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Sample records for class proteobacteria characterization

  1. Characterization of rickettsial adhesin Adr2 belonging to a new group of adhesins in α-proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellaiswamy, Manohari; Kowalczewska, Malgorzata; Merhej, Vicky; Nappez, Claude; Vincentelli, Renaud; Renesto, Patricia; Raoult, Didier

    2011-05-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is the etiological agent of epidemic typhus and is an obligate intracellular bacterium that grows as a parasite freely within the cytoplasm of a eukaryotic host cell. Previous studies have shown that rOmpA and rOmpB which belong to the family of rickettsial cell surface antigens are involved in vitro in the adhesion of Rickettsiae to epithelial cells. Recently, two putative rickettsial adhesins have been identified using high resolution 2D-PAGE coupled with mass spectrometry. In this study, we further characterize and describe the adhesin Adr2 from R. prowazekii. Using an overlay assay coupled with mass spectrometry two adhesins, Adr1 (RP827) and Adr2 (RP828), were identified from the R. prowazekii proteome Recombinant R. prowazekii Adr2 was expressed through fusion with Dsbc in Escherichia coli, purified and concentrated, thus allowing production of specific monoclonal antibodies, as confirmed by western blot assays. Finally, inhibition of rickettsiae-induced cytotoxicity with monoclonal anti-Adr2 antibody has showed a greatest impact on bacterial cell entry at 8 h post-infection (ca50%) and then decreased progressively to attempt 18% of inhibition at day 7. These, correlated to the inhibition of rickettsiae-induced cytotoxicity with monoclonal anti-rOmpB antibody. Thus, Adr2 is sufficient to mediate R. prowazekii entry into the cell at early stage of mammalian cell infection. Our results suggest that R. prowazekii Adr2 could be the main actor promoting the entry of rickettsiae into the host cells. The present study opens the framework for future investigations for better understanding of the Adr2 -mediated mechanisms involved in adhesion/invasion or intracellular survival of R. prowazekii. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Using Linguistic References To Characterize Class Integration.

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    Stewart, Gay B.; Stewart, John C.; Skinner, Stephen; Baily, Crystal

    1999-01-01

    Introduces a technique using linguistic references in the communication of a physics class to characterize class integration. Measurement of a traditional physics class shows only marginal integration; however, measurement of a traditional physics class shows that integration can be dramatically improved. (Author/CCM)

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

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    Yannick Fleury

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs, synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs, obtained through the linkage of (unusual amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs.

  4. Characterization of the first alginolytic operons in a marine bacterium: from their emergence in marine Flavobacteriia to their independent transfers to marine Proteobacteria and human gut Bacteroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, François; Barbeyron, Tristan; Tonon, Thierry; Génicot, Sabine; Czjzek, Mirjam; Michel, Gurvan

    2012-09-01

    Alginate constitutes a significant part of seaweed biomass and thus a crucial nutrient for numerous marine heterotrophic bacteria. However, the mechanisms for alginate assimilation remain largely unknown in marine microorganisms. We show here that the genome of the marine flavobacterium Zobellia galactanivorans contains seven putative alginate lyase genes, five of them localized within two clusters comprising additional carbohydrate-related genes. The transcription of these genes and the alginolytic activity were strongly induced when Z. galactanivorans used alginate as sole carbon source. These clusters were shown to be transcribed as polycistronic mRNAs and thus to constitute operons. Several candidate enzymes were successfully overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and their activity tested. Particularly, AlyA1, AlyA4, AlyA5 and AlyA7 are confirmed as active alginate lyases. Zg2622 and Zg2614 are a dehydrogenase and a kinase, respectively, further converting the terminal unsaturated monosaccharides released by alginate lyases into 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate. In-depth phylogenomic analyses reveal that such alginolytic operons originated from an ancestral marine flavobacterium and were independently transferred to marine proteobacteria and Japanese gut Bacteroides. These bacteria thus gained the capacity to assimilate the main polysaccharide of brown algae, an adaptive advantage in coastal environments but also in the gut microbiota of specific human population. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Characterization of Cyclohexanone Inclusions in Class 1 RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Characterization of Cyclohexanone Inclusions in Class 1 RDX by Rose A. Pesce-Rodriguez and Stephanie M. Piraino ARL-TR-6962 June 2014...TR-6962 June 2014 Characterization of Cyclohexanone Inclusions in Class 1 RDX Rose A. Pesce-Rodriguez and Stephanie M. Piraino Weapons...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 12/2012 to 6/2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Cyclohexanone Inclusions in Class 1 RDX 5a. CONTRACT

  6. Ubiquitous and persistent Proteobacteria and other Gram-negative bacteria in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2017-05-15

    Drinking water comprises a complex microbiota, in part shaped by the disinfection and distribution systems. Gram-negative bacteria, mainly members of the phylum Proteobacteria, represent the most frequent bacteria in drinking water, and their ubiquity and physiological versatility raises questions about possible implications in human health. The first step to address this concern is the identification and characterization of such bacteria that is the first objective of this study, aiming at identifying ubiquitous or persistent Gram-negative bacteria, Proteobacteria or members of other phyla, isolated from tap water or from its source. >1000 bacterial isolates were characterized and identified, and a selected group (n=68) was further analyzed for the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) to antibiotics (amoxicillin and gentamicin) and metals (copper and arsenite). Total DNA extracts of tap water were examined for the presence of putatively acquired antibiotic resistance or related genes (intI1, blaTEM, qnrS and sul1). The ubiquitous tap water genera comprised Proteobacteria of the class Alpha- (Blastomonas, Brevundimonas, Methylobacterium, Sphingobium, Sphingomonas), Beta- (Acidovorax, Ralstonia) and Gamma- (Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas). Persistent species were members of genera such as Aeromonas, Enterobacter or Dechloromonas. Ralstonia spp. showed the highest MIC values to gentamicin and Acinetobacter spp. to arsenite. The genes intI1, blaTEM or sul1 were detected, at densities lower than 2.3×10(5)copies/L, 2.4×10(4)copies/L and 4.6×10(2)copies/L, respectively, in most tap water samples. The presence of some bacterial groups, in particular of Beta- or Gammaproteobacteria (e.g. Ralstonia, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas) in drinking water may deserve attention given their potential as reservoirs or carriers of resistance or as opportunistic pathogens.

  7. Regulation and evolution of malonate and propionate catabolism in proteobacteria.

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    Suvorova, I A; Ravcheev, D A; Gelfand, M S

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria catabolize malonate via two pathways, encoded by the mdc and mat genes. In various bacteria, transcription of these genes is controlled by the GntR family transcription factors (TFs) MatR/MdcY and/or the LysR family transcription factor MdcR. Propionate is metabolized via the methylcitrate pathway, comprising enzymes encoded by the prp and acn genes. PrpR, the Fis family sigma 54-dependent transcription factor, is known to be a transcriptional activator of the prp genes. Here, we report a detailed comparative genomic analysis of malonate and propionate metabolism and its regulation in proteobacteria. We characterize genomic loci and gene regulation and identify binding motifs for four new TFs and also new regulon members, in particular, tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters. We describe restructuring of the genomic loci and regulatory interactions during the evolution of proteobacteria.

  8. Signature proteins that are distinctive of alpha proteobacteria

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    Gupta Radhey S

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The alpha (α proteobacteria, a very large and diverse group, are presently characterized solely on the basis of 16S rRNA trees, with no known molecular characteristic that is unique to this group. The genomes of three α-proteobacteria, Rickettsia prowazekii (RP, Caulobacter crescentus (CC and Bartonella quintana (BQ, were analyzed in order to search for proteins that are unique to this group. Results Blast analyses of protein sequences from the above genomes have led to the identification of 61 proteins which are distinctive characteristics of α-proteobacteria and are generally not found in any other bacteria. These α-proteobacterial signature proteins are generally of hypothetical functions and they can be classified as follows: (i Six proteins (CC2102, CC3292, CC3319, CC1887, CC1725 and CC1365 which are uniquely present in most sequenced α-proteobacterial genomes; (ii Ten proteins (CC1211, CC1886, CC2245, CC3470, CC0520, CC0365, CC0366, CC1977, CC3010 and CC0100 which are present in all α-proteobacteria except the Rickettsiales; (iii Five proteins (CC2345, CC3115, CC3401, CC3467 and CC1021 not found in the intracellular bacteria belonging to the order Rickettsiales and the Bartonellaceae family; (iv Four proteins (CC1652, CC2247, CC3295 and CC1035 that are absent from various Rickettsiales as well as Rhodobacterales; (v Three proteins (RP104, RP105 and RP106 that are unique to the order Rickettsiales and four proteins (RP766, RP192, RP030 and RP187 which are specific for the Rickettsiaceae family; (vi Six proteins (BQ00140, BQ00720, BQ03880, BQ12030, BQ07670 and BQ11900 which are specific to the order Rhizobiales; (vii Four proteins (BQ01660, BQ02450, BQ03770 and BQ13470 which are specific for the order Rhizobiales excluding the family Bradyrhizobiaceae; (viii Nine proteins (BQ12190, BQ11460, BQ11450, BQ11430, BQ11380, BQ11160, BQ11120, BQ11100 and BQ11030 which are distinctive of the Bartonellaceae family;(ix Six

  9. Reclassification of Thiobacillus aquaesulis (Wood & Kelly, 1995) as Annwoodia aquaesulis gen. nov., comb. nov., transfer of Thiobacillus (Beijerinck, 1904) from the Hydrogenophilales to the Nitrosomonadales, proposal of Hydrogenophilalia class. nov. within the 'Proteobacteria', and four new families within the orders Nitrosomonadales and Rhodocyclales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Rich; Hutt, Lee P; Rae, Alex W

    2017-05-01

    The genus Thiobacillus comprises four species with validly published names, of which Thiobacillus aquaesulis DSM 4255T (=ATCC 43788T) is the only species that can grow heterotrophically or mixotrophically - the rest being obligate autotrophs - and has a significant metabolic difference in not producing tetrathionate during the oxidation of thiosulfate during autotrophic growth. On the basis of this and differential chemotaxonomic properties and a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 93.4 % to the type species Thiobacillus thioparus DSM 505T, we propose that it is moved to a novel genus, Annwoodia gen. nov., for which the type species is Annwoodia aquaesulis gen. nov., comb. nov. We confirm that the position of the genus Thiobacillus in the Betaproteobacteria falls within the Nitrosomonadales rather than the Hydrogenophilales as previously proposed. Within the Nitrosomonadales we propose the circumscription of genera to form the Thiobacilliaceae fam. nov. and the Sterolibacteriaceae fam. nov. We propose the merging of the family Methylophilaceae into the Nitrosomonadales, and that the Sulfuricellaceae be merged into the Gallionellaceae, leaving the orders Methylophilales and Sulfuricellales defunct. In the Rhodocyclales we propose the Azonexaceae fam. nov. and the Zoogloeaceae fam. nov. We also reject the Hydrogenophilales from the Betaproteobacteria on the basis of a very low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the class-proper as well as physiological properties, forming the Hydrogenophilalia class. nov. in the 'Proteobacteria'. We provide emended descriptions of Thiobacillus, Hydrogenophilales, Hydrogenophilaceae, Nitrosomonadales, Gallionellaceae, Rhodocyclaceae and the Betaproteobacteria.

  10. Comparative Genomics of Regulation of Fatty Acid and Branched-chain Amino Acid Utilization in Proteobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Alexey E.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Arkin, Adam Paul; Dubchak, Inna; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Alm, Eric

    2008-10-31

    Bacteria can use branched-chain amino acids (ILV, i.e. isoleucine, leucine, valine) and fatty acids (FA) as sole carbon and energy sources convering ILV into acetyl-CoA, propanoyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA, respectively. In this work, we used the comparative genomic approach to identify candidate transcriptional factors and DNA motifs that control ILV and FA utilization pathways in proteobacteria. The metabolic regulons were characterized based on the identification and comparison of candidate transcription factor binding sites in groups of phylogenetically related genomes. The reconstructed ILV/FA regulatory network demonstrates considerable variability and involves six transcriptional factors from the MerR, TetR and GntR families binding to eleven distinct DNA motifs. The ILV degradation genes in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria are mainly regulated by anovel regulator from the MerR family (e.g., LiuR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa) (40 species), in addition, the TetR-type regulator LiuQ was identified in some beta-proteobacteria (8 species). Besides the core set of ILV utilization genes, the LiuR regulon in some lineages is expanded to include genes from other metabolic pathways, such as the glyoxylate shunt and glutamate synthase in the Shewanella species. The FA degradation genes are controlled by four regulators including FadR in gamma-proteobacteria (34 species), PsrA in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (45 species), FadP in beta-proteobacteria (14 species), and LiuR orthologs in alpha-proteobacteria (22 species). The remarkable variability of the regulatory systems associated with the FA degradation pathway is discussed from the functional and evolutionary points of view.

  11. Characterization of recombination in the HLA class II region

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    Cullen, M.; Carrington, M. [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (United States); Noble, J. [Roche Molecular Systems, Almeda, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Studies of linkage disequilibrium across the HLA class II region have been useful in predicting where recombination is most likely to occur. The strong associations between genes within the 85-kb region from DQB1 to DRB1 are consistent with low frequency of recombination in this segment of DNA. Conversely, a lack of association between alleles of TAP1 and TAP2 ({approximately}15 kb) has been observed, suggesting that recombination occurs here with relatively high frequency. Much of the HLA class II region has now been sequenced, providing the tools to undertake detailed analysis of recombination. Twenty-seven families containing one or two recombinant chromosomes within the 500-kb interval between the DPB1 and DRB1 genes were used to determine patterns of recombination across this region. SSCP analysis and microsatellite typing yielded identification of 127 novel polymorphic markers distributed throughout the class II region, allowing refinement of the site of crossover in 30 class II recombinant chromosomes. The three regions where recombination was observed most frequently are as follows: the 45-kb interval between HLA-DNA and RING3 (11 cases), the 50-kb interval between DQB3 and DQB1 (6 cases), and an 8.8-kb segment of the TAP2 gene (3 cases). Six of the 10 remaining recombinants await further characterization, pending identification of additional informative markers, while four recombinants were localized to other intervals (outliers). Analysis of association between markers flanking HLA-DNA to RING3 (45 kb), as well as TAP1 to TAP2 (15 kb), by use of independent CEPH haplotypes indicated little or no linkage disequilibrium, supporting the familial recombination data. A notable sequence motif located within a region associated with increased rates of recombination consisted of a (TGGA){sub 12} tandem repeat within the TAP2 gene. 74 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. The bovine class II major histocompatibility complex : serological definition and further characterization of class II haplotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis an analysis of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II in cattle is reported, with emphasis on the development of class II serology. First, the production of class II alloantisera, and the serological definition of bovine MHC class II polymorphism is described.

  13. The bovine class II major histocompatibility complex: Serological definition and further characterization of class II haplotypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, Ph.R.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis an analysis of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II in cattle is reported, with emphasis on the development of class II serology. First, the production of class II alloantisera, and the serological definition of bovine MHC class II polymorphism is described. Subsequentl

  14. Greater-than-Class C low-level waste characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piscitella, R.R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1991-12-31

    In 1985, Public Law 99-240 (Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985) made the Department of Energy (DOE) responsible for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW). DOE strategies for storage and disposal of GTCC LLW required characterization of volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate characteristics, project volumes, and determine radionuclide activities to the years 2035 and 2055. Twenty-year life extensions for 70% of the operating nuclear reactors were assumed to calculate the GTCC LLW available in 2055. The following categories of GTCC LLW were addressed: Nuclear Utilities Waste; Potential Sealed Sources GTCC LLW; DOE-Held Potential GTCC LLW; and Other Generator Waste. It was determined that the largest volume of these wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear utilities. The Other Generator Waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. DOE-Held Potential GTCC LLW accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035. Potential Sealed Sources GTCC LLW is less than 0.2% of the total projected volume. The base case total projected volume of GTCC LLW for all categories was 3,250 cubic meters. This was substantially less than previous estimates.

  15. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

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    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E.; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B.; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-01

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  16. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ulrich, Luke [ORNL; Lupa, Boguslaw [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Susanti, Dwi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Porat, I. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hooper, Sean [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lykidis, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Whitman, William [ORNL; Woese, Carl [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Background Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  17. Genomic characterization of methanomicrobiales reveals three classes of methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-06-04

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  18. Genomic characterization of methanomicrobiales reveals three classes of methanogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Anderson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II, and the Methanosarcinales (Class III.

  19. Stepwise evolution of the Sec machinery in Proteobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, EO; Driessen, AJM; Sluis, Eli O. van der

    2006-01-01

    The Sec machinery facilitates the translocation of proteins across and into biological membranes. In several of the Proteobacteria, this machinery contains accessory features that are not present in any other bacterial division. The genomic distribution of these features in the context of bacterial

  20. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in Proteobacteria.

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    Semen A Leyn

    Full Text Available Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ∼ 200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.

  1. Brain microbial populations in HIV/AIDS: α-proteobacteria predominate independent of host immune status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branton, William G; Ellestad, Kristofor K; Maingat, Ferdinand; Wheatley, B Matt; Rud, Erling; Warren, René L; Holt, Robert A; Surette, Michael G; Power, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The brain is assumed to be a sterile organ in the absence of disease although the impact of immune disruption is uncertain in terms of brain microbial diversity or quantity. To investigate microbial diversity and quantity in the brain, the profile of infectious agents was examined in pathologically normal and abnormal brains from persons with HIV/AIDS [HIV] (n = 12), other disease controls [ODC] (n = 14) and in cerebral surgical resections for epilepsy [SURG] (n = 6). Deep sequencing of cerebral white matter-derived RNA from the HIV (n = 4) and ODC (n = 4) patients and SURG (n = 2) groups revealed bacterially-encoded 16 s RNA sequences in all brain specimens with α-proteobacteria representing over 70% of bacterial sequences while the other 30% of bacterial classes varied widely. Bacterial rRNA was detected in white matter glial cells by in situ hybridization and peptidoglycan immunoreactivity was also localized principally in glia in human brains. Analyses of amplified bacterial 16 s rRNA sequences disclosed that Proteobacteria was the principal bacterial phylum in all human brain samples with similar bacterial rRNA quantities in HIV and ODC groups despite increased host neuroimmune responses in the HIV group. Exogenous viruses including bacteriophage and human herpes viruses-4, -5 and -6 were detected variably in autopsied brains from both clinical groups. Brains from SIV- and SHIV-infected macaques displayed a profile of bacterial phyla also dominated by Proteobacteria but bacterial sequences were not detected in experimentally FIV-infected cat or RAG1⁻/⁻ mouse brains. Intracerebral implantation of human brain homogenates into RAG1⁻/⁻ mice revealed a preponderance of α-proteobacteria 16 s RNA sequences in the brains of recipient mice at 7 weeks post-implantation, which was abrogated by prior heat-treatment of the brain homogenate. Thus, α-proteobacteria represented the major bacterial component of the primate brain's microbiome

  2. Cloning and functional characterization of a class III chitinase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... encoded by VvChiF III showed a high identity to that of a class III ... gene corresponds to the Glyco-hydro-18 super family that consisting of a signal peptide with the ..... broad-spectrum plant defence mechanism has been well.

  3. The Characterization of the Spectrum of a Class of Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Characterization of the Spectrum of a Class of Relations

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary, directed subsets of a group and a semigroup and some of their properties are discussed. A class of relations in terms of the range projections of a partial representation of a discrete group is introduced. It is shown that the spectrum of these relations is homeomorphic to the set of all characters of the diagonal subalgebra of the Toeplitz algebra.

  4. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria.

  5. Purification and Characterization of Enzymes from Yeast: An Extended Undergraduate Laboratory Sequence for Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Kelly E.; Watt, Terry J.; McIntyre, Neil R.; Thompson, Marleesa

    2013-01-01

    Providing a project-based experience in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory class can be complex with large class sizes and limited resources. We have designed a 6-week curriculum during which students purify and characterize the enzymes invertase and phosphatase from bakers yeast. Purification is performed in two stages via ethanol…

  6. Characterization of binding specificities of bovine leucocyte class I molecules: impacts for rational epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Andreas M.; Rasmussen, Michael; Svitek, Nicholas;

    2014-01-01

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide-binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized...

  7. Characterization of binding specificities of Bovine Leucocyte class I molecules: Impacts for rational epitope discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized. Her...

  8. Purification and Characterization of Enzymes from Yeast: An Extended Undergraduate Laboratory Sequence for Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Kelly E.; Watt, Terry J.; McIntyre, Neil R.; Thompson, Marleesa

    2013-01-01

    Providing a project-based experience in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory class can be complex with large class sizes and limited resources. We have designed a 6-week curriculum during which students purify and characterize the enzymes invertase and phosphatase from bakers yeast. Purification is performed in two stages via ethanol…

  9. A novel lineage of proteobacteria involved in formation of marine Fe-oxidizing microbial mat communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Emerson

    the first cultured representative of a new candidatus class of the Proteobacteria that is widely distributed in deep-sea environments, Candidatus zeta (zeta-Proteobacteria cl. nov.

  10. Computation Sequences: A Way to Characterize Classes of Attribute Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Hanne Riis

    1983-01-01

    A computation sequence for a derivation tree specifies a way of walking through the tree evaluating all the attributes of all nodes. By requiring that each derivation tree has a computation sequence with a certain property, it is possible to give simple characterizations of well-known subclasses ...

  11. GammaProteobacteria as a potential bioindicator of a multiple contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepceron, Maïté; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Crampon, Marc; Portet-Koltalo, Florence; Akpa-Vinceslas, Marthe; Legras, Marc; Bru, David; Bureau, Fabrice; Bodilis, Josselin

    2013-09-01

    The impact of a multiple contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was studied on permanent grassland soil, historically presenting low contamination (i.e. less than 1 mg kg(-1)). Soil microcosms were spiked at 300 mg kg(-1) with either single or a mixture of seven PAHs. While total dissipation of the phenanthrene was reached in under 90 days, only 60% of the PAH mixture were dissipated after 90 days. Interestingly, after 30 days, the abundance of the GammaProteobacteria class (assessed by qPCR) become significantly higher in microcosms spiked with the PAH mixture. In addition, the specific abundance of the cultivable Pseudomonas spp., which belong to the GammaProteobacteria class, increased earlier and transiently (after 8 days) in the microcosms spiked with the PAH mixture. Consequently, we propose to use the GammaProteobacteria as a bioindicator to detect the impact on the bacterial community of a multiple contamination by PAHs in agricultural soils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Workload Characterization of a Leadership Class Storage Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Gunasekaran, Raghul [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Zhang, Zhe [ORNL; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Understanding workload characteristics is critical for optimizing and improving the performance of current systems and software, and architecting new storage systems based on observed workload patterns. In this paper, we characterize the scientific workloads of the world s fastest HPC (High Performance Computing) storage cluster, Spider, at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). Spider provides an aggregate bandwidth of over 240 GB/s with over 10 petabytes of RAID 6 formatted capacity. OLCFs flagship petascale simulation platform, Jaguar, and other large HPC clusters, in total over 250 thousands compute cores, depend on Spider for their I/O needs. We characterize the system utilization, the demands of reads and writes, idle time, and the distribution of read requests to write requests for the storage system observed over a period of 6 months. From this study we develop synthesized workloads and we show that the read and write I/O bandwidth usage as well as the inter-arrival time of requests can be modeled as a Pareto distribution.

  13. Characterization of a new class of surface micromachined pumps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, Paul C.

    2004-12-01

    This is the latest in a series of LDRD's that we have been conducting with Florida State University/Florida A&M University (FSU/FAMU) under the campus executive program. This research builds on the earlier projects; ''Development of Highly Integrated Magnetically and Electrostatically Actuated Micropumps'' (SAND2003-4674) and ''Development of Magnetically and Electrostatically Driven Surface Micromachined Pumps'' (SAND2002-0704P). In this year's LDRD we designed 2nd generation of surface micromachined (SMM) gear and viscous pumps. Two SUMMiT{trademark} modules full of design variations of these pumps were fabricated and one SwIFT{trademark} module is still in fabrication. The SwIFT{trademark} fabrication process results in a transparent pump housing cover that will enable visualization inside the pumps. Since the SwIFT{trademark} pumps have not been tested as they are still in fabrication, this report will focus on the 2nd generation SUMMiT{trademark} designs. Pump testing (pressure vs. flow) was conducted on several of the SUMMiT{trademark} designs resulting in the first pump curve for this class of SMM pumps. A pump curve was generated for the higher torque 2nd generation gear pump designed by Jason Hendrix of FSU. The pump maximum flow rate at zero head was 6.5 nl/s for a 30V, 30 Hz square wave signal. This level of flow rate would be more than adequate for our typical SMM SUMMiT{trademark} or SwIFT{trademark} channels which have typical volumes on the order of 50 pl.

  14. Characterization of microsatellite loci in the SLA class I region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoyoung; McClure, Matthew Charles

    2011-04-01

    Microsatellite (MS) markers in the SLA-1 region were characterized via sequencing analysis with BAC clones generated from the National Institute of Health miniature pigs (MIPs). A total of 16 BAC clones were sequenced producing 15,228 shotgun reads, corresponding to 11.2 X sequencing coverage, that were used to construct a contig of 12.18 Mb in length. MS markers were compared with previously deposited GenBank sequences to verify the existence of 423 potential MS candidate markers in the SLA-1 region. Evaluation of these polymorphisms confirmed 59 markers in MIPs, and the combined data including sequences from GenBank revealed 155 polymorphic MS markers. MS markers identified from this analysis can be used to provide an alternative method to direct typing for determining an individual's SLA-1 haplotype. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Symbiotic ß-proteobacteria beyond legumes: Burkholderia in Rubiaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brecht Verstraete

    Full Text Available Symbiotic ß-proteobacteria not only occur in root nodules of legumes but are also found in leaves of certain Rubiaceae. The discovery of bacteria in plants formerly not implicated in endosymbiosis suggests a wider occurrence of plant-microbe interactions. Several ß-proteobacteria of the genus Burkholderia are detected in close association with tropical plants. This interaction has occurred three times independently, which suggest a recent and open plant-bacteria association. The presence or absence of Burkholderia endophytes is consistent on genus level and therefore implies a predictive value for the discovery of bacteria. Only a single Burkholderia species is found in association with a given plant species. However, the endophyte species are promiscuous and can be found in association with several plant species. Most of the endophytes are part of the plant-associated beneficial and environmental group, but others are closely related to B. glathei. This soil bacteria, together with related nodulating and non-nodulating endophytes, is therefore transferred to a newly defined and larger PBE group within the genus Burkholderia.

  16. Characterizing interactive engagement activities in a flipped introductory physics class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Donnelly, Robyn; Hardy, Judy

    2016-06-01

    Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of how they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in practice is needed. Our aim in this paper is to present a characterization of the type and duration of interactions, as experienced by students, that took place during two introductory physics courses (1A and 1B) at a university in the United Kingdom. Through this work, a simple framework for analyzing lectures—the framework for interactive learning in lectures (FILL), which focuses on student interactions (with the lecturer, with each other, and with the material) is proposed. The pedagogical approach is based on Peer Instruction (PI) and both courses are taught by the same lecturer. We find lecture activities can be categorized into three types: interactive (25%), vicarious interactive (20%) (involving questions to and from the lecturer), and noninteractive (55%). As expected, the majority of both interactive and vicarious interactive activities took place during PI. However, the way that interactive activities were used during non-PI sections of the lecture varied significantly between the two courses. Differences were also found in the average time spent on lecturer-student interactions (28% for 1A and 12% for 1B), although not on student-student interactions (12% and 12%) or on individual learning (10% and 7%). These results are explored in detail and the implications for future research are discussed.

  17. Molecular characterization of major histocompatibility complex class 1 (MHC-I) from squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascalis, Hervé; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Fendel, Rolf; Lavergne, Anne; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2003-12-01

    Little is known about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class 1 in squirrel monkeys ( Saimiri sciureus). We cloned, sequenced and characterized two alleles and the cDNA of the coding region of MHC class 1 in these New World monkeys. Phylogenetic analyses showed that these sequences are related to HLA class 1 genes ( HLA-A and HLA-G). The structure and organization of one of the two identified clones was similar to that of a class 1 MHC gene ( HLA-A2). All the exon/intron splice acceptor/donor sites are conserved and their locations correspond to the HLA-A2 gene. The sequences of the newly described cDNAs reveal that they code for the characteristic class 1 MHC proteins, with all the features thought necessary for cell surface expression. Typical sequences for the leader peptide, alpha(1), alpha(2), alpha(3), transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains were found.

  18. Molecular characterization of zeta class glutathione S-transferases from Pinus brutia Ten.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E. Oztetik; F. Kockar; M. Alper; M. Iscan

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs; EC 2.5.1.18) play important roles in stress tolerance and metabolic detoxification in plants. In higher plants, studies on GSTs have focussed largely on agricultural plants. There is restricted information about molecular characterization of GSTs in gymnosperms. To date, only tau class GST enzymes have been characterized from some pinus species. For the first time, the present study reports cloning and molecular characterization of two zeta class GST genes, namely PbGSTZ1 and PbGSTZ2 from Pinus brutia Ten., which is an economically important pine native to the eastern Mediterranean region and have to cope with several environmental stress conditions. The PbGSTZ1 gene was isolated from cDNA, whereas PbGSTZ2 was isolated from genomic DNA. Sequence analysis of PbGSTZ1 and PbGSTZ2 revealed the presence of an open reading frame of 226 amino acids with typical consensus sequences of the zeta class plant GSTs. Protein and secondary structure prediction analysis of two zeta class PbGSTZs have shared common features of other plant zeta class GSTs. Genomic clone, PbGSTZ2 gene, is unexpectedly intronless. Extensive sequence analysis of PbGSTZ2, with cDNA clone, PbGSTZ1, revealed 87% identity at nucleotide and 81% identity at amino acid levels with 41 amino acids differences suggesting that genomic PbGSTZ2 gene might be an allelic or a paralogue version of PbGSTZ1.

  19. A Class of Asymmetric Gapped Hamiltonians on Quantum Spin Chains and its Characterization II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yoshiko

    2016-12-01

    We give a characterization of the class of gapped Hamiltonians introduced in Part I (Ogata, A class of asymmetric gapped Hamiltonians on quantum spin chains and its classification I, 2015). The Hamiltonians in this class are given as MPS (Matrix product state) Hamiltonians. In Ogata (A class of asymmetric gapped Hamiltonians on quantum spin chains and its classification I, 2015), we list up properties of ground state structures of Hamiltonians in this class. In this Part II, we show the converse. Namely, if a (not necessarily MPS) Hamiltonian H satisfies five of the listed properties, there is a Hamiltonian H' from the class by Ogata (A class of asymmetric gapped Hamiltonians on quantum spin chains and its classification I, 2015), satisfying the following: The ground state spaces of the two Hamiltonians on the infinite interval coincide. The spectral projections onto the ground state space of H on each finite intervals are approximated by that of H' exponentially well, with respect to the interval size. The latter property has an application to the classification problem with open boundary conditions.

  20. A Class of Asymmetric Gapped Hamiltonians on Quantum Spin Chains and its Characterization II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yoshiko

    2016-06-01

    We give a characterization of the class of gapped Hamiltonians introduced in Part I (Ogata, A class of asymmetric gapped Hamiltonians on quantum spin chains and its classification I, 2015). The Hamiltonians in this class are given as MPS (Matrix product state) Hamiltonians. In Ogata (A class of asymmetric gapped Hamiltonians on quantum spin chains and its classification I, 2015), we list up properties of ground state structures of Hamiltonians in this class. In this Part II, we show the converse. Namely, if a (not necessarily MPS) Hamiltonian H satisfies five of the listed properties, there is a Hamiltonian H' from the class by Ogata (A class of asymmetric gapped Hamiltonians on quantum spin chains and its classification I, 2015), satisfying the following: The ground state spaces of the two Hamiltonians on the infinite interval coincide. The spectral projections onto the ground state space of H on each finite intervals are approximated by that of H' exponentially well, with respect to the interval size. The latter property has an application to the classification problem with open boundary conditions.

  1. Proteobacteria become predominant during regrowth after water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Castro, Cristina; Macedo, Gonçalo; Silva, Adrian M T; Manaia, Célia M; Nunes, Olga C

    2016-12-15

    Disinfection processes aim at reducing the number of viable cells through the generation of damages in different cellular structures and molecules. Since disinfection involves unspecific mechanisms, some microbial populations may be selected due to resilience to treatment and/or to high post-treatment fitness. In this study, the bacterial community composition of secondarily treated urban wastewater and of surface water collected in the intake area of a drinking water treatment plant was compared before and 3-days after disinfection with ultraviolet radiation, ozonation or photocatalytic ozonation. The aim was to assess the dynamics of the bacterial communities during regrowth after disinfection. In all the freshly collected samples, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla (40-50% and 20-30% of the reads, respectively). Surface water differed from wastewater mainly in the relative abundance of Actinobacteria (17% and disinfected samples presented a shift of Gammaproteobacteria (from 8 to 10% to 33-65% of the reads) and Betaproteobacteria (from 14 to 20% to 31-37% of the reads), irrespective of the type of water and disinfection process used. Genera such as Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter or Rheinheimera presented a selective advantage after water disinfection. These variations were not observed in the non-disinfected controls. Given the ubiquity and genome plasticity of these bacteria, the results obtained suggest that disinfection processes may have implications on the microbiological quality of the disinfected water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein domains and architectural innovation in plant-associated Proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie J Allan

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of new complex biological behaviour tends to arise by novel combinations of existing building blocks. The functional and evolutionary building blocks of the proteome are protein domains, the function of a protein being dependent on its constituent domains. We clustered completely-sequenced proteomes of prokaryotes on the basis of their protein domain content, as defined by Pfam (release 16.0. This revealed that, although there was a correlation between phylogeny and domain content, other factors also have an influence. This observation motivated an investigation of the relationship between an organism's lifestyle and the complement of domains and domain architectures found within its proteome. Results We took a census of all protein domains and domain combinations (architectures encoded in the completely-sequenced proteobacterial genomes. Nine protein domain families were identified that are found in phylogenetically disparate plant-associated bacteria but are absent from non-plant-associated bacteria. Most of these are known to play a role in the plant-associated lifestyle, but they also included domain of unknown function DUF1427, which is found in plant symbionts and pathogens of the alpha-, beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria, but not known in any other organism. Further, several domains were identified as being restricted to phytobacteria and Eukaryotes. One example is the RolB/RolC glucosidase family, which is found only in Agrobacterium species and in plants. We identified the 0.5% of Pfam protein domain families that were most significantly over-represented in the plant-associated Proteobacteria with respect to the background frequencies in the whole set of available proteobacterial proteomes. These included guanylate cyclase, domains implicated in aromatic catabolism, cellulase and several domains of unknown function. We identified 459 unique domain architectures found in phylogenetically diverse plant pathogens

  3. Set Theory Applied to the Mathematical Characterization of HLA Class II Binding Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Rodríguez Velásquez, MD, esp.1

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Antigen presentation contains the molecularbasis for antigenic identification and immuneresponses. The set theory and experimental datawere used in order to develop an union core regionmathematic characterization through the definitionof 8 laws associated to HLA class II binding.The laws were applied to 4 promiscuous peptides,25 natural peptides sequences of core region: 13binding peptides and 12 no binding peptides; and19 synthetic peptides looking to differentiate peptides.Only one peptide was not rightly characterized.This methodology may be used to choose keypeptides in the development of vaccine.

  4. Suspension cell culture as a tool for the characterization of class III peroxidases in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Creste, Silvana; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Secreted class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) are implicated in a broad range of physiological processes throughout the plant life cycle. However, the unambiguous determination of the precise biological role of an individual class III peroxidase isoenzyme is still a difficult task due to genetic redundancy and broad substrate specificity in vitro. In addition, many difficulties are encountered during extraction and analysis of cell wall proteins. Since class III peroxidases are also secreted into the apoplast, the use of suspension cell cultures can facilitate isolation and functional characterization of individual isoforms. Here, we report on the characterization of class III peroxidases secreted in the spent medium of sugarcane suspension cell cultures. After treatment with specific inducers of cell wall lignification, peroxidases were isolated and activities assayed with guaiacol, syringaldazine and coniferyl alcohol. Enzymatic activity was not significantly different after treatments, regardless of the substrate, with the exception of methyl-jasmonate treatment, which led to a decreased guaiacol peroxidase activity. Remarkably, peroxidases isolated from the medium were capable of oxidizing syringaldazine, an analog to sinapyl alcohol, suggesting that sugarcane cultures can produce peroxidases putatively correlated to lignification. A proteomic approach using activity staining of 2-DE gels revealed a complex isoperoxidase profile, composed predominantly of cationic isoforms. Individual spots were excised and analyzed by LC-ESI-Q-TOF and homology-based search against the Sugarcane EST Database resulted in the identification of several proteins. Spatio-temporal expression pattern of selected genes was determined for validation of identified class III peroxidases that were preferentially expressed during sugarcane stem development.

  5. Wavelet Characterization of Hörmander Symbol Class $S^m_{ρ,}$ and Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Q X Yang

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, we characterize the symbol in Hörmander symbol class $S^m_{ρ}(m\\in R,ρ,≥ 0)$ by its wavelet coefficients. Consequently, we analyse the kernel-distribution property for the symbol in the symbol class $S^m_{ρ,}(m\\in R,ρ > 0,≥ 0)$ which is more general than known results; for non-regular symbol operators, we establish sharp 2-continuity which is better than Calderón and Vaillancourt's result, and establish $L^p(1≤ p≤∞)$ continuity which is new and sharp. Our new idea is to analyse the symbol operators in phase space with relative wavelets, and to establish the kernel distribution property and the operator's continuity on the basis of the wavelets coefficients in phase space.

  6. LLUSTRATION OF AMINO ACIDS REACTIONS AND PROTEINS CHARACTERIZATION FOR EXPERIMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY CLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Parreira

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available New teaching methodologies have been developed to facilitate the learning of biochemistry concepts. A new  approach to Biochemistry  teaching  has become more frequent,  one that does not  require reagents but use photos, videos, softwares etc. Experimental Biochemistry classes, i.e. covering characterization of amino acids and proteins,  might be more productive with the use of complementary didactic material.  Furthermore,  if experiments cannot be implemented, classes may  be well illustrated with complementary didactic material covering from the simplest to the most  complex experiments.  In order to  aid Biochemistry classes without practical experiments, some tests and reactions were documented in our laboratory through digital photos, for  instance: (1 the biuret reaction wherein the blue reagent turns violet in the presence of proteins and changes to pink when combined with short-chain polypeptides; (2 the ninhydrin test used in amino acid analysis of proteins: most of the amino acids are hydrolyzed and react with ninhydrin; when reacting with these free amines, a deep blue or purple color appears; (3 methods for detecting proteins wherein spectrophotometry is used, that deals with the relationship between absorbance, concentration and path length, which constitute the Beer-Lambert Law. A didactic material constituted by texts, schemes and illustrated by photos has been created for each class topic. This material can be used either as a teacher script or in a presentation form to illustrate classes without experimental activities. Financial Support: Pro-Reitoria Graduação-USP, CNPq.

  7. Proteobacteria-specific IgA regulates maturation of the intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirpuri, Julie; Raetz, Megan; Sturge, Carolyn R; Wilhelm, Cara L; Benson, Alicia; Savani, Rashmin C; Hooper, Lora V; Yarovinsky, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota changes dynamically from birth to adulthood. In this study we identified γ-Proteobacteria as a dominant phylum present in newborn mice that is suppressed in normal adult microbiota. The transition from a neonatal to a mature microbiota was in part regulated by induction of a γ-Proteobacteria-specific IgA response. Neocolonization experiments in germ-free mice further revealed a dominant Proteobacteria-specific IgA response triggered by the immature microbiota. Finally, a role for B cells in the regulation of microbiota maturation was confirmed in IgA-deficient mice. Mice lacking IgA had persistent intestinal colonization with γ-Proteobacteria that resulted in sustained intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility to neonatal and adult models of intestinal injury. Collectively, these results identify an IgA-dependent mechanism responsible for the maturation of the intestinal microbiota.

  8. Class 2 aldehyde dehydrogenase. Characterization of the hamster enzyme, sensitive to daidzin and conserved within the family of multiple forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmqvist, L; Lundgren, R; Norin, A; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B; Klyosov, A; Keung, W M

    1997-10-13

    Mitochondrial (class 2) hamster aldehyde dehydrogenase has been purified and characterized. Its primary structure has been determined and correlated with the tertiary structure recently established for this class from another species. The protein is found to represent a constant class within a complex family of multiple forms. Variable segments that occur in different species correlate with non-functional segments, in the same manner as in the case of the constant class of alcohol dehydrogenases (class III type) of another protein family, but distinct from the pattern of the corresponding variable enzymes. Hence, in both these protein families, overall variability and segment architectures behave similarly, with at least one 'constant' form in each case, class III in the case of alcohol dehydrogenases, and at least class 2 in the case of aldehyde dehydrogenases.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of new class of ionic liquids containing phenolate anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lethesh, Kallidanthiyil Chellappan, E-mail: lethesh.chellappan@petronas.com.my [PETRONAS Ionic Liquids Center, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Wilfred, Cecilia Devi; Taha, M. F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Thanabalan, M. [Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    In these manuscript novel ionic liquids containing a new class of 'phenolate' anions was synthesized and characterized. 1-methylmidazole with different alkyl chains such as butyl, hexyl and octyl groups was used as the cationic part. All the ionic liquids were obtained as liquids at room temperature. The synthesized ionic liquids were characterized using {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. The thermal stability of the ionic liquids was studied using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of temperature on the density and viscosity of the ionic liquids were studied over a temperature range from 293.15 K to 373.15K at atmospheric pressure. From the experimental values of density, the molecular volume, standard molar entropy and the lattice energy of the ionic liquids were calculated.

  10. Proteobacteria, extremophiles and unassigned species dominate in a tape-like showerhead biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Charnock

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of showerhead biofilms exposes the user to repeated contact with potentially pathogenic microbes, yet we know relatively little about the content of these aggregates. The aim of the present study was to examine the microbial content of tape-like films found protruding from a domestic showerhead. Culturing showed that the films were dominated by aerobic α- and β-proteobacteria. Three isolates made up almost the entire plate count. These were a Brevundimonas species, a metalophilic Cupriavidus species and a thermophile, Geobacillus species. Furthermore, it was shown that the Cupriavidus isolate alone had a high capacity for biofilm formation and thus might be the initiator of biofilm production. A clone library revealed the same general composition. However, half of the 70 clones analyzed could not be assigned to a particular bacterial phylum and of these 29 differed from one another by only 1–2 base pairs, indicating a single species. Thus both the culture dependent and culture independent characterizations suggest a simple yet novel composition. The work is important as the biofilm is fundamentally different in form (tape-like and content from that of all previously reported ones, where variously Mycobacterium, Methylobacterium and Xanthomonas species have dominated, and extremophiles were not reported.

  11. Genome Analysis of a Novel Broad Host Range Proteobacteria Phage Isolated from a Bioreactor Treating Industrial Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Marina; Baron, Maayan; Brenner, Asher; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and consequently they have a major impact on the development of a microbial population. In this study, the genome of a novel broad host range bacteriophage, Aquamicrobium phage P14, isolated from a wastewater treatment plant, was analyzed. The Aquamicrobium phage P14 was found to infect members of different Proteobacteria classes (Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria). This phage contains a 40,551 bp long genome and 60% of its genes had blastx hits. Furthermore, the bacteriophage was found to share more than 50% of its genes with several podoviruses and has the same gene order as other polyvalent bacteriophages. The results obtained in this study led to the conclusion that indeed general features of the genome of the Aquamicrobium phage P14 are shared with other broad host range bacteriophages, however further analysis of the genome is needed in order to identify the specific mechanisms which enable the bacteriophage to infect both Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. PMID:28106814

  12. Molecular characterization of L class genome segments of a newly isolated turkey arthritis reovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Sunil K; Sharafeldin, Tamer A; Porter, Robert E; Goyal, Sagar M

    2014-10-01

    Seven strains of turkey arthritis reovirus (TARV) isolated from cases of turkey arthritis were characterized on the basis of their L class genome segment sequences, which were then compared with those of turkey enteric reovirus (TERV) and chicken reovirus (CRV). All three L class gene segments of TARVs and TERVs and their encoded proteins λA, λB, and λC were similar in size to those of CRV reference strain S1133. The conserved motifs such as C2H2 zinc-binding motif and conserved polymerase region were present in λA and λB, respectively. A conserved motif for ATP/GTP-binding site and an S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-binding pocket for methyltransferase were observed in λC protein of TARVs and TERVs with only one substitution as compared to that in CRV. We propose a new genotype classification system for avian reoviruses (ARVs) based on the nt identity cut-off value for each of the L class. Based on this new genotype classification, all ARVs were divided into six, seven and eight genotypes in L1, L2 and L3 genes, respectively. Interestingly TARVs and TERVs grouped with three CRVs (two arthritic strains from Taiwan and one enteritic strain from Japan) in genotype L1-I and formed a different genotypes (L2-I, L3-I) from CRVs in L2 and L3 genes. The maximum nucleotide divergence was observed in genotypes of L1 and L2 genes but less at amino acid level indicates mostly changes were synonymous type. Compared to L1 and L2 genes, the nonsynonymous changes were more in L3 gene. Point mutations and possible reassortments among TARVs, TERVs and CRVs were also observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Purification and characterization of a class II α-Mannosidase from Moringa oleifera seed kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejavath, Kiran Kumar; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar

    2014-10-01

    α-Mannosidase (EC. 3.2.1.114) belonging to class II glycosyl hydrolase family 38 was purified from Moringa oleifera seeds to apparent homogeneity by conventional protein purification methods followed by affinity chromatography on Con A Sepharose and size exclusion chromatography. The purified enzyme is a glycoprotein with 9.3 % carbohydrate and exhibited a native molecular mass of 240 kDa, comprising two heterogeneous subunits with molecular masses of 66 kDa (α-larger subunit) and 55 kDa (β-smaller subunit). Among both the subunits only larger subunit stained for carbohydrate with periodic acid Schiff's staining. The optimum temperature and pH for purified enzyme was 50 °C and pH 5.0, respectively. The enzyme was stable within the pH range of 3.0-7.0. The enzyme was inhibited by EDTA, Hg(2+), Ag(2+), and Cu(2+). The activity lost by EDTA was completely regained by addition of Zn(2+). The purified enzyme was characterized in terms of the kinetic parameters K m (1.6 mM) and V max (2.2 U/mg) using para-nitrophenyl-α-D-mannopyranoside as substrate. The enzyme was very strongly inhibited by swainsonine (SW) at 1 μM concentration a class II α-Mannosidase inhibitor, but not by deoxymannojirimycin (DMNJ). Chemical modification studies revealed involvement of tryptophan at active site. The inhibition by SW and requirement of the Zn(2+) as a metal ion suggested that the enzyme belongs to class II α-Mannosidase.

  14. Characterization of a yam class IV chitinase produced by recombinant Pichia pastoris X-33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akond, Muhammad Ali; Matsuda, Yusuke; Ishimaru, Takayuki; Iwai, Ken; Saito, Akira; Kato, Akio; Tanaka, Shuhei; Kobayashi, Jun; Koga, Daizo

    2014-01-01

    A yam (Dioscorea opposita Thunb) class IV chitinase, whose genomic DNA was cloned by Mitsunaga et al. (2004), was produced by the recombinant Pichia pastoris X-33 in high yields such as 66 mg/L of culture medium. The chitinase was purified by column chromatography after Endoglycosidase H treatment and then characterized. It showed properties similar to the original chitinase E purified from the yam tuber reported by Arakane et al. (2000). This Pichia-produced chitinase also showed strong lytic activity against Fusarium oxysporum and Phytophthora nicotianae, wide pH and thermal stability, optimum activity at higher temperature such as 70 °C, and high substrate affinity, indicating that one can use this Pichia-produced yam chitinase as a bio-control agent.

  15. Characterization of duck (Anas platyrhynchos) MHC class I gene in two duck lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LIN ZHANG; WEI-JIE LIU; JIA-QIANG WU; MIN-LI XU; ZHENG-JIE KONG; YAN-YAN HUANG; SHAO-HUA YANG

    2017-06-01

    To enrich gene polymorphism ofDuMHCI and provide data for further studies on disease resistance, 14DuMHCI genes from Weishan Ma duck and Cherry Valley duck were cloned, and their characterization were investigated. The overallconservation of the 14 alleles could be observed within the sequences, and relative conservation were also displayed in the peptide-binding domain and CD8 interaction sites. Based on full-length amino acid homology, MHC class I fromdifferent duck lines could be divided into 13 gene groups and three novel gene groups existed.Moreover, 14 key variable residues corresponding to gene groups division were exhibited on the homology modelling constructed based on theresolved protein structure of DuMHC I. This study explicit the characteristics of DuMHC I in the two duck lines and could contribute to design effective diagnostics and vaccines for the species against various infections.

  16. Pharmacoepidemiological characterization of psychotropic drugs consumption using a latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainstein, Laura; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Sébille, Véronique; Hardouin, Jean-Benoît; Feuillet, Fanny; Pivette, Jacques; Chaslerie, Anicet; Jolliet, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    France has one of the highest recorded rates of psychotropic use of drugs compared with other European countries, especially for anxiolytics, hypnotics and antidepressants. The aim of this study was to characterize the use of three psychotropic drugs among the most prescribed in France (bromazepam, paroxetine, zolpidem) using reimbursement databases in real-life conditions. Individuals from a region affiliated to the French General Health Insurance Scheme, who had received at least two dispensings of bromazepam, paroxetine or zolpidem reimbursed between 1 January and 30 June 2008, were included. We used a latent class analysis to identify different subgroups of users for these three psychotropic drugs. A total of 40,644 patients were included for bromazepam, 36,264 for zolpidem and 31,235 for paroxetine. Using latent class analysis, four clinical subtypes of users of bromazepam and zolpidem were identified: nonproblematic users, at-risk users, users with a probable mental disorder and compulsive users. Three subgroups were identified for paroxetine that differed rather by the prescription patterns. Users of anxiolytics and hypnotics with at-risk behaviours represented a significant proportion in the studied population. This original method could be extended to other prescription databases to identify populations at risk of abuse or dependence to psychotropic drugs.

  17. Mesospheric turbulence detection and characterization with AMISR-class radars under consistent meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Collins, R. L.; Newman, D.; Nicolls, M. J.; Varney, R. H.; Thurairajah, B.

    2015-12-01

    A recent study has shown the ability of the Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar (AMISR) at Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR, PFISR) to characterize turbulence in the mesosphere (D-Region) [Nicolls et. al, 2011]. We present case studies of AMISR measurements of turbulence where the meteorological conditions are defined by the presence of persistent Mesospheric Inversion Layers (MILs). We consider MILs that are detected by satellite over a day and are also detected by Rayleigh lidar at PFRR [Irving et. al, 2014]. MILs are a signature of large-scale planetary wave breaking in the upper atmosphere, where a region with a temperature inversion lies below a region with an adiabatic lapse rate. The region with the inversion allows small-scale waves to become unstable, break, and generate turbulence. The region with the adiabatic lapse rate is indicative of a well-mixed layer and the presence of turbulence. AMISR-class radars have a steerable narrow beam (1°) and high vertical resolution (750 m). We review the principles and practices of incoherent scatter radar with a focus on detection of D-region turbulence using radar spectra. We present the geometry of the turbulence and the radar, comparing the turbulent, plasma, and radar spatial scales. We develop a turbulence retrieval algorithm using a Voigt function spectral line. We fit the spectra to a Voigt function using the Levenberg-Marquardt method and use the Gaussian component of the Voigt spectra to calculate the RMS velocity, and hence the turbulent energy dissipation rate. With the environmental conditions characterized by satellite and lidar and the turbulence characterized by radar data, we can test the ability of PFISR to characterize mesospheric turbulence under consistent meteorological conditions and develop robust technique for turbulence measurements.

  18. Characterization of EBV gB indicates properties of both class I and class II viral fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backovic, Marija; Leser, George P; Lamb, Robert A; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2007-11-10

    To gain insight into Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B (gB), recombinant, secreted variants were generated. The role of putative transmembrane regions, the proteolytic processing and the oligomerization state of the gB variants were investigated. Constructs containing 2 of 3 C-terminal hydrophobic regions were secreted, indicating that these do not act as transmembrane anchors. The efficiency of cleavage of the gB furin site was found to depend on the nature of C-terminus. All of the gB constructs formed rosette structures reminiscent of the postfusion aggregates formed by other viral fusion proteins. However, substitution of putative fusion loop residues, WY(112-113) and WLIY(193-196), with less hydrophobic amino acids from HSV-1 gB, produced trimeric protein and abrogated the ability of the EBV gB ectodomains to form rosettes. These data demonstrate biochemical features of EBV gB that are characteristic of other class I and class II viral fusion proteins, but not of HSV-1 gB.

  19. Characterization of an endogenous retrovirus class in elephants and their relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Englbrecht Claudia C

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenous retrovirus-like elements (ERV-Ls, primed with tRNA leucine are a diverse group of reiterated sequences related to foamy viruses and widely distributed among mammals. As shown in previous investigations, in many primates and rodents this class of elements has remained transpositionally active, as reflected by increased copy number and high sequence diversity within and among taxa. Results Here we examine whether proviral-like sequences may be suitable molecular probes for investigating the phylogeny of groups known to have high element diversity. As a test we characterized ERV-Ls occurring in a sample of extant members of superorder Uranotheria (Asian and African elephants, manatees, and hyraxes. The ERV-L complement in this group is even more diverse than previously suspected, and there is sequence evidence for active expansion, particularly in elephantids. Many of the elements characterized have protein coding potential suggestive of activity. Conclusions In general, the evidence supports the hypothesis that the complement had a single origin within basal Uranotheria.

  20. Evolution and diversity of periplasmic proteins involved in copper homeostasis in gamma proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Montes, Georgina; Argüello, José M; Valderrama, Brenda

    2012-11-02

    Different systems contributing to copper homeostasis in bacteria have been described in recent years involving periplasmic and transport proteins that provide resistance via metal efflux to the extracellular media (CopA/Cue, Cus, Cut, and Pco). The participation of these proteins in the assembly of membrane, periplasmic and secreted cuproproteins has also been postulated. The integration and interrelation of these systems and their apparent redundancies are less clear since they have been studied in alternative systems. Based on the idea that cellular copper is not free but rather it is transferred via protein-protein interactions, we hypothesized that systems would coevolve and be constituted by set numbers of essential components. By the use of a phylogenomic approach we identified the distribution of 14 proteins previously characterized as members of homeostasis systems in the genomes of 268 gamma proteobacteria. Only 3% of the genomes presented the complete systems and 5% of them, all intracellular parasites, lacked the 14 genes. Surprisingly, copper homeostatic pathways did not behave as evolutionary units with particular species assembling different combinations of basic functions. The most frequent functions, and probably because of its distribution the most vital, were copper extrusion from the cytoplasm to the periplasm performed by CopA and copper export from the cytoplasm to the extracellular space performed by CusC, which along with the remaining 12 proteins, assemble in nine different functional repertoires. These observations suggest complex evolutionary dynamics and still unexplored interactions to achieve copper homeostasis, challenging some of the molecular transport mechanism proposed for these systems.

  1. Evolution and diversity of periplasmic proteins involved in copper homeostasis in gamma proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Montes Georgina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different systems contributing to copper homeostasis in bacteria have been described in recent years involving periplasmic and transport proteins that provide resistance via metal efflux to the extracellular media (CopA/Cue, Cus, Cut, and Pco. The participation of these proteins in the assembly of membrane, periplasmic and secreted cuproproteins has also been postulated. The integration and interrelation of these systems and their apparent redundancies are less clear since they have been studied in alternative systems. Based on the idea that cellular copper is not free but rather it is transferred via protein-protein interactions, we hypothesized that systems would coevolve and be constituted by set numbers of essential components. Results By the use of a phylogenomic approach we identified the distribution of 14 proteins previously characterized as members of homeostasis systems in the genomes of 268 gamma proteobacteria. Only 3% of the genomes presented the complete systems and 5% of them, all intracellular parasites, lacked the 14 genes. Surprisingly, copper homeostatic pathways did not behave as evolutionary units with particular species assembling different combinations of basic functions. The most frequent functions, and probably because of its distribution the most vital, were copper extrusion from the cytoplasm to the periplasm performed by CopA and copper export from the cytoplasm to the extracellular space performed by CusC, which along with the remaining 12 proteins, assemble in nine different functional repertoires. Conclusions These observations suggest complex evolutionary dynamics and still unexplored interactions to achieve copper homeostasis, challenging some of the molecular transport mechanism proposed for these systems.

  2. Characterization and expression of MHC class II alpha and II beta genes in mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyan; Tan, Shangjin; Cai, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II plays a key role in adaptive immunity by presenting foreign peptides to CD4(+) T cells and by triggering the adaptive immune response. While the structure and function of MHC class II have been well characterized in mammalian, limited research has been done on fishes. In this study, we characterized the gene structure and expression of MHC class II α (Lunar-DAA) and II β (Lunar-DAB) of mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus). Both genes shared, respectively, a high similarity and typical features with other vertebrate MHC class II α and II β. The phylogenetic analysis of the deduced peptides revealed that both Lunar-DAA and Lunar-DAB were located in the teleost subclass. Western blotting analyses indicated that both MHC class II α and II β were expressed ubiquitously in immune-related cells, tissues and organs, and that MHC class II α and II β chains existed mainly as heterodimers. While it was highly expressed in gills, thymus, head kidney (HK), spleen, head kidney macrophage and spleen leucocytes, MHC class II β chain was expressed with a low abundance in skin, intestine, stomach and heart. The highest expression of MHC class II β in thymus confirmed the conclusion that thymus is one of the primary lymphoid organs in fishes. The detection of MHC class II αβ dimers in HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes indicated that HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes play a critical role in the adaptive immunity in fishes. All these results provide valuable information for understanding the structure of MHC class II α and II β and their function in immune responses.

  3. Genomic Insights Into the First Cultured Member of the Zeta-Proteobacteria, the Fe-Oxidizing Mariprofundus Ferrooxydans PV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, E.; Emerson, D.; Webb, E.; Nelson, W.; Heidelberg, J.; Kuenen, G.; Edwards, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    We present the genome of Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1, the first cultured representative in the novel candidatus class Zetaproteobacteria to date. Isolated from iron mats in 1,100m depth at the Loihi Seamount, Hawai’i, M. ferrooxydans is known as a microaerophilic, obligate iron oxidizer. Its most striking feature is the formation of a highly structured and localized stalk comprised primarily of iron oxides and an organic matrix. During its cell cycle, M. ferrooxydans alternates between forming attached stalks and free-living cells. The genome appears deeply-rooted within the Proteobacteria, as conserved structural and functional genes, for example encoding key enzymes, share less than 40% similarity with homologs found in Alpha-, Beta-, Delta-, and Gammaproteobacteria. Genome analysis revealed a complete TCA cycle, the ability to fix CO2, carbon-storage proteins and a sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), which may facilitate the transport of carbohydrates across the cell membrane and possibly aid in stalk formation. Two-component signal transduction system genes, including histidine kinases, GGDEF domain genes, and response regulators containing CheY-like receivers, are abundant and widely distributed across the genome. Most of these are located in close proximity to genes involved in cell division, phosphate uptake and transport, exopolymer and heavy metal secretion, flagellar biosynthesis and pilus assembly suggesting that these functions are highly regulated. Several cytochromes encode for an electron transport chain potentially involved in Fe(II)-oxidation. Antioxidant genes, such as super oxide dismutases and peroxidases, as well as aerotaxis sensory genes encode for the potential to regulate functions in response to oxygen gradients, such as would be required to maintain cellular redox balance in the specialized habitat M. ferrooxydans resides. The first exploration of the genetic potential of M. ferrooxydans PV-1 will serve as a foundation for

  4. Heterologous expression and functional characterization of avian mu-class glutathione S-transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunderson, Brett R; Kim, Ji Eun; Croasdell, Amanda; Mendoza, Kristelle M; Reed, Kent M; Coulombe, Roger A

    2013-08-01

    Hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs: EC2.5.1.1.8) catalyze the detoxification of reactive electrophilic compounds, many of which are toxic and carcinogenic intermediates, via conjugation with the endogenous tripeptide glutathione (GSH). Glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated detoxification is a critical determinant of species susceptibility to the toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), which in resistant animals efficiently detoxifies the toxic intermediate produced by hepatic cytochrome P450 bioactivation, the exo-AFB1-8,9-epoxide (AFBO). Domestic turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are one of the most sensitive animals known to AFB1, a condition associated with a deficiency of hepatic GST-mediated detoxification of AFBO. We have recently shown that unlike their domestic counterparts, wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris), which are relatively resistant, express hepatic GST-mediated detoxification activity toward AFBO. Because of the importance of GSTs in species susceptibility, and to explore possible GST classes involved in AFB1 detoxification, we amplified, cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the hepatic mu-class GSTs tGSTM3 (GenBank accession no. JF340152), tGSTM4 (JF340153) from domestic turkeys, and a GSTM4 variant (ewGSTM4, JF340154) from Eastern wild turkeys. Predicted molecular masses of tGSTM3 and two tGSTM4 variants were 25.6 and 25.8kDa, respectively. Multiple sequence comparisons revealed four GSTM motifs and the mu-loop in both proteins. tGSTM4 has 89% amino acid sequence identity to chicken GSTM2, while tGSTM3 has 73% sequence identity to human GSTM3 (hGSTM3). Specific activities of Escherichia coli-expressed tGSTM3 toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide were five-fold greater than tGSTM4 while tGSTM4 possessed more than three-fold greater activity toward 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB). The two enzymes displayed equal activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA

  5. Characterization of Different Land Classes and Disaster Monitoring Using Microwave Land Emissivity for the Indian Subcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Korak; Raju, Suresh; Antony, Tinu; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    Despite the ability of satellite borne microwave radiometers to measure the atmospheric pa-rameters, liquid water and the microphysical properties of clouds, they have serious limitations over the land owing its large and spatially heterogeneous emissivity compared to the relatively low and homogenous oceans. This calls for determination of the spatial maps of land-surface emissivity with accuracies better than ˜2%. In this study, the characterization of microwave emissivity of different land surface classes over the Indian region is carried out with the forth-coming Indo-French microwave satellite program Megha-Tropiques in focus. The land emissivity is retrieved using satellite microwave radiometer data from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) at 10, 19, 22, 37 and 85 GHz. After identify-ing the clear sky daily data, the microwave radiative transfer computation, is applied to the respective daily atmospheric profile for deducing the upwelling and downwelling atmospheric radiations. This, along with the skin temperature data, is used to retrieve land emission from satellites data. The emissivity maps of placecountry-regionIndia for three months representing winter (January) and post-monsoon (September-October) seasons of 2008 at V and H polar-izations of all the channels (except for 22 GHz) are generated. Though the land emissivity values in V-polarization vary between 0.5 and ˜1, some land surface classes such as the desert region, marshy land, fresh snow covered region and evergreen forest region, etc, show distinct emissivity characteristics. On this basis few typical classes having uniform physical properties over sufficient area are identified. Usually the Indian desert region is dry and shows low emis-sivity (˜0.88 in H-polarisation) and high polarization difference, V-H (˜0.1). Densely vegetated zones of tropical rain forests exhibit high emissivity values (˜0.95) and low polarization dif-ference (lt;0.01). The

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Three β-Lactam-Catabolizing Soil Proteobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Spivak, Aaron; Gianoulis, Tara A.; Forsberg, Kevin J.; Gibson, Molly K.; Johnsky, Lauren A.; Broomall, Stacey M.; Rosenzweig, C. Nicole; Skowronski, Evan W.; Gibbons, Henry S.; Sommer, Morten O. A.; Dantas, Gautam

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most antibiotics are derived from the soil, but their catabolism there, which is necessary to close the antibiotic carbon cycle, remains uncharacterized. We report the first draft genome sequences of soil Proteobacteria identified for subsisting solely on β-lactams as their carbon sources. The genomes encode multiple β-lactamases, although their antibiotic catabolic pathways remain enigmatic. PMID:28798166

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Three β-Lactam-Catabolizing Soil Proteobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crofts, Terence S.; Wang, Bin; Spivak, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Most antibiotics are derived from the soil, but their catabolism there, which is necessary to close the antibiotic carbon cycle, remains uncharacterized. We report the first draft genome sequences of soil Proteobacteria identified for subsisting solely on β-lactams as their carbon sources. The ge...

  8. Characterization and Inhibition of a Class II Diterpene Cyclase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Francis M.; Prisic, Sladjana; Hu, Huayou; Xu, Meimei; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a widespread and devastating human pathogen, whose ability to infiltrate macrophage host cells from the human immune system is an active area of investigation. We have recently reported the discovery of a novel diterpene from M. tuberculosis, edaxadiene, whose ability to arrest phagosomal maturation in isolation presumably contributes to this critical process in M. tuberculosis infections. (Mann, F. M., Xu, M., Chen, X., Fulton, D. B., Russell, D. G., and Peters, R. J. (2009) J. Am. Chem. Soc., in press). Here, we present characterization of the class II diterpene cyclase that catalyzes the committed step in edaxadiene biosynthesis, i.e. the previously identified halimadienyl-diphosphate synthase (HPS; EC 5.5.1.16). Intriguingly, our kinetic analysis suggests a potential biochemical regulatory mechanism that triggers edaxadiene production upon phagosomal engulfment. Furthermore, we report characterization of potential HPS inhibitors: specifically, two related transition state analogs (15-aza-14,15-dihydrogeranylgeranyl diphosphate (7a) and 15-aza-14,15-dihydrogeranylgeranyl thiolodiphosphate (7b)) that exhibit very tight binding. Although arguably not suitable for clinical use, these nevertheless provide a basis for pharmaceutical design against this intriguing biosynthetic pathway. Finally, we provide evidence indicating that this pathway exists only in M. tuberculosis and is not functional in the closely related Mycobacterium bovis because of an inactivating frameshift in the HPS-encoding gene. Thus, we hypothesize that the inability to produce edaxadiene may be a contributing factor in the decreased infectivity and/or virulence of M. bovis relative to M. tuberculosis in humans. PMID:19574210

  9. Phylogenomics and signature proteins for the alpha Proteobacteria and its main groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok Amy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha proteobacteria are one of the largest and most extensively studied groups within bacteria. However, for these bacteria as a whole and for all of its major subgroups (viz. Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Rickettsiales, Sphingomonadales and Caulobacterales, very few or no distinctive molecular or biochemical characteristics are known. Results We have carried out comprehensive phylogenomic analyses by means of Blastp and PSI-Blast searches on the open reading frames in the genomes of several α-proteobacteria (viz. Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Brucella suis, Caulobacter crescentus, Gluconobacter oxydans, Mesorhizobium loti, Nitrobacter winogradskyi, Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, Silicibacter sp. TM1040, Rhodospirillum rubrum and Wolbachia (Drosophila endosymbiont. These studies have identified several proteins that are distinctive characteristics of all α-proteobacteria, as well as numerous proteins that are unique repertoires of all of its main orders (viz. Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Rickettsiales, Sphingomonadales and Caulobacterales and many families (viz. Rickettsiaceae, Anaplasmataceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Bradyrhiozobiaceae, Brucellaceae and Bartonellaceae. Many other proteins that are present at different phylogenetic depths in α-proteobacteria provide important information regarding their evolution. The evolutionary relationships among α-proteobacteria as deduced from these studies are in excellent agreement with their branching pattern in the phylogenetic trees and character compatibility cliques based on concatenated sequences for many conserved proteins. These studies provide evidence that the major groups within α-proteobacteria have diverged in the following order: (Rickettsiales(Rhodospirillales (Sphingomonadales (Rhodobacterales (Caulobacterales-Parvularculales (Rhizobiales. We also describe two conserved inserts in DNA

  10. Functional Characterization of a Novel Class of Morantel-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors in Nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Courtot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated channels involved in excitatory neuro-transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In nematodes, they represent major targets for cholinergic agonist or antagonist anthelmintic drugs. Despite the large diversity of acetylcholine-receptor subunit genes present in nematodes, only a few receptor subtypes have been characterized so far. Interestingly, parasitic nematodes affecting human or animal health possess two closely related members of this gene family, acr-26 and acr-27 that are essentially absent in free-living or plant parasitic species. Using the pathogenic parasitic nematode of ruminants, Haemonchus contortus, as a model, we found that Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 are co-expressed in body muscle cells. We demonstrated that co-expression of Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the functional expression of an acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to the anthelmintics morantel and pyrantel. Importantly we also reported that ACR-26 and ACR-27, from the distantly related parasitic nematode of horses, Parascaris equorum, also formed a functional acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to these two drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living model nematode, we demonstrated that heterologous expression of the H. contortus and P. equorum receptors drastically increased its sensitivity to morantel and pyrantel, mirroring the pharmacological properties observed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results are the first to describe significant molecular determinants of a novel class of nematode body wall muscle AChR.

  11. Characterizing the Effects of a Vertical Time Threshold for a Class of Well-Clear Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Jason M.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain James P.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental requirement for the integration of unmanned aircraft into civil airspace is the capability of aircraft to remain well clear of each other and avoid collisions. This requirement has led to a broad recognition of the need for an unambiguous, formal definition of well clear. It is further recognized that any such definition must be interoperable with existing airborne collision avoidance systems (ACAS). A particular class of well-clear definitions uses logic checks of independent distance thresholds as well as independent time thresholds in the vertical and horizontal dimensions to determine if a well-clear violation is predicted to occur within a given time interval. Existing ACAS systems also use independent distance thresholds, however a common time threshold is used for the vertical and horizontal logic checks. The main contribution of this paper is the characterization of the effects of the decoupled vertical time threshold on a well-clear definition in terms of (1) time to well-clear violation, and (2) interoperability with existing ACAS. The paper provides governing equations for both metrics and includes simulation results to illustrate the relationships. In this paper, interoperability implies that the time of well-clear violation is strictly less than the time a resolution advisory is issued by ACAS. The encounter geometries under consideration in this paper are initially well clear and consist of constant-velocity trajectories resulting in near-mid-air collisions.

  12. Functional Characterization of a Novel Class of Morantel-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors in Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtot, Elise; Charvet, Claude L; Beech, Robin N; Harmache, Abdallah; Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent; Peineau, Nicolas; Woods, Debra J; Neveu, Cedric

    2015-12-01

    Acetylcholine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated channels involved in excitatory neuro-transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In nematodes, they represent major targets for cholinergic agonist or antagonist anthelmintic drugs. Despite the large diversity of acetylcholine-receptor subunit genes present in nematodes, only a few receptor subtypes have been characterized so far. Interestingly, parasitic nematodes affecting human or animal health possess two closely related members of this gene family, acr-26 and acr-27 that are essentially absent in free-living or plant parasitic species. Using the pathogenic parasitic nematode of ruminants, Haemonchus contortus, as a model, we found that Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 are co-expressed in body muscle cells. We demonstrated that co-expression of Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the functional expression of an acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to the anthelmintics morantel and pyrantel. Importantly we also reported that ACR-26 and ACR-27, from the distantly related parasitic nematode of horses, Parascaris equorum, also formed a functional acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to these two drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living model nematode, we demonstrated that heterologous expression of the H. contortus and P. equorum receptors drastically increased its sensitivity to morantel and pyrantel, mirroring the pharmacological properties observed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results are the first to describe significant molecular determinants of a novel class of nematode body wall muscle AChR.

  13. Pharmacological and kinetic characterization of two functional classes of serotonergic modulation in Aplysia sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, L L; Mercer, A R; Emptage, N J; Carew, T J

    1996-02-01

    1. Modulation of mechanoafferent sensory neurons (SNs) by the neutrotransmitter serotonin (5HT) plays a significant role in behavioral sensitization of several withdrawal reflexes in Aplysia. The modulatory effects of 5HT on these SNs include increased excitability, increased input resistance, action potential broadening, and increased synaptic transmission. Based on a previously described dissociation of some of these modulatory effects, revealed with the 5HT-receptor antagonist, cyproheptadine, we investigated whether a similar dissociation could be found by systematically varying the concentration of the endogenous agonist, 5HT. 2. We first applied a range of 5HT concentrations to isolated pleural/pedal ganglia (containing tail SNs and tail motor neurons, respectively), and measured the magnitude of 5HT-induced modulation of spike broadening and increased excitability. The resulting dose-response curve showed that both forms of modulation increase monotonically as a function of 5HT concentration, but that excitability has a lower threshold for modulation by 5HT than does spike duration. 3. We further characterized the modulatory effects of 5HT on Aplysia SNs by comparing the time course of onset of modulation by 5HT and the time course of recovery after washout. Independent of 5HT concentration, modulation of excitability increases rapidly in the presence of 5HT and recovers rapidly (broadening, which resembles the kinetics of increased excitability and increased input resistance. Higher concentrations of 5HT (2.5 and 5 microM) induce a more slowly developing and prolonged-recovery form of spike broadening (> 9 min). At these higher concentrations, the recovery profile for prolonged spike broadening is significantly different from those observed for both increased excitability and increased input resistance. 4. We next compared the relationship between spike broadening and short-term synaptic facilitation. We found that significant facilitation of synaptic

  14. Quantification of ploidy in proteobacteria revealed the existence of monoploid, (mero-oligoploid and polyploid species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Pecoraro

    Full Text Available Bacteria are generally assumed to be monoploid (haploid. This assumption is mainly based on generalization of the results obtained with the most intensely studied model bacterium, Escherichia coli (a gamma-proteobacterium, which is monoploid during very slow growth. However, several species of proteobacteria are oligo- or polyploid, respectively. To get a better overview of the distribution of ploidy levels, genome copy numbers were quantified in four species of three different groups of proteobacteria. A recently developed Real Time PCR approach, which had been used to determine the ploidy levels of halophilic archaea, was optimized for the quantification of genome copy numbers of bacteria. Slow-growing (doubling time 103 minutes and fast-growing (doubling time 25 minutes E. coli cultures were used as a positive control. The copy numbers of the origin and terminus region of the chromosome were determined and the results were in excellent agreement with published data. The approach was also used to determine the ploidy levels of Caulobacter crescentus (an alpha-proteobacterium and Wolinella succinogenes (an epsilon-proteobacterium, both of which are monoploid. In contrast, Pseudomonas putida (a gamma-proteobacterium contains 20 genome copies and is thus polyploid. A survey of the proteobacteria with experimentally-determined genome copy numbers revealed that only three to four of 11 species are monoploid and thus monoploidy is not typical for proteobacteria. The ploidy level is not conserved within the groups of proteobacteria, and there are no obvious correlations between the ploidy levels with other parameters like genome size, optimal growth temperature or mode of life.

  15. The α-proteobacteria Wolbachia pipientis protein disulfide machinery has a regulatory mechanism absent in γ-proteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M Walden

    Full Text Available The α-proteobacterium Wolbachia pipientis infects more than 65% of insect species worldwide and manipulates the host reproductive machinery to enable its own survival. It can live in mutualistic relationships with hosts that cause human disease, including mosquitoes that carry the Dengue virus. Like many other bacteria, Wolbachia contains disulfide bond forming (Dsb proteins that introduce disulfide bonds into secreted effector proteins. The genome of the Wolbachia strain wMel encodes two DsbA-like proteins sharing just 21% sequence identity to each other, α-DsbA1 and α-DsbA2, and an integral membrane protein, α-DsbB. α-DsbA1 and α-DsbA2 both have a Cys-X-X-Cys active site that, by analogy with Escherichia coli DsbA, would need to be oxidized to the disulfide form to serve as a disulfide bond donor toward substrate proteins. Here we show that the integral membrane protein α-DsbB oxidizes α-DsbA1, but not α-DsbA2. The interaction between α-DsbA1 and α-DsbB is very specific, involving four essential cysteines located in the two periplasmic loops of α-DsbB. In the electron flow cascade, oxidation of α-DsbA1 by α-DsbB is initiated by an oxidizing quinone cofactor that interacts with the cysteine pair in the first periplasmic loop. Oxidizing power is transferred to the second cysteine pair, which directly interacts with α-DsbA1. This reaction is inhibited by a non-catalytic disulfide present in α-DsbA1, conserved in other α-proteobacterial DsbAs but not in γ-proteobacterial DsbAs. This is the first characterization of the integral membrane protein α-DsbB from Wolbachia and reveals that the non-catalytic cysteines of α-DsbA1 regulate the redox relay system in cooperation with α-DsbB.

  16. Characterizing supernova remnant and molecular cloud interaction environments using Class I methanol (CH3OH) masers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Bridget C.

    Astronomical masers are useful probes of the physical conditions of the gas in which they are formed. Masers form under specific physical conditions and therefore, can be used to trace distinct environments, for example, star forming regions (SFRs), supernova remnants (SNRs), evolved stars, and outflows. In particular, collisionally excited 36 and 44 GHz methanol (CH3OH) and 1720 MHz hydroxl (OH) masers are found associated with gas shocked by the interaction between SNRs and neighboring molecular clouds (MCs). The overall goal of my thesis research is to combine modeling and observations to characterize the properties and formation of Class I CH3OH masers in these SNR/MC interaction regions. Developing a general model of the distribution of maser emission in these regions in all SNRs interacting with MCs will aid in the understanding of different processes that may be triggered through these interactions, namely induced star formation (SF) and cosmic ray (CR) acceleration. More accurate information on the density (and density gradients) in these turbulent regions could, for example, be used as inputs or constraints for models of galactic SNR CR acceleration and help explain if conditions are conducive for SF. In this thesis, I present results from calculations of the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of collisionally pumped Class I 36, 44, 84, and 95 GHz CH3OH maser lines near SNRs, using an escape probability and level population code. The modeling shows that given a sufficient CH3OH abundance, CH3OH maser emission arises over a wide range of densities and temperatures, with optimal conditions at 10 4 sample of SNRs with previous and recent CH 3OH maser detections (G1.4-0.1, W28, Sgr A East, G5.7-0.0, W44, and W51C). I also discuss how detections of CH3OH masers can be used along with other maser tracers, i.e. H2O masers, to pinpoint sights of SF near SNRs. Furthermore, I will discuss the close spatial and kinematic correlation of CH3OH masers in

  17. Characterization of Ser73 in Arabidopsis thaliana Glutathione S-transferase zeta class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are ubiquitous detoxifying superfamily enzymes. The zeta class GST from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtGSTZ) can efficiently degrade dichloroacetic acid (DCA), which is a common carcinogenic contaminant in drinking water. Ser73 in AtGSTZ is a conserved residue at Glutathione binding site (G-site). Compared with the equivalent residues in other GSTs, the catalytic and structural properties of Ser73 were poorly investigated. In this article, site-saturation mutagenesis was performed to characterize the detailed role of Ser73. The DCA de.chlorinating (DCA-DC) activity showed that most of the mutants had less than 3% of the wild-type activity, except S73T and $73A showing 43.48% and 21.62% of the wild-type activity, respectively, indicating that position 73 in AtGSTZ showed low mutational substitutability. Kinetic experiments revealed that mutants S73T, $73A, and S73G showed low binding affinity and catalytic efficiency toward DCA, 1.8-, 3.1-, and 10.7- fold increases in KmDcA values and 4.0-, 9.6-, and 34.1- fold decreases in KcatDCA/KmDCA values, respectively, compared to the wild type. Thermostability and refolding experiments showed that the wild type maintalned more thermostability and recovered activity. These results demonstrated the important role of Set73 in catalytic activity and structural stability of the enzyme. Such properties of Set73 could be particularly crucial to the molecular evolution of AtGSTZ and might,therefore, help explain why Ser73 is conserved in all GSTs. This conclusion might provide insights into the directed evolution of the DCA-DC activity of AtGSTZ.

  18. Molecular characterization of fruit-specific class III peroxidase genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chii-Jeng; Chan, Yuan-Li; Shien, Chin Hui; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2015-04-01

    In this study, expression of four peroxidase genes, LePrx09, LePrx17, LePrx35 and LePrxA, was identified in immature tomato fruits, and the function in the regulation of fruit growth was characterized. Analysis of amino acid sequences revealed that these genes code for class III peroxidases, containing B, D and F conserved domains, which bind heme groups, and a buried salt bridge motif. LePrx35 and LePrxA were identified as novel peroxidase genes in Solanum lycopersicum (L.). The temporal expression patterns at various fruit growth stages revealed that LePrx35 and LePrxA were expressed only in immature green (IMG) fruits, whereas LePrx17 and LePrx09 were expressed in both immature and mature green fruits. Tissue-specific expression profiles indicated that only LePrx09 was expressed in the mesocarp but not the inner tissue of immature fruits. The effects of hormone treatments and stresses on the four genes were examined; only the expression levels of LePrx17 and LePrx09 were altered. Transcription of LePrx17 was up-regulated by jasmonic acid (JA) and pathogen infection and expression of LePrx09 was induced by ethephon, salicylic acid (SA) and JA, in particular, as well as wounding, pathogen infection and H2O2 stress. Tomato plants over-expressing LePrx09 displayed enhanced resistance to H2O2 stress, suggesting that LePrx09 may participate in the H2O2 signaling pathway to regulate fruit growth and disease resistance in tomato fruits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization and transferability of class 1 integrons in commensal bacteria isolated from farm and nonfarm environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Byelashov, Oleksandr A; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Goodridge, Lawrence D; Nightingale, Kendra K; Belk, Keith E; Smith, Gary C; Sofos, John N

    2010-12-01

    This study assessed the distribution of class 1 integrons in commensal bacteria isolated from agricultural and nonfarm environments, and the transferability of class 1 integrons to pathogenic bacteria. A total of 26 class 1 integron-positive isolates were detected in fecal samples from cattle operations and a city park, water samples from a beef ranch and city lakes, and soil, feed (unused), manure, and compost samples from a dairy farm. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of class 1 integron-positive Enterobacteriaceae isolates from city locations displayed multi-resistance to 12-13 out of the 22 antibiotics tested, whereas class 1 integron-positive Enterobacteriaceae isolates from cattle operations only displayed tetracycline resistance. Most class 1 integrons had one gene cassette belonging to the aadA family that confers resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin. One isolate from a dog fecal sample collected from a city dog park transferred its class 1 integron to a strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7 at a frequency of 10(-7) transconjugants/donor by in vitro filter mating experiments under the stated laboratory conditions. Due to the numerous factors that may affect the transferability testing, further investigation using different methodologies may be helpful to reveal the transferability of the integrons from other isolates. The presence of class 1 integrons among diverse commensal bacteria from agricultural and nonfarm environments strengthens the possible role of environmental commensals in serving as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

  20. Characterization of the major histocompatibility complex class II genes in miiuy croaker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjun Xu

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC has a central role in the adaptive immune system by presenting foreign peptide to the T-cell receptor. In order to study the molecular function and genomic characteristic of class II genes in teleost, the full lengths of MHC class IIA and IIB cDNA and genomic sequence were cloned from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy. As in other teleost, four exons and three introns were identified in miiuy croaker class IIA gene; but the difference is that six exons and five introns were identified in the miiuy croaker class IIB gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of class IIA and class IIB had 26.3-85.7% and 11.0-88.8% identity with those of mammal and teleost, respectively. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that the MHC class IIA and IIB were ubiquitously expressed in ten normal tissues; expression levels of MHC genes were found first upregulated and then downregulated, and finally by a recovery to normal level throughout the pathogenic bacteria infection process. In addition, we report on the underlying mechanism that maintains sequences diversity among many fish species. A series of site-model tests implemented in the CODEML program revealed that positive Darwinian selection is likely the cause of the molecular evolution in the fish MHC class II genes.

  1. The diversity and evolution of cell cycle regulation in alpha-proteobacteria: a comparative genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengoni Alessio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, CtrA coordinates DNA replication, cell division, and polar morphogenesis and is considered the cell cycle master regulator. CtrA activity varies during cell cycle progression and is modulated by phosphorylation, proteolysis and transcriptional control. In a phosphorylated state, CtrA binds specific DNA sequences, regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression and silences the origin of replication. Although the circuitry regulating CtrA is known in molecular detail in Caulobacter, its conservation and functionality in the other alpha-proteobacteria are still poorly understood. Results Orthologs of Caulobacter factors involved in the regulation of CtrA were systematically scanned in genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. In particular, orthologous genes of the divL-cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay, the divJ-pleC-divK two-component system, the cpdR-rcdA-clpPX proteolysis system, the methyltransferase ccrM and transcriptional regulators dnaA and gcrA were identified in representative genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. CtrA, DnaA and GcrA binding sites and CcrM putative methylation sites were predicted in promoter regions of all these factors and functions controlled by CtrA in all alphas were predicted. Conclusions The regulatory cell cycle architecture was identified in all representative alpha-proteobacteria, revealing a high diversification of circuits but also a conservation of logical features. An evolutionary model was proposed where ancient alphas already possessed all modules found in Caulobacter arranged in a variety of connections. Two schemes appeared to evolve: a complex circuit in Caulobacterales and Rhizobiales and a simpler one found in Rhodobacterales.

  2. Class II genes of miniature swine. II. Molecular identification and characterization of B (beta) genes from the SLAc haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, K; Sachs, D H; Germana, S; el-Gamil, M; Hirsch, F; Gustafsson, K; LeGuern, C

    1990-01-01

    Genomic clones corresponding to class II beta genes of the SLAc haplotype of miniature swine have been isolated and characterized. These genes have been grouped into seven non-overlapping clusters on the basis of restriction mapping. Ordering of exons within each cluster was accomplished by hybridization of Southern blots of restriction fragments with exon-specific probes. The two clusters (clusters 2 and 3) encoding the DRB and DQB genes were identified on the basis of hybridization with locus-specific 3' untranslated cDNA probes. Cluster 4 contained exons of both DOB and DQB genes, the basis for which remains to be determined. The remaining four clusters (1, 5, 6, 7) were identified as containing DP, DR, and DO coding sequences, respectively, on the basis of sequence analysis. The porcine class II region appears very similar to that of man in number and nature of the class II genes identified and in the intron/exon organization of corresponding genes.

  3. Isolation and characterization of Phi class glutathione transferase partial gene from Iranian barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mohabatkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases are multifunctional proteins involved in several diverse intracellular events such as primary and secondary metabolisms, signaling and stress metabolism. These enzymes have been subdivided into eight classes in plants. The Phi class, being plant specific, is the most represented. In the present study, based on the sequences available at GenBank, different primers were designed for amplifying the Phi class of glutathione transferase gene in the genome and transcriptome of Iranian barley, Karoun cultivar. After extraction of DNA and total RNA, Phi class was amplified and sequenced. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that the deduced protein sequence has two ß-sheets, eight α-helices and some intermediate loops in its secondary structure. Consequently, the sequences were submitted to NCBI GenBank with GS262333 and GW342614 accession numbers. Phylogenic relationships of the sequences were compared with existing sequences in GenBank.

  4. Characterizing Longitudinal Patterns of Physical Activity in Mid-Adulthood Using Latent Class Analysis: Results From a Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Silverwood, RJ; Nitsch, D.; Pierce, M; Kuh, D; Mishra, GD

    2011-01-01

    : The authors aimed to describe how longitudinal patterns of physical activity during mid-adulthood (ages 31-53 years) can be characterized using latent class analysis in a population-based birth cohort study, the Medical Research Council's 1946 National Survey of Health and Development. Three different types of physical activity-walking, cycling, and leisure-time physical activity-were analyzed separately using self-reported data collected from questionnaires between 1977 and 1999; 3,847 stu...

  5. Characterizing a new class of variability in GRS 1915+105 with simultaneous INTEGRAL/RXTE observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannikainen, D.C.; Rodriguez, J.; Vilhu, O.

    2005-01-01

    , 271) but not to any previously known variability class. We separated the INTEGRAL data into two subsets covering the maxima and minima of the pulses and fitted the resulting two broadband spectra with a hybrid thermal-non-thermal Comptonization model. The fits show the source to be in a soft state...... characterized by a strong disc component below ∼ 6 keV and Comptonization by both thermal and non-thermal electrons at higher energies....

  6. Discovery and Characterization of the N-phenyl-N 0 -Naphthylurea Class of p38 Kinase Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirillo, P.; Hickey, E; Moss, N; Breitfelder, S; Betageri, R; Fadra, T; Gaenzler, F; Gilmore, T; Xiong, Z; et al.

    2009-01-01

    An effort aimed at exploring structural diversity in the N-pyrazole-N{prime}-naphthylurea class of p38 kinase inhibitors led to the synthesis and characterization of N-phenyl-N{prime}-naphthylureas. Examples of these compounds displayed excellent inhibition of TNF-{alpha} production in vitro, as well as efficacy in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide induced endotoxemia. In addition, perspective is provided on the role of a sulfonamide functionality in defining inhibitor potency.

  7. Dispersion Modeling and Characterization of Particulates from Land Application of Class B Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Abhishek S.

    This study presents a comprehensive approach to understand the particle characteristics, identify the source profile, develop new equations for emission rates, analyze the source-receptor relationship, and develop and evaluate a numerical model for the dispersion and transport of particles released during the injection of biosolids. Two field studies were conducted in the summer of 2008 and 2009 to collect airborne particulate matter emitted during the injection application of class B biosolids. The sampling was carried out before (pre-application), during (application), and after (post-application) the application. The research work characterized the particulate emissions deposited on the aerosols spectrometer. The mass concentrations of fine (PM2.5) and ultrafine (PM 1.0) particles were highest during the pre-application. The mass concentration of thoracic fraction (PM2.5-10) increased significantly during the application. A bimodal size distribution was observed throughout the sampling. Nuclei mode formation was predominant during the pre-application and the post-application, whereas the accumulation mode was distinctive during the application. Airborne particles were collected on filter papers during the biosolids application process using an aerosol spectrometer. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) tool was used to analyze particles collected before, during, and after injection of biosolids. The major emphasis of the analysis was on providing in depth information on particle count, size, shape, morphology, and chemical composition. The particle count was significantly sensitive towards the different activities surrounding the application. The combination of SEM, particle analysis software, and EDS technique was capable of revealing detailed information on the size, shape, morphology, and chemical composition of individual particles. These techniques proved to be an effective non-destructive method for the

  8. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I loci of the lark sparrow (Chondestes grammacus) and insights into avian MHC evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Amanda C; Hoostal, Matthew J; Bouzat, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    The major histocompatibilty complex (MHC) has become increasingly important in the study of the immunocapabilities of non-model vertebrates due to its direct involvement in the immune response. The characterization of MHC class I loci in the lark sparrow (Chondestes grammacus) revealed multiple MHC class I loci with elevated genetic diversity at exon 3, evidence of differential selection between the peptide binding region (PBR) and non-PBR, and the presence of multiple pseudogenes with limited divergence. The minimum number of functional MHC class I loci was estimated at four. Sequence analysis revealed d N /d S ratios significantly less than one at non-PBR sites, indicative of negative selection, whereas PBR sites associated with antigen recognition showed ratios greater than 1 but non-significant. GenBank surveys and phylogenetic analyses of previously reported avian MHC class I sequences revealed variable signatures of evolutionary processes acting upon this gene family, including gene duplication and potential concerted evolution. An increase in the number of class I loci across species coincided with an increase in pseudogene prevalence, revealing the importance of gene duplication in the expansion of multigene families and the creation of pseudogenes.

  9. Genome Analysis of a Novel Broad Host Range Proteobacteria Phage Isolated from a Bioreactor Treating Industrial Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina de Leeuw

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and consequently they have a major impact on the development of a microbial population. In this study, the genome of a novel broad host range bacteriophage, Aquamicrobium phage P14, isolated from a wastewater treatment plant, was analyzed. The Aquamicrobium phage P14 was found to infect members of different Proteobacteria classes (Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. This phage contains a 40,551 bp long genome and 60% of its genes had blastx hits. Furthermore, the bacteriophage was found to share more than 50% of its genes with several podoviruses and has the same gene order as other polyvalent bacteriophages. The results obtained in this study led to the conclusion that indeed general features of the genome of the Aquamicrobium phage P14 are shared with other broad host range bacteriophages, however further analysis of the genome is needed in order to identify the specific mechanisms which enable the bacteriophage to infect both Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria.

  10. Characterizing Class I WW domains defines key specificity determinants and generates mutant domains with novel specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasanov, J; Pirozzi, G; Uveges, A J; Kay, B K

    2001-03-01

    WW domains are small protein interaction modules found in a wide range of eukaryotic signaling and structural proteins. Five classes of WW domains have been annotated to date, where each class is largely defined by the type of peptide ligand selected, rather than by similarities within WW domains. Class I WW domains bind Pro-Pro-Xxx-Tyr containing ligands, and it would be of interest to determine residues within the domains that determine this specificity. Fourteen WW domains selected Leu/Pro-Pro-Xxx-Tyr containing peptides ligands via phage display and were thus designated as Class 1 WW domains. These domains include those present in human YAP (hYAP) and WWP3, as well as those found in ubiquitin protein ligases of the Nedd4 family, including mouse Nedd4 (mNedd4), WWP1, WWP2 and Rsp5. Comparing the primary structures of these WW domains highlighted a set of highly conserved residues, in addition to those originally noted to occur within WW domains. Substitutions at two of these conserved positions completely inhibited ligand binding, whereas substitution at a non-conserved position did not. Moreover, mutant WW domains containing substitutions at conserved positions bound novel peptide ligands. Class I WW domains contain a highly conserved set of residues that are important in selecting Pro-Xxx-Tyr containing peptide ligands. The presence of these residues within an uncharacterized WW domain can be used to predict its ability to bind Pro-Xxx-Tyr containing peptide ligands.

  11. Structural characterization of the catalytic site of a Nilaparvata lugens delta-class glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a major class of detoxification enzymes that play a central role in the defense against environmental toxicants and oxidative stress. Here, we studied the crystal structure of a delta-class glutathione transferase from Nilaparvata lugens, nlGSTD, to gain insights into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of nlGSTD in complex with glutathione, determined at a resolution of 1.7Å, revealed that it exists as a dimer and its secondary and tertiary structures are similar to those of other delta-class GSTs. Analysis of a complex between nlGSTD and glutathione showed that the bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of nlGSTD mutants indicated that amino acid residues Ser11, His52, Glu66, and Phe119 contribute to catalytic activity.

  12. Characterization of Class A low-level radioactive waste 1986--1990. Volume 3: Main report -- Part B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehmel, J.C.; Loomis, D.; Mauro, J. [S. Cohen & Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Kaplan, M. [Eastern Research Group, Inc., Lexington, MA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, the firms of S. Cohen & Associates, Inc. (SC&A) and Eastern Research Group (ERG) have compiled a report that describes the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of Class-A low-level radioactive waste. The report also presents information characterizing various methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste. A database management program was developed for use in accessing, sorting, analyzing, and displaying the electronic data provided by EG&G. The program was used to present and aggregate data characterizing the radiological, physical, and chemical properties of the waste from descriptions contained in shipping manifests. The data thus retrieved are summarized in tables, histograms, and cumulative distribution curves presenting radionuclide concentration distributions in Class-A waste as a function of waste streams, by category of waste generators, and regions of the United States. The report also provides information characterizing methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste, including industrial, municipal, and hazardous waste regulated under Subparts C and D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The information includes a list of disposal options, the geographical locations of the processing and disposal facilities, and a description of the characteristics of such processing and disposal facilities. Volume 1 contains the Executive Summary, Volume 2 presents the Class-A waste database, Volume 3 presents the information characterizing non-radioactive waste management practices and facilities, and Volumes 4 to 7 contain Appendices A to P with supporting information.

  13. Characterization of Class A low-level radioactive waste 1986--1990. Volume 6: Appendices G--J

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehmel, J.C.; Loomis, D.; Mauro, J. [S. Cohen & Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Kaplan, M. [Eastern Research Group, Inc., Lexington, MA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, the firms of S. Cohen & Associates, Inc. (SC&A) and Eastern Research Group (ERG) have compiled a report that describes the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of Class-A low-level radioactive waste. The report also presents information characterizing various methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste. A database management program was developed for use in accessing, sorting, analyzing, and displaying the electronic data provided by EG&G. The program was used to present and aggregate data characterizing the radiological, physical, and chemical properties of the waste from descriptions contained in shipping manifests. The data thus retrieved are summarized in tables, histograms, and cumulative distribution curves presenting radionuclide concentration distributions in Class-A waste as a function of waste streams, by category of waste generators, and regions of the United States. The report also provides information characterizing methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste, including industrial, municipal, and hazardous waste regulated under Subparts C and D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The information includes a list of disposal options, the geographical locations of the processing and disposal facilities, and a description of the characteristics of such processing and disposal facilities. Volume 1 contains the Executive Summary, Volume 2 presents the Class-A waste database, Volume 3 presents the information characterizing non-radioactive waste management practices and facilities, and Volumes 4 through 7 contain Appendices A through P with supporting information.

  14. Characterization of Class A low-level radioactive waste 1986--1990. Volume 7: Appendices K--P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehmel, J.C.; Loomis, D.; Mauro, J. [S. Cohen & Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Kaplan, M. [Eastern Research Group, Inc., Lexington, MA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, the firms of S. Cohen & Associates, Inc. (SC&A) and Eastern Research Group (ERG) have compiled a report that describes the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of Class-A low-level radioactive waste. The report also presents information characterizing various methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste. A database management program was developed for use in accessing, sorting, analyzing, and displaying the electronic data provided by EG&G. The program was used to present and aggregate data characterizing the radiological, physical, and chemical properties of the waste from descriptions contained in shipping manifests. The data thus retrieved are summarized in tables, histograms, and cumulative distribution curves presenting radionuclide concentration distributions in Class-A waste as a function of waste streams, by category of waste generators, and regions of the United States. The report also provides information characterizing methods and facilities used to treat and dispose non-radioactive waste, including industrial, municipal, and hazardous waste regulated under Subparts C and D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The information includes a list of disposal options, the geographical locations of the processing and disposal facilities, and a description of the characteristics of such processing and disposal facilities. Volume 1 contains the Executive Summary, Volume 2 presents the Class-A waste database, Volume 3 presents the information characterizing non-radioactive waste management practices and facilities, and Volumes 4 through 7 contain Appendices A through P with supporting information.

  15. Characterization of system theoretic properties for a class of spatially invariant systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatmawati,; Zwart, Hans; El Jai, A.; Afifi, L.; Zerrik, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the analysis of the system properties stability and stabilizability for a class of spatially distributed systems on a two-dimensional spatial domain. Using the Fourier transform on the spatial variables, we obtain a mathematically simpler infinite dimensional system. The analysi

  16. Characterization of PGL(2, ) by its order and one conjugacy class size

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yanheng Chen; Guiyun Chen

    2015-11-01

    Let be a prime. In this paper, we do not use the classification theorem of finite simple groups and prove that the projective general linear group PGL(2, ) can be uniquely determined by its order and one special conjugacy class size. Further, the validity of a conjecture of J. G. Thompson is generalized to the group PGL(2, ) by a new way.

  17. Functional Characterization of OXA-57, a Class D β-Lactamase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Karen E.; Oyston, Petra C.; Crossett, Ben; Fairweather, Neil F.; Titball, Richard W.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Brown, Katherine A.

    2005-01-01

    Class D β-lactamase OXA-57 was identified in a range of isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis. Comparative kinetic analyses of wild-type and mutant forms of B. pseudomallei OXA-57 are reported. Implications of these data for β-lactam resistance and the proposed role of Ser-104 in β-lactam hydrolysis are discussed.

  18. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I, and class II DRB loci of captive and wild Indian leopards (Panthera pardus fusca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Drashti R; Mitra, Siuli; Bhadouriya, Snehalata; Rao, Tirupathi; Kunteepuram, Vaishnavi; Gaur, Ajay

    2017-08-22

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), in vertebrate animals, is a multi-genic protein complex that encodes various receptors. During a disease, MHC interacts with the antigen and triggers a cascade of adaptive immune responses to overcome a disease outbreak. The MHC is very important region from immunological point of view, but it is poorly characterized among Indian leopards. During this investigation, we examined genetic diversity for MHC class I (MHC-I) and MHC class II-DRB (MHC-II) among wild and captive Indian leopards. This study estimated a pool of 9 and 17 alleles for MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. The wild group of individuals showed higher nucleotide diversity and amino acid polymorphism compared to the captive group. A phylogenetic comparison with other felids revealed a clustering in MHC-I and interspersed presence in MHC-II sequences. A test for selection also revealed a deviation from neutrality at MHC-II DRB loci and higher non-synonymous substitution rate (dN) among the individuals from wild group. Further, the wild individuals showed higher dN for both MHC I and II genes compared to the group that was bred under captive conditions. These findings suggest the role of micro-evolutionary forces, such as pathogen-mediated selection, to cause MHC variations among the two groups of Indian leopards, because the two groups have been bred in two different environments for a substantial period of time. Since, MHC diversity is often linked with the quality of immunological health; the results obtained from this study fill the gap of knowledge on disease predisposition among wild and captive Indian leopards.

  19. Phenotypic characterization of mononuclear cells and class II antigen expression in angular cheilitis infected by Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Jonsson, R

    1989-04-01

    In the present study we characterized the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells in angular cheilitis lesions to further explore the pathogenesis of this disorder. Frozen sections from lesions infected by Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed to subsets of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and macrophages. In addition, the expression of Class II antigens (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR), the interleukin 2- and transferrin-receptors was studied on resident and infiltrating cells. An intense infiltration of T-lymphocytes was accompanied by expression of Class II antigens on the epidermal keratinocytes in lesion infected by Candida albicans. The Staphylococcus aureus infected lesions displayed a diffuse infiltration of T-lymphocytes but virtually no expression of Class II antigen by epidermal keratinocytes. These observations suggest that the cell-mediated arm of the immune system is involved in the inflammatory reaction of lesions infected by Candida albicans. In addition, the present study confirms that epidermal expression of Class II antigens is closely related to the type and magnitude of the infiltrating T-lymphocyte. Finally, these findings indicate that the type of inflammatory reaction in angular cheilitis is primarily dependent on the isolated microorganism, although the clinical pictures of the disorder are virtually identical.

  20. Selection of Type I and Type II Methanotrophic Proteobacteria in a Fluidized Bed Reactor under Non-Sterile Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Selection of Type I and Type II methanotrophic proteobacteria in a fluidized bed reactor under...laboratory- scale fluidized bed reactor was initially inoculated with a Type II Methylocystis-like dominated culture. At elevated levels of dissolved...personal copy Selection of Type I and Type II methanotrophic proteobacteria in a fluidized bed reactor under non-sterile conditions Andrew R. Pfluger a, Wei

  1. Expression, Purification and Characterization of Ricin vectors used for exogenous antigen delivery into the MHC Class I presentation pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Daniel C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Disarmed versions of the cytotoxin ricin can deliver fused peptides into target cells leading to MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation [Smith et al. J Immunol 2002; 169:99-107]. The ricin delivery vector must contain an attenuated catalytic domain to prevent target cell death, and the fused peptide epitope must remain intact for delivery and functional loading to MHC class I molecules. Expression in E. coli and purification by cation exchange chromatography of the fusion protein is described. Before used for delivery, the activity of the vector must be characterized in vitro, via an N-glycosidase assay, and in vivo, by a cytotoxicity assay. The presence of an intact epitope must be confirmed using mass spectrometry by comparing the actual mass with the predicted mass.

  2. Structural basis of a protein partner switch that regulates the general stress response of α-proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrou, Julien; Rotskoff, Grant; Luo, Yun; Roux, Benoît; Crosson, Sean

    2012-05-22

    α-Proteobacteria uniquely integrate features of two-component signal transduction (TCS) and alternative sigma factor (σ) regulation to control transcription in response to general stress. The core of this regulatory system is the PhyR protein, which contains a σ-like (SL) domain and a TCS receiver domain. Aspartyl phosphorylation of the PhyR receiver in response to stress signals promotes binding of the anti-σ factor, NepR, to PhyR-SL. This mechanism, whereby NepR switches binding between its cognate σ factor and phospho-PhyR (PhyR∼P), controls transcription of the general stress regulon. We have defined the structural basis of the PhyR∼P/NepR interaction in Caulobacter crescentus and characterized the effect of aspartyl phosphorylation on PhyR structure by molecular dynamics simulations. Our data support a model in which phosphorylation of the PhyR receiver domain promotes its dissociation from the PhyR-SL domain, which exposes the NepR binding site. A highly dynamic loop-helix region (α3-α4) of the PhyR-SL domain plays an important role in PhyR∼P binding to NepR in vitro, and in stress-dependent activation of transcription in vivo. This study provides a foundation for understanding the protein-protein interactions and protein structural dynamics that underpin general stress adaptation in a large and metabolically diverse clade of the bacterial kingdom.

  3. ZTI: Preliminary characterization of an ignition class reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathke, C. G.; Krakowski, R. A.; Miller, R. L.; Werley, K. A.

    A preliminary cost-optimized conceptual design of an intermediate-step, ignition-class reverse-field pinch (RFP) device (ZTI) for the study of alpha-particle physics in a deuterium (DT) plasma is reported. The ZTI design reflects potentially significant cost savings relative to similar ignition-class tokamaks for device parameters that reside on the path to a viable commercial RFP reactor. Reductions in both device costs and number of steps to commercialization portend a significantly reduced development cost for fusion. The methodology and result and coupling realistic physics, engineering, and cost models through a multi-dimensional optimizer are reported for ZTI, which is a device that would follow the 2 to 4 MAzth on an approximately greater than 1996 to 98 timescale.

  4. Mapping and characterization of non-HLA multigene assemblages in the human MHC class I region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venditti, C.P.; Harris, J.M.; Geraghty, D.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ. College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-15

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I region has been shown to be associated with a variety of immune and nonimmune disorders. In an effort to initiate steps designed to identify the idiopathic hemochromatosis disease gene (HFE), the authors have cloned and mapped two expressed messages using probes from the HLA-H subregion that lie immediately distal to the HLA-A9 breakpoint. Although the cDNA clones identify distinct multifragment families that are dispersed throughout the MHC, the gene sequences from which the two cDNA clones derive map centromeric to the HLA-B locus and are absent from the genomes of higher nonhuman primates. This suggests that a syntenic coding segment arose within a highly polymorphic region (TNF to HLA-B interval) as the result of an insertion event following the emergence of Homo sapiens. An additional syntenic cluster exists within a peak of linkage disequilibrium with the HFE gene and may define coding sequences that underlie the defect in genetic iron overload. These data generally support the concept that the class I region is potentially gene-rich and further highlight the possibility that these new coding sequences may play a role in the development of a variety of HLA-linked diseases. The observations presented suggest that interlocus exchanges have played a structural role in the genesis of the human class I region. 46 refs., 6 refs.

  5. Characterization of a nonclassical class I MHC gene in a reptile, the Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Glaberman

    Full Text Available Squamates are a diverse order of vertebrates, representing more than 7,000 species. Yet, descriptions of full-length major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes in this group are nearly absent from the literature, while the number of MHC studies continues to rise in other vertebrate taxa. The lack of basic information about MHC organization in squamates inhibits investigation into the relationship between MHC polymorphism and disease, and leaves a large taxonomic gap in our understanding of amniote MHC evolution. Here, we use both cDNA and genomic sequence data to characterize a class I MHC gene (Amcr-UA from the Galápagos marine iguana, a member of the squamate subfamily Iguaninae. Amcr-UA appears to be functional since it is expressed in the blood and contains many of the conserved peptide-binding residues that are found in classical class I genes of other vertebrates. In addition, comparison of Amcr-UA to homologous sequences from other iguanine species shows that the antigen-binding portion of this gene is under purifying selection, rather than balancing selection, and therefore may have a conserved function. A striking feature of Amcr-UA is that both the cDNA and genomic sequences lack the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are necessary to anchor the class I receptor molecule into the cell membrane, suggesting that the product of this gene is secreted and consequently not involved in classical class I antigen-presentation. The truncated and conserved character of Amcr-UA lead us to define it as a nonclassical gene that is related to the few available squamate class I sequences. However, phylogenetic analysis placed Amcr-UA in a basal position relative to other published classical MHC genes from squamates, suggesting that this gene diverged near the beginning of squamate diversification.

  6. Occurrence and characterization of class 1 integrons in Escherichia coli from healthy individuals and those with urinary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Pinto, Clarisse; Diamantino, Cristiane; Oliveira, Patrícia L; Reis, Mariana P; Costa, Patrícia S; Paiva, Magna C; Nardi, Regina M D; Magalhães, Paula P; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2017-05-01

    Class 1 integrons are among the main vehicles that facilitate the spread of antibiotic-resistance genes, with serious public health consequences. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the presence of class 1 integrons and to characterize their variable regions, as well as the antimicrobial resistance profiles and phylogenetic groups of a collection of Escherichia coli isolates recovered from healthy subjects (n=42) and those with urinary infection (n=40). The methods used included PCR, sequencing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. PCR screening for the integrase gene (intI1) revealed a higher incidence of class 1 integrons in uropathogenic E. coli (65 %, UPEC) than in commensal isolates (11.9 %). Eight of 31 intI1-positive isolates, all of them UPEC, harboured empty integrons. The variable regions of the other 23 contained gene cassettes encoding resistance to β-lactams (blaOXA-1), aminoglycosides (aadA1 and aadA5), trimethoprim (dfrA1 and dfrA17) and an ORF. To our knowledge this is the first report of an ORF identified as a putative phage tail protein associated with a class 1 integron. The aadA1 and dfrA17-addA5 arrays prevailed in commensal E. coli and UPEC, respectively. UPEC isolates were highly resistant to the antimicrobials tested, in contrast to commensal isolates. The E. coli isolates carrying gene cassettes associated with class 1 integrons were found to be unrelated to any phylogroup or multiresistance. Co-resistance to clinically relevant fluoroquinolone and trimethoprim-sulfamethazole in all UPEC isolates is a cause for concern. These results expand the current knowledge of gene cassettes in both commensal and pathogenic E. coli.

  7. A Finite Characterization and Recognition of Intersection Graphs of Hypergraphs with Rank at Most 3 and Multiplicity at Most 2 in the Class of Threshold Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metelsky Yury

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We characterize the class L32$L_3^2 $ of intersection graphs of hypergraphs with rank at most 3 and multiplicity at most 2 by means of a finite list of forbidden induced subgraphs in the class of threshold graphs. We also give an O(n-time algorithm for the recognition of graphs from L32$L_3^2 $ in the class of threshold graphs, where n is the number of vertices of a tested graph.

  8. Organization and expression of photosynthesis genes and operons in anoxygenic photosynthetic proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotenberg, Sylviane; Steunou, Anne-Soisig; Picaud, Martine; Reiss-Husson, Françoise; Astier, Chantal; Ouchane, Soufian

    2008-09-01

    Genes belonging to the same metabolic route are usually organized in operons in microbial genomes. For instance, most genes involved in photosynthesis were found clustered and organized in operons in photosynthetic Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria. The discovery of Gammaproteobacteria with a conserved photosynthetic gene cluster revives the questions on the role and the maintenance of such organization in proteobacteria. In this paper, we report the analysis of the structure and expression of the 14 kb cluster (crtEF-bchCXYZ-pufBALMC-crtADC) in the photosynthetic betaproteobacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus, with the purpose of understanding the reasons and the biological constraints that might have led to the clustering of photosynthesis genes. The genetic analyses are substantiated by reverse transcription-PCR data which reveal the presence of a transcript encompassing the 14 genes and provide evidence of a polycistronic 'super-operon' organization starting at crtE and ending 14 kb downstream at the crtC gene. Furthermore, genetic analyses suggest that one of the selection pressures that may have driven and maintained the photosynthesis operons/super-operons in proteobacteria could very likely be the coexpression and regulation of the clustered genes/operon.

  9. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of a functional GSTmu class from the cattle tick Boophilus annulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahein, Yasser Ezzat; El Sayed El-Hakim, Amr; Abouelella, Amira Mohamed Kamal; Hamed, Ragaa Reda; Allam, Shaimaa Abdul-Moez; Farid, Nevin Mahmoud

    2008-03-25

    A full-length cDNA of a glutathione S-transferase (GST) was cloned from a cDNA library of the local Egyptian cattle tick Boophilus annulatus. The 672 bp cloned fragment was sequenced and showed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 223 amino acids. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with GSTs from other species revealed that the sequence is closely related to the mammalian mu-class GST. The cloned gene was expressed in E. coli under T7 promotor of pET-30b vector, and purified under native conditions. The purified enzyme appeared as a single band on 12% SDS-PAGE and has a molecular weight of 30.8 kDa including the histidine tag of the vector. The purified enzyme was assayed upon the chromogenic substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and the recombinant enzyme showed high level of activity even in the presence of the beta-galactosidase region on its 5' end and showed maximum activity at pH 7.5. The Km values for CDNB and GSH were 0.57 and 0.79 mM, respectively. The over expressed rBaGST showed high activity toward CDNB (121 units/mg protein) and less toward DCNB (29.3 units/mg protein). rBaGST exhibited peroxidatic activity on cumene hydroperoxide sharing this property with GSTs belonging to the GST alpha class. I50 values for cibacron blue and bromosulfophthalein were 0.22 and 8.45 microM, respectively, sharing this property with the mammalian GSTmu class. Immunoblotting revealed the presence of the GST molecule in B. annulatus protein extracts; whole tick, larvae, gut, salivary gland and ovary. Homologues to the GSTmu were also detected in other tick species as Hyalomma dromedarii and Rhipicephalus sp. while in Ornithodoros moubata, GSTmu homologue could not be detected.

  10. Characterizing Rocky and Gaseous Exoplanets with 2-meter Class Space-based Coronagraphs: General Considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Tyler D; Marley, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Several concepts now exist for small, space-based missions to directly characterize exoplanets in reflected light. Here, we develop an instrument noise model suitable for studying the spectral characterization potential of a coronagraph-equipped, space-based telescope. We adopt a baseline set of telescope and instrument parameters, including a 2 m diameter primary aperture, an operational wavelength range of 0.4-1.0 um, and an instrument spectral resolution of 70, and apply our baseline model to a variety of spectral models of different planet types, including Earth twins, Jupiter twins, and warm and cool Jupiters and Neptunes. With our exoplanet spectral models, we explore wavelength-dependent planet-star flux ratios for main sequence stars of various effective temperatures, and discuss how coronagraph inner and outer working angle constraints will influence the potential to study different types of planets. For planets most favorable to spectroscopic characterization---cool Jupiters and Neptunes as well as ...

  11. ON THE CHARACTERIZATION OF CYCLIC CODES OVER TWO CLASSES OF RINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiusheng LIU

    2013-01-01

    Let R be a finite chain ring with maximal ideal and residue field F,and let γ be of nilpotency index t.To every code C of length n over R,a tower of codes C=(C∶γ0) (∈) (C∶γ)(∈)… (∈) (C∶γi) (∈)… (∈) (C∶γt-1) can be associated withC,where for any r ∈ R,(C ∶ r) ={e ∈ Rn | re ∈ C}.Using generator elements of the projection of such a tower of codes to the residue field F,we characterize cyclic codes over R.This characterization turns the condition for codes over R to be cyclic into one for codes over the residue field F.Furthermore,we obtain a characterization of cyclic codes over the formal power series ring of a finite chain ring.

  12. Characterization and functional analysis of a recombinant tau class glutathione transferase GmGSTU2-2 from Glycine max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopelitou, Katholiki; Muleta, Abdi W; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Chronopoulou, Evangelia G; Pavli, Ourania; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Skaracis, Georgios N; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2017-01-01

    The plant tau class glutathione transferases (GSTs) perform diverse catalytic as well as non-catalytic roles in detoxification of xenobiotics, prevention of oxidative damage and endogenous metabolism. In the present work, the tau class isoenzyme GSTU2-2 from Glycine max (GmGSTU2-2) was characterized. Gene expression analysis of GmGSTU2 suggested a highly specific and selective induction pattern to osmotic stresses, indicating that gene expression is controlled by a specific mechanism. Purified, recombinant GmGSTU2-2 was shown to exhibit wide-range specificity towards xenobiotic compounds and ligand-binding properties, suggesting that the isoenzyme could provide catalytic flexibility in numerous metabolic conditions. Homology modeling and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the catalytic and ligand binding sites of GmGSTU2-2 are well conserved compared to other tau class GSTs. Structural analysis identified key amino acid residues in the hydrophobic binding site and provided insights into the substrate specificity of this enzyme. The results established that GmGSTU2-2 participates in a broad network of catalytic and regulatory functions involved in the plant stress response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of Two Classes of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Arp2/3 Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolen, B.; Tomasevic, N; Russell, A; Pierce, D; Jia, Z; McCormick, C; Hartman, J; Sakowicz, R; Pollard, T

    2009-01-01

    Polymerization of actin filaments directed by the actin-related protein (Arp)2/3 complex supports many types of cellular movements. However, questions remain regarding the relative contributions of Arp2/3 complex versus other mechanisms of actin filament nucleation to processes such as path finding by neuronal growth cones; this is because of the lack of simple methods to inhibit Arp2/3 complex reversibly in living cells. Here we describe two classes of small molecules that bind to different sites on the Arp2/3 complex and inhibit its ability to nucleate actin filaments. CK-0944636 binds between Arp2 and Arp3, where it appears to block movement of Arp2 and Arp3 into their active conformation. CK-0993548 inserts into the hydrophobic core of Arp3 and alters its conformation. Both classes of compounds inhibit formation of actin filament comet tails by Listeria and podosomes by monocytes. Two inhibitors with different mechanisms of action provide a powerful approach for studying the Arp2/3 complex in living cells.

  14. Characterization and expression pattern ofpouII1,a novel class Ⅱ POU gene in zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    POU domain transcription factors that share a conserved DNA-binding domain, POU domain, are important regulators for the development of embryos in various animal species. A novel zebrafish POU domain gene, pouII1has been cloned. The pouII1 cDNA is 2080 kb in length and encodes a putative polypeptide of 596 amino acids. It is placed into class Ⅱ POU family since it shares a high degree of homology with the known members of this family.Northern hybridization identifies a major transcript of approximately 2.1 kb that was present in embryos at the single-cell stage throughout 24 h postfertilizafion. The whole mountin situ hybridization shows thatpouII1 transcripts are present in the single-cell embryos, strongly suggesting that these transcripts are of maternal origin. During early development of the embryos, pouII1 mRNA was ubiquitously distributed in all cells and tissues. The transcripts are gradually limited to brains and become completely undetectable by day 3. To our knowledge, pouII1 is the first class Ⅱ POU gene identified in zebrafish.``

  15. Characterization of the finite variation property for a class of stationary increment infinitely divisible processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas; Rosiński, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We characterize the finite variation property for stationary increment mixed moving averages driven by infinitely divisible random measures. Such processes include fractional and moving average processes driven by Levy processes, and also their mixtures. We establish two types of zero-one laws...

  16. Characterization of the finite variation property for a class of stationary increment infinitely divisible processes

    CERN Document Server

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We characterize the finite variation property for stationary increment mixed moving averages driven by infinitely divisible random measures. Such processes include fractional and moving average processes driven by Levy processes, and also their mixtures. We establish two types of zero-one laws for the finite variation property. We also consider some examples to illustrate our results.

  17. Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling, Class II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, Jack; Blasingame, Tom; Doublet, Louis; Kelkar, Mohan; Freeman, George; Callard, Jeff; Moore, David; Davies, David; Vessell, Richard; Pregger, Brian; Dixon, Bill; Bezant, Bryce

    2000-03-16

    The major purpose of this project was to demonstrate the use of cost effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs such as the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit.

  18. Biochemical Characterization of SFC-1, a class A carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Fátima; Sarmento, Ana Cristina; Henriques, Isabel; Samyn, Bart; van Beeumen, Jozef; Domingues, Pedro; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Saavedra, Maria José; Correia, António

    2007-12-01

    The carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase SFC-1 from Serratia fonticola UTAD54 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. The enzyme exhibited an apparent molecular mass of 30.5 kDa, determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. SFC-1 hydrolyzes penicillins, cephalosporins, aztreonam, and carbapenems and is inhibited by clavulanic acid, sulbactam, and tazobactam.

  19. Biochemical Characterization of SFC-1, a Class A Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing β-Lactamase▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Fátima; Sarmento, Ana Cristina; Henriques, Isabel; Samyn, Bart; van Beeumen, Jozef; Domingues, Pedro; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Saavedra, Maria José; Correia, António

    2007-01-01

    The carbapenem-hydrolyzing β-lactamase SFC-1 from Serratia fonticola UTAD54 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. The enzyme exhibited an apparent molecular mass of 30.5 kDa, determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. SFC-1 hydrolyzes penicillins, cephalosporins, aztreonam, and carbapenems and is inhibited by clavulanic acid, sulbactam, and tazobactam. PMID:17875998

  20. Genetic, biochemical characterization and mutagenesis of the chromosomal class A β-lactamase of Raoultella (formerly Klebsiella) terrigena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walckenaer, E; Delmas, J; Leflon-Guibout, V; Bonnet, R; Nicolas-Chanoine, M-H

    2015-09-01

    Chromosomal class A β-lactamases have been characterized in Raoultella ornithinolytica and Raoultella planticola. The purpose of this study was to characterize that of Raoultella terrigena. The blaTER-1 gene of R. terrigena strain ATCC33257(T) was cloned (pACter-1) and sequenced. It was then used to detect the bla gene of strains BM 85 01 095 and SB2796. The hypermutable Escherichia coli strain AB1157 mutS::Tn10 was transformed with pACter-1 and mutants growing on plates containing>2mg/L ceftazidime were studied. Notably, the impact of mutations only observed in the promoter region on β-lactam resistance was assessed by site-directed mutagenesis experiments. R. terrigena strains ATCC33257(T) and BM 85 01 095 had the same bla gene and deduced protein (TER-1) whereas there were 3 substitutions in those of strain SB2796 (TER-2). Class A β-lactamases TER showed 78%, 69.9% and 38.7% identity with PLA or ORN, TEM-1 and KOXY, respectively. Compared with TEM-1, TER-1 and TER-2 showed 2 particular substitutions, Leu75Pro and Glu240Asn demonstrated to be involved in the inherent β-lactam resistance profile of R. terrigena. TER-1 (pI of 7.6) had a high activity against penicillin G and a significantly low one against amoxicillin. Substitution G/T observed in the -35 region of the blaTER gene harbored by strains growing in the presence of≥2mg/L ceftazidime was shown to be responsible for this growth. TER is a new class A β-lactamase belonging to functional group 2b. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. Characterization of a Phanerochaete chrysosporium glutathione transferase reveals a novel structural and functional class with ligandin properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Yann; Prosper, Pascalita; Buée, Marc; Dumarçay, Stéphane; Favier, Frédérique; Gelhaye, Eric; Gérardin, Philippe; Harvengt, Luc; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Lamant, Tiphaine; Meux, Edgar; Mathiot, Sandrine; Didierjean, Claude; Morel, Mélanie

    2012-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) form a superfamily of multifunctional proteins with essential roles in cellular detoxification processes. A new fungal specific class of GST has been highlighted by genomic approaches. The biochemical and structural characterization of one isoform of this class in Phanerochaete chrysosporium revealed original properties. The three-dimensional structure showed a new dimerization mode and specific features by comparison with the canonical GST structure. An additional β-hairpin motif in the N-terminal domain prevents the formation of the regular GST dimer and acts as a lid, which closes upon glutathione binding. Moreover, this isoform is the first described GST that contains all secondary structural elements, including helix α4' in the C-terminal domain, of the presumed common ancestor of cytosolic GSTs (i.e. glutaredoxin 2). A sulfate binding site has been identified close to the glutathione binding site and allows the binding of 8-anilino-1-naphtalene sulfonic acid. Competition experiments between 8-anilino-1-naphtalene sulfonic acid, which has fluorescent properties, and various molecules showed that this GST binds glutathionylated and sulfated compounds but also wood extractive molecules, such as vanillin, chloronitrobenzoic acid, hydroxyacetophenone, catechins, and aldehydes, in the glutathione pocket. This enzyme could thus function as a classical GST through the addition of glutathione mainly to phenethyl isothiocyanate, but alternatively and in a competitive way, it could also act as a ligandin of wood extractive compounds. These new structural and functional properties lead us to propose that this GST belongs to a new class that we name GSTFuA, for fungal specific GST class A.

  2. Design, synthesis and biological characterization of a new class of osteogenic (1H)-quinolone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetti, Fabrizio; Petricci, Elena; Gabrielli, Annalisa; Mann, Andrè; Faure, Hélène; Gorojankina, Tatiana; Brasseur, Laurent; Hoch, Lucile; Ruat, Martial; Taddei, Maurizio

    2016-10-04

    Smoothened (Smo) is the signal transducer of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway and its stimulation is considered a potential powerful tool in regenerative medicine to treat severe tissue injuries. Starting from GSA-10, a recently reported Hh activator acting on Smo, we have designed and synthesized a new class of quinolone-based compounds. Modification and decoration of three different portions of the original scaffold led to compounds able to induce differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal cells into osteoblasts. The submicromolar activity of several of these new quinolones (0.4-0.9 μM) is comparable to or better than that of SAG and purmorphamine, two reference Smo agonists. Structure-activity relationships allow identification of several molecular determinants important for the activity of these compounds.

  3. Characterization of structural features controlling the receptiveness of empty class II MHC molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rupp, Bernd; Günther, Sebastian; Makhmoor, Talat;

    2011-01-01

    MHC class II molecules (MHC II) play a pivotal role in the cell-surface presentation of antigens for surveillance by T cells. Antigen loading takes place inside the cell in endosomal compartments and loss of the peptide ligand rapidly leads to the formation of a non-receptive state of the MHC...... known MHC molecules. This shift causes a narrowing of the two helices flanking the binding site and results in a closure, which is further stabilized by the formation of a critical hydrogen bond between residues aQ9 and ßN82. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed that replacement of either one of the two......-receptiveness. Manipulation of peptide loading efficiency for improved peptide vaccination strategies could be one of the applications profiting from the structural knowledge provided by this study....

  4. Functional characterization of alpha-class glutathione s-transferases from the Turkey (meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Bunderson, Brett R; Croasdell, Amanda; Coulombe, Roger A

    2011-11-01

    Six Alpha-class glutathione S-transferase (GST) subunits were cloned from domestic turkey livers, which are one of the most susceptible animals known to the carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B₁. In most animals, GST dysfunction is a risk factor for susceptibility toward AFB₁, and we have shown that turkeys lack GSTs with affinity toward the carcinogenic intermediate exo-aflatoxin B(1)-8-9-epoxide (AFBO). Conversely, mice are resistant to AFB₁ carcinogenesis, due to high constitutive expression of mGSTA3 that has high affinity toward AFBO. When expressed in Escherichia coli, all six tGSTA subunits possessed conjugating activities toward substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), ethacrynic acid (ECA), and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) with tGSTA1.2 appearing most active. Interestingly, tGSTA1.1, which lacks one of the four Alpha-class signature motifs, possessed enzymatic activities toward all substrates. All had comparable activities toward AFBO conjugation, an activity absent in turkey liver cytosols. E. coli-expressed mGSTA3 conjugated AFBO with more than 3-fold greater activity than that of tGSTAs and had higher activity toward GST prototype substrates. Mouse hepatic cytosols had approximately 900-fold higher catalytic activity toward AFBO compared with those from turkey. There was no apparent amino acid profile in tGSTAs that might correspond to specificity toward AFBO, although tGSTA1.2, which had slightly higher AFBO-trapping ability, shared Tyr¹⁰⁸ with mGSTA3, a residue postulated to be critical for AFBO trapping activity in mammalian systems. The observation that recombinant tGSTAs detoxify AFBO, whereas their hepatic forms do not, implies that the hepatic forms of these enzymes are silenced by one or more regulatory mechanisms.

  5. Functional characterization of duplicated B-class MADS-box genes in Japanese gentian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Takashi; Saito, Misa; Nishihara, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    The heterodimer formation between B-class MADS-box proteins of GsAP3a and GsPI2 proteins plays a core role for petal formation in Japanese gentian plants. We previously isolated six B-class MADS-box genes (GsAP3a, GsAP3b, GsTM6, GsPI1, GsPI2, and GsPI3) from Japanese gentian (Gentiana scabra). To study the roles of these MADS-box genes in determining floral organ identities, we investigated protein-protein interactions among them and produced transgenic Arabidopsis and gentian plants overexpressing GsPI2 alone or in combination with GsAP3a or GsTM6. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses revealed that among the GsPI proteins, GsPI2 interacted with both GsAP3a and GsTM6, and that these heterodimers were localized to the nuclei. The heterologous expression of GsPI2 partially converted sepals into petaloid organs in transgenic Arabidopsis, and this petaloid conversion phenomenon was accelerated by combined expression with GsAP3a but not with GsTM6. In contrast, there were no differences in morphology between vector-control plants and transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing GsAP3a or GsTM6 alone. Transgenic gentian ectopically expressing GsPI2 produced an elongated tubular structure that consisted of an elongated petaloid organ in the first whorl and stunted inner floral organs. These results imply that the heterodimer formation between GsPI2 and GsAP3a plays a core role in determining petal and stamen identities in Japanese gentian, but other B-function genes might be important for the complete development of petal organs.

  6. Characterizing long-term patterns of weight change in China using latent class trajectory modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Paynter

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, obesity-related diseases have increased tremendously in China, and are now the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Patterns of weight change can be used to predict risk of obesity-related diseases, increase understanding of etiology of disease risk, identify groups at particularly high risk, and shape prevention strategies.Latent class trajectory modeling was used to compute weight change trajectories for adults aged 18 to 66 using the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS data (n = 12,611. Weight change trajectories were computed separately for males and females by age group at baseline due to differential age-related patterns of weight gain in China with urbanization. Generalized linear mixed effects models examined the association between weight change trajectories and baseline characteristics including urbanicity, BMI category, age, and year of study entry.Trajectory classes were identified for each of six age-sex subgroups corresponding to various degrees of weight loss, maintenance and weight gain. Baseline BMI status was a significant predictor of trajectory membership for all age-sex subgroups. Baseline overweight/obesity increased odds of following 'initial loss with maintenance' trajectories. We found no significant association between baseline urbanization and trajectory membership after controlling for other covariates.Trajectory analysis identified patterns of weight change for age by gender groups. Lack of association between baseline urbanization status and trajectory membership suggests that living in a rural environment at baseline was not protective. Analyses identified age-specific nuances in weight change patterns, pointing to the importance of subgroup analyses in future research.

  7. Discovery and dynamical characterization of the Amor-class asteroid 2012 XH16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, I.; Cernis, K.; Boyle, R. P.; Laugalys, V.

    2014-03-01

    The near-Earth asteroid belt is continuously replenished with material originally moving in Amor-class orbits. Here, the orbit of the dynamically interesting Amor-class asteroid 2012 XH16 is analysed. This asteroid was discovered with the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) at the Mt Graham International Observatory as part of an ongoing asteroid survey focused on astrometry and photometry. The orbit of the asteroid was computed using 66 observations (57 obtained with VATT and 9 from the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory-Spacewatch II project) to give a = 1.63 au, e = 0.36, i = 3.76°. The absolute magnitude of the asteroid is 22.3 which translates into a diameter in the range 104-231 m, assuming the average albedos of S-type and C-type asteroids, respectively. We have used the current orbit to study the future dynamical evolution of the asteroid under the perturbations of the planets and the Moon, relativistic effects, and the Yarkovsky force. Asteroid 2012 XH16 is locked close to the strong 1:2 mean motion resonance with the Earth. The object shows stable evolution and could survive in near-resonance for a relatively long period of time despite experiencing frequent close encounters with Mars. Moreover, results of our computations show that the asteroid 2012 XH16 can survive in the Amor region at most for about 200-400 Myr. The evolution is highly chaotic with a characteristic Lyapunov time of 245 yr. Jupiter is the main perturber but the effects of Saturn, Mars and the Earth-Moon system are also important. In particular, secular resonances with Saturn are significant.

  8. Purifying selection in mitochondria, free-living and obligate intracellular proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popadin Konstantin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effectiveness of elimination of slightly deleterious mutations depends mainly on drift and recombination frequency. Here we analyze the influence of these two factors on the strength of the purifying selection in mitochondrial and proteobacterial orthologous genes taking into account the differences in the organism lifestyles. Results (I We found that the probability of fixation of nonsynonymous substitutions (Kn/Ks in mitochondria is significantly lower compared to obligate intracellular bacteria and even marginally significantly lower compared to free-living bacteria. The comparison of bacteria of different lifestyles demonstrates more effective elimination of slightly deleterious mutations in (II free-living bacteria as compared to obligate intracellular species and in (III obligate intracellular parasites as compared to obligate intracellular symbionts. (IV Finally, we observed that the level of the purifying selection (i.e. 1-Kn/Ks increases with the density of mobile elements in bacterial genomes. Conclusion This study shows that the comparison of patterns of molecular evolution of orthologous genes between ecologically different groups of organisms allow to elucidate the genetic consequences of their various lifestyles. Comparing the strength of the purifying selection among proteobacteria with different lifestyles we obtained results, which are in concordance with theoretical expectations: (II low effective population size and level of recombination in obligate intracellular proteobacteria lead to less effective elimination of mutations compared to free-living relatives; (III rare horizontal transmissions, i.e. effectively zero recombination level in symbiotic obligate intracellular bacteria leads to less effective purifying selection than in parasitic obligate intracellular bacteria; (IV the increased frequency of recombination in bacterial genomes with high mobile element density leads to a more effective

  9. On a constructive characterization of a class of trees related to pairs of disjoint matchings

    CERN Document Server

    Kamalian, R R

    2007-01-01

    For a graph consider the pairs of disjoint matchings which union contains as many edges as possible, and define a parameter $\\alpha$ which eqauls the cardinality of the largest matching in those pairs. Also, define $\\betta$ to be the cardinality of a maximum matching of the graph. We give a constructive characterization of trees which satisfy the $\\alpha=\\betta$ equality. The proof of our main theorem is based on a new decomposition algorithm obtained for trees.

  10. Characterization of Class F Fly Ash Using STXM: Identifying Intraparticle Heterogeneity at Nanometer Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, J.; S. Chae; Chou, K.W.; Tyliszczak, T.; P.J.M. Monteiro

    2016-01-01

    Chemical and physical characterization of fly ash particles were conducted using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Compositional and spatial investigation and correlation among the main elemental constituents of fly ash (Al, Si, and Fe) were conducted based on microscopic and NEXAFS spectral analysis. Homogeneous oxidation and coordination state of Al and Fe were observed whereas Si shows spatial variation in its chemical state. We also identified that Si and Al are spatially cor...

  11. Molecular Analysis of Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria of the ß Subdivision of the Class Proteobacteria in Compost and Composted Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalchuk, G.A.; Naoumenko, Z.S.; Derikx, P.J.L.; Felske, A.; Stephen, J.R.; Arkhipchenko, I.A.

    1999-01-01

    Although the practice of composting animal wastes for use as biofertilizers has increased in recent years, little is known about the microorganisms responsible for the nitrogen transformations which occur in compost and during the composting process. Ammonia is the principle available nitrogenous

  12. Identification and characterization of an unusual class I myosin involved in vesicle traffic in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Spitznagel

    Full Text Available Myosins are a multimember family of motor proteins with diverse functions in eukaryotic cells. African trypanosomes possess only two candidate myosins and thus represent a useful system for functional analysis of these motors. One of these candidates is an unusual class I myosin (TbMyo1 that is expressed at similar levels but organized differently during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei. This myosin localizes to the polarized endocytic pathway in bloodstream forms of the parasite. This organization is actin dependent. Knock down of TbMyo1 results in a significant reduction in endocytic activity, a cessation in cell division and eventually cell death. A striking morphological feature in these cells is an enlargement of the flagellar pocket, which is consistent with an imbalance in traffic to and from the surface. In contrast TbMyo1 is distributed throughout procyclic forms of the tsetse vector and a loss of approximately 90% of the protein has no obvious effects on growth or morphology. These results reveal a life cycle stage specific requirement for this myosin in essential endocytic traffic and represent the first description of the involvement of a motor protein in vesicle traffic in these parasites.

  13. Identification and characterization of an unusual class I myosin involved in vesicle traffic in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitznagel, Diana; O'Rourke, John F; Leddy, Neal; Hanrahan, Orla; Nolan, Derek P

    2010-01-01

    Myosins are a multimember family of motor proteins with diverse functions in eukaryotic cells. African trypanosomes possess only two candidate myosins and thus represent a useful system for functional analysis of these motors. One of these candidates is an unusual class I myosin (TbMyo1) that is expressed at similar levels but organized differently during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei. This myosin localizes to the polarized endocytic pathway in bloodstream forms of the parasite. This organization is actin dependent. Knock down of TbMyo1 results in a significant reduction in endocytic activity, a cessation in cell division and eventually cell death. A striking morphological feature in these cells is an enlargement of the flagellar pocket, which is consistent with an imbalance in traffic to and from the surface. In contrast TbMyo1 is distributed throughout procyclic forms of the tsetse vector and a loss of approximately 90% of the protein has no obvious effects on growth or morphology. These results reveal a life cycle stage specific requirement for this myosin in essential endocytic traffic and represent the first description of the involvement of a motor protein in vesicle traffic in these parasites.

  14. Carbon nitrides: synthesis and characterization of a new class of functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T S; Jorge, A Belen; Suter, T M; Sella, A; Corà, F; McMillan, P F

    2017-06-21

    Carbon nitride compounds with high N : C ratios and graphitic to polymeric structures are being investigated as potential next-generation materials for incorporation in devices for energy conversion and storage as well as for optoelectronic and catalysis applications. The materials are built from C- and N-containing heterocycles with heptazine or triazine rings linked via sp(2)-bonded N atoms (N(C)3 units) or -NH- groups. The electronic, chemical and optical functionalities are determined by the nature of the local to extended structures as well as the chemical composition of the materials. Because of their typically amorphous to nanocrystalline nature and variable composition, significant challenges remain to fully assess and calibrate the structure-functionality relationships among carbon nitride materials. It is also important to devise a useful and consistent approach to naming the different classes of carbon nitride compounds that accurately describes their chemical and structural characteristics related to their functional performance. Here we evaluate the current state of understanding to highlight key issues in these areas and point out new directions in their development as advanced technological materials.

  15. Identification and Characterization of a Class of MALAT1-like Genomic Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The MALAT1 (Metastasis-Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 gene encodes a noncoding RNA that is processed into a long nuclear retained transcript (MALAT1 and a small cytoplasmic tRNA-like transcript (mascRNA. Using an RNA sequence- and structure-based covariance model, we identified more than 130 genomic loci in vertebrate genomes containing the MALAT1 3′ end triple-helix structure and its immediate downstream tRNA-like structure, including 44 in the green lizard Anolis carolinensis. Structural and computational analyses revealed a co-occurrence of components of the 3′ end module. MALAT1-like genes in Anolis carolinensis are highly expressed in adult testis, thus we named them testis-abundant long noncoding RNAs (tancRNAs. MALAT1-like loci also produce multiple small RNA species, including PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs, from the antisense strand. The 3′ ends of tancRNAs serve as potential targets for the PIWI-piRNA complex. Thus, we have identified an evolutionarily conserved class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs with similar structural constraints, post-transcriptional processing, and subcellular localization and a distinct function in spermatocytes.

  16. Impact of Transcription Units rearrangement on the evolution of the regulatory network of gamma-proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcelos Ana

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past years, several studies begun to unravel the structure, dynamical properties, and evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. However, even those comparative studies that focus on a group of closely related organisms are limited by the rather scarce knowledge on regulatory interactions outside a few model organisms, such as E. coli among the prokaryotes. Results In this paper we used the information annotated in Tractor_DB (a database of regulatory networks in gamma-proteobacteria to calculate a normalized Site Orthology Score (SOS that quantifies the conservation of a regulatory link across thirty genomes of this subclass. Then we used this SOS to assess how regulatory connections have evolved in this group, and how the variation of basic regulatory connection is reflected on the structure of the chromosome. We found that individual regulatory interactions shift between different organisms, a process that may be described as rewiring the network. At this evolutionary scale (the gamma-proteobacteria subclass this rewiring process may be an important source of variation of regulatory incoming interactions for individual networks. We also noticed that the regulatory links that form feed forward motifs are conserved in a better correlated manner than triads of random regulatory interactions or pairs of co-regulated genes. Furthermore, the rewiring process that takes place at the most basic level of the regulatory network may be linked to rearrangements of genetic material within bacterial chromosomes, which change the structure of Transcription Units and therefore the regulatory connections between Transcription Factors and structural genes. Conclusion The rearrangements that occur in bacterial chromosomes-mostly inversion or horizontal gene transfer events – are important sources of variation of gene regulation at this evolutionary scale.

  17. From gene trees to organismal phylogeny in prokaryotes: the case of the gamma-Proteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Lerat

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in published genomic sequences for bacteria presents the first opportunity to reconstruct evolutionary events on the scale of entire genomes. However, extensive lateral gene transfer (LGT may thwart this goal by preventing the establishment of organismal relationships based on individual gene phylogenies. The group for which cases of LGT are most frequently documented and for which the greatest density of complete genome sequences is available is the gamma-Proteobacteria, an ecologically diverse and ancient group including free-living species as well as pathogens and intracellular symbionts of plants and animals. We propose an approach to multigene phylogeny using complete genomes and apply it to the case of the gamma-Proteobacteria. We first applied stringent criteria to identify a set of likely gene orthologs and then tested the compatibilities of the resulting protein alignments with several phylogenetic hypotheses. Our results demonstrate phylogenetic concordance among virtually all (203 of 205 of the selected gene families, with each of the exceptions consistent with a single LGT event. The concatenated sequences of the concordant families yield a fully resolved phylogeny. This topology also received strong support in analyses aimed at excluding effects of heterogeneity in nucleotide base composition across lineages. Our analysis indicates that single-copy orthologous genes are resistant to horizontal transfer, even in ancient bacterial groups subject to high rates of LGT. This gene set can be identified and used to yield robust hypotheses for organismal phylogenies, thus establishing a foundation for reconstructing the evolutionary transitions, such as gene transfer, that underlie diversity in genome content and organization.

  18. Functional analysis of N-linking oligosaccharyl transferase enzymes encoded by deep-sea vent proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Dominic C; Jervis, Adrian J; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Yates, Laura E; Cuccui, Jon; Linton, Dennis; Wren, Brendan W

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial N-linking oligosaccharyl transferases (OTase enzymes) transfer lipid-linked glycans to selected proteins in the periplasm and were first described in the intestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, a member of the ε-proteobacteria-subdivision of bacteria. More recently, orthologues from other ε-proteobacterial Campylobacter and Helicobacter species and a δ-proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, have been described, suggesting that these two subdivisions of bacteria may be a source of further N-linked protein glycosylation systems. Whole-genome sequencing of both ε- and δ-proteobacteria from deep-sea vent habitats, a rich source of species from these subdivisions, revealed putative ORFs encoding OTase enzymes and associated adjacent glycosyltransferases similar to the C. jejuni N-linked glycosylation locus. We expressed putative OTase ORFs from the deep-sea vent species Nitratiruptor tergarcus, Sulfurovum lithotrophicum and Deferribacter desulfuricans in Escherichia coli and showed that they were able to functionally complement the C. jejuni OTase, CjPglB. The enzymes were shown to possess relaxed glycan specificity, transferring diverse glycan structures and demonstrated different glycosylation sequon specificities. Additionally, a permissive D. desulfuricans acceptor protein was identified, and we provide evidence that the N-linked glycan synthesized by N. tergarcus and S. lithotrophicum contains an acetylated sugar at the reducing end. This work demonstrates that deep-sea vent bacteria encode functional N-glycosylation machineries and are a potential source of biotechnologically important OTase enzymes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Characterizing Rocky and Gaseous Exoplanets with 2 m Class Space-based Coronagraphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-02-01

    Several concepts now exist for small, space-based missions to directly characterize exoplanets in reflected light. While studies have been performed that investigate the potential detection yields of such missions, little work has been done to understand how instrumental and astrophysical parameters will affect the ability of these missions to obtain spectra that are useful for characterizing their planetary targets. Here, we develop an instrument noise model suitable for studying the spectral characterization potential of a coronagraph-equipped, space-based telescope. We adopt a baseline set of telescope and instrument parameters appropriate for near-future planned missions like WFIRST-AFTA, including a 2 m diameter primary aperture, an operational wavelength range of 0.4-1.0 μm, and an instrument spectral resolution of λ/Δλ = 70, and apply our baseline model to a variety of spectral models of different planet types, including Earth twins, Jupiter twins, and warm and cool Jupiters and Neptunes. With our exoplanet spectral models, we explore wavelength-dependent planet-star flux ratios for main-sequence stars of various effective temperatures and discuss how coronagraph inner and outer working angle constraints will influence the potential to study different types of planets. For planets most favorable to spectroscopic characterization—cool Jupiters and Neptunes as well as nearby super-Earths—we study the integration times required to achieve moderate signal-to-noise ratio spectra. We also explore the sensitivity of the integration times required to either detect the bottom or presence of key absorption bands (for methane, water vapor, and molecular oxygen) to coronagraph raw contrast performance, exozodiacal light levels, and the distance to the planetary system. Decreasing detector quantum efficiency at longer visible wavelengths makes the detection of water vapor in the atmospheres of Earth-like planets extremely challenging, and also hinders detections

  20. Characterization of bovine MHC class II DRB3 diversity in South American Holstein cattle populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, S-N; Giovambattista, G; Okimoto, N; Matsumoto, Y; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Acosta, T J; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2015-12-01

    Holstein cattle dominate the global milk production industry because of their outstanding milk production, however, this breed is susceptible to tropical endemic pathogens and suffers from heat stress and thus fewer Holstein populations are raised in tropical areas. The bovine major histocompatibility complex (BoLA)-DRB3 class II gene is used as a marker for disease and immunological traits, and its polymorphism has been studied extensively in Holstein cattle from temperate and cold regions. We studied the genetic diversity of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in South American Holstein populations to determine whether tropical populations have diverged from those bred in temperate and cold regions by selection and/or crossbreeding with local native breeds. We specifically studied Exon 2 of this gene from 855 South American Holstein individuals by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequence-based typing method. We found a high degree of gene diversity at the allelic (Na > 20 and He > 0.87) and molecular (π > 0.080) levels, but a low degree of population structure (FST = 0.009215). A principal components analysis and tree showed that the Bolivian subtropical population had the largest genetic divergence compared with Holsteins bred in temperate or cold regions, and that this population was closely related to Bolivian Creole cattle. Our results suggest that Holstein genetic divergence can be explained by selection and/or gene introgression from local germplasms. This is the first examination of BoLA-DRB3 in Holsteins adapted to tropical environments, and contributes to an ongoing effort to catalog bovine MHC allele frequencies by breed and location.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of tunable coumarin- linked glasses as new class of organic/inorganic phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luridiana, Alberto; Pretta, Gianluca; Secci, Francesco; Frongia, Angelo [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Complesso universitario di Monserrato, SS 554, bivio per Sestu, Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Chiriu, Daniele; Carbonaro, Carlo Maria; Corpino, Riccardo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Complesso universitario di Monserrato, SS 554, bivio per Sestu, Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Ricci, Pier Carlo, E-mail: carlo.ricci@dsf.unica.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi di Cagliari, S.P. Monserrato-Sestu Km 0,700, 09042 Monserrato (Canada) (Italy)

    2014-10-21

    It is well known that stilbene with a trans conformation is highly fluorescent. From the viewpoint of molecular structure, coumarins bear a carbon-carbon double bond which is fixed as trans conformation as in trans-stilbene through a lactone structure. This can help to avoid the trans-cis transformation of the double bond under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation as observed in stilbene compounds and results in strong fluorescence and high fluorescence quantum yield and photostability in most of coumarin derivatives. Herein we report some preliminary results about the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of tunable coumarins and the development of a new linkage protocol for the obtainment of monolayer coumarin-covalently linked glasses. The resulting organic/inorganic coumarin/silica based Self-Assembled Monolayer (SMA) film is proposed as new phosphors for the substituting of critical raw materials, like rare earths, in photonics applications.

  2. Characterization of Class F Fly Ash Using STXM: Identifying Intraparticle Heterogeneity at Nanometer Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and physical characterization of fly ash particles were conducted using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM. Compositional and spatial investigation and correlation among the main elemental constituents of fly ash (Al, Si, and Fe were conducted based on microscopic and NEXAFS spectral analysis. Homogeneous oxidation and coordination state of Al and Fe were observed whereas Si shows spatial variation in its chemical state. We also identified that Si and Al are spatially correlated at nanometer scale in which high concentration of Si and Al was concurrently and consistently observed within the 30 nm resolution whereas Fe distribution did not show any specific correlation to Al and Si. Results of this study indicate that fly ash chemical composition has heterogeneous distribution depending on the elements which would determine and result in the differences in the reactivity.

  3. Cloning, characterization and anion inhibition study of a β-class carbonic anhydrase from the caries producing pathogen Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedeoglu, Nurcan; De Luca, Viviana; Isik, Semra; Yildirim, Hatice; Kockar, Feray; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-07-01

    The oral pathogenic bacterium involved in human dental caries formation Streptococcus mutans, encodes for two carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) one belonging to the α- and the other one to the β-class. This last enzyme (SmuCA) has been cloned, characterized and investigated for its inhibition profile with a major class of CA inhibitors, the inorganic anions. Here we show that SmuCA has a good catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction, with kcat 4.2×10(5)s(-1) and kcat/Km of 5.8×10(7)M(-1)×s(-1), being inhibited by cyanate, carbonate, stannate, divannadate and diethyldithiocarbamate in the submillimolar range (KIs of 0.30-0.64mM) and more efficiently by sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid (KIs of 15-46μM). The anion inhibition profile of the S. mutans enzyme is very different from other α- and β-CAs investigated earlier. Identification of effective inhibitors of this new enzyme may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the role of S. mutans CAs in dental caries formation, and eventually the development of pharmacological agents with a new mechanism of antibacterial action.

  4. Characterization of the hydrophobic substrate-binding site of the bacterial beta class glutathione transferase from Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Luca; Masulli, Michele; Di Ilio, Carmine; Allocati, Nerino

    2010-09-01

    Since their discovery, bacterial glutathione (GSH)transferases have been characterized in terms of their ability to catalyse a variety of different reactions on a large set of toxic molecules of xenobiotic or endobiotic origin. Furthermore the contribution of different residues in the GSH-binding site to GSH activation has been extensively investigated. Little is known, however, about the contribution to catalysis and overall stability of single residues shaping the hydrophobic co-substrate binding site (H-site). Here we tackle this problem by site-directed mutagenesis of residues facing the H-site in the bacterial beta class GSH transferase from Proteus mirabilis. We investigate the behaviour of these mutants under a variety of conditions and analyse their activity against several co-substrates, representative of the different reactions catalyzed by bacterial GSH transferases. Our work shows that mutations at the H-site can be used to modulate activity at the level of the different catalytic mechanisms operating on the chosen substrates, each mutation showing a different fingerprint. This work paves the way for future studies aimed at improving the catalytic properties of beta class GSH transferases against selected substrates for bioremediation purposes.

  5. Characterization of the variable region in the class 1 integron of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Natália; Meneghetti, Karine Lena; de Almeida, Clara Ponzi; da Rosa Bastos, Marina; Otton, Letícia Muner; Corção, Gertrudes

    2016-01-01

    Fecal bacteria are considered to be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes in the aquatic environment and could horizontally transfer these genes to autochthonous bacteria when carried on transferable and/or mobile genetic elements. Such circulation of resistance genes constitutes a latent public health hazard. The aim of this study was to characterize the variable region of the class 1 integron and relate its genetic content to resistance patterns observed in antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from the surface waters of Patos Lagoon, Southern Brazil. Genetic diversity of the isolates and presence of the qacEΔ1 gene, which confers resistance to quaternary ammonium compounds, were also investigated. A total of 27 isolates were analyzed. The variable region harbored dfrA17, dfrA1 and dfrA12 genes, which confer resistance to trimethoprim, and aadA1, aadA5 and aadA22 genes that encode resistance to streptomycin/spectinomycin. Most of the isolates were considered resistant to quaternary ammonium compounds and all of them carried the qacEΔ1 gene at the 3' conserved segment of the integron. ERIC-PCR analyses of E. coli isolates that presented the integrons showed great genetic diversity, indicating diverse sources of contamination in this environment. These results suggest that fecal bacteria with class 1 integrons in aquatic environments are potentially important reservoirs of antibiotic-resistance genes and may transfer these elements to other bacteria that are capable of infecting humans.

  6. Characterization of structural features controlling the receptiveness of empty class II MHC molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Rupp

    Full Text Available MHC class II molecules (MHC II play a pivotal role in the cell-surface presentation of antigens for surveillance by T cells. Antigen loading takes place inside the cell in endosomal compartments and loss of the peptide ligand rapidly leads to the formation of a non-receptive state of the MHC molecule. Non-receptiveness hinders the efficient loading of new antigens onto the empty MHC II. However, the mechanisms driving the formation of the peptide inaccessible state are not well understood. Here, a combined approach of experimental site-directed mutagenesis and computational modeling is used to reveal structural features underlying "non-receptiveness." Molecular dynamics simulations of the human MHC II HLA-DR1 suggest a straightening of the α-helix of the β1 domain during the transition from the open to the non-receptive state. The movement is mostly confined to a hinge region conserved in all known MHC molecules. This shift causes a narrowing of the two helices flanking the binding site and results in a closure, which is further stabilized by the formation of a critical hydrogen bond between residues αQ9 and βN82. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed that replacement of either one of the two residues by alanine renders the protein highly susceptible. Notably, loading enhancement was also observed when the mutated MHC II molecules were expressed on the surface of fibroblast cells. Altogether, structural features underlying the non-receptive state of empty HLA-DR1 identified by theoretical means and experiments revealed highly conserved residues critically involved in the receptiveness of MHC II. The atomic details of rearrangements of the peptide-binding groove upon peptide loss provide insight into structure and dynamics of empty MHC II molecules and may foster rational approaches to interfere with non-receptiveness. Manipulation of peptide loading efficiency for improved peptide vaccination strategies could be one of the applications profiting

  7. Ovarian tumor characterization and classification: a class of GyneScan™ systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Sree, Vinitha S; Saba, Luca; Molinari, Filippo; Guerriero, Stefano; Suri, Jasjit S

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we have developed an adjunct Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) technique that uses 3D acquired ultrasound images of the ovary and data mining algorithms to accurately characterize and classify benign and malignant ovarian tumors. In this technique, we extracted image-texture based and Higher Order Spectra (HOS) based features from the images. The significant features were then selected and used to train and test the Decision Tree (DT) classifier. The proposed technique was validated using 1000 benign and 1000 malignant images, obtained from 10 patients with benign and 10 with malignant disease, respectively. On evaluating the classifier with 10-fold stratified cross validation, we observed that the DT classifier presented a high accuracy of 95.1%, sensitivity of 92.5% and specificity of 97.7%. Thus, the four significant features could adequately quantify the subtle changes and nonlinearities in the pixel intensities. The preliminary results presented in this paper indicate that the proposed technique can be reliably used as an adjunct tool for ovarian tumor classification since the system is accurate, completely automated, cost-effective, and can be easily written as a software application for use in any computer.

  8. Characterization of the variable region in the class 1 integron of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from surface water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Canal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fecal bacteria are considered to be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes in the aquatic environment and could horizontally transfer these genes to autochthonous bacteria when carried on transferable and/or mobile genetic elements. Such circulation of resistance genes constitutes a latent public health hazard. The aim of this study was to characterize the variable region of the class 1 integron and relate its genetic content to resistance patterns observed in antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from the surface waters of Patos Lagoon, Southern Brazil. Genetic diversity of the isolates and presence of the qacEΔ1 gene, which confers resistance to quaternary ammonium compounds, were also investigated. A total of 27 isolates were analyzed. The variable region harbored dfrA17, dfrA1 and dfrA12 genes, which confer resistance to trimethoprim, and aadA1, aadA5 and aadA22 genes that encode resistance to streptomycin/spectinomycin. Most of the isolates were considered resistant to quaternary ammonium compounds and all of them carried the qacE Δ1 gene at the 3′ conserved segment of the integron. ERIC-PCR analyses of E. coli isolates that presented the integrons showed great genetic diversity, indicating diverse sources of contamination in this environment. These results suggest that fecal bacteria with class 1 integrons in aquatic environments are potentially important reservoirs of antibiotic-resistance genes and may transfer these elements to other bacteria that are capable of infecting humans.

  9. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-2: Mixed GTCC LLW assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirner, N.P. [Ebasco Environmental, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mixed greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (mixed GTCC LLW) is waste that combines two characteristics: it is radioactive, and it is hazardous. This report uses information compiled from Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Characterization: Estimated Volumes, Radionuclide Activities, and Other Characteristics (DOE/LLW 1 14, Revision 1), and applies it to the question of how much and what types of mixed GTCC LLW are generated and are likely to require disposal in facilities jointly regulated by the DOE and the NRC. The report describes how to classify a RCRA hazardous waste, and then applies that classification process to the 41 GTCC LLW waste types identified in the DOE/LLW-114 (Revision 1). Of the 41 GTCC LLW categories identified, only six were identified in this study as potentially requiring regulation as hazardous waste under RCRA. These wastes can be combined into the following three groups: fuel-in decontamination resins, organic liquids, and process waste consisting of lead scrap/shielding from a sealed source manufacturer. For the base case, no mixed GTCC LLW is expected from nuclear utilities or sealed source licensees, whereas only 177 ml of mixed GTCC LLW are expected to be produced by other generators through the year 2035. This relatively small volume represents approximately 40% of the base case estimate for GTCC wastes from other generators. For these other generators, volume estimates for mixed GTCC LLW ranged from less than 1 m{sup 3} to 187 m{sup 3}, depending on assumptions and treatments applied to the wastes.

  10. Detection of Alpha and Gamma-Proteobacteria in Amblyomma triste (Acari: Ixodidae) from Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzal, José Manuel; Estrada-Peña, Agustín; Portillo, Aránzazu; Mangold, Atilio J; Castro, Oscar; de Souza, Carlos G; Félix, María L; Pérez-Martínez, Laura; Santibánez, Sonia; Oteo, José A

    2008-01-01

    Amblyomma triste is the most prevalent tick species reported in human tick bites in Uruguay and has been found to be infected with Rickettsia parkeri, but no other microorganisms have been reported from this tick. A sample of 254 adults of A. triste was collected by flagging on vegetation in suburban areas in southern Uruguay. Pools of five ticks were assembled and a screening for the DNA from the resulting 51 pools was realized by PCR assays using primers for amplifying a fragment of 16S rRNA gene for members of Anaplasmataceae. Seventeen pools were positive (33%) and the sequenciation of the gene fragment amplified revealed the presence of a putative new Alpha-Proteobacterium (denominated Atri-uru). The phylogenetic analysis showed that this microorganism is closely related to the symbiont of I. ricinus denominated 'Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii' and other associated organisms. This rickettsial symbiont of ticks is included in a recent new clade proposed for the Alpha subclass of the Proteobacteria. The discovery of this bacterium in A. triste is the first evidence of this group of Rickettsiales detected in the Genus Amblyomma, and the first record in South America. Also, in two of 17 positive samples a Gamma-Proteobacterium related to Francisella-like organisms was detected.

  11. Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir, Class II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, T. Scott; Justice, James J.; Egg, Rebecca

    2001-08-07

    The Oxy operated Class 2 Project at West Welch Project is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO2 injection projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate reservoirs. The research and design phase (Budget Period 1) primarily involved advanced reservoir demonstration characterization. The current demonstration phase (Budget Period 2) is the implementation of the reservoir management plan for an optimum miscible CO2 flood design based on the reservoir characterization.

  12. Characterization and application of a novel class II thermophilic peroxidase from Myceliophthora thermophila in biosynthesis of polycatechol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerva, Anastasia; Christakopoulos, Paul; Topakas, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    A peroxidase from the thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora thermophila that belongs to ascomycete Class II based on PeroxiBase classification was functionally expressed in methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The putative peroxidase from the genomic DNA was successfully cloned in P. pastoris X-33 under the transcriptional control of the alcohol oxidase (AOX1) promoter. The heterologous production was greatly enhanced by the addition of hemin with a titer of 0.41 U mL(-1) peroxidase activity at the second day of incubation. The recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity (50 kDa) and characterized using a series of phenolic substrates that indicated similar characteristics with those of generic peroxidases. In addition, the enzyme was found thermostable, retaining its activity for temperatures up to 60 °C after eight hours incubation. Moreover, the enzyme displayed remarkable H2O2 stability, retaining more than 80% of its initial activity after 24h incubation in 5000-fold molar excess of H2O2. The ability of the peroxidase to polymerize catechol at high superoxide concentrations, together with its high thermostability and substrate specificity, indicate a potential commercial significance of the enzyme. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Control of methionine metabolism by the SahR transcriptional regulator in Proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichkov, Pavel S; Li, Xiaoqing; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Price, Morgan N; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2014-01-01

    Sulphur is an essential element in the metabolism. The sulphur-containing amino acid methionine is a metabolic precursor for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which serves as a coenzyme for ubiquitous methyltrtansferases. Recycling of organic sulphur compounds, e.g. via the SAM cycle, is an important metabolic process that needs to be tightly regulated. Knowledge about transcriptional regulation of these processes is still limited for many free-living bacteria. We identified a novel transcription factor SahR from the ArsR family that controls the SAM cycle genes in diverse microorganisms from soil and aquatic ecosystems. By using comparative genomics, we predicted SahR-binding DNA motifs and reconstructed SahR regulons in the genomes of 62 Proteobacteria. The conserved core of SahR regulons includes all enzymes required for the SAM cycle: the SAH hydrolase AhcY, the methionine biosynthesis enzymes MetE/MetH and MetF, and the SAM synthetase MetK. By using a combination of experimental techniques, we validated the SahR regulon in the sulphate-reducing Deltaproteobacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis. SahR functions as a negative regulator that responds to the S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). The elevated SAH level in the cell dissociates SahR from its DNA operators and induces the expression of SAM cycle genes. The effector-sensing domain in SahR is related to SAM-dependent methylases that are able to tightly bind SAH. SahR represents a novel type of transcriptional regulators for the control of sulphur amino acid metabolism.

  14. Genetic diversity of Burkholderia (Proteobacteria) species from the Caatinga and Atlantic rainforest biomes in Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, A C; Santos, H R M; Gross, E; Corrêa, R X

    2013-03-11

    The genus Burkholderia (β-Proteobacteria) currently comprises more than 60 species, including parasites, symbionts and free-living organisms. Several new species of Burkholderia have recently been described showing a great diversity of phenotypes. We examined the diversity of Burkholderia spp in environmental samples collected from Caatinga and Atlantic rainforest biomes of Bahia, Brazil. Legume nodules were collected from five locations, and 16S rDNA and recA genes of the isolated microorganisms were analyzed. Thirty-three contigs of 16S rRNA genes and four contigs of the recA gene related to the genus Burkholderia were obtained. The genetic dissimilarity of the strains ranged from 0 to 2.5% based on 16S rDNA analysis, indicating two main branches: one distinct branch of the dendrogram for the B. cepacia complex and another branch that rendered three major groups, partially reflecting host plants and locations. A dendrogram designed with sequences of this research and those designed with sequences of Burkholderia-type strains and the first hit BLAST had similar topologies. A dendrogram similar to that constructed by analysis of 16S rDNA was obtained using sequences of the fragment of the recA gene. The 16S rDNA sequences enabled sufficient identification of relevant similarities and groupings amongst isolates and the sequences that we obtained. Only 6 of the 33 isolates analyzed via 16S rDNA sequencing showed high similarity with the B. cepacia complex. Thus, over 3/4 of the isolates have potential for biotechnological applications.

  15. A survey of sRNA families in α-proteobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Val, Coral; Romero-Zaliz, Rocío; Torres-Quesada, Omar; Peregrina, Alexandra; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, Jose I

    2012-01-01

    We have performed a computational comparative analysis of six small non-coding RNA (sRNA) families in α-proteobacteria. Members of these families were first identified in the intergenic regions of the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont S. meliloti by a combined bioinformatics screen followed by experimental verification. Consensus secondary structures inferred from covariance models for each sRNA family evidenced in some cases conserved motifs putatively relevant to the function of trans-encoded base-pairing sRNAs i.e., Hfq-binding signatures and exposed anti Shine-Dalgarno sequences. Two particular family models, namely αr15 and αr35, shared own sub-structural modules with the Rfam model suhB (RF00519) and the uncharacterized sRNA family αr35b, respectively. A third sRNA family, termed αr45, has homology to the cis-acting regulatory element speF (RF00518). However, new experimental data further confirmed that the S. meliloti αr45 representative is an Hfq-binding sRNA processed from or expressed independently of speF, thus refining the Rfam speF model annotation. All the six families have members in phylogenetically related plant-interacting bacteria and animal pathogens of the order of the Rhizobiales, some occurring with high levels of paralogy in individual genomes. In silico and experimental evidences predict differential regulation of paralogous sRNAs in S. meliloti 1021. The distribution patterns of these sRNA families suggest major contributions of vertical inheritance and extensive ancestral duplication events to the evolution of sRNAs in plant-interacting bacteria. PMID:22418845

  16. Production of volatile organic compounds in the culture of marine α-proteobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, M.; Abe, M.; Hashimoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) release halogens in the troposphere and in the stratosphere by photolysis and released halogens catalyze ozone depletion . In the ocean, macroalgae, phytoplankton, and bacteria are considered to be the main producers of VOCs. Recent investigations have shown that marine bacteria produce halomethanes such as chloromethane, bromomethane, and iodomethane. However, knowledge of aquatic VOC production, particularly through bacteria, is lacking. We studied the production of VOCs, including halomethanes, through the bacterium HKF-1. HKF-1 was isolated from brackish water in Sanaru Lake, Shizuoka prefecture, Japan. The bacterium belongs to the α-proteobacteria. Bacteria were incubated in marine broth 2216 (Difco) added with KI and KIO3 (each at 0.02 μmol/L) at 25°C. VOCs in the gas phase above the cultured samples was determined using a dynamic headspace (GESTEL DHS)—gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N)—mass spectrometer (Agilent 5975C) at 0, 4, 7, 10 and 12 incubation days. In addition, the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was measured during the culture period. Measurement of VOCs showed that chloromethane, bromomethane, iodomethane, isoprene, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide were produced in the culture of HKF-1. Dihalomethanes and trihalomethanes, such as dibromomethane, chloroiodomethane, bromoiodomethane, and tribromomethane, were not detected. Given that monohalomethanes and sulfur-containing VOCs were abundant in the culture, HKF-1 is one of the possible candidates as a producer of monohalomethane and sulfur-containing VOCs in marine environment, but not of di- or trihalomethanes.

  17. Identification of bacteria from clinical samples using Bartonella alpha-Proteobacteria growth medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas, Maria B; Maggi, Ricardo G; Diniz, Pedro P V P; Breitschwerdt, Kyle T; Sontakke, Sushama; Breithschwerdt, Edward B

    2007-11-01

    In an effort to overcome historical problems associated with the isolation of Bartonella species from animal and human blood samples, our laboratory developed a novel, chemically modified, insect-based, liquid culture medium (Bartonella alpha-Proteobacteria growth medium, BAPGM). In this study, we describe the isolation of non-Bartonella bacteria from aseptically obtained human blood and tissue samples that were inoculated into BAPGM pre-enrichment culture medium, and were obtained during attempts to define each individuals Bartonella infection status. After incubation for at least 7 days in liquid BAPGM, pre-enriched inoculums were sub-cultured onto a BAPGM/blood agar plate. Bacterial DNA was extracted from pooled plated colonies and amplified using conventional PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Subsequently, amplicons were cloned, sequenced and compared to GenBank database sequences using the BLAST program. Regardless of the patient's Bartonella status, seventeen samples generated only one 16S rDNA sequence, representing the following genera: Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Bartonella, Dermabacter, Methylobacterium, Propionibacterium, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and bacteria listed as "non-cultured" in the GenBank database. Alkalibacterium, Arthrobacter, Erwinia, Kineococcus, Methylobacterium, Propionibacterium, Sphingomonas, and Staphylococcus were isolated from nine Bartonella-infected individuals. Co-isolation of Acinetobacter, Sphingomonas, Staphylococcus spp. and bacteria listed as "non-cultured" in the GenBank database was achieved for four samples in which Bartonella spp. were not detected. Despite the phylogenetic limitations of using partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing for species and strain identification, the investigational methodology described in this study may provide a complementary approach for the isolation and identification of bacteria from patient samples.

  18. Purification and Characterization of Suicin 65, a Novel Class I Type B Lantibiotic Produced by Streptococcus suis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Vaillancourt

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides of bacterial origin that are considered as a promising alternative to the use of conventional antibiotics. Recently, our laboratory reported the purification and characterization of two lantibiotics, suicin 90-1330 and suicin 3908, produced by the swine pathogen and zoonotic agent Streptococcus suis (serotype 2. In this study, a novel bacteriocin produced by S. suis has been identified and characterized. The producing strain S. suis 65 (serotype 2 was found to belong to the sequence type 28, that includes strains known to be weakly or avirulent in a mouse model. The bacteriocin, whose production was only possible following growth on solid culture medium, was purified to homogeneity by cationic exchange and reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. The bacteriocin, named suicin 65, was heat, pH and protease resistant. Suicin 65 was active against all S. suis isolates tested, including antibiotic resistant strains. Amino acid sequencing of the purified bacteriocin by Edman degradation revealed the presence of modified amino acids suggesting a lantibiotic. Using the partial sequence obtained, a blast was performed against published genomes of S. suis and allowed to identify a putative lantibiotic locus in the genome of S. suis 89-1591. From this genome, primers were designed and the gene cluster involved in the production of suicin 65 by S. suis 65 was amplified by PCR. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of ten open reading frames, including a duplicate of the structural gene. The structural genes (sssA and sssA' of suicin 65 encodes a 25-amino acid residue leader peptide and a 26-amino acid residue mature peptide yielding an active bacteriocin with a deducted molecular mass of 3,005 Da. Mature suicin 65 showed a high degree of identity with class I type B lantibiotics (globular structure produced by Streptococcus pyogenes (streptococcin FF22; 84.6%, Streptococcus macedonicus (macedocin ACA

  19. Characterization of a Highly pH Stable Chi-Class Glutathione S-Transferase from Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Tripti; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Chhetri, Gaurav; Tripathi, Timir; Singh, Arvind Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes present in virtually all organisms. Besides having an essential role in cellular detoxification, they also perform various other functions, including responses in stress conditions and signaling. GSTs are highly studied in plants and animals; however, the knowledge regarding GSTs in cyanobacteria seems rudimentary. In this study, we report the characterization of a highly pH stable GST from the model cyanobacterium--Synechocystis PCC 6803. The gene sll0067 was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), and the protein was purified to homogeneity. The expressed protein exists as a homo-dimer, which is composed of about 20 kDa subunit. The results of the steady-state enzyme kinetics displayed protein's glutathione conjugation activity towards its class specific substrate- isothiocyanate, having the maximal activity with phenethyl isothiocyanate. Contrary to the poor catalytic activity and low specificity towards standard GST substrates such as 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene by bacterial GSTs, PmGST B1-1 from Proteus mirabilis, and E. coli GST, sll0067 has broad substrate degradation capability like most of the mammalian GST. Moreover, we have shown that cyanobacterial GST sll0067 is catalytically efficient compared to the best mammalian enzymes. The structural stability of GST was studied as a function of pH. The fluorescence and CD spectroscopy in combination with size exclusion chromatography showed a highly stable nature of the protein over a broad pH range from 2.0 to 11.0. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first GST with such a wide range of pH related structural stability. Furthermore, the presence of conserved Proline-53, structural motifs such as N-capping box and hydrophobic staple further aid in the stability and proper folding of cyanobacterial GST-sll0067.

  20. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  1. Characterization of a Highly pH Stable Chi-Class Glutathione S-Transferase from Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Pandey

    Full Text Available Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs are multifunctional enzymes present in virtually all organisms. Besides having an essential role in cellular detoxification, they also perform various other functions, including responses in stress conditions and signaling. GSTs are highly studied in plants and animals; however, the knowledge regarding GSTs in cyanobacteria seems rudimentary. In this study, we report the characterization of a highly pH stable GST from the model cyanobacterium--Synechocystis PCC 6803. The gene sll0067 was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli, and the protein was purified to homogeneity. The expressed protein exists as a homo-dimer, which is composed of about 20 kDa subunit. The results of the steady-state enzyme kinetics displayed protein's glutathione conjugation activity towards its class specific substrate- isothiocyanate, having the maximal activity with phenethyl isothiocyanate. Contrary to the poor catalytic activity and low specificity towards standard GST substrates such as 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene by bacterial GSTs, PmGST B1-1 from Proteus mirabilis, and E. coli GST, sll0067 has broad substrate degradation capability like most of the mammalian GST. Moreover, we have shown that cyanobacterial GST sll0067 is catalytically efficient compared to the best mammalian enzymes. The structural stability of GST was studied as a function of pH. The fluorescence and CD spectroscopy in combination with size exclusion chromatography showed a highly stable nature of the protein over a broad pH range from 2.0 to 11.0. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first GST with such a wide range of pH related structural stability. Furthermore, the presence of conserved Proline-53, structural motifs such as N-capping box and hydrophobic staple further aid in the stability and proper folding of cyanobacterial GST-sll0067.

  2. Extended characterization of a new class of membranes for blood purification: the high cut-off membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschetti-de-Fierro, Adriana; Voigt, Manuel; Storr, Markus; Krause, Bernd

    2013-07-01

    High cut-off membranes are a new class of blood purification membranes whose particular characteristics present challenges for commonly-used characterization methods. Dextran sieving curves for representative blood purification membranes of the high-flux and high cut-off types were measured and compared to curves for the glomerular filtration barrier (GFB). The performance was also determined after blood exposure for the most permeable synthetic membranes. High cut-off membranes were observed to be more open than the GFB before blood exposure, but become tighter and more selective after the exposure, keeping the permeation for low and middle molecules while restraining the filtration of large species. Based on dextran sieving experiments for a variety of commercially available blood purification membranes, we present a novel method for classifying blood purification membranes. By using a well-established technique and introducing a new characteristic parameter for the sieving curve--the molecular weight retention onset (MWRO)--a graph of molecular weight cut-off versus molecular weight retention onset provides the landscape of dialysis membrane types. This meaningful representation is based on only one in vitro method, and allows the membrane classification by indirectly considering two structural parameters: pore size and pore size distribution. In this way, the families of low-flux, high-flux, protein leaking, and high cut-off membranes are clearly differentiated. The differentiation allows for the definition of MWCO/MWRO regions for the different types, so that further classification of newly developed membranes can be easily achieved.

  3. Characterization of a null mutation in ace-1, the gene encoding class A acetylcholinesterase in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talesa, V; Culetto, E; Schirru, N; Bernardi, H; Fedon, Y; Toutant, J P; Arpagaus, M

    1995-01-09

    Two genes (ace-1 and ace-2) encode two major classes (A and B) of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. A null mutation in ace-1 (allele p1000) suppresses all acetylcholinesterase activity of class A. We have identified an opal mutation TGG (W99)-->TGA (Stop) as the only alteration in the mutated gene. This leads to a truncated protein (98 instead of 620 amino acids) with no enzymatic activity. The mutation also reduces the level of ace-1 transcripts to only 10% of that in wild-type animals. This most likely results from a destabilization of mRNA containing the nonsense message. In contrast, compensation of class B by class A AChE in the null mutant strain ace-2 takes place with unchanged ace-1 mRNA level and enzymatic activity similar to class A AChE.

  4. Characterization of CIA-1, an Ambler class A extended-spectrum β-lactamase from Chryseobacterium indologenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Nagata, Mika; Ishimine, Nau; Kawasaki, Kenji; Yamauchi, Kazuyoshi; Hidaka, Eiko; Kasuga, Eriko; Horiuchi, Kazuki; Oana, Kozue; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    An Ambler class A β-lactamase gene, bla(CIA-1), was cloned from the reference strain Chryseobacterium indologenes ATCC 29897 and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The bla(CIA-1) gene encodes a novel extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) that shared 68% and 60% identities with the CGA-1 and CME-1 β-lactamases, respectively. bla(CIA-1)-like genes were detected from clinical isolates. In addition to the metallo-β-lactamase IND of Ambler class B, C. indologenes has a class A ESBL gene, bla(CIA-1), located on the chromosome.

  5. Characterization of the first beta-class carbonic anhydrase from an arthropod (Drosophila melanogaster and phylogenetic analysis of beta-class carbonic anhydrases in invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niederhauser Barbara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The β-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1 enzymes have been reported in a variety of organisms, but their existence in animals has been unclear. The purpose of the present study was to perform extensive sequence analysis to show that the β-CAs are present in invertebrates and to clone and characterize a member of this enzyme family from a representative model organism of the animal kingdom, e.g., Drosophila melanogaster. Results The novel β-CA gene, here named DmBCA, was identified from FlyBase, and its orthologs were searched and reconstructed from sequence databases, confirming the presence of β-CA sequences in 55 metazoan species. The corresponding recombinant enzyme was produced in Sf9 insect cells, purified, kinetically characterized, and its inhibition was investigated with a series of simple, inorganic anions. Holoenzyme molecular mass was defined by dynamic light scattering analysis and gel filtration, and the results suggested that the holoenzyme is a dimer. Double immunostaining confirmed predictions based on sequence analysis and localized DmBCA protein to mitochondria. The enzyme showed high CO2 hydratase activity, with a kcat of 9.5 × 105 s-1 and a kcat/KM of 1.1 × 108 M-1s-1. DmBCA was appreciably inhibited by the clinically-used sulfonamide acetazolamide, with an inhibition constant of 49 nM. It was moderately inhibited by halides, pseudohalides, hydrogen sulfide, bisulfite and sulfate (KI values of 0.67 - 1.36 mM and more potently by sulfamide (KI of 0.15 mM. Bicarbonate, nitrate, nitrite and phenylarsonic/boronic acids were much weaker inhibitors (KIs of 26.9 - 43.7 mM. Conclusions The Drosophila β-CA represents a highly active mitochondrial enzyme that is a potential model enzyme for anti-parasitic drug development.

  6. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  7. Biogeochemical N signatures from rate-yield trade-offs during in vitro chemosynthetic NO3- reduction by deep-sea vent ε-Proteobacteria and Aquificae growing at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana; Sievert, Stefan M.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Foustoukos, Dionysis I.

    2017-08-01

    NO3- reduction is a metabolism that is widespread among ε-Proteobacteria and Aquificae, two abundant classes of microorganisms found at deep-sea vents. In this study, we used Sulfurovum lithotrophicum, Caminibacter mediatlanticus and Thermovibrio ammonificans as representatives of these groups to study ecophysiological, metabolic and biogeochemical parameters associated with chemolithoautotrophic NO3- reduction under different temperature regimes. We observed that while S. lithotrophicum and C. mediatlanticus achieved higher cell densities than T. ammonificans, the overall NO3- consumption by the latter was on average ∼9 and ∼5 times faster on a per cell basis, respectively. Comparison with previously published data from other cultured vent ε-Proteobacteria and Aquificae suggests that the rate-yield trade-offs observed in our experiments are generally conserved between these two groups in line with their ecophysiologies. Kinetic isotope effects of N from NO3- reduction were 9.6 ± 2.7‰ for S. lithotrophicum, 6.4 ± 0.7‰ for C. mediatlanticus and 8.8 ± 0.6‰ for T. ammonificans. Our results help evaluate how metabolic partitioning between growth efficiency and reaction kinetics during chemolithoautotrophic NO3- reduction affect the concentration and isotope composition of N compounds at deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

  8. Truck Rollover Characterization for Class-8 Tractor-Trailers Utilizing Standard Dual Tires and New-Generation Single Tires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Gary [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Transportation Research Center; Knee, Bill [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Transportation Research Center; Franzese, Oscar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Transportation Research Center; Pollock, Paul [Dana Corporation, Kalamazoo, MI (United States). Commercial Vehicle Systems Division; Coleman, Daniel [Dana Corporation, Kalamazoo, MI (United States). Commercial Vehicle Systems Division; Janajreh, Ibrahim [Michelin Americas Research and Development Corporation, Greenville, SC (United States); Haas, Steven [Michelin Americas Research and Development Corporation, Greenville, SC (United States); Frey, Norm [Michelin Americas Research and Development Corporation, Greenville, SC (United States); Law, Harry [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Fluor Daniel Engineering Innovation Building; Johnson, Eric [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Fluor Daniel Engineering Innovation Building; Lawson, Robert [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Fluor Daniel Engineering Innovation Building; Petrolino, Joe [National Transportation Research Center, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Rice, Dave [National Transportation Research Center, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2005-07-30

    The Heavy Truck Rollover Characterization Project is a major research effort conducted by the National Transportation Research Center, Inc. (NTRCI) in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Dana Corporation (Dana), Michelin Americas Research and Development Corporation (Michelin) and Clemson University (Clemson), under the NTRCIs Heavy Vehicle Safety Research Center (HVSRC) for the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). ORNL provided the day-to-day management of the project. The expertise mix of this team coupled with complementary research needs and interests, and a positive can-do attitude provided an extremely positive experimental research opportunity for all involved. Furthermore, this team supplied significant and valuable resources that provided a strong positive benchmark regarding the ability to conduct research within a public-private partnership. The work conducted by this team focused on initial efforts to generate data and information on heavy truck rollover not currently available in the industry. It reflects efforts within Phases 1 and 2 of a longer-term four-phase research program. A 1999 Peterbilt 379 class-8 tractor and 2004 Wabash dry freight van trailer were the test vehicles utilized in this effort. Both were instrumented with a number of sensors to capture the dynamics of the tractor and trailer as it engaged in various testing maneuvers that included: an evasive maneuver, swept sine, constant radius, and a run-off-the-road maneuver. The run-off-the-road maneuver was discontinued because the test track could not safety accommodate such a maneuver. These maneuvers were carried out utilizing both standard dual tires and new-generation dual tires in six test series. Two test series also included the use of a wider-slider suspension. Outriggers were placed on the test vehicle to assure that an actual rollover would not occur, however, the tests were designed to generate lift-off of tires during the tests. One of the main objectives

  9. Structural and functional characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus's class IIb fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodagli, Glenn C; Lee, Stephen A; Boehm, Kyle J; Brady, Kristin M; Pegan, Scott D

    2014-12-09

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common nosocomial sources of soft-tissue and skin infections and has more recently become prevalent in the community setting as well. Since the use of penicillins to combat S. aureus infections in the 1940s, the bacterium has been notorious for developing resistances to antibiotics, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). With the persistence of MRSA as well as many other drug resistant bacteria and parasites, there is a growing need to focus on new pharmacological targets. Recently, class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) have garnered attention to fill this role. Regrettably, scarce biochemical data and no structural data are currently available for the class II FBA found in MRSA (SaFBA). With the recent finding of a flexible active site zinc-binding loop (Z-Loop) in class IIa FBAs and its potential for broad spectrum class II FBA inhibition, the lack of information regarding this feature of class IIb FBAs, such as SaFBA, has been limiting for further Z-loop inhibitor development. Therefore, we elucidated the crystal structure of SaFBA to 2.1 Å allowing for a more direct structural analysis of SaFBA. Furthermore, we determined the KM for one of SaFBA's substrates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, as well as performed mode of inhibition studies for an inhibitor that takes advantage of the Z-loop's flexibility. Together the data offers insight into a class IIb FBA from a pervasively drug resistant bacterium and a comparison of Z-loops and other features between the different subtypes of class II FBAs.

  10. Enhanced metabolic versatility of planktonic sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria in an oxygen-deficient coastal ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro A. Murillo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur-oxidizing Gamma-proteobacteria are abundant in marine oxygen-deficient waters, and appear to play a key role in a previously unrecognized cryptic sulfur cycle. Metagenomic analyses of members of the uncultured SUP05 lineage in the Canadian seasonally anoxic fjord Saanich Inlet (SI, hydrothermal plumes in the Guaymas Basin (GB and single cell genomics analysis of two ARCTIC96BD-19 representatives from the South Atlantic Sub-Tropical Gyre (SASG have shown them to be metabolically versatile. However, SI and GB SUP05 bacteria seem to be obligate chemolithoautotrophs, whereas ARCTIC96BD-19 has the genetic potential for aerobic respiration. Here, we present results of a metagenomic analysis of sulfur-oxidizing Gamma-proteobacteria (GSO, closely related to the SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 clade, from a coastal ecosystem in the eastern South Pacific (ESP. This ecosystem experiences seasonal anoxia and accumulation of nitrite and ammonium at depth, with a corresponding increase in the abundance of GSO representatives. The ESP-GSOs appear to have a significantly different gene complement than those from Saanich Inlet, Guaymas Basin and SASG. Genomic analyses of de novo assembled contigs indicate the presence of a complete aerobic respiratory complex based on the cytochrome bc1 oxidase. Furthermore, they appear to encode a complete TCA cycle and several transporters for dissolved organic carbon species, suggesting a mixotrophic lifestyle. Thus, the success of sulfur-oxidizing Gamma-proteobacteria in oxygen-deficient marine ecosystems appears due not only to their previously recognized anaerobic metabolic versatility, but also to their capacity to function under aerobic conditions using different carbon sources. Finally, members of ESP-GSO cluster also have the genetic potential for reducing nitrate to ammonium based on the nirBD genes, and may therefore facilitate a tighter coupling of the nitrogen and sulfur cycles in oxygen-deficient waters.

  11. Expression and characterization of recombinant single-chain salmon class I MHC fused with beta2-microglobulin with biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Stet, René J M; Skjødt, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    antibodies were successfully produced against both the MHC class I heavy chain and beta(2)m, and showed binding to the recombinant molecule. The recombinant complex Sasabeta2mUBA*0301 was expressed and isolated; the production was scaled up by adjusting to its optimal conditions. Subsequently......, the recombinant proteins were purified by affinity chromatography using mAb against beta2m and alpha3. Eluates were analyzed by Western blot and refolded by the removal of denaturant. The correct folding was confirmed by measuring its binding capacity against mAb produced to recognize the native form of MHC...... molecules by biosensor analysis. This production of sufficient amounts of class I MHC proteins may represent a useful tool to study the peptide-binding specificity of MHC class I molecules, in order to design a peptide vaccine against viral pathogens....

  12. Characterization and evolution of MHC class II B genes in Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaberman, Scott; Moreno, Maria A; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2009-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules play a key role in the adaptive immune system of vertebrates. Class II B genes appear to evolve in a very different manner in mammals and birds. Orthology is commonly observed among mammal loci, while genes tend to cluster phylogenetically within bird species. Here we present class II B data from a representative of another major group of amniotes, the squamates (i.e. lizards, snakes, amphisbaenians), with the ultimate goal of placing mammalian and avian MHC evolution into a broader context. In this study, eight class II B cDNA sequences were obtained from the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) which were divided into five locus groups, Amcr-DAB1 through -DAB5, based on similarities along most of the coding and noncoding portions of the transcribed gene. All marine iguana sequences were monophyletic with respect to class II genes from other vertebrates indicating that they originated from a common ancestral locus after squamates split from other reptiles. The beta-1 domain, which is involved in antigen binding, exhibited signatures of positive selection as well as interlocus gene conversion in both long and short tracts-a pattern also observed in birds and fish, but not in mammals. On the other hand, the beta-2 domain was divergent between gene groups, which is characteristic of mammals. Based on these results, we preliminarily show that squamate class II B genes have been shaped by a unique blend of evolutionary forces that have been observed in differing degrees in other vertebrates.

  13. Characterization of class 1 integrons associated with R-plasmids in clinical Aeromonas salmonicida isolates from various geographical areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, A.S.; Bruun, Morten Sichlau; Larsen, J.L.;

    2001-01-01

    Class 1 integrons were found in 26 of 40 antibiotic-resistant isolates of the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida from Northern Europe and North America. Three different dhfr genes, conferring trimethoprim resistance, and one ant(3 " )1a aminoglycoside resistance gene were identified as gene...... inserts. The gene cassettes tended to be conserved among isolates from a particular geographical area. Nineteen isolates transferred R- plasmids carrying different tet determinants to Escherichia coli in filter mating assays, and in 15 cases, the class 1 integrons were co-transferred. Transferable...

  14. MHC class II genes in the European badger (Meles meles) : Characterization, patterns of variation, and transcription analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sin, Yung Wa; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W.; Burke, Terry

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) comprises many genes, some of which are polymorphic with numerous alleles. Sequence variation among alleles is most pronounced in exon 2 of the class II genes, which encodes the alpha 1 and beta 1 domains that form the antigen-binding site (ABS) for the

  15. Molecular Characterization of a Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing Class A β-Lactamase, SFC-1, from Serratia fonticola UTAD54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Isabel; Moura, Alexandra; Alves, Artur; Saavedra, Maria José; Correia, António

    2004-01-01

    An environmental isolate of Serratia fonticola resistant to carbapenems contains a gene encoding a class A β-lactamase with carbapenemase activity. The enzyme was designated SFC-1. The blaSFC-I gene is contained in the chromosome of S. fonticola UTAD54 and is absent from other S. fonticola strains. PMID:15155245

  16. Molecular characterization of a carbapenem-hydrolyzing class A beta-lactamase, SFC-1, from Serratia fonticola UTAD54.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Isabel; Moura, Alexandra; Alves, Artur; Saavedra, Maria José; Correia, António

    2004-06-01

    An environmental isolate of Serratia fonticola resistant to carbapenems contains a gene encoding a class A beta-lactamase with carbapenemase activity. The enzyme was designated SFC-1. The bla(SFC-I) gene is contained in the chromosome of S. fonticola UTAD54 and is absent from other S. fonticola strains.

  17. Genes for directing vacuolar morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. I. Isolation and characterization of two classes of vam mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y; Ohsumi, Y; Anraku, Y

    1992-09-15

    We identified nine VAM genes (for vacuolar morphology) by genetic analyses on mutants with defective vacuolar morphologies and assembly in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The nine VAM genes were classified into two classes according to the mutant phenotypes. The class I vam mutants (vam1, vam5, vam8, and vam9) show a few small vesicles that are stained with histochemical markers for the vacuolar compartment. They also have defects in the maturation of vacuolar marker proteins, and their growth is hypersensitive to high concentrations of CaCl2 or a temperature of 37 degrees C. There are apparent genetic overlaps among the class I vam mutations and other mutations including cls, end, pep, and vps, which have been shown to be involved in the expression of the vacuolar functions. The class II vam mutants (vam2, vam3, vam4, vam6, and vam7) contain numerous small vesicles stained with the vacuolar histochemical markers and mature forms of the vacuolar proteins and do not show any apparent growth defects in the presence of CaCl2 or at 37 degrees C.

  18. MHC class II genes in the European badger (Meles meles) : Characterization, patterns of variation, and transcription analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sin, Yung Wa; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W.; Burke, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) comprises many genes, some of which are polymorphic with numerous alleles. Sequence variation among alleles is most pronounced in exon 2 of the class II genes, which encodes the alpha 1 and beta 1 domains that form the antigen-binding site (ABS) for the pre

  19. Establishing a role for bacterial cellulose in environmental interactions: lessons learned from diverse biofilm-producing Proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Vincent Augimeri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cellulose (BC serves as a molecular glue to facilitate intra- and inter-domain interactions in nature. Biosynthesis of BC-containing biofilms occurs in a variety of Proteobacteria that inhabit diverse ecological niches. The enzymatic and regulatory systems responsible for the polymerization, exportation and regulation of BC are equally as diverse. Though the magnitude and environmental consequences of BC production are species-specific, the common role of BC containing biofilms is to establish close contact with a preferred host to facilitate efficient host-bacteria interactions. Universally, BC aids in attachment, adherence, and subsequent colonization of a substrate. Bi-directional interactions influence host physiology, bacterial physiology and regulation of BC biosynthesis, primarily through modulation of intracellular bis-(3’→5’-cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP levels. Depending on the circumstance, BC producers exhibit a pathogenic or symbiotic relationship with plant, animal or fungal hosts. Rhizobiaceae species colonize plant roots, Pseudomonadaceae inhabit the phyllosphere, Acetobacteriaceae associate with sugar-loving insects and inhabit the carposphere, Enterobacteriaceae use fresh produce as vehicles to infect animal hosts, and Vibrionaceae, particularly Aliivibrio fischeri, colonize the light organ of squid. This review will highlight the diversity of the biosynthesis and regulation of BC in nature by discussing various examples of Proteobacteria that use BC-containing biofilms to facilitate host-bacteria interactions. Through discussion of current data we will establish new directions for the elucidation of BC biosynthesis, regulation and ecophysiological roles.

  20. Activities and Prevalence of Proteobacteria Members Colonizing Echinacea purpurea Fully Account for Macrophage Activation Exhibited by Extracts of This Botanical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, Mona H; Tyler, Heather L; Pugh, Nirmal D; Moraes, Rita M; Maddox, Victor L; Jackson, Colin R; Pasco, David S

    2016-09-01

    Evidence supports the theory that bacterial communities colonizing Echinacea purpurea contribute to the innate immune enhancing activity of this botanical. Previously, we reported that only about half of the variation in in vitro monocyte stimulating activity exhibited by E. purpurea extracts could be accounted for by total bacterial load within the plant material. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that the type of bacteria, in addition to bacterial load, is necessary to fully account for extract activity. Bacterial community composition within commercial and freshly harvested (wild and cultivated) E. purpurea aerial samples was determined using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Bacterial isolates representing 38 different taxa identified to be present within E. purpurea were acquired, and the activity exhibited by the extracts of these isolates varied by over 8000-fold. Members of the Proteobacteria exhibited the highest potency for in vitro macrophage activation and were the most predominant taxa. Furthermore, the mean activity exhibited by the Echinacea extracts could be solely accounted for by the activities and prevalence of Proteobacteria members comprising the plant-associated bacterial community. The efficacy of E. purpurea material for use against respiratory infections may be determined by the Proteobacterial community composition of this plant, since ingestion of bacteria (probiotics) is reported to have a protective effect against this health condition. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a new class of amphipathic biopolymers capable of self-assembly from aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, G.G.; Cannon, G.C.; McCormick, C.L. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Extensive research is being done in many laboratories to investigate the role of synthetic hydrophobically-modified polymers and amphipathic proteins for their potential in phase-transfer, sequestration, and elimination of polluting hydrocarbons and surfactants. Our laboratory has begun a research program which is aimed at the development of a new class of environmentally benign biomaterials using the amphipathic proteins termed {open_quotes}hydrophobins{close_quotes} and an associated polysaccharide, schizophyllan. These biopolymers can stabilize oil dispersions, attach strongly to polyethylene and polytetrafluoroethylene surfaces rendering them hydrophilic, and can self-assemble into a stable, flexible membrane. Preliminary experiments in our laboratory and others have demonstrated the immense technological potential of this class of biomaterials for surface modification of membranes and coatings, fouling resistance, controlled delivery, protective encapsulation, and drag reduction.

  2. Characterization of an omega-class glutathione S-transferase in the stress response of the silkmoth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Teshiba, S; Shigeoka, Y; Aso, Y; Banno, Y; Fujiki, T; Katakura, Y

    2011-06-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily is involved in detoxification of various xenobiotics. Using real-time PCR, mRNA encoding an omega-class GST of Bombyx mori (bmGSTO) was shown to be induced after exposure to various environmental stresses. A soluble form of recombinant protein (rbmGSTO) was functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and purified to homogeneity. Cys 38 and Pro 39 were found to be highly conserved in omega-class GSTs, and their roles were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis/kinetic analysis. Mutations of Cys 38 and Pro 39 residues affected the catalytic efficiency of enzymes, indicating that the presence of Cys 38 and Pro 39 residues is important for bmGSTO activity. Thus, bmGSTO could contribute to increasing the environmental stress resistance of lepidopteran insects.

  3. Phylogenetic characterization of Clonorchis sinensis proteins homologous to the sigma-class glutathione transferase and their differential expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-An; Kim, Jeong-Geun; Kong, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferase (GST) is one of the major antioxidant proteins with diverse supplemental activities including peroxidase, isomerase, and thiol transferase. GSTs are classified into multiple classes on the basis of their primary structures and substrate/inhibitor specificity. However, the evolutionary routes and physiological environments specific to each of the closely related bioactive enzymes remain elusive. The sigma-like GSTs exhibit amino acid conservation patterns similar to the prostaglandin D synthases (PGDSs). In this study, we analyzed the phylogenetic position of the GSTs of the biocarcinogenic liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis. We also observed induction profile of the GSTs in association with the parasite's maturation and in response to exogenous oxidative stresses, with special attention to sigma-class GSTs and PGDSs. The C. sinensis genome encoded 12 GST protein species, which were separately assigned to cytosolic (two omega-, one zeta-, two mu-, and five sigma-class), mitochondrial (one kappa-class), and microsomal (one membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism-like protein) GST families. Multiple sigma GST (or PGDS) orthologs were also detected in Opisthorchis viverrini. Other trematode species possessed only a single sigma-like GST gene. A phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that one of the sigma GST lineages duplicated in the common ancestor of trematodes were specifically expanded in the opisthorchiids, but deleted in other trematodes. The induction profiles of these sigma GST genes along with the development and aging of C. sinensis, and against various exogenous chemical stimuli strongly suggest that the paralogous sigma GST genes might be undergone specialized evolution to cope with the diverse hostile biochemical environments within the mammalian hepatobiliary ductal system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Single Residue Switch for Mg2+-dependent Inhibition Characterizes Plant Class II Diterpene Cyclases from Primary and Secondary Metabolism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Francis M.; Prisic, Sladjana; Davenport, Emily K.; Determan, Mara K.; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.

    2010-01-01

    Class II diterpene cyclases mediate the acid-initiated cycloisomerization reaction that serves as the committed step in biosynthesis of the large class of labdane-related diterpenoid natural products, which includes the important gibberellin plant hormones. Intriguingly, these enzymes are differentially susceptible to inhibition by their Mg2+ cofactor, with those involved in gibberellin biosynthesis being more sensitive to such inhibition than those devoted to secondary metabolism, which presumably limits flux toward the potent gibberellin phytohormones. Such inhibition has been suggested to arise from intrasteric Mg2+ binding to the DXDD motif that cooperatively acts as the catalytic acid, whose affinity must then be modulated in some fashion. While further investigating class II diterpene cyclase catalysis, we discovered a conserved basic residue that seems to act as a counter ion to the DXDD motif, enhancing the ability of aspartic acid to carry out the requisite energetically difficult protonation of a carbon-carbon double bond and also affecting inhibitory Mg2+ binding. Notably, this residue is conserved as a histidine in enzymes involved in gibberellin biosynthesis and as an arginine in those dedicated to secondary metabolism. Interchanging the identity of these residues is sufficient to switch the sensitivity of the parent enzyme to inhibition by Mg2+. These striking findings indicate that this is a single residue switch for Mg2+ inhibition, which not only supports the importance of this biochemical regulatory mechanism in limiting gibberellin biosynthesis, but the importance of its release, presumably to enable higher flux, into secondary metabolism. PMID:20430888

  5. Characterization of the Antigen Processing Machinery and Endogenous Peptide Presentation of a Bat MHC Class I Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James W; Woon, Amanda P; Dudek, Nadine L; Croft, Nathan P; Ng, Justin H J; Baker, Michelle L; Wang, Lin-Fa; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-06-01

    Bats are a major reservoir of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, including severe acute respiratory syndrome-like coronaviruses, henipaviruses, and Ebola virus. Although highly pathogenic to their spillover hosts, bats harbor these viruses, and a large number of other viruses, with little or no clinical signs of disease. How bats asymptomatically coexist with these viruses is unknown. In particular, little is known about bat adaptive immunity, and the presence of functional MHC molecules is mostly inferred from recently described genomes. In this study, we used an affinity purification/mass spectrometry approach to demonstrate that a bat MHC class I molecule, Ptal-N*01:01, binds antigenic peptides and associates with peptide-loading complex components. We identified several bat MHC class I-binding partners, including calnexin, calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase A3, tapasin, TAP1, and TAP2. Additionally, endogenous peptide ligands isolated from Ptal-N*01:01 displayed a relatively broad length distribution and an unusual preference for a C-terminal proline residue. Finally, we demonstrate that this preference for C-terminal proline residues was observed in Hendra virus-derived peptides presented by Ptal-N*01:01 on the surface of infected cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify endogenous and viral MHC class I ligands for any bat species and, as such, provides an important avenue for monitoring and development of vaccines against major bat-borne viruses both in the reservoir and spillover hosts. Additionally, it will provide a foundation to understand the role of adaptive immunity in bat antiviral responses.

  6. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Zirczy, Helena H.

    2000-05-24

    The objective of this Class 3 project was to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, was completed this year, and Phase 2 began. The project is focused on East Ford field, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO{sub 2} flood is being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

  7. Characterization of putative class II bacteriocins identified from a non-bacteriocin-producing strain Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yang-Cheng; Liu, Cheng-Feng; Lin, Jhao-Fen; Li, An-Chieh; Lo, Ta-Chun; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2013-01-01

    Several putative class II bacteriocin-like genes were identified in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, all of which might encode peptides with a double-glycine leader. Six peptides encoded by these genes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and then partially purified in order to test their bacteriocin activity. The results revealed that the mature LSEI_2163 peptide was a class IId bacteriocin that exhibited antimicrobial activity against some lactobacilli and several Listeria species. Similarly, mature LSEI_2386 was a putative pheromone peptide that also had significant bacteriocin activity against several Listeria species. The activities of both peptides tolerated 121°C for 30 min but not treatment with proteinase K or trypsin. The two Cys residues located at positions 4 and 24 in the mature LSEI_2163 peptide were shown by mass spectrometry to form a disulfide bridge, which was required for optimal antibacterial activity. However, replacement of one or both Cys with Ser would cause significant reduction of the antibacterial activity, the reduction being greater when only one of the Cys residues (C4S) was replaced than when both (C4S/C24S) were replaced.

  8. A plant class V chitinase from a cycad (Cycas revoluta): biochemical characterization, cDNA isolation, and posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Toki; Hayashi, Hiroko; Tajiri, Yoshiko; Onaga, Shoko; Uechi, Gen-ichiro; Iwasaki, Hironori; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2009-12-01

    Chitinase-A (CrChi-A) was purified from leaf rachises of Cycas revoluta by several steps of column chromatography. It was found to be a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 40 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.6. CrChi-A produced mainly (GlcNAc)(3) from the substrate (GlcNAc)(6) through a retaining mechanism. More interestingly, CrChi-A exhibited transglycosylation activity, which has not been observed in plant chitinases investigated so far. A cDNA encoding CrChi-A was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and polymerase chain reaction procedures. It consisted of 1399 nucleotides and encoded an open reading frame of 387-amino-acid residues. Sequence analysis indicated that CrChi-A belongs to the group of plant class V chitinases. From peptide mapping and mass spectrometry of the native and recombinant enzyme, we found that an N-terminal signal peptide and a C-terminal extension were removed from the precursor (M1-A387) to produce a mature N-glycosylated protein (Q24-G370). This is the first report on a plant chitinase with transglycosylation activity and posttranslational modification of a plant class V chitinase.

  9. From β- to α-proteobacteria: the origin and evolution of rhizobial nodulation genes nodIJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Seishiro; Ito, Motomi; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2013-11-01

    Although many α- and some β-proteobacterial species are symbiotic with legumes, the evolutionary origin of nitrogen-fixing nodulation remains unclear. We examined α- and β-proteobacteria whose genomes were sequenced using large-scale phylogenetic profiling and revealed the evolutionary origin of two nodulation genes. These genes, nodI and nodJ (nodIJ), play key roles in the secretion of Nod factors, which are recognized by legumes during nodulation. We found that only the nodulating β-proteobacteria, including the novel strains isolated in this study, possess both nodIJ and their paralogous genes (DRA-ATPase/permease genes). Contrary to the widely accepted scenario of the α-proteobacterial origin of rhizobia, our exhaustive phylogenetic analysis showed that the entire nodIJ clade is included in the clade of Burkholderiaceae DRA-ATPase/permease genes, that is, the nodIJ genes originated from gene duplication in a lineage of the β-proteobacterial family. After duplication, the evolutionary rates of nodIJ were significantly accelerated relative to those of homologous genes, which is consistent with their novel function in nodulation. The likelihood analyses suggest that this accelerated evolution is not associated with changes in either nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rates or transition/transversion rates, but rather, in the GC content. Although the low GC content of the nodulation genes has been assumed to reflect past horizontal transfer events from donor rhizobial genomes with low GC content, no rhizobial genome with such low GC content has yet been found. Our results encourage a reconsideration of the origin of nodulation and suggest new perspectives on the role of the GC content of bacterial genes in functional adaptation.

  10. Characterizing Objective Quality of Life and Normative Outcomes in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Exploratory Latent Class Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop-Fitzpatrick, Lauren; Hong, Jinkuk; Smith, Leann E.; Makuch, Renee A.; Greenberg, Jan S.; Mailick, Marsha R.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to extend the definition of quality of life (QoL) for adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, n = 180, ages 23-60) by: (1) characterizing the heterogeneity of normative outcomes (employment, independent living, social engagement) and objective QoL (physical health, neighborhood quality, family contact, mental health issues); and…

  11. "Racializing" Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt-Echeverria, Beth; Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to explore how racial and class oppressions intersect, the authors use their autobiographical narratives to depict cultural and experiential continuity and discontinuity in growing up white working class versus Chicano working class. They specifically focus on "racializing class" due to the ways class is often used as a copout by…

  12. Identification and characterization of a novel class of extracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerase from Bacillus sp. strain NRRL B-14911.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wan-Ting; Lin, Ju-Hui; Chen, Hui-Ju; Chen, Syuan-Yi; Shaw, Gwo-Chyuan

    2011-11-01

    The catalytic, linker, and denatured poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (dPHB)-binding domains of bacterial extracellular PHB depolymerases (PhaZs) are classified into several different types. We now report a novel class of extracellular PHB depolymerase from Bacillus sp. strain NRRL B-14911. Its catalytic domain belongs to type 1, whereas its putative linker region neither possesses the sequence features of the three known types of linker domains nor exhibits significant amino acid sequence similarity to them. Instead, this putative linker region can be divided into two distinct linker domains of novel types: LD1 and LD2. LD1 shows significant amino acid sequence similarity to certain regions of a large group of PHB depolymerase-unrelated proteins. LD2 and its homologs are present in a small group of PhaZs. The remaining C-terminal portion of this PhaZ can be further divided into two distinct domains: SBD1 and SBD2. Each domain showed strong binding to dPHB, and there is no significant sequence similarity between them. Each domain neither possesses the sequence features of the two known types of dPHB-binding domains nor shows significant amino acid sequence similarity to them. These unique features indicate the presence of two novel and distinct types of dPHB-binding domains. Homologs of these novel domains also are present in the extracellular PhaZ of Bacillus megaterium and the putative extracellular PhaZs of Bacillus pseudofirmus and Bacillus sp. strain SG-1. The Bacillus sp. NRRL B-14911 PhaZ appears to be a representative of a novel class of extracellular PHB depolymerases.

  13. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the chromosomal class A beta-lactamases of Raoultella (formerly Klebsiella) planticola and Raoultella ornithinolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walckenaer, Estelle; Poirel, Laurent; Leflon-Guibout, Véronique; Nordmann, Patrice; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène

    2004-01-01

    Enterobacterial strains of Raoultella spp. display a penicillinase-related beta-lactam resistance pattern suggesting the presence of a chromosomal bla gene. From whole-cell DNA of Raoultella planticola strain ATCC 33531(T) and Raoultella ornithinolytica strain ATCC 31898(T), bla genes were cloned and expressed into Escherichia coli. Each gene encoded an Ambler class A beta-lactamase, named PLA-1 and ORN-1 for R. planticola and R. ornithinolytica, respectively. These beta-lactamases (291 amino acids), with the same pI value of 7.8, had a shared amino acid identity of 94%, 37 to 47% identity with the majority of the chromosome-encoded class A beta-lactamases previously described for Enterobacteriaceae, and 66 to 69% identity with the two beta-lactamases LEN-1 and SHV-1 from Klebsiella pneumoniae. However, the highest identity percentage (69 to 71%) was found with the plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase TEM-1. PLA-1, which displayed very strong hydrolytic activity against penicillins, also displayed significant hydrolytic activity against cefepime and, to a lesser extent, against cefotaxime and aztreonam, but there was no hydrolytic activity against ceftazidime. Such a substrate profile suggests that the Raoultella beta-lactamases PLA-1 and ORN-1 should be classified into the group 2be of the beta-lactamase classification of K. Bush, G. A. Jacoby, and A. A. Medeiros (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 39:1211-1233, 1995). The highly homologous regions upstream of the bla(PLA-1A) and bla(ORN-1A) genes comprised a nucleotide sequence identical to the -35 region and another one very close to the -10 region of the bla(LEN-1) gene. From now on, as the bla gene sequences of the most frequent Raoultella and Klebsiella species are available, the bla gene amplification method can be used to differentiate these species from each other, which the biochemical tests currently carried out in the clinical laboratory are unable to do.

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Musavian, Hanieh Sadat; Butt, Tariq Mahmood;

    2015-01-01

    response to three Gram-negative commensal Prevotella strains (Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nanceiensis and Prevotella salivae) and three Gram-negative pathogenic Proteobacteria known to colonize lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma (Haemophilus influenzae...... B, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis). The commensal Prevotella spp. and pathogenic Proteobacteria were found to exhibit intrinsic differences in innate inflammatory capacities on murine lung cells in vitro. In vivo in mice, non-typeable H.influenzae induced severe Toll...

  15. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  16. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  17. Isolation and identification of α-proteobacteria from Culex pipiens (Diptera Culicidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchida, M C; Riccillo, P M; Rodriguero, M S; García, J J; Micieli, M V

    2012-01-01

    A survey of drainage ditches in suburban areas of La Plata, Buenos Aires province, Argentina for pathogens of Culex pipiens larvae was conducted from 2003 to 2006. C. pipiens larvae of opaque, white color were found in several of those field collections. When the white larvae were dissected and observed by phase-contrast microscopy in wet-mount preparations, the presence of bacteria, located in the hemocoel, was recorded. Laboratory experiments were performed to elucidate the pathway for transmission of this pathogen. Although approaches involving traditional culturing had failed to reveal the identity of the new microorganism present, molecular techniques to identify the pathogen in the studies reported here were successful. The partial sequence of the 16S-rRNA gene constitutes a powerful tool for the detection of new isolates from the hemocoele of C. pipiens larvae. These bacteria were characterized as belonging to the genus Novispirillum. In spite of the genus's wide distribution in different aquatic environments, information related to the parasitic relationship of Novispirillum spp. to aquatic insects is scarce, and this association has not been described in other mosquito species. This report constitutes the first documentation of Novispirillum spp. as a pathogen for mosquito larvae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO2 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

    2002-07-26

    The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This provides results of the final year of the six-year project for each of the four areas.

  19. An acidic class III chitinase in sugar beet: induction by Cercospora beticola, characterization, and expression in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, K K; Mikkelsen, J D; Kragh, K M; Bojsen, K

    1993-01-01

    An acidic chitinase (SE) was found to accumulate in leaves of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) during infection with Cercospora beticola. Two isoforms, SE1 and SE2, with MW of 29 kDa and pI of approximately 3.0 were purified to homogeneity. SE2 is an endochitinase that also exhibits exochitinase activity, i.e., it is capable of hydrolyzing chito-oligosaccharides, including chitobiose, into N-acetyl-glucosamine. Partial amino acid sequence data for SE2 were used to obtain a cDNA clone by polymerase chain reaction. The clone was used to isolate a cDNA clone encoding SE2. The deduced amino acid sequence for SE2 is 58-67% identical to the class III chitinases from cucumber, Arabidopsis, and tobacco. A transient induction of SE2 mRNA during the early stages of infection with C. beticola is much stronger in tolerant plants than in susceptible plants. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) plants constitutively accumulate SE2 protein in the intercellular space of their leaves. In a preliminary infection experiment, the transgenic plants did not show increase in resistance against C. nicotianae.

  20. The structural and optical characterization of a new class of dilute nitride compound semiconductors: GaInNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H. P.; Huang, Y. S.; Wu, C. H.; Su, Y. K.; Juang, F. S.; Hong, Y. G.; Tu, C. W.

    2004-08-01

    We report a detailed structural and optical characterization of Ga0.46In0.54NxP1-x (0 \\leqslant x \\leqslant 2% ) films grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(001) substrates. The polarized high resolution x-ray rocking curves (HXRC) and contactless electroreflectance (CER) and piezoreflectance (PzR) spectra at room temperature show anisotropic character along the [110] and [1\\bar {1}0] directions. Ordering-induced superlattice-like microstructure observed in high resolution transmission electron microscope (HTEM) images confirms the spontaneous ordering in Ga0.46In0.54NxP1-x layers. In addition, the temperature dependent optical properties are characterized via polarized PzR measurements in the range between 15 and 300 K. The PzR spectra obtained are fitted using the first derivative of a Lorentzian line-shape functional form. The valence band maximum, crystal field/strain splitting and spin-orbit splitting to conduction band transition energies, denoted respectively as Eg, Eg+Dgr12 and Eg+Dgr13, are accurately determined. The temperature dependences of these near band edge critical point transition energies are analysed using the Varshni expression and an expression containing the Bose-Einstein occupation factor for phonons. The parameters that describe the temperature variation of the transition energies are evaluated and discussed.

  1. Zeta-Proteobacteria dominate the formation of microbial mats in low-temperature hydrothermal vents at Loihi Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassa, A. C.; McAllister, S. M.; Safran, S. A.; Moyer, C. L.

    2007-12-01

    Loihi Seamount is Hawaii's youngest volcano and one of the earth's most active. Loihi is located 30 km SE of the big island of Hawaii and rises over 3000m above the sea floor and summits at 1100m below sea level. An eruption in 1996 of Loihi led to the formation of Pele's Pit, a 300 meter deep caldera. The current observations have revealed diffuse hydrothermal venting causing low to intermediate temperatures (10 to 65°C). The elevated temperatures, coupled with high concentrations of Fe(II) (ranging from 50 to 750 μM) support conditions allowing for extensive microbial mat formation. The focus of this study was to identify the colonizing populations of bacteria generated by the microbial mats at Loihi Seamount. Twenty-six microbial growth chambers were deployed and recovered after placement in the flow of hydrothermal vents for 3 to 8 days from within Loihi's caldera. Genomic DNA was extracted from samples and analyzed by Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) using eight restriction enzyme treatments to generate fingerprints from bacterial amplicons of small subunit rRNA genes (SSU rDNAs). Pearson product-moment coupled with UPGMA cluster analysis of these T-RFLP fingerprints showed that these communities bifurcated into two primary clusters. The first (Group 1) had an average vent effluent temperature of 44°C, and the second (Group 2) had an average vent effluent temperature of 64°C. Representative samples from within the two clusters (or groups) were chosen for further clone library and sequencing analysis. These libraries revealing a dominance of the recently discovered zeta- Proteobacteria in the lower temperature group (Group 1) indicating that they were the dominant colonizers of the microbial mats. These microaerophilic, obligately lithotrophic, Fe-oxidizing bacteria are most closely related to Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. The higher temperature group (Group 2) was dominated by epsilon- Proteobacteria primarily of the genus

  2. Dependent Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasiunas, Vaidas; Mezini, Mira; Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Virtual classes allow nested classes to be refined in subclasses. In this way nested classes can be seen as dependent abstractions of the objects of the enclosing classes. Expressing dependency via nesting, however, has two limitations: Abstractions that depend on more than one object cannot...... be modeled and a class must know all classes that depend on its objects. This paper presents dependent classes, a generalization of virtual classes that expresses similar semantics by parameterization rather than by nesting. This increases expressivity of class variations as well as the flexibility...... of their modularization. Besides, dependent classes complement multi-methods in scenarios where multi-dispatched abstractions rather than multi-dispatched method are needed. They can also be used to express more precise signatures of multi-methods and even extend their dispatch semantics. We present a formal semantics...

  3. Characterization of three mnp genes of Fomitiporia mediterranea and report of additional class II peroxidases in the order hymenochaetales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Ingo; Robertson, Deborah L; Hibbett, David S

    2010-10-01

    We report the sequence-based characterization and expression patterns of three manganese peroxidase genes from the white rot fungus and grape vine pathogen Fomitiporia mediterranea (Agaricomycotina, Hymenochaetales), termed Fmmnp1, Fmmnp2, and Fmmnp3. The predicted open reading frames (ORFs) are 1,516-, 1,351-, and 1,345-bp long and are interrupted by seven, four, and four introns, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences encode manganese peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.13) containing 371, 369, and 371 residues, respectively, and are similar to the manganese peroxidases of the model white rot organism Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The expression of the genes is most likely differentially regulated, as revealed by real-time PCR analysis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that other members of the order Hymenochaetales harbor mnp genes encoding proteins that are related only distantly to those of F. mediterranea. Furthermore, multiple partial lip- and mnp-like sequences obtained for Pycnoporus cinnabarinus (Agaricomycotina, Polyporales) suggest that lignin degradation by white rot taxa relies heavily on ligninolytic peroxidases and is not efficiently achieved by laccases only.

  4. Characterization and 454 pyrosequencing of Major Histocompatibility Complex class I genes in the great tit reveal complexity in a passerine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepil Irem

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The critical role of Major Histocompatibility Complex (Mhc genes in disease resistance and their highly polymorphic nature make them exceptional candidates for studies investigating genetic effects on survival, mate choice and conservation. Species that harbor many Mhc loci and high allelic diversity are particularly intriguing as they are potentially under strong selection and studies of such species provide valuable information as to the mechanisms maintaining Mhc diversity. However comprehensive genotyping of complex multilocus systems has been a major challenge to date with the result that little is known about the consequences of this complexity in terms of fitness effects and disease resistance. Results In this study, we genotyped the Mhc class I exon 3 of the great tit (Parus major from two nest-box breeding populations near Oxford, UK that have been monitored for decades. Characterization of Mhc class I exon 3 was adopted and bidirectional sequencing was carried using the 454 sequencing platform. Full analysis of sequences through a stepwise variant validation procedure allowed reliable typing of more than 800 great tits based on 214,357 reads; from duplicates we estimated the repeatability of typing as 0.94. A total of 862 alleles were detected, and the presence of at least 16 functional loci was shown - the highest number characterized in a wild bird species. Finally, the functional alleles were grouped into 17 supertypes based on their antigen binding affinities. Conclusions We found extreme complexity at the Mhc class I of the great tit both in terms of allelic diversity and gene number. The presence of many functional loci was shown, together with a pseudogene family and putatively non-functional alleles; there was clear evidence that functional alleles were under strong balancing selection. This study is the first step towards an in-depth analysis of this gene complex in this species, which will help

  5. Aerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by a Proteobacteria strain in a closed culture system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Wei-hong; CHEN Jian-meng; LU Zheng; CHEN Dong-zhi; CHEN Xiao

    2007-01-01

    The contamination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in underground waters has become a widely concerned problem all over the world. In this study, a novel closed culture system with oxygen supplied by H2O2 was introduced for MTBE aerobic biodegradation. After 7 d, almost all MTBE was degraded by a pure culture, a member of β-Proteobacteria named as PM1, in a closed system with oxygen supply, while only 40% MTBE was degraded in one without oxygen supply. Dissolved oxygen (DO) levels of the broth in closed systems respectively with and without H2O2 were about 5-6 and 4 mg/L. Higher DO may improve the activity of monooxygemase, which is the key enzyme of metabolic pathway from MTBE to tert-butyl alcohol and finally to CO2, and may result in the increase of the degrading activity of PM1 cell. The purge and trap GC-MS result of the broth in closed systems showed that tert-butyl alcohol,isopronol and acetone were the main intermediate products.

  6. Analysis of genes contributing to plant-beneficial functions in Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria and related Proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruto, Maxime; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Muller, Daniel; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2014-09-02

    The positive effects of root-colonizing bacteria cooperating with plants lead to improved growth and/or health of their eukaryotic hosts. Some of these Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) display several plant-beneficial properties, suggesting that the accumulation of the corresponding genes could have been selected in these bacteria. Here, this issue was targeted using 23 genes contributing directly or indirectly to established PGPR effects, based on genome sequence analysis of 304 contrasted Alpha- Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria. Most of the 23 genes studied were also found in non-PGPR Proteobacteria and none of them were common to all 25 PGPR genomes studied. However, ancestral character reconstruction indicated that gene transfers -predominantly ancient- resulted in characteristic gene combinations according to taxonomic subgroups of PGPR strains. This suggests that the PGPR-plant cooperation could have established separately in various taxa, yielding PGPR strains that use different gene assortments. The number of genes contributing to plant-beneficial functions increased along the continuum -animal pathogens, phytopathogens, saprophytes, endophytes/symbionts, PGPR- indicating that the accumulation of these genes (and possibly of different plant-beneficial traits) might be an intrinsic PGPR feature. This work uncovered preferential associations occurring between certain genes contributing to phytobeneficial traits and provides new insights into the emergence of PGPR bacteria.

  7. Comparison of venoms from wild and long-term captive Bothrops atrox snakes and characterization of Batroxrhagin, the predominant class PIII metalloproteinase from the venom of this species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas-de-Sousa, L A; Amazonas, D R; Sousa, L F; Sant'Anna, S S; Nishiyama, M Y; Serrano, S M T; Junqueira-de-Azevedo, I L M; Chalkidis, H M; Moura-da-Silva, A M; Mourão, R H V

    2015-11-01

    Comparisons between venoms from snakes kept under captivity or collected at the natural environment are of fundamental importance in order to obtain effective antivenoms to treat human victims of snakebites. In this study, we compared composition and biological activities of Bothrops atrox venom from snakes collected at Tapajós National Forest (Pará State, Brazil) or maintained for more than 10 years under captivity at Instituto Butantan herpetarium after have been collected mostly at Maranhão State, Brazil. Venoms from captive or wild snakes were similar except for small quantitative differences detected in peaks correspondent to phospholipases A2 (PLA2), snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP) class PI and serine proteinases (SVSP), which did not correlate with fibrinolytic and coagulant activities (induced by PI-SVMPs and SVSPs). In both pools, the major toxic component corresponded to PIII-SVMPs, which were isolated and characterized. The characterization by mass spectrometry of both samples identified peptides that matched with a single PIII-SVMP cDNA characterized by transcriptomics, named Batroxrhagin. Sequence alignments show a strong similarity between Batroxrhagin and Jararhagin (96%). Batroxrhagin samples isolated from venoms of wild or captive snakes were not pro-coagulant, but inhibited collagen-induced platelet-aggregation, and induced hemorrhage and fibrin lysis with similar doses. Results suggest that in spite of environmental differences, venom variability was detected only among the less abundant components. In opposition, the most abundant toxin, which is a PIII-SVMP related to the key effects of the venom, is structurally conserved in the venoms. This observation is relevant for explaining the efficacy of antivenoms produced with venoms from captive snakes in human accidents inflicted at distinct natural environments.

  8. The common equine class I molecule Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3.1) is characterized by narrow peptide binding and T cell epitope repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Tobias; Moore, Carrie; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca; Harman, Rebecca M; Oseroff, Carla; Wriston, Amanda; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Antczak, Douglas F; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a detailed quantitative peptide-binding motif for the common equine leukocyte antigen (ELA) class I allele Eqca-1*00101, present in roughly 25 % of Thoroughbred horses. We determined a preliminary binding motif by sequencing endogenously bound ligands. Subsequently, a positional scanning combinatorial library (PSCL) was used to further characterize binding specificity and derive a quantitative motif involving aspartic acid in position 2 and hydrophobic residues at the C-terminus. Using this motif, we selected and tested 9- and 10-mer peptides derived from the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) proteome for their capacity to bind Eqca-1*00101. PSCL predictions were very efficient, with an receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance of 0.877, and 87 peptides derived from 40 different EHV-1 proteins were identified with affinities of 500 nM or higher. Quantitative analysis revealed that Eqca-1*00101 has a narrow peptide-binding repertoire, in comparison to those of most human, non-human primate, and mouse class I alleles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from six EHV-1-infected, or vaccinated but uninfected, Eqca-1*00101-positive horses were used in IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. When we screened the 87 Eqca-1*00101-binding peptides for T cell reactivity, only one Eqca-1*00101 epitope, derived from the intermediate-early protein ICP4, was identified. Thus, despite its common occurrence in several horse breeds, Eqca-1*00101 is associated with a narrow binding repertoire and a similarly narrow T cell response to an important equine viral pathogen. Intriguingly, these features are shared with other human and macaque major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with a similar specificity for D in position 2 or 3 in their main anchor motif.

  9. Birthing Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first birth and hope to have a vaginal delivery this time, there is a class for that, too. Choose ... t covered in your birthing class, it’s a good idea to take an individual class on it, especially if you are a first-time mother. The health benefits of breastfeeding your baby ...

  10. Alpha-class glutathione S-transferases in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo): characterization and role in resistance to the carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Bunderson, Brett R; Croasdell, Amanda; Reed, Kent M; Coulombe, Roger A

    2013-01-01

    Domestic turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are one of the most susceptible animals known to the toxic effects of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a potent human hepatocarcinogen, and universal maize contaminant. We have demonstrated that such susceptibility is associated with the inability of hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) to detoxify the reactive electrophilic metabolite exo-AFB1-8,9-epoxide (AFBO). Unlike their domestic counterparts, wild turkeys, which are relatively AFB1-resistant, possess hepatic GST-mediated AFBO conjugating activity. Here, we characterized the molecular and functional properties of hepatic alpha-class GSTs (GSTAs) from wild and domestic turkeys to shed light on the differences in resistance between these closely related strains. Six alpha-class GST genes (GSTA) amplified from wild turkeys (Eastern and Rio Grande subspecies), heritage breed turkeys (Royal Palm) and modern domestic (Nicholas strain) turkeys were sequenced, and catalytic activities of heterologously-expressed recombinant enzymes determined. Alpha-class identity was affirmed by conserved GST domains and four signature motifs. All GSTAs contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in their coding regions: GSTA1.1 (5 SNPs), GSTA1.2 (7), GSTA1.3 (3), GSTA2 (3), GSTA3 (1) and GSTA4 (2). E. coli-expressed GSTAs possessed varying activities toward GST substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), ethacrynic acid (ECA), cumene hydroperoxide (CHP). As predicted by their relative resistance, livers from domestic turkeys lacked detectable GST-mediated AFBO detoxification activity, whereas those from wild and heritage birds possessed this critical activity, suggesting that intensive breeding and selection resulted in loss of AFB1-protective alleles during domestication. Our observation that recombinant tGSTAs detoxify AFBO, whereas their hepatic forms do not, implies that the hepatic forms of these enzymes are down-regulated, silenced, or

  11. Alpha-class glutathione S-transferases in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo: characterization and role in resistance to the carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Kim

    Full Text Available Domestic turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo are one of the most susceptible animals known to the toxic effects of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, a potent human hepatocarcinogen, and universal maize contaminant. We have demonstrated that such susceptibility is associated with the inability of hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs to detoxify the reactive electrophilic metabolite exo-AFB1-8,9-epoxide (AFBO. Unlike their domestic counterparts, wild turkeys, which are relatively AFB1-resistant, possess hepatic GST-mediated AFBO conjugating activity. Here, we characterized the molecular and functional properties of hepatic alpha-class GSTs (GSTAs from wild and domestic turkeys to shed light on the differences in resistance between these closely related strains. Six alpha-class GST genes (GSTA amplified from wild turkeys (Eastern and Rio Grande subspecies, heritage breed turkeys (Royal Palm and modern domestic (Nicholas strain turkeys were sequenced, and catalytic activities of heterologously-expressed recombinant enzymes determined. Alpha-class identity was affirmed by conserved GST domains and four signature motifs. All GSTAs contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in their coding regions: GSTA1.1 (5 SNPs, GSTA1.2 (7, GSTA1.3 (3, GSTA2 (3, GSTA3 (1 and GSTA4 (2. E. coli-expressed GSTAs possessed varying activities toward GST substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB, 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB, ethacrynic acid (ECA, cumene hydroperoxide (CHP. As predicted by their relative resistance, livers from domestic turkeys lacked detectable GST-mediated AFBO detoxification activity, whereas those from wild and heritage birds possessed this critical activity, suggesting that intensive breeding and selection resulted in loss of AFB1-protective alleles during domestication. Our observation that recombinant tGSTAs detoxify AFBO, whereas their hepatic forms do not, implies that the hepatic forms of these enzymes are down-regulated, silenced, or

  12. Comparative biochemical characterization of peroxidases (class III) tightly bound to the maize root cell walls and modulation of the enzyme properties as a result of covalent binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadži-Tašković Šukalović, Vesna; Vuletić, Mirjana; Marković, Ksenija; Cvetić Antić, Tijana; Vučinić, Željko

    2015-01-01

    Comparative biochemical characterization of class III peroxidase activity tightly bound to the cell walls of maize roots was performed. Ionically bound proteins were solubilized from isolated walls by salt washing, and the remaining covalently bound peroxidases were released, either by enzymatic digestion or by a novel alkaline extraction procedure that released covalently bound alkali-resistant peroxidase enzyme. Solubilized fractions, as well as the salt-washed cell wall fragments containing covalently bound proteins, were analyzed for peroxidase activity. Peroxidative and oxidative activities indicated that peroxidase enzymes were predominately associated with walls by ionic interactions, and this fraction differs from the covalently bound one according to molecular weight, isozyme patterns, and biochemical parameters. The effect of covalent binding was evaluated by comparison of the catalytic properties of the enzyme bound to the salt-washed cell wall fragments with the corresponding solubilized and released enzyme. Higher thermal stability, improved resistance to KCN, increased susceptibility to H2O2, stimulated capacity of wall-bound enzyme to oxidize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) as well as the difference in kinetic parameters between free and bound enzymes point to conformational changes due to covalent binding. Differences in biochemical properties of ionically and covalently bound peroxidases, as well as the modulation of the enzyme properties as a result of covalent binding to the walls, indicate that these two fractions of apoplastic peroxidases play different roles.

  13. HPLC-DAD for the determination of three different classes of antifungals: method characterization, statistical approach, and application to a permeation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Diogo; Lange, Alini; Zimmer, Aline R; Mayorga, Paulo; Schapoval, Elfrides E S

    2014-12-01

    This study describes and characterizes methods for high-performance liquid chromatography diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) analysis of formulations containing molecules with antifungal activity of three different classes: terbinafine and butenafine (allylamines), miconazole and fluconazole (azoles), and geraniol, neral and geranial (monoterpenes). All methods used the same chromatographic column (RP18 ), enabling the analysis to be performed in a single batch. The specificity was extensively discussed through the establishment of purity peak methods. The analytical parameters (linearity, precision and accuracy) were calculated and discussed in detail using specific statistical approaches. All substances showed satisfactory results for chromatographic and analytical parameters. Limits of 1.3% to mean repeatability and 2.0% for intermediate precision are suggested as acceptance criteria in validation of methods by HPLC-DAD, in situations where there is no extensive pretreatment of the samples. The methods proved to be robust and significant factors were discussed regarding their influence on chromatographic parameters (retention time, resolution, tailing factor and column efficiency). Finally, the application of the developed methods was demonstrated by the results of a permeation study of the antifungal agents through bovine hoof membranes.

  14. Distinct Seasonal Patterns of Bacterioplankton Abundance and Dominance of Phyla α-Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria in Qinhuangdao Coastal Waters Off the Bohai Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaodong He

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Qinhuangdao coastal waters in northern China are heavily impacted by anthropogenic and natural activities, and we anticipate a direct influence of the impact on the bacterioplankton abundance and diversity inhabiting the adjacent coastal areas. To ascertain the anthropogenic influences, we first evaluated the seasonal abundance patterns and diversity of bacterioplankton in the coastal areas with varied levels of natural and anthropogenic activities and then analyzed the environmental factors which influenced the abundance patterns. Results indicated distinct patterns in bacterioplankton abundance across the warm and cold seasons in all stations. Total bacterial abundance in the stations ranged from 8.67 × 104 to 2.08 × 106 cells/mL and had significant (p < 0.01 positive correlation with total phosphorus (TP, which indicated TP as the key monitoring parameter for anthropogenic impact on nutrients cycling. Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria were the most abundant phyla in the Qinhuangdao coastal waters. Redundancy analysis revealed significant (p < 0.01 influence of temperature, dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll a on the spatiotemporal abundance pattern of α-Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria groups. Among the 19 identified bacterioplankton subgroups, α-Proteobacteria (phylum Proteobacteria was the dominant one followed by Family II (phylum Cyanobacteria, representing 19.1–55.2% and 2.3–54.2% of total sequences, respectively. An inverse relationship (r = -0.82 was observed between the two dominant subgroups, α-Proteobacteria and Family II. A wide range of inverse Simpson index (10.2 to 105 revealed spatial heterogeneity of bacterioplankton diversity likely resulting from the varied anthropogenic and natural influences. Overall, our results suggested that seasonal variations impose substantial influence on shaping bacterioplankton abundance patterns. In addition, the predominance of only a few cosmopolitan species in the Qinhuangdao coastal

  15. Molecular characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I (B-F) mRNA variants from chickens differing in resistance to Marek's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgaard, T S; Vitved, L; Skjødt, K; Thomsen, B; Labouriau, R; Jensen, K H; Juul-Madsen, H R

    2005-09-01

    In this study, the relative distributions of two alternatively polyadenylated chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mRNA isoforms of approximately 1.5 and 1.9 kb were analysed in spleen cells from chickens homozygous for the MHC haplotypes B21 and B19v1 as well as in heterozygous B19v1/B21 birds. Both isoforms are likely to encode classical MHC class I (B-F) alpha chains. The B19v1 and B21 MHC haplotypes confer different levels of protection against Marek's disease (MD), which is caused by infection with MD virus (MDV). In spleen cells, MD-resistant B21 birds were shown to have the highest percentage of the 1.5 kb variant relative to the total MHC class I expression, MD-susceptible B19v1 birds the lowest and B19v1/B21 birds an intermediate percentage. Infection of 4-week-old chickens with the GA strain of MDV was shown to cause a significant increase in the relative amount of 1.5 kb transcripts in B21 birds 32 days postinfection (dpi). Alternatively polyadenylated mRNA isoforms may encode identical proteins, but differences in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) can influence polyadenylation, mRNA stability, intracellular localization and translation efficiency. It was shown that the increased 1.5 kb percentage in B21 birds 32 days postinfection may be a result of a change in the choice of poly(A) site rather than a locus-specific upregulated transcription of the BF1 gene that preferentially expresses the 1.5 kb variant. Furthermore, the 3' end of the 1.5 kb mRNA variants deriving from B19v1 and B21 chickens was characterized by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) and sequencing. No potentially functional elements were identified in the 3' UTR of the RACE products corresponding to this short isoform. However, variation in polyadenylation site was observed between the BF1 and BF2 mRNA transcripts and alternative splicing-out of the sequence (exon 7) encoding the second segment of the cytoplasmic part of the mature BF2*19 molecules. This alternative exon 7

  16. Characterization of In53, a class 1 plasmid- and composite transposon-located integron of Escherichia coli which carries an unusual array of gene cassettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naas, T; Mikami, Y; Imai, T; Poirel, L; Nordmann, P

    2001-01-01

    Further characterization of the genetic environment of the gene encoding the Escherichia coli extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, bla(VEB-1), revealed the presence of a plasmid-located class 1 integron, In53, which carried eight functional resistance gene cassettes in addition to bla(VEB-1). While the aadB and the arr-2 gene cassettes were identical to those previously described, the remaining cassettes were novel: (i) a novel nonenzymatic chloramphenicol resistance gene of the cmlA family, (ii) a qac allele encoding a member of the small multidrug resistance family of proteins, (iii) a cassette, aacA1b/orfG, which encodes a novel 6'-N-acetyltransferase, and (iv) a fused gene cassette, oxa10/aadA1, which is made of two cassettes previously described as single cassettes. In addition, oxa10 and aadA1 genes were expressed from their own promoter sequence present upstream of the oxa10 cassette. arr-2 coded for a protein that shared 54% amino acid identity with the rifampin ADP-ribosylating transferase encoded by the arr-1 gene from Mycobacterium smegmatis DSM43756. While in M. smegmatis, the main inactivated compound was 23-ribosyl-rifampin, the inactivated antibiotic recovered from E. coli culture was 23-O-ADP-ribosyl-rifampin. The integrase gene of In53 was interrupted by an IS26 insertion sequence, which was also present in the 3' conserved segment. Thus, In53 is a truncated integron located on a composite transposon, named Tn2000, bounded by two IS26 elements in opposite orientations. Target site duplication at both ends of the transposon indicated that the integron likely was inserted into the plasmid through a transpositional process. This is the first description of an integron located on a composite transposon.

  17. On uniqueness of characteristic classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda

    2011-01-01

    We give an axiomatic characterization of maps from algebraic K-theory. The results apply to a large class of maps from algebraic K-theory to any suitable cohomology theory or to algebraic K-theory. In particular, we obtain comparison theorems for the Chern character and Chern classes and for the ......We give an axiomatic characterization of maps from algebraic K-theory. The results apply to a large class of maps from algebraic K-theory to any suitable cohomology theory or to algebraic K-theory. In particular, we obtain comparison theorems for the Chern character and Chern classes...

  18. Is eLearning only for the tech savvy and the lazy? : A survey study to determine what characterizes students who enroll in internet based classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhee, van der B.; Verma, R.; Plaschka, G.

    2005-01-01

    More and more Business Schools are offering classes using a mix of face-to-face and online elements. We conducted a large scale survey to determine whether only students who are technology savvy would enroll in these mixed classes and whether there exists a participation bias such that students with

  19. Word classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of recent literature and research on word classes, focusing in particular on typological approaches to word classification. The cross-linguistic classification of word class systems (or parts-of-speech systems) presented in this article is based on statements found...... a parts-of-speech system that includes the categories Verb, Noun, Adjective and Adverb, other languages may use only a subset of these four lexical categories. Furthermore, quite a few languages have a major word class whose members cannot be classified in terms of the categories Verb – Noun – Adjective...

  20. The mosaic genome of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C suggests an aerobic common ancestor to the delta-proteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara H Thomas

    Full Text Available Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C is a versaphilic delta-Proteobacterium distributed throughout many diverse soil and sediment environments. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis groups A. dehalogenans together with the myxobacteria, which have distinguishing characteristics including strictly aerobic metabolism, sporulation, fruiting body formation, and surface motility. Analysis of the 5.01 Mb strain 2CP-C genome substantiated that this organism is a myxobacterium but shares genotypic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria (i.e., the Desulfuromonadales. Reflective of its respiratory versatility, strain 2CP-C possesses 68 genes coding for putative c-type cytochromes, including one gene with 40 heme binding motifs. Consistent with its relatedness to the myxobacteria, surface motility was observed in strain 2CP-C and multiple types of motility genes are present, including 28 genes for gliding, adventurous (A- motility and 17 genes for type IV pilus-based motility (i.e., social (S- motility that all have homologs in Myxococcus xanthus. Although A. dehalogenans shares many metabolic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria, strain 2CP-C grows under microaerophilic conditions and possesses detoxification systems for reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, two gene clusters coding for NADH dehydrogenase subunits and two cytochrome oxidase gene clusters in strain 2CP-C are similar to those in M. xanthus. Remarkably, strain 2CP-C possesses a third NADH dehydrogenase gene cluster and a cytochrome cbb(3 oxidase gene cluster, apparently acquired through ancient horizontal gene transfer from a strictly anaerobic green sulfur bacterium. The mosaic nature of the A. dehalogenans strain 2CP-C genome suggests that the metabolically versatile, anaerobic members of the delta-Proteobacteria may have descended from aerobic ancestors with complex lifestyles.

  1. The Inhibitory Mechanism of the ζ Subunit of the F1FO-ATPase Nanomotor of Paracoccus denitrificans and Related α-Proteobacteria*

    OpenAIRE

    García-Trejo, José J.; Zarco-Zavala, Mariel; Mendoza-Hoffmann, Francisco; Hernández-Luna, Eduardo; Ortega, Raquel; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The ζ subunit is a novel inhibitor of the F1FO-ATPase of Paracoccus denitrificans and related α-proteobacteria. It is different from the bacterial (ϵ) and mitochondrial (IF1) inhibitors. The N terminus of ζ blocks rotation of the γ subunit of the F1-ATPase of P. denitrificans (Zarco-Zavala, M., Morales-Ríos, E., Mendoza-Hernández, G., Ramírez-Silva, L., Pérez-Hernández, G., and García-Trejo, J. J. (2014) FASEB J. 24, 599–608) by a hitherto unknown quaternary structure that was first modeled h...

  2. Class size versus class composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sam

    Raising schooling quality in low-income countries is a pressing challenge. Substantial research has considered the impact of cutting class sizes on skills acquisition. Considerably less attention has been given to the extent to which peer effects, which refer to class composition, also may affect...... bias from omitted variables, the preferred IV results indicate considerable negative effects due to larger class sizes and larger numbers of overage-for-grade peers. The latter, driven by the highly prevalent practices of grade repetition and academic redshirting, should be considered an important...

  3. Bioinformatic analysis of an unusual gene-enzyme relationship in the arginine biosynthetic pathway among marine gamma proteobacteria: implications concerning the formation of N-acetylated intermediates in prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labedan Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The N-acetylation of L-glutamate is regarded as a universal metabolic strategy to commit glutamate towards arginine biosynthesis. Until recently, this reaction was thought to be catalyzed by either of two enzymes: (i the classical N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS, gene argA first characterized in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa several decades ago and also present in vertebrates, or (ii the bifunctional version of ornithine acetyltransferase (OAT, gene argJ present in Bacteria, Archaea and many Eukaryotes. This paper focuses on a new and surprising aspect of glutamate acetylation. We recently showed that in Moritella abyssi and M. profunda, two marine gamma proteobacteria, the gene for the last enzyme in arginine biosynthesis (argH is fused to a short sequence that corresponds to the C-terminal, N-acetyltransferase-encoding domain of NAGS and is able to complement an argA mutant of E. coli. Very recently, other authors identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis an independent gene corresponding to this short C-terminal domain and coding for a new type of NAGS. We have investigated the two prokaryotic Domains for patterns of gene-enzyme relationships in the first committed step of arginine biosynthesis. Results The argH-A fusion, designated argH(A, and discovered in Moritella was found to be present in (and confined to marine gamma proteobacteria of the Alteromonas- and Vibrio-like group. Most of them have a classical NAGS with the exception of Idiomarina loihiensis and Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis which nevertheless can grow in the absence of arginine and therefore appear to rely on the arg(A sequence for arginine biosynthesis. Screening prokaryotic genomes for virtual argH-X 'fusions' where X stands for a homologue of arg(A, we retrieved a large number of Bacteria and several Archaea, all of them devoid of a classical NAGS. In the case of Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans, the arg(A-like sequence

  4. Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy H Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip, we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and alpha-proteobacteria found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

  5. Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

    2010-03-01

    Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

  6. Resonance classes of measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Torres De Squire

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend F. Holland's definition of the space of resonant classes of functions, on the real line, to the space R(Φpq (1≦p, q≦∞ of resonant classes of measures, on locally compact abelian groups. We characterize this space in terms of transformable measures and establish a realatlonship between R(Φpq and the set of positive definite functions for amalgam spaces. As a consequence we answer the conjecture posed by L. Argabright and J. Gil de Lamadrid in their work on Fourier analysis of unbounded measures.

  7. A DNA element recognised by the molybdenum-responsive transcription factor ModE is conserved in Proteobacteria, green sulphur bacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Richard N

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transition metal molybdenum is essential for life. Escherichia coli imports this metal into the cell in the form of molybdate ions, which are taken up via an ABC transport system. In E. coli and other Proteobacteria molybdenum metabolism and homeostasis are regulated by the molybdate-responsive transcription factor ModE. Results Orthologues of ModE are widespread amongst diverse prokaryotes, but not ubiquitous. We identified probable ModE-binding sites upstream of genes implicated in molybdenum metabolism in green sulphur bacteria and methanogenic Archaea as well as in Proteobacteria. We also present evidence of horizontal transfer of nitrogen fixation genes between green sulphur bacteria and methanogenic Archaea. Conclusions Whereas most of the archaeal helix-turn-helix-containing transcription factors belong to families that are Archaea-specific, ModE is unusual in that it is found in both Archaea and Bacteria. Moreover, its cognate upstream DNA recognition sequence is also conserved between Archaea and Bacteria, despite the fundamental differences in their core transcription machinery. ModE is the third example of a transcriptional regulator with a binding signal that is conserved in Bacteria and Archaea.

  8. Characterizing the successful student in general chemistry and physical science classes in terms of Jung's personality types as identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Wayne David

    1998-11-01

    A student's success in a science class can depend upon previous experiences, motivation, and the level of interest in the subject. Since psychological type is intrinsic to a person's whole being, it can be influential upon the student's motivation and interests. Thus, a study of student psychological types versus the level of success in a class, as measured by a percentage, has potential to uncover certain personality characteristics which may be helpful to or which may hinder a student's learning environment. This study was initiated, using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, to evaluate any correlation between a student's personality type and his/her performance in a science class. A total of 1041 students from three classes: Chemistry 121/122, Chemistry 112, Physical Science 100, volunteered for the study. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the levels of significance among sixteen personality types' averages. The results reveal that for the Chemistry 1121/122 course, the average score of the INTJ personality type was 5.1 to 12.6 points higher than every other personality type. The ANOVA identifies 3 personality types with averages significantly below the INTJ at the p < 0.05 significance level. The ANOVA analysis for the Chemistry 112 course identified significances between student scores at p = 0.08. The significance level for the differences among scores for the Physical Science 100 course was determined at a level of p = 0.02. Significance levels for p < 0.05 and <0.01 were identified between several groups in this course. The data suggest, that although personality type may not predict a particular student's success in a science class, students with certain personality traits may be favored in a chemistry class due the structure of the instruction and the presentation of the subject matter.

  9. Greater-than-Class C low-level waste characterization. Appendix G: Evaluation of potential for greater-than-Class C classification of irradiated hardware generated by utility-operated reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, J.E.

    1991-08-01

    This study compiles and evaluates data from many sources to expand a base of data from which to estimate the activity concentrations and volumes of greater-than-Class C low-level waste that the Department of Energy will receive from the commercial power industry. Sources of these data include measurements of irradiated hardware made by or for the utilities that was classified for disposal in commercial burial sites, measurements of neutron flux in the appropriate regions of the reactor pressure vessel, analyses of elemental constituents of the particular structural material used for the components, and the activation analysis calculations done for hardware. Evaluations include results and assumptions in the activation analyses. Sections of this report and the appendices present interpretation of data and the classification definitions and requirements.

  10. Class size versus class composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sam

    Raising schooling quality in low-income countries is a pressing challenge. Substantial research has considered the impact of cutting class sizes on skills acquisition. Considerably less attention has been given to the extent to which peer effects, which refer to class composition, also may affect...... outcomes. This study uses new microdata from East Africa, incorporating test score data for over 250,000 children, to compare the likely efficacy of these two types of interventions. Endogeneity bias is addressed via fixed effects and instrumental variables techniques. Although these may not fully mitigate...

  11. The complete far-infrared and submillimeter spectrum of the Class 0 protostar Serpens SMM1 obtained with Herschel. Characterizing UV-irradiated shocks heating and chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Goicoechea, Javier; Cernicharo, J.; Karska, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first complete 55-671 um spectral scan of a low-mass Class 0 protostar (Serpens SMM1) taken with the PACS and SPIRE spectrometers on board Herschel. More than 145 lines have been detected, most of them rotationally excited lines of 12CO (full ladder from J=4-3 to 42-41), H2O, OH, 13...

  12. Comparative genomic analysis of regulation of anaerobic respiration in ten genomes from three families of gamma-proteobacteria (Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae, Vibrionaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mironov Andrey A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gamma-proteobacteria, such as Escherichia coli, can use a variety of respiratory substrates employing numerous aerobic and anaerobic respiratory systems controlled by multiple transcription regulators. Thus, in E. coli, global control of respiration is mediated by four transcription factors, Fnr, ArcA, NarL and NarP. However, in other Gamma-proteobacteria the composition of global respiration regulators may be different. Results In this study we applied a comparative genomic approach to the analysis of three global regulatory systems, Fnr, ArcA and NarP. These systems were studied in available genomes containing these three regulators, but lacking NarL. So, we considered several representatives of Pasteurellaceae, Vibrionaceae and Yersinia spp. As a result, we identified new regulon members, functioning in respiration, central metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, citrate cicle, metabolism of pyruvate and lactate, metabolism of carbohydrates and fatty acids, transcriptional regulation and transport, in particular: the ATP synthase operon atpIBEFHAGCD, Na+-exporting NADH dehydrogenase operon nqrABCDEF, the D-amino acids dehydrogenase operon dadAX. Using an extension of the comparative technique, we demonstrated taxon-specific changes in regulatory interactions and predicted taxon-specific regulatory cascades. Conclusion A comparative genomic technique was applied to the analysis of global regulation of respiration in ten gamma-proteobacterial genomes. Three structurally different but functionally related regulatory systems were described. A correlation between the regulon size and the position of a transcription factor in regulatory cascades was observed: regulators with larger regulons tend to occupy top positions in the cascades. On the other hand, there is no obvious link to differences in the species' lifestyles and metabolic capabilities.

  13. Class distinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. Catherine

    Typical 101 courses discourage many students from pursuing higher level science and math courses. Introductory classes in science and math serve largely as a filter, screening out all but the most promising students, and leaving the majority of college graduates—including most prospective teachers—with little understanding of how science works, according to a study conducted for the National Science Foundation. Because few teachers, particularly at the elementary level, experience any collegiate science teaching that stresses skills of inquiry and investigation, they simply never learn to use those methods in their teaching, the report states.

  14. Chemical Characterization and Source Apportionment of Size Fractionated Atmospheric Aerosols, and, Evaluating Student Attitudes and Learning in Large Lecture General Chemistry Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory Harold

    between the OOA2 and WBOA factors and smoke levels indicates that these factors can be used to identify the influence of biomass burning on ambient aerosols. The effectiveness of using the ChemWiki instead of a traditional textbook was investigated during the spring quarter of 2014. Student performance was measured using common midterms, a final, and a pre/post content exams. We also employed surveys, the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) for Chemistry, and a weekly time-on-task survey to quantify students' attitudes and study habits. The effectiveness of the ChemWiki compared to a traditional textbook was examined using multiple linear regression analysis with a standard non-inferiority testing framework. Results show that the performance of students in the section who were assigned readings from the ChemWiki was non-inferior to the performance of students in the section who were assigned readings from the traditional textbook, indicating that the ChemWiki does not substantially differ from the standard textbook in terms of student learning outcomes. The results from the surveys also suggest that the two classes were similar in their beliefs about chemistry and overall average time spent studying. These results indicate that the ChemWiki is a viable cost-saving alternative to traditional textbooks. The impact of using active learning techniques in a large lecture general chemistry class was investigated by assessing student performance and attitudes during the fall 2014 and winter 2015 quarters. One instructor applied active learning strategies while the remaining instructors employed more traditional lecture styles. Student performance, learning, learning environments, and attitudes were measured using a standardized pre/post exams, common final exams, classroom observations, and the CLASS chemistry instrument in large lecture general chemistry courses. Classroom observation data showed that the active learning class was the most student centered

  15. Characterization of VCC-1, a Novel Ambler Class A Carbapenemase from Vibrio cholerae Isolated from Imported Retail Shrimp Sold in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangat, Chand S; Boyd, David; Janecko, Nicol; Martz, Sarah-Lynn; Desruisseau, Andrea; Carpenter, Michael; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Mulvey, Michael R

    2016-01-11

    One of the core goals of the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS) is to monitor major meat commodities for antimicrobial resistance. Targeted studies with methodologies based on core surveillance protocols are used to examine other foods, e.g., seafood, for antimicrobial resistance to detect resistances of concern to public health. Here we report the discovery of a novel Ambler class A carbapenemase that was identified in a nontoxigenic strain of Vibrio cholerae (N14-02106) isolated from shrimp that was sold for human consumption in Canada. V. cholerae N14-02106 was resistant to penicillins, carbapenems, and monobactam antibiotics; however, PCR did not detect common β-lactamases. Bioinformatic analysis of the whole-genome sequence of V. cholerae N14-02106 revealed on the large chromosome a novel carbapenemase (referred to here as VCC-1, for Vibrio cholerae carbapenemase 1) with sequence similarity to class A enzymes. Two copies of blaVCC-1 separated and flanked by ISVch9 (i.e., 3 copies of ISVch9) were found in an acquired 8.5-kb region inserted into a VrgG family protein gene. Cloned blaVCC-1 conferred a β-lactam resistance profile similar to that in V. cholerae N14-02106 when it was transformed into a susceptible laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. Purified VCC-1 was found to hydrolyze penicillins, 1st-generation cephalosporins, aztreonam, and carbapenems, whereas 2nd- and 3rd-generation cephalosporins were poor substrates. Using nitrocefin as a reporter substrate, VCC-1 was moderately inhibited by clavulanic acid and tazobactam but not EDTA. In this report, we present the discovery of a novel class A carbapenemase from the food supply. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Molecular characterization of Ambler class A to D β-lactamases, ISAba1, and integrons reveals multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp. isolates in northeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyu; Liu, Bin; Chen, Yan; Huang, Honglan; Wang, Guoqing; Li, Fan; Ni, Zhaohui

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of various Ambler class A to D β-lactamases, ISAba1, and class 1 and 2 integrons as well as the clonal relatedness in 105 Acinetobacter spp. isolates found in northeastern China was investigated. All 105 Acinetobacter spp. isolates were determined to be multidrug resistant (MDR), and the resistance rates to carbapenem agents were approximately 50%. PER, IMP, AmpC, and OXA-23 were found to be dominant β-lactamases belonging to different classes, respectively. This is the first report of the coexistence of blaPER, blaIMP, blaAmpC, and blaOXA-23-like genes in Acinetobacter spp. isolates from northeastern China. ISAba1 was found upstream of the blaOXA-23-like gene in 87.8% (36/41) strains and upstream of the blaOXA-51-like gene in 26.5% (13/49) strains. ISAba3-like element was found upstream of the blaOXA-58-like gene in one blaOXA-58-like-positive strain. The presence of IntI1 was detected in 63.8% (67/105) of the isolates and the most prevalent gene cassettes were aacA4, aadA1, and catB8. The highly prevalent isolates belong to international clonal lineage (ICL)-II. These results indicate that the wide horizontal and clonal spread of MDR Acinetobacter spp. isolates harbouring multiple β-lactamase genes has become a serious problem in northeastern China.

  17. Characterization of non-coding DNA satellites associated with sweepoviruses (genus Begomovirus, Geminiviridae - definition of a distinct class of begomovirus-associated satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria eLozano

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Begomoviruses (family Geminiviridae are whitefly-transmitted, plant-infecting single-stranded DNA viruses that cause crop losses throughout the warmer parts of the World. Sweepoviruses are a phylogenetically distinct group of begomoviruses that infect plants of the family Convolvulaceae, including sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas. Two classes of subviral molecules are often associated with begomoviruses, particularly in the Old World; the betasatellites and the alphasatellites. An analysis of sweet potato and Ipomoea indica samples from Spain and Merremia dissecta samples from Venezuela identified small non-coding subviral molecules in association with several distinct sweepoviruses. The sequences of 18 clones were obtained and found to be structurally similar to tomato leaf curl virus–satellite (ToLCV-sat, the first DNA satellite identified in association with a begomovirus, with a region with significant sequence identity to the conserved region of betasatellites, an A-rich sequence, a predicted stem-loop structure containing the nonanucleotide TAATATTAC, and a second predicted stem-loop. These sweepovirus-associated satellites join an increasing number of ToLCV-sat-like non-coding satellites identified recently. Although sharing some features with betasatellites, evidence is provided to suggest that the ToLCV-sat-like satellites are distinct from betasatellites and should be considered a separate class of satellites, for which the collective name deltasatellites is proposed.

  18. Regulation of expression and biochemical characterization of a beta-class carbonic anhydrase from the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simarjot; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Tripathi, Anil K

    2009-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA; [EC 4.2.1.1]) is a ubiquitous enzyme catalysing the reversible hydration of CO(2) to bicarbonate, a reaction that supports various biochemical and physiological functions. Genome analysis of Azospirillum brasilense, a nonphotosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing, rhizobacterium, revealed an ORF with homology to beta-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Biochemical characteristics of the beta-class CA of A. brasilense, analysed after cloning the gene (designated as bca), overexpressing in Escherichia coli and purifying the protein by affinity purification, revealed that the native recombinant enzyme is a homotetramer, inhibited by the known CA inhibitors. CA activity in A. brasilense cell extracts, reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that bca was constitutively expressed under aerobic conditions. Lower beta-galactosidase activity in A. brasilense cells harbouring bca promoter: lacZ fusion during the stationary phase or during growth on 3% CO(2) enriched air or at acidic pH indicated that the transcription of bca was downregulated by the stationary phase, elevated CO(2) levels and acidic pH conditions. These observations were also supported by RT-PCR analysis. Thus, beta-CA in A. brasilense seems to be required for scavenging CO(2) from the ambient air and the requirement of CO(2) hydration seems to be higher for the cultures growing exponentially at neutral to alkaline pH.

  19. 肺炎克雷伯菌Ⅰ型整合子的检测与鉴定%Detection and characterization of class 1 integrons in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛璞; 傅威; 邱桂霞; 叶丹; 黎毅敏

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究Ⅰ型整合子参与肺炎克雷伯菌耐药的分子机制.方法 收集2007年至2010年某院临床分离的297株肺炎克雷伯菌,应用K-B纸片扩散法检测耐药性,采用聚合酶链式反应进行Ⅰ类整合子整合酶基因的检测;整合子可变区扩增、克隆测序,分析Ⅰ类整合子基因结构.结果 297株肺炎克雷伯菌中,除MEM、IPM外,对其余11种抗菌素,Ⅰ类整合酶基因阳性菌株的耐药率明显高于Ⅰ类整合酶基因阴性菌株.57.91%(172/297)的菌株Ⅰ类整合子整合酶基因阳性,共检测出10种不同基因盒.可变区编码耐药基因有aadA2、aadA1、aadA5、aadA3C、aacA4,介导氨基糖苷类抗菌素耐药;dhfrhI、dfrA 12、dfrA14、dfrA17、dfrA1、dfrA25、dhfrhI,介导磺胺类抗菌素的耐药;aar-2,介导利福平耐药.结论 Ⅰ类整合子在本院临床分离肺炎克雷伯菌中分布较广泛,主要介导氨基糖苷类和磺胺类抗菌素耐药.整合子与肺炎克雷伯菌的耐药有关,在肺炎克雷伯菌耐药性的形成和播散中具有重要作用.%Objective To investigate the molecular mechanism of integron mediated resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae. Methods 297 strains were collected between 2007 and 2010. All strains were tested by K-B method for drug resistance. PCR and DNA sequencing were undertaken to detected int I and clarify the context of gene cassette. Results Susceptibility data showed that strains carrying Class I integron were significantly more resistant to all of the antibiotics tested then isolates lacking Class I integron excepted MEM and IPM. Int I was detected in 57.91% (172/297)of the isolates. Ten types of gene cassettes were identified. The gene cassttes encoded genes resistance aminoglycosides(aadA2, aadAl, aadAS, aadASC, aacA4), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (dhfrhl, dfrA12, dfrA14, dfrA17, dfrAl, dfrA25, dhfrhl) and rifampicin(aar-2). Conclusions High incidence of class I integrons was found in Klebsiella pneumoniae

  20. ON THE SPH-DISTRIBUTION CLASS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Dinghua; Guo Jinli; Liu Liming

    2005-01-01

    Following up Neuts'idea, the SPH-distribution class associated with bounded Q matrices for infinite Markov chains is defined. The main result in this paper is to characterize the SPH class through the derivatives of the distribution functions. Based on the characterization theorem, closure properties, the expansion, uniform approximation,and the matrix representations of the SPH class are also discussed by the derivatives of the distribution functions at origin.

  1. Characterization of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance genes and their relatedness to class 1 integron and insertion sequence common region in gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hae Won; Lim, Jinsook; Kim, Semi; Kim, Jimyung; Kwon, Gye Cheol; Koo, Sun Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been used for the treatment of urinary tract infections, but increasing resistance to TMP-SMX has been reported. In this study, we analyzed TMP-SMX resistance genes and their relatedness with integrons and insertion sequence common regions (ISCRs) in uropathogenic gram-negative bacilli. Consecutive nonduplicate TMP-SMX nonsusceptible clinical isolates of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter spp., and P. aeruginosa were collected from urine. The minimal inhibitory concentration was determined by Etest. TMP-SMX resistance genes (sul and dfr), integrons, and ISCRs were analyzed by PCR and sequencing. A total of 45 E. coli (37.8%), 15 K. pneumoniae (18.5%), 12 Acinetobacter spp. (70.6%), and 9 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.0%) isolates were found to be resistant to TMP-SMX. Their MICs were all over 640. In E. coli and K. pneumoniae, sul1 and dfr genes were highly prevalent in relation with integron1. The sul3 gene was detected in E. coli. However, in P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp., only sul1 was prevalent in relation with class 1 integron; however, dfr was not detected and sul2 was less prevalent than in Enterobacteriaceae. ISCR1 and/or ISCR2 were detected in E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter spp. but the relatedness with TMP-SMX resistance genes was not prominent. ISCR14 was detected in six isolates of E. coli. In conclusion, resistance mechanisms for TMP-SMX were different between Enterobacteriaceae and glucose non-fermenting gram-negative bacilli. Class 1 integron was widely disseminated in uropathogenic gram-negative baciili, so the adoption of prudent use of antimicrobial agents and the establishment of a surveillance system are needed.

  2. Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

    2002-11-18

    The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

  3. Characterization of microbiota composition and presence of selected antibiotic resistance genes in carriage water of ornamental fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Gerzova

    Full Text Available International trade with ornamental fish is gradually recognized as an important source of a wide range of different antibiotic resistant bacteria. In this study we therefore characterized the prevalence of selected antibiotic resistance genes in the microbiota found in the carriage water of ornamental fish originating from 3 different continents. Real-time PCR quantification showed that the sul1 gene was present in 11 out of 100 bacteria. tet(A was present in 6 out of 100 bacteria and strA, tet(G, sul2 and aadA were present in 1-2 copies per 100 bacteria. Class I integrons were quite common in carriage water microbiota, however, pyrosequencing showed that only 12 different antibiotic gene cassettes were present in class I integrons. The microbiota characterized by pyrosequencing of the V3/V4 variable region of 16S rRNA genes consisted of Proteobacteria (48%, Bacteroidetes (29.5%, Firmicutes (17.8%, Actinobacteria (2.1% and Fusobacteria (1.6%. Correlation analysis between antibiotic resistance gene prevalence and microbiota composition verified by bacterial culture showed that major reservoirs of sul1 sul2, tet(A, tet(B tet(G, cat, cml, bla, strA, aacA, aph and aadA could be found among Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria with representatives of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Rhizobiaceae and Comamonadaceae being those most positively associated with the tested antibiotic resistance genes.

  4. Identification and characterization of an Apis cerana cerana Delta class glutathione S-transferase gene ( AccGSTD) in response to thermal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huiru; Jia, Haihong; Wang, Xiuling; Gao, Hongru; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2013-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multifunctional enzyme super family that plays a pivotal role in both insecticide resistance and protection against oxidative stress. In this study, we identified a single-copy gene, AccGSTD, as being a Delta class GST in the Chinese honey bee ( Apis cerana cerana). A predicted antioxidant response element, CREB, was found in the 1,492-bp 5'-flanking region, suggesting that AccGSTD may be involved in oxidative stress response pathways. Real-time PCR and immunolocalization studies demonstrated that AccGSTD exhibited both developmental- and tissue-specific expression patterns. During development, AccGSTD transcript was increased in adults. The AccGSTD expression level was the highest in the honey bee brain. Thermal stress experiments demonstrated that AccGSTD could be significantly upregulated by temperature changes in a time-dependent manner. It is hypothesized that high expression levels might be due to the increased levels of oxidative stress caused by the temperature challenges. Additionally, functional assays of the recombinant AccGSTD protein revealed that AccGSTD has the capability to protect DNA from oxidative damage. Taken together, these data suggest that AccGSTD may be responsible for antioxidant defense in adult honey bees.

  5. Comparative Characterization of CTX-M-64 and CTX-M-14 Provides Insights into the Structure and Catalytic Activity of the CTX-M Class of Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dandan; Chiou, Jiachi; Zeng, Zhenling; Chan, Edward Wai-Chi; Liu, Jian-Hua; Chen, Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Clinical isolates producing hybrid CTX-M β-lactamases, presumably due to recombination between the blaCTX-M-15 and blaCTX-M-14 elements, have emerged in recent years. Among the hybrid enzymes, CTX-M-64 and CTX-M-14 display the most significant difference in catalytic activity. This study aims to investigate the mechanisms underlying such differential enzymatic activities in order to provide insight into the structure/function relationship of this class of enzymes. Sequence alignment analysis showed that the major differences between the amino acid composition of CTX-M-64 and CTX-M-14 lie at both the N and C termini of the enzymes. Single or multiple amino acid substitutions introduced into CTX-M-64 and CTX-M-14 were found to produce only minor effects on hydrolytic functions; such a finding is consistent with the notion that the discrepancy between the functional activities of the two enzymes is not the result of only a few amino acid changes but is attributable to interactions between a unique set of amino acid residues in each enzyme. This theory is supported by the results of the thermal stability assay, which confirmed that CTX-M-64 is significantly more stable than CTX-M-14. Our data confirmed that, in addition to the important residues located in the active site, residues distal to the active site also contribute to the catalytic activity of the enzyme through stabilizing its structural integrity.

  6. A cDNA Cloning of a Novel Alpha-Class Tyrosinase of Pinctada fucata: Its Expression Analysis and Characterization of the Expressed Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryousuke Takgi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase plays an important role in the formation of the shell matrix and melanin synthesis in mollusks shells. A cDNA clone encoding a 47 kDa protein was isolated from the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. The cDNA was 1,957 base pairs long and encodes a 417 residue protein that has extensive sequence identity with tyrosinase (polyphenol oxidase: EC 1.14.18.1. This tyrosinase-like protein, termed PfTy, contains an N-terminal signal sequence and the two copper-binding domain signatures (CuA and CuB, suggesting that PfTy belongs to the α-subclass of type-3 copper proteins. Enzyme activity of PfTy was examined by a spectrophotometric method using the translation product derived from an S30 T7 high-yield protein expression system. Tyrosinase activity was seen in this recombinant product. RT-PCR analysis showed that PfTy mRNA was expressed in the mantle pallial, but not in the mantle edge. Therefore, PfTy may participate in insoluble shell matrix formation of the nacreous layer. PfTy expression was also observed in the foot, liver, and adductor muscle, suggesting that PfTy participates in the synthesis of melanins, which are effective scavengers of free radicals formed in multiple intracellular oxidative processes. This is the first report of a novel α-class tyrosinase from the pearl oyster P. fucata.

  7. Molecular docking and fluorescence characterization of benzothieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one sulphonamide thio-derivatives, a novel class of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Mariarita; Pannuzzo, Giovanna; Santagati, Andrea; Catalfo, Alfio; De Guidi, Guido; Cardile, Venera

    2014-05-14

    The aims of this study were: (i) to explore the structure-activity relationship of some new anti-inflammatory benzothieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one sulphonamide thio-derivatives 1-11; and (ii) to evaluate the possibility of using the most active compounds as fluorescent probes to determine tumours or their progression. Therefore, to know the precise mechanism by which these compounds interact with cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 enzyme, a molecular docking study was carried out; to assess spectroscopic characteristics, their absorption and emission properties were determined. The results demonstrated that some derivatives of benzothieno[3,2-d] pyrimidine exhibit interesting anti-inflammatory properties related to interactions with active sites of COX-2 and are fluorescent. The antipyrine-bearing compound 4 displayed high COX-2 affinity (ΔG = -9.4) and good fluorescent properties (Φfl = 0.032). Thus, some members of this new class of anti-inflammatory may be promising for fluorescence imaging of cancer cells that express the COX-2 enzyme. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  8. Molecular Docking and Fluorescence Characterization of Benzothieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one Sulphonamide Thio-Derivatives, a Novel Class of Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarita Barone

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were: (i to explore the structure-activity relationship of some new anti-inflammatory benzothieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one sulphonamide thio-derivatives 1–11; and (ii to evaluate the possibility of using the most active compounds as fluorescent probes to determine tumours or their progression. Therefore, to know the precise mechanism by which these compounds interact with cyclooxygenase (COX-2 enzyme, a molecular docking study was carried out; to assess spectroscopic characteristics, their absorption and emission properties were determined. The results demonstrated that some derivatives of benzothieno[3,2-d] pyrimidine exhibit interesting anti-inflammatory properties related to interactions with active sites of COX-2 and are fluorescent. The antipyrine-bearing compound 4 displayed high COX-2 affinity (ΔG = −9.4 and good fluorescent properties (Φfl = 0.032. Thus, some members of this new class of anti-inflammatory may be promising for fluorescence imaging of cancer cells that express the COX-2 enzyme. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  9. Molecular characterization of plantain class i chitinase gene and its expression in response to infection by Gloeosporium musarum Cke and Massee and other abiotic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianming; Wang, Hongbin; Feng, Dongru; Liu, Bin; Liu, Haiyan; Wang, Jinfa

    2007-11-01

    We have cloned a chitinase cDNA (MpChi-1) from plantain (Musa paradisiacal L) using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) according to a sequence fragment which we had cloned using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique. The MpChi-1 encodes a protein of 326 amino acids and belongs to acidic chitinase class Ib subfamily. MpChi-1 shares high identity with rice endochitinase (XP_468714) and different each other only at three residues. Homology modelling indicated these three substitutions would not change the configuration of the activity site of the enzyme. We have expressed recombinant MpChi-1 and purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and preparative reversed phase HPLC. The recombinant protein could hydrolyse chitin and inhibit the growth of the Gloeosporium musarum Cke and Massee in vitro. Northern blot revealed that the MpChi-1 transcripts rapidly after inoculation with G. musarum and maximum mRNA accumulation reached at 48 h. Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) could induce MpChi-1 expression, while mechanical wounding, silver nitrate and osmotic stress stimulated only a slight accumulation of MpChi-1 transcripts. Abscisic acid (ABA) could induce MpChi-1 transcript. These results suggest the MpChi-1 plays important role in the events of the hypersensitive reaction (HR).

  10. Presence of Selected Methanogens, Fibrolytic Bacteria, and Proteobacteria in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Neonatal Dairy Calves from Birth to 72 Hours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar E Guzman

    Full Text Available The microbial communities in the gastrointestinal tract of a young calf are essential for the anatomical and physiological development that permits a transition from milk to solid feed. Selected methanogens, fibrolytic bacteria, and proteobacteria were quantified in the rumen fluid and tissue, abomasum fluid, cecum fluid and tissue, and feces of Holstein bull calves on day 0 (0-20 mins after birth, day 1 (24 ± 1 h after birth, day 2 (48 ± 1 h after birth, and day 3 (72 ± 1 h after birth. Methanogens, fibrolytic bacteria, and Geobacter spp. were found to be already present from birth, indicating that microbial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract occurred before or during delivery. The abundance of methanogens and Geobacter spp. differed between the days tested and between compartments of the digestive tract and feces, but such difference was not observed for fibrolytic bacteria. Our findings suggests that methanogens might have an alternative hydrogen provider such as Geobacter spp. during these early stages of postnatal development. In addition, fibrolytic bacteria were present in the rumen well before the availability of fibrous substrates, suggesting that they might use nutrients other than cellulose and hemicellose.

  11. Prolonged applied potential to anode facilitate selective enrichment of bio-electrochemically active Proteobacteria for mediating electron transfer: microbial dynamics and bio-catalytic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannaiah Goud, R; Mohan, S Venkata

    2013-06-01

    Prolonged application of poised potential to anode was evaluated to understand the influence of applied potentials [500 mV (E500); 1000 mV (E1000); 2000 mV (E2000)] on bio-electrogenic activity of microbial fuel cell (MFC) and the resulting dynamics in microbial community in comparison to control operation. E1000 system documented higher electrogenic activity (309 mW/m(2)) followed by E500 (143 mW/m(2)), E2000 (112 mW/m(2)) and control (65 mW/m(2)) operations. The improved power output at optimum applied potential (1000mV) might be attributed to the enrichment of electrochemically active bacteria majorly belonging to the phylum Proteobacteria with less extent of Firmicutes which helped in effective electron (mediated) transfer through release of exogenous shuttlers. Improved bio-electrogenic activity due to enrichment at 1000mV applied potential also correlated well with the observed cyctochrome-c peaks on the voltamatogram, lower ion ohmic losses and bio-electro kinetic analysis. Electric-shock at higher applied potential (E2000) resulted in the survival of less number of microbial species leading to lower electrogenesis.

  12. A LysR-family transcriptional regulator required for virulence in Brucella abortus is highly conserved among the α-proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Lauren M; Budnick, James A; Blanchard, Catlyn; Dunman, Paul M; Caswell, Clayton C

    2015-10-01

    Small RNAs are principal elements of bacterial gene regulation and physiology. Two small RNAs in Brucella abortus, AbcR1 and AbcR2, are required for wild-type virulence. Examination of the abcR loci revealed the presence of a gene encoding a LysR-type transcriptional regulator flanking abcR2 on chromosome 1. Deletion of this lysR gene (bab1_1517) resulted in the complete loss of abcR2 expression while no difference in abcR1 expression was observed. The B. abortus bab1_1517 mutant strain was significantly attenuated in macrophages and mice, and bab1_1517 was subsequently named vtlR for virulence-associated transcriptional LysR-family regulator. Microarray analysis revealed three additional genes encoding small hypothetical proteins also under the control of VtlR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that VtlR binds directly to the promoter regions of abcR2 and the three hypothetical protein-encoding genes, and DNase I footprint analysis identified the specific nucleotide sequence in these promoters that VtlR binds to and drives gene expression. Strikingly, orthologs of VtlR are encoded in a wide range of host-associated α-proteobacteria, and it is likely that the VtlR genetic system represents a common regulatory circuit critical for host-bacterium interactions.

  13. Profile and characterization of the chlorogenic acids in green Robusta coffee beans by LC-MS(n): identification of seven new classes of compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Patras, Maria Alexandra; Eravuchira, Pinkie Jacob; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2010-08-11

    LC-MS(n) (n = 2-4) has been used to detect and characterize in green Robusta coffee beans 15 quantitatively minor sinapic acid and trimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid-containing chlorogenic acids, all reported for the first time from this source, with 13 of them not previously reported in nature. These comprise 3-sinapoylquinic acid, 4-sinapoylquinic acid, and 5-sinapoylquinic acid (M(r) 398); 3-sinapoyl-5-caffeoylquinic acid, 3-sinapoyl-4-caffeoylquinic acid, and 4-sinapoyl-3-caffeoylquinic acid (M(r) 560); 3-(3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxy)cinnamoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid (M(r) 560); 3-sinapoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid, 3-feruloyl-4-sinapoylquinic acid, and 4-sinapoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid (M(r) 574); 4-trimethoxycinnamoyl-5-caffeoylquinic acid, 3-trimethoxycinnamoyl-5-caffeoylquinic acid (M(r) 574); and 5-feruloyl-3-trimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, 3-trimethoxycinnamoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid, and 4-trimethoxycinnamoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid (M(r) 588). Furthermore, a series of structures including nine new triacyl quinic acids have been assigned on the basis of LC-MS(n) patterns of fragmentation, relative hydrophobicity, and analogy of fragmentation patterns if compared to feruloyl, caffeoyl, and dimethoxycinnamoyl quinic acids. Sixty-nine chlorogenic acids have now been characterized in green Robusta coffee beans.

  14. [Social classes and poverty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benach, Joan; Amable, Marcelo

    2004-05-01

    Social classes and poverty are two key social determinants fundamental to understand how disease and health inequalities are produced. During the 90's in Spain there has been a notable oscillation in the inequality and poverty levels, with an increase in the middle of the decade when new forms of social exclusion, high levels of unemployment and great difficulties in accessing the labour market, especially for those workers with less resources, emerged. Today society is still characterized by a clear social stratification and the existence of social classes with a predominance of high levels of unemployment and precarious jobs, and where poverty is an endemic social problem much worse than the EU average. To diminish health inequalities and to improve the quality of life will depend very much on the reduction of the poverty levels and the improvement of equal opportunities and quality of employment. To increase understanding of how social class and poverty affect public health, there is a need to improve the quality of both information and research, and furthermore planners and political decision makers must take into account those determinants when undertaking disease prevention and health promotion.

  15. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31

    The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the

  16. Characterization of a Novel Class I Transcription Factor A (CITFA) Subunit That Is Indispensable for Transcription by the Multifunctional RNA Polymerase I of Trypanosoma brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, T. N.

    2012-10-26

    Trypanosoma brucei is the only organism known to have evolved a multifunctional RNA polymerase I (pol I) system that is used to express the parasite\\'s ribosomal RNAs, as well as its major cell surface antigens, namely, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) and procyclin, which are vital for establishing successful infections in the mammalian host and the tsetse vector, respectively. Thus far, biochemical analyses of the T. brucei RNA pol I transcription machinery have elucidated the subunit structure of the enzyme and identified the class I transcription factor A (CITFA). CITFA binds to RNA pol I promoters, and its CITFA-2 subunit was shown to be absolutely essential for RNA pol I transcription in the parasite. Tandem affinity purification (TAP) of CITFA revealed the subunits CITFA-1 to -6, which are conserved only among kinetoplastid organisms, plus the dynein light chain DYNLL1. Here, by tagging CITFA-6 instead of CITFA-2, a complex was purified that contained all known CITFA subunits, as well as a novel proline-rich protein. Functional studies carried out in vivo and in vitro, as well as a colocalization study, unequivocally demonstrated that this protein is a bona fide CITFA subunit, essential for parasite viability and indispensable for RNA pol I transcription of ribosomal gene units and the active VSG expression site in the mammalian-infective life cycle stage of the parasite. Interestingly, CITFA-7 function appears to be species specific, because expression of an RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant CITFA-7 transgene from Trypanosoma cruzi could not rescue the lethal phenotype of silencing endogenous CITFA-7.

  17. Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, Tracy; Schechter, David S.

    2000-04-11

    The overall goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective was accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the fourth year of the five-year project for each of the four areas including a status report of field activities leading up to injection of CO{sub 2}.

  18. Characterization of new class III lantibiotics--erythreapeptin, avermipeptin and griseopeptin from Saccharopolyspora erythraea, Streptomyces avermitilis and Streptomyces griseus demonstrates stepwise N-terminal leader processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völler, Ginka H; Krawczyk, Joanna M; Pesic, Alexander; Krawczyk, Bartlomiej; Nachtigall, Jonny; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2012-05-29

    Lantibiotics are a large group of ribosomally synthesized peptides post-translationally modified to incorporate the amino acid lanthionine. They are classified, according to their biosynthetic pathway and bioactivity, into three major subtypes. Of Actinomycetes type III lantibiotics, only four peptides (SapB, SapT, LabA1, and LabA2) have been described and structurally characterized, although homologous gene clusters are abundant in other Actinomycetes. All these gene clusters share a similar architecture with a characteristic Ser/Ser/Cys motif in precursor peptides, which has previously been suggested to act as a precursor for lanthionine (SapB) and labionin (LabA2) rings. Mass spectrometry screening led to the discovery and characterization of three new representatives of type III lantibiotics: Avermipeptin (Avi), Erythreapeptin (Ery), and Griseopeptin (Gri) from Streptomyces avermitilis DSM 46492, Saccharopolyspora erythraea NRRL 2338, and Streptomyces griseus DSM 40236, respectively. Apart from the assignment of these peptides to their corresponding gene clusters, additional investigations on Avi, Ery and Gri peptides indicate stepwise leader processing by putative aminopeptidase-like protease(s), thus yielding mixtures of differently N-terminal-processed lantibiotic peptides. Similar peptide processing was observed for a heterologously expressed eryth biosynthetic gene cluster expressed in a Streptomyces host system. Remarkably, all isolates of the new type III lantibiotics contain both the amino acids lanthionine and labionin, thus implying dual-mode cyclase activity of the processing lyase-kinase-cyclase enzymes. These findings have implications for the structures and maturation of other type III lantibiotics from Actinomycetes.

  19. Estimates for Solutions of the $\\partial$-Equation and Application to the Characterization of the Zero Varieties of the Functions of the Nevanlinna Class for Lineally Convex Domains of Finite Type

    CERN Document Server

    Charpentier, Philippe; Mounkaila, Modi

    2011-01-01

    In the late ten years, the resolution of the equation $\\bar\\partial u=f$ with sharp estimates has been intensively studied for convex domains of finite type by many authors. In this paper, we consider the case of lineally convex domains. As the method used to obtain global estimates for a support function cannot be carried out in this case, we use a kernel that does not gives directly a solution of the $\\bar\\partial$-equation but only a representation formula which allows us to end the resolution of the equation using Kohn's $L^2$ theory. As an application we give the characterization of the zero sets of the functions of the Nevanlinna class for lineally convex domains of finite type.

  20. Development and characterization of hepatitis C virus genotype 1-7 cell culture systems: role of CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I and effect of antiviral drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Scheel, Troels K H; Jensen, Tanja B

    2009-01-01

    Six major hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and numerous subtypes have been described, and recently a seventh major genotype was discovered. Genotypes show significant molecular and clinical differences, such as differential response to combination therapy with interferon-alpha and ribavirin...... against the putative coreceptors CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, neutralizing antibodies in selected chronic phase HCV sera had differential effects against genotype 1-7 viruses. Conclusion: We completed and characterized a panel of JFH1-based cell culture...... systems of all seven major HCV genotypes and important subtypes and used these viruses in comparative studies of antivirals, HCV receptor interaction, and neutralizing antibodies....

  1. Polymeric Amorphous Solid Dispersions: A Review of Amorphization, Crystallization, Stabilization, Solid-State Characterization, and Aqueous Solubilization of Biopharmaceutical Classification System Class II Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-09-01

    Poor water solubility of many drugs has emerged as one of the major challenges in the pharmaceutical world. Polymer-based amorphous solid dispersions have been considered as the major advancement in overcoming limited aqueous solubility and oral absorption issues. The principle drawback of this approach is that they can lack necessary stability and revert to the crystalline form on storage. Significant upfront development is, therefore, required to generate stable amorphous formulations. A thorough understanding of the processes occurring at a molecular level is imperative for the rational design of amorphous solid dispersion products. This review attempts to address the critical molecular and thermodynamic aspects governing the physicochemical properties of such systems. A brief introduction to Biopharmaceutical Classification System, solid dispersions, glass transition, and solubility advantage of amorphous drugs is provided. The objective of this review is to weigh the current understanding of solid dispersion chemistry and to critically review the theoretical, technical, and molecular aspects of solid dispersions (amorphization and crystallization) and potential advantage of polymers (stabilization and solubilization) as inert, hydrophilic, pharmaceutical carrier matrices. In addition, different preformulation tools for the rational selection of polymers, state-of-the-art techniques for preparation and characterization of polymeric amorphous solid dispersions, and drug supersaturation in gastric media are also discussed.

  2. Identification and characterization of five new classes of chlorogenic acids in burdock (Arctium lappa L.) roots by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2011-01-01

    Burdock (Arcticum lappa L.) roots are used in folk medicine and also as a vegetable in Asian countries especially Japan, Korea, and Thailand. We have used LC-MS(n) (n = 2-4) to detect and characterize in burdock roots 15 quantitatively minor fumaric, succinic, and malic acid-containing chlorogenic acids, 11 of them not previously reported in nature. These comprise 3-succinoyl-4,5-dicaffeoyl or 1-succinoyl-3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 1,5-dicaffeoyl-3-succinoylquinic acid, 1,5-dicaffeoyl-4-succinoylquinic acid, and 3,4-dicaffeoyl-5-succinoylquinic acid (M(r) 616); 1,3-dicaffeoyl-5-fumaroylquinic acid and 1,5-dicaffeoyl-4-fumaroylquinic acid (M(r) 614); 1,5-dicaffeoyl-3-maloylquinic acid, 1,4-dicaffeoyl-3-maloylquinic acid, and 1,5-dicaffeoyl-4-maloylquinic acid (M(r) 632); 1,3,5-tricaffeoyl-4-succinoylquinic acid (M(r) 778); 1,5-dicaffeoyl-3,4-disuccinoylquinic acid (M(r) 716); 1,5-dicaffeoyl-3-fumaroyl-4-succinoylquinic acid and 1-fumaroyl-3,5-dicaffeoyl-4-succinoylquinic acid (M(r) 714); dicaffeoyl-dimaloylquinic acid (M(r) 748); and 1,5-dicaffeoyl-3-succinoyl-4-dimaloylquinic acid (M(r) 732). All the structures have been assigned on the basis of LC-MS(n) patterns of fragmentation, relative hydrophobicity, and analogy of fragmentation patterns if compared to caffeoylquinic acids.

  3. Major soil classes of the metropolitan region of Curitiba (PR, Brazil: I - mineralogical characterization of the sand, silt and clay fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Christina Duarte Pires

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of most representative soils of the Region of Curitiba, Paraná State. Samples were collected at different depths. The results showed: (a the quartz was the only identified mineral at the silt and sand fractions. The dominant clay mineral was Kaolinite, with contents ranging from 676.7 to 820.8 g kg-1. The gibbsite was also an important constituent of the most weathered horizons and the hematite and goethite contents were low, mainly in the Histosol; (b at the C horizon of the Inceptisol, high intensity of vermiculite/smectite reflections were detected (X-ray diffraction, justifying the high capacity of expansion and contraction, normally showed for this soil horizon; (c was observed a good relation between pedogenetic degree and crystallographic mineral characteristics.Devido a grande importância dos minerais, notadamente aqueles da fração argila, sobre o planejamento de uso e sobre os impactos das atividades antrópicas, estudos detalhados da composição dos solos das regiões metropolitanas são imprescindíveis. Para avaliar as características mineralógicas e químicas de solos mais representativos da Região Metropolitana de Curitiba, estado do Paraná, foram coletadas amostras das classes Organossolo, Latossolo e Cambissolo, em diferentes profundidades. As frações areia, silte e argila foram estudadas por difratometria de Raios-X (DRX e a fração mais fina foi submetida a análise térmica e extrações químicas com oxalato de amônio (OA, ditionito-citrato-bicarbonato (DCB e solução de NaOH 5 mol L-1 fervente. As características cristalográficas da hematita (Hm, goethita (Gt, gibbsita (Gb e caulinita (Ct foram determinadas por DRX. Os resultados permitiram concluir que: (a o quartzo foi o único mineral identificado nas frações areia e silte. Na fração argila, verificou-se o predomínio de Ct, com teores variando de 661,7 a 820,8 g kg-1

  4. Microbial ecology of á-Proteobacteria ammonia-oxidizers along a concentration gradient of dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the San Bernadino Mountain Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, F. L.; Fenn, M. E.; Stein, L. Y.

    2002-12-01

    The fate of atmospherically-deposited nitrogen from industrial pollution is of major concern in the montane ecosystems bordering the South Coast California Air Basin. Nitrogen deposition rates in the more exposed regions of the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM) are among the highest in North America often exceeding 40 kg ha-1 year-1 in throughfall deposition of nitrate and ammonium (Fenn and Poth, 1999). Forest ecosystems with elevated N deposition generally exhibit elevated accumulation of soil nitrate, leaching and runoff, elevated emissions of nitrogenous gases, increased nitrification, and decreased litter decomposition rates. The role of nitrifying microbial populations, especially those taxonomically associated with the beta-Proteobacteria ammonia-oxidizers (AOB), will provide insight into nitrogen-cycling in these extremely N-saturated environments. Using 16S ribosomal DNA-based molecular techniques (16S rDNA clone library construction and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism), we are comparing AOB community diversity at 3 different locations along a natural atmospheric N-deposition concentration gradient in the SBM: from high at Camp Paviaka (CP), medium at Strawberry Peak (SP) to low at Dogwood (DW). As observed for wet N-deposition systems on the east coast, we hypothesized a negative correlation between AOB community diversity, abundance and function with nitrogen loading in the dry N deposition system of SBM. Nitrification potentials determined for the 3 sites along the N-deposition gradient were in the order of CP less than SP less than DW. Preliminary results indicate no correlation between diversity of AOB and increased nitrogen loading. Shannon-Weiner diversity indices calculated for ammonia-oxidizer RFLP group units were 2.22, 2.66 and 1.80 for CP, SP and DW, respectively.

  5. Incidence of Male-Killing Rickettsia spp. (α-Proteobacteria) in the Ten-Spot Ladybird Beetle Adalia decempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Schulenburg, J. Hinrich Graf; Habig, Michael; Sloggett, John J.; Webberley, K. Mary; Bertrand, Dominique; Hurst, Gregory D. D.; Majerus, Michael E. N.

    2001-01-01

    The diversity of endosymbiotic bacteria that kill male host offspring during embryogenesis and their frequencies in certain groups of host taxa suggest that the evolution of male killing and the subsequent spread of male-killing symbionts are primarily determined by host life history characteristics. We studied the 10-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia decempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), in which male killing has not been recorded previously, to test this hypothesis, and we also assessed the evolution of the male killer identified by DNA sequence analysis. Our results show that A. decempunctata harbors male-killing Rickettsia (α-proteobacteria). Male-killing bacteria belonging to the genus Rickettsia have previously been reported only for the congeneric two-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia bipunctata L. Phylogenetic analysis of Rickettsia DNA sequences isolated from different populations of the two host species revealed a single origin of male killing in the genus Rickettsia. The data also indicated possible horizontal transfer of symbionts between host species. In addition, A. bipunctata is known to bear at least four different male-killing symbionts in its geographic range two of which coexist in the two locations from which A. decempunctata specimens were obtained for the present study. Since only a single male-killing taxon was found in A. decempunctata, we assume that the two closely related ladybird beetle species must differ in the number and/or geographic distribution of male killers. We discuss the importance of these findings to our understanding of the evolution and dynamics of symbiotic associations between male-killing bacteria and their insect hosts. PMID:11133455

  6. Functions, Compositions, and Evolution of the Two Types of Carboxysomes: Polyhedral Microcompartments That Facilitate CO2 Fixation in Cyanobacteria and Some Proteobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Benjamin D.; Long, Benedict M.; Badger, Murray R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Cyanobacteria are the globally dominant photoautotrophic lineage. Their success is dependent on a set of adaptations collectively termed the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM). The purpose of the CCM is to support effective CO2 fixation by enhancing the chemical conditions in the vicinity of the primary CO2-fixing enzyme, d-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), to promote the carboxylase reaction and suppress the oxygenase reaction. In cyanobacteria and some proteobacteria, this is achieved by encapsulation of RubisCO within carboxysomes, which are examples of a group of proteinaceous bodies called bacterial microcompartments. Carboxysomes encapsulate the CO2-fixing enzyme within the selectively permeable protein shell and simultaneously encapsulate a carbonic anhydrase enzyme for CO2 supply from a cytoplasmic bicarbonate pool. These bodies appear to have arisen twice and undergone a process of convergent evolution. While the gross structures of all known carboxysomes are ostensibly very similar, with shared gross features such as a selectively permeable shell layer, each type of carboxysome encapsulates a phyletically distinct form of RubisCO enzyme. Furthermore, the specific proteins forming structures such as the protein shell or the inner RubisCO matrix are not identical between carboxysome types. Each type has evolutionarily distinct forms of the same proteins, as well as proteins that are entirely unrelated to one another. In light of recent developments in the study of carboxysome structure and function, we present this review to summarize the knowledge of the structure and function of both types of carboxysome. We also endeavor to cast light on differing evolutionary trajectories which may have led to the differences observed in extant carboxysomes. PMID:24006469

  7. Teachers in Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Galen, Jane

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I argue for a closer read of the daily "class work" of teachers, as posited by Reay, 1998. In developing exploratory class portraits of four teachers who occupy distinctive social positions (two from working-class homes now teaching upper-middle-class children and two from upper-middle-class homes now teaching poor children), I…

  8. RxClass

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The RxClass Browser is a web application for exploring and navigating through the class hierarchies to find the RxNorm drug members associated with each class....

  9. Two classes of metric spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Garrido

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The class of metric spaces (X,d known as small-determined spaces, introduced by Garrido and Jaramillo, are properly defined by means of some type of real-valued Lipschitz functions on X. On the other hand, B-simple metric spaces introduced by Hejcman are defined in terms of some kind of bornologies of bounded subsets of X. In this note we present a common framework where both classes of metric spaces can be studied which allows us to see not only the relationships between them but also to obtain new internal characterizations of these metric properties.

  10. On differential characteristic classes

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Man-Ho

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we give explicit formulas of differential characteristic classes of principal $G$-bundles with connections and prove their expected properties. In particular, we obtain explicit formulas for differential Chern classes, differential Pontryagin classes and differential Euler class. Furthermore, we show that the differential Chern class is the unique natural transformation from (Simons-Sullivan) differential $K$-theory to (Cheeger-Simons) differential characters that is compatible ...

  11. Loosely coupled class families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    are expressed using virtual classes seem to be very tightly coupled internally. While clients have achieved the freedom to dynamically use one or the other family, it seems that any given family contains a xed set of classes and we will need to create an entire family of its own just in order to replace one......Families of mutually dependent classes that may be accessed polymor- phically provide an advanced tool for separation of concerns, in that it enables client code to use a group of instances of related classes safely without depending on the exact classes involved. However, class families which...... of the members with another class. This paper shows how to express class families in such a manner that the classes in these families can be used in many dierent combinations, still enabling family polymorphism and ensuring type safety....

  12. Characterization of suspended bacteria from processing units in an advanced drinking water treatment plant of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Li, Weiying; Zhang, Junpeng; Qi, Wanqi; Zhou, Yanyan; Xiang, Yuan; Shi, Nuo

    2017-05-01

    For the drinking water treatment plant (DWTP), the organic pollutant removal was the primary focus, while the suspended bacterial was always neglected. In this study, the suspended bacteria from each processing unit in a DWTP employing an ozone-biological activated carbon process was mainly characterized by using heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs), a flow cytometer, and 454-pyrosequencing methods. The results showed that an adverse changing tendency of HPC and total cell counts was observed in the sand filtration tank (SFT), where the cultivability of suspended bacteria increased to 34%. However, the cultivability level of other units stayed below 3% except for ozone contact tank (OCT, 13.5%) and activated carbon filtration tank (ACFT, 34.39%). It meant that filtration processes promoted the increase in cultivability of suspended bacteria remarkably, which indicated biodegrading capability. In the unit of OCT, microbial diversity indexes declined drastically, and the dominant bacteria were affiliated to Proteobacteria phylum (99.9%) and Betaproteobacteria class (86.3%), which were also the dominant bacteria in the effluent of other units. Besides, the primary genus was Limnohabitans in the effluents of SFT (17.4%) as well as ACFT (25.6%), which was inferred to be the crucial contributors for the biodegradable function in the filtration units. Overall, this paper provided an overview of community composition of each processing units in a DWTP as well as reference for better developing microbial function for drinking water treatment in the future.

  13. A Model for Teaching Large Classes: Facilitating a "Small Class Feel"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Rosealie P.; Pappas, Eric

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a model for teaching large classes that facilitates a "small class feel" to counteract the distance, anonymity, and formality that often characterize large lecture-style courses in higher education. One author (E. P.) has been teaching a 300-student general education critical thinking course for ten years, and the…

  14. PRCR Classes and Activities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — This data is specific to Parks and Recreation classes, workshops, and activities within the course catalog. It contains an entry for upcoming classes.*This data set...

  15. Class 1 Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A "Class 1" area is a geographic area recognized by the EPA as being of the highest environmental quality and requiring maximum protection. Class I areas are areas...

  16. Doodling in Math Class

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arkenberg, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

      Arkenberg reviews Doodling in Math Class, an Internet resource available at www.youtube.com. Both math and art teachers have recommended the series of YouTube videos "Doodling in Math Class with Vihart...

  17. A Virtual Class Calculus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik; Ostermann, Klaus; Cook, William Randall

    2006-01-01

    model for virtual classes has been a long-standing open question. This paper presents a virtual class calculus, vc, that captures the essence of virtual classes in these full-fledged programming languages. The key contributions of the paper are a formalization of the dynamic and static semantics of vc...

  18. Education and Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Galen, Jane A.

    2000-01-01

    The working class is nearly invisible in multicultural education literature. Examines the possibilities of a more careful foregrounding of the complexities of social class in shaping life chances, focusing on the educational experiences of working class students and discussing the poor in order to promote understanding of the potential of teacher…

  19. Persian Preposition Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pantcheva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I present the prepositional system in Persian. I show that Persian prepositions can be divided into three classes (Class 1, Class 2a and Class 2b which exhibit distinct syntactic behavior. Then I examine the question of the categorial status of Class 2 prepositions and demonstrate that they are not to be regarded as nouns. Finally I present the extended PP projection of Persian spatial prepositions and argue for a feature-based analysis of the properties they manifest.

  20. Class, Culture and Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrits, Gitte Sommer

    2013-01-01

    Even though contemporary discussions of class have moved forward towards recognizing a multidimensional concept of class, empirical analyses tend to focus on cultural practices in a rather narrow sense, that is, as practices of cultural consumption or practices of education. As a result......, discussions within political sociology have not yet utilized the merits of a multidimensional conception of class. In light of this, the article suggests a comprehensive Bourdieusian framework for class analysis, integrating culture as both a structural phenomenon co-constitutive of class and as symbolic...

  1. A class of positive atomic maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej [Institute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5/7, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2008-05-30

    We construct a new class of positive indecomposable maps in the algebra of d x d complex matrices. These maps are characterized by the 'weakest' positivity property and for this reason they are called atomic. This class provides a new rich family of atomic entanglement witnesses which define an important tool for investigating quantum entanglement. It turns out that they are able to detect states with the 'weakest' quantum entanglement.

  2. A class of positive atomic maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2008-05-01

    We construct a new class of positive indecomposable maps in the algebra of d × d complex matrices. These maps are characterized by the 'weakest' positivity property and for this reason they are called atomic. This class provides a new rich family of atomic entanglement witnesses which define an important tool for investigating quantum entanglement. It turns out that they are able to detect states with the 'weakest' quantum entanglement.

  3. 16S ribosomal DNA characterization of nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from banana (Musa spp.) and pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães Cruz, L; de Souza, E M; Weber, O B; Baldani, J I; Döbereiner, J; Pedrosa, F de O

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from banana (Musa spp.) and pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merril) were characterized by amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Herbaspirillum seropedicae, Herbaspirillum rubrisubalbicans, Burkholderia brasilensis, and Burkholderia tropicalis were identified. Eight other types were placed in close proximity to these genera and other alpha and beta Proteobacteria.

  4. Weak Coherence in Abundance Patterns Between Bacterial Classes and Their Constituent OTUs Along a Regulated River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-González, Clara; Salazar, Guillem; Logares, Ramiro; Proia, Lorenzo; Gasol, Josep M.; Sabater, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Deductions about the ecology of high taxonomic bacterial ranks (i.e., phylum, class, order) are often based on their abundance patterns, yet few studies have quantified how accurately variations in abundance of these bacterial groups represent the dynamics of the taxa within them. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we investigated whether the changes in abundance of six dominant bacterial classes (Actinobacteria, Beta-/Alpha-/Gamma-proteobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Sphingobacteria) along a large dam-regulated river are reflected by those of their constituent Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs; 97% similarity level). The environmental impact generated by the reservoirs promoted clear compositional shifts in all bacterial classes that resulted from changes in the abundance of individual OTUs rather than from the appearance of new taxa along the river. Abundance patterns at the class level represented the dynamics of only a small but variable proportion of their constituting OTUs, which were not necessarily the most abundant ones. Within most classes, we detected sub-groups of OTUs showing contrasting responses to reservoir-induced environmental changes. Overall, we show that the patterns observed at the class level fail to capture the dynamics of a significant fraction of their constituent members, calling for caution when the ecological attributes of high-ranks are to be interpreted. PMID:26635761

  5. Communities and classes in symmetric fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, M J

    2014-01-01

    Two aspects of fractal networks are considered: the community structure and the class structure, where classes of nodes appear as a consequence of a local symmetry of nodes. The analysed systems are the networks constructed for two selected symmetric fractals: the Sierpinski triangle and the Koch curve. Communities are searched for by means of a set of differential equations. Overlapping nodes which belong to two different communities are identified by adding some noise to the initial connectivity matrix. Then, a node can be characterized by a spectrum of probabilities of belonging to different communities. Our main goal is that the overlapping nodes with the same spectra belong to the same class.

  6. Class network routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2009-09-08

    Class network routing is implemented in a network such as a computer network comprising a plurality of parallel compute processors at nodes thereof. Class network routing allows a compute processor to broadcast a message to a range (one or more) of other compute processors in the computer network, such as processors in a column or a row. Normally this type of operation requires a separate message to be sent to each processor. With class network routing pursuant to the invention, a single message is sufficient, which generally reduces the total number of messages in the network as well as the latency to do a broadcast. Class network routing is also applied to dense matrix inversion algorithms on distributed memory parallel supercomputers with hardware class function (multicast) capability. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the communication patterns of dense matrix inversion can be served by hardware class functions, which results in faster execution times.

  7. Culture and social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuri

    2017-08-08

    A large body of research in Western cultures has demonstrated the psychological and health effects of social class. This review outlines a cultural psychological approach to social stratification by comparing psychological and health manifestations of social class across Western and East Asian cultures. These comparisons suggest that cultural meaning systems shape how people make meaning and respond to material/structural conditions associated with social class, thereby leading to culturally divergent manifestations of social class. Specifically, unlike their counterparts in Western cultures, individuals of high social class in East Asian cultures tend to show high conformity and other-orientated psychological attributes. In addition, cultures differ in how social class impacts health (i.e. on which bases, through which pathways, and to what extent). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fostering a Middle Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO BIN

    2011-01-01

    Though there is no official definition of "middle class" in China,the tag has become one few Chinese people believe they deserve anyway.In early August,the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences released a report on China's urban development,saying China had a middle-class population of 230 million in 2009,or 37 percent of its urban residents.It also forecast half of city dwellers in China would be part of the middle class by 2023.

  9. Tailor-Made Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreirer, Barbara A.

    1978-01-01

    Adapted teaching materials and procedures were developed at Florida State University to help visually handicapped students in the public schools participate in a mainstreamed home economics class. (MF)

  10. Language, Culture, Class, Gender, and Class Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrick, Stephanie

    This paper explores reasons why some students with English as a Second Language (ESL) feel less entitled to speak out in class than others, discussing ways in which teachers can widen the definition of participation. The first section explains how student background can affect participation. For students who are non-native English speakers and who…

  11. The Question of Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Paul C.

    2007-01-01

    For too long, educators' approach to understanding the relationships between poverty, class and education has been framed by studying the behaviors and cultures of poor students and their families. If only people--in the middle and upper-middle classes--can understand "their" culture, why "those people" do not value education, why "those parents"…

  12. The Conversation Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Acy L.

    2012-01-01

    The conversation class occupies a unique place in the process of learning English as a second or foreign language. From the author's own experience in conducting special conversation classes with Persian-speaking adults, he has drawn up a number of simple but important guidelines, some of which he hopes may provide helpful suggestions for the…

  13. Class II Microcins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, Gaëlle; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Peduzzi, Jean

    Class II microcins are 4.9- to 8.9-kDa polypeptides produced by and active against enterobacteria. They are classified into two subfamilies according to their structure and their gene cluster arrangement. While class IIa microcins undergo no posttranslational modification, class IIb microcins show a conserved C-terminal sequence that carries a salmochelin-like siderophore motif as a posttranslational modification. Aside from this C-terminal end, which is the signature of class IIb microcins, some sequence similarities can be observed within and between class II subclasses, suggesting the existence of common ancestors. Their mechanisms of action are still under investigation, but several class II microcins use inner membrane proteins as cellular targets, and some of them are membrane-active. Like group B colicins, many, if not all, class II microcins are TonB- and energy-dependent and use catecholate siderophore receptors for recognition/­translocation across the outer membrane. In that context, class IIb microcins are considered to have developed molecular mimicry to increase their affinity for their outer membrane receptors through their salmochelin-like posttranslational modification.

  14. Class in disguise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Stine Thidemann; Prieur, Annick

    This paper asks how class can have importance in one of the worlds’ most equal societies: Denmark. The answer is that class here appears in disguised forms. The field under study is a city, Aalborg, in the midst of transition from a stronghold of industrialism to a post industrial economy...

  15. Cutting Class Harms Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lewis A., III

    2012-01-01

    An accessible business school population of undergraduate students was investigated in three independent, but related studies to determine effects on grades due to cutting class and failing to take advantage of optional reviews and study quizzes. It was hypothesized that cutting classes harms exam scores, attending preexam reviews helps exam…

  16. DEFINING THE MIDDLE CLASS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Classifying the middle class remains controversial despite its alleged growth China’s cities housed more than 230 million middle-class residents in 2009 or 37 percent of the urban population,according to the 2011 Blue Book of Cities in China released on August 3.

  17. DEFINING THE MIDDLE CLASS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG HAIRONG

    2011-01-01

    China's cities housed more than 230 million middle-class residents in 2009ot 37 percent of the urban population,according to the 2011 Blue Book of Cities in China released on August 3.In China's main urban centers,Beijing and Shanghai,the middle class accounted for 46 percent and 38 percent,respectively,of the local population.

  18. Universality classes of inflation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We investigate all single-field, slow-roll inflationary models whose slow-roll parameters scale as 1/N in the limit of a large number of e-folds N. We proof that all such models belong to two universality classes, characterised by a single parameter. One class contains small field models like hillto

  19. Teaching Social Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablante, Courtney B.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Discussing socioeconomic status in college classes can be challenging. Both teachers and students feel uncomfortable, yet social class matters more than ever. This is especially true, given increased income inequality in the United States and indications that higher education does not reduce this inequality as much as many people hope. Resources…

  20. Generalized Fourier transforms classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend; Møller, Steen

    2002-01-01

    The Fourier class of integral transforms with kernels $B(\\omega r)$ has by definition inverse transforms with kernel $B(-\\omega r)$. The space of such transforms is explicitly constructed. A slightly more general class of generalized Fourier transforms are introduced. From the general theory...

  1. Class Transitions in Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, S K

    2005-01-01

    A black hole spectrum is known to change from the hard state to the soft state when the energy spectral index $\\alpha$ ($F_E \\propto E^{-\\alpha}$) in, say, 2-20 keV range changes from $\\alpha \\sim 0.5$ to $\\sim 1.5$. However, this `classical' definition which characterizes black holes like Cyg X-1, becomes less useful for many objects such as GRS 1915+105 in which the spectral slope is seen to vary from one to the other in a matter of seconds and depending on whether or not winds form, the spectral slope also changes. The light curves and the colour-colour diagrams may look completely different on different days depending on the frequency and mode of switching from one spectral state to the other. Though RXTE observations have yielded wealth of information on such `variability classes' in GRS 1915+105, very rarely one has been able to observe how the object goes from one class to the other. In the present review, we discuss possible origins of the class transition and present several examples of such transiti...

  2. Teaching Dystopian Literature to a Consumer Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Many students are struggling with more depression and anxiety than ever before. These are characteristic dangers of the "consumer class"--1.7 billion people worldwide who are "characterized by diets of highly processed food, desire for bigger houses, more and bigger cars, higher levels of debt, and lifestyles devoted to the accumulation of…

  3. Teaching Dystopian Literature to a Consumer Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Many students are struggling with more depression and anxiety than ever before. These are characteristic dangers of the "consumer class"--1.7 billion people worldwide who are "characterized by diets of highly processed food, desire for bigger houses, more and bigger cars, higher levels of debt, and lifestyles devoted to the accumulation of…

  4. Social Class Dialogues and the Fostering of Class Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    How do critical pedagogies promote undergraduate students' awareness of social class, social class identity, and social class inequalities in education? How do undergraduate students experience class consciousness-raising in the intergroup dialogue classroom? This qualitative study explores undergraduate students' class consciousness-raising in an…

  5. Semantic Analysis of Virtual Classes and Nested Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1999-01-01

    Virtual classes and nested classes are distinguishing features of BETA. Nested classes originated from Simula, but until recently they have not been part of main stream object- oriented languages. C++ has a restricted form of nested classes and they were included in Java 1.1. Virtual classes...... the central elements of the semantic analysis used in the Mjølner BETA compiler....

  6. Social Class Dialogues and the Fostering of Class Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    How do critical pedagogies promote undergraduate students' awareness of social class, social class identity, and social class inequalities in education? How do undergraduate students experience class consciousness-raising in the intergroup dialogue classroom? This qualitative study explores undergraduate students' class consciousness-raising in an…

  7. Metaproteogenomic analysis of a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture reveals genomic organization of key enzymes in the m-xylene degradation pathway and metabolic activity of proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinovski, Dragana; Taubert, Martin; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; von Bergen, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Seifert, Jana

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to ascertain the functional and phylogenetic relationships within an m-xylene degrading sulfate-reducing enrichment culture, which had been maintained for several years in the laboratory with m-xylene as the sole source of carbon and energy. Previous studies indicated that a phylotype affiliated to the Desulfobacteraceae was the main m-xylene assimilating organism. In the present study, genes and gene products were identified by a metaproteogenomic approach using LC-MS/MS analysis of the microbial community, and 2426 peptides were identified from 576 proteins. In the metagenome of the community, gene clusters encoding enzymes involved in fumarate addition to a methyl moiety of m-xylene (nms, bss), as well as gene clusters coding for enzymes involved in modified beta-oxidation to (3-methyl)benzoyl-CoA (bns), were identified in two separate contigs. Additionally, gene clusters containing homologues to bam genes encoding benzoyl-CoA reductase (Bcr) class II, catalyzing the dearomatization of (3-methyl)benzoyl-CoA, were identified. Time-resolved protein stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) experiments using (13)C-labeled m-xylene showed that the respective gene products were highly (13)C-labeled. The present data suggested the identification of gene products that were similar to those involved in methylnaphthalene degradation even though the consortium was not capable of growing in the presence of naphthalene, methylnaphthalene or toluene as substrates. Thus, a novel branch of enzymes was found that was probably specific for anaerobic m-xylene degradation.

  8. Characterization and antifungal activity of gazyumaru (Ficus microcarpa) latex chitinases: both the chitin-binding and the antifungal activities of class I chitinase are reinforced with increasing ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Toki; Ohdomari, Atsuko; Nakama, Naoya; Shimoji, Makiko; Ishihara, Masanobu

    2005-04-01

    Three chitinases, designated gazyumaru latex chitinase (GLx Chi)-A, -B, and -C, were purified from the latex of gazyumaru (Ficus microcarpa). GLx Chi-A,-B, and -C are an acidic class III (33 kDa, pI 4.0), a basic class I (32 kDa, pI 9.3), and a basic class II chitinase (27 kDa, pI > 10) respectively. GLx Chi-A did not exhibit any antifungal activity. At low ionic strength, GLx Chi-C exhibited strong antifungal activity, to a similar extent as GLx Chi-B. The antifungal activity of GLx Chi-C became weaker with increasing ionic strength, whereas that of GLx Chi-B became slightly stronger. GLx Chi-B and -C bound to the fungal cell-walls at low ionic strength, and then GLx Chi-C was dissociated from them by an escalation of ionic strength, but this was not the case for GLx Chi-B. The chitin-binding activity of GLx Chi-B was enhanced by increasing ionic strength. These results suggest that the chitin-binding domain of basic class I chitinase binds to the chitin in fungal cell walls by hydrophobic interaction and assists the antifungal action of the chitinase.

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Musavian, Hanieh Sadat; Butt, Tariq Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune......-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P.nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung...... pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P.nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable...

  10. Characterization of VPS34-IN1, a selective inhibitor of Vps34, reveals that the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate-binding SGK3 protein kinase is a downstream target of class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bago, Ruzica; Malik, Nazma; Munson, Michael J; Prescott, Alan R; Davies, Paul; Sommer, Eeva; Shpiro, Natalia; Ward, Richard; Cross, Darren; Ganley, Ian G; Alessi, Dario R

    2014-11-01

    The Vps34 (vacuolar protein sorting 34) class III PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) phosphorylates PtdIns (phosphatidylinositol) at endosomal membranes to generate PtdIns(3)P that regulates membrane trafficking processes via its ability to recruit a subset of proteins possessing PtdIns(3)P-binding PX (phox homology) and FYVE domains. In the present study, we describe a highly selective and potent inhibitor of Vps34, termed VPS34-IN1, that inhibits Vps34 with 25 nM IC50 in vitro, but does not significantly inhibit the activity of 340 protein kinases or 25 lipid kinases tested that include all isoforms of class I as well as class II PI3Ks. Administration of VPS34-IN1 to cells induces a rapid dose-dependent dispersal of a specific PtdIns(3)P-binding probe from endosome membranes, within 1 min, without affecting the ability of class I PI3K to regulate Akt. Moreover, we explored whether SGK3 (serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-3), the only protein kinase known to interact specifically with PtdIns(3)P via its N-terminal PX domain, might be controlled by Vps34. Mutations disrupting PtdIns(3)P binding ablated SGK3 kinase activity by suppressing phosphorylation of the T-loop [PDK1 (phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1) site] and hydrophobic motif (mammalian target of rapamycin site) residues. VPS34-IN1 induced a rapid ~50-60% loss of SGK3 phosphorylation within 1 min. VPS34-IN1 did not inhibit activity of the SGK2 isoform that does not possess a PtdIns(3)P-binding PX domain. Furthermore, class I PI3K inhibitors (GDC-0941 and BKM120) that do not inhibit Vps34 suppressed SGK3 activity by ~40%. Combining VPS34-IN1 and GDC-0941 reduced SGK3 activity ~80-90%. These data suggest SGK3 phosphorylation and hence activity is controlled by two pools of PtdIns(3)P. The first is produced through phosphorylation of PtdIns by Vps34 at the endosome. The second is due to the conversion of class I PI3K product, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 into PtdIns(3)P, via the sequential actions of the Ptd

  11. IELP Class Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈了了

    2010-01-01

    @@ As an exchange student majoring in English, I am curious about how English is taught to international students here in America. Therefore, I observed an IELP (Intensive English Learning Program) class in Central Connecticut State University where I study.

  12. Teaching Heterogeneous Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millrood, Radislav

    2002-01-01

    Discusses an approach to teaching heterogeneous English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language classes. Draws on classroom research data to describe the features of a success-building lesson context. (Author/VWL)

  13. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Classes of Heart Failure Updated:Sep 28,2016 Doctors usually classify patients' ... Blood Pressure Tracker Find additional helpful resources here Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  14. MKT 438 Complete Class

    OpenAIRE

    admin

    2015-01-01

      To purchase this material click below link   http://www.assignmentcloud.com/MKT-438/MKT-438-Complete-Class-Guide   For more classes visit www.assignmentcloud.com   MKT 438 Week 1 Individual Assignment Defining Public Relation Paper MKT 438 Week 2 Team Assignment Public Relations Campaign Overview Paper MKT 438 Week 3 Individual Assignment Functions of Public Relation Paper MKT 438 Week 3 Team Assignment Public Relations Campaig...

  15. A class in astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airieau, S. A.

    1999-09-01

    The goal of this class is to provide basic astrobiology knowledge to upper division science students. The scope is broad and in-depth coverage is not possible in this introductory course. Instead, science students from various branches of academia can acquire a broad basis and understanding of the other fields: astronomy, biology, geology, biochemistry, planetary and space sciences. The class is highly modular and allows instructors to concentrate on or eliminate topics according to their priorities and preferences.

  16. Nordic Walking Classes

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2015-01-01

    Four classes of one hour each are held on Tuesdays. RDV barracks parking at Entrance A, 10 minutes before class time. Spring Course 2015: 05.05/12.05/19.05/26.05 Prices 40 CHF per session + 10 CHF club membership 5 CHF/hour pole rental Check out our schedule and enroll at: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Nordic%20Walking/NewForm.aspx? Hope to see you among us! fitness.club@cern.ch

  17. Caracterização química e mineralógica de agregados de diferentes classes de tamanho de Latossolos Bruno e Vermelho localizados no estado do Paraná Chemical and mineralogical characterization of the different structure size classes of Red-Yellow and Dusky Red Latosols in Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vander de Freitas Melo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O teor e a forma dos minerais da fração argila são determinantes na definição da morfologia dos agregados do solo. Objetivando estudar a mineralogia da fração argila e as propriedades químicas de diferentes classes de agregados de Latossolos (Latossolo Bruno Ácrico húmico - LBd e Latossolo Vermelho Distroférrico húmico - LVdf originados de rochas basálticas no Estado do Paraná, coletaram-se amostras indeformadas em diferentes profundidades (horizontes Bw1 e Bw2 em perfis de solos localizados em duas toposseqüências (quatro perfis no LBd e três no LVdf. Após secagem e separação das amostras indeformadas em seis classes de agregados (2-4; 1-2; 0,5-1; 0,25-0,5; 0,105-0,25; The content and shap of clay minerals are important in the definition of soil structure morphology. To evaluate the clay mineralogy and chemical properties of different aggregate size-classes of Latosols (Red-Yellow - LBd and Dusky Red - LVdf derived from basalt in the state of Paraná, Brazil, soil samples of the Bw1 and Bw2 horizons were collected in four LBd and three LVdf profiles, distributed across two distinct toposequences. Dried and undisturbed soil samples were separated into six size-classes (2-4; 1-2; 0.5-1; 0.25-0.5; 0.105-0.25; < 0.105 mm and the soluble Si in 0,5 mol L-1 acetic acid and exchangeable K, Ca, Mg and Al contents were determined. The clay fraction extracted from each aggregate size-class was investigated by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and chemical analysis. The content of exchangeable elements did not vary among the aggregate size-classes in the Bw1 and Bw2 horizons for Red-Yellow and Dusky Red Latosol profiles. In spite of the high and continuous weathering of these soils the mineralogical characteristics of the aggregate clay fraction were not homogenized. The highest variation in the mineral contents, according to the aggregate size class, was observed for the profile in the highest position of the LBd toposequence; the

  18. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Denis, Kevin; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  19. The Lunar Volatiles Orbiter: A Discovery Class Lunar Water Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, P. G.; Sun, X.; Petro, N.; Farrell, W.; Abshire, J. B.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Green, R.; Thompson, D. E.; Greenberger, R.; Hurley, D.; McClanahan, T. P.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2016-11-01

    The Lunar Volatiles Orbiter is a Discovery Class mission concept aimed at characterizing the nature and mobility of water on the Moon. Its instruments include a laser spectrometer, an infrared hyperspectral imager, and a neutral mass spectrometer.

  20. CLASS: The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    CERN Document Server

    Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dünner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Harrington, Kathleen; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary F; Huang, Caroline; Irwin, Kent; Jones, Glenn; Karakla, John; Kogut, Alan J; Larson, David; Limon, Michele; Lowry, Lindsay; Marriage, Tobias; Mehrle, Nicholas; Miller, Amber D; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel H; Novak, Giles; Reintsema, Carl; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wagner, Emily; Watts, Duncan; Wollack, Edward; Xu, Zhilei; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an experiment to measure the signature of a gravita-tional-wave background from inflation in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CLASS is a multi-frequency array of four telescopes operating from a high-altitude site in the Atacama Desert in Chile. CLASS will survey 70\\% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz, which are chosen to straddle the Galactic-foreground minimum while avoiding strong atmospheric emission lines. This broad frequency coverage ensures that CLASS can distinguish Galactic emission from the CMB. The sky fraction of the CLASS survey will allow the full shape of the primordial B-mode power spectrum to be characterized, including the signal from reionization at low $\\ell$. Its unique combination of large sky coverage, control of systematic errors, and high sensitivity will allow CLASS to measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at a level of $r=0.01$ and make a cosmi...

  1. CLASS: The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dunner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an experiment to measure the signature of a gravitational wave background from inflation in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CLASS is a multi-frequency array of four telescopes operating from a high-altitude site in the Atacama Desert in Chile. CLASS will survey 70% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz, which are chosen to straddle the Galactic-foreground minimum while avoiding strong atmospheric emission lines. This broad frequency coverage ensures that CLASS can distinguish Galactic emission from the CMB. The sky fraction of the CLASS survey will allow the full shape of the primordial B-mode power spectrum to be characterized, including the signal from reionization at low-length. Its unique combination of large sky coverage, control of systematic errors, and high sensitivity will allow CLASS to measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at a level of r = 0:01 and make a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to the surface of last scattering, tau. (c) (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  2. Talking Class in Tehroon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elling, Rasmus Christian; Rezakhani, Khodadad

    2016-01-01

    Persian, like any other language, is laced with references to class, both blatant and subtle. With idioms and metaphors, Iranians can identify and situate others, and thus themselves, within hierarchies of social status and privilege, both real and imagined. Some class-related terms can be traced...... back to medieval times, whereas others are of modern vintage, the linguistic legacy of television shows, pop songs, social media memes or street vernacular. Every day, it seems, an infectious set of phrases appears that make yesterday’s seem embarrassingly antiquated....

  3. NR 512 Entire Class

    OpenAIRE

    Laynebaril1

    2017-01-01

     NR 512 Entire Class   Click Link Below To Buy:   http://hwcampus.com/shop/nr-512-entire-class/ Or Visit www.hwcampus.com   NR512 Week 1 Discussion Latest 2017 Integration of Nursing Informatics Skills and Competencies (graded) • Reflect on your own practice. Discuss how informatics is used in your practice. What is your primary area where you would use informatics? NR512 Week 2 Discussion Latest 2017 Wisdom Versus Judgment (graded) How does the conc...

  4. Class Actions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with the relatively new Danish Act on Class Action (Danish: gruppesøgsmål) which was suggested by The Permanent Council on Civil procedure (Retsplejerådet) of which the article's author is a member. The operability of the new provisions is illustrated through some wellknown Dani...... cases: Hafnia case (investment prospectus), and Danish Eternit (roof elements) where the existence of Danish provisions on class actions might have made a difference, and the article also deals with the delicate questions of opt-in and opt-out....

  5. MIDDLE CLASS MOVEMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. K. Sravana Kumar

    2016-01-01

                The middle class is placed between labour and capital. It neither directly awns the means of production that pumps out the surplus generated by wage labour power, nor does it, by its own labour, produce the surplus which has use and exchange value. Broadly speaking, this class consists of the petty bourgeoisie and the white-collar workers. The former are either self-employed or involved in the distribution of commodities and t...

  6. MIDDLE CLASS MOVEMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. K. Sravana Kumar

    2016-01-01

                The middle class is placed between labour and capital. It neither directly awns the means of production that pumps out the surplus generated by wage labour power, nor does it, by its own labour, produce the surplus which has use and exchange value. Broadly speaking, this class consists of the petty bourgeoisie and the white-collar workers. The former are either self-employed or involved in the distribution of commodities and t...

  7. BUSN 460 Complete Class

    OpenAIRE

    Laynebaril1

    2017-01-01

    BUSN 460 Complete Class Click Link Below To Buy:   http://hwcampus.com/shop/busn-460-complete-class/     Week 1 DQ 1 Selling your team’s services to CanGo  Week 1 DQ 2 Mission, Vision & Values  Week 2 DQ 1 Planning a Technological Solution  Week 2 DQ 2 Cost Benefit Analysis  Week 3 DQ 1 Flow Charting Processes  Week 3 DQ 2 Implementing Technology  Week 4 DQ 1 Group vs Team  Week  4 DQ 2 Matrixed Employee Environments  Week 5 DQ 1 Pe...

  8. On the middle class

    OpenAIRE

    MacLennan, Michael; Magalhães, Beatrix Judice

    2013-01-01

    The Middle class as a concept has evolved over time, taking on various meanings at various points throughout history, becoming an object to aspire to for poor people, an object of desire for a strong government, a buzzword for politicians the world over, and the source of new customers for firms, and the global economy more broadly. This special issue of Poverty in Focus, exclusively devoted to the exploration of themes related to the middle class is part of a larger endeavour initiated by Th...

  9. Caracterização das funções estomatognáticas e disfunções temporomandibulares pré e pós cirurgia ortognática e reabilitação fonoaudiológica da deformidade dentofacial classe II esquelética Functional characterization and temporomandibular disorders before and after orthognathic surgery and myofunctional treatment of class II dentofacial deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Bartolomucci Angeli Pereira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: investigar as características funcionais e de disfunções temporomandibulares em indivíduos com deformidade dentofacial do tipo Classe II esquelética com indicação de cirurgia ortognática, assim como sua evolução após correção cirúrgica das bases ósseas e reabilitação miofuncional orofacial, buscando subsídios para o aprimoramento de reabilitação desses pacientes. MÉTODO: estudo longitudinal com 22 indivíduos com deformidade dentofacial Classe II, definidos após análise de critérios de inclusão e exclusão. A investigação dos dados referentes às queixas gerais, disfunções temporomandibulares e funções estomatognáticas foi realizada em avaliação miofuncional orofacial prévia à cirurgia, e em reavaliação quatro meses após realização da cirurgia ortognática e reabilitação fonoaudiológica. Foi utilizado teste de igualdade de duas proporções para análise estatística. RESULTADOS: as principais queixas foram funcionais. Constatou-se presença de disfunção temporomandibular na maioria da amostra, com remissão dos sinais em 81% dos casos comprometidos. A caracterização das funções estomatognáticas foi descrita, sendo obtida melhora funcional após os tratamentos com diferenças estatisticamente significantes. CONCLUSÃO: os tratamentos, cirúrgico e fonoaudiológico, produzem modificações dos padrões funcionais e dos sinais de disfunção temporomandibular com redução das queixas iniciais, redução dos sinais e correção dos padrões funcionais, sendo a deglutição a função mais beneficiada pelos tratamentos.PURPOSE: to investigate and to describe the functional characterization and temporomandibular disorders (TMD before and after orthognathic surgery and myofunctional treatment of Class II Dentofacial deformity patients. METHOD: a longitudinal study including 22 subjects with Class II dentofacial deformity, defined after analysis of inclusion and exclusion criteria, was

  10. Evaluation depth of the curve of Spee in class I, class II, and class III malocclusion: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Occlusal plane is an essential consideration when multiple long-span posterior restorations are designed. When restorations are added to an existing tooth arrangement characterized by rotated, tipped, or extruded teeth, excursive interferences may be incorporated, resulting in detrimental squeal. The curve of Spee, which exists in the ideal natural dentition, allows harmony to exist between the anterior tooth and condylar guidance. This curve exists in the sagittal plane and is the best viewed from a lateral aspect. It permits total posterior disclusion on mandibular protrusion, given proper anterior tooth guidance. It is unclear that whether the curve of Spee is a description of the occlusal surface of each arch separately or in maximal intercuspation. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in the depth of curve of Spee between the class I, class II, class III and to investigate the relationship of depth of curve of Spee with over jet, over-bite.

  11. Phylogenetic and degradation characterization of Burkholderia cepacia WZ1 degrading herbicide quinclorac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Zhenmei; Min, Hang; Wu, Shuwen; Ruan, Aidong

    2003-11-01

    Strain WZI capable of degrading quinclorac was isolated from a pesticide manufactory soil and considered to be Burkholderia cepacia, belonged to bacteria, Proteobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria, based on morphology, physio-biochemical properties, whole cell fatty acid analysis and a partial sequencing of 16S rDNA. Strain WZ1 decomposed 90% of quinclorac at original concentration of 1000 mg L(-1) within 11 days. GC/MS analysis showed that the strain degraded quinclorac to 3,7-dichloro-8-quinoline and the cracked residue 2-chloro, 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, indicating that the metabolic pathway was initiated by process of decarboxylation followed by cleavage of the aromatic ring. Stain WZ1 was also able to degrade some other herbicides and aromatic compounds, including 2,4,5-T, phenol, naphthalene and hydrochinone etc. This paper describes for the first time Phylogenetic and degradation characterization of a pure bacterium which, is able to mineralize quinclorac.

  12. Class, Cultism, and Multiculturalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Peter; Farahmandpur, Ramin

    2001-01-01

    Globalization has hurt both developed and developing countries. Capitalism's relations of exploitation can hurt people of color in disabling ways. Discusses the relationships among race, gender, ethnic, and class identities in order to articulate a political framework that moves toward transnational ethnic alliances, abolishing the role of capital…

  13. Teaching Very Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRogatis, Amy; Honerkamp, Kenneth; McDaniel, Justin; Medine, Carolyn; Nyitray, Vivian-Lee; Pearson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The editor of "Teaching Theology and Religion" facilitated this reflective conversation with five teachers who have extensive experience and success teaching extremely large classes (150 students or more). In the course of the conversation these professors exchange and analyze the effectiveness of several active learning strategies they…

  14. Communication, "Class," and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffres, Leo W.

    A study was conducted to examine the relationships among communication, social class, and ethnic heritage. Eleven of thirteen ethnic groups in a Midwestern metropolitan area who had been studied in 1976 were surveyed again in late 1980 and early 1981. Groups surveyed were Irish, Greek, Czech, Italian, Lebanese, Hungarian, Lithuanian, Polish,…

  15. Shrinking Your Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron-Thorpe, Farren L.; Olson, Jo Clay; Davis, Denny

    2010-01-01

    Toys in the classroom was the result of a National Science Foundation grant that brought two engineering graduate students to a middle school math class. The graduate students and teachers collaborated in an effort to enhance students' mathematical learning. An engineering context was theorized as a way to further develop students' understanding…

  16. Openers for Biology Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, C. Robert R.

    This teaching guide contains 200 activities that are suitable for openers and demonstrations in biology classes. Details are provided regarding the use of these activities. Some of the broad topics under which the activities are organized include algae, amphibians, bacteria, biologists, crustaceans, dinosaurs, ecology, evolution, flowering plants,…

  17. Reference class forecasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    Underbudgettering og budgetoverskridelser forekommer i et flertal af større bygge- og anlægsprojekter. Problemet skyldes optimisme og/eller strategisk misinformation i budgetteringsprocessen. Reference class forecasting (RCF) er en prognosemetode, som er udviklet for at reducere eller eliminere...

  18. IQ and Social Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbein, Siv

    1980-01-01

    Swedish longitudinal studies of twins support Scarr-Salapatek's explanation of nature-nurture influences on intelligence. This model predicts more genetic variance in test results for advantaged than disadvantaged groups. Jensen's work, however, suggests equal amounts of variance among different social classes. (Author/CP)

  19. An "expanded" class perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steur, Luisa Johanna

    2014-01-01

    -back of Adivasis against their age-old colonization or the work of ‘external’ agitators. Capitalist restructuring and ‘globalization’ was generally seen as simply the latest chapter in the suffering of these Adivasis. Little focused attention was paid to the recent class trajectory of their lives under changing...

  20. Fostering a Middle Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Though there is no official definition of "middle class" in China, the tag has become one few Chinese people believe they deserve anyway.In early August, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences released a report on China’s urban development,

  1. The MHC class I genes of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirscherl, Hayley; McConnell, Sean C; Yoder, Jeffrey A; de Jong, Jill L O

    2014-09-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the immune response and in the recognition of non-self. Found in all jawed vertebrate species, including zebrafish and other teleosts, MHC genes are considered the most polymorphic of all genes. In this review we focus on the multi-faceted diversity of zebrafish MHC class I genes, which are classified into three sequence lineages: U, Z, and L. We examine the polygenic, polymorphic, and haplotypic diversity of the zebrafish MHC class I genes, discussing known and postulated functional differences between the different class I lineages. In addition, we provide the first comprehensive nomenclature for the L lineage genes in zebrafish, encompassing at least 15 genes, and characterize their sequence properties. Finally, we discuss how recent findings have shed new light on the remarkably diverse MHC loci of this species.

  2. THE LYGEO-STIPETEA CLASS IN SICILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. BRULLO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Basing on literature data and unpublished relevés from Sicily, a survey of the syntaxa belonging to the class Lygeo-Stipetea Rivas-Martínez 1978 is presented. This perennial vegetation is characterized by the dominance of big caespitose hemicryptophytes, and it is widely distributed in Sicily from the sea level up to 1500 m a.s.l. The class is represented in Sicily by two orders, floristically and ecologically well differentiated: Lygeo-Stipetalia, including the sole alliance Moricandio-Lygeion exclusively of clayey substrates, and Hyparrhenietalia hirtae, including five alliances (Hyparrhenion hirtae, Avenulo cincinnatae-Ampelodesmion mauritanici, Thero-Brachypodion ramosi, Bromo-Oryzopsion miliaceae, and Arundion collinae occurring on various substrates. Within the class, 50 associations have been recognized. To support the syntaxonomic proposal, a multivariate numerical analysis, considering literature and personal data, has been performed. Nomenclature, floristic settlement, ecology, syndynamism and chorology are examined for each syntaxon.

  3. Coincidence classes in nonorientable manifolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study Nielsen coincidence theory for maps between manifolds of same dimension regardless of orientation. We use the definition of semi-index of a class, review the definition of defective classes, and study the occurrence of defective root classes. We prove a semi-index product formula for lifting maps and give conditions for the defective coincidence classes to be the only essential classes.

  4. Isolation and characterization of different bacterial strains for bioremediation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermouche M'rassi, A; Bensalah, F; Gury, J; Duran, R

    2015-10-01

    Crude oil is a common environmental pollutant composed of a large number of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Biodegradation is carried out by microbial communities that are important in determining the fate of pollutants in the environment. The intrinsic biodegradability of the hydrocarbons and the distribution in the environment of competent degrading microorganisms are crucial information for the implementation of bioremediation processes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of various bacteria toward aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate and characterize hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from contaminated soil of a refinery in Arzew, Algeria. A collection of 150 bacterial strains was obtained; the bacterial isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and their ability to degrade hydrocarbon compounds characterized. The isolated strains were mainly affiliated to the Gamma-Proteobacteria class. Among them, Pseudomonas spp. had the ability to metabolize high molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds such as pristane (C19) at 35.11 % by strain LGM22 and benzo[a] pyrene (C20) at 33.93 % by strain LGM11. Some strains were able to grow on all the hydrocarbons tested including octadecane, squalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. Some strains were specialized degrading only few substrates. In contrast, the strain LGM2 designated as Pseudomonas sp. was found able to degrade both linear and branched alkanes as well as low and high poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The alkB gene involved in alkane degradation was detected in LGM2 and other Pseudomonas-related isolates. The capabilities of the isolated bacterial strains to degrade alkanes and PAHs should be of great practical significance in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments.

  5. Out about class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, L; Sell, I

    2001-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lesbian activist Léonie Walker traces the evolution of her involvement in social change philanthropy and her work to bring together activists of diverse class and racial backgrounds. She shows how she was trained as an activist, discusses conscious and socially responsible ways to steward wealth, and gives voice to the seldom-heard experiences of LGBT people with inherited wealth. The co-founder of the Women Managing Wealth program at the Ms. Foundation and a board member of Astraea Lesbian Action Foundation, she has also developed and facilitated numerous Dismantling Classism workshops. In this article, she discusses the importance of, and ways of implementing, cross-class, cross-race dialogue that can further understanding among activists of different backgrounds.

  6. World Class Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Ole Emil; Jensen, Per Anker

    2013-01-01

    Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet.......Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet....

  7. Flexible Word Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    • First major publication on the phenomenon • Offers cross-linguistic, descriptive, and diverse theoretical approaches • Includes analysis of data from different language families and from lesser studied languages This book is the first major cross-linguistic study of 'flexible words', i.e. words...... that cannot be classified in terms of the traditional lexical categories Verb, Noun, Adjective or Adverb. Flexible words can - without special morphosyntactic marking - serve in functions for which other languages must employ members of two or more of the four traditional, 'specialised' word classes. Thus......, flexible words are underspecified for communicative functions like 'predicating' (verbal function), 'referring' (nominal function) or 'modifying' (a function typically associated with adjectives and e.g. manner adverbs). Even though linguists have been aware of flexible world classes for more than...

  8. World Class Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Ole Emil; Jensen, Per Anker

    2013-01-01

    Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet.......Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet....

  9. A Rising Consumer Class

    OpenAIRE

    Manish Sonthalia

    2010-01-01

    India has had two stages of growth, both related to consumption since 1947. The first was based on developing economic self sufficiency; the second on rising disposable income. It is now entering its third period of consumption growth which sees it entering the world stage as one of the largest consumers in the world. This paper explains the factors that are driving this dramatic shift from the emerging middle classes to the patterns of consumption and investment in India today.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of Gas Production from Class 2 and Class 3 Hydrate Deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George; Zhang, Keni

    2008-05-01

    Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds in which gas molecules are lodged within the lattices of an ice-like crystalline solid. The vast quantities of hydrocarbon gases trapped in hydrate formations in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments may constitute a new and promising energy source. Class 2 hydrate deposits are characterized by a Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is underlain by a saturated zone of mobile water. Class 3 hydrate deposits are characterized by an isolated Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL) that is not in contact with any hydrate-free zone of mobile fluids. Both classes of deposits have been shown to be good candidates for exploitation in earlier studies of gas production via vertical well designs - in this study we extend the analysis to include systems with varying porosity, anisotropy, well spacing, and the presence of permeable boundaries. For Class 2 deposits, the results show that production rate and efficiency depend strongly on formation porosity, have a mild dependence on formation anisotropy, and that tighter well spacing produces gas at higher rates over shorter time periods. For Class 3 deposits, production rates and efficiency also depend significantly on formation porosity, are impacted negatively by anisotropy, and production rates may be larger, over longer times, for well configurations that use a greater well spacing. Finally, we performed preliminary calculations to assess a worst-case scenario for permeable system boundaries, and found that the efficiency of depressurization-based production strategies are compromised by migration of fluids from outside the system.

  11. Class Action and Class Settlement in a European Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The article analyses the options for introducing common European rules on class action lawsuits with an opt-out-model in individual cases. An analysis is made of how the risks of misuse of class actions can be prevented. The article considers the Dutch rules on class settlements (the WCAM procedure...

  12. Classroom contexts: connections between class size and within class grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchford, P; Baines, E; Kutnick, P; Martin, C

    2001-06-01

    There has been a vigorous debate for many years about the educational effects of class size differences, but even if differences have an impact on pupils' academic progress this still leaves unanswered important questions about what mediates the effect. This paper is informed by a classroom contextual perspective, and examines associations between class size and within class groupings (in terms of size and number of groups, adult presence in groups, and type of interaction between grouping members). Age differences in these relationships are also explored. The quantitative study is based on analysis of 3157 groupings, from 672 Reception, Year 2 and Year 5 classes in 331 schools. The qualitative study was based on 12 classes in 8 case study schools, and questionnaire responses completed by over 100 class teachers. Links between size of class and within class groupings were examined on the basis of a 'grouping mapping survey', in which teachers at a given time in the school day provided information on group size and number, adult presence, and type of interaction between pupils, and complementary qualitative analyses of data from teacher-completed questionnaires, and interviews. The number of groups in a class increased with the size of the class. Over all three year groups, small classes had on average just over three groups, while large classes approached six groups. The size of groups in the class decreased with size of class. In class sizes over 25, pupils were more likely to be in a large group of 7-10, while in classes under 25 they were more likely to be in whole class groupings. Qualitative analyses showed that teachers felt that groups of 7-10 pupils had negative educational effects, for example, in terms of the quality and quantity of teaching and children's concentration and contribution in groups. Results suggest that the effects of class size can be best seen as through the size and number of groups, which will then have implications for learning

  13. Anomalia de Classe III

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Projeto de Pós-Graduação/Dissertação apresentado à Universidade Fernando Pessoa como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do grau de Mestre em Medicina Dentária Introdução: A anomalia de classe III, é uma má oclusão que afeta os indivíduos psicologicamente, pois hoje em dia, a estética é socialmente valorizada. Deste modo, o diagnóstico deve ser executado precocemente para que os indivíduos portadores desta anomalia, possam ser acompanhados desde criança, pelos profissionais área da Medicina...

  14. Social class and body weight among Chinese urban adults: the role of the middle classes in the nutrition transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefond, Céline; Clément, Matthieu

    2014-07-01

    While a plethoric empirical literature addresses the relationship between socio-economic status and body weight, little is known about the influence of social class on nutritional outcomes, particularly in developing countries. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the analysis of the social determinants of adult body weight in urban China by taking into account the influence of social class. More specifically, we propose to analyse the position of the Chinese urban middle class in terms of being overweight or obese. The empirical investigations conducted as part of this research are based on a sample of 1320 households and 2841 adults from the China Health and Nutrition Survey for 2009. For the first step, we combine an economic approach and a sociological approach to identify social classes at household level. First, households with an annual per capita income between 10,000 Yuan and the 95th income percentile are considered as members of the middle class. Second, we strengthen the characterization of the middle class using information on education and employment. By applying clustering methods, we identify four groups: the elderly and inactive middle class, the old middle class, the lower middle class and the new middle class. For the second step, we implement an econometric analysis to assess the influence of social class on adult body mass index and on the probability of being overweight or obese. We use multinomial treatment regressions to deal with the endogeneity of the social class variable. Our results show that among the four subgroups of the urban middle class, the new middle class is the only one to be relatively well-protected against obesity. We suggest that this group plays a special role in adopting healthier food consumption habits and seems to be at a more advanced stage of the nutrition transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cephalometric characterization of skeletal Class II, division 1 malocclusion in white Brazilian subjects Caracterização cefalométrica da má oclusão de Classe II, 1ª. divisão, em brasileiros leucodermas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Roberto de Freitas

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the main points in Orthodontic studies is the growth and development of the craniofacial structures. In this study, skeletal cephalometric characteristics of Class II, division 1 malocclusion were assessed in lateral cephalograms. The experimental sample comprised 55 white Brazilian individuals of both genders, with an ANB angle of 4.5 degrees or higher. The mean age of the subjects was 13.5 years. Steiner and McNamara Jr cephalometric analyses were used in order to evaluate the relation between angular and linear positions of the apical bases, the dental and cranial structures, comparing with the values obtained in the control group (available at Bauru Dental School-USP. The results showed that, for the experimental group, the maxilla was well positioned in relation to the cranial base. The maxillomandibular relation showed an increased overjet, which was predictable based on criteria for sample selection. The geometrical proportion of the apical bases presented a small mandible and a normal sized maxilla. The craniofacial growth pattern presented a vertical tendency. The maxillary incisors were buccally inclined and well positioned by the linear evaluation. The mandibular incisors showed marked buccal inclination and protrusion. No statistically significant difference between genders was found.Um dos principais temas em Ortodontia é o estudo do crescimento e desenvolvimento craniofacial. Neste estudo, a caracterização cefalométrica da Classe II, 1ª divisão, esquelética, foi estudada em telerradiografias em norma lateral. O grupo experimental foi composto por 55 indivíduos brasileiros leucodermas, de ambos os gêneros, apresentando um ângulo ANB maior ou igual a 4.5 graus. A idade média foi 13.5 anos. Foram utilizadas grandezas cefalométricas da análise de Steiner e McNamara Jr. para avaliar a relação entre as posições angulares e lineares das bases apicais, estruturas dentárias e destas com as estruturas cranianas

  16. Team Learning in Large Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Information and suggestions are provided on the use of team learning in large college classes. Introductory material discusses the negative cycle of student-teacher interaction that may be provoked by large classes, and the use of permanent, heterogeneous, six- or seven-member student learning groups as the central focus of class activity as a…

  17. Reconciling Virtual Classes with Genericity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2006-01-01

    classes. As a result, a kind of type parameters have been introduced, but they are simple and only used where they excel. Conversely, final definitions of virtual classes have been re- moved from the language, thus making virtual classes more flexible. The result- ing language presents a clearer and more...

  18. Understanding Class in Contemporary Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrits, Gitte Sommer

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that claims about the death of class and the coming of the classless society are premature. Such claims are seldom genuinely empirical, and the theoretical argument often refers to a simple and therefore easily dismissible concept of class. By rejecting the concept of class...

  19. Characterization of phenotypically metallo-β-lactamase positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa human isolates from Himachal Pradesh for MBL genes (blaVIM-2 and blaIMP-1, integrase gene class 1, 2, 3 (int1, int2 and int3 and sulphonamide resistance gene (sul1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Chauhan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The present study highlights the occurrence of MBL gene (blaVIM-2, integron class 1 (int1 and sulphonamide resistance (sul1 genes in P. aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients of Shimla region of India. Methods: P. aeruginosa isolates detected positive for MBL by Combined Disc and Ezy MIC tests were characterized by PCR amplification of segments of blaIMP-1 and blaVIM-2, integrase genes encoding integron classes int1, int2 and int3, and sul1 gene. The nucleotide sequence homologies with the published sequences of Pseudomonas spp and other gram-negative bacilli were determined. Results: All the confirmed isolates of P. aeruginosa were further subjected to nucleotide sequencing of 16SrRNA amplicons. MBL gene (blaVIM-2 was amplified in six out of 27 MBL positive isolates, int1 gene in eleven and sul1 gene in 14 MBL positive isolates .Only one isolate Pa138 carried both blaVIM-2 and int1 genes. The specificity was established by nucleotide sequencing of the amplicons. Interpretation & Conclusion: The occurrence of blaVIM-2, int1 and sul1 genes has been reported in the P. aeruginosa isolates of Shimla region of Himachal Pradesh. The studies might be useful to the clinicians for selecting suitable antibiotic for treating and controlling P. aeruginosa infections in this region.

  20. Discharge of landfill leachate to streambed sediments impacts the mineralization potential of phenoxy acid herbicides depending on the initial abundance of tfdA gene classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazarbasi, Meric Batioglu; Milosevic, Nemanja; Malaguerra, Flavio

    2013-01-01

    To understand the role of abundance of tfdA gene classes belonging to β- and γ-proteobacteria on phenoxy acid herbicide degradation, streambed sediments were sampled around three seepage meters (SMs) installed in a landfill-impacted groundwater–surface water interface. Highest herbicide mass...... faster mineralization. The observed difference in mineralization rates between discharge zones was simulated by a Monod-based kinetic model, which confirmed the role of abundance of tfdA gene classes. This study suggests presence of specific degraders adapted to slow growth rate and high yield strategy...... due to long-term herbicide exposure; and thus groundwater–surface water interface could act as a natural biological filter and protect stream water quality....

  1. Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 LigG involved in lignin degradation is structurally and biochemically related to the glutathione transferase ω class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meux, Edgar; Prosper, Pascalita; Masai, Eiji; Mulliert, Guillermo; Dumarçay, Stéphane; Morel, Mélanie; Didierjean, Claude; Gelhaye, Eric; Favier, Frédérique

    2012-11-16

    SpLigG is one of the three glutathione transferases (GSTs) involved in the process of lignin breakdown in the soil bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Sequence comparisons showed that SpLigG and several proteobacteria homologues form an independent cluster within cysteine-containing GSTs. The relationship between SpLigG and other GSTs was investigated. The X-ray structure and biochemical properties of SpLigG indicate that this enzyme belongs to the omega class of glutathione transferases. However, the hydrophilic substrate binding site of SpLigG, together with its known ability to stereoselectively deglutathionylate the physiological substrate α-glutathionyl-β-hydroxypropiovanillone, argues for broadening the definition of the omega class.

  2. Hirzebruch classes of complex hypersurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain E; Schuermann, Joerg; Shaneson, Julius L

    2009-01-01

    The Milnor-Hirzebruch class of a locally complete intersection X in an algebraic manifold M measures the difference between the (Poincare dual of the) Hirzebruch class of the virtual tangent bundle of X and, respectively, the Brasselet-Schuermann-Yokura (homology) Hirzebruch class of X. In this note, we calculate the Milnor-Hirzebruch class of a globally defined algebraic hypersurface X in terms of the corresponding Hirzebruch invariants of singular strata in a Whitney stratification of X. Our approach is based on Schuermann's specialization property for the motivic Hirzebruch class transformation of Brasselet-Schuermann-Yokura.

  3. Class Attendance in Undergraduate Classes: Why and When Do Students Miss Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blerkom, Malcolm L.

    The first part of this study examined class attendance of 959 students in 17 sections of undergraduate psychology classes. It was found that class attendance decreased from the beginning to the end of the semester. An investigation of 117 of the students found that attendance displayed moderate correlations with course grades. Students missed…

  4. Class Discovery in Galaxy Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Bazell, D; Bazell, David; Miller, David J.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, automated, supervised classification techniques have been fruitfully applied to labeling and organizing large astronomical databases. These methods require off-line classifier training, based on labeled examples from each of the (known) object classes. In practice, only a small batch of labeled examples, hand-labeled by a human expert, may be available for training. Moreover, there may be no labeled examples for some classes present in the data, i.e. the database may contain several unknown classes. Unknown classes may be present due to 1) uncertainty in or lack of knowledge of the measurement process, 2) an inability to adequately ``survey'' a massive database to assess its content (classes), and/or 3) an incomplete scientific hypothesis. In recent work, new class discovery in mixed labeled/unlabeled data was formally posed, with a proposed solution based on mixture models. In this work we investigate this approach, propose a competing technique suitable for class discovery in neural network...

  5. Propagating Class and Method Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a mixin based class and method combination mechanism with block structure propagation. Traditionally, mixins can be composed to form new classes, possibly merging the implementations of methods (as in CLOS). In our approach, a class or method combination operation may cause any...... number of implicit combinations. For example, it is possible to specify separate aspects of a family of classes, and then combine several aspects into a full-fledged class family. The combination expressions would explicitly combine whole-family aspects, and by propagation implicitly combine the aspects...... for each member of the class family, and again by propagation implicitly compose each method from its aspects. As opposed to CLOS, this is type-checked statically; and as opposed to other systems for advanced class combination/ merging/weaving, it is integrated directly in the language, ensuring a clear...

  6. Pseudo Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance "modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow," some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month.

  7. Network class superposition analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A B Pearson

    Full Text Available Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., ≈ 10(30 for the yeast cell cycle process, considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix T, which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for T derived from boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying T to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with T. We show how to generate Derrida plots based on T. We show that T-based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on T. We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for T, for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses.

  8. Social class differences in self, attribution, and attention: socially expansive individualism of middle-class Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Nicholas A; Kitayama, Shinobu; Nisbett, Richard E

    2009-07-01

    Although U.S. culture strongly sanctions the ideal of independence, the specific ways in which independence is realized may be variable depending, among other factors, on social class. Characterized by relative scarcity of social and material resources, working-class (WC) Americans were expected to strongly value self-reliance. In contrast, with choices among abundant resources, middle-class (MC) Americans were expected to value personal control and social expansiveness. In support of this analysis, relative to their WC counterparts, MC Americans reported more support from friends and greater likelihood of giving and receiving advice but less self-reliance (Study 1). Furthermore, we found evidence that this social difference has cognitive consequences: College students with MC backgrounds were more likely than their WC counterparts were to endorse situational attributions for others' behavior (Studies 2a and 2b) as well as to show holistic visual attention (Study 3).

  9. Early treatment of Class III malocclusion with a tandem traction bow appliance

    OpenAIRE

    Sneha Basaveshwar Valgadde; Kishor Chougule

    2016-01-01

    Since Class III malocclusion is progressive in nature, the facial growth of Class III malocclusion worsens with age. Class III malocclusion is associated with a deviation in the sagittal relationship of the maxilla and the mandible, characterized by a deficient maxilla, retrognathic mandible, or a combination of both. The early orthopedic treatment of Class III malocclusions, at the end of primary dentition or the beginning of mixed dentition, prior to growth spurt, allows the accomplishment ...

  10. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pseudo-Class III Malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ariel Reyes; Luis Serret; Marcos Peguero; Orlando Tanaka

    2014-01-01

    Pseudo-Class III malocclusion is characterized by the presence of an anterior crossbite due to a forward functional displacement of the mandible; in most cases, the maxillary incisors present some degree of retroclination, and the mandibular incisors are proclined. Various types of appliances have been described in the literature for the early treatment of pseudo-Class III malocclusion. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the importance of making the differential diagnosis between...

  11. Dynamics and Control of a Class of Underactuated Mechanical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; van der Schaft, Arjan; McClamroch, N. Harris; Kolmanovsky, Ilya

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for the dynamics and control of underactuated mechanical systems, defined as systems with fewer inputs than degrees of freedom. Control system formulation of underactuated mechanical systems is addressed and a class of underactuated systems characterized by nonintegrable dynamics relations is identified. Controllability and stabilizability results are derived for this class of underactuated systems. Examples are included to illustrate the results; t...

  12. Early Treatment Protocol for Skeletal Class III Malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Oltramari-Navarro,Paula Vanessa Pedron; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues; Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira CONTI; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; de Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues; Fernandes,Leandra Sant'Anna Ferreira Parron

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal Class III malocclusion, with its unpredictable and unfavorable nature, has been characterized by a growth pattern with doubtful prognosis regarding orthodontic mechanics, even when performed early. For a long time, Class III malocclusion was regarded as a synonym of mandibular prognathism, regardless of the affected skeletal structures. Mandibular growth, essentially determined by genetic factors, could barely be controlled by early orthodontic interventions. Therefore, the treatment...

  13. Class Action and Class Settlement in a European Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The article analyses the options for introducing common European rules on class action lawsuits with an opt-out-model in individual cases. An analysis is made of how the risks of misuse of class actions can be prevented. The article considers the Dutch rules on class settlements (the WCAM procedure......) and the advantage of integrating equivalent rules into a European rule set. The Danish rules, which have now been in effect for some years, are then considered....

  14. Working class conservatism: a system justification perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, John T

    2017-08-12

    Working class conservatism is a perennial issue in social science, but researchers have struggled to provide an adequate characterization. In social psychology, the question has too often been framed in 'either/or' terms of whether the disadvantaged are more or less likely to support the status quo than the advantaged. This is a crude rendering of the issue obscuring the fact that even if most working class voters are not conservative, millions are-and conservatives could not win elections without their support. System justification theory highlights epistemic, existential, and relational needs to reduce uncertainty, threat, and social discord that are shared by everyone-and that promote conservative attitudes. I summarize qualitative and quantitative evidence of system justification among the disadvantaged and consider prospects for more constructive political activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of bacterial communities associating with larval development of Yesso Scallop ( Patinopecten yessoensisis Jay, 1857) by high-throughput sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xueying; Liu, Jichen; Li, Ming; Zhao, Xuewei; Liang, Jun; Sun, Pihai; Ma, Yuexin

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial community presumably plays an essential role in inhibiting pathogen colonization and maintaining the health of scallop larvae, but limiting data are available for Yesso scallop ( Patinopecten yessoensisis Jay, 1857) larval development stages. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the bacterial communities associating with Yesso scallop larval development at fertilized egg S1, trochophora S2, D-shaped larvae S3, umbo larvae S4, and juvenile scallop S5 stages by Illumina high-throughput sequencing. Genomic DNA was extracted from the larvae and their associating bactera, and a gene segment covering V3-V4 region of 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced using an Illumina Miseq sequencer. Overall, 106760 qualified sequences with an average length of 449 bp were obtained. Sequences were compared with those retrieved from 16S rRNA gene databases, and 4 phyla, 7 classes, 15 orders, 21 families, 31 genera were identified. Proteobacteria was predominant phylum, accounting for more than 99%, at all 5 larval development stages. At genus level, Pseudomonas was dominant at stages S1 (80.60%), S2 (87.77%) and S5 (68.71%), followed by Photobacterium (17.06%) and Aeromonas (1.64%) at stage S1, Serratia (6.94%), Stenotrophomonas (3.08%) and Acinetobacter (1.2%) at stage S2, Shewanella (25.95%) and Pseudoalteromonas (4.57%) at stage S5. Moreover, genus Pseudoalteromonas became dominant at stages S3 (44.85%) and S4 (56.02%), followed by Photobacterium (29.82%), Pseudomonas (11.86%), Aliivibrio (8.60%) and Shewanella (3.39%) at stage S3, Pseudomonas (18.16%), Aliivibrio (14.29%), Shewanella (4.11%), Psychromonas (4.04%) and Psychrobacter (1.81%) at stage S4. From the results, we concluded that the bacterial community changed significantly at different development stages of Yesso Scallop larvae.

  16. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2006-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  17. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC 0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  18. Class IId or Linear and Non-Pediocin-Like Bacteriocins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatani, Shun; Zendo, Takeshi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    Class IId bacteriocins are one of the subclasses of class II bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria. This class of bacteriocins, however, show a great diversity in their primary structures and modes of action. This chapter focuses on two aspects: (1) the description of those heterogeneous bacteriocins with the concept of three potential subgroups and (2) the modes of action of lactococcin A, lactococcin 972, and lacticin Q, each of which belongs to a different subgroup and is well characterized in its unique mode of action.

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pseudo-Class III Malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Ariel; Serret, Luis; Peguero, Marcos; Tanaka, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Pseudo-Class III malocclusion is characterized by the presence of an anterior crossbite due to a forward functional displacement of the mandible; in most cases, the maxillary incisors present some degree of retroclination, and the mandibular incisors are proclined. Various types of appliances have been described in the literature for the early treatment of pseudo-Class III malocclusion. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the importance of making the differential diagnosis between a skeletal and a pseudo-Class III malocclusion and to describe the correction of an anterior crossbite. The association of maxillary expansion and a 2 × 4 appliance can successfully be used to correct anterior crossbites.

  20. Mutation classes of certain quivers with potentials as derived equivalence classes

    CERN Document Server

    Ladkani, Sefi

    2011-01-01

    We characterize the marked bordered unpunctured oriented surfaces with the property that all the Jacobian algebras of the quivers with potentials arising from their triangulations are derived equivalent. These are either surfaces of genus g with b boundary components and one marked point on each component, or the disc with 4 or 5 points on its boundary. We show that for each such marked surface, all the quivers in the mutation class have the same number of arrows, and the corresponding Jacobian algebras constitute a complete derived equivalence class of finite-dimensional algebras whose members are connected by sequences of Brenner-Butler tilts. In addition, we provide explicit quivers for each of these classes. We consider also 10 of the 11 exceptional finite mutation classes of quivers not arising from triangulations of marked surfaces excluding the one of the quiver X_7, and show that all the finite-dimensional Jacobian algebras in such class (for suitable choice of potentials) are derived equivalent only ...

  1. Organizing MHC Class II Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Fooksman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules are ligands for CD4+ T cells and are critical for initiating the adaptive immune response. This review is focused on what is currently known about MHC class II organization at the plasma membrane of antigen presenting cells and how this affects antigen presentation to T cells. The organization and diffusion of class II molecules have been measured by a variety of biochemical and microscopic techniques. Membrane lipids and other proteins have been implicated in MHC class II organization and function. However, when compared with the organization of MHC class I or TCR complexes, much less is known about MHC class II. Since clustering of T cell receptors occurs during activation, the organization of MHC molecules prior to recognition and during synapse formation may be critical for antigen presentation.

  2. Weil classes on abelian varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Moonen, B J J; Zarhin, Yu. G.

    1996-01-01

    Consider a complex abelian variety X on which a field F acts. Generalizing a construction of A. Weil, one associates to this a subspace W_F of the cohomology of X, which we call the space of Weil classes w.r.t. F. The purpose of this paper is to answer the following two questions: Q1: under what conditions on F does the space W_F contain, or even consist of, Hodge classes?, Q2: if W_F contains Hodge classes, under what conditions on F are these exceptional? In case X is defined over a number field, we also answer the analogous questions for Tate classes.

  3. Random Series of Trace Class Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Pisier, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    In this lecture, we present some results on Gaussian (or Rademacher) random series of trace class operators, mainly due jointly with F. Lust-Piquard. We will emphasize the probabilistic reformulation of these results, as well as the open problems suggested by them. We start by a brief survey of what is known about the problem of characterizing a.s. convergent (Gaussian or Rademacher) series of random vectors in a Banach space. The main result presented here is that for certain pairs of Banach spaces $E,F$ that include Hilbert spaces (and type 2 spaces with the analytic UMD property), we have

  4. Type Families with Class, Type Classes with Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serrano, Alejandro; Hage, Jurriaan; Bahr, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Type classes and type families are key ingredients in Haskell programming. Type classes were introduced to deal with ad-hoc polymorphism, although with the introduction of functional dependencies, their use expanded to type-level programming. Type families also allow encoding type-level functions...

  5. The omega-class glutathione transferases: structure, function, and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Philip G

    2011-05-01

    The omega class of glutathione transferases (GSTs) is a relatively ancient member of the cytosolic GST superfamily, and the omega-class GSTs are found in plants, animals, and some microbial species. The omega-class GSTs exhibit the canonical GST fold, but, unlike other GSTs, the omega-class GSTs have a cysteine residue in their active site. Consequently, the omega-class GSTs catalyze a range of thiol transferase and reduction reactions that are not catalyzed by members of the other classes. Human GSTO1-1 can catalyze the reduction of monomethylarsonic acid (V), but this does not appear to be physiologically important in cases of high environmental arsenic exposure. GSTO1-1 also plays an important role in the biotransformation of reactive α-haloketones to nontoxic acetophenones. Genetic variation is common in the omega-class GST genes, and variants that result in deficiency of GSTO1-1 have been characterized. Genetic linkage studies have discovered associations between GSTO genes and the age at onset of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The mechanism underlying this association with neurological disease may derive from the capacity of omega-class GSTs to mitigate oxidative stress or their role in activating the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β.

  6. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Saccucci Matteo; D’Attilio Michele; Rodolfino Daria; Festa Felice; Polimeni Antonella; Tecco Simona

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). ...

  7. Translanguaging in a Reading Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Viniti; Subhan, Aidil

    2015-01-01

    Using translanguaging as a theoretical foundation, this paper analyses findings from a Grade 2 reading class for low achieving students, where Malay was used as a scaffold to teach English. Data come from one class in one school in Singapore and its Learning Support Programme (LSP), which is part of a larger research project on biliteracy. The LSP…

  8. Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassler, Sharon; Miller, Amanda J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning cohabitation literature, research has failed to examine social class variation in processes of forming and advancing such unions. Drawing upon in-depth interviews with 122 working- and middle-class cohabitors, we examine the duration between dating and moving in together, reasons for cohabiting, and subsequent plans.…

  9. Relations among tautological classes revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    We give a simple generalisation of a theorem of Morita (1989) [10] and [11], which leads to a great number of relations among tautological classes on moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces......We give a simple generalisation of a theorem of Morita (1989) [10] and [11], which leads to a great number of relations among tautological classes on moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces...

  10. Tautological Classes on Projective Towers

    CERN Document Server

    Negut, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    When one has a tower of projective bundles over an algebraic variety and wishes to compute the push-forward of any cohomology class down this tower, one needs to recursively compute the Segre classes corresponding to each level. In this paper, we give a closed combinatorial formula that encodes this recursive procedure.

  11. Ideas for Managing Large Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabel, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes management strategies used in a large kinetics/industrial chemistry course. Strategies are designed to make instruction in such classes more efficient and effective. Areas addressed include homework assignment, quizzes, final examination, grading and feedback, and rewards for conducting the class in the manner described. (JN)

  12. Class, Identity, and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Galen, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the possibilities of working with White, working-class teacher education students to explore the "complex social trajectory" (Reay in Women's Stud Int Forum 20(2):225-233, 1997a, p. 19) of class border crossing as they progress through college. Through analysis of a course that I have developed, "Education and the American…

  13. Student Engagement and Marketing Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steven A.; Hunter, Gary L.; Melton, Horace; Goodwin, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    A study is reported that investigates the goals underlying undergraduate students' engagement in their major classes, nonmajor classes, and in extracurricular activities. The qualitative study employs both focus groups and goal-mapping exercises. The results suggest that students tend to focus on utilitarian, attribute-level considerations mainly…

  14. Making Large Classes More Interactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, John

    2000-01-01

    Describes the method of using prompts to allow students to have more "voice" in a large class. The prompt assignment requires students to respond anonymously to a statement that concerns the chapter being discussed in the class. Discusses how the Internet has allowed more freedom with the prompts. Puts forth some student responses to the…

  15. The Paradox of Paperless Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackie, Paula

    1998-01-01

    Describes paperless classes developed at Carleton College that augment traditional classes by giving students and faculty the ability to share digital course-related materials via the campus computer network. Presents a case study of a managerial economics course, and includes problems with various aspects of the course and solutions. (LRW)

  16. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might...

  17. Notes on absolute Hodge classes

    CERN Document Server

    Charles, François

    2011-01-01

    We survey the theory of absolute Hodge classes. The notes include a full proof of Deligne's theorem on absolute Hodge classes on abelian varieties as well as a discussion of other topics, such as the field of definition of Hodge loci and the Kuga-Satake construction.

  18. ADULT EDUCATION AND SOCIAL CLASS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LONDON, JACK; AND OTHERS

    IDENTIFICATION OF SOME OF THE VARIABLES THAT ENCOURAGE OR DISCOURAGE PARTICIPATION IN ADULT EDUCATION AMONG MIDDLE-CLASS AND WORKING-CLASS MEN WAS THE BASIS FOR THIS STUDY. A COMMUNITY SURVEY WAS USED TO LOCATE A SAMPLE OF PARTICIPANTS AND NONPARTICIPANTS, AS WELL AS TO PROVIDE DESCRIPTIVE DATA ABOUT THE RATES OF PARTICIPATION. A MATCHED SAMPLE…

  19. Control Class Summaries and Control Class IV from April 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-02-22

    The D0 cryogenic control system is a complicated system with many facets. Because of the large number and variety of features in the system, a series of ongoing control system training seminars, or control classes, were created in order to keep people up to date on the operation of the system. As of the writing of this engineering note, there have been four classes. The original lecture notes from each class can be found in the cryogenic control room at the D0 Assembly Building, or in the Co-op office. This note provides a summary of the first three control classes, and it includes the entire set of notes from the fourth class, which was held in April of 1990. This class was taught by Jeff Wendlandt and Dan Markley. Dan should be consulted for more complete explanations than those given in the notes. The notes are, in fact, more of a reference for someone who has some experience with the system, than they are a training manual. Most of the pages include pictures and printouts of different menus and functions, useful for finding details without searching through the actual program. In general, this note serves as a pointer to the existence of the control class lecture notes, and as an explanation of their overall contents and purpose.

  20. Scaling behavior of the directed percolation universality class

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebeck, S. [Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)]. E-mail: sven@thp.uni-duisburg.de; Willmann, R.D. [Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: r.willmann@fz-juelich.de

    2005-07-11

    In this work we consider five different lattice models which exhibit continuous phase transitions into absorbing states. By measuring certain universal functions, which characterize the steady state as well as the dynamical scaling behavior, we present clear numerical evidence that all models belong to the universality class of directed percolation. Since the considered models are characterized by different interaction details the obtained universal scaling plots are an impressive manifestation of the universality of directed percolation.

  1. Spectral energy distribution analysis of class I and class II FU Orionis stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Gómez, Mercedes [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina, Laprida 854, 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Rodón, Javier A., E-mail: luciana@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mercedes@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: jrodon@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ∼80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} versus ∼10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (∼70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  2. A Latent Class Analysis to Empirically Describe Eating Disorders through Developmental Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Sonja A.; Horton, Nicholas J.; Crosby, Ross D.; Micali, Nadia; Sonneville, Kendrin R.; Eddy, Kamryn; Field, Alison E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The current standards for classifying eating disorders were primarily informed by adult, clinical study populations, while it is unknown whether an empirically based classification system can be supported across preadolescence through young adulthood. Using latent class analyses, we sought to empirically classify disordered eating in females from preadolescence to young adulthood, and assess the association between classes and adverse outcomes. Methods Latent class models were fit using observations from the 9,039 girls participating in the Growing Up Today Study, an on-going cohort following participants annually or biennially since 1996 when they were ages 9–14 years. Associations between classes and drug use, binge drinking, and depressive symptoms were assessed using generalized estimating equations. Results Across age groups, there was evidence of six classes: a large asymptomatic class, a class characterized by shape/weight concerns, a class characterized by overeating without loss of control, and three resembling full and subthreshold binge eating disorder, purging disorder, and bulimia nervosa. Relative prevalences of classes varied across developmental stages, with symptomatic classes increasing in prevalence with increasing age. Symptomatic classes were associated with concurrent and incident drug use, binge drinking, and high depressive symptoms. Discussion A classification system resembling broader definitions of DSM-5 diagnoses along with two further subclinical symptomatic classes may be a useful framework for studying disordered eating among adolescent and young adult females. PMID:24909947

  3. Fouling of Seawater Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) Membrane: Chemical and Microbiological Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad T.

    2013-12-01

    In spite of abundant water resources, world is suffering from the scarcity of usable water. Seawater Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) desalination technology using polymeric membranes has been recognized as a key solution to water scarcity problem. However, economic sustainability of this advanced technology is adversely impacted by the membrane fouling problem. Fouling of RO membranes is a highly studied phenomenon. However, literature is found to be lacking a detailed study on kinetic and dynamic aspects of SWRO membrane fouling. The factors that impact the fouling dynamics, i.e., pretreatment and water quality were also not adequately studied at full–scale of operation. Our experimental protocol was designed to systematically explore these fouling aspects with the objective to improve the understanding of SWRO membrane fouling mechanisms. An approach with multiple analytical techniques was developed for fouling characterization. In addition to the fouling layer characterization, feed water quality was also analysed to assess its fouling potential. Study of SWRO membrane fouling dynamics and kinetics revealed variations in relative abundance of chemical and microbial constituents of the fouling layer, over operating time. Aromatic substances, most likely humic–like substances, were observed at relatively high abundance in the initial fouling layer, followed by progressive increase in relative abundances of proteins and polysaccharides. Microbial population grown on all membranes was dominated by specific groups/species belonging to different classes of Proteobacteria phylum; however, similar to abiotic foulant, their relative abundance also changed with the biofilm age and with the position of membrane element in RO vessel. Our results demonstrated that source water quality can significantly impact the RO membrane fouling scenarios. Moreover, the major role of chlorination in the SWRO membrane fouling was highlighted. It was found that intermittent mode of chlorination

  4. Diffusion distinguishes between structural universality classes of disordered media

    CERN Document Server

    Papaioannou, Antonios; Fieremans, Els; Boutis, Gregory S

    2016-01-01

    Identifying relevant parameters is central to understanding complex phenomena. This often evokes the concept of universality, which groups microscopically distinct systems into a handful of universality classes, according to the relevant degrees of freedom affecting their thermodynamic and dynamical properties. Here we show that universality is key to relating transport to structure in disordered systems. We experimentally demonstrate the relation between the structural exponent, characterizing a structural universality class, and the dynamical exponent of classical diffusion in disordered media. To that end, we manufactured samples of hyperuniform and short-range disorder, characterized by the statistics of the placement of {\\mu}m-thin parallel barriers permeable to water. We used NMR-measured water diffusion to identify the structural universality class of these samples via the dynamical exponent describing the power-law decrease of the diffusion coefficient across the barriers at long times. Our experiment...

  5. Dynamics and control of a class of underactuated mechanical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Schaft, van der Arjan; McClamroch, N. Harris; Kolmanovsky, Ilya

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for the dynamics and control of underactuated mechanical systems, defined as systems with fewer inputs than degrees of freedom. Control system formulation of underactuated mechanical systems is addressed and a class of underactuated systems characterized b

  6. Dynamics and Control of a Class of Underactuated Mechanical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Schaft, Arjan van der; McClamroch, N. Harris; Kolmanovsky, Ilya

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for the dynamics and control of underactuated mechanical systems, defined as systems with fewer inputs than degrees of freedom. Control system formulation of underactuated mechanical systems is addressed and a class of underactuated systems characterized b

  7. The Class of Stabilizing Nonlinear Plant Controller Pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paice, A.D.B.; Schaft, Arjan J. van der

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a general approach is taken to yield a characterization of the class of stable plant controller pairs which is a generalization of the Youla parameterization for linear systems. This is based on the idea of representing the input-output pairs of the plant and controller as elements of

  8. New Ramsey Classes from Old

    CERN Document Server

    Bodirsky, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Let C_1 and C_2 be strong amalgamation classes of finite structures, with disjoint finite signatures sigma and tau. Then C_1 wedge C_2 denotes the class of all finite (sigma cup tau)-structures whose sigma-reduct is from C_1 and whose tau-reduct is from C_2. We prove that when C_1 and C_2 are Ramsey, then C_1 wedge C_2 is also Ramsey. We also discuss variations of this statement, and give several examples of new Ramsey classes derived from those general results.

  9. Lipschitz classes on local fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-yi SU; Guo-xiang CHEN

    2007-01-01

    The Lipschitz class Lipα on a local field K is defined in this note, and the equivalent relationship between the Lipschitz class Lipα and the Holder type space Cα (K) is proved. Then, those important characteristics on the Euclidean space Rn and the local field K are compared, so that one may interpret the essential differences between the analyses on Rn and K. Finally, the Cantor type fractal function (V)(x) is showed in the Lipschitz class Lip (m, K), m < ln2/ln3.

  10. Lipschitz classes on local fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Lipschitz class Lipαon a local field K is defined in this note,and the equivalent relationship between the Lipschitz class Lipαand the Holder type space C~α(K)is proved.Then,those important characteristics on the Euclidean space R~n and the local field K are compared,so that one may interpret the essential differences between the analyses on R~n and K.Finally,the Cantor type fractal functionθ(x)is showed in the Lipschitz class Lip(m,K),m<(ln 2/ln 3).

  11. Homogeneous products of conjugacy classes

    OpenAIRE

    Adan-Bante, Edith

    2006-01-01

    Let $G$ be a finite group and $a\\in G$. Let $a^G=\\{g^{-1}ag\\mid g\\in G\\}$ be the conjugacy class of $a$ in $G$. Assume that $a^G$ and $b^G$ are conjugacy classes of $G$ with the property that ${\\bf C}_G(a)={\\bf C}_G(b)$. Then $a^G b^G$ is a conjugacy class if and only if $[a,G]=[b,G]=[ab,G]$ and $[ab,G]$ is a normal subgroup of $G$.

  12. The Relationship between Class I and Class II Methanol Masers

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, S P

    2005-01-01

    The Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra millimetre telescope has been used to search for 95.1-GHz class I methanol masers towards sixty-two 6.6-GHz class II methanol masers. A total of twenty-six 95.1-GHz masers were detected, eighteen of these being new discoveries. Combining the results of this search with observations reported in the literature, a near complete sample of sixty-six 6.6-GHz class II methanol masers has been searched in the 95.1-GHz transition, with detections towards 38 per cent (twenty-five detections ; not all of the sources studied in this paper qualify for the complete sample, and some of the sources in the sample were not observed in the present observations). There is no evidence of an anti-correlation between either the velocity range, or peak flux density of the class I and II transitions, contrary to suggestions from previous studies. The majority of class I methanol maser sources have a velocity range that partially overlaps with the class II maser transitions. The presence...

  13. Unsupervised learning of cone spectral classes from natural images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah C Benson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first step in the evolution of primate trichromatic color vision was the expression of a third cone class not present in ancestral mammals. This observation motivates a fundamental question about the evolution of any sensory system: how is it possible to detect and exploit the presence of a novel sensory class? We explore this question in the context of primate color vision. We present an unsupervised learning algorithm capable of both detecting the number of spectral cone classes in a retinal mosaic and learning the class of each cone using the inter-cone correlations obtained in response to natural image input. The algorithm's ability to classify cones is in broad agreement with experimental evidence about functional color vision for a wide range of mosaic parameters, including those characterizing dichromacy, typical trichromacy, anomalous trichromacy, and possible tetrachromacy.

  14. Unsupervised learning of cone spectral classes from natural images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Noah C; Manning, Jeremy R; Brainard, David H

    2014-06-01

    The first step in the evolution of primate trichromatic color vision was the expression of a third cone class not present in ancestral mammals. This observation motivates a fundamental question about the evolution of any sensory system: how is it possible to detect and exploit the presence of a novel sensory class? We explore this question in the context of primate color vision. We present an unsupervised learning algorithm capable of both detecting the number of spectral cone classes in a retinal mosaic and learning the class of each cone using the inter-cone correlations obtained in response to natural image input. The algorithm's ability to classify cones is in broad agreement with experimental evidence about functional color vision for a wide range of mosaic parameters, including those characterizing dichromacy, typical trichromacy, anomalous trichromacy, and possible tetrachromacy.

  15. Management of Classes with Breaches of Discipline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海军

    2009-01-01

    As an only child is pampered and spoiled by parents, the contemporary student easily breaches class discipline. Class management appears more concerned than ever because breaches of class discipline have great impact on teaching. The author clarifies the necessity to study the management of classes with breaches of class discipline, numerates the phenomena of breaches of class discipline, precisely analyzes the causes from teachers and students and especially submits several measures to effectively prevent breaches of class discipline.

  16. Characterizing Interactive Engagement Activities in a Flipped Introductory Physics Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Donnelly, Robyn; Hardy, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of "how" they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in…

  17. Characterizing Interactive Engagement Activities in a Flipped Introductory Physics Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Donnelly, Robyn; Hardy, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of "how" they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in…

  18. Research on the use of E-Class in the university class management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG QIN; LAI YI WEI

    2016-01-01

    As an information exchange platform for online class, E-Class has played an important role in class management since its foundation. Based on the analysis of the impact of the network to university class management, this paper studied the advantages and the disadvantages of the current E-Class in class management, and proposed suggestions of strengthening the E-Class management.

  19. USING PICTURES IN ENGLISH CLASSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Introduction In China, some English teachers go to class with only a textbook and a teaching plan, nothing else. After a while, the students complain that their classes are becoming more and more boring. Teachers have tried many ways to make their classes more interesting, motivating and effective, but using pictures in the classroom to do this has not been a popular method. The world provides us with all kinds of beautiful pictures. There is no reason why we should not make better use of them in language learning and teaching. This article will discuss the reasons for using pictures, suggest ways of collecting pictures and ways of using pictures in reading, writing, listening and speaking classes.

  20. Brainwriting in the Theory Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Ilse Gerda

    1973-01-01

    Considers the problem of taking dictation in a music class and recognizes the importance of perception for understanding musical structure. Author demonstrates his point with an analysis of a German folksong. (RK)

  1. An English Class with Emily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Lawrence F.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a high school student's description in class of her deep connection to Hester Prynne in Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter," and how it offers a glimpse of the vast interior lives of women. (SR)

  2. Molecular characterization of a dechlorinating community resulting from in situ biostimulation in a trichloroethene-contaminated deep, fractured basalt aquifer and comparison to a derivative laboratory culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macbeth, Tamzen W; Cummings, David E; Spring, Stefan; Petzke, Lynn M; Sorenson, Kent S

    2004-12-01

    Sodium lactate additions to a trichloroethene (TCE) residual source area in deep, fractured basalt at a U.S. Department of Energy site have resulted in the enrichment of the indigenous microbial community, the complete dechlorination of nearly all aqueous-phase TCE to ethene, and the continued depletion of the residual source since 1999. The bacterial and archaeal consortia in groundwater obtained from the residual source were assessed by using PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. A clone library of bacterial amplicons was predominated by those from members of the class Clostridia (57 of 93 clones), of which a phylotype most similar to that of the homoacetogen Acetobacterium sp. strain HAAP-1 was most abundant (32 of 93 clones). The remaining Bacteria consisted of phylotypes affiliated with Sphingobacteria, Bacteroides, Spirochaetes, Mollicutes, and Proteobacteria and candidate divisions OP11 and OP3. The two proteobacterial phylotypes were most similar to those of the known dechlorinators Trichlorobacter thiogenes and Sulfurospirillum multivorans. Although not represented by the bacterial clones generated with broad-specificity bacterial primers, a Dehalococcoides-like phylotype was identified with genus-specific primers. Only four distinct phylotypes were detected in the groundwater archaeal library, including predominantly a clone affiliated with the strictly acetoclastic methanogen Methanosaeta concilii (24 of 43 clones). A mixed culture that completely dechlorinates TCE to ethene was enriched from this groundwater, and both communities were characterized by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). According to T-RFLP, the laboratory enrichment community was less diverse overall than the groundwater community, with 22 unique phylotypes as opposed to 43 and a higher percentage of Clostridia, including the Acetobacterium population. Bioreactor archaeal structure was very similar to that of the groundwater community, suggesting that methane is

  3. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saccucci Matteo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients, skeletal class II (70 patients and skeletal class III (65 patients. Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma. TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI. Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p 3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p 2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p  Conclusion Skeletal class appeared to be associated to the mandibular condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population.

  4. Cpf1 Is a Single RNA-Guided Endonuclease of a Class 2 CRISPR-Cas System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetsche, Bernd; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Slaymaker, Ian M.; Makarova, Kira S.; Essletzbichler, Patrick; Volz, Sara E.; Joung, Julia; Oost, van der John; Regev, Aviv; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The microbial adaptive immune system CRISPR mediates defense against foreign genetic elements through two classes of RNA-guided nuclease effectors. Class 1 effectors utilize multi-protein complexes, whereas class 2 effectors rely on single-component effector proteins such as the well-characterized

  5. Cpf1 Is a Single RNA-Guided Endonuclease of a Class 2 CRISPR-Cas System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetsche, Bernd; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Slaymaker, Ian M.; Makarova, Kira S.; Essletzbichler, Patrick; Volz, Sara E.; Joung, Julia; Oost, van der John; Regev, Aviv; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The microbial adaptive immune system CRISPR mediates defense against foreign genetic elements through two classes of RNA-guided nuclease effectors. Class 1 effectors utilize multi-protein complexes, whereas class 2 effectors rely on single-component effector proteins such as the well-characterized C

  6. Perceptual qualities and material classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Roland W; Wiebel, Christiane; Gegenfurtner, Karl

    2013-07-11

    Under typical viewing conditions, we can easily group materials into distinct classes (e.g., woods, plastics, textiles). Additionally, we can also make many other judgments about material properties (e.g., hardness, rigidity, colorfulness). Although these two types of judgment (classification and inferring material properties) have different requirements, they likely facilitate one another. We conducted two experiments to investigate the interactions between material classification and judgments of material qualities in both the visual and semantic domains. In Experiment 1, nine students viewed 130 images of materials from 10 different classes. For each image, they rated nine subjective properties (glossiness, transparency, colorfulness, roughness, hardness, coldness, fragility, naturalness, prettiness). In Experiment 2, 65 subjects were given the verbal names of six material classes, which they rated in terms of 42 adjectives describing material qualities. In both experiments, there was notable agreement between subjects, and a relatively small number of factors (weighted combinations of different qualities) were substantially independent of one another. Despite the difficulty of classifying materials from images (Liu, Sharan, Adelson, & Rosenholtz, 2010), the different classes were well clustered in the feature space defined by the subjective ratings. K-means clustering could correctly identify class membership for over 90% of the samples, based on the average ratings across subjects. We also found a high degree of consistency between the two tasks, suggesting subjects access similar information about materials whether judging their qualities visually or from memory. Together, these findings show that perceptual qualities are well defined, distinct, and systematically related to material class membership.

  7. Biofilms on Hospital Shower Hoses: Characterization and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the source of drinking water used in hospitals is commonly, biofilms on water pipelines are refuge to bacteria that survive different disinfection strategies. Drinking water (DW) biofilms are well known to harbor opportunistic pathogens, however, these biofilm communities remain poorly characterized by culture-independent approaches that circumvent the limitations of conventional monitoring efforts. Hence, the frequency of pathogens in DW biofilms and how biofilm members withstand high doses of disinfectants and/or chlorine residuals in the water supply remain speculative, but directly impact public health. The aim of this study was to characterize the composition of microbial communities growing on five hospital shower hoses using both culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques. Two different sequence-based methods were used to characterize the bacterial fractions: 16S rRNA gene sequencing of bacterial cultures and next generation sequencing of metagenomes. Based on the metagenomic data, we found that Mycobacterium-like species was the abundant bacterial taxa that overlapped among the five samples. We also recovered the draft genome of a novel Mycobacterium species, closely related to opportunistic pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria, M. rhodesiae and M. tusciae, in addition to other, less abundant species. In contrast, the cultured fraction was mostly affiliated to Proteobacteria, such as members of the Sphingomonas, Blastomonas and Porph

  8. Prolonged grief and depression after unnatural loss: Latent class analyses and cognitive correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Paul A; Reijntjes, Albert; J Djelantik, A A A Manik; Smid, Geert E

    2016-06-30

    This study sought to identify (a) subgroups among people confronted with unnatural/violent loss characterized by different symptoms profiles of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) and depression, and (b) socio-demographic, loss-related, and cognitive variables associated with subgroup membership. We used data from 245 individuals confronted with the death of a loved one due to an accident (47.3%), suicide (49%) or homicide (3.7%). Latent class analysis revealed three classes of participants: a resilient-class (25.3%), a predominantly PGD-class (39.2%), and a combined PGD/Depression-class (35.5%). Membership in the resilient-class was predicted by longer time since loss and lower age; membership in the combined class was predicted by lower education. Endorsement of negative cognitions about the self, life, the future, and one's own grief-reactions was lowest in the Resilient-class, intermediate in the PGD-class, and highest in the combined PGD/Depression-class. When all socio-demographic, loss-related, and cognitive variables were included in multinomial regression analyses predicting class-membership, it was found that negative cognitions about one's grief was the only variable predicting membership of the PGD-class. Negative cognitions about the self, life, and grief predicted membership of the combined PGD/Depression-class. These findings provide valuable information for the development of interventions for different subgroups of bereaved individuals confronted with unnatural/violent loss.

  9. Classes subalternas, lutas de classe e hegemonia: uma abordagem gramsciana Subaltern classes, class struggles and hegemony: a gramscian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Simionatto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo procura resgatar, no pensamento de Antonio Gramsci, a concepção de classes subalternas e a sua relação com outras categorias, especialmente, o Estado, a sociedade civil e a hegemonia, como suportes da luta de classes na realidade contemporânea. Aborda, ainda, as relações entre classes subalternas, senso comum e ideologia, bem como as formas de superação tematizadas por Gramsci, através da cultura e da filosofia da práxis. Nesse sentido, num movimento de totalidade, busca recuperar a discussão das classes subalternas, a partir da original formulação gramsciana no âmbito do marxismo, mediante a interação dialética entre estrutura e superestrutura, economia e política. Além do resgate conceitual, apontam-se alguns elementos como subsídios à discussão das formas de subalternidade presentes na realidade contemporânea e as possibilidades de fortalecimento das lutas de tais camadas de classe, sobretudo em momentos de forte desmobilização da participação popular.This article sought to revive the concept of subaltern classes and their relation with other categories, particularly the State, civil society and hegemony in the thinking of Antonio Gramsci, as a support for contemporary class struggles. It also analyzes the relations between subaltern classes, common sense and ideology, as well as the forms of "overcoming" conceptualized by Gramsci, through the culture and philosophy of praxis. The paper revives the discussion of the subaltern classes, based on the original Gramscian formulation in the realm of Marxism, through the dialectic interaction between structure and superstructure, economy and politics. In addition to the conceptual revival, it indicates some elements that can support the discussion of the forms of subalternity found in contemporary reality and the possibilities for strengthening the struggles of these class layers, above all in moments of strong demobilization of popular participation.

  10. Seven functional classes of Barth syndrome mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Kevin; Baile, Matthew G.; Currier, Pamela; Claypool, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Barth syndrome (BTHS), a rare X-linked disease, suffer from skeletal and cardiomyopathy and bouts of cyclic neutropenia. The causative gene encodes tafazzin, a transacylase, which is the major determinant of the final acyl chain composition of the mitochondrial-specific phospholipid, CL. In addition to numerous frame shift and splice-site mutations, 36 missense mutations have been associated with BTHS. Previously, we established a BTHS-mutant panel in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that successfully models 18/21 conserved pathogenic missense mutations and defined the loss-of-function mechanism associated with a subset of the mutant tafazzins. Here, we report the biochemical and cell biological characterization of the rest of the yeast BTHS-mutant panel and in so doing identify three additional modes of tafazzin dysfunction. The largest group of mutant tafazzins is catalytically null, two mutants encode hypomorphic alleles, and another two mutants are temperature sensitive. Additionally, we have expanded the defects associated with previously characterized matrix-mislocalized-mutant tafazzins to include the rapid degradation of aggregation-prone polypeptides that correctly localize to the mitochondrial IMS. In sum, our in-depth characterization of the yeast BTHS-mutant panel has identified seven functional classes of BTHS mutation. PMID:23100323

  11. On the structure of entanglement witnesses and new class of positive indecomposable maps

    OpenAIRE

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    We construct a new class of positive indecomposable maps in the algebra of 'd x d' complex matrices. Each map is uniquely characterized by a cyclic bistochastic matrix. This class generalizes a Choi map for d=3. It provides a new reach family of indecomposable entanglement witnesses which define important tool for investigating quantum entanglement.

  12. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix-a structural feature of all GPCRs-the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region...

  13. Distinguishing PTSD, Complex PTSD, and Borderline Personality Disorder: A latent class analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylène Cloitre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been debate regarding whether Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD is distinct from Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD when the latter is comorbid with PTSD. Objective: To determine whether the patterns of symptoms endorsed by women seeking treatment for childhood abuse form classes that are consistent with diagnostic criteria for PTSD, Complex PTSD, and BPD. Method: A latent class analysis (LCA was conducted on an archival dataset of 280 women with histories of childhood abuse assessed for enrollment in a clinical trial for PTSD. Results: The LCA revealed four distinct classes of individuals: a Low Symptom class characterized by low endorsements on all symptoms; a PTSD class characterized by elevated symptoms of PTSD but low endorsement of symptoms that define the Complex PTSD and BPD diagnoses; a Complex PTSD class characterized by elevated symptoms of PTSD and self-organization symptoms that defined the Complex PTSD diagnosis but low on the symptoms of BPD; and a BPD class characterized by symptoms of BPD. Four BPD symptoms were found to greatly increase the odds of being in the BPD compared to the Complex PTSD class: frantic efforts to avoid abandonment, unstable sense of self, unstable and intense interpersonal relationships, and impulsiveness. Conclusions: Findings supported the construct validity of Complex PTSD as distinguishable from BPD. Key symptoms that distinguished between the disorders were identified, which may aid in differential diagnosis and treatment planning.

  14. Gender, social class, and women's employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Kathleen L; Oh, Eunsil

    2017-07-17

    People in low-power positions, whether due to gender or class, tend to exhibit other-oriented rather than self-oriented behavior. Women's experiences at work and at home are shaped by social class, heightening identification with gender for relatively upper class women and identification with class for relatively lower class women, potentially mitigating, or even reversing, class-based differences documented in past research. Gender-class differences are reflected in women's employment beliefs and behaviors. Research integrating social class with gendered experiences in homes and workplaces deepens our understanding of the complex interplay between sources of power and status in society. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identifying Subgroups of Adult Superutilizers in an Urban Safety-Net System Using Latent Class Analysis: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Deborah J; Oronce, Carlos; Durfee, Michael J; Ranby, Krista W; Batal, Holly A; Hanratty, Rebecca; Vogel, Jody; Johnson, Tracy L

    2016-09-14

    Patients with repeated hospitalizations represent a group with potentially avoidable utilization. Recent publications have begun to highlight the heterogeneity of this group. Latent class analysis provides a novel methodological approach to utilizing administrative data to identify clinically meaningful subgroups of patients to inform tailored intervention efforts. The objective of the study was to identify clinically distinct subgroups of adult superutilizers. Retrospective cohort analysis. Adult patients who had an admission at an urban safety-net hospital in 2014 and 2 or more admissions within the preceding 12 months. Patient-level medical, mental health (MH) and substance use diagnoses, social characteristics, demographics, utilization and charges were obtained from administrative data. Latent class analyses were used to determine the number and characteristics of latent subgroups that best represented these data. In this cohort (N=1515), a 5-class model was preferred based on model fit indices, clinical interpretability and class size: class 1 (16%) characterized by alcohol use disorder and homelessness; class 2 (14%) characterized by medical conditions, MH/substance use disorders and homelessness; class 3 (25%) characterized primarily by medical conditions; class 4 (13%) characterized by more serious MH disorders, drug use disorder and homelessness; and class 5 (32%) characterized by medical conditions with some MH and substance use. Patient demographics, utilization, charges and mortality also varied by class. The overall cohort had high rates of multiple chronic medical conditions, MH, substance use disorders, and homelessness. However, the patterns of these conditions were different between subgroups, providing important information for tailoring interventions.

  16. Conservative treatment of Angle Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Hélder Ferreira de Aguiar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by anteroposterior dental discrepancy which might be associated or not with skeletal changes. Class III molar relationship is associated with vertical or lingually tipped mandibular incisors and a usually concave profile. These characteristics seriously affect facial esthetics and most frequently are the reason why patients seek orthodontic treatment. This case was presented to the committee of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as part of the requisites to become a BBO Diplomate.

  17. Turkish Managers as a Part of the Transnational Capitalist Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Yinaz Sener

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available During the period after 1970s, capitalism has gone through a significant restructuring. This period has been primarily characterized by the process of globalization. Globalization has not emerged as the natural result of capitalism but it has been actively promoted and the appropriate conditions for the functioning of global capitalism have been created by certain actors. Many scholars argue that it is a newly emerging transnational capitalist class which transformed capitalism into a globalizing project. Although the members of this class are located in different parts of the world, they have a common interest in supporting globalization. They are aware of their common interests and they have a certain class consciousness. Moreover, their habits, tastes, and lifestyles are becoming increasingly similar. Considering these debates on transnational capitalist class, in a case study of the Turkish top managers working in the ?stanbul branch of a multinational corporation, this paper looks at the lifestyle characteristics of this group of managers, comparing them with those aspects of the lifestyle of the transnational capitalist class that are indicated by the scholars. A second question that has been considered is to what extent these managers feel themselves as part of a transnational class that has common goals and interests. This study shows that for this group of managers the primary identification is with the people who have the same position with them, regardless of their country or corporation, not with their fellow nationals.

  18. 47 CFR 74.708 - Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class A TV and digital Class A TV station... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.708 Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protection. (a) The Class A TV and digital Class A TV station protected contours are specified...

  19. Four classes of interactions for evolutionary games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, György; Bodó, Kinga S; Allen, Benjamin; Nowak, Martin A

    2015-08-01

    The symmetric four-strategy games are decomposed into a linear combination of 16 basis games represented by orthogonal matrices. Among these basis games four classes can be distinguished as it is already found for the three-strategy games. The games with self-dependent (cross-dependent) payoffs are characterized by matrices consisting of uniform rows (columns). Six of 16 basis games describe coordination-type interactions among the strategy pairs and three basis games span the parameter space of the cyclic components that are analogous to the rock-paper-scissors games. In the absence of cyclic components the game is a potential game and the potential matrix is evaluated. The main features of the four classes of games are discussed separately and we illustrate some characteristic strategy distributions on a square lattice in the low noise limit if logit rule controls the strategy evolution. Analysis of the general properties indicates similar types of interactions at larger number of strategies for the symmetric matrix games.

  20. Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven

    2012-07-30

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-Ds) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by defective switched isotype (IgG/IgA/IgE) production. Depending on the molecular defect in question, the Ig-CSR-D may be combined with an impairment in somatic hypermutation (SHM). Some of the mechanisms underlying Ig-CSR and SHM have been described by studying natural mutants in humans. This approach has revealed that T cell-B cell interaction (resulting in CD40-mediated signaling), intrinsic B-cell mechanisms (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced DNA damage), and complex DNA repair machineries (including uracil-N-glycosylase and mismatch repair pathways) are all involved in class-switch recombination and SHM. However, several of the mechanisms required for full antibody maturation have yet to be defined. Elucidation of the molecular defects underlying the diverse set of Ig-CSR-Ds is essential for understanding Ig diversification and has prompted better definition of the clinical spectrum of diseases and the development of increasingly accurate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  1. Moran sets and Moran classes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this survey is to present Moran sets and Moran classes which generalize the classical selfsimilar sets from the following points: ( i ) The placements of the basic sets at each step of the constructions can be arbitrary; (ii) the contraction ratios may be different at each step; and (iii) the lower limit of the contraction ratios permits zero. In this discussion we will present geometrical properties and results of dimensions of these sets and classes,and discuss conformal Moran sets and random Moran sets as well.``

  2. Teaching Reading in Large Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas B Leyla María

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the problem of overcrowded classes. Ideas from research findings are given in an attempt to approach the teaching of reading at tertiary and secondary levels. This study is mainly based on the analysis of five pedagogical principles that emerged from the Lancaster-Leeds Language Learning in Large Classes Research Project in the United Kingdom (1986- 1999. Emphasis is also made on two important general principles emerging from the project: being realistic and giving more responsibility to the learner. Practical suggestions from research on reading are made based on the principles stated.

  3. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might...... coefficients that are used in order to describe surface scattering (roughness of material) as well as scattering of reflected sound caused by limited surface size (diffraction). A method which combines scattering caused by diffraction due to surface dimensions, angle of incidence and incident path length...

  4. Supervised Object Class Colour Normalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riabchenko, Ekatarina; Lankinen, Jukka; Buch, Anders Glent;

    2013-01-01

    Colour is an important cue in many applications of computer vision and image processing, but robust usage often requires estimation of the unknown illuminant colour. Usually, to obtain images invariant to the illumination conditions under which they were taken, color normalisation is used....... In this work, we develop a such colour normalisation technique, where true colours are not important per se but where examples of same classes have photometrically consistent appearance. This is achieved by supervised estimation of a class specic canonical colour space where the examples have minimal variation...

  5. Enzymatic Browning: a practical class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Pedrosa Silva Clerici

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a practical class about the enzymes polyphenol oxidases, which have been shown to be responsible for the enzymatic browning of fruits and vegetables. Vegetables samples were submitted to enzymatic inactivation process with chemical reagents, as well as by bleaching methods of applying heat by conventional oven and microwave oven. Process efficiency was assessed qualitatively by both observing the guaiacol peroxidase activity and after the storage period under refrigeration or freezing. The practical results obtained in this class allow exploring multidisciplinary knowledge in food science, with practical applications in everyday life.

  6. Achieving world class maintenance status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlingson, P.D. [Paul D. Tomingson Associates (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The article written by a management consultant, discusses the art of successful planning and operation of maintenance in mines considering factors such as benchmaking, key performance indices (KPIs) and frequency of procedures which can help achieve 'world class maintenance'. 1 fig.

  7. Professional Elites in "Classes" Societies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Magala (Slawomir)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractModern European identity has been forged in class struggles between the French revolution and fall of the Berlin Wall, which fell twice. Once, with the rest of the city in May 1945, when a national socialist alternative to a modernizing mix of parliamentary democracy and market economy

  8. Professional Elites in "Classes" Societies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Magala (Slawomir)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractModern European identity has been forged in class struggles between the French revolution and fall of the Berlin Wall, which fell twice. Once, with the rest of the city in May 1945, when a national socialist alternative to a modernizing mix of parliamentary democracy and market economy c

  9. Active Learning in Large Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    the lectures in the course. The main idea is to use inductive, case-based learning, with many small exercises/ discussions during the lectures. We describe a framework for the lectures, that most lectures in the class were based on. The framework contains the conceive, design, and implement stage from the CDIO...

  10. Sigma-class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Jack U; Smythe, Mark L

    2011-05-01

    Mammalian cytosolic glutathione transferases (GSTs) can be grouped into seven classes. Of these, the sigma class is also widely distributed in nature, with isoforms found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It contains examples of proteins that have evolved specialized functions, such as the cephalopod lens S-crystallins, the mammalian hematopoietic prostaglandin D(2) synthase, and the helminth 28-kDa antigen. In mammals, the sigma-class GST has both anti- and proinflammatory functions, depending on the type of immune response, and an immunomodulatory function is also associated with the enzyme from helminth parasites. In the fly, it is associated with a specific detoxication activity toward lipid oxidation products. Mice genetically depleted of the sigma-class GST, or transgenically overexpressing it, have provided insight into the physiological roles of the GST. Inhibitors of the mammalian enzyme developed by structure-based methods are effective in controlling allergic response. This review covers the structure, function, and pharmacology of vertebrate and invertebrate GSTs.

  11. COOPERATIVE LEARNING IN LARGE CLASSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoXiangju

    2004-01-01

    Teaching college English in large classes is a new challenge to teachers. To meet this challenge, the strategy of cooperative learning is practicable. This paper introduces cooperative learning and describes the experiment results, which prove the advantages of cooperative learning over competitive learning or individualistic learning.

  12. MATERIALS FOR LITERARY ENJOYMENT CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Prasasti

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available As the introductory class of literature at the Faculty of Letters, Literary Enjoyment serves as a campaign to motivate students to appreciate and enjoy works of literature. Materials, which generally hinder the students' ability to enjoy literary works, should be carefully considered. Ideally, language and content should be easily digested but a compromise can be made between language and content.

  13. A class of topological actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Michel [Service de Physique Theorique de Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Girardi, Georges [LAPTH, Chemin de Bellevue, BP 110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux cedex (France); Stora, Ramond [LAPTH, Chemin de Bellevue, BP 110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux cedex (France); Thuillier, Frank [LAPTH, Chemin de Bellevue, BP 110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux cedex (France)

    2005-08-01

    We review definitions of generalized parallel transports in terms of Cheeger-Simons differential characters. Integration formulae are given in terms of Deligne-Beilinson cohomology classes. These representations of parallel transport can be extended to situations involving distributions as is appropriate in the context of quantized fields.

  14. A Class of Topological Actions

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, M; Stora, Raymond Félix; Thuillier, F

    2005-01-01

    We review definitions of generalized parallel transports in terms of Cheeger-Simons differential characters. Integration formulae are given in terms of Deligne-Beilinson cohomology classes. These representations of parallel transport can be extended to situations involving distributions as is appropriate in the context of quantized fields.

  15. Civility in Classes and Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Civility is a polite or courteous act, expression, or standard of conduct, including the display of respect and tolerance to everyone. Teaching and modeling civility in classes and with sport teams is essential so students and athletes can learn the importance of and demonstrate civility in their interactions with others. Teachers and coaches…

  16. Class-Based Affirmative Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    Discusses class-based, or economic, affirmative action, touted by the Bush administration as a race-neutral alternative to race-conscious affirmative action in college admissions. Explores whether such policies will result in fewer minority admissions and considers the "fairness" of the approach. (SLD)

  17. Art of Class Teaching Encourage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jiao-fei

    2013-01-01

    Teaching encourage can lead to student’s learning motivation and interesting. It improves the effect of classroom teach⁃ing. Methods of class teaching inspiration are: Target encourage, expectation encourage, emotional encourage, positive encourage, attribution encourage, competition encourage, caress encourage, democracy encourage, praise encourage, time encourage, check en⁃courage, questions encourage, examination encourage, score encourage, example encourage and understanding encourage.

  18. A Class of Graceful Trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟凡洪; 苏耕; 杨继

    2000-01-01

    The present paper shows the coordinates of a tree and its vertices, defines a kind of Trees with Odd-Number Radiant Type (TONRT), deals with the gracefulness of TONRT by using the edge-moving theorem, and uses graceful TONRT to construct another class of graceful trees.

  19. A Touch of...Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtel, Claudine, Ed.; Amyot, Denise, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    A series of class activities for French instruction includes uses of the telephone book, tape recordings, advertising, word and pattern games, and creation of a radio program. Suggestions for instruction of Canadian natives include games for animal, body, and clothing vocabulary. (MSE)

  20. The Current Status of CLASS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbig, P

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: I give a brief overview of the current status of some aspects of the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS): description of the survey, current list of lens systems, cosmological parameters from lensing statistics, H_0 from time delays, dark lenses, wide-separation lenses.

  1. Ethnicity, class, and civil war

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hechter, Michael Norman; Siroky, David

    2016-01-01

    Why are some countries prone to ethno-nationalist conflict, whereas others are plagued by class conflict? This is a question that has seldom been raised and rarely been examined empirically. This paper presents a social-structural theory to account for the variable incidence of these two forms...

  2. Characterization and transcriptional analysis of two gene clusters for type IV secretion machinery in Wolbachia of Armadillidium vulgare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Félix, Christine; Pichon, Samuel; Braquart-Varnier, Christine;

    2008-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited alpha-proteobacteria that induce feminization of genetic males in most terrestrial crustacean isopods. Two clusters of vir genes for a type IV secretion machinery have been identified at two separate loci and characterized for the first time in a feminizing...... Wolbachia. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these operons are transcriptionally active in ovaries and in all other tissues tested, suggesting that T4SS has a significant role in Wolbachia biology. These observations and the identification of homologous vir genes in Wolbachia strains infecting insects...... or nematodes show that vir genes are conserved among Wolbachia strains whatever the phenotype induced by the bacteria....

  3. The Dimanganese(II) Site of Bacillus subtilis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (MIT); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    Class Ib ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) use a dimanganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor, Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet}, in their homodimeric NrdF ({beta}2) subunit to initiate reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The structure of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} form of NrdF is an important component in understanding O{sub 2}-mediated formation of the active metallocofactor, a subject of much interest because a unique flavodoxin, NrdI, is required for cofactor assembly. Biochemical studies and sequence alignments suggest that NrdF and NrdI proteins diverge into three phylogenetically distinct groups. The only crystal structure to date of a NrdF with a fully ordered and occupied dimanganese site is that of Escherichia coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, prototypical of the enzymes from actinobacteria and proteobacteria. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, representative of the enzymes from a second group, from Bacillus and Staphylococcus. The structures of the metal clusters in the {beta}2 dimer are distinct from those observed in E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF. These differences illustrate the key role that solvent molecules and protein residues in the second coordination sphere of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} cluster play in determining conformations of carboxylate residues at the metal sites and demonstrate that diverse coordination geometries are capable of serving as starting points for Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly in class Ib RNRs.

  4. A Discussion Strategy for an Online Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese-Durham, Nancy Faith

    2014-01-01

    As a former teacher of face-to-face classes now assigned to teach only online classes, Nancy Reese Durham found herself challenged to change to accommodate online learners. She was determined to provide an environment in the online class where the high level of discussion she had provided in face-to-face classes could flourish as well. Here she…

  5. Student versus Faculty Perceptions of Missing Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, Merry J.; Ritzer, Darren R.; Casey, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Examines and compares student and faculty attitudes towards students missing classes and class attendance. Surveys undergraduate students (n=231) in lower and upper level psychology courses and psychology faculty. Reports that students found more reasons acceptable for missing classes and that the amount of in-class material on the examinations…

  6. Class Action Suits against Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesibov, Laurie

    1984-01-01

    If a suit is brought as a class action, either plaintiff or defendant may move to uphold or challenge class certification. If neither does so, the court decides whether the action may be maintained as a class suit. Prerequisites for class certification from Rule 23 (Federal Rules of Civil Procedure) are explained. (TE)

  7. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pseudo-Class III Malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudo-Class III malocclusion is characterized by the presence of an anterior crossbite due to a forward functional displacement of the mandible; in most cases, the maxillary incisors present some degree of retroclination, and the mandibular incisors are proclined. Various types of appliances have been described in the literature for the early treatment of pseudo-Class III malocclusion. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the importance of making the differential diagnosis between a skeletal and a pseudo-Class III malocclusion and to describe the correction of an anterior crossbite. The association of maxillary expansion and a 2 × 4 appliance can successfully be used to correct anterior crossbites.

  8. Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) Focal Plane Development

    CERN Document Server

    Chuss, D T; Amiri, M; Appel, J; Bennett, C L; Colazo, F; Denis, K L; Dünner, R; Essinger-Hileman, T; Eimer, J; Fluxa, P; Gothe, D; Halpern, M; Harrington, K; Hilton, G; Hinshaw, G; Hubmayr, J; Iuliano, J; Marriage, T A; Miller, N; Moseley, S H; Mumby, G; Petroff, M; Reintsema, C; Rostem, K; U-Yen, K; Watts, D; Wagner, E; Wollack, E J; Xu, Z; Zeng, L

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background to search for and characterize the polarized signature of inflation. CLASS will operate from the Atacama Desert and observe $\\sim$70% of the sky. A variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) modulates the polarization at $\\sim$10 Hz to suppress the 1/f noise of the atmosphere and enable the measurement of the large angular scale polarization modes. The measurement of the inflationary signal across angular scales that span both the recombination and reionization features allows a test of the predicted shape of the polarized angular power spectra in addition to a measurement of the energy scale of inflation. CLASS is an array of telescopes covering frequencies of 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz. These frequencies straddle the foreground minimum and thus allow the extraction of foregrounds from the primordial signal. Each focal plane contains feedhorn-coupled transition-edge sensors that simultaneously d...

  9. Properties of $\\gamma$-Ray Burst Classes

    CERN Document Server

    Hakkila, J; Roiger, R J; Mallozzi, R S; Pendleton, G N; Meegan, C A; Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    The three gamma-ray burst (GRB) classes identified by statistical clustering analysis (Mukherjee et al. 1998) are examined using the pattern recognition algorithm C4.5 (Quinlan 1986). Although the statistical existence of Class 3 (intermediate duration, intermediate fluence, soft) is supported, the properties of this class do not need to arise from a distinct source population. Class 3 properties can easily be produced from Class 1 (long, high fluence, intermediate hardness) by a combination of measurement error, hardness/intensity correlation, and a newly-identified BATSE bias (the fluence duration bias). Class 2 (short, low fluence, hard) does not appear to be related to Class 1.

  10. Trabalho e classes sociais Work and social classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Haddad

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Exposição, discussão e refutação das principais tentativas de atualizar a teoria marxista de classes e posterior reavaliação dessa teoria à luz da transformação da ciência em fator de produção e da possível perda de centralidade do trabalho no processo produtivo, tendo por base as interpretações lógicas da obra de Marx feitas por Ruy Fausto.Exposition, discussion and refutation of the main attempts of actualizing marxist class theory and a posterior reevaluation of this theory taking into account the transformation of Science into a factor of production and of the possible centrality-loss of work in the productive process, based on the logic interpretations of Marx's work made by Ruy Fausto.

  11. FDM Video Classe: Modes d'emploi pour la classe (FDM Video Class: Classroom Uses).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacco, Marcella Di Giura

    1996-01-01

    Content and design of the videotape series FDM Video Classe, produced by the journal "Le francais dans le monde," are described and classroom uses suggested. The materials are from authentic television programs, selected to illustrate aspects of French culture. It is suggested that the teacher also provide students with supporting materials that…

  12. Pan-specific MHC class I predictors: A benchmark of HLA class I pan-specific prediction methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hao; Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    emerging pathogens. Methods have recently been published that are able to predict peptide binding to any human MHC class I molecule. In contrast to conventional allele-specific methods, these methods do allow for extrapolation to un-characterized MHC molecules. These pan-specific HLA predictors have...... not previously been compared using independent evaluation sets. Results: A diverse set of quantitative peptide binding affinity measurements was collected from IEDB, together with a large set of HLA class I ligands from the SYFPEITHI database. Based on these data sets, three different pan-specific HLA web......-accessible predictors NetMHCpan, Adaptive-Double-Threading (ADT), and KISS were evaluated. The performance of the pan-specific predictors was also compared to a well performing allele-specific MHC class I predictor, NetMHC, as well as a consensus approach integrating the predictions from the NetMHC and Net...

  13. STUDENTS’ ANXIETIES IN SPEAKING CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyuzar Rahman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research discussed the anxieties the students of semester 3, English Department, IAIN STS Jambi faced during the speaking class. The result of the research indicated that the causes of the students’ anxieties were the lack of grammar mastery, pronunciation problem, lack of vocabulary, unconfident feeling, fear of making mistakes and feared of being laughed by other students. But the dominant factors found were the lack of grammar, the lack of good pronunciation, and lack of vocabulary mastery. The lecturer had taken part to overcome these problems by giving them motivation not to give up easily, how to cope with vocabulary problems, and how to prepare well before coming into the class.

  14. A Transformer Class E Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolajewski Miroslaw

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In a high-efficiency Class E ZVS resonant amplifier a matching and isolation transformer can replace some or even all inductive components of the amplifier thus simplifying the circuit and reducing its cost. In the paper a theoretical analysis, a design example and its experimental verification for a transformer Class E amplifier are presented. In the experimental amplifier with a transformer as the only inductive component in the circuit high efficiency ηMAX = 0.95 was achieved for supply voltage VI = 36 V, maximum output power POMAX = 100 W and the switching frequency f = 300 kHz. Measured parameters and waveforms showed a good agreement with theoretical predictions. Moreover, the relative bandwidth of the switching frequency was only 19% to obtain output power control from 4.8 W to POMAX with efficiency not less than 0.9 in the regulation range.

  15. Monoalkoxy BODIPYs—A Fluorophore Class for Bioimaging

    OpenAIRE

    Courtis, Alexandra M.; Santos, Sofia A.; Guan, Yinghua; Hendricks, J. Adam; Ghosh, Balaram; Szantai-Kis, D. Miklos; Reis, Surya A.; Shah, Jagesh V.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Small molecule fluorophores are indispensable tools for modern biomedical imaging techniques. In this report, we present the development of a new class of BODIPY dyes based on an alkoxy-fluoro-boron-dipyrromethene core. These novel fluorescent dyes, which we term MayaFluors, are characterized by good aqueous solubility and favorable in vitro physicochemical properties. MayaFluors are readily accessible in good yields in a one-pot, two-step approach starting from well-established BODIPY dyes, ...

  16. Growing a strong middle class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Martin

    2009-01-01

    An important mission for the country is achieving sustainability while strengthening the middle class. American leadership and innovation can play a critical role in defining the interconnectedness of our economy and environment-and in unlocking, harnessing, and advancing green technologies. The State of Maryland has launched a Green Jobs Initiative focused on attracting green businesses, working with existing businesses to adopt sustainable practices, promoting clean energy research and use, and training the work force for ne, green-collar jobs.

  17. Relationship between Hubble type and spectroscopic class in local galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Munoz-Tunon, C; Huertas-Company, M

    2011-01-01

    We compare the Hubble type and the spectroscopic class of the galaxies with spectra in SDSS/DR7. As it is long known, elliptical galaxies tend to be red whereas spiral galaxies tend to be blue, however, this relationship presents a large scatter, which we measure and quantify in detail. We compare the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means based classification (ASK) with most of the commonly used morphological classifications. All of them provide consistent results. Given a spectral class, the morphological type wavers with a standard deviation between 2 and 3 T types, and the same large dispersion characterizes the variability of spectral classes fixed the morphological type. The distributions of Hubble types given an ASK class are very skewed -- they present long tails that go to the late morphological types for the red galaxies, and to the early morphological types for the blue spectroscopic classes. The scatter is not produced by problems in the classification, and it remains when particular subsets are consider...

  18. Early treatment protocol for skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; de Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues; Fernandes, Leandra Sant'Anna Ferreira Parron

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal Class III malocclusion, with its unpredictable and unfavorable nature, has been characterized by a growth pattern with doubtful prognosis regarding orthodontic mechanics, even when performed early. For a long time, Class III malocclusion was regarded as a synonym of mandibular prognathism, regardless of the affected skeletal structures. Mandibular growth, essentially determined by genetic factors, could barely be controlled by early orthodontic interventions. Therefore, the treatment choice was to wait for the patient to grow, and then make an orthodontic intervention associated with an orthognathic surgery. Maxillary involvement in the etiology of Class III malocclusion was conclusive to change orthodontic therapeutics. Maxillary intramembranous growth has a better response to orthopedic treatment, based on growth control and redirection, thus contributing for early intervention success. In several cases, excellent results have been achieved with rapid maxillary expansion and protraction. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss the treatment of a patient with Class III malocclusion, whose treatment planning comprised two phases: interceptive (mechanical orthopedic appliances) and comprehensive (fixed orthodontic appliance). The results of this case showed that Class III malocclusion should be intercepted as early as possible to permit growth redirection, mainly when the maxilla is the primary etiologic factor or dental and/or functional factors are involved. Diagnosis, treatment planning and prognosis depend on patient age, growth potential and severity of malocclusion. Early intervention, adequate indication of appliances, and patient compliance are key factors for good outcomes.

  19. Composite materials processing, applications, characterizations

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Composite materials are used as substitutions of metals/traditional materials in aerospace, automotive, civil, mechanical and other industries. The present book collects the current knowledge and recent developments in the characterization and application of composite materials. To this purpose the volume describes the outstanding properties of this class of advanced material which recommend it for various industrial applications.

  20. A class of luminescent cyclometalated alkynylgold(III) complexes: synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical, photophysical, and computational studies of [Au(C=N=C)(C triple bond C-R)] (C=N=C = kappa(3)C,N,C bis-cyclometalated 2,6-diphenylpyridyl).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Keith Man-Chung; Hung, Ling-Ling; Lam, Wai Han; Zhu, Nianyong; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2007-04-11

    A new class of luminescent cyclometalated alkynylgold(III) complexes, [Au(RC=N(R')=CR)(CCR' ')], i.e., [Au(C=N=C)(C triple bond CR'')] (HC=N=CH = 2,6-diphenylpyridine) R' ' = C6H5 1, C6H4-Cl-p 2, C6H4-NO2-p 3, C6H4-OCH3-p 4, C6H4-NH2-p 5, C6H4-C6H13-p 6, C6H13 7, [Au(tBuC=N=CtBu)(C triple bond CC6H5)] 8 (HtBuC=N=CtBuH = 2,6-bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)pyridine), and [Au(C=NTol=C)(CCC6H4-C6H13-p)] 9 (HC=NTol=CH = 2,6-diphenyl-4-p-tolylpyridine), have been synthesized and characterized. The X-ray crystal structures of most of the complexes have also been determined. Electrochemical studies show that, in general, the first oxidation wave is an alkynyl ligand-centered oxidation, while the first reduction couple is ascribed to a ligand-centered reduction of the cyclometalated ligand with the exception of 3 in which the first reduction couple is assigned as an alkynyl ligand-centered reduction. Their electronic absorption and luminescence behaviors have also been investigated. In dichloromethane solution at room temperature, the low-energy absorption bands are assigned as the pi-pi* intraligand (IL) transition of the cyclometalated RC=N(R')=CR ligand with some mixing of a [pi(C triple bond CR'') --> pi*(RC=N(R')=CR)] ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT) character. The low-energy emission bands of all the complexes, with the exception of 5, are ascribed to origins mainly derived from the pi-pi* IL transition of the cyclometalated RC=N(R')=CR ligand. In the case of 5 that contains an electron-rich amino substituent on the alkynyl ligand, the low-energy emission band was found to show an obvious shift to the red. A change in the origin of emission is evident, and the emission of 5 is tentatively ascribed to a [pi(CCC6H4NH2) --> pi*(C=N=C)] LLCT excited-state origin. DFT and TDDFT computational studies have been performed to verify and elucidate the results of the electrochemical and photophysical studies.

  1. Do class size effects differ across grades?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandrup, Anne Brink

    This paper contributes to the class size literature by analyzing whether short-run class size effects are constant across grade levels in compulsory school. Results are based on administrative data on all pupils enroled in Danish public schools. Identification is based on a government-imposed class...... size cap that creates exogenous variation in class sizes. Significant (albeit modest) negative effects of class size increases are found for children on primary school levels. The effects on math abilities are statistically different across primary and secondary school. Larger classes do not affect...

  2. Measuring Class Cohesion Based on Dependence Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Qiang Chen; Bao-Wen Xu; Yu-Ming Zhou

    2004-01-01

    Classes are the basic modules in object-oriented (OO) software, which consist of attributes and methods. Thus, in OO environment, the cohesion is mainly about the tightness of the attributes and methods of classes. This paper discusses the relationships between attributes and attributes, attributes and methods, methods and methods of a class based on dependence analysis. Then the paper presents methods to compute these dependencies. Based on these, the paper proposes a method to measure the class cohesion, which satisfies the properties that a good measurement should have. The approach overcomes the limitations of previous class cohesion measures, which consider only one or two of the three relationships in a class.

  3. A FRAMEWORK TO MEASURE CLASS COHESION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Baowen; Chen Zhenqiang; Zhou Yuming

    2003-01-01

    Classes are the basic modules in Object-Oriented (OO) software, which consist of attributes and methods. Thus, in OO environment, the cohesion is mainly about how tightly the attributes and methods of classes cohere with each other. This letter discusses the relationships between attributes and attributes, attributes and methods, methods and methods of a class,and the properties of these relationships. Based on these properties, the letter proposes a new framework to measure the cohesion of a class. The approach overcomes the limitations of previous class cohesion measures, which consider only one or two of the three relationships in a class.

  4. Microbial dehalogenation of trichlorophenol by a bacterial consortium: characterization and mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chlorinated phenolic compounds are a class of toxic and refractory organic pollutants. The pollution caused by chlorophenols poses serious ecological and environmental problems. A stable bacterial consortium capable of reductively dechlorinating trichlorophenol was isolated using chlorophenol as the sole source of carbon and energy. The physiological characteristics of the mixed cultures were studied and the results show that the consortium could use pyruvate as the carbon and energy source. The fermentation of pyruvate, sulfate reduction and dechlorination process proceeded strictly in succession within this consortium. The effect of specific inhibitors on the dechlorinating activity of the consortium was investigated, and the results indicate that sulfate and molybdate (1 mmol/L) have a strong inhibitive influence on the dechlorination activity. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique was applied to analyzing the composition of the consortium and the results reveal that one major subpopulation within the consortium was phylogenetically affiliated to gamma and delta subclass of Proteobacteria.

  5. The intersectionality of discrimination attributes and bullying among youth: an applied latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Bernice Raveche; Masyn, Katherine E; Austin, S Bryn; Miller, Matthew; Williams, David R; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2014-08-01

    Discrimination is commonly experienced among adolescents. However, little is known about the intersection of multiple attributes of discrimination and bullying. We used a latent class analysis (LCA) to illustrate the intersections of discrimination attributes and bullying, and to assess the associations of LCA membership to depressive symptoms, deliberate self harm and suicidal ideation among a sample of ethnically diverse adolescents. The data come from the 2006 Boston Youth Survey where students were asked whether they had experienced discrimination based on four attributes: race/ethnicity, immigration status, perceived sexual orientation and weight. They were also asked whether they had been bullied or assaulted for these attributes. A total of 965 (78%) students contributed to the LCA analytic sample (45% Non-Hispanic Black, 29% Hispanic, 58% Female). The LCA revealed that a 4-class solution had adequate relative and absolute fit. The 4-classes were characterized as: low discrimination (51%); racial discrimination (33%); sexual orientation discrimination (7%); racial and weight discrimination with high bullying (intersectional class) (7%). In multivariate models, compared to the low discrimination class, individuals in the sexual orientation discrimination class and the intersectional class had higher odds of engaging in deliberate self-harm. Students in the intersectional class also had higher odds of suicidal ideation. All three discrimination latent classes had significantly higher depressive symptoms compared to the low discrimination class. Multiple attributes of discrimination and bullying co-occur among adolescents. Research should consider the co-occurrence of bullying and discrimination.

  6. CONVEX CLASS OF STARLIKE FUNCTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, V. P.

    1984-01-01

    Let $S$ denote the class of functions of the form $f(z)=z-¥sum_{n=2}^{¥infty}|a_{n}|z^{n}$ that are analytic and univalent in the unit disk $U$. Let $S(¥alpha, ¥beta)$ and $K(¥alpha, ¥beta)$ denote the subclasses of $S$ consisting respectively, of starlike and close-to-convex functions of order $¥alpha(0¥leqq¥alpha

  7. A Class of Integrable Metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Anabalon, Andres

    2016-01-01

    In four dimensions, the most general metric admitting two Killing vectors and a rank-two Killing tensor can be parameterized by ten arbitrary functions of a single variable. We show that picking a special vierbien, reducing the system to eight functions, implies the existence of two geodesic and share-free, null congruences, generated by two principal null directions of the Weyl tensor. Thus, if the spacetime is an Einstein manifold, the Goldberg-Sachs theorem implies it is Petrov type D, and by explicit construction, is in the Carter class. Hence, our analysis provide an straightforward connection between the most general integrable structure and the Carter family of spacetimes.

  8. Mandatory Class 1 Federal Areas Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web service contains the following layers: Mandatory Class 1 Federal Area polygons and Mandatory Class 1 Federal Area labels in the United States. The polygon...

  9. Middle-class projects in modern Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Within the last two decades or so there has been increased scholarly focus on the emergence, consolidation and future of the middle class in developing Asia. This is also the case with the Malay Muslim middle class in Malaysia, but how this class is developing over time is not well understood even...... if the Malays constitute the largest and fastest growing section of the middle class in Malaysia. Based on research projects I have carried out from the mid-1990s to the present, this article argues that an unpacking of the Malay Muslim middle class over time is important in order to understand the broader...... picture surrounding this class and its relationship to Malaysian national repertoires such as Islamic revivalism, politics, consumer culture, social mobility and the state-market nexus. I understand middle-class projects to be the making of local class culture in Malaysia and explore these in four...

  10. Middle-class projects in modern Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fischer, Johan

    2017-01-01

    .... This is also the case with the Malay Muslim middle class in Malaysia, but how this class is developing over time is not well understood even if the Malays constitute the largest and fastest growing...

  11. Equivariant characteristic classes of complex algebraic varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain E; Schuermann, Joerg; Shaneson, Julius L

    2010-01-01

    Homology Hirzebruch characteristic classes for singular varieties have been recently defined by Brasselet-Schuermann-Yokura as an attempt to unify previously known characteristic class theories for singular spaces (e.g., MacPherson-Chern classes, Baum-Fulton-MacPherson Todd classes, and Goresky-MacPherson L-classes, respectively). In this note we define equivariant analogues of these classes for quasi-projective varieties acted upon by a finite group of algebraic automorphisms, and show how these can be used to calculate the homology Hirzebruch classes of global orbifolds. We also compute the new classes in the context of monodromy problems, e.g., for varieties that fiber equivariantly (in the complex topology) over a connected algebraic manifold.

  12. Investment Company Series and Class Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Securities and Exchange Commission — The Series and Class Report provides basic identification information for all active registered investment company series and classes that have been issued IDs by...

  13. Class Based Contextual Logic for DOOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JoseK.Raphel; SiuCheungHui; 等

    1996-01-01

    Cntextual logic provides a mechanism to reason about modules.In this paper,this theory of modules if modules is extended to a context theory of classes where class is in the true spirit of object-oriented databases.The logic,referred to as CLOG,is class-based.CLOG supports class,object identity,multiple role of object, monotonic and non-monotonic inheritance of data and method,method factoring,views,derived and query classes.Views and derived classes are queries in themselves.Objects are pure data terms representing the ground instances of facts in the class.Object identity is a first class term in the logic.Inheritance is handled through delegation.

  14. What Are Lay Theories of Social Class?

    OpenAIRE

    Michael E. W. Varnum

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the effects of social class on psychological and behavioral variables. However, lay beliefs about how social class affects these dimensions have not been systematically tested. Studies 1 and 2 assessed lay beliefs about the association between social class and 8 variables (including psychological and behavioral tendencies and cognitive ability). Study 3 assessed lay beliefs about the Big five personality traits and social class, and study 4 reframed the 8 vari...

  15. Hirzebruch-Milnor classes of complete intersections

    CERN Document Server

    Maxim, Laurentiu; Schuermann, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We prove a new formula for the Hirzebruch-Milnor classes of global complete intersections with arbitrary singularities describing the difference between the Hirzebruch classes and the virtual ones. This generalizes a formula for the Chern-Milnor classes in the hypersurface case that was conjectured by S. Yokura and was proved by A. Parusinski and P. Pragacz. It also generalizes a formula of T. Suwa for the Chern-Milnor classes of complete intersections with isolated singularities.

  16. Characterization of Gastric Microbiota in Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Quanjiang; Xin, Yongning; Wang, Lili; Meng, Xinying; Yu, Xinjuan; Lu, Linlin; Xuan, Shiying

    2017-02-01

    Contribution of host genetic backgrounds in the development of gastric microbiota has not been clearly defined. This study was aimed to characterize the biodiversity, structure and composition of gastric microbiota among twins. A total of four pairs of twins and eight unrelated individuals were enrolled in the study. Antral biopsies were obtained during endoscopy. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified and pyrosequenced. Sequences were analyzed for the composition, structure, and α and β diversities of gastric microbiota. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria were the most predominant phyla of gastric microbiota. Each individual, twins as well as unrelated individuals, harbored a microbiota of distinct composition. There was no evidence of additional similarity in the richness and evenness of gastric microbiota among co-twins as compared to unrelated individuals. Calculations of θYC and PCoA demonstrated that the structure similarity of gastric microbial community between co-twins did not increase compared to unrelated individuals. In contrast, the structure of microbiota was altered enormously by Helicobacter pylori infection. These results suggest that host genetic backgrounds had little effect in shaping the gastric microbiota. This property of gastric microbiota could facilitate the studies discerning the role of microbiota from genetic grounds in the pathogenesis.

  17. Identification and characterization of humic substances-degrading bacterial isolates from an estuarine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esham; Ye; Moran

    2000-12-01

    Bacterial isolates were obtained from enrichment cultures containing humic substances extracted from estuarine water using an XAD-8 resin. Eighteen isolates were chosen for phylogenetic and physiological characterization based on numerical importance in serial dilutions of the enrichment culture and unique colony morphology. Partial sequences of the 16S rRNA genes indicated that six of the isolates were associated with the alpha subclass of Proteobacteria, three with the gamma-Proteobacteria, and nine with the Gram-positive bacteria. Ten isolates degraded at least one (and up to six) selected aromatic single-ring compounds. Six isolates showed ability to degrade [(14)C]humic substances derived from the dominant salt marsh grass in the estuary from which they were isolated (Spartina alterniflora), mineralizing 0.4-1.1% of the humic substances over 4 weeks. A mixture of all 18 isolates did not degrade humic substances significantly faster than any of the individual strains, however, and no isolate degraded humic substances to the same extent as the natural marine bacterial community (3.0%). Similar studies with a radiolabeled synthetic lignin ([beta-(14)C]dehydropolymerisate) showed measurable levels of degradation by all 18 bacteria (3.0-8.8% in 4 weeks), but mineralization levels were again lower than that observed for the natural marine bacterial community (28.2%). Metabolic capabilities of the 18 isolates were highly variable and generally did not map to phylogenetic affiliation.

  18. Phylogenetic diversity and phenotypic characterization of cultivable bacterioplankton isolated from polar oceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yinxin; LI Huirong; YU Yong; CHEN Bo; ZHENG Tianling

    2007-01-01

    A set of 27 marine planktonic bacteria isolated from the polar regions was characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and physiological and biochemical testing. More than half of these bacteria were positive for caseinase, gelatinase and β-glucosidase, and could utilize glucose, maltose or malic acid as carbon source for cell growth. Twelve isolates expressed nitrate reduction activities. Except for one antarctic isolate BSw10175 belonging to Actinobacteria phylum, these isolates were classified as γ-Proteobacteria, suggesting that γ-Proteobacteria dominated in cultivable marine bacterioplankton at both poles. Genus Pseudoalteromonas was the predominant group in the Chukchi Sea and the Bering Sea, and genus Shewanella dominated in cultivable bacterioplankton in the Prydz Bay. With sequence similarities above 97%, genus Psychrobacter was found at both poles. These 27 isolates were psychrotolerant, and significant 16S rDNA sequence similarities were found not only between arctic and antarctic marine bacteria ( > 99% ),but also between polar marine bacteria and bacteria from other aquatic environments ( ≥98.8% ) , including temperate ocean,deep sea, pond and lake, suggesting that in the polar oceans less temperature-sensitive bacteria may be cosmopolitan and have a bipolar, even global, distribution at the species level.

  19. Inverted rank distributions: Macroscopic statistics, universality classes, and critical exponents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    An inverted rank distribution is an infinite sequence of positive sizes ordered in a monotone increasing fashion. Interlacing together Lorenzian and oligarchic asymptotic analyses, we establish a macroscopic classification of inverted rank distributions into five “socioeconomic” universality classes: communism, socialism, criticality, feudalism, and absolute monarchy. We further establish that: (i) communism and socialism are analogous to a “disordered phase”, feudalism and absolute monarchy are analogous to an “ordered phase”, and criticality is the “phase transition” between order and disorder; (ii) the universality classes are characterized by two critical exponents, one governing the ordered phase, and the other governing the disordered phase; (iii) communism, criticality, and absolute monarchy are characterized by sharp exponent values, and are inherently deterministic; (iv) socialism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by continuous power-law statistics; (v) feudalism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by discrete exponential statistics. The results presented in this paper yield a universal macroscopic socioeconophysical perspective of inverted rank distributions.

  20. SED analysis of class I and class II FU Orionis stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gramajo, Luciana V; Gómez, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUORS) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUORS in an homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUORS stage. We modeled the SEDs of 24 of the 26 currently known FUORS, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al (2003b). We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. (2007) for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods, by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUORS have more massive disks: we find that $\\sim80\\%$ of the disks in FUORS are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ~ 1.e-7 Msun/yr vs ~ 1.e-5 Msun/yr for standard YSOs (young stellar o...