing 12 different medical conditions in 6 different species. No trial had sufficiently low RoB to be judged as reliable evidence: 16 of the 20 RCTs had high RoB; the remaining four had uncertain RoB in several domains of assessment. For three trials with uncertain RoB and without overt vested interest, it was inconclusive whether homeopathy combined with conventional intervention was more or was less effective than conventional intervention alone for modulation of immune response in calves, or in the prophylaxis of cattle tick or of diarrhoea in piglets. Due to the poor reliability of their data, OTP-controlled trials do not currently provide useful insight into the effectiveness of homeopathy in animals.

  11. Critical review: Copper runoff from outdoor copper surfaces at atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Hedberg, Jonas F; Herting, Gunilla; Goidanich, Sara; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2014-01-01

    This review on copper runoff dispersed from unsheltered naturally patinated copper used for roofing and facades summarizes and discusses influencing factors, available literature, and predictive models, and the importance of fate and speciation for environmental risk assessment. Copper runoff from outdoor surfaces is predominantly governed by electrochemical and chemical reactions and is highly dependent on given exposure conditions (size, inclination, geometry, degree of sheltering, and orientation), surface parameters (age, patina composition, and thickness), and site-specific environmental conditions (gaseous pollutants, chlorides, rainfall characteristics (amount, intensity, pH), wind direction, temperature, time of wetness, season). The corrosion rate cannot be used to assess the runoff rate. The extent of released copper varies largely between different rain events and is related to dry and wet periods, dry deposition prior to the rain event and prevailing rain and patina characteristics. Interpretation and use of copper runoff data for environmental risk assessment and management need therefore to consider site-specific factors and focus on average data of long-term studies (several years). Risk assessments require furthermore that changes in copper speciation, bioavailability aspects, and potential irreversible retention on solid surfaces are considered, factors that determine the environmental fate of copper runoff from outdoor surfaces.

  12. Wind Turbine Condition Monitoring: State-of-the-Art Review, New Trends, and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Tchakoua

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As the demand for wind energy continues to grow at exponential rates, reducing operation and maintenance (OM costs and improving reliability have become top priorities in wind turbine (WT maintenance strategies. In addition to the development of more highly evolved WT designs intended to improve availability, the application of reliable and cost-effective condition-monitoring (CM techniques offers an efficient approach to achieve this goal. This paper provides a general review and classification of wind turbine condition monitoring (WTCM methods and techniques with a focus on trends and future challenges. After highlighting the relevant CM, diagnosis, and maintenance analysis, this work outlines the relationship between these concepts and related theories, and examines new trends and future challenges in the WTCM industry. Interesting insights from this research are used to point out strengths and weaknesses in today’s WTCM industry and define research priorities needed for the industry to meet the challenges in wind industry technological evolution and market growth.

  13. A review of social isolation: an important but underassessed condition in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Nicholas R

    2012-06-01

    Social isolation is a major and prevalent health problem among community-dwelling older adults, leading to numerous detrimental health conditions. With a high prevalence, and an increasing number of older persons, social isolation will impact the health, well-being, and quality of life of numerous older adults now and in the foreseeable future. For this review, a series of literature searches of the CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Medline databases were conducted, using the key words "social isolation," "social networks," "older adults," "elderly," "belonging," "perceived isolation," "social engagement," "social contacts," and "social integration," for the period of 1995-2010. The results show that there is an overabundance of evidence demonstrating numerous negative health outcomes and potential risk factors related to social isolation. However, there is scarce evidence that public health professionals are assessing social isolation in older persons, despite their unique access to very socially isolated, homebound older adults. Additionally, few viable interventions were found; therefore, it is advisable to focus on the prevention of social isolation in older adults. Public health professionals can take steps toward increasing the early assessment of social isolation and referring at-risk individuals to available community resources in order to prevent social isolation or further isolation, which would serve to reduce the numerous negative health outcomes associated with this condition.

  14. Natural healers: a review of animal assisted therapy and activities as complementary treatment for chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Reiley; Ferrer, Lilian; Villegas, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this review is to synthesize the existing literature on the use of animal-assisted therapy and activity (AAT/A) as complementary treatment among people living with chronic disease and to discuss the possible application of this practice among children living with HIV. Relevant databases were searched between March 10 and April 11, 2011, using the words: animal assisted therapy or treatment and chronic conditions or diseases. Thirty-one articles were found and 18 followed the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Research suggests that AAT/A is effective for different patient profiles, particularly children. Interaction with dogs has been found to increase positive behaviors, such as sensitivity and focus, in children with social disabilities. Decreased levels of pain have also been reported among child patients as a result of AAT/A. More research should be done in the area of children living with chronic diseases that require strict adherence to treatment, such as HIV, and on AAT/A's prospective use as an educational tool to teach children about the importance of self-care for their medical conditions.

  15. Application of water footprint in a fertirrigated melon crop under semiarid conditions: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos Serrano, María Teresa; Requejo Mariscal, María Isabel; Villena Gordo, Raquel; Cartagena Causapé, María Carmen; Arce Martínez, Augusto; Ribas Elcorobarrutia, Francisco; Jesús Cabello Cabello, María; María Tarquis Alfonso, Ana

    2015-04-01

    In recent times, there has been a major increase in the use of water and fertilizers in order to increase agricultural production, while at the same time there has increased evidence that aquifers are reducing their water level, enriched by nutrient and degraded as a result of pollution. So best management practices are needed for much of cropped, irrigated and fertirrigated land, to avoid contamination of fresh water and groundwater. The concept of "water footprint" (WF) was introduced as an indicator for the total volume of direct and indirect freshwater used, consumed and/or polluted [1]. The WF distinguishes between blue water (volume of surface and groundwater consumed), green water (rain-water consumed), and grey water (volume of freshwater that is required to assimilate the load of pollutants based on existing ambient water quality standards). This study is focused in calculating the crops WF using a real case of study in a fertirrigated melon crop under semiarid conditions which is principally cultivated in the centre of Spain declared vulnerable zone to nitrate pollution by applying the Directive 91/676/CEE. During successive years, a melon crop (Cucumis melo L.) was grown under field conditions applying mineral and organic fertilizers. Different doses of ammonium nitrate were used as well as compost derived from the wine-distillery industry which is relevant in this area. This application help us to review the different concepts in which is based WF. Acknowledgements: This project has been supported by INIA-RTA04-111-C3 and INIA-RTA2010-00110-C03-01. Keywords: Water footprint, nitrogen, fertirrigation, inorganic fertilizers, organic amendments, winery waste, semiarid conditions. [1] Hoekstra, A.Y. 2003. Virtual water trade. Proceedings of the International Expert Meeting on Virtual Water Trade, Delft, The Netherlands, 12-13 December 2002. Value of Water Research Report Series No. 12, UNESCO-IHE, Delft, The Netherlands.

  16. Family and professionals underestimate quality of life across diverse cultures and health conditions: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Thomas F; Smith, Jaime K; Skevington, Suzanne M

    2015-05-01

    To examine how accurately proxies evaluate quality of life (QoL) in people they know, using cross-cultural data from the multidimensional, multilingual World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment short-form (the WHOQOL-BREF) and whether accuracy varies by health condition or proxy type (eg, family/professional). Systematic review with meta-analysis: We searched five databases for reports of proxy-completed WHOQOL-BREF scores and aggregated results using a random-effects model. Minimal clinically important difference values were calculated. Analyses included nine studies (1980 dyads) of physical (n = 762) or mental (n = 604) health conditions, or intellectual disability (n = 614), in 10 countries. Mean person-proxy correlations ranged from 0.28 (social QoL) to 0.44 (physical QoL). Proxy measures were underestimates (ie, significantly lower than persons reported for themselves) for social [mean difference (MD) = 4.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8, 7.6], psychological (MD = 3.7, 95% CI: 0.6, 6.8), and physical (MD = 3.1, 95% CI: 0.6, 5.6) QoL. Underestimates varied significantly between health conditions for social (P Family members assessed psychological and environmental QoL better than professionals. Proxies tend to be imprecise, underestimating QoL, and should be aware of this tendency. Where health care is decided for others, family members' views about QoL should be prioritized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Patient-level costs of major cardiovascular conditions: a review of the international literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholson G

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gina Nicholson,1 Shravanthi R Gandra,2 Ronald J Halbert,1 Akshara Richhariya,2 Robert J Nordyke1 1ICON, El Segundo, 2Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA Objective: Robust cost estimates of cardiovascular (CV events are required for assessing health care interventions aimed at reducing the economic burden of major adverse CV events. This review synthesizes international cost estimates of CV events.Methods: MEDLINE database was searched electronically for English language studies published during 2007-2012, with cost estimates for CV events of interest – unstable angina, myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, and CV revascularization. Included studies provided at least one estimate of patient-level direct costs in adults for any identified country. Information on study characteristics and cost estimates were collected. All costs were adjusted for inflation to 2013 values.Results: Across the 114 studies included, the average cost was US $6,466 for unstable angina, $11,664 for acute myocardial infarction, $11,686 for acute heart failure, $11,635 for acute ischemic stroke, $37,611 for coronary artery bypass graft, and $13,501 for percutaneous coronary intervention. The ranges for cost estimates varied widely across countries with US cost estimate being at least twice as high as European Union costs for some conditions. Few studies were found on populations outside the US and European Union.Conclusion: This review showed wide variation in the cost of CV events within and across countries, while showcasing the continuing economic burden of CV disease. The variability in costs was primarily attributable to differences in study population, costing methodologies, and reporting differences. Reliable cost estimates for assessing economic value of interventions in CV disease are needed. Keywords: cardiovascular diseases, health care costs, hospitalization economics, follow-up studies

  18. Overview of Systematic Reviews of Mindfulness Meditation-based Interventions for People With Long-term Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jaqui; Briggs, Michelle; Astin, Felicity

    2017-01-01

    Context • Increasing numbers of people worldwide live with a long-term health condition (LTC). Finding new ways to support people diagnosed with LTCs is important, both to improve their health-related quality of life and to manage the demands on health services that their conditions present. This effort includes a recognition of the importance of interventions to promote self-care. A growing number of systematic reviews of mindfulness meditation-based interventions (MMIs) for people with LTCs have been published but are diverse in scope and quality. Objectives • This systematic review of reviews aims to provide a critical overview of reviews evaluating studies using MMIs and to identify outcomes and conditions for which the clearest evidence exists for MMI effectiveness. Design • The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Cochrane, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Medline, PsycInfo, and Web of Science databases were searched in November 2013 for systematic reviews of MMIs for LTCs published since January 2005. Review selection and methodological quality assessment were subject to independent checking. Results • Of 3178 identified articles, 27 papers reporting on 26 reviews met the inclusion criteria. A substantially consistent picture emerged. Improvements in depressive disorders, particularly recurrent major depression, were strongly supported. Evidence for other psychological conditions was limited by lack of data. In populations with physical conditions, the evidence for significant improvements in psychological well-being was clear, regardless of population or specific mindfulness intervention. Changes in physical health measures were inconclusive; however, pain acceptance and coping were improved. Further research is needed to determine long-term and mindfulness-specific effects and to clarify the relationship between levels of mindfulness practice and outcomes

  19. A systematic review of adherence in Indigenous Australians: an opportunity to improve chronic condition management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dassel, Jessica Langloh; Ralph, Anna P; Cass, Alan

    2017-12-27

    Indigenous Australians experience high rates of chronic conditions. It is often asserted Indigenous Australians have low adherence to medication; however there has not been a comprehensive examination of the evidence. This systematic literature review presents data from studies of Indigenous Australians on adherence rates and identifies supporting factors and impediments from the perspective of health professionals and patients. Search strategies were used to identify literature in electronic databases and websites. The following databases were searched: Scopus, Medline, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, Academic Search Premier, Cochrane Library, Trove, Indigenous Health infonet and Grey Lit.org . Articles in English, reporting original data on adherence to long-term, self-administered medicines in Australia's Indigenous populations were included. Data were extracted into a standard template and a quality assessment was undertaken. Forty-seven articles met inclusion criteria. Varied study methodologies prevented the use of meta-analysis. health professionals believe adherence is a significant problem for Indigenous Australians; however, adherence rates are rarely measured. Health professionals and patients often reported the same barriers and facilitators, providing a framework for improvement. There is no evidence that medication adherence amongst Indigenous Australians is lower than for the general population. Nevertheless, the heavy burden of morbidity and mortality faced by Indigenous Australians with chronic conditions could be alleviated by enhancing medication adherence. Some evidence supports strategies to improve adherence, including the use of dose administration aids. This evidence should be used by clinicians when prescribing, and to implement and evaluate programs using standard measures to quantify adherence, to drive improvement in health outcomes.

  20. Factors that condition the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions among nurses: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Alessia; Colaceci, Sofia; Giusti, Angela; Vellone, Ercole; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    To describe and synthesise previous research on factors conditioning the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions among nurses. Spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions by health-care providers, are a main instrument for the continuous evaluation of the risk-benefit ratio of every drug. Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions by all health-care providers, in particular by nurses, is a major limitation to this system. An integrated review of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus databases and Google Scholar. After evaluation for appropriateness related to inclusion/exclusion criteria, 16 studies were included in the final analysis and synthesis. Two factors emerged from the study: (1) intrinsic factors related to nurses' knowledge and attitudes; (2) extrinsic factors related to nurses' interaction with health-care organisations and to the relationship between nurses and physicians. Nurses' attitudes that hinder reporting include ignorance, insecurity, fear and lethargy. Nurses are not fully aware of their role in adverse drug reaction reporting. Nurses must acquire greater knowledge to implement specific skills into their daily clinical practice. To improve nurses' reporting of adverse drug reactions, it is necessary to develop management approaches that modify both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Review on plasmas in extraordinary media: plasmas in cryogenic conditions and plasmas in supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauss, Sven; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Terashima, Kazuo

    2018-02-01

    Plasma science and technology has enabled advances in very diverse fields: micro- and nanotechnology, chemical synthesis, materials fabrication and, more recently, biotechnology and medicine. While many of the currently employed plasma tools and technologies are very advanced, the types of plasmas used in micro- and nanofabrication pose certain limits, for example, in treating heat-sensitive materials in plasma biotechnology and plasma medicine. Moreover, many physical properties of plasmas encountered in nature, and especially outer space, i.e. very-low-temperature plasmas or plasmas that occur in high-density media, are not very well understood. The present review gives a short account of laboratory plasmas generated under ’extreme’ conditions: at cryogenic temperatures and in supercritical fluids. The fundamental characteristics of these cryogenic plasmas and cryoplasmas, and plasmas in supercritical fluids, especially supercritical fluid plasmas, are presented with their main applications. The research on such exotic plasmas is expected to lead to further understanding of plasma physics and, at the same time, enable new applications in various technological fields.

  2. Surface Conditioning of Cardiovascular 316L Stainless Steel Stents: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Lucila; Luna, Julio; Rintoul, Ignacio

    2017-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and 90% of coronary interventions consists in stenting procedures. Most of the implanted stents are made of AISI 316L stainless steel (SS). Excellent mechanical properties, biocompatibility, corrosion resistance, workability and statistically demonstrated medical efficiency are the reasons for the preference of 316L SS over any other material for stent manufacture. However, patients receiving 316L SS bare stents are reported with 15-20% of restenosis probability. The decrease of the restenosis probability is the driving force for a number of strategies for surface conditioning of 316L SS stents. This review reports the latest advances in coating, passivation and the generation of controlled topographies as strategies for increasing the corrosion resistance and reducing the ion release and restenosis probability on 316L SS stents. Undoubtedly, the future of technique is related to the elimination of interfaces with abrupt change of properties, the elimination of molecules and any other phase somehow linked to the metal substrate. And leaving the physical, chemical and topographical smart modification of the outer part of the 316L SS stent for enhancing the biocompatiblization with endothelial tissues.

  3. Halitosis: a review of the etiologic factors and association with systemic conditions and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokeem, Sameer A

    2014-11-01

    Halitosis is a general term defined as an unpleasant or offensive odor emanating from the breath, arising from either oral or nonoral sources. Extraoral factors, such as ear-nose-throat conditions or gastrointestinal, respiratory, and systemic diseases, may also contribute to oral malodor. Although, halitosis has a multifactorial etiology, local factors play an important role in the majority of cases. Halitosis may lead to significant personal discomfort and social embarrassment. Assessment of halitosis can be performed using organoleptic measurements, sulfide monitoring, gas chromatography, microbial testing and chemical test strips. Management approaches are based on masking oral malodor, reducing the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), and mechanical and/or chemical treatment. This review aims to identify the etiology of oral halitosis, describe the methods available for assessment and differential diagnosis and introduce a variety of management strategies. The importance of a multidisciplinary approach for the improvement of overall health and for the management and prevention of halitosis is highlighted.

  4. Web Use for Symptom Appraisal of Physical Health Conditions: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Julia; Jay, Caroline; Harper, Simon; Davies, Alan; Vega, Julio; Todd, Chris

    2017-06-13

    The Web has become an important information source for appraising symptoms. We need to understand the role it currently plays in help seeking and symptom evaluation to leverage its potential to support health care delivery. The aim was to systematically review the literature currently available on Web use for symptom appraisal. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ACM Digital Library, SCOPUS, and Web of Science for any empirical studies that addressed the use of the Web by lay people to evaluate symptoms for physical conditions. Articles were excluded if they did not meet minimum quality criteria. Study findings were synthesized using a thematic approach. A total of 32 studies were included. Study designs included cross-sectional surveys, qualitative studies, experimental studies, and studies involving website/search engine usage data. Approximately 35% of adults engage in Web use for symptom appraisal, but this proportion varies between 23% and 75% depending on sociodemographic and disease-related factors. Most searches were symptom-based rather than condition-based. Users viewed only the top search results and interacted more with results that mentioned serious conditions. Web use for symptom appraisal appears to impact on the decision to present to health services, communication with health professionals, and anxiety. Web use for symptom appraisal has the potential to influence the timing of help seeking for symptoms and the communication between patients and health care professionals during consultations. However, studies lack suitable comparison groups as well as follow-up of participants over time to determine whether Web use results in health care utilization and diagnosis. Future research should involve longitudinal follow-up so that we can weigh the benefits of Web use for symptom appraisal (eg, reductions in delays to diagnosis) against the disadvantages (eg, unnecessary anxiety and health care use) and relate these to health care costs. ©Julia Mueller

  5. Review of the complexation of tetravalent actinides by ISA and gluconate under alkaline to hyperalkaline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona, X; Montoya, V; Colàs, E; Grivé, M; Duro, L

    2008-12-12

    Isosaccharinic (ISA) and gluconic acids (GLU) are polyhydroxy carboxylic compounds showing a high affinity to metal complexation. Both organic ligands are expected in the cementitious environments usually considered for the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The hyperalkaline conditions imposed by cementitious materials contribute to the formation of ISA through cellulose degradation, whereas GLU is commonly used as a concrete additive. Despite the high stability attributed to ISA/GLU complexes of tetravalent actinides, the number and reliability of available experimental studies is still limited. This work aims at providing a general and comprehensive overview of the state of the art regarding Th, U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) complexes with ISA and GLU. In the presence of ISA/GLU concentrations in the range 10(-5)-10(-2) M and absence of calcium, An(IV)(OH)x(L)y complexes (An(IV)=Th, U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV); L=ISA, GLU) are expected to dominate the aqueous speciation of tetravalent actinides in the alkaline pH range. There is a moderate agreement among their stability, although the stoichiometry of certain An(IV)-GLU complexes is still ill-defined. Under hyperalkaline conditions and presence of calcium, the species CaTh(OH)4(L)2(aq) has been described for both ISA and GLU, and similar complexes may be expected to form with other tetravalent actinides. In the present work, the available thermodynamic data for An(IV)-ISA/GLU complexes have been reviewed and re-calculated to ensure the internal consistency of the stability constants assessed. Further modelling exercises, estimations based on Linear Free-Energy Relationships (LFER) among tetravalent actinides, as well as direct analogies between ISA and GLU complexes have also been performed. This approach has led to the definition of a speciation scheme for the complexes of Th, U(IV), Np(IV) and Pu(IV) with ISA and GLU forming in alkaline to hyperalkaline pH conditions, both in the absence and

  6. Review of the expected behaviour of alpha titanium alloys under Yucca Mountain conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoesmith, D.W

    2000-03-01

    The use of titanium alloys in two different waste package designs has been reviewed under the, conditions anticipated in the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. In the first design. they are considered as one of three barrier materials incorporated into the waste package design and potentially in galvanic contact with the other two waste package materials, 316L stainless steel and Alloy-22. In the second design the Ti alloy is considered as a drip shield placed over, and not in contact with, a dual wall waste package fabricated from the other two materials. The possible failure processes, crevice corrosion, pitting and hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) have been reviewed for the candidate titanium alloys (Ti-12, Ti-16 and Ti-7). Both pitting and crevice corrosion are very remote possibilities under these conditions. For Ti-12, a limited amount of crevice corrosion is possible but repassivation will occur before substantial damage is sustained. When Ti is considered as part of the triple wall waste package, hydrogen absorption leading to HIC, within an acidified but passive crevice, is the most likely failure mechanism. When the Ti alloy is utilized in the form of a drip shield then hydrogen absorption under potentially alkaline conditions is the major fear. Both Ti-12 and Ti-16 have been shown capable of tolerating substantial amounts of hydrogen ({approx}400 {mu} g{center_dot}g{sup -1} for Ti-12, and > 1000 {mu}g.g{sup -1} for Ti-16) before any effect on the materials fracture toughness is observed. The rate of absorption to a hydrogen content which exceeds these values will be the key feature determining if, or when, the material becomes susceptible to cracking. Once this condition is achieved, whether or not failure occurs will depend on the strength and location of stresses within the structure. For Ti to absorb hydrogen it is inevitably necessary to subject the material to cathodic polarization, either by coupling to a more active material or by the

  7. Review of the expected behaviour of alpha titanium alloys under Yucca Mountain conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    2000-03-01

    The use of titanium alloys in two different waste package designs has been reviewed under the, conditions anticipated in the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. In the first design. they are considered as one of three barrier materials incorporated into the waste package design and potentially in galvanic contact with the other two waste package materials, 316L stainless steel and Alloy-22. In the second design the Ti alloy is considered as a drip shield placed over, and not in contact with, a dual wall waste package fabricated from the other two materials. The possible failure processes, crevice corrosion, pitting and hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) have been reviewed for the candidate titanium alloys (Ti-12, Ti-16 and Ti-7). Both pitting and crevice corrosion are very remote possibilities under these conditions. For Ti-12, a limited amount of crevice corrosion is possible but repassivation will occur before substantial damage is sustained. When Ti is considered as part of the triple wall waste package, hydrogen absorption leading to HIC, within an acidified but passive crevice, is the most likely failure mechanism. When the Ti alloy is utilized in the form of a drip shield then hydrogen absorption under potentially alkaline conditions is the major fear. Both Ti-12 and Ti-16 have been shown capable of tolerating substantial amounts of hydrogen (∼400 μ g·g -1 for Ti-12, and > 1000 μg.g -1 for Ti-16) before any effect on the materials fracture toughness is observed. The rate of absorption to a hydrogen content which exceeds these values will be the key feature determining if, or when, the material becomes susceptible to cracking. Once this condition is achieved, whether or not failure occurs will depend on the strength and location of stresses within the structure. For Ti to absorb hydrogen it is inevitably necessary to subject the material to cathodic polarization, either by coupling to a more active material or by the application of galvanic protection

  8. Tai Chi for Chronic Pain Conditions: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling Jun; Lauche, Romy; Klose, Petra; Bu, Jiang Hui; Yang, Xiao Cun; Guo, Chao Qing; Dobos, Gustav; Cheng, Ying Wu

    2016-04-29

    Several studies reported that Tai Chi showed potential effects for chronic pain, but its role remains controversial. This review assessed the evidence regarding the effects of Tai Chi for chronic pain conditions. 18 randomized controlled trials were included in our review. The aggregated results have indicated that Tai Chi showed positive evidence on immediate relief of chronic pain from osteoarthritis (standardized mean difference [SMD], -0.54; 95% confidence intervals [CI], -0.77 to -0.30; P chronic pain from low back pain (SMD, -0.81; 95% CI, -1.11 to -0.52; P complementary and alternative medicine for chronic pain conditions.

  9. Enamel matrix proteins associated with GTR and bioactive glass in the treatment of class III furcation in dogs Proteína da matriz do esmalte associada a R.T.G. e vidro bioativo no tratamento de furca grau III em cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcos Alves Fernandes

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated, both histologically and histometrically, the efficacy of enamel matrix derived proteins (EMD associated with bioactive glass (BG and an absorbable membrane in the treatment of class III furcation defects in mongrel dogs. After surgical defect creation and chronification, the lesions were randomly divided into three groups according to the treatment employed: Test Group 1 - EMD + BG + membrane, Test Group 2 - EMD + membrane and Control Group - BG + membrane. After a 90-day healing period, the dogs were sacrificed. The descriptive analysis and the histometric data showed similar results for the experimental groups in all studied parameters (MANOVA, p > 0.05. The association of Emdogain® with bioglass and GTR, or with GTR only, showed similar results when compared with the ones obtained with bioglass associated with membrane in the treatment of class III furcation defects in dogs. The three modalities of treatment showed partial filling of the furcations, with bone and cementum regeneration limited to the apical portion of the defects.Este estudo investigou, histológica e histometricamente, a eficácia da proteína derivada da matriz de esmalte (EMD associada com vidro bioativo (BG e membrana absorvível, no tratamento de defeitos de furcas classe III em cães. Após criação cirúrgica e cronificação dos defeitos, as lesões foram divididas aleatoriamente em três grupos de acordo com o tratamento proposto: Grupo Teste 1 - EMD + BG + membrana, Grupo Teste 2 - EMD + membrana e Grupo Controle - BG + membrana. Após 90 dias do período de cicatrização, os cães foram sacrificados. A análise descritiva e os dados histométricos mostraram resultados similares para os grupos experimentais em todos os parâmetros estudados (MANOVA, p > 0,05. As associações de Emdogain com vidro bioativo e RTG, ou somente com RTG, mostraram resultados similares quando comparadas ao vidro bioativo associado à membrana no tratamento de

  10. Determinants for swine mycoplasmal pneumonia reproduction under experimental conditions: A systematic review and recursive partitioning analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Morante, Beatriz; Segalés, Joaquim; Serrano, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    One of the main Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) swine experimental model objectives is to reproduce mycoplasmal pneumonia (MP). Unfortunately, experimental validated protocols to maximize the chance to successfully achieve lung lesions induced by M. hyopneumoniae are not available at the moment. Thus, the objective of this work was to identify those factors that might have a major influence on the effective development of MP, measured as macroscopic lung lesions, under experimental conditions. Data from 85 studies describing M. hyopneumoniae inoculation experiments were compiled by means of a systematic review and analyzed thereafter. Several variables were considered in the analyses such as the number of pigs in the experiment, serological status against M. hyopneumoniae, source of the animals, age at inoculation, type of inoculum, strain of M. hyopneumoniae, route, dose and times of inoculation, study duration and co-infection with other swine pathogens. Descriptive statistics were used to depict M. hyopneumoniae experimental model main characteristics whereas a recursive partitioning approach, using regression trees, assessed the importance of the abovementioned experimental variables as MP triggering factors. A strong link between the time period between challenge and necropsies and lung lesion severity was observed. Results indicated that the most important factors to explain the observed lung lesion score variability were: (1) study duration, (2) M. hyopneumoniae strain, (3) age at inoculation, (4) co-infection with other swine pathogens and (5) animal source. All other studied variables were not relevant to explain the variability on M. hyopneumoniae lung lesions. The results provided in the present work may serve as a basis for debate in the search for a universally accepted M. hyopneumoniae challenge model. PMID:28742802

  11. Determinants for swine mycoplasmal pneumonia reproduction under experimental conditions: A systematic review and recursive partitioning analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Garcia-Morante

    Full Text Available One of the main Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae swine experimental model objectives is to reproduce mycoplasmal pneumonia (MP. Unfortunately, experimental validated protocols to maximize the chance to successfully achieve lung lesions induced by M. hyopneumoniae are not available at the moment. Thus, the objective of this work was to identify those factors that might have a major influence on the effective development of MP, measured as macroscopic lung lesions, under experimental conditions. Data from 85 studies describing M. hyopneumoniae inoculation experiments were compiled by means of a systematic review and analyzed thereafter. Several variables were considered in the analyses such as the number of pigs in the experiment, serological status against M. hyopneumoniae, source of the animals, age at inoculation, type of inoculum, strain of M. hyopneumoniae, route, dose and times of inoculation, study duration and co-infection with other swine pathogens. Descriptive statistics were used to depict M. hyopneumoniae experimental model main characteristics whereas a recursive partitioning approach, using regression trees, assessed the importance of the abovementioned experimental variables as MP triggering factors. A strong link between the time period between challenge and necropsies and lung lesion severity was observed. Results indicated that the most important factors to explain the observed lung lesion score variability were: (1 study duration, (2 M. hyopneumoniae strain, (3 age at inoculation, (4 co-infection with other swine pathogens and (5 animal source. All other studied variables were not relevant to explain the variability on M. hyopneumoniae lung lesions. The results provided in the present work may serve as a basis for debate in the search for a universally accepted M. hyopneumoniae challenge model.

  12. "Meth Mouth": An Interdisciplinary Review of a Dental and Psychiatric Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, Cornel N; Glass, Magdalena; Muzyka, Brian C; Glass, Oliver M

    Chronic methamphetamine (MA) users experience many dental problems, a condition characterized as "meth mouth." These devastating effects on dentition is the main reason why many seek professional help. Here, we discuss the effects of MA on oral health and advocate for improved collaboration between dentists and mental health providers. We also introduce a dental evaluation tool with the goal of improving the quality of care for this often-marginalized patient population. A Medline literature search (1985-2016) was conducted with keywords "meth mouth," "methamphetamine AND oral health"; "methamphetamine AND dental"; "methamphetamine AND dentist." Results were supplemented by references gleaned from recent reviews, credible online sources, and citations of search returns. MA predisposes users to tooth decay. They are also more likely to have missing dentition with a linear relationship correlating the number of years of use. A constellation of dental symptoms resulting from chronic MA use has been described in literature: gingival inflammation, excessive tooth wear, decreased salivary output, and severe dental caries. With continued use, mucosal lesions may appear on the lips and the gingival tissue may recede. MA can trigger bruxism, resulting in severe wear patterns and even cracked teeth. Users of MA have many unmet medical and mental health needs. An interdisciplinary approach between dentists and mental health providers can improve outcomes. The dental evaluation tool described here can improve the bidirectional collaboration between mental health and dentistry. Dental professionals are in a unique position to identify users and can facilitate referral to substance abuse treatment. Likewise, mental health providers can identify, assess severity, and prompt users for medical and dental attention.

  13. The Facilitators, Obstacles and Needs of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Conditions Accessing Further and Higher Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Nicky; Hanley, Terry; Hebron, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Many young adults diagnosed with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) intend to go to college and/or university, yet research suggests that these individuals find aspects of college and university life challenging. To explore the views of individuals directly affected by these challenges, a systematic review of the existing qualitative literature in…

  14. Evidence of the efficacy for occupational therapy in different conditions: an overview of systematic reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the research evidence available from systematic reviews of the efficacy of occupational therapy (OT) for practitioners, researchers, purchasing organizations and policy-makers. DATA SOURCE: The search for systematic reviews was conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Library

  15. Using mobile phones and short message service to deliver self-management interventions for chronic conditions: a meta-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katherine R; Lekhak, Nirmala; Kaewluang, Napatsawan

    2014-04-01

    The worldwide burden of chronic disease is widespread and growing. This shift from acute to chronic care requires rethinking how resources are invested in managing these conditions. One response has been to create programs and interventions that have the goal of helping patients better manage their own conditions. Over time, these self-management interventions and strategies have increasingly relied on various technologies for their implementation, with the newest technology being mobile phones and short message service (SMS). The objective of this meta-review was to evaluate the current evidence on the use of mobile phones and SMS to deliver self-management interventions for chronic conditions. A meta-review was conducted of the 11 systematic reviews (SRs) that were identified and retrieved after an extensive search of electronic databases covering the years 2000-2012. Relevant information was abstracted from each systematic review and a quality assessment carried out using the AMSTAR ("A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews") criteria. The number and types of included studies and total number of subjects varied significantly across the systematic reviews. Mobile phone text messaging was reported to significantly improve adherence to appointments and antiretroviral therapy, short-term smoking quit rates, and selected clinical and behavioral outcomes. AMSTAR scores ranged from 11 to 3, reflecting substantial variation in SR quality. Mobile phones and SMS show promise as a technology to deliver self-management interventions to improve outcomes of chronic care management. However, the quality of future studies and systematic reviews needs to be improved. There also are unresolved issues about the technology itself. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. A Systematic Review Exploring the Social Cognitive Theory of Self-Regulation as a Framework for Chronic Health Condition Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougas, Michelle E; Hayden, Jill A; McGrath, Patrick J; Huguet, Anna; Rozario, Sharlene

    2015-01-01

    Theory is often recommended as a framework for guiding hypothesized mechanisms of treatment effect. However, there is limited guidance about how to use theory in intervention development. We conducted a systematic review to provide an exemplar review evaluating the extent to which use of theory is identified and incorporated within existing interventions. We searched electronic databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CENTRAL, and EMBASE from inception to May 2014. We searched clinicaltrials.gov for registered protocols, reference lists of relevant systematic reviews and included studies, and conducted a citation search in Web of Science. We included peer-reviewed publications of interventions that referenced the social cognitive theory of self-regulation as a framework for interventions to manage chronic health conditions. Two reviewers independently assessed articles for eligibility. We contacted all authors of included studies for information detailing intervention content. We describe how often theory mechanisms were addressed by interventions, and report intervention characteristics used to address theory. Of 202 articles that reported using the social cognitive theory of self-regulation, 52% failed to incorporate self-monitoring, a main theory component, and were therefore excluded. We included 35 interventions that adequately used the theory framework. Intervention characteristics were often poorly reported in peer-reviewed publications, 21 of 35 interventions incorporated characteristics that addressed each of the main theory components. Each intervention addressed, on average, six of eight self-monitoring mechanisms, two of five self-judgement mechanisms, and one of three self-evaluation mechanisms. The self-monitoring mechanisms 'Feedback' and 'Consistency' were addressed by all interventions, whereas the self-evaluation mechanisms 'Self-incentives' and 'External rewards' were addressed by six and four interventions, respectively. The present review establishes that

  17. Review of Physicochemical-Based Diagnostic Techniques for Assessing Insulation Condition in Aged Transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janvier Sylvestre N’cho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A power transformer outage has a dramatic financial consequence not only for electric power systems utilities but also for interconnected customers. The service reliability of this important asset largely depends upon the condition of the oil-paper insulation. Therefore, by keeping the qualities of oil-paper insulation system in pristine condition, the maintenance planners can reduce the decline rate of internal faults. Accurate diagnostic methods for analyzing the condition of transformers are therefore essential. Currently, there are various electrical and physicochemical diagnostic techniques available for insulation condition monitoring of power transformers. This paper is aimed at the description, analysis and interpretation of modern physicochemical diagnostics techniques for assessing insulation condition in aged transformers. Since fields and laboratory experiences have shown that transformer oil contains about 70% of diagnostic information, the physicochemical analyses of oil samples can therefore be extremely useful in monitoring the condition of power transformers.

  18. Remote Ischemic Conditioning to Protect against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevoord, Daniel; Kranke, Peter; Kuijpers, Marijn; Weber, Nina; Hollmann, Markus; Preckel, Benedikt

    2012-01-01

    Background Remote ischemic conditioning is gaining interest as potential method to induce resistance against ischemia reperfusion injury in a variety of clinical settings. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether remote ischemic conditioning reduces mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events, length of stay in hospital and in the intensive care unit and biomarker release in patients who suffer from or are at risk for ischemia reperfusion injury. Methods and Results Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized clinical trials comparing remote ischemic conditioning, regardless of timing, with no conditioning. Two investigators independently selected suitable trials, assessed trial quality and extracted data. 23 studies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery (15 studies), percutaneous coronary intervention (four studies) and vascular surgery (four studies), comprising in total 1878 patients, were included in this review. Compared to no conditioning, remote ischemic conditioning did not reduce mortality (odds ratio 1.22 [95% confidence interval 0.48, 3.07]) or major adverse cardiovascular events (0.65 [0.38, 1.14]). However, the incidence of myocardial infarction was reduced with remote ischemic conditioning (0.50 [0.31, 0.82]), as was peak troponin release (standardized mean difference −0.28 [−0.47, −0.09]). Conclusion There is no evidence that remote ischemic conditioning reduces mortality associated with ischemic events; nor does it reduce major adverse cardiovascular events. However, remote ischemic conditioning did reduce the incidence of peri-procedural myocardial infarctions, as well as the release of troponin. PMID:22860077

  19. Motivational interviewing to increase physical activity in people with chronic health conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Paul D; Blackstock, Felicity; Shields, Nora; Holland, Anne; Iles, Ross; Kingsley, Mike; Bernhardt, Julie; Lannin, Natasha; Morris, Meg E; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2014-12-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to determine if motivational interviewing leads to increased physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness or functional exercise capacity in people with chronic health conditions. Seven electronic databases (MEDLINE, PsychINFO, EMBASE, AMED, CINHAL, SPORTDiscus and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials) were searched from inception until January 2014. Two reviewers independently examined publications for inclusion. Trials were included if participants were adults (>18 years), had a chronic health condition, used motivational interviewing as the intervention and examined physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness or functional exercise capacity. Two reviewers independently extracted data. Risk of bias within trials was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale. Meta-analyses were conducted with standardized mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach was used to evaluate the quality of the evidence. Eleven publications (of ten trials) were included. There was moderate level evidence that motivational interviewing had a small effect in increasing physical activity levels in people with chronic health conditions relative to comparison groups (standardized mean differences = 0.19, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.32, p = 0.004). Sensitivity analysis based on trials that confirmed treatment fidelity produced a larger effect. No conclusive evidence was observed for cardiorespiratory fitness or functional exercise capacity. The addition of motivational interviewing to usual care may lead to modest improvements in physical activity for people with chronic health conditions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Does prolactin mediate parental and life-history decisions in response to environmental conditions in birds? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelier, Frédéric; Wingfield, John C; Tartu, Sabrina; Chastel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". In vertebrates, adjustments of physiology and behavior to environmental changes are often mediated by central physiological mechanisms, and more specifically by hormonal mechanisms. As a consequence, these mechanisms are thought to orchestrate life-history decisions in wild vertebrates. For instance, investigating the hormonal regulation of parental behavior is relevant to evaluate how parents modulate their effort according to specific environmental conditions. Surprisingly and despite being classically known as the 'parental hormone', prolactin has been overlooked in birds relative to this context. Our aim is to review evidence that changes in prolactin levels can mediate, at least to some extent, the response of breeding birds to environmental conditions. To do so, we first examine current evidence and limits for the role of prolactin in mediating parental behavior in birds. Second, we emphasize the influence of environmental conditions and stressors on circulating prolactin levels. In addition, we review to what extent prolactin levels are a reliable predictor of breeding success in wild birds. By linking environmental conditions, prolactin regulation, parental behavior, and breeding success, we highlight the potential role of this hormone in mediating parental decisions in birds. Finally, we also review the potential role of prolactin in mediating other life history decisions such as clutch size, re-nesting, and the timing of molt. By evaluating the influence of stressors on circulating prolactin levels during these other life-history decisions, we also raise new hypotheses regarding the potential of the prolactin stress response to regulate the orchestration of the annual cycle when environmental changes occur. To sum up, we show in this review that prolactin regulation has a strong potential to allow ecological physiologists to better understand how individuals adjust their life-history decisions

  1. Oral health status and prosthodontic conditions of Chinese adults: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Kreulen, C.M.; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess oral health and prosthodontic conditions of Chinese adults and the changes in these conditions over time. MATERIALS AND METHODS: PubMed was searched by combining the keyword China with dental health survey, oral health, tooth loss, DMFT (decayed/missing/filled teeth), dental

  2. 78 FR 19026 - Submission for Review: Request to Disability Annuitant for Information on Physical Condition and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... Information on Physical Condition and Employment, RI 30-1 AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION... Condition and Employment, RI 30-1. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, (Pub. L. 104-13, 44 U... technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic...

  3. Miscellaneous conditions of the shoulder: Anatomical, clinical, and pictorial review emphasizing potential pitfalls in imaging diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, Nikdokht [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); Bruce, Dean [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Chung, Christine B. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)], E-mail: cbchung@ucsd.edu

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint including hydroxyapatite deposition disease, rotator cuff interval pathology, acromioclavicular joint pathology, glenohumeral osteoarthrosis, and synovial inflammatory processes, with specific emphasis on findings that have associated pitfalls in imaging diagnosis. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of the above mentioned categories of pathology will be reviewed, followed in each section by a detailed pictorial review of the key imaging findings in each category including plain film, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings as applicable. Imaging challenges that relate to both diagnosis and characterization will be addressed with each type of pathology. The goal is that after reading this article, the reader will be able to recognize the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint and will become familiar with the potential pitfalls in their imaging diagnosis.

  4. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's antitrust review of nuclear power plants: the conditioning of licenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penn, D.W.; Delaney, J.B.; Honeycutt, T.C.

    1976-04-01

    The 1970 amendments to Section 105 of the Atomic Energy Act require the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to conduct a prelicensing antitrust review of applications for licenses to construct and operate nuclear power plants. The Commission must make a finding as to whether the granting of a license 'would create or maintain a situation inconsistent with the antitrust laws,' and it has the authority to issue or continue a license, to refuse to issue a license, to rescind or amend a license, and to issue a license with conditions that it deems appropriate. This report provides information about the antitrust license conditions that have resulted from the NRC's antitrust review process. The process itself is described and a catalog of the applications requiring antitrust license conditions is presented. For each application, the license conditions are put into the general categories of unit access, transmission services, coordination, and contractual provisions. For completeness, the report also catalogs applications requiring no antitrust license conditions, and lists applications that were exempted from the 1970 amendments, are the subject of litigation, or have been withdrawn

  5. Review on the Pavement-repairing Measures as a Condition for the Choice of Road-Maintenance Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedevska Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The road-maintenance strategies vary from one country to another, and even between the road management authorities within a one single country. It is not surprising, as there is not best maintenance method, nor a universal set of strategies that can be applied equally everywhere. Generally, there are strategies acceptable in certain conditions, but the factors influencing the selection process are diverse and very complex. This paper will present a review of the various measures that can be applied on the roads, which is certainly the basic condition of selection of an appropriate maintenance strategy.

  6. Effectiveness of maxillary protraction using facemask with or without maxillary expansion: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foersch, Moritz; Jacobs, Collin; Wriedt, Susanne; Hechtner, Marlene; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2015-07-01

    Class III therapy using a face mask is a common approach for treatment of a deficient maxilla and reverse overbite. Usually, maxillary protraction is combined with transverse palatal expansion using intraoral appliances. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the effectiveness of face mask therapy in combination with concepts of palatal expansion and compression. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to identify studies that address class III treatment using a face mask. The search was carried out using common electronic databases as well as hand search. Both screening and study eligibility analysis were performed with consideration of PRISMA and Cochrane Guidelines for systematic reviews. Several terms describing class III face mask treatment were searched. Particular attention was paid to new strategies of enhancing maxillary protraction. The initial search identified 2048 studies. After a thorough selection process, a total of 22 articles met the inclusion criteria. After assessment of the individual quality scoring of each article, eight studies were provided for meta-analysis of the cephalometric parameters. The statistical analysis of treatment changes advocates a positive influence on sagittal maxillary development, which is not primarily influenced by transverse expansion. Dental side effects are more distinct when no expansion was carried out. For the concept of alternating activation/deactivation of the expansion appliance (alt-RAMEC), two articles of high methodological scoring were identified. They indicate an enhancement of face mask treatment. The findings are consistent with results of previous literature studies regarding the efficiency of class III face mask treatment. A further need for more randomized controlled studies was identified especially with regard to the new concept of alternating maxillary expansion and compression, which showed a positive influence on the maxillary protraction based on two studies. Class

  7. Book Review: A Clinical Atlas of Skin Conditions in HIV/AIDS: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A Clinical Atlas of Skin Conditions in HIV/AIDS: An Illustrated Management Guide for Health Care Professionals. By Ncoza Dlova and Anisa Mosam. 2nd ed. Pretoria: HPMG, 2009. Pp. 100. ISBN 1-875098-40-2.

  8. Farm to abattoir conditions, animal factors and their subsequent effects on cattle behavioural responses and beef quality — A review

    OpenAIRE

    Yonela Zifikile Njisane; Voster Muchenje

    2017-01-01

    The current review seeks to highlight the concerns that have been raised on pre-slaughter stress, contributing factors and its consequent effects on cattle behavioural responses and the quality of beef; inter-linking the activities involved from birth to slaughter. Such information is crucial in light of the consumer concerns on overall animal welfare, quality of meat and food security. Slaughter animals are exposed to different conditions during production and transportation to abattoirs on ...

  9. Asthma and lung cancer, after accounting for co-occurring respiratory diseases and allergic conditions: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denholm, Rachel; Crellin, Elizabeth; Arvind, Ashwini; Quint, Jennifer

    2017-01-16

    Asthma is one of the most frequently diagnosed respiratory diseases in the UK, and commonly co-occurs with other respiratory and allergic diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have shown an increased risk of lung cancer related to asthma, but the evidence is mixed when accounting for co-occurring respiratory diseases and allergic conditions. A systematic review of published data that investigate the relationship between asthma and lung cancer, accounting for co-occurring respiratory and allergic diseases, will be conducted to investigate the independent association of asthma with lung cancer. A systematic review will be conducted, and include original reports of cohort, cross-sectional and case-control studies of the association of asthma with lung cancer after accounting for co-occurring respiratory diseases. Articles published up to June 2016 will be included, and their selection will follow the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. A standardised data extraction form will be developed and pretested, and descriptive analyses will be used to summarise the available literature. If appropriate, pooled effect estimates of the association between asthma and lung cancer, given adjustment for a specific co-occurring condition will be estimated using random effects models. Potential sources of heterogeneity and between study heterogeneity will also be investigated. The study will be a review of published data and does not require ethical approval. Results will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication. International Prospective Register for Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) number CRD42016043341. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. The role of psychosocial working conditions on burnout and its core component emotional exhaustion – a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Aims To analyze the association between psychosocial working conditions and burnout and its core component emotional exhaustion, a systematic literature review was undertaken including cohort studies, case–control studies, and randomized controlled trials. Methods The literature search in Medline and PsycInfo was based on a defined search string and strict exclusion and inclusion criteria. Evaluation of the 5,599 initially identified search hits by two independent reviewers and a detailed quality assessment resulted in six methodologically adequate cohort studies considering the relationship between psychosocial working conditions and burnout (one study) as well as the burnout core component emotional exhaustion (five studies). Results The results of our systematic review point to a relationship between psychosocial working conditions and the development of emotional exhaustion/burnout. Particularly high job demands seem to play a role in the development of emotional exhaustion. However, strong intercorrelations between workplace factors, as a matter of principle, make the identification of a single psychosocial workplace factor (being associated with an especially high or low risk of burnout) difficult. Conclusions Multidimensional approaches including reduction of work demands, enhancement of decision latitude and improving the social climate might be promising for preventing burnout and emotional exhaustion. However, methodologically adequate intervention studies are urgently needed to prove the effectiveness of workplace interventions. PMID:24628839

  11. A Review of the Condition Monitoring of Capacitors in Power Electronic Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Hammam Abdelaal Hammam; Wang, Huai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    Capacitor is one of the reliability critical components in power electronic systems. In the last two decades, many efforts in the academic research have been devoted to the condition monitoring of capacitors to estimate their health status. Industry applications demand more reliable power...... electronics products with preventive maintenance. Nevertheless, most of the developed capacitor condition monitoring technologies are rarely adopted by industry due to the complexity, increased cost and other relevant issues. An overview of the prior-art research in this area is therefore needed to justify....... Therefore, this paper firstly classifies the capacitor condition monitoring methods into three categories, then the respective technology evolution from 1993 to 2015 is summarized. Remarks on the state-of-the-art research and the future opportunities targeting for practical industry applications are given....

  12. A Review of the Condition Monitoring of Capacitors in Power Electronic Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Hammam Abdelaal Hammam; Wang, Huai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    Capacitors are one type of reliability-critical components in power electronic systems. In the last two decades, many efforts in academic research have been devoted to the condition monitoring of capacitors to estimate their health status. Industry applications are demanding more reliable power...... electronics products with preventive maintenance. Nevertheless, most of the developed capacitor condition monitoring technologies are rarely adopted by industry due to the complexity, increased cost, and other relevant issues. An overview of the prior-art research in this area is therefore needed to justify......, this paper first classifies the capacitor condition monitoring methods into three categories, then the respective technology evolution in the last two decades is summarized. Finally, the state-of-the-art research and the future opportunities targeting for industry applications are given....

  13. Rare medical conditions and suggestive past-life memories: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; dos Santos Camargo, Luizete; Lucchetti, Alessandra L G; Schwartz, Gary E; Nasri, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    We aim to report the case of a 38-year-old male with suggestive past-life memories during a regression session and to show how these memories were related to unusual medical conditions: (1) isolated obstruction of the right coronary artery in a young patient, (2) omental infarction, and (3) right aortic arch with isolation of the left subclavian artery. These conditions were related to the following suggestive past-life memories: (1) a priest who committed suicide with a crucifix nailed to his chest and (2) a medieval weapon (skull flail) hitting his cervical and left back region. There was an intriguing relation between the patient's suggestive past-life memories and rare medical conditions. In this article, the authors highlight possible explanations, rarity of findings, and similarities/differences from previous cases and potential pitfalls in this area. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Review Article: Atmospheric conditions inducing extreme precipitation over the eastern and western Mediterranean

    OpenAIRE

    Dayan, U.; Nissen, K.; Ulbrich, U.

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses published studies of heavy rainfall events over the Mediterranean Basin, combining them in a more general picture of the dynamic and thermodynamic factors and processes that produce heavy rain storms. It distinguishes the western and eastern Mediterranean in order to point out specific regional peculiarities. The crucial moisture for developing intensive convection over these regions can be originated not only from the adjacent Mediterranean Sea but als...

  15. Review Article: Atmospheric conditions inducing extreme precipitation over the Eastern and Western Mediterranean

    OpenAIRE

    U. Dayan; K. M. Nissen; U. Ulbrich

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses published studies of heavy rainfall events over the Mediterranean Basin, combining them in a more general picture of the dynamic and thermodynamic factors and processes producing heavy rain storms. It distinguishes the Western and Eastern Mediterranean in order to point at specific regional peculiarities. The crucial moisture for developing intensive convection over these regions can be originated not only from the ad...

  16. Strategies to translate knowledge related to common musculoskeletal conditions into physiotherapy practice: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérubé, Marie-Ève; Poitras, Stéphane; Bastien, Marc; Laliberté, Lydie-Anne; Lacharité, Anyck; Gross, Douglas P

    2018-03-01

    Many physiotherapists underuse evidence-based practice guidelines or recommendations when treating patients with musculoskeletal disorders, yet synthesis of knowledge translation interventions used within the field of physiotherapy fails to offer clear conclusions to guide the implementation of clinical practice guidelines. To evaluate the effectiveness of various knowledge translation interventions used to implement changes in the practice of current physiotherapists treating common musculoskeletal issues. A computerized literature search of MEDLINE, CINHAL and ProQuest of systematic reviews (from inception until May 2016) and primary research studies (from January 2010 until June 2016). Eligibility criteria specified articles evaluating interventions for translating knowledge into physiotherapy practice. Two reviewers independently screened the titles and abstracts, reviewed full-text articles, performed data extraction, and performed quality assessment. Of a total of 13014 articles located and titles and abstracts screened, 34 studies met the inclusion criteria, including three overlapping publications, resulting in 31 individual studies. Knowledge translation interventions appear to have resulted in a positive change in physiotherapist beliefs, attitudes, skills and guideline awareness. However, no consistent improvement in clinical practice, patient and economic outcomes were observed. The studies included had small sample sizes and low methodological quality. The heterogeneity of the studies was not conducive to pooling the data. The intensity and type of knowledge translation intervention seem to have an effect on practice change. More research targeting financial, organizational and regulatory knowledge translation interventions is needed. Copyright © 2017 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A review on the recent development of solar absorption and vapour compression based hybrid air conditioning with low temperature storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor D. N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional air conditioners or vapour compression systems are main contributors to energy consumption in modern buildings. There are common environmental issues emanating from vapour compression system such as greenhouse gas emission and heat wastage. These problems can be reduced by adaptation of solar energy components to vapour compression system. However, intermittence input of daily solar radiation was the main issue of solar energy system. This paper presents the recent studies on hybrid air conditioning system. In addition, the basic vapour compression system and components involved in the solar air conditioning system are discussed. Introduction of low temperature storage can be an interactive solution and improved economically which portray different modes of operating strategies. Yet, very few studies have examined on optimal operating strategies of the hybrid system. Finally, the findings of this review will help suggest optimization of solar absorption and vapour compression based hybrid air conditioning system for future work while considering both economic and environmental factors.

  18. Health, work and working conditions: a review of the European economic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnay, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Economists have traditionally been very cautious when studying the interaction between employment and health because of the two-way causal relationship between these two variables: health status influences the probability of being employed and, at the same time, working affects the health status. Because these two variables are determined simultaneously, researchers control endogeneity skews (e.g., reverse causality, omitted variables) when conducting empirical analysis. With these caveats in mind, the literature finds that a favourable work environment and high job security lead to better health conditions. Being employed with appropriate working conditions plays a protective role on physical health and psychiatric disorders. By contrast, non-employment and retirement are generally worse for mental health than employment, and overemployment has a negative effect on health. These findings stress the importance of employment and of adequate working conditions for the health of workers. In this context, it is a concern that a significant proportion of European workers (29 %) would like to work fewer hours because unwanted long hours are likely to signal a poor level of job satisfaction and inadequate working conditions, with detrimental effects on health. Thus, in Europe, labour-market policy has increasingly paid attention to job sustainability and job satisfaction. The literature clearly invites employers to take better account of the worker preferences when setting the number of hours worked. Overall, a specific "flexicurity" (combination of high employment protection, job satisfaction and active labour-market policies) is likely to have a positive effect on health.

  19. Kinetics of Natural Attenuation: Review of the Critical Chemical Conditions and Measurements at Bore Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Atteia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the chemical conditions that should favour the biodegradation of organic pollutants. Thermodynamic considerations help to define the reaction that can occur under defined chemical conditions. The BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene degradation is focused on benzene, as it is the most toxic oil component and also because it has the slowest degradation rate under most field conditions. Several studies on benzene degradation allow the understanding of the basic degradation mechanisms and their importance in field conditions. The use of models is needed to interpret field data when transport, retardation, and degradation occur. A detailed comparison of two existing models shows that the limits imposed by oxygen transport must be simulated precisely to reach correct plumes shapes and dimensions, and that first-order kinetic approaches may be misleading. This analysis led us to develop a technique to measure directly biodegradation in the field. The technique to recirculate water at the borehole scale and the CO2 analysis are depicted. First results of biodegradation show that this technique is able to easily detect the degradation of 1 mg/l of hydrocarbons and that, in oxic media, a fast degradation rate of mixed fuel is observed.

  20. Barriers to Physical Activity for People with Long-Term Neurological Conditions: A Review Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Hilda F.; Hale, Leigh A.; Whitehead, Lisa; Baxter, G. David

    2012-01-01

    People with disability are insufficiently physically active for health. This study identified the volume, quality, and findings of research that exposes environmental and personal barriers of physical activity participation for people with neurological conditions. CINAHL, Sport Discus, EMBASE, Medline, and AMED were systematically searched between…

  1. The therapeutic use of botulinum toxin in cervical and maxillofacial conditions: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihde, Stefan K A; Konstantinovic, Vitomir S

    2007-08-01

    The role of botulinum toxin as a therapeutic agent for several conditions is expanding. We sought to determine if botulinum toxin is safe and effective in treating patients with cervical dystonia and maxillofacial conditions. Our purpose was to establish a safety and efficacy profile to determine whether or not this treatment may be used prophylactically in patients undergoing dental implant therapy. We performed a systematic search of the literature to identify randomized clinical trials evaluating patients treated with botulinum toxin as an adjunct to dental implant therapy, maxillofacial conditions including temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and cervical dystonia. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met our search criteria in the area of cervical dystonia and chronic facial pain. No RCTs were identified evaluating dental implant therapy. Patients with cervical dystonia exhibited significant improvements in baseline functional, pain, and global assessments compared to placebo. Adverse events were mild and transient with numbers needed to harm (NNH) ranging from 12 to 17. Patients with chronic facial pain improved significantly from baseline in terms of pain compared to placebo. Rates of adverse events were less than 1%. Botulinum toxin appears relatively safe and effective in treating cervical dystonia and chronic facial pain associated with masticatory hyperactivity. No literature exists evaluating its use in dental implantology. Randomized clinical trials are warranted to determine its safety and efficacy in dental implantology and other maxillofacial conditions such as bruxism.

  2. Review of parameters influencing the structural response of a submerged body under cavitation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escaler, X; De La Torre, O; Farhat, M

    2015-01-01

    Submerged structures that operate under extreme flows are prone to suffer large scale cavitation attached to their surfaces. Under such conditions the added mass effects differ from the expected ones in pure liquids. Moreover, the existence of small gaps between the structure and surrounding bodies filled with fluid also influence the dynamic response. A series of experiments and numerical simulations have been carried out with a truncated NACA0009 hydrofoil mounted as a cantilever beam at the LMH-EPFL cavitation tunnel. The three first modes of vibration have been determined and analysed under various hydrodynamic conditions ranging from air and still water to partial cavitation and supercavitation. A remote nonintrusive excitation system with piezoelectric patches has been used for the experiments. The effects of the cavity properties and the lateral gap size on the natural frequencies and mode shapes have been determined. As a result, the significance of several parameters in the design of such structures is discussed. (paper)

  3. Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis Project, 1987-1997 Project Review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrock, Robin M.; Hans, Karen M.; Beeman, John W. [US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA

    1997-12-01

    The assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis Project (Bonneville Power Administration Project 87-401) monitored attributes of salmonid smolt physiology in the Columbia and Snake River basins from 1987 to 1997, under the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, in cooperation with the Smolt Monitoring Program of the Fish Passage Center. The primary goal of the project was to investigate the physiological development of juvenile salmonids related to migration rates. The assumption was made that the level of smolt development, interacting with environmental factos such as flow, would be reflected in travel times. The Fish Passage Center applied the physiological measurements of smolt condition to Water Budget management, to regulate flows so as to decrease travel time and increase survival.

  4. Review of parameters influencing the structural response of a submerged body under cavitation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaler, X.; De La Torre, O.; Farhat, M.

    2015-12-01

    Submerged structures that operate under extreme flows are prone to suffer large scale cavitation attached to their surfaces. Under such conditions the added mass effects differ from the expected ones in pure liquids. Moreover, the existence of small gaps between the structure and surrounding bodies filled with fluid also influence the dynamic response. A series of experiments and numerical simulations have been carried out with a truncated NACA0009 hydrofoil mounted as a cantilever beam at the LMH-EPFL cavitation tunnel. The three first modes of vibration have been determined and analysed under various hydrodynamic conditions ranging from air and still water to partial cavitation and supercavitation. A remote nonintrusive excitation system with piezoelectric patches has been used for the experiments. The effects of the cavity properties and the lateral gap size on the natural frequencies and mode shapes have been determined. As a result, the significance of several parameters in the design of such structures is discussed.

  5. Nonmyeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Seth M; O'Connor, Thomas P; Hashash, Jana; Tabbara, Imad A

    2009-12-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation provides many patients, with hematological and malignant diseases, hope of remission and in some cases cure. Because the toxicities of this approach are severe, its use has been limited to younger healthier patients. Nonmyeloablative and reduced intensity conditioning regimens depend more on donor cellular immune effects and less on the cytotoxic effects of the conditioning regimen to eradicate the underlying disease. This approach is based on the induction of host tolerance to donor cells followed by the administration of scheduled donor T-lymphocytes infusions. Accumulated clinical data have been encouraging, and prospective studies are underway to compare this approach to conventional myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation with regard to outcome, durability of responses, effects on the immune system, and the consequences of late complications such as chronic graft-versus-host disease.

  6. Review of parameters influencing the structural response of a submerged body under cavitation conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Escaler, X; De La Torre, O; Farhat, M

    2015-01-01

    Submerged structures that operate under extreme flows are prone to suffer large scale cavitation attached to thei r surfaces. Under such conditions the added mass effects differ from the expected ones in pure liquids. Moreover, the existence of small gaps between the structure and surrounding bodies filled with fluid also influence the dynamic response. A series of experiments and numerical simulations have been carried out with a truncated NACA0009 hydrofoil mounted as a cantilever beam at t...

  7. Childhood interventions to reduce stigma towards peers with disabilities and chronic health conditions: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Hennessy, Eilis; Silke, C.; Stokes, Diarmuid; Heary, Caroline; Swords, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Stigma is a problem for children with a wide range of disabilities and chronic health conditions including epilepsy, HIV/AIDS, and mental health problems (e.g. ADHD). When stigma occurs, it has particular significance for a child¿s psychological wellbeing and development.  Evidence that stigmatizing attitudes develop early in life make it imperative that interventions for school-age children are developed to prevent or reduce stigma.  While several interventions exist,...

  8. Pine Nuts: A Review of Recent Sanitary Conditions and Market Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Umair Masood Awan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pine nuts are non-wood forest products (NWFP with a constantly growing market notwithstanding a series of phytosanitary issues and related trade problems. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the relationship between phytosanitary problems and trade development. Production and trade of pine nuts in Mediterranean Europe have been negatively affected by the spreading of Diplodia sapinea (a fungus associated with an adventive insect Leptoglossus occidentalis (fungal vector, with impacts on forest management, production and profitability and thus in value chain organization. Reduced availability of domestic production in markets with a growing demand has stimulated the import of pine nuts. China has become a leading exporter of pine nuts, but its export is affected by a symptom caused by the nuts of some pine species: ‘pine nut syndrome’ (PNS. Most of the studies mentioned in the literature review concern PNS occurrence associated with the nuts of Pinus armandii. We highlight the need for a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of the pine nuts value chain organization, where research on food properties and clinical toxicology may be connected to breeding and forest management, forest pathology and entomology, and trade development.

  9. Deep neuromuscular block to optimize surgical space conditions during laparoscopic surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruintjes, M H; van Helden, E V; Braat, A E; Dahan, A; Scheffer, G J; van Laarhoven, C J; Warlé, M C

    2017-06-01

    Neuromuscular block (NMB) is frequently used in abdominal surgery to improve surgical conditions by relaxation of the abdominal wall and prevention of sudden muscle contractions. The evidence supporting routine use of deep NMB is still under debate. We aimed to provide evidence for the superiority of routine use of deep NMB during laparoscopic surgery. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies comparing the influence of deep vs moderate NMB during laparoscopic procedures on surgical space conditions and clinical outcomes. Trials were identified from Medline, Embase, and Central databases from inception to December 2016. We included randomized trials, crossover studies, and cohort studies. Our search yielded 12 studies on the effect of deep NMB on the surgical space conditions. Deep NMB during laparoscopic surgeries improves the surgical space conditions when compared with moderate NMB, with a mean difference of 0.65 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.47-0.83) on a scale of 1-5, and it facilitates the use of low-pressure pneumoperitoneum. Furthermore, deep NMB reduces postoperative pain scores in the postanaesthesia care unit, with a mean difference of - 0.52 (95% CI: -0.71 to - 0.32). Deep NMB improves surgical space conditions during laparoscopic surgery and reduces postoperative pain scores in the postanaesthesia care unit. Whether this leads to fewer intraoperative complications, an improved quality of recovery, or both after laparoscopic surgery should be pursued in future studies. The review methodology was specified in advance and registered at Prospero on July 27, 2016, registration number CRD42016042144. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Self-report and subjective history in the diagnosis of painful neck conditions: A systematic review of diagnostic accuracy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizer, Adam; Bachmann, Alexa; Gibson, Jessie; Donaldson, Megan Burrowbridge

    2017-10-01

    Rising healthcare costs and inherent risks with over-utilizing diagnostic imaging require a quality subjective examination to improve effectiveness and time management of physical examinations. This systematic review investigates the diagnostic accuracy of subjective history and self-report items to determine if there is significant alteration in the probability of identifying specific painful neck conditions. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were followed. 1) Written in the English language 2) Cervical pain with/without referred upper extremity or head pain 3) Subjective history or self-report items 4) Study designs that reported diagnostic statistics or allowed calculation of sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic odds ratios, and likelihood ratios 5) used a reference standard that has a sensitivity or specificity ≥75% or a diagnostic tool that is strongly supported in the literature where this data is not available. Quality Assessment of Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy II was performed to evaluate risk of bias. Five studies with 830 total patients met the inclusion criteria. Conditions commonly reported in the literature included: cervical radiculopathy, cervical myelopathy, degenerative joint disease, and cervicogenic headache. Individual history questions show minimal diagnostic value in identifying cervical conditions without the physical examination. The value of the subjective history report is important and requires further investigation for specific neck conditions. Clustering symptoms may provide more insight than individual history items in future studies. The diagnostic value of history for neck conditions may be underrepresented due to the lack of studies that isolate subjective examination from the physical examination. 3a. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Early-life conditions and older adult health in low- and middle-income countries: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEniry, M

    2013-02-01

    Population aging and subsequent projected large increases in chronic conditions will be important health concerns in low- and middle-income countries. Although evidence is accumulating, little is known regarding the impact of poor early-life conditions on older adult (50 years and older) health in these settings. A systematic review of 1141 empirical studies was conducted to identify population-based and community studies in low- and middle-income countries, which examined associations between early-life conditions and older adult health. The resulting review of 20 studies revealed strong associations between (1) in utero/early infancy exposures (independent of other early life and adult conditions) and adult heart disease and diabetes; (2) poor nutrition during childhood and difficulties in adult cognition and diabetes; (3) specific childhood illnesses such as rheumatic fever and malaria and adult heart disease and mortality; (4) poor childhood health and adult functionality/disability and chronic diseases; (5) poor childhood socioeconomic status (SES) and adult mortality, functionality/disability and cognition; and (6) parental survival during childhood and adult functionality/disability and cognition. In several instances, associations remained strong even after controlling for adult SES and lifestyle. Although exact mechanisms cannot be identified, these studies reinforce to some extent the importance of early-life environment on health at older ages. Given the paucity of cohort data from the developing world to examine hypotheses of early-life conditions and older adult health, population-based studies are relevant in providing a broad perspective on the origins of adult health.

  12. The role of conditioning, learning and dopamine in sexual behavior: a narrative review of animal and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom, Mirte; Both, Stephanie; Laan, Ellen; Everaerd, Walter; Spinhoven, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Many theories of human sexual behavior assume that sexual stimuli obtain arousing properties through associative learning processes. It is widely accepted that classical conditioning contributes to the etiology of both normal and maladaptive human behaviors. Despite the hypothesized importance of basic learning processes in sexual behavior, research on classical conditioning of the sexual response in humans is scarce. In the present paper, animal studies and studies in humans on the role of pavlovian conditioning on sexual responses are reviewed. Animal research shows robust, direct effects of conditioning processes on partner- and place preference. On the contrast, the empirical research with humans in this area is limited and earlier studies within this field are plagued by methodological confounds. Although recent experimental demonstrations of human sexual conditioning are neither numerous nor robust, sexual arousal showed to be conditionable in both men and women. The present paper serves to highlight the major empirical findings and to renew the insight in how stimuli can acquire sexually arousing value. Hereby also related neurobiological processes in reward learning are discussed. Finally, the connections between animal and human research on the conditionability of sexual responses are discussed, and suggestions for future directions in human research are given. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Logistic Conditions of Container Transportation on the Oder Waterway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kulczyk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains the analysis of the possibility of container transportation on the Oder Waterway (the Gliwice Canal, the canalized stretch of the Oder River, and the regulated stretch of the Oder River, on the assumption that the waterway complies with conditions of class III European waterway. The analysis is based on the concept of modern motor cargo vessel, adjusted to hydraulic parameters of waterway. The vessel is designed for ballasting when passing under bridges. The amount of ballast water that enables transportation of two tiers of containers is given. The costs of waterborne transportation are compared to the costs of rail transportation of containers on selected shipping routes.

  14. Adverse Events of Massage Therapy in Pain-Related Conditions: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain-related massage, important in traditional Eastern medicine, is increasingly used in the Western world. So the widening acceptance demands continual safety assessment. This review is an evaluation of the frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs reported mainly for pain-related massage between 2003 and 2013. Relevant all-languages reports in 6 databases were identified and assessed by two coauthors. During the 11-year period, 40 reports of 138 AEs were associated with massage. Author, year of publication, country of occurrence, participant related (age, sex or number of patients affected, the details of manual therapy, and clinician type were extracted. Disc herniation, soft tissue trauma, neurologic compromise, spinal cord injury, dissection of the vertebral arteries, and others were the main complications of massage. Spinal manipulation in massage has repeatedly been associated with serious AEs especially. Clearly, massage therapies are not totally devoid of risks. But the incidence of such events is low.

  15. Evaluation of Different Types of Lasers in Surface Conditioning of Porcelains: A Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhashemi, Amirhossin; Sharifi, Nastaran; Moharrami, Mohammad; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2017-01-01

    To achieve proper bond strength for porcelains, adequate surface roughness is essential, which is traditionally gained by sandblasting or acid etching with hydrofluoric (HF) acid. Nowadays with the development of laser systems, serious efforts were made to apply this new instrument for surface etching of porcelains due to easy usage, safety, and more efficiency. There are different kinds of lasers and porcelains, so choosing the ones which will be good match for each other is crucial. Besides that, changing the irradiation setting can be beneficial as well. This article reviewed 33 related studies and summarized results of etching accomplished by Nd:YAG, Er:YAG, Er,Cr:YSGG and CO2 lasers on different types of porcelains considering different laser settings and evaluation methods to bring a comprehensive insight. PMID:29123628

  16. Xerostomia Due to Systemic Disease: A Review of 20 Conditions and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, H; Baharvand, M; Movahhedian, A; Mohammadi, M; Khodadoustan, A

    2014-01-01

    Xerostomia is a common complaint of nearly half of the elderly population and about one-fifth of younger adults. It causes several signs and symptoms, and compromise oral functions and health-related quality-of-life. Multiple reasons are proposed to describe the etiology of xerostomia such as local factors, psychogenic factors, and systemic diseases. In order to manage xerostomia effectively, identification of the main causality is mandatory. The aim of this review was to present systemic diseases leading to xerostomia with their mechanisms of action. We used various general search engines and specialized databases such as Google, Google Scholar, Yahoo, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Medknow, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, Scopus, WebMD, EMBASE, and authorized textbooks to find relevant topics by means of Medical Subject Headings keywords such as “xerostomia,” “hyposalivations,” “mouth dryness,” “disease,” and “systemic.” We appraised 97 English-language articles published over the last 40 years in both medical and dental journals including reviews, meta-analysis, original papers, and case reports. Upon compilation of relevant data, it was concluded that autoimmune diseases most frequently involve salivary glands and cause xerostomia followed by diabetes mellitus, renal failure, and graft-versus-host disease. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms of systemic disease-related xerostomia are: autoimmunity, infiltration of immunocompetent cells, granuloma formation, fibrosis and dehydration, deposition of proteinaceous substances, bacterial infection, and side-effects of medications. PMID:25221694

  17. Bariatric surgery complications. Internal hernia: A potentially fatal condition. A case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadas, Raul; Lombana, Luis Jorge; Hernandez, Javier; Solano, Claudia; Suarez, Yanette; Torres, Diana; Alvarado, Jaime; Valencia, William; Garcia, Jairo; Hani, Albis

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, Obesity (defined as Body Mass Index > 30 kg/m2) has increased its prevalence reaching epidemic levels in countries such as The United States where it has became a national health issue. In Colombia the Obesity prevalence is figured around 14%. Treatment options for Obesity include life style modifications, pharmacologist management and surgical approach (Bariatric Surgery). This article describes a patient with previous bariatric surgery, who presents abdominal pain and melena owed to isquemic process of the alimentary limb caused by an internal hernia which is a potentially lethal condition if it is not highly suspected allowing its early diagnosis and treatment

  18. Tumorous Conditions of the Hand: A Retrospective Review of 402 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali CAVİT

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Knowledge concerning treatment and care of hand lesions is often based on small case series, case reports and a few large general case series. The aim of this study is to present our experience with hand tumors’ and tumor-like lesions’ incidence, age range and localizations. Material and Method: Between 2006-2016, 402 patients operated and histopathologically diagnosed with bone and soft tissue tumorous conditions of the hand were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Three hundred sixty one out of 402 cases (89.8% were soft tissue tumors and 41 cases (10.2% were osseous tumors of the hand. A total of 10 malignant tumors (2.5% were encountered in the hand. The average age of the patients was 41.9 years (ranged from 1 to 83 years. Among 361 soft tissue tumors, only 6 cases (1.6% were malignant and they were squamous cell tumors (n=5 and synovial sarcoma (n=1. The most common soft tissue pathology was ganglion cyst (n=125. The most common bone tumor was enchondroma, diagnosed in 26 patients (6.4% of all patients. Primary malignant bone tumors were extremely rare in the hand; one osteosarcoma and one chondrosarcoma were reported. Metastatic tumors to the hand were seen in two patients; and they were lung carcinoma and chondrosarcoma metastasis. Conclusion: Up-date knowledge and a thorough understanding of the nature and demographic characteristics of the tumorous conditions of the hand are crucial for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  19. Tumorous Conditions of the Hand: A Retrospective Review of 402 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavit, Ali; Özcanli, Haluk; Sançmiş, Mesut; Ocak, Güzide Ayşe; Gürer, Elif İnanç

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge concerning treatment and care of hand lesions is often based on small case series, case reports and a few large general case series. The aim of this study is to present our experience with hand tumors' and tumor-like lesions' incidence, age range and localizations. Between 2006-2016, 402 patients operated and histopathologically diagnosed with bone and soft tissue tumorous conditions of the hand were evaluated retrospectively. Three hundred sixty one out of 402 cases (89.8%) were soft tissue tumors and 41 cases (10.2%) were osseous tumors of the hand. A total of 10 malignant tumors (2.5%) were encountered in the hand. The average age of the patients was 41.9 years (ranged from 1 to 83 years). Among 361 soft tissue tumors, only 6 cases (1.6%) were malignant and they were squamous cell tumors (n=5) and synovial sarcoma (n=1). The most common soft tissue pathology was ganglion cyst (n=125). The most common bone tumor was enchondroma, diagnosed in 26 patients (6.4% of all patients). Primary malignant bone tumors were extremely rare in the hand; one osteosarcoma and one chondrosarcoma were reported. Metastatic tumors to the hand were seen in two patients; and they were lung carcinoma and chondrosarcoma metastasis. Up-date knowledge and a thorough understanding of the nature and demographic characteristics of the tumorous conditions of the hand are crucial for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  20. Conditional cash transfers for improving uptake of health interventions in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, Mylene; Haines, Andy; Palmer, Natasha

    2007-10-24

    Cash transfers conditional on certain behaviors, intended to provide access to social services, have been introduced in several developing countries. The effectiveness of these strategies in different contexts has not previously been the subject of a systematic review. To assess the effectiveness of conditional monetary transfers in improving access to and use of health services, as well as improving health outcomes, in low- and middle-income countries. Relevant publications were identified via electronic medical and social science databases from inception to April 2006 (PubMED, EMBASE, POPLINE, CAB Direct, Healthcare Management Information Consortium, WHOLIS (World Health Organization Library Database), African Healthline, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), Eldis, British Library for Development Studies (BLDS), ID21, Journal Storage (Jstor), Inter-Science, ScienceDirect, Internet Documents in Economics Access Service (Research Papers in Economics) (IDEAS[Repec]), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), MEDCARIB, Virtual Library in Health (ADOLEC), Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), FRANCIS, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, and the Effective Practice and Organization of Care Group (EPOC) Register. Reference lists of relevant papers and "gray" literature resources were also searched. To be included, a paper had to meet study design criteria (randomized controlled trial, interrupted time series analysis, and controlled before and after study) and include a measure of at least 1 of the following outcomes: health care utilization, health expenditure, or health outcomes. Twenty-eight papers were retrieved for assessment and 10 were included in this review. Methodological details and outcomes were extracted by 2 reviewers who independently assessed the quality of the papers. Overall, the evidence suggests that conditional cash transfer programs

  1. Understanding factors that influence participation in physical activity among people with a neuromusculoskeletal condition: a review of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newitt, Rosemarie; Barnett, Fiona; Crowe, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to describe the factors that influence participation in physical activity (PA) in people with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions. A systematic search of six databases was conducted. Articles were included if the study qualitatively explored factors that influence participation in PA by individuals with a NMS condition. Fifteen peer-reviewed articles published between 2003 and 2013 were analysed for common themes and critically appraised. Results were categorised using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework. The most common demotivators reported for the three areas of functioning, body function and structures, activities and participation were lack of walking balance, muscle weakness, pain, stiffness, bladder and blower problems, depression, thermoregulation and fear of injury. Fluctuating symptoms and fatigue were mentioned as demotivators in all of the progressive conditions. Maintaining independence, function and weight, and the prevention of secondary conditions were the leading motivators reported in this domain. Most common environmental barriers include accessibility, costs, transport and insufficient information and knowledge from health professionals. Social support is a consistent determinate of PA and is reported as a facilitator in every study. The most common personal demotivators include lack of motivation, feelings of self-consciousness and embarrassment in public, anxiety, frustration and anger. Personal motivators include goal setting and achieving, enjoyment, feeling good, feeling "normal", motivation and optimism, redefining self and escapism from everyday boundaries. Individuals with NMS conditions report complex common barriers, facilitators, demotivators and motivators to participation in PA. The way these factors influence participation in PA is unique to the individual; therefore, it is necessary to adopt an individually tailored approach when designing interventions. Individuals

  2. Gender inequalities in occupational health related to the unequal distribution of working and employment conditions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Serna, Javier; Ronda-Pérez, Elena; Artazcoz, Lucia; Moen, Bente E; Benavides, Fernando G

    2013-08-05

    Gender inequalities exist in work life, but little is known about their presence in relation to factors examined in occupation health settings. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize the working and employment conditions described as determinants of gender inequalities in occupational health in studies related to occupational health published between 1999 and 2010. A systematic literature review was undertaken of studies available in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Sociological Abstracts, LILACS, EconLit and CINAHL between 1999 and 2010. Epidemiologic studies were selected by applying a set of inclusion criteria to the title, abstract, and complete text. The quality of the studies was also assessed. Selected studies were qualitatively analysed, resulting in a compilation of all differences between women and men in the prevalence of exposure to working and employment conditions and work-related health problems as outcomes. Most of the 30 studies included were conducted in Europe (n=19) and had a cross-sectional design (n=24). The most common topic analysed was related to the exposure to work-related psychosocial hazards (n=8). Employed women had more job insecurity, lower control, worse contractual working conditions and poorer self-perceived physical and mental health than men did. Conversely, employed men had a higher degree of physically demanding work, lower support, higher levels of effort-reward imbalance, higher job status, were more exposed to noise and worked longer hours than women did. This systematic review has identified a set of working and employment conditions as determinants of gender inequalities in occupational health from the occupational health literature. These results may be useful to policy makers seeking to reduce gender inequalities in occupational health, and to researchers wishing to analyse these determinants in greater depth.

  3. Gender inequalities in occupational health related to the unequal distribution of working and employment conditions: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Gender inequalities exist in work life, but little is known about their presence in relation to factors examined in occupation health settings. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize the working and employment conditions described as determinants of gender inequalities in occupational health in studies related to occupational health published between 1999 and 2010. Methods A systematic literature review was undertaken of studies available in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Sociological Abstracts, LILACS, EconLit and CINAHL between 1999 and 2010. Epidemiologic studies were selected by applying a set of inclusion criteria to the title, abstract, and complete text. The quality of the studies was also assessed. Selected studies were qualitatively analysed, resulting in a compilation of all differences between women and men in the prevalence of exposure to working and employment conditions and work-related health problems as outcomes. Results Most of the 30 studies included were conducted in Europe (n=19) and had a cross-sectional design (n=24). The most common topic analysed was related to the exposure to work-related psychosocial hazards (n=8). Employed women had more job insecurity, lower control, worse contractual working conditions and poorer self-perceived physical and mental health than men did. Conversely, employed men had a higher degree of physically demanding work, lower support, higher levels of effort-reward imbalance, higher job status, were more exposed to noise and worked longer hours than women did. Conclusions This systematic review has identified a set of working and employment conditions as determinants of gender inequalities in occupational health from the occupational health literature. These results may be useful to policy makers seeking to reduce gender inequalities in occupational health, and to researchers wishing to analyse these determinants in greater depth. PMID:23915121

  4. Oral conditions in renal disorders and treatment considerations – A review for pediatric dentist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Gupta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the current understanding of the oral and dental aspects of chronic renal disease (CRD. A PubMed literature search was performed and all relevant studies were assessed. As the number of people suffering from CRD increases worldwide, dentists are expected to encounter more patients with CRD who need oral care. In children, CRD can elicit a wide spectrum of oral manifestations in the hard and soft tissues. Bleeding, altered drug metabolism, impaired immune function, and an increased risk of dentally induced bacterial endocarditis are some important features that require attention. Dental management of patients with CRD requires that clinicians appreciate that multiple systems can be affected by the disease. Dentists should consult with nephrologists regarding the specific precautions required for each patient. Medical treatments in these patients may need to be postponed due to an unfavorable oral health status or potential risk of life-threatening infection after surgery. Improving oral hygiene and performing necessary dental and oral treatment before hemodialysis or transplantation may prevent endocarditis and septicemia in these patients. Hence, treatment plans should be formulated to restore the patient’s dentition and protect them from potentially severe infections of dental origin.

  5. The risk of falling in young adults with neurological conditions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saverino, Alessia; Moriarty, Amy; Playford, Diane

    2014-01-01

    To review systematically the literature on fall risk factors for young patients affected by neurological disorders. A systematic search of all primary research-based literature on risk factors for falls or fall characteristics in young adults (mean age characteristics and environmental hazards are significant environmental risk factors. The heterogeneity of the assessment tools used to measure risk factors limited comparison across studies. Falling is a common problem among young patients affected by neurological disorders, although the risk of falling for a specific individual is difficult to predict and the risk of a severe fall-related injury has not yet been established. Young patients with impaired gait and balance or medium to severe motor disability appear to be at increased risk of falling. Patients who are relatively independent and still participating in challenging activities have an increased exposure to fall-risk. Walking aids, wheelchair characteristics and environmental hazards are significant environmental risk factors. These risk factors should be monitored closely in the young neurological population to help prevent falls.

  6. Electrochemical Sensors for Monitoring the Corrosion Conditions of Reinforced Concrete Structures: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita B. Figueira

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Several methods for corrosion monitoring of reinforced concrete structures (RCS have been proposed in the last few decades. These systems may be used either in new, existing or repaired structures. The corrosion monitoring can be performed by different methodologies. These may or may not be destructive, use different degrees of complexity and cost, and provide information on the progression and kinetics of the corrosion phenomena. The destructive methods are limited to sampling. Therefore, these may not be representative of the whole structure, which is extremely important in RCS with large heterogeneities both in terms of materials used and in terms of the exposure environment. Within this context, non-destructive methods have been widely developed, which are intended to provide quick information about the entire structure. Ideally, these systems should be able to detect the corrosion state of the steel inside the concrete, the main causes of corrosion and the evolution of corrosion phenomena over time. This manuscript reviews and summarizes the actual state of the art and the main achievements in the field of electrochemical sensors based on non-destructive methods for corrosion monitoring of RCS in the last few years. The challenges and perspectives in this field will also be discussed.

  7. Review Article: Atmospheric conditions inducing extreme precipitation over the eastern and western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, U.; Nissen, K.; Ulbrich, U.

    2015-11-01

    This review discusses published studies of heavy rainfall events over the Mediterranean Basin, combining them in a more general picture of the dynamic and thermodynamic factors and processes that produce heavy rain storms. It distinguishes the western and eastern Mediterranean in order to point out specific regional peculiarities. The crucial moisture for developing intensive convection over these regions can be originated not only from the adjacent Mediterranean Sea but also from distant upwind sources. Transport from remote sources is usually in the mid-tropospheric layers and associated with specific features and patterns of the larger-scale circulations. The synoptic systems (tropical and extratropical) that account for most of the major extreme precipitation events and the coupling of circulation and extreme rainfall patterns are presented. Heavy rainfall over the Mediterranean Basin is caused at times in concert by several atmospheric processes working at different atmospheric scales, such as local convection, upper synoptic-scale-level troughs, and mesoscale convective systems. Under tropical air-mass intrusions, convection generated by static instability seems to play a more important role than synoptic-scale vertical motions. Locally, the occurrence of torrential rains and their intensity is dependent on factors such as temperature profiles and implied instability, atmospheric moisture, and lower-level convergence.

  8. Energetic demand and physical conditioning of table tennis players. A study review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Kondric, Miran; Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theo; Sperlich, Billy

    2018-04-01

    Table tennis is a racket sport characterised by an intermittent movement profile, including short rallies interspersed with short breaks. In contrast to other racket sports, information is lacking regarding the: (i) physiological responses during table tennis matches and training; and (ii) practical recommendations for enhancing aerobic and anaerobic performance in table tennis by improving cardio-metabolic and neuro-muscular fitness, anthropometry and nutritional strategies. Therefore, this review article attempts to narratively provide an overview of the physiology of table tennis by describing the metabolic mechanisms underlying match play and outlining a framework for practical recommendations for improving cardio-metabolic and neuro-muscular fitness, anthropometry as well as nutritional strategies. A second aim was to stimulate future research on table tennis and to point out study limitations in this context. In general, the most important finding is that the rally duration is short at around 3.5s, with a longer rest time of around 8-20s, resulting in an effort-rest ratio ranging from 0.15 to 0.22 in official matches and energetic demands during match relatively low. Future studies should focus on the relationship between energetic demand and table tennis performance with a view to predicting performance in table tennis using physiological parameters.

  9. Cyber-Victimization of People With Chronic Conditions and Disabilities: A Systematic Review of Scope and Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaboby, Zhraa A; Barnes, James; Evans, Hala; Short, Emma

    2017-01-01

    The victimization of individuals with chronic conditions or disabilities is prevalent with severe impact at psychological and physiological levels. With the increasing use of technology these experiences were further reshaped. This systematic review aimed at scoping the experiences of cyber-victimization of people living with chronic conditions or disabilities and examine the documented impact on them. Following a four-stage search strategy in several databases including MEDLINE, Embase, PsychINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane and snowballing of references, a total of 2,922 studies were scanned and 10 studies were eventually included. Quality assessment was done in two phases using tools specific to observational studies and cyber-victimization research. A narrative synthesis of reported results covered a total of 3,070 people. Sample size ranged between 42 and 823 participants, and the age range was 6-71 years with a majority of White ethnic backgrounds. Most studies (n=9) were cross sectional. The prevalence range of cyber-victimization was 2%-41.7% based on variable definitions, duration and methods. Targeted conditions included physical impairments, intellectual disabilities and specific chronic diseases. The most common documented impact was psychological/psychiatric, mainly depression followed by anxiety and distress. Somatic health complaints and self-harm were also reported. We concluded that people with chronic conditions and disabilities were consistently at higher risk of victimization with devastating health complications. Research gaps were identified such as the need to address more conditions and acknowledge differences between heterogeneous health conditions. Other recommendations include allowing flexibility and accountability to patients/victims in research design, education on victimization and health consequences, and improving primary care.

  10. Response of SiC/SiC to Transient Thermal Conditions: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Russell H.

    2001-01-01

    The database on thermal shock behavior of SiC/SiC composites is very limited. The existing data suggests continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites, such as SiC/SiC, exhibit very good thermal shock characteristics but most data was obtained for -Delta T conditions as a result of quenching from an elevated temperature. Thermal shock in a fusion energy system will result from plasma discharge and will result in a +Delta T. One study was reported for SiC/SiC composites given a +Delta T with no loss in strength following 25 cycles at a heating rate of 1700 degrees C/s. Monolithic SiC failed in 1.5 cycles at a heating rate of 1400 degrees C/s. Thermal fatigue test results also suggest that SiC/SiC composites will exhibit little or no degradation for 100's of cycles. It was estimated that radiation could, in an extreme case, cause a reduction in the thermal shock performance from a calculated Delta Tc of 957K to about 300K if the fiber strength is reduced by 50%. Newer composites with greater radiation resistance should have a much smaller change in the Delta Tc.

  11. Occlusal changes secondary to temporomandibular joint conditions: a critical review and implications for clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    CALDAS, Waleska; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; JANSON, Guilherme; Paulo César Rodrigues, CONTI

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and malocclusion is an extremely critical issue in dentistry. Contrary to the old concept that malocclusion causes TMD, occlusal changes, especially those observed as sudden, may be secondary and reflect joint or muscle disorders due to the obvious connection between these structures and the dental occlusion. Objectives The aim of this article is to present the most commonly occlusal changes secondary to TMD. Methods The clinical presentation of these conditions is discussed. Details regarding diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients presenting TMD prior or during treatment are also presented. Conclusions All plans for irreversible therapy should be preceded by a meticulous analysis of TMD signs and symptoms in such a way that patients are not submitted to irreversible treatment, based on an untrue occlusal relationship, secondary to articular and/or muscular disorders. When present, TMD symptoms must always be controlled to reestablish a “normal” occlusion and allow proper treatment strategy. PMID:27556214

  12. Zika puzzle in Brazil: peculiar conditions of viral introduction and dissemination - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possas, Cristina; Brasil, Patricia; Marzochi, Mauro CA; Tanuri, Amilcar; Martins, Reinaldo M; Marques, Ernesto TA; Bonaldo, Myrna C; Ferreira, Antonio GP; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Nogueira, Rita Maria R; Sequeira, Patricia C; Marzochi, Keyla BF; Homma, Akira

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the peculiar conditions that favoured the unexpected introduction of Zika virus into the poorest northeastern region of Brazil in 2015, its speed of transmission to other Brazilian states, other Latin American countries and other regions, and the severity of related neurological disorders in newborns and adults. Contrasting with evidence that Zika had so far caused only mild cases in humans in the last six decades, the epidemiological scenario of this outbreak in Brazil indicates dramatic health effects: in 2015, an increase of 20-fold in notified cases of microcephaly and/or central nervous system (CNS) alterations suggestive of Zika congenital infection, followed by an exponential increase in 2016, with 2366 cumulative cases confirmed in the country by the end of December 2016. A significant increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults has also been reported. Factors involved in viral dissemination, neural pathogenesis and routes of transmission in Brazil are examined, such as the role of social and environmental factors and the controversies involved in the hypothesis of antibody-dependent enhancement, to explain the incidence of congenital Zika syndrome in Brazil. Responses to the Zika outbreak and the development of new products are also discussed. PMID:28443985