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Sample records for class ii gene

  1. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Frentz, G; Fugger, L;

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DQA, -DQB, -DPA, and -DPB in 20 Danish patients with alopecia areata (AA) and in healthy Danes. The frequency in AA of the DQB1*0301 and DQw7 associated DQB Bgl/II 4.2 kb...... of the serologically defined HLA-DQw7 specificity. Individuals who carried both DQA1*0501 and DQB1*0301 seemed to have a further increased risk of developing AA compared to individuals carrying only one of these HLA class II genes. Analysis of the combined presence of DQB1*0301 and DPA1*0103 in AA suggests...

  2. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse—Effects of selection and gene conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

  3. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuduk Katarzyna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia.

  4. MHC Class II and Non-MHC Class II Genes Differentially Influence Humoral Immunity to Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A. James

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax Lethal Toxin consists of Protective Antigen (PA and Lethal Factor (LF, and current vaccination strategies focus on eliciting antibodies to PA. In human vaccination, the response to PA can vary greatly, and the response is often directed toward non-neutralizing epitopes. Variable vaccine responses have been shown to be due in part to genetic differences in individuals, with both MHC class II and other genes playing roles. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MHC class II versus non-MHC class II genes in the humoral response to PA and LF immunization using three immunized strains of inbred mice: A/J (H-2k at the MHC class II locus, B6 (H-2b, and B6.H2k (H-2k. IgG antibody titers to LF were controlled primarily by the MHC class II locus, whereas IgG titers to PA were strongly influenced by the non-MHC class II genetic background. Conversely, the humoral fine specificity of reactivity to LF appeared to be controlled primarily through non-MHC class II genes, while the specificity of reactivity to PA was more dependent on MHC class II. Common epitopes, reactive in all strains, occurred in both LF and PA responses. These results demonstrate that MHC class II differentially influences humoral immune responses to LF and PA.

  5. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes from the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddle, Hannah V; Sanderson, Claire; Belov, Katherine

    2007-09-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is currently threatened by an emerging wildlife disease, devil facial tumour disease. The disease is decreasing devil numbers dramatically and may lead to the extinction of the species. At present, nothing is known about the immune genes or basic immunology of the devil. In this study, we report the construction of the first genetic library for the Tasmanian devil, a spleen cDNA library, and the isolation of full-length MHC Class I and Class II genes. We describe six unique Class II beta chain sequences from at least three loci, which belong to the marsupial Class II DA gene family. We have isolated 13 unique devil Class I sequences, representing at least seven Class I loci, two of which are most likely non-classical genes. The MHC Class I sequences from the devil have little heterogeneity, indicating recent divergence. The MHC genes described here are most likely involved in antigen presentation and are an important first step for studying MHC diversity and immune response in the devil. PMID:17673996

  6. Comprehensive analysis of cooperative gene mutations between class I and class II in de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yuichi; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Akane; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Kuriyama, Kazutaka; Tomonaga, Masao; Naoe, Tomoki

    2009-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been thought to be the consequence of two broad complementation classes of mutations: class I and class II. However, overlap-mutations between them or within the same class and the position of TP53 mutation are not fully analyzed. We comprehensively analyzed the FLT3, cKIT, N-RAS, C/EBPA, AML1, MLL, NPM1, and TP53 mutations in 144 newly diagnosed de novo AML. We found 103 of 165 identified mutations were overlapped with other mutations, and most overlap-mutations consisted of class I and class II mutations. Although overlap-mutations within the same class were found in seven patients, five of them additionally had the other class mutation. These results suggest that most overlap-mutations within the same class might be the consequence of acquiring an additional mutation after the completion both of class I and class II mutations. However, mutated genes overlapped with the same class were limited in N-RAS, TP53, MLL-PTD, and NPM1, suggesting the possibility that these irregular overlap-mutations might cooperatively participate in the development of AML. Notably, TP53 mutation was overlapped with both class I and class II mutations, and associated with morphologic multilineage dysplasia and complex karyotype. The genotype consisting of complex karyotype and TP53 mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor in entire AML patients, indicating this genotype generates a disease entity in de novo AML. These results collectively suggest that TP53 mutation might be a functionally distinguishable class of mutation. PMID:19309322

  7. Active suppression of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is acquired very early in B-cell ontogeny and is maintained up to the B-cell blast stage. Terminal differentiation in plasma cells is, however, accompanied by a loss of class II gene expression. In B cells this gene system is under the control of several loci encoding transacting factors with activator function, one of which, the aIr-1 gene product, operates across species barriers. In this report human class II gene expression is shown to be extinguished in somatic cell hybrids between the human class II-positive B-cell line Raji and the mouse class-II negative plasmacytoma cell line P3-U1. Since all murine chromosomes are retained in these hybrids and no preferential segregation of a specific human chromosome is observed, the results are compatible with the presence of suppressor factors of mouse origin, operating across species barriers and inhibiting class II gene expression. Suppression seems to act at the level of transcription or accumulation of class II-specific mRNA, since no human, and very few murine, class II transcripts are detectable in the hybrids

  8. Characterization and expression pattern ofpouII1,a novel class Ⅱ POU gene in zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    POU domain transcription factors that share a conserved DNA-binding domain, POU domain, are important regulators for the development of embryos in various animal species. A novel zebrafish POU domain gene, pouII1has been cloned. The pouII1 cDNA is 2080 kb in length and encodes a putative polypeptide of 596 amino acids. It is placed into class Ⅱ POU family since it shares a high degree of homology with the known members of this family.Northern hybridization identifies a major transcript of approximately 2.1 kb that was present in embryos at the single-cell stage throughout 24 h postfertilizafion. The whole mountin situ hybridization shows thatpouII1 transcripts are present in the single-cell embryos, strongly suggesting that these transcripts are of maternal origin. During early development of the embryos, pouII1 mRNA was ubiquitously distributed in all cells and tissues. The transcripts are gradually limited to brains and become completely undetectable by day 3. To our knowledge, pouII1 is the first class Ⅱ POU gene identified in zebrafish.``

  9. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle

    OpenAIRE

    S.N. Takeshima; Miyasaka, T; M. Polat; Kikuya, M.; Matsumoto, Y; C.N. Mingala; Villanueva, M.A.; Salces, A.J.; ONUMA, M.; Aida, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-D...

  10. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, A. R.; Wagner, R; Khatri, K; Notani, G.; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A; Yunis, E J

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes...

  11. A class II KNOX gene, KNOX4, controls seed physical dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Maofeng; Zhou, Chuanen; Molina, Isabel; Fu, Chunxiang; Nakashima, Jin; Li, Guifen; Zhang, Wenzheng; Park, Jongjin; Tang, Yuhong; Jiang, Qingzhen; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2016-06-21

    Physical dormancy of seed is an adaptive trait that widely exists in higher plants. This kind of dormancy is caused by a water-impermeable layer that blocks water and oxygen from the surrounding environment and keeps embryos in a viable status for a long time. Most of the work on hardseededness has focused on morphological structure and phenolic content of seed coat. The molecular mechanism underlying physical dormancy remains largely elusive. By screening a large number of Tnt1 retrotransposon-tagged Medicago truncatula lines, we identified nondormant seed mutants from this model legume species. Unlike wild-type hard seeds exhibiting physical dormancy, the mature mutant seeds imbibed water quickly and germinated easily, without the need for scarification. Microscopic observations of cross sections showed that the mutant phenotype was caused by a dysfunctional palisade cuticle layer in the seed coat. Chemical analysis found differences in lipid monomer composition between the wild-type and mutant seed coats. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that a class II KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOXII) gene, KNOX4, was responsible for the loss of physical dormancy in the seeds of the mutants. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identified CYP86A, a gene associated with cutin biosynthesis, as one of the downstream target genes of KNOX4 This study elucidated a novel molecular mechanism of physical dormancy and revealed a new role of class II KNOX genes. Furthermore, KNOX4-like genes exist widely in seed plants but are lacking in nonseed species, indicating that KNOX4 may have diverged from the other KNOXII genes during the evolution of seed plants. PMID:27274062

  12. Association analysis of class II cytokine and receptor genes in vitiligo patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traks, Tanel; Karelson, Maire; Reimann, Ene; Rätsep, Ranno; Silm, Helgi; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli

    2016-05-01

    The loss of melanocytes in vitiligo is mainly attributed to defective autoimmune mechanisms and lately autoinflammatory mediators have become more emphasized. Among these, a number of class II cytokines and their receptors have displayed altered expression patterns in vitiligo. Thus, we selected 30 SNPs from the regions of respective genes to be genotyped in Estonian case-control sample (109 and 328 individuals, respectively). For more precise analyses, patients were divided into subgroups based on vitiligo progression activity, age of onset, sex, occurrence of vitiligo among relatives, extent of depigmented areas, appearance of Köbner's phenomenon, existence of halo nevi, occurrence of spontaneous repigmentation, and amount of thyroid peroxidase antibodies. No associations appeared in whole vitiligo group. In subgroups, several allelic and haplotype associations were found. The strongest involved SNPs rs12301088 (near IL26 gene), that was associated with familial vitiligo and existence of halo nevi, and rs2257167 (IFNAR1 gene), that was associated with female vitiligo. Additionally, haplotypes consisting of rs12301088 and rs12321603 alleles (IL26-IL22 genes), that were associated with familial vitiligo and existence of halo nevi. In conclusion, several genetic associations with vitiligo subphenotypes were revealed and functional explanations to these remain to be determined in respective studies. PMID:26429320

  13. HLA class II genes in chronic hepatitis C virus-infection and associated immunological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congia, M; Clemente, M G; Dessi, C; Cucca, F; Mazzoleni, A P; Frau, F; Lampis, R; Cao, A; Lai, M E; De Virgiliis, S

    1996-12-01

    To investigate the factors that may confer susceptibility or protection to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and to HCV-associated immunological disorders, we designed two studies on 420 Sardinian transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients followed in our department in Cagliari since 1974. The first one was an epidemiological survey aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HCV infection and HCV-associated immunological disorders. In the second study, the distribution of different HLA class II genes was examined by DNA analysis in 116 HCV positive patients, 30 HCV negative patients, and 606 healthy controls. Three hundred fourteen patients became infected with HCV (74.7%) after 5.6 +/- 2.8 years of regular transfusion program. Mixed cryoglobulinemia, purpura, arthritis, proteinuria, decreased complement levels, rheumatoid factor and anti-GOR, smooth muscle antibody (SMA), anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), and liver, kidney microsome (LKM) autoantibodies were significantly more represented in HCV positive patients than in negative ones (P patients who despite 10.3 +/- 2.2 years in a regular blood transfusion program did not show any evidence of HCV infection (Pc < .0092). Our results represent clear evidence for a relationship between HCV infection and immune extrahepatic abnormalities. A gene(s) located in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region may play an important role in conferring protection against HCV infection. PMID:8938157

  14. Trans-species polymorphism and selection in the MHC class II DRA genes of domestic sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith T Ballingall

    Full Text Available Highly polymorphic genes with central roles in lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance are grouped together in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC in higher vertebrates. Generally, across vertebrate species the class II MHC DRA gene is highly conserved with only limited allelic variation. Here however, we provide evidence of trans-species polymorphism at the DRA locus in domestic sheep (Ovis aries. We describe variation at the Ovar-DRA locus that is far in excess of anything described in other vertebrate species. The divergent DRA allele (Ovar-DRA*0201 differs from the sheep reference sequences by 20 nucleotides, 12 of which appear non-synonymous. Furthermore, DRA*0201 is paired with an equally divergent DRB1 allele (Ovar-DRB1*0901, which is consistent with an independent evolutionary history for the DR sub-region within this MHC haplotype. No recombination was observed between the divergent DRA and B genes in a range of breeds and typical levels of MHC class II DR protein expression were detected at the surface of leukocyte populations obtained from animals homozygous for the DRA*0201, DRB1*0901 haplotype. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis groups Ovar-DRA*0201 with DRA sequences derived from species within the Oryx and Alcelaphus genera rather than clustering with other ovine and caprine DRA alleles. Tests for Darwinian selection identified 10 positively selected sites on the branch leading to Ovar-DRA*0201, three of which are predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen. As the Ovis, Oryx and Alcelaphus genera have not shared a common ancestor for over 30 million years, the DRA*0201 and DRB1*0901 allelic pair is likely to be of ancient origin and present in the founding population from which all contemporary domestic sheep breeds are derived. The conservation of the integrity of this unusual DR allelic pair suggests some selective advantage which is likely to be associated with the presentation of pathogen antigen to T

  15. The properties of the single chicken MHC classical class II alpha chain ( B-LA) gene indicate an ancient origin for the DR/E-like isotype of class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Jan; Marston, Denise; Avila, David;

    2003-01-01

    significantly in the peptide-binding alpha(1) domain. The cDNA and genomic DNA sequences from chickens of diverse origins show few alleles, which differ in only four nucleotides and one amino acid. In contrast, significant restriction fragment length polymorphism is detected by Southern blot analysis of genomic...... DNA, suggesting considerable diversity around the gene. Analysis of a large back-cross family indicates that the class II alpha chain locus ( B-LA) is located roughly 5.6 cM from the MHC locus, which encodes the classical class II beta chains. Thus the chicken class II alpha chain gene is like the...

  16. Polymorphism and Balancing Selection of MHC Class II DAB Gene in 7 Selective Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus Families

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    Min Du

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the genetic variation of the MHC class IIB exon2 allele in the offspring, 700 fry from seven families of Japanese flounder challenged with V. anguillarum were studied, and different mortality rates were found in those families. Five to ten surviving and dead fry from each of the seven families were selected to study the MHC class II B exon2 gene with PCR and a direct sequencing method. One hundred and sixteen different exon2 sequences were found and 116 different alleles were identified, while a minimum of four loci were revealed in the MHC class II B exon2 gene. The ratio (dN/dS of nonsynonymous substitution (dN to synonymous substitutions (dS in the peptide-binding region (PBR of the MHC class IIB gene was 6.234, which indicated that balancing selection is acting on the MHC class IIB genes. The MHC IIB alleles were thus being passed on to their progeny. Some alleles were significantly more frequent in surviving than dead individuals. All together our data suggested that the alleles Paol-DAB*4301, Paol-DAB*4601, Paol-DAB*4302, Paol-DAB*3803, and Paol-DAB*4101 were associated with resistance to V. anguillarum in flounder.

  17. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, S N; Miyasaka, T; Polat, M; Kikuya, M; Matsumoto, Y; Mingala, C N; Villanueva, M A; Salces, A J; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2014-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle. PMID:25606401

  18. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Takeshima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-sequence-based typing (SBT. Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle. A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle.

  19. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A R; Wagner, R; Khatri, K; Notani, G; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A; Yunis, E J

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes in 25 non-Jewish PV patients, DR4, DQw8 was found in 12 of the patients and DRw6, DQw5 was found in 15. Only 3 patients had neither. Only 1 of the DR4, DQw8 haplotypes was [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] and 2 were HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8; most were the presumed fragments (SC31, DR4, DQw8) or (SC21, DR4, DQw8) or DR4, DQw8 with some other complotype. Of the patients with DRw6, DQw5, all were DRw14, DQw5, and 6 had a rare Caucasian haplotype, HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5. Four of 6 of these were found in patients of Italian extraction, as was the 1 normal example. The non-Jewish patients were of more Southern European extraction than our controls. This suggests that there are two major MHC susceptibility alleles in American patients with PV. The more ancient apparently arose on a haplotype in the Jews, HLA-B38(35), SC21(SC31), DR4, DQw8, and spread to other populations largely as D-region segments. The other arose in or near Italy on the haplotype HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5 and has also partially fragmented so that many patients carry only DRw14, DQw5. The available data do not permit the specific localization of either the DR4, DQw8- or the DRw14, DQw5-linked susceptibility genes. Images PMID:1675792

  20. Exceptional hyperthyroidism and a role for both major histocompatibility class I and class II genes in a murine model of Graves' disease.

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    Sandra M McLachlan

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hyperthyroidism, Graves' disease, can be induced by immunizing susceptible strains of mice with adenovirus encoding the human thyrotropin receptor (TSHR or its A-subunit. Studies in two small families of recombinant inbred strains showed that susceptibility to developing TSHR antibodies (measured by TSH binding inhibition, TBI was linked to the MHC region whereas genes on different chromosomes contributed to hyperthyroidism. We have now investigated TSHR antibody production and hyperthyroidism induced by TSHR A-subunit adenovirus immunization of a larger family of strains (26 of the AXB and BXA strains. Analysis of the combined AXB and BXA families provided unexpected insight into several aspects of Graves' disease. First, extreme thyroid hyperplasia and hyperthyroidism in one remarkable strain, BXA13, reflected an inability to generate non-functional TSHR antibodies measured by ELISA. Although neutral TSHR antibodies have been detected in Graves' sera, pathogenic, functional TSHR antibodies in Graves' patients are undetectable by ELISA. Therefore, this strain immunized with A-subunit-adenovirus that generates only functional TSHR antibodies may provide an improved model for studies of induced Graves' disease. Second, our combined analysis of linkage data from this and previous work strengthens the evidence that gene variants in the immunoglobulin heavy chain V region contribute to generating thyroid stimulating antibodies. Third, a broad region that encompasses the MHC region on mouse chromosome 17 is linked to the development of TSHR antibodies (measured by TBI. Most importantly, unlike other strains, TBI linkage in the AXB and BXA families to MHC class I and class II genes provides an explanation for the unresolved class I/class II difference in humans.

  1. Patterns of evolution of MHC class II genes of crows (Corvus suggest trans-species polymorphism

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    John A. Eimes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A distinguishing characteristic of genes that code for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC is that alleles often share more similarity between, rather than within species. There are two likely mechanisms that can explain this pattern: convergent evolution and trans-species polymorphism (TSP, in which ancient allelic lineages are maintained by balancing selection and retained by descendant species. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms has major implications in how we view adaptation of immune genes. In this study we analyzed exon 2 of the MHC class IIB in three passerine bird species in the genus Corvus: jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos japonensis American crows (C. brachyrhynchos and carrion crows (C. corone orientalis. Carrion crows and American crows are recently diverged, but allopatric, sister species, whereas carrion crows and jungle crows are more distantly related but sympatric species, and possibly share pathogens linked to MHC IIB polymorphisms. These patterns of evolutionary divergence and current geographic ranges enabled us to test for trans-species polymorphism and convergent evolution of the MHC IIB in crows. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MHC IIB sequences revealed several well supported interspecific clusters containing all three species, and there was no biased clustering of variants among the sympatric carrion crows and jungle crows. The topologies of phylogenetic trees constructed from putatively selected sites were remarkably different than those constructed from putatively neutral sites. In addition, trees constructed using non-synonymous substitutions from a continuous fragment of exon 2 had more, and generally more inclusive, supported interspecific MHC IIB variant clusters than those constructed from the same fragment using synonymous substitutions. These phylogenetic patterns suggest that recombination, especially gene conversion, has partially erased the signal of allelic ancestry in these species. While

  2. Trans-species polymorphism of the Mhc class II DRB-like gene in banded penguins (genus Spheniscus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Eri F; Tsuda, Tomi T; Sumiyama, Daisuke; Naruse, Taeko K; Fukuda, Michio; Kurita, Masanori; Wilson, Rory P; LeMaho, Yvon; Miller, Gary D; Tsuda, Michio; Murata, Koichi; Kulski, Jerzy K; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2009-05-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (Mhc) class II DRB locus of vertebrates is highly polymorphic and some alleles may be shared between closely related species as a result of balancing selection in association with resistance to parasites. In this study, we developed a new set of PCR primers to amplify, clone, and sequence overlapping portions of the Mhc class II DRB-like gene from the 5'UTR end to intron 3, including exons 1, 2, and 3 and introns 1 and 2 in four species (20 Humboldt, six African, five Magellanic, and three Galapagos penguins) of penguin from the genus Spheniscus (Sphe). Analysis of gene sequence variation by the neighbor-joining method of 21 Sphe sequences and 20 previously published sequences from four other penguin species revealed overlapping clades within the Sphe species, but species-specific clades for the other penguin species. The overlap of the DRB-like gene sequence variants between the four Sphe species suggests that, despite their allopatric distribution, the Sphe species are closely related and that some shared DRB1 alleles may have undergone a trans-species inheritance because of balancing selection and/or recent rapid speciation. The new primers and PCR assays that we have developed for the identification of the DRB1 DNA and protein sequence variations appear to be useful for the characterization of the molecular evolution of the gene in closely related Penguin species and might be helpful for the assessment of the genetic health and the management of the conservation and captivity of these endangered species. PMID:19319519

  3. Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection is associated with lower MHC class II gene expression in Apodemus flavicollis: indication for immune suppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axtner, Jan; Sommer, Simone

    2011-12-01

    Due to their key role in recognizing foreign antigens and triggering the subsequent immune response the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) provide a potential target for parasites to attack in order to evade detection and expulsion from the host. A diminished MHC gene expression results in less activated T cells and might serve as a gateway for pathogens and parasites. Some parasites are suspected to be immune suppressors and promote co-infections of other parasites even in other parts of the body. In our study we found indications that the gut dwelling nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus might exert a systemic immunosuppressive effect in yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis). The amount of hepatic MHC class II DRB gene RNA transcripts in infected mice was negatively associated with infection intensity with H. polygyrus. The hepatic expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, such as transforming growth factor β and interleukin 10 was not associated with H. polygyrus infection. We did not find direct positive associations of H. polygyrus with other helminth species. But the prevalence and infection intensity of the nematodes Syphacia stroma and Trichuris muris were higher in multiple infected individuals. Furthermore, our data indicated antagonistic effects in the helminth community of A. flavicollis as cestode infection correlated negatively with H. polygyrus and helminth species richness. Our study shows that expression analyses of immune relevant genes can also be performed in wildlife, opening new aspects and possibilities for future ecological and evolutionary research. PMID:21983561

  4. Sequence-specific interactions of nuclear factors with conserved sequences of human class II major histocompatibility complex genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All class II major histocompatibility complex genes contain two highly conserved sequences, termed X and Y, with the promoter region(s), which may have a role in regulation of expression. To study trans-acting factors that interact with these sequences, sequence-specific DNA binding activity has been examined by the gel electrophoresis retardation assay using the HLA-DQ2β gene 5' flanking DNA and nuclear extracts derived from various cell types. Several specific protein-binding activities were found using a 45-base-pair (bp) HinfI/Sau96I (-142 to -98 bp) and a 38-bp Sau96I/Sau96I (-97 to -60 bp) fragment, which include conserved sequence X (-113 to -100 bp) and conserved sequence Y (-80 to -71 bp), respectively. Competition experiments, methylation interference analysis, and DNase I footprinting demonstrated that distinct proteins in a nuclear extract of Raji cells (a human B lymphoma line) bind to sequence X, to sequence Y, and to DNA 5' of the X sequence (termed sequence W). The factor binding site in the W sequence is also found to be conserved among β-chain genes and is suggested to be a γ-interferon control region

  5. B-cell-specific enhancer activity of conserved upstream elements of the class II major histocompatibility complex DQB gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, M.; Strominger, J.L.

    1988-09-01

    A 95-base-pair immediate upstream sequence of the human class II major histocompatibility complex DQB gene containing the conserved X and Y elements showed enhancer activity in a transient expression assay. An enhancer test plasmid harboring the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene under the control of a truncated simian virus 40 enhancerless early promoter was employed. The DQB sequence inserted into this plasmid was active as an enhancer in Raji cells (human Burkitt lymphoma cells) but not active in Jurkat cells (human T-cell leukemia cells) or in HeLa cells (human cervical carcinoma cells). This cell-type specificity suggests that this enhancer activity may be involved in the tissue specificity of the DQB gene that is normally expressed only in mature B cells, macrophages, and thymic epithelial cells. Deletion analysis showed that both X and Y box sequences are essential for the full activity of the enhancer sequence and that these two sequences may function in a cooperative manner as cis-acting elements. Further deletions were used to define the 5' border of the X element. These results suggest that previously characterized protein factors that bind to X and Y include transcription factors involved in the cell-type specificity of this enhancer activity.

  6. Non-neutral evolution and reciprocal monophyly of two expressed Mhc class II B genes in Leach's storm-petrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearborn, Donald C; Gager, Andrea B; Gilmour, Morgan E; McArthur, Andrew G; Hinerfeld, Douglas A; Mauck, Robert A

    2015-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) is subject to pathogen-mediated balancing selection and can link natural selection with mate choice. We characterized two Mhc class II B loci in Leach's storm-petrel, Oceanodroma leucorhoa, focusing on exon 2 which encodes the portion of the protein that binds pathogen peptides. We amplified and sequenced exon 2 with locus-specific nested PCR and Illumina MiSeq using individually barcoded primers. Repeat genotyping of 78 single-locus genotypes produced identical results in 77 cases (98.7%). Sequencing of messenger RNA (mRNA) from three birds confirmed expression of both loci, consistent with the observed absence of stop codons or frameshifts in all alleles. In 48 birds, we found 9 and 12 alleles at the two loci, respectively, and all 21 alleles translated to unique amino acid sequences. Unlike many studies of duplicated Mhc genes, alleles of the two loci clustered into monophyletic groups. Consistent with this phylogenetic result, interlocus gene conversion appears to have affected only two short fragments of the exon. As predicted under a paradigm of pathogen-mediated selection, comparison of synonymous and non-synonymous substitution rates found evidence of a history of positive selection at putative peptide binding sites. Overall, the results suggest that the gene duplication event leading to these two loci is not recent and that point mutations and positive selection on the peptide binding sites may be the predominant forces acting on these genes. Characterization of these loci sets the stage for population-level work on the evolutionary ecology of Mhc in this species. PMID:25416539

  7. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Dalhoff, K; Fugger, L;

    1992-01-01

    ) associated DRB Bgl II 9.1 kilobase (kb) fragment (RR = 2.9; P less than 0.05, 'corrected' P greater than 0.05), the DQA1*0501 associated DQA Taq I 4.8 kb fragment (RR = 3.1; P less than 0.05, 'corrected' P greater than 0.05), the DQB1*0201 (DQw2) associated DQB Hin dIII 11.5 kb fragment (RR = 3.1; P less...

  8. TaqMan Probe-Based Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection and Discrimination of Class I, II, and III tfdA Genes in Soils Treated with Phenoxy Acid Herbicides▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Bælum, Jacob; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2009-01-01

    Separate quantification of three classes of tfdA genes was performed using TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR for 13 different soils subsequent to mineralization of three phenoxy acids. Class III tfdA genes were found to be involved in mineralization more often than class I and II tfdA genes.

  9. Gene knockout mice establish a primary protective role for major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted responses in Chlamydia trachomatis genital tract infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, R P; Feilzer, K; Tumas, D B

    1995-01-01

    Mice with disrupted beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m-/-), I-A (class II-/-), or CD4 (CD4-/-) genes were examined for their capacity to resolve Chlamydia trachomatis genital tract infection. C57BL/6 and beta 2m-/- mice resolved infection similarly and were culture negative by 4 to 5 weeks following infection. Conversely, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-/- mice failed to resolve infection, and CD4-/- mice showed a significant delay (2 weeks). Secondary challenge of C57BL/6, beta 2m...

  10. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowland, J B; Andersen, V; Halberg, P;

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, -DPB in 24 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and in 102 healthy Danes. A highly significant increase of the frequency of the DR3......- and DRw6-associated 7.00 kb DRB TaqI DNA fragment was found in SLE patients compared to normal controls (83.3% vs 35.5%; RR = 9.1, p < 10(-4). The frequencies of the DQA1*0501-associated 4.56 kb DQA TaqI fragment and the DRB3*01/03-associated 9.79 kb TaqI fragment were also found to be significantly...... increased in SLE patients (70.8% vs 29.7%; RR = 5.8, p < 10(-2) for the DQA fragment and 70.8% vs 36.1%; RR = 4.3, p < 0.05 for the DRB3 fragment). Less extensive and insignificant increases of the frequencies of the DR3-associated DQB and DPB fragments were observed. The frequencies of the DR2-associated...

  11. Immunogenetics of rheumatoid arthritis and primary Sjögren's syndrome: DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Andersen, V; Fugger, L;

    1992-01-01

    . The frequencies of DNA fragments associated with the following HLA class II genes were increased in RA when compared to normal controls: DRB1*04 (DR4) (relative risk, RR = 7.4, P less than 10(-3), DRB4*0101 (DRw53) (RR = 9.6, P less than 10(-3), DQA1*0301 (RR = 9.6, P less than 10(-3), DQB1*0301 (DQw7) (RR = 2.......8, P less than 0.05, 'corrected' P greater than 0.05), and DQB1*0302 (DQw8) (RR = 4.5, P less than 10(-2). Negative associations were found between RA and DRB1*1501 (DR2/DRw15) (RR = 0.2, P less than 10(-2) and DQB1*0602 (DQw6) (RR = 0.2, P less than 10(-2), 'corrected' P greater than 0......(-3). Positive associations were found between primary SS and DNA fragments associated with DRB1*03/13 (RR = 6.8, P less than 10(-3), DRB3*0101 (DRw52) (RR = 5.7, P less than 10(-2), DQA1*0501 (RR = 6.8, P less than 10(-3), DQB1*0201 (DQw2) (RR = 11.6, P less than 10(-5), and DQB1*0602 (DQw6) (RR = 2.7, P less...

  12. Two Zebrafish Alcohol Dehydrogenases Share Common Ancestry with Mammalian Class I, II, IV, and V Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genes but Have Distinct Functional Characteristics*

    OpenAIRE

    Reimers, Mark J.; Hahn, Mark E.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Ethanol is teratogenic to many vertebrates. We are utilizing zebrafish as a model system to determine whether there is an association between ethanol metabolism and ethanol-mediated developmental toxicity. Here we report the isolation and characterization of two cDNAs encoding zebrafish alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). Phylogenetic analysis of these zebrafish ADHs indicates that they share a common ancestor with mammalian class I, II, IV, and V ADHs. The genes encoding these zebrafish ADHs have...

  13. Differential expression of 12 histone deacetylase (HDAC) genes in astrocytomas and normal brain tissue: class II and IV are hypoexpressed in glioblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma is the most lethal primary malignant brain tumor. Although considerable progress has been made in the treatment of this aggressive tumor, the clinical outcome for patients remains poor. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are recognized as promising targets for cancer treatment. In the past several years, HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) have been used as radiosensitizers in glioblastoma treatment. However, no study has demonstrated the status of global HDAC expression in gliomas and its possible correlation to the use of HDACis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare mRNA and protein levels of class I, II and IV of HDACs in low grade and high grade astrocytomas and normal brain tissue and to correlate the findings with the malignancy in astrocytomas. Forty-three microdissected patient tumor samples were evaluated. The histopathologic diagnoses were 20 low-grade gliomas (13 grade I and 7 grade II) and 23 high-grade gliomas (5 grade III and 18 glioblastomas). Eleven normal cerebral tissue samples were also analyzed (54 total samples analyzed). mRNA expression of class I, II, and IV HDACs was studied by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and normalized to the housekeeping gene β-glucuronidase. Protein levels were evaluated by western blotting. We found that mRNA levels of class II and IV HDACs were downregulated in glioblastomas compared to low-grade astrocytomas and normal brain tissue (7 in 8 genes, p < 0.05). The protein levels of class II HDAC9 were also lower in high-grade astrocytomas than in low-grade astrocytomas and normal brain tissue. Additionally, we found that histone H3 (but not histone H4) was more acetylated in glioblastomas than normal brain tissue. Our study establishes a negative correlation between HDAC gene expression and the glioma grade suggesting that class II and IV HDACs might play an important role in glioma malignancy. Evaluation of histone acetylation levels showed that histone H3 is more acetylated in

  14. Comparative genomic analysis reveals independent expansion of a lineage-specific gene family in vertebrates: The class II cytokine receptors and their ligands in mammals and fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogensen Knud

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high degree of sequence conservation between coding regions in fish and mammals can be exploited to identify genes in mammalian genomes by comparison with the sequence of similar genes in fish. Conversely, experimentally characterized mammalian genes may be used to annotate fish genomes. However, gene families that escape this principle include the rapidly diverging cytokines that regulate the immune system, and their receptors. A classic example is the class II helical cytokines (HCII including type I, type II and lambda interferons, IL10 related cytokines (IL10, IL19, IL20, IL22, IL24 and IL26 and their receptors (HCRII. Despite the report of a near complete pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes genome sequence, these genes remain undescribed in fish. Results We have used an original strategy based both on conserved amino acid sequence and gene structure to identify HCII and HCRII in the genome of another pufferfish, Tetraodon nigroviridis that is amenable to laboratory experiments. The 15 genes that were identified are highly divergent and include a single interferon molecule, three IL10 related cytokines and their potential receptors together with two Tissue Factor (TF. Some of these genes form tandem clusters on the Tetraodon genome. Their expression pattern was determined in different tissues. Most importantly, Tetraodon interferon was identified and we show that the recombinant protein can induce antiviral MX gene expression in Tetraodon primary kidney cells. Similar results were obtained in Zebrafish which has 7 MX genes. Conclusion We propose a scheme for the evolution of HCII and their receptors during the radiation of bony vertebrates and suggest that the diversification that played an important role in the fine-tuning of the ancestral mechanism for host defense against infections probably followed different pathways in amniotes and fish.

  15. The role of HLA class II genes in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: Molecular analysis of 180 Caucasian, multiplex families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, J.A.; Cook, M.; Erlich, H.A. [Roche Molecular Systems, Alameda, CA (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    We report here our analysis of HLA class II alleles in 180 Caucasian nuclear families with at least two children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 genotypes were determined with PCR/sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe typing methods. The data allowed unambiguous determination of four-locus haplotypes in all but three of the families. Consistent with other studies, our data indicate an increase in DR3/DR4, DR3/DR3, and DR4/DR4 genotypes in patients compared to controls. In addition, we found an increase in DR1/DR4, DR1/DR3, and DR4/DR8 genotypes. While the frequency of DQB1*0302 on DR4 haplotypes is dramatically increased in DR3/DR4 patients, DR4 haplotypes in DR1/DR4 patients exhibit frequencies of DQB1*0302 and DQB1*0301 more closely resembling those in control populations. The protective effect of DR2 is evident in this data set and is limited to the common DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype. Most DR2{sup +} patients carry the less common DR2 haplotype DRB1*1601-DQB1*0502, which is not decreased in patients relative to controls. DPB1 also appears to play a role in disease susceptibility. DPB1*0301 is increased in patients (P < .001) and may contribute to the disease risk of a number of different DR-DQ haplotypes. DPB1*0101, found almost exclusively on DR3 haplotypes in patients, is slightly increased, and maternal transmissions of DRB1*0301-DPB1*0101 haplotypes to affected children occur twice as frequently as do paternal transmissions. Transmissions of DR3 haplotypes carrying other DPB1 alleles occur at approximately equal maternal and paternal frequencies. The complex, multigenic nature of HLA class II-associated IDDM susceptibility is evident from these data. 76 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  16. Mutations in the HLA class II genes leading to loss of expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordanova, ES; Philippo, K; Giphart, MJ; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM

    2003-01-01

    Loss of expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules on tumor cells affects the onset and modulation of the immune response through lack of activation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Previously, we showed that the frequent loss of expression of HLA class II in diffuse large B-cell lymphom

  17. Genetic variation of the MHC class II DRB genes in the Japanese weasel, Mustela itatsi, endemic to Japan, compared with the Siberian weasel, Mustela sibirica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishita, Y; Abramov, A V; Kosintsev, P A; Lin, L-K; Watanabe, S; Yamazaki, K; Kaneko, Y; Masuda, R

    2015-12-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that play a critical role in vertebrate immune system and are highly polymorphic. To further understand the molecular evolution of the MHC genes, we compared MHC class II DRB genes between the Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi), a species endemic to Japan, and the Siberian weasel (Mustela sibirica), a closely related species on the continent. We sequenced a 242-bp region of DRB exon 2, which encodes antigen-binding sites (ABS), and found 24 alleles from 31 M. itatsi individuals and 17 alleles from 21 M. sibirica individuals, including broadly distributed, species-specific and/or geographically restricted alleles. Our results suggest that pathogen-driven balancing selection have acted to maintain the diversity in the DRB genes. For predicted ABS, nonsynonymous substitutions exceeded synonymous substitutions, also indicating positive selection, which was not seen at non-ABS. In a Bayesian phylogenetic tree, two M. sibirica DRB alleles were basal to the rest of the sequences from mustelid species and may represent ancestral alleles. Trans-species polymorphism was evident between many mustelid DRB alleles, especially between M. itatsi and M. sibirica. These two Mustela species divided about 1.7 million years ago, but still share many MHC alleles, indicative of their close phylogenetic relationship. PMID:26593752

  18. Purifying selection and birth-and-death evolution in the class II hydrophobin gene families of the ascomycete Trichoderma/Hypocrea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenerley Charles M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrophobins are proteins containing eight conserved cysteine residues that occur uniquely in mycelial fungi. Their main function is to confer hydrophobicity to fungal surfaces in contact with air or during attachment of hyphae to hydrophobic surfaces of hosts, symbiotic partners or themselves resulting in morphogenetic signals. Based on their hydropathy patterns and solubility characteristics, hydrophobins are divided into two classes (I and II, the latter being found only in ascomycetes. Results We have investigated the mechanisms driving the evolution of the class II hydrophobins in nine species of the mycoparasitic ascomycetous genus Trichoderma/Hypocrea, using three draft sequenced genomes (H. jecorina = T. reesei, H. atroviridis = T. atroviride; H. virens = T. virens an additional 14,000 ESTs from six other Trichoderma spp. (T. asperellum, H. lixii = T. harzianum, T. aggressivum var. europeae, T. longibrachiatum, T. cf. viride. The former three contained six, ten and nine members, respectively. Ten is the highest number found in any ascomycete so far. All the hydrophobins we examined had the conserved four beta-strands/one helix structure, which is stabilized by four disulfide bonds. In addition, a small number of these hydrophobins (HFBscontained an extended N-terminus rich in either proline and aspartate, or glycine-asparagine. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a mosaic of terminal clades containing duplicated genes and shows only three reasonably supported clades. Calculation of the ratio of differences in synonymous vs. non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions provides evidence for strong purifying selection (KS/Ka >> 1. A genome database search for class II HFBs from other ascomycetes retrieved a much smaller number of hydrophobins (2–4 from each species, and most were from Sordariomycetes. A combined phylogeny of these sequences with those of Trichoderma showed that the Trichoderma HFBs mostly formed their own clades

  19. Exceptional Hyperthyroidism and a Role for both Major Histocompatibility Class I and Class II Genes in a Murine Model of Graves' Disease

    OpenAIRE

    McLachlan, Sandra M.; Aliesky, Holly A.; Chen, Chun-Rong; Williams, Robert W.; Rapoport, Basil

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune hyperthyroidism, Graves' disease, can be induced by immunizing susceptible strains of mice with adenovirus encoding the human thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) or its A-subunit. Studies in two small families of recombinant inbred strains showed that susceptibility to developing TSHR antibodies (measured by TSH binding inhibition, TBI) was linked to the MHC region whereas genes on different chromosomes contributed to hyperthyroidism. We have now investigated TSHR antibody production and h...

  20. Immunopathology of american cutaneous leishmaniasis. Modulation of MHC class II gene products by Keratinocytes before and after glucantime therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Pirmez

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal changes from 32 cutaneous and 3 mucosal American leishmaniasis (ACL active lesions were studied for HLA-DR, -DP expression, Lanerhans cells and lymphocyte infiltration. In addition to a DR and DQ positivity at the surface of the cells of the inflammatory infiltrate, a strong reaction for DR antigens was detected on keratinocytes. Hyperplasia of Langerhans cells was present in al cutaneous lesions and epidermis was infiltrated by T lymphocytes. When healed lesions of 14 of these subjects were re-biopsied 1 to 12 months after the end of pentavalent antimonial therapy, MHC class antigens could no longer be seen on keratinocytes. Our data represrn evidence for hhe reversibility of the abnormal HLA-DR expression by keratinocytes in ACL after Glucantime therapy or spontaneous scar formation, demonstrating that this expresion is restricted to the period of active lesions. The present findings can be regarded as an indirect evidence that keratinocytes may be involved in the immunopathology of ACL.

  1. Two zebrafish alcohol dehydrogenases share common ancestry with mammalian class I, II, IV, and V alcohol dehydrogenase genes but have distinct functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Mark J; Hahn, Mark E; Tanguay, Robert L

    2004-09-10

    Ethanol is teratogenic to many vertebrates. We are utilizing zebrafish as a model system to determine whether there is an association between ethanol metabolism and ethanol-mediated developmental toxicity. Here we report the isolation and characterization of two cDNAs encoding zebrafish alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). Phylogenetic analysis of these zebrafish ADHs indicates that they share a common ancestor with mammalian class I, II, IV, and V ADHs. The genes encoding these zebrafish ADHs have been named Adh8a and Adh8b by the nomenclature committee. Both genes were genetically mapped to chromosome 13. The 1450-bp Adh8a is 82, 73, 72, and 72% similar at the amino acid level to the Baltic cod ADH8 (previously named ADH1), the human ADH1B2, the mouse ADH1, and the rat ADH1, respectively. Also, the 1484-bp Adh8b is 77, 68, 67, and 66% similar at the amino acid level to the Baltic cod ADH8, the human ADH1B2, the mouse ADH1, and the rat ADH1, respectively. ADH8A and ADH8B share 86% amino acid similarity. To characterize the functional properties of ADH8A and ADH8B, recombinant proteins were purified from SF-9 insect cells. Kinetic studies demonstrate that ADH8A metabolizes ethanol, with a V(max) of 13.4 nmol/min/mg protein, whereas ADH8B does not metabolize ethanol. The ADH8A K(m) for ethanol as a substrate is 0.7 mm. 4-Methyl pyrazole, a classical competitive inhibitor of class I ADH, failed to inhibit ADH8A. ADH8B has the capacity to efficiently biotransform longer chain primary alcohols (>/=5 carbons) and S-hydroxymethlyglutathione, whereas ADH8A does not efficiently metabolize these substrates. Finally, mRNA expression studies indicate that both ADH8A and ADH8B mRNA are expressed during early development and in the adult brain, fin, gill, heart, kidney, muscle, and liver. Together these results indicate that class I-like ADH is conserved in zebrafish, albeit with mixed functional properties. PMID:15231826

  2. Association of HLA Class I and Class II genes with bcr-abl transcripts in leukemia patients with t(9;22 (q34;q11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Pedro

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the site of breakpoint in t(9;22 (q34;q11, bcr-abl fusion in leukemia patients is associated with different types of transcript proteins. In this study we have seen the association of HLA genes with different types of bcr-abl transcripts. The association could predict the bcr-abl peptide presentation by particular HLA molecules. Methods The study included a total of 189 patients of mixed ethnicity with chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia who were being considered for bone marrow transplantation. Typing of bcr-abl transcripts was done by reverse transcriptase PCR method. HLA typing was performed by molecular methods. The bcr-abl and HLA association was studied by calculating the relative risks and chi-square test. Results Significant negative associations (p Conclusions The negative associations of a particular bcr-abl transcript with specific HLA alleles suggests that these alleles play a critical role in presenting peptides derived from the chimeric proteins and eliciting a successful T-cell cytotoxic response. Knowledge of differential associations between HLA phenotypes and bcr-abl fusion transcript types would help in developing better strategies for immunization with the bcr-abl peptides against t(9;22 (q34;q11-positive leukemia.

  3. Association of HLA Class I and Class II genes with bcr-abl transcripts in leukemia patients with t(9;22) (q34;q11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the site of breakpoint in t(9;22) (q34;q11), bcr-abl fusion in leukemia patients is associated with different types of transcript proteins. In this study we have seen the association of HLA genes with different types of bcr-abl transcripts. The association could predict the bcr-abl peptide presentation by particular HLA molecules. The study included a total of 189 patients of mixed ethnicity with chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia who were being considered for bone marrow transplantation. Typing of bcr-abl transcripts was done by reverse transcriptase PCR method. HLA typing was performed by molecular methods. The bcr-abl and HLA association was studied by calculating the relative risks and chi-square test. Significant negative associations (p < 0.05) were observed with HLA-A*02 (b2a2, e1a2), -A*68 (b2a2, b3a2, e1a2), -B*14 (b2a2, b3a2, e1a2), -B*15 (b2a2, b3a2), -B*40 (b2a2), -DQB1*0303 (b2a2, b3a2), -DQB1*0603 (b2a2), -DRB1*0401 (e1a2), -DRB1*0701 (b3a2), and -DRB1*1101 (b2a2). The negative associations of a particular bcr-abl transcript with specific HLA alleles suggests that these alleles play a critical role in presenting peptides derived from the chimeric proteins and eliciting a successful T-cell cytotoxic response. Knowledge of differential associations between HLA phenotypes and bcr-abl fusion transcript types would help in developing better strategies for immunization with the bcr-abl peptides against t(9;22) (q34;q11)-positive leukemia

  4. Localization of the gene encoding the putative human HLA class II associated protein (PHAPI) to chromosome 15q22.3-q23 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, T.M.; Lichter, P. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Abt. Organisation komplexer Genome, Heidelberg (Germany); Vaesen, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer experimentelle Medizin Abt. Immunchemie, Goettingen (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The putative HLA class II associated proteins PHAPI and PHAPII were purified and cloned on the basis of their ability to bind to the cytoplasmatic domain of the HLA Dr{alpha}-chain. They might be components of the transmembrane signaling pathway that is activated after extracellular binding of ligands during the immune response. Both proteins share extended stretches of highly acidic amino acids in their C-terminal regions that also indicate a nuclear localization. Indeed, PHAPI is likely to be the human homologue of the rat {open_quotes}leucine-rich acidic nuclear protein{close_quotes} (LANP) (83.6% amino acid identity), which was shown to be localized in the nuclei of Purkinje cells. Comparison of the cDNA sequences with entries in the EMBL data library revealed that PHAPII is identical to a protein named SET. The SET gene is located on chromosome 9q34 and was found to be fused to the putative oncogene CAN in one patient with acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL). 9 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Class II malocclusion occlusal severity description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Janson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It is well known that the efficacy and the efficiency of a Class II malocclusion treatment are aspects closely related to the severity of the dental anteroposterior discrepancy. Even though, sample selection based on cephalometric variables without considering the severity of the occlusal anteroposterior discrepancy is still common in current papers. In some of them, when occlusal parameters are chosen, the severity is often neglected. The purpose of this study is to verify the importance given to the classification of Class II malocclusion, based on the criteria used for sample selection in a great number of papers published in the orthodontic journal with the highest impact factor. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A search was performed in PubMed database for full-text research papers referencing Class II malocclusion in the history of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJO-DO. RESULTS: A total of 359 papers were retrieved, among which only 72 (20.06% papers described the occlusal severity of the Class II malocclusion sample. In the other 287 (79.94% papers that did not specify the anteroposterior discrepancy severity, description was considered to be crucial in 159 (55.40% of them. CONCLUSIONS: Omission in describing the occlusal severity demands a cautious interpretation of 44.29% of the papers retrieved in this study.

  6. Structural Properties of MHC Class II Ligands, Implications for the Prediction of MHC Class II Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kasper Winther; Buus, Søren; Nielsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    properties of MHC class II ligands. Here, we perform one such large-scale analysis. A large set of SYFPEITHI MHC class II ligands covering more than 20 different HLA-DR molecules was analyzed in terms of their secondary structure and surface exposure characteristics in the context of the native structure of...... the corresponding source protein. We demonstrated that MHC class II ligands are significantly more exposed and have significantly more coil content than other peptides in the same protein with similar predicted binding affinity. We next exploited this observation to derive an improved prediction...

  7. Modes of salmonid MHC class I and II evolution differ from the primate paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shum, B.P.; Guethlein, L.; Flodin, L.R.; Adkison, M.A.; Hedrick, R.P.; Nehring, R.B.; Stet, R.J.M.; Secombes, C.; Parham, P.

    2001-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) represent two salmonid genera separated for 15-20 million years. cDNA sequences were determined for the classical MHC class I heavy chain gene UBA and the MHC class II β-chain gene DAB from 15 rainbow and 10 brown trout. Both genes a

  8. Lateral cephalometric diagnosis of asymmetry in Angle Class II subdivision compared to Class I and II

    OpenAIRE

    Aparecida Fernanda Meloti; Renata de Cássia Gonçalves; Ertty Silva; Lídia Parsekian Martins; Ary dos Santos-Pinto

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lateral cephalometric radiographs are traditionally required for orthodontic treatment, yet rarely used to assess asymmetries. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to use lateral cephalometric radiographs to identify existing skeletal and dentoalveolar morphological alterations in Class II subdivision and to compare them with the existing morphology in Class I and II relationship. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ninety initial lateral cephalometric radiographs of male...

  9. Roles for common MLL/COMPASS subunits and the 19S proteasome in regulating CIITA pIV and MHC class II gene expression and promoter methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koues Olivia I

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies indicate that the 19S proteasome contributes to chromatin reorganization, independent of the role the proteasome plays in protein degradation. We have previously shown that components of the 19S proteasome are crucial for regulating inducible histone activation events in mammalian cells. The 19S ATPase Sug1 binds to histone-remodeling enzymes, and in the absence of Sug1, a subset of activating epigenetic modifications including histone H3 acetylation, H3 lysine 4 trimethylation and H3 arginine 17 dimethylation are inhibited at cytokine-inducible major histocompatibilty complex (MHC-II and class II transactivator (CIITA promoters, implicating Sug1 in events required to initiate mammalian transcription. Results Our previous studies indicate that H3 lysine 4 trimethylation at cytokine-inducible MHC-II and CIITA promoters is dependent on proteolytic-independent functions of 19S ATPases. In this report, we show that multiple common subunits of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL/complex of proteins associated with Set I (COMPASS complexes bind to the inducible MHC-II and CIITA promoters; that overexpressing a single common MLL/COMPASS subunit significantly enhances promoter activity and MHC-II HLA-DRA expression; and that these common subunits are important for H3 lysine 4 trimethylation at MHC-II and CIITA promoters. In addition, we show that H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, which is inversely correlated with H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, is significantly elevated in the presence of diminished 19S ATPase Sug1. Conclusion Taken together, these experiments suggest that the 19S proteasome plays a crucial role in the initial reorganization of events enabling the relaxation of the repressive chromatin structure surrounding inducible promoters.

  10. 25 CFR 502.3 - Class II gaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....3 Class II gaming. Class II gaming means: (a) Bingo or lotto (whether or not electronic, computer... pattern on such cards; (b) If played in the same location as bingo or lotto, pull-tabs, punch boards,...

  11. Lateral cephalometric diagnosis of asymmetry in Angle Class II subdivision compared to Class I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida Fernanda Meloti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Lateral cephalometric radiographs are traditionally required for orthodontic treatment, yet rarely used to assess asymmetries. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to use lateral cephalometric radiographs to identify existing skeletal and dentoalveolar morphological alterations in Class II subdivision and to compare them with the existing morphology in Class I and II relationship. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ninety initial lateral cephalometric radiographs of male and female Brazilian children aged between 12 to 15 years old were randomly and proportionally divided into three groups: Group 1 (Class I, Group 2 (Class II and Group 3 (Class II subdivision. Analysis of lateral cephalometric radiographs included angular measurements, horizontal linear measurements and two indexes of asymmetry that were prepared for this study. RESULTS: In accordance with an Index of Dental Asymmetry (IDA, greater mandibular dental asymmetry was identified in Group 3. An Index of Mandibular Asymmetry (IMA revealed less skeletal and dental mandibular asymmetry in Group 2, greater skeletal mandibular asymmetry in Group 1, and greater mandibular dental asymmetry in Group 3. CONCLUSION: Both IDA and IMA revealed greater mandibular dental asymmetry for Group 3 in comparison to Groups 1 and 2. These results are in accordance with those found by other diagnostic methods, showing that lateral cephalometric radiography is an acceptable method to identify existing skeletal and dentoalveolar morphological alterations in malocclusions.

  12. Presence of Third Molar Germs in Orthodontic Patients with Class II/2 and Class III Malocclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Maričić, Barbara Mady; Legović, Mario; Šlaj, Martina; Lapter Varga, Marina; Žuvić Butorac, Marta; Kapović, Miljenko

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of third molar germs in patients with Class II/2 and Class III malocclusions. The study comprised 146 examinees from Zagreb and Istria. Examinees with Class II/2 malocclusions amounted to 77 and those with Class III 69. With regard to development of dentition the examinees were divided into two groups: Group I subjects with early mixed dentition (23 subjects with Class II/2 and 21 subjects with Class III), and Group II subjects with late mix...

  13. Archform Comparisons between Skeletal Class II and III Malocclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Wei; Wu, Jiaqi; Jiang, JiuHui; Xu, Tianmin; Li, CuiYing

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional research was to explore the relationship of the mandibular dental and basal bone archforms between severe Skeletal Class II (SC2) and Skeletal Class III (SC3) malocclusions. We also compared intercanine and intermolar widths in these two malocclusion types. Thirty-three virtual pretreatment mandibular models (Skeletal Class III group) and Thirty-five Skeletal Class II group pretreatment models were created with a laser scanning system. FA (the midpoint of t...

  14. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moutsianas, Loukas; Jostins, Luke; Beecham, Ashley H;

    2015-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17......,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles...... (HLA-DRB1*15:01, HLA-DRB1*13:03, HLA-DRB1*03:01, HLA-DRB1*08:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:02) and class I protective alleles (HLA-A*02:01, HLA-B*44:02, HLA-B*38:01 and HLA-B*55:01), we find evidence for two interactions involving pairs of class II alleles: HLA-DQA1*01:01-HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01-HLA...

  15. PENELOPE. Taking advantage of Class II simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PENELOPE is a general-purpose Monte Carlo code for the simulation of electron-photon showers in arbitrary materials. It covers the energy range from ∼1 keV up to ∼1 GeV. The simulation of electron and positron transport is based on a mixed (Class II) simulation scheme. The cut-off angular deflection, which separates soft and hard (catastrophic) elastic collisions, is allowed to vary with the energy of the particle in such a way that the multiple soft interactions which occur between two consecutive hard events produce only gentle deflections of the track. Space displacements are generated by a simple and accurate algorithm that works even in the vicinity of interfaces. The physics of PENELOPE, the simulation algorithm for charged particle transport and the structure and operation of the code system are described. The distribution package also includes subroutines for simulation in quadric geometries (i.e. material systems consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces) and a simple geometry viewer. (author)

  16. Whole blood transcriptional profiling reveals significant down-regulation of human leukocyte antigen class I and II genes in essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Thomassen, Mads;

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiling studies in the Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms have revealed significant deregulation of several immune and inflammation genes that might be of importance for clonal evolution due to defective tumor immune surveillance. Other mechanisms might b...

  17. Tolerance to MHC class II disparate allografts through genetic modification of bone marrow

    OpenAIRE

    Jindra, Peter T.; TRIPATHI, SUDIPTA; Tian, Chaorui; Iacomini, John; Bagley, Jessamyn

    2012-01-01

    Induction of molecular chimerism through genetic modification of bone marrow is a powerful tool for the induction of tolerance. Here we demonstrate for the first time that expression of an allogeneic MHC class II gene in autologous bone marrow cells, resulting in a state of molecular chimerism, induces tolerance to MHC class II mismatched skin grafts, a stringent test of transplant tolerance. Reconstitution of recipients with syngeneic bone marrow transduced with retrovirus encoding H-2I-Ab (...

  18. Evaluation of arch width among Class I normal occlusion, Class II Division 1, Class II Division 2, and Class III malocclusion in Indian population

    OpenAIRE

    Dolly Patel; Falguni Mehta; Nimesh Patel; Nishit Mehta; Ipist Trivedi; Apexa Mehta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that there is no difference between Class I (CI) normal occlusion, Class II division 1 (CIId1) and CII division 2 (CIId2), and Class III (CIII) malocclusion with respect to arch widths, width of the maxillary and mandibular arches, gender dimorphism within groups, and gender comparisons. Materials and Methods: Samples of 40 CI subjects, 40 CIId1 subjects, 40 CIId2 subjects, and 34 CIII subjects were studied. All subjects were Indians with no history of or...

  19. 78 FR 37114 - Self-Regulation of Class II Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... the issuance of a certificate for tribal self-regulation of Class II gaming. 78 FR 20236, April 4... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 518 RIN 3141-AA44 Self-Regulation of Class II Gaming AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission, Department of the Interior. ACTION: Final rule; technical and...

  20. Dentofacial characteristics of patients with Angle Class I and Class II malocclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Lacerda dos Santos

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study assessed some cephalometric measurements of the soft tissue profile in order to observe the behavior of facial convexity in patients with Class I, Class II division 1, and Class II division 2 malocclusions. METHODS: One hundred and thirty pre-treatment teleradiographs of Caucasian patients aged 10-16 years (mean age of 12.6 years were selected for study and divided into 3 groups. The cephalometric measurements used in the present study were the following: H.SN, Cx, NLA, MLA, UL-SUL-S, LL-S, IMPA, and 1-SN. Analysis of variance and Tukey's test were applied for measurements H.SN, Cx, IMPA, 1-SN, MLA, and NLA, whereas Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests were applied for UL-S and LL-S. RESULTS: The results showed statistically significant differences for the measurements H.SN, Cx, UL-S, and IMPA between Groups I, II-1 and II-2 (p < 0.05. Measurements LL-S and MLA showed statistically significant difference between Groups I and II-1 only (p < 0.05. On the other hand, no statistically significant differences were found for measurement NLA among the 3 groups (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Regarding facial characteristics expressed by measurements H.SN, Cx, and UL-S, one could conclude that Class II division 1 and Class II division 2 malocclusions, both differed from Class I malocclusion. In addition, Class II division 1 malocclusion was found to have facial characteristics expressed by MLA, which differentiate it from the Class II division 2 and Class 1 malocclusions. Class I, Class II division 1 and Class II division 2 malocclusions showed no difference in facial characteristics expressed by the measurement NLA, and measurement LL-S was directly related to eversion of the lower lip.

  1. CITA/NLRC5: A critical transcriptional regulator of MHC class I gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Isaac; Vijayan, Saptha; Sidiq, Tabasum; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules play essential roles in the development and activation of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator) has been recognized as a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression, albeit knowledge about the regulatory mechanism of MHC class I gene expression had been limited. Recently identified MHC class I transactivator (CITA), or NLRC5, also belongs to the NLR protein family and constitutes a critical regulator for the transcriptional activation of MHC class I genes. In addition to MHC class I genes, CITA/NLRC5 induces the expression of β2 -microglobulin, TAP1 and LMP2, essential components of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, CITA/NLRC5 and CIITA are transcriptional regulators that orchestrate the concerted expression of critical components in the MHC class I and class II pathways, respectively. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):349-357, 2016. PMID:27087581

  2. Postura de cabeça nas deformidades dentofaciais classe II e classe III Head posture in the presence of class II and class III dentofacial deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Ralin de Carvalho Deda

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: este estudo investiga se existe diferença entre grupos com diferentes deformidades dentofaciais (padrão classe II e classe III e o grupo sem a deformidade em relação à postura de cabeça. MÉTODO: participaram deste estudo, voluntariamente, 25 pacientes (entre 16 e 40 anos. Dez pacientes com diagnóstico de deformidade dentofacial classe II e 15 pacientes com o diagnóstico de classe III esquelética e 15 voluntários sadios, com equivalência em sexo e idade ao grupo de deformidade, formando o grupo controle. Primeiramente foi realizada a inspeção da postura de cabeça. Logo em seguida foi realizada a avaliação postural de cabeça por meio da fotografia postural (fotogrametria. RESULTADOS: não houve diferença significante (p>0,05 entre os grupos em relação à avaliação postural utilizando-se a fotogrametria. Já em relação à avaliação postural pela inspeção clínica, observou-se uma postura anterior de cabeça nos indivíduos com a deformidade dentofacial padrão classe II, comparados ao padrão classe III (p = 0,001 e ao grupo controle (p = 0,001. Foi visto também que o grupo deformidade classe II apresentou um percentual inferior de indivíduos com posição neutra de cabeça comparado ao grupo deformidade classe III (p = 0,008 e ao grupo controle (p = 0,001. CONCLUSÃO: indivíduos com deformidade dentofacial classe II podem apresentar uma anteriorização de cabeça. Não há influência da deformidade no aumento ou na redução do ângulo cabeça-pescoço, analisado por meio da fotogrametria.PURPOSE: this study investigates whether there is a difference in head posture between groups with different dentofacial deformities (class II and class III and a group with no deformity. METHOD: 25 volunteers aged from 16 to 40 year old took part in the study. Ten patients had a diagnosis of class II dentofacial deformity, 15 had a diagnosis of class III skeletal deformity, and 15 healthy volunteers matched for sex and

  3. MHC Class II epitope predictive algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole; Buus, S; Lundegaard, Claus

    2010-01-01

    for this is that the MHC-II molecule is open at both ends allowing binding of peptides extending out of the groove. The binding core of MHC-II-bound peptides is therefore not known a priori and the binding motif is hence not readily discernible. Recent progress has been obtained by including the......-specific methods have been able to make reasonably accurate predictions for alleles that were not included in the training data. These methods can be used to define supertypes (clusters) of MHC-II alleles where alleles within each supertype have similar binding specificities. Furthermore, the pan-specific methods...

  4. Multiple parasites mediate balancing selection at two MHC class II genes in the fossorial water vole: insights from multivariate analyses and population genetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tollenaere, C.; Bryja, Josef; Galan, M.; Cadet, P.; Deter, J.; Chaval, Y.; Berthier, K.; Ribas Salvador, A.; Voutilainen, L.; Laakkonen, J.; Henttonen, H.; Cosson, J.-F.; Charbonnel, N.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 5 (2008), s. 1307-1320. ISSN 1010-061X Grant ostatní: 6th Framework Programme EC(XE) GOCE-2003-010284 EDEN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : co-inertia * DQA and DRB MHC genes * immunogenetics * multivariate analysis * parasite-mediated balancing selection Subject RIV: EB - Genetic s ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.471, year: 2008

  5. Expression of the class II tumor suppressor gene RIG1 is directly regulated by p53 tumor suppressor in cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tzu-Hui; Chu, Chin-Chen; Jiang, Shun-Yuan; Hung, May-Whey; Ni, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Huai-En; Chang, Tsu-Chung

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies indicated that the RIG1 (RARRES3/TIG3) plays an important role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of RIG1 gene expression has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we identified a functional p53 response element (p53RE) in the RIG1 gene promoter. Transfection studies revealed that the RIG1 promoter activity was greatly enhanced by wild type but not mutated p53 protein. Sequence specific mutation of the p53RE abolished p53-mediated transactivation. Specific binding of p53 protein to the rig-p53RE was demonstrated using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Further studies confirmed that the expression of RIG1 mRNA and protein is enhanced through increased p53 protein in HepG2 or in H24-H1299 cells. In conclusion, our results indicated that RIG1 gene is a downstream target of p53 in cancer cell lines. PMID:22616991

  6. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell......-like) as well as T cells producing both cytokines (THO-like) responded to class II mAb. The costimulatory effect was not restricted to IL-2-driven T cell growth, since TCR/CD3-induced T cell activation was also enhanced by HLA-DR mAb. Moreover, class II costimulation potentiated CD28-mAb-induced T cell...

  7. Class II barodontalgia: review and report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodmansey, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Barodontalgia is a rarely reported condition involving changes in ambient pressure resulting in tooth pain. According to Ferjentsik and Aker, Class II barodontalgia is observed in teeth that have pre-existing pulpal disease and an ultimate diagnosis of irreversible pulpitis.1 This article describes a case of Class II barodontalgia that was experienced on a commercial airline flight and reviews current knowledge regarding this phenomenon, including proposed etiologic mechanisms. PMID:21444271

  8. MHC class II polymorphisms, autoreactive T-cells and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue eTsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes, also known as human leukocyte antigen genes (HLA in humans, are the prevailing contributors of genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 Diabetes (T1D, Multiple Sclerosis (MS, and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, among others (Todd and Wicker, 2001;MacKay et al., 2002;Hafler et al., 2007. Although the pathways through which MHC molecules afford autoimmune risk or resistance remain to be fully mapped out, it is generally accepted that they do so by shaping the central and peripheral T cell repertoires of the host towards autoimmune proclivity or resistance, respectively. Disease-predisposing MHC alleles would both spare autoreactive thymocytes from central tolerance and bias their development towards a pathogenic phenotype. Protective MHC alleles, on the other hand, would promote central deletion of autoreactive thymocytes and skew their development towards non-pathogenic phenotypes. This interpretation of the data is at odds with two other observations: that in MHC-heterozygous individuals, resistance is dominant over susceptibility; and that it is difficult to understand how deletion of one or a few clonal autoreactive T cell types would suffice to curb autoimmune responses driven by hundreds if not thousands of autoreactive T cell specificities. This review provides an update on current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying MHC class II-associated autoimmune disease susceptibility and/or resistance and attempts to reconcile these seemingly opposing concepts.

  9. MHC class II B diversity in blue tits : A preliminary study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivero-de Aguilar, Juan; Schut, Elske; Merino, Santiago; Martinez, Javier; Komdeur, Jan; Westerdahl, Helena

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we partly characterize major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B in the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus). A total of 22 individuals from three different European locations: Spain, The Netherlands, and Sweden were screened for MHC allelic diversity. The MHC genes were investigate

  10. Expression of GFP-mTalin reveals an actin-related role for the Arabidopsis Class II formin AtFH12

    OpenAIRE

    Cvrčková, F.; Grunt, M.; Žárský, V.

    2012-01-01

    Formins (FH2 proteins) are implicated in F-actin nucleation and other aspects of cytoskeletal organization. Plants possess two formin clades, relatively well-described Class I formins and so far poorly characterized Class II formins. Comparison of Class II formin genes of two Arabidopsis species, A. thaliana and A. lyrata, indicates dynamic evolution within the Class II formin clade. Disruption of an outlier A. thaliana Class II formin gene, AtFH12 (At1g42980), whose expression is induced by ...

  11. Non-extraction treatment of skeletal class II malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay K Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Every orthodontist at some point in his clinical practice has faced the dilemma of how ′best′ to manage a mild to moderate Class II malocclusion. Aims and Objectives: To demonstrate the efficacy of Forsus™ Fatigue Resistant Device in the management of Class II malocclusion. Materials and Method: A patient having Class II division 1 malocclusion with functional jaw retrusion was treated using MBT 0.022" prescription and Forsus FRD appliance. Pre- and post-treatment photographs and lateral cephalograms were taken. Cephalometric analysis was done, and results were superimposed. Result: 7-8 months of Forsus wear obtained stable and successful results with improvement in facial profile, skeletal jaw relationship, and mild increase in IMPA. Discussion and Conclusion: Greater forward displacement of the mandible was the predominant factor for successful treatment Class II patient. Forsus gives good results for class II management, and it would be wise to consider treating such cases by non-extraction approach rather than contemplating extractions.

  12. Dentofacial characteristics of patients with Angle Class I and Class II malocclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Rogério Lacerda dos Santos; Antônio Carlos de Oliveira Ruellas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study assessed some cephalometric measurements of the soft tissue profile in order to observe the behavior of facial convexity in patients with Class I, Class II division 1, and Class II division 2 malocclusions. METHODS: One hundred and thirty pre-treatment teleradiographs of Caucasian patients aged 10-16 years (mean age of 12.6 years) were selected for study and divided into 3 groups. The cephalometric measurements used in the present study were the following: H.SN, C...

  13. Exposing the specific roles of the invariant chain isoforms in shaping the MHC class II peptidome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Simon eFortin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The peptide repertoire (peptidome associated with MHC class II molecules (MHCIIs is influenced by the polymorphic nature of the peptide binding groove but also by cell-intrinsic factors. The invariant chain (Ii chaperones MHCIIs, affecting their folding and trafficking. Recent discoveries relating to Ii functions have provided insights as to how it edits the MHCII peptidome. In humans, the Ii gene encodes four different isoforms for which structure-function analyses have highlighted common properties but also some non-redundant roles. Another layer of complexity arises from the fact that Ii heterotrimerizes, a characteristic that has the potential to affect the maturation of associated MHCIIs in many different ways, depending on the isoform combinations. Here, we emphasize the peptide editing properties of Ii and discuss the impact of the various isoforms on the MHCII peptidome.

  14. 14 CFR 21.223 - Class II provisional airworthiness certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Class II provisional airworthiness certificates. 21.223 Section 21.223 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... the aircraft has been issued to the manufacturer. (c) The applicant must submit a statement by...

  15. Organization and characteristics of the major histocompatibility complex class II region in the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Rui; Ruan, Jue; Wan, Xiao-Ling; Zheng, Yang; Chen, Min-Min; Zheng, Jin-Song; Wang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the genome of Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) (YFP) or other cetaceans. In this study, a high-quality YFP bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed. We then determined the organization and characterization of YFP MHC class II region by screening the BAC library, followed by sequencing and assembly of positive BAC clones. The YFP MHC class II region consists of two segregated contigs (218,725 bp and 328,435 bp respectively) that include only eight expressed MHC class II genes, three pseudo MHC genes and twelve non-MHC genes. The YFP has fewer MHC class II genes than ruminants, showing locus reduction in DRB, DQA, DQB, and loss of DY. In addition, phylogenic and evolutionary analyses indicated that the DRB, DQA and DQB genes might have undergone birth-and-death evolution, whereas the DQB gene might have evolved under positive selection in cetaceans. These findings provide an essential foundation for future work, such as estimating MHC genetic variation in the YFP or other cetaceans. This work is the first report on the MHC class II region in cetaceans and offers valuable information for understanding the evolution of MHC genome in cetaceans. PMID:26932528

  16. Multiple sclerosis-associated CLEC16A controls HLA class II expression via late endosome biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijn, Marvin M; Kreft, Karim L; Jongsma, Marlieke L; Mes, Steven W; Wierenga-Wolf, Annet F; van Meurs, Marjan; Melief, Marie-José; der Kant, Rik van; Janssen, Lennert; Janssen, Hans; Tan, Rusung; Priatel, John J; Neefjes, Jacques; Laman, Jon D; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2015-06-01

    C-type lectins are key players in immune regulation by driving distinct functions of antigen-presenting cells. The C-type lectin CLEC16A gene is located at 16p13, a susceptibility locus for several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. However, the function of this gene and its potential contribution to these diseases in humans are poorly understood. In this study, we found a strong upregulation of CLEC16A expression in the white matter of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 14) compared to non-demented controls (n = 11), mainly in perivascular leukocyte infiltrates. Moreover, CLEC16A levels were significantly enhanced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 69) versus healthy controls (n = 46). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, CLEC16A was most abundant in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, in which it strongly co-localized with human leukocyte antigen class II. Treatment of these professional antigen-presenting cells with vitamin D, a key protective environmental factor in multiple sclerosis, downmodulated CLEC16A in parallel with human leukocyte antigen class II. Knockdown of CLEC16A in distinct types of model and primary antigen-presenting cells resulted in severely impaired cytoplasmic distribution and formation of human leucocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes, as determined by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Mechanistically, CLEC16A participated in the molecular machinery of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosome formation and trafficking to perinuclear regions, involving the dynein motor complex. By performing co-immunoprecipitations, we found that CLEC16A directly binds to two critical members of this complex, RILP and the HOPS complex. CLEC16A silencing in antigen-presenting cells disturbed RILP-mediated recruitment of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes to perinuclear regions. Together, we identify CLEC16A as a pivotal gene in multiple sclerosis

  17. HLA class I and class II haplotypes in admixed families from several regions of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquera, Rodrigo; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Hernández-Díaz, Raquel; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Montoya-Gama, Karla; Moscoso, Juan; Torres-García, Diana; García-Salas, Claudia; Silva, Beatriz; Cruz-Robles, David; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio

    2008-02-01

    We studied HLA class I and class II alleles in 191 Mexican families (381 non-related individuals) to directly obtain the HLA-A/B/DRB1/DQB1 haplotypes and their linkage disequilibrium (LD). The most frequent HLA haplotypes observed were: A*02-B*39-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302, A*02-B*35-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302, A*68-B*39-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302, A*02-B*35-DRB1*08-DQB1*04, A*33-B*1402-DRB1*01-DQB1*05, and A*24-B*35-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302. The four most common haplotypes found by our study involve those previously reported in Amerindian populations. LD analysis of HLA-A-B and HLA-B-DRB1 loci showed significant associations between A29(19)-B44(12), A33(19)-B65(14), A1-B8, A26(19)-B44(12), A24(9)-B61(40), B65(14)-DR1, B8-DR17(3), B44(12)-DR7, B7-DR15(2), and B39(16)-DR4. Also, all DRB1-DQB1 associations showed significant LD values. Admixture estimations using a trihybrid model showed that Mexicans from the State of Sinaloa (Northern Mexico) have a greater proportion of European genetic component compared with Mexicans from the Central area of Mexico, who have a greater percentage of Amerindian genes. Our results are important for future comparative genetic studies of different Mexican ethnic groups with special relevance to disease association and transplantation studies. PMID:17904223

  18. Changes in Cranial Base Morphology in Class I and Class II Division 1 Malocclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Anirudh; Pandey, Harsh; Bajaj, Kamal; Pandey, Lavesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The cranial base plays a key role in craniofacial growth; it helps to integrate spatially and functionally different patterns of growth in various adjoining regions of the skull such as components of the brain, the nasal and oral cavity and the pharynx. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in cranial base flexure between skeletal and dental Class I and Class II division 1.

  19. Treatment of Class II Division 1 Malocclusion using Cervical Headgear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska Lestari Hendrawan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Class II division 1 malocclusions have many variation and treatment options. Choosing the right treatment begins with a correct diagnosis. The aim of this article is to describe treatment of Class II division 1 malocclusion in a growing patient using combined cervical headgear and non-extraction fixed orthodontic therapy. Class I molar and canine relationship was achieved with normal overbite and overjet. There is improvement in jaw relationship and facial profile. This correction was achieved by downward displacement and inhibition of the forward growth of maxilla with favorable growth of mandible, upper molar distalization and retraction of upper incisors from cervical headgear use. There was neither downward rotation of the mandible nor maxillary first molar extrusion. Treatment time, favorable mandibular growth pattern and patient compliance proved to be determining factors in the success of this treatment.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i3.106

  20. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus paraplantarum L-ZS9, a probiotic starter producing class II bacteriocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Pinglan

    2016-03-20

    Lactobacillus paraplantarum L-ZS9 is a probiotic starter isolated from fermented sausage and it is a great producer of class II bacteriocins. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first complete sequenced genome of L. paraplantarum deposited in GenBank database. The size of the complete genome of L. paraplantarum L-ZS9 is 3,139,729bp. The genomic sequence revealed that this strain includes 19 genes involved in class II bacteriocins production and regulation. The information fill the gaps of the L. paraplantarum genome information and contribute to the improvement of class II bacteriocins research. PMID:26853479

  1. Low MHC class II diversity in the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Sanderson, Claire; Jones, Menna; Belov, Katherine

    2012-07-01

    The largest remaining carnivorous marsupial, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), is currently under threat of extinction due to a fatal contagious cancer-devil facial tumour disease. Low major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I diversity is believed to have contributed to the transmission of the tumour allograft through devil populations. Here, we report low MHC class II variability in this species, with DA β chain genes (Saha-DAB1, 2 and 3) exhibiting very limited diversity and the sole α chain gene (Saha-DAA) monomorphic. Three, six and three alleles were found at Saha-DAB1, 2 and 3, respectively, with a predominant allele found at each locus. Heterozygosity at these three loci is low in the eastern population and modestly higher in northwestern individuals. The results are indicative of a selective sweep likely due to an infectious disease resulting in the fixation of selectively favoured alleles and depletion of genetic diversity at devil class II loci. Several attempts were made to isolate the other marsupial classical class II gene family, namely, DB, resulting in only one DBB pseudogene being found. These findings further support the view that this species has a compromised capacity to respond to pathogen evolution, emerging infectious diseases and environmental changes. PMID:22460528

  2. A comparative study on applying functional therapeutic method versus class II elastics edgewise in class II skeletal patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslamian L

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Various comparative studies have been conducted to investigate the effect of functional and fixed appliances in treatment of class II skeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to compare Bionator and Edgewise appliances associated with class II elastics in the treatment of class II skeletal patients, without extraction. Lateral cephalograms of 30 patients (16 girls, 14 boys, 10-13 years old, with class II div I maolocclusion, treated with Bionater and Edgewise appliances were investigated before and after treatment. SNA, SNB, ANB, " to SN, IMP A, mandibular and maxillary lengths, upper anterior facial height to lower anterior facial height, overjet and overbite were measured in each group before and after treatment. The results were analyzed by paired t- test. The magnification of linear measurements were calculated. The differences between variables in 2 groups were compared by t-test. There was no significant difference, regarding age and sex. In both groups, increase in SNB, mandibular length, and IMPA and decrease in " to SN, overjet and overbite and upper anterior face height to lower anterior face height after treatment were statistically significant. Comparing 2 groups before and after treatment showed that increase in SNB and decrease of ANB, overjet and overbite were more in Bionator group than fixed group, which were significant. Decrease in upper anterior face height to lower anterior face height, and increase in IMPA and mandibular length were more in Bionater group but the differences were not statistically significant.

  3. The Association of HLA-Class I and Class II with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in Iranian Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Arezou Sayad; Mohammad Taghi Akbari; Mahshid Mehdizadeh; Abolfazl Movafagh; Abbas Hajifathali

    2014-01-01

    The Hodgkin's lymphoma disease (HD) is a common malignant neoplasm with germinal centre B-cell origin. It has been suggested that the HLA class I and class II regions have susceptibility effects on HD. In different ethnic groups, different HLA class I and class II alleles affect HD. As a result, there is no consensus which of the different HLA alleles confers susceptibility to HD. In this study, we aimed to ascertain the role of HLA class I and class II alleles in association with Hodgkin's l...

  4. Restricted dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotypes and genotypes in Beagles

    OpenAIRE

    Soutter, Francesca; Kennedy, Lorna J; Ollier, William E R; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Beagles are commonly used in vaccine trials as part of the regulatory approval process. Genetic restriction within this breed and the impact this might have on vaccine responses are rarely considered. This study was designed to characterise diversity of dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II genes in a breeding colony of laboratory Beagles, whose offspring are used in vaccine studies. DLA haplotypes were determined by PCR and sequence-based typing from genomic DNA extracted from blood. Breeding...

  5. Distribution of class ii major histocompatibility complex antigenexpressing cells in human dental pulp with carious lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dental caries is a bacterial infection which causes destruction of the hard tissues of the tooth. Exposure of the dentin to the oral environment as a result of caries inevitably results in a cellular response in the pulp. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a group of genes that code for cell-surface histocompatibility antigens. Cells expressing class II MHC molecules participate in the initial recognition and the processing of antigenic substances to serve as antigen-pr...

  6. 454 sequencing reveals extreme complexity of the class II Major Histocompatibility Complex in the collared flycatcher

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson Lars; Stuglik Michał; Babik Wiesław; Zagalska-Neubauer Magdalena; Cichoń Mariusz; Radwan Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Because of their functional significance, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I and II genes have been the subject of continuous interest in the fields of ecology, evolution and conservation. In some vertebrate groups MHC consists of multiple loci with similar alleles; therefore, the multiple loci must be genotyped simultaneously. In such complex systems, understanding of the evolutionary patterns and their causes has been limited due to challenges posed by ge...

  7. 454 sequencing reveals extreme complexity of the class II Major Histocompatibility Complex in the collared flycatcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson Lars

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of their functional significance, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I and II genes have been the subject of continuous interest in the fields of ecology, evolution and conservation. In some vertebrate groups MHC consists of multiple loci with similar alleles; therefore, the multiple loci must be genotyped simultaneously. In such complex systems, understanding of the evolutionary patterns and their causes has been limited due to challenges posed by genotyping. Results Here we used 454 amplicon sequencing to characterize MHC class IIB exon 2 variation in the collared flycatcher, an important organism in evolutionary and immuno-ecological studies. On the basis of over 152,000 sequencing reads we identified 194 putative alleles in 237 individuals. We found an extreme complexity of the MHC class IIB in the collared flycatchers, with our estimates pointing to the presence of at least nine expressed loci and a large, though difficult to estimate precisely, number of pseudogene loci. Many similar alleles occurred in the pseudogenes indicating either a series of recent duplications or extensive concerted evolution. The expressed alleles showed unambiguous signals of historical selection and the occurrence of apparent interlocus exchange of alleles. Placing the collared flycatcher's MHC sequences in the context of passerine diversity revealed transspecific MHC class II evolution within the Muscicapidae family. Conclusions 454 amplicon sequencing is an effective tool for advancing our understanding of the MHC class II structure and evolutionary patterns in Passeriformes. We found a highly dynamic pattern of evolution of MHC class IIB genes with strong signals of selection and pronounced sequence divergence in expressed genes, in contrast to the apparent sequence homogenization in pseudogenes. We show that next generation sequencing offers a universal, affordable method for the characterization and, in perspective

  8. Paths of lateral gene transfer of lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with a unique evolutionary transition stage of prokaryotes coding for class I and II varieties by the same organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nussinov Ruth

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the premise that lateral gene transfer (LGT is a dominant evolutionary force is still in considerable dispute, the case for widespread LGT in the family of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS is no longer contentious. aaRSs are ancient enzymes, guarding the fidelity of the genetic code. They are clustered in two structurally unrelated classes. Only lysine aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS is found both as a class 1 and a class 2 enzyme (LysRS1-2. Remarkably, in several extant prokaryotes both classes of the enzyme coexist, a unique phenomenon that has yet to receive its due attention. Results We applied a phylogenetic approach for determining the extent and origin of LGT in prokaryotic LysRS. Reconstructing species trees for Archaea and Bacteria, and inferring that their last common ancestors encoded LysRS1 and LysRS2, respectively, we studied the gains and losses of both classes. A complex pattern of LGT events emerged. In specific groups of organisms LysRS1 was replaced by LysRS2 (and vice versa. In one occasion, within the alpha proteobacteria, a LysRS2 to LysRS1 LGT was followed by reversal to LysRS2. After establishing the most likely LGT paths, we studied the possible origins of the laterally transferred genes. To this end, we reconstructed LysRS gene trees and evaluated the likely origins of the laterally transferred genes. While the sources of LysRS1 LGTs were readily identified, those for LysRS2 remain, for now, uncertain. The replacement of one LysRS by another apparently transits through a stage simultaneously coding for both synthetases, probably conferring a selective advantage to the affected organisms. Conclusion The family of LysRSs features complex LGT events. The currently available data were sufficient for identifying unambiguously the origins of LysRS1 but not of LysRS2 gene transfers. A selective advantage is suggested to organisms encoding simultaneously LysRS1-2.

  9. Angle Class II malocclusion treated with extraction of permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Mattos Barreto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Angle Class II malocclusion associated with anterior open bite in adult patients demands a carefully elaborated orthodontic planning, aiming at restoring not only harmonious dental and facial esthetics, but also a balanced masticatory function. Orthognathic surgery or permanent teeth extraction are often the choice of treatment, therefore, treatment decision is related to all dental, skeletal and functional aspects. The present report discusses orthodontic compensation carried out by means of upper premolar extraction performed to correct the Class II canine relationship and, consequently, the anterior open bite, accepting that the upper incisors be retroclined. This clinical case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO as part of the requirements for obtaining the BBO Certification.

  10. Relation between Angle Class II malocclusion and deleterious oral habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tarcísio Lima Ferreira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oral habits may interfere on the growth and development of the stomatognathic system and orofacial myofunctional conditions, producing changes in the position of teeth in their dental arches. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to verify the presence of deleterious oral habits in individuals with malocclusion and see if there is a predominance of Class II malocclusion in these individuals. METHODS: The records of 140 patients treated at the Clinic of Preventive Orthodontics FORP-USP who had already completed treatment were randomly selected and analyzed. Their ages ranged from 6 to 10 years and 11 months. Associations were made between the presence or absence of deleterious oral habits, type and number of habits found in each individual and the type of malocclusion according to Angle classification. The statistical analysis used was the Chi-square test with a significance level of 5%. History of deleterious oral habits was found in 67.1% of individuals. RESULTS: The Class I malocclusion was most frequent (82.9%, followed by Class II malocclusion (12.1% and Class III (5%. CONCLUSION: There was a predominance of Class II malocclusion in individuals with a history of deleterious oral habits.INTRODUÇÃO: hábitos bucais podem interferir no crescimento e desenvolvimento do sistema estomatognático e nas condições miofuncionais bucofaciais, acarretando alterações no posicionamento dos dentes nas respectivas arcadas dentárias. OBJETIVO: o objetivo dessa pesquisa foi verificar a presença de hábitos bucais deletérios em indivíduos portadores de má oclusão e observar se existe predominância de má oclusão Classe II de Angle nesses indivíduos. MÉTODOS: foram selecionadas, aleatoriamente, e analisadas 140 fichas de pacientes atendidos na Clínica de Ortodontia Preventiva da FORP-USP, que já haviam recebido alta no tratamento. A faixa etária variou dos 6 anos a 10 anos e 11 meses. Foram realizadas associações entre

  11. Relation between Angle Class II malocclusion and deleterious oral habits

    OpenAIRE

    José Tarcísio Lima Ferreira; Maria do Rosário Ferreira Lima; Luciana Zappeloni Pizzolato

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oral habits may interfere on the growth and development of the stomatognathic system and orofacial myofunctional conditions, producing changes in the position of teeth in their dental arches. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to verify the presence of deleterious oral habits in individuals with malocclusion and see if there is a predominance of Class II malocclusion in these individuals. METHODS: The records of 140 patients treated at the Clinic of Preventive Orthodontics...

  12. Applying the Listening to Mothers II Results in Lamaze Classes

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Elizabeth H.

    2007-01-01

    Childbirth educators can use Childbirth Connection's Listening to Mothers II survey as a resource for updating their curriculum and teaching methods. The survey reveals that issues surrounding a woman's choice of care providers, her nutrition and fitness habits, and her possible experiences with depression and abuse may not be addressed sufficiently in a traditional, third-trimester, Lamaze class and may need greater emphasis in early pregnancy. The survey's results also show that women turn ...

  13. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Yunis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family, Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family, Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families, Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family, Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family, Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family. for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1. Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America.

  14. Interplay among coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1, CBP, and CIITA in IFN-γ-inducible MHC-II gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Zika, Eleni; Fauquier, Lucas; Vandel, Laurence; Ting, Jenny P -Y

    2005-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (MHC-II) genes are prototype targets of IFN-γ. IFN-γ activates the expression of the non-DNA-binding master regulator of MHC-II, class II transactivator (CIITA), which is crucial for enhanceosome formation and gene activation. This report shows the importance of the histone methyltransferase, coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase (CARM1/PRMT4), during IFN-γ-induced MHC-II gene activation. It also demonstrates the coordinated regulation of CIITA, C...

  15. Spectral energy distribution analysis of class I and class II FU Orionis stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Gómez, Mercedes [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina, Laprida 854, 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Rodón, Javier A., E-mail: luciana@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mercedes@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: jrodon@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ∼80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} versus ∼10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (∼70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  16. Evolução dos preparos das cavidades de classe II Developments in preparation of class II cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Miyuki ONO

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A evolução dos preparos de classe II com a introdução de novos materiais e a conscientização da importância da preservação de estrutura dental sadia são abordadas nos preparos do tipo Almqvist, Roggenkamp e túnel, em que se observa a necessidade de menor desgaste da estrutura dentária, com aumento da resistência à fratura, melhor estética e melhor retençãoDevelopments in preparation of class II cavities with the introduction of new materials and awareness of the importance of preservation of a sound dental structure are broached in preparations of the type Almqvist, Roggenkamp and tunnel, where the need for less wear of the dental structure was observed with an increase in fracture strength, better aesthetics, and better retention

  17. Molecular characterization by high-resolution isoelectric focusing of the products encoded by the class II region loci of the major histocompatibility complex in humans. I. DR and DQ gene variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez de Cordoba, S; Nunez-Roldan, A; Winchester, R; Marshall, P; Carrier, C; Mollen, N; Walker, M; Ginsberg-Fellner, F; Rubinstein, P

    1987-09-01

    We describe a new approach to the analysis of the structural polymorphism of the DR beta, DQ alpha, and DQ beta polypeptide chains of human histocompatibility class II antigens. In comparison to conventional two-dimensional gel studies, this method provides sharper definition of the protein bands and side-by-side comparisons within the same gel, thereby permitting the detection of minor differences in the isoelectric points of the protein chains. Using this methodology we have analyzed the IEF polymorphism and the variability in the number of the DR beta chains encoded by different DR haplotypes. Twenty DR beta chain variants, which include the products of no less than two separate DR beta loci, have been thus far identified. Alleles at one of these loci are assumed to code for DR beta chains carrying the DR alloespecificities DR1, DR2, DR3, DR4, DR5, DRw6, DR7, and DR8. Alleles at a second DR beta locus encode DR beta chains that may be shared by serologically DR-different haplotypes and carry supertypic serologic specificities (i.e., DRw52 and DRw53). We also demonstrate here that the structural polymorphisms of the DQ alpha and DQ beta chains are more extensive than previously thought, report the characterization of 14 DQ beta variants, and define their relationship to the previously described DQw serologic specificities. In addition, we describe the class II haplotype associations observed for the different DR and DQ variants characterized. PMID:3679903

  18. Improved prediction of MHC class I and class II epitopes using a novel Gibbs sampling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Worning, Peder; Hvid, C.S.; Lamberth, K.; Buus, S.; Brunak, Søren; Lund, Ole

    2004-01-01

    , identifying the correct alignment is a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. In this context, we wish to describe a novel Gibbs motif sampler method ideally suited for recognizing such weak sequence motifs. The method is based on the Gibbs sampling method, and it incorporates...... MHC class II complex HLA-DR4(B1*0401). Prior identification of information-rich (anchor) positions in the binding motif is shown to improve the predictive performance of the Gibbs sampler. Similarly, a consensus solution obtained from an ensemble average over suboptimal solutions is shown to...... conventional alignment algorithm of ClustalW. The calculation demonstrates that the predictive performance of the Gibbs sampler is higher than that of ClustalW and in most cases also higher than that of the TEPITOPE method....

  19. Distribution of class ii major histocompatibility complex antigenexpressing cells in human dental pulp with carious lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is a bacterial infection which causes destruction of the hard tissues of the tooth. Exposure of the dentin to the oral environment as a result of caries inevitably results in a cellular response in the pulp. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a group of genes that code for cell-surface histocompatibility antigens. Cells expressing class II MHC molecules participate in the initial recognition and the processing of antigenic substances to serve as antigen-presenting cells. Purpose: The aim of the study was to elucidate the alteration in the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in human dental pulp as carious lesions progressed toward the pulp. Methods: Fifteen third molars with caries at the occlusal site at various stages of decay and 5 intact third molars were extracted and used in this study. Before decalcifying with 10% EDTA solution (pH 7.4, all the samples were observed by micro-computed tomography to confirm the lesion condition three-dimensionally. The specimens were then processed for cryosection and immunohistochemistry using an anti-MHC class II monoclonal antibody. Results: Class II MHC antigen-expressing cells were found both in normal and carious specimens. In normal tooth, the class II MHC-immunopositive cells were observed mainly at the periphery of the pulp tissue. In teeth with caries, class II MHC-immunopositive cells were located predominantly subjacent to the carious lesions. As the caries progressed, the number of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells was increased. Conclusion: The depth of carious lesions affects the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in the dental pulp.Latar belakang: Karies merupakan penyakit infeksi bakteri yang mengakibatkan destruksi jaringan keras gigi. Dentin yang terbuka akibat karies akan menginduksi respon imun seluler pada pulpa. Kompleks histokompatibilitas utama (MHC merupakan sekumpulan gen yang mengkode histokompatibilitas

  20. Evaluation depth of the curve of Spee in class I, class II, and class III malocclusion: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Occlusal plane is an essential consideration when multiple long-span posterior restorations are designed. When restorations are added to an existing tooth arrangement characterized by rotated, tipped, or extruded teeth, excursive interferences may be incorporated, resulting in detrimental squeal. The curve of Spee, which exists in the ideal natural dentition, allows harmony to exist between the anterior tooth and condylar guidance. This curve exists in the sagittal plane and is the best viewed from a lateral aspect. It permits total posterior disclusion on mandibular protrusion, given proper anterior tooth guidance. It is unclear that whether the curve of Spee is a description of the occlusal surface of each arch separately or in maximal intercuspation. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in the depth of curve of Spee between the class I, class II, class III and to investigate the relationship of depth of curve of Spee with over jet, over-bite.

  1. Simultaneous observation of water and class I methanol masers toward class II methanol maser sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyunwoo; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Seokho; Park, Yong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    We present a simultaneous single-dish survey of 22 GHz water maser and 44 GHz and 95 GHz class I methanol masers toward 77 6.7 GHz class II methanol maser sources, which were selected from the Arecibo methanol maser Galactic plane survey (AMGPS) catalog.Water maser emission is detected in 39 (51%) sources, of which 15 are new detections. Methanol maser emission at 44 GHz and 95 GHz is found in 25 (32%) and 19 (25%) sources, of which 21 and 13 sources are newly detected, respectively. We find 4 high-velocity (> 30 km/s) water maser sources, including 3 dominant blue- or redshifted outflows.The 95 GHz masers always appear with the 44 GHz maser emission. They are strongly correlated with 44 GHz masers in velocity, flux density, and luminosity, while they are not correlated with either water or 6.7 GHz class II methanol masers. The average peak flux density ratio of 95 GHz to 44 GHz masers is close to unity, which is two times higher than previous estimates. The flux densities of class I methanol masers are more ...

  2. 78 FR 24061 - Minimum Technical Standards for Class II Gaming Systems and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... ensuring the integrity of electronic Class II games and aids. 73 FR 60508, Oct. 10, 2008. The technical... Class II gaming system; and to clarify the term ``alternate standard.'' 77 FR 58473, Sept. 21, 2012. In... control standards (MICS) for Class II gaming. 77 FR 58708, Sept. 21, 2012. Similar to the part...

  3. Ablation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase class II alpha suppresses hepatoma cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by complex perturbations in multiple signaling pathways, including the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K/AKT) pathways. Herein we investigated the role of PI3K catalytic isoforms, particularly class II isoforms in HCC proliferation. Among the siRNAs tested against the eight known catalytic PI3K isoforms, specific ablation of class II PI3K alpha (PIK3C2α) was the most effective in impairing cell growth and this was accompanied by concomitant decrease in PIK3C2α mRNA and protein levels. Colony formation ability of cells deficient for PIK3C2α was markedly reduced and growth arrest was associated with increased caspase 3 levels. A small but significant difference in gene dosage and expression levels was detected between tumor and non-tumor tissues in a cohort of 19 HCC patients. Taken together, these data suggest for the first time that in addition to class I PI3Ks in cancer, class II PIK3C2α can modulate HCC cell growth.

  4. Compensatory canine angulation in angle Class II and III patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carlos Agner Busato

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurence of compensation in mesiodistal axial inclinations of canines in skeletal malocclusions patients. The sample consisted of 25 Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion (group 1 and 19 Angle Class III malocclusion patients (group 2. After measurement of dental angulations through a method that associates plaster model photography and AutoCad software, comparisons between the groups were performed by T-test for independent samples. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 between groups, when maxillary canine angulations were compared. Regarding the mandibular canines, there was a statistically significant difference in dental angulation, expressed by 3.2° for group 1 and 0.15° for group 2. An upright position tendency for mandibular canines was observed in the Angle Class III sample. This configures a pattern of compensatory coronary positioning, since the angulation of these teeth makes them occupy less space in the dental arch and consequently mandibular incisors can be in a more retracted position in the sagittal plane.

  5. Gene selection in class space for molecular classification of cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Junying; Yue Joseph WANG; Javed KHAN; Robert CLARKE

    2004-01-01

    Gene selection (feature selection) is generally performed in gene space (feature space), where a very serious curse of dimensionality problem always exists because the number of genes is much larger than the number of samples in gene space (G-space). This results in difficulty in modeling the data set in this space and the low confidence of the result of gene selection. How to find a gene subset in this case is a challenging subject. In this paper, the above G-space is transformed into its dual space, referred to as class space (C-space) such that the number of dimensions is the very number of classes of the samples in G-space and the number of samples in C-space is the number of genes in G-space. It is obvious that the curse of dimensionality in C-space does not exist. A new gene selection method which is based on the principle of separating different classes as far as possible is presented with the help of Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The experimental results on gene selection for real data set are evaluated with Fisher criterion, weighted Fisher criterion as well as leave-one-out cross validation, showing that the method presented here is effective and efficient.

  6. Assessment of upper airways measurements in patients with mandibular skeletal Class II malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Nayanna Nadja e; Rosa Helena Wanderley Lacerda; Alexandre Wellos Cunha Silva; Tania Braga Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mandibular Class II malocclusions seem to interfere in upper airways measurements. The aim of this study was to assess the upper airways measurements of patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion in order to investigate the association between these measurements and the position and length of the mandible as well as mandibular growth trend, comparing the Class II group with a Class I one.Methods:A total of 80 lateral cephalograms from 80 individuals aged between 10 and 17 years o...

  7. Assessment of upper airways measurements in patients with mandibular skeletal Class II malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Nayanna Nadja e; Lacerda, Rosa Helena Wanderley; Silva, Alexandre Wellos Cunha; Ramos, Tania Braga

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mandibular Class II malocclusions seem to interfere in upper airways measurements. The aim of this study was to assess the upper airways measurements of patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion in order to investigate the association between these measurements and the position and length of the mandible as well as mandibular growth trend, comparing the Class II group with a Class I one. Methods: A total of 80 lateral cephalograms from 80 individuals aged between 10 and 17 years...

  8. Evaluation of the dental arch asymmetry in natural normal occlusion and Class II malocclusion individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Estevão Scanavini; Luiz Renato Paranhos; Fernando César Torres; Maria Helena Ferreira Vasconcelos; Renata Pilli Jóias; Marco Antonio Scanavini

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To verify the presence and degree of asymmetry of dental arches in Brazilian individuals with natural normal occlusion and Class II, Divisions 1 and 2 malocclusions. METHODS: The study evaluated the symmetry of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches of 180 pairs of dental casts, divided into: Group I = 60 pairs of natural normal occlusion individuals; Group II = 60 pairs of Class II, Division 1 malocclusion individuals; and Group III = 60 pairs of Class II, Division 2 malocclus...

  9. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02:0...... both HLA class I and class I restricted responses, a quality which might be of potential interest for peptide-based vaccine development....

  10. The nonconventional MHC class II molecule DM governs diabetes susceptibility in NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A J Morgan

    Full Text Available The spontaneous destruction of insulin producing pancreatic beta cells in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice provides a valuable model of type 1 diabetes. As in humans, disease susceptibility is controlled by the classical MHC class II genes that guide CD4(+ T cell responses to self and foreign antigens. It has long been suspected that the dedicated class II chaperone designated HLA-DM in humans or H-2M in mice also makes an important contribution, but due to tight linkage within the MHC, a possible role played by DM peptide editing has not been previously tested by conventional genetic approaches. Here we exploited newly established germ-line competent NOD ES cells to engineer a loss of function allele. DM deficient NOD mice display defective class II peptide occupancy and surface expression, and are completely protected against type 1 diabetes. Interestingly the mutation results in increased proportional representation of CD4(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells and the absence of pathogenic CD4(+ T effectors. Overall, this striking phenotype establishes that DM-mediated peptide selection plays an essential role in the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

  11. Evaluation of dentoskeletal effects of Farmand functional appliance (Fa II on class II malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassaei S.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Functional appliances refer to a variety of removable or fixed appliances designed to alter the mandibular position both sagitally and vertically, resulting in orthodontic and orthopedic changes. Despite the long history of functional appliances, there is still much controversy related to their effectiveness and mode of action. The aim of this study was to evaluate dental and skeletal effects of Fa II in patients with class II malocclusion due to mandibular deficiency.Materials and Methods: In this before-after clinical trial, 35 patients with class II div I malocclusion were selected. These samples were under treatment with Fa II appliance for 11 months. The range of age of females was 10-13 years and males 11-14 years. Combination analysis was used to determine skeletal and dental effects. Paired t-test was used to compare the differences of mean value pre and post treatment. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: There was significant difference between pre and post treatment in respect to posterior and anterior facial height, eruption of upper and lower posterior teeth, eruption of upper anterior teeth, mandibular body length, ANB angle, IMPA and 1 to SN. No significant difference was observed between pre and post treatment regarding facial growth.Conclusion: Treatment with Fa II functional appliance leads to significant alterations in dental and skeletal elements of craniofacial complex and improvement of dental and jaws relationship.

  12. Removable functional appliances effective in patients with Class II malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madurantakam, Parthasarathy

    2016-03-01

    Data sourcesMedline (Pubmed), Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Google Scholar, Web of Science, Evidence-based Medicine, Scopus, LILACS database, Ovid database, Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontolgogia, Bandolier, Atypon Link, African Journals Online, ProQuest, Conference Paper Index, German National Library of Medicine, metaRegister of Controlled Trials.Study selectionRandomised Controlled Trials (RCT) or prospective Controlled Clinical Trials (pCCT) in patients with Class II malocclusions that compared at least one removable functional appliance (RFA) with a non-intervention control. Primary outcomes were angular measurements of skeletal, dental and soft tissue changes as measured by lateral cephalographs.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. A third author assessed bias across studies. Pooling of data was done if similar control groups were used and if the same angular cephalometric measurements were reported. A random-effects model was used to analyse pooled estimates and results were expressed as mean differences (MDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The extent and impact of heterogeneity was assessed.ResultsData were pooled from seventeen studies (seven RCTs and ten pCCT) involving 1031 patients with a mean age of 10.6 years. Most of the RCTs were associated with high risk of bias while most of the pCCTs were without serious methodological limitations. RFA treatment in Class II malocclusions was shown to have a statistically significant short-term effect on skeletal, dental and soft tissue relationships when compared to untreated controls. There is a minimal reduction of SNA (MD=-0.26 degree/year, 95% CI=-0.44 to -0.12 degree/year), minimal increase of SNB (MD=0.62 degree/year, 95% CI=0.36 to 0.88 degree/year) and a small decrease in ANB (MD= -1.14degree/year, 95% CI=-1.52 to 0.77 degree/year). Maxillary incisors were significantly

  13. Management of severe class II division II malocclusion using simplified MPA - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yugandhar Garlapati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A fully established Class II Div. II malocclusion case with severe mandibular deficiency treated with simplified mandibular protraction appliance (MPA along with Begg′s looped archwire is presented. This type of case with antero-posterior and vertical skeletal dysplasia demands correction of the underlying skeletal malocclusions in growing patients. The task becomes very daunting especially in patients with skeletal deep bite with retroclined upper incisors. One such case treated to produce optimal skeletal and dentoalveolar relationship with the help of a fixed functional device is illustrated in this case report.

  14. The Atlantic Salmon MHC class II alpha and beta promoters are active in mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestrheim, O; Lundin, M; Syed, M

    2007-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) genes are only constitutively expressed in certain immune response cells such as B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells and other antigen presenting cells. This cell specific expression pattern and the presence of conserved regions such as the X-, X2-, Y-, and W-boxes make the MHCII promoters especially interesting as vector constructs. We tested whether the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) MHCII promoters can function in cell lines from other organisms. We found that the salmon MHCII alpha and MHCII beta promoters could drive expression of a LacZ reporter gene in adherent lymphoblast cell lines from dog (DH82) and rabbit (HybL-L). This paper shows that the promoters of Atlantic salmon MHCII alpha and beta genes can function in mammalian cell lines. PMID:17934904

  15. Class I HDACs regulate angiotensin II-dependent cardiac fibrosis via fibroblasts and circulating fibrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah M; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Ferguson, Bradley S; Schuetze, Katherine B; Cavasin, Maria A; Demos-Davies, Kim; Yeager, Michael E; Stenmark, Kurt R; McKinsey, Timothy A

    2014-02-01

    Fibrosis, which is defined as excessive accumulation of fibrous connective tissue, contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases involving diverse organ systems. Cardiac fibrosis predisposes individuals to myocardial ischemia, arrhythmias and sudden death, and is commonly associated with diastolic dysfunction. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors block cardiac fibrosis in pre-clinical models of heart failure. However, which HDAC isoforms govern cardiac fibrosis, and the mechanisms by which they do so, remains unclear. Here, we show that selective inhibition of class I HDACs potently suppresses angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated cardiac fibrosis by targeting two key effector cell populations, cardiac fibroblasts and bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Class I HDAC inhibition blocks cardiac fibroblast cell cycle progression through derepression of the genes encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, p15 and p57. In contrast, class I HDAC inhibitors block agonist-dependent differentiation of fibrocytes through a mechanism involving repression of ERK1/2 signaling. These findings define novel roles for class I HDACs in the control of pathological cardiac fibrosis. Furthermore, since fibrocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases, including heart, lung and kidney failure, our results suggest broad utility for isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors as anti-fibrotic agents that function, in part, by targeting these circulating mesenchymal cells. PMID:24374140

  16. Hyoid bone position and head posture comparison in skeletal Class I and Class II subjects: A retrospective cephalometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawankumar Dnyandeo Tekale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the hyoid bone position and the head posture using lateral cephalograms in subjects with skeletal Class I and skeletal Class II pattern and to investigate the gender differences. Materials and Methods: The study used lateral cephalograms of 40 subjects (20 skeletal Class I pattern; 20 skeletal Class II pattern. Lateral cephalograms were traced and analyzed for evaluation of the hyoid bone position and the head posture using 34 parameters. Independent sample t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups and between genders in each group. Statistical tests were performed using NCSS 2007 software (NCSST, Kaysville, Utah, USA. Results: The linear measurements between the hyoid bone (H and cervical spine (CV2ia, the nasion-sella line, palatal line nasion line, the anterior nasal spine (ANS to perpendicular projection of H on the NLP (NLP- Nasal Linear Projection (H-NLP/ANS as well as the posterior cranial points (Bo, Ar and S points were found to be less in skeletal Class II subjects. The measurement H-CV2ia was found to be less in males with skeletal Class I pattern and H-CV4ia was found to be less in males with skeletal Class II pattern. The natural head posture showed no significant gender differences. Conclusion: The position of hyoid bone was closer to the cervical vertebra horizontally in skeletal Class II subjects when compared with skeletal Class I subjects. In males, the hyoid bone position was closer to the cervical vertebra horizontally both in skeletal Class I and skeletal Class II subjects.

  17. Characterization of the rat Class 3 aldehyde dehydrogenase gene promoter.

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Y Q; Takimoto, K; Pitot, H. C.; Miskimins, W K; Lindahl, R

    1996-01-01

    The Class 3 aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (ALDH-3) is differentially expressed. Expression is either constitutive or xenobiotic inducible via an aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor-mediated pathway, depending upon the tissue. A series of studies were performed to examine the regulation of rat ALDH-3 basal expression. DNase I footprint analysis identified four DNA regions within the proximal 1 kb of the 5' flanking region of rat ALDH-3 which interact with regulatory proteins. Reporter gene and ge...

  18. Class II fusion protein of alphaviruses drives membrane fusion through the same pathway as class I proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitseva, Elena; Mittal, Aditya; Griffin, Diane E.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2005-01-01

    Viral fusion proteins of classes I and II differ radically in their initial structures but refold toward similar conformations upon activation. Do fusion pathways mediated by alphavirus E1 and influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) that exemplify classes II and I differ to reflect the difference in their initial conformations, or concur to reflect the similarity in the final conformations? Here, we dissected the pathway of low pH–triggered E1-mediated cell–cell fusion by reducing the numbers of a...

  19. Características cefalométricas de pacientes portadores de más oclusões Classe I e Classe II de Angle Cephalometric characteristics of patients with Angle Class I and Class II malocclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Rogério Lacerda dos Santos; Antônio Carlos de Oliveira Ruellas

    2009-01-01

    OBJETIVOS: o presente estudo comparou algumas medidas cefalométricas relacionadas às características faciais em pacientes com má oclusão Classe I, Classe II 1ª divisão e Classe II 2ª divisão. METODOLOGIA: foram selecionadas 130 telerradiografias de pacientes leucodermas em fase inicial de tratamento ortodôntico, com idades entre 10 e 16 anos (média de 12,6 anos); e divididos em 3 grupos. As medidas cefalométricas utilizadas neste estudo foram: ANB, ı-SN, IMPA, AML, Ls-ı, Li-ī e...

  20. Sibling rivalry: competition between MHC class II family members inhibits immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, Lisa K; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules in the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen-presenting cells is catalyzed by human leukocyte antigen-DM (HLA-DM) and modulated by HLA-DO. In a structural study in this issue, Guce et al. show that HLA-DO is an MHC class II mimic and functions as a competitive and essentially irreversible inhibitor of HLA-DM activity, thereby inhibiting MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:23288359

  1. Management of Class I and Class II Amalgam Restorations with Localized Defects: Five-Year Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Martin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of dental restorations has been the traditional treatment for defective restorations. This five-year prospective clinical trial evaluated amalgam restorations with localized defects that were treated by means of repair or refurbishing. Fifty-two patients (50% female and 50% male, mean age 28.3±18.1 years, range 18–80 with 160 class I and class II defective restorations were included. The study focused on the application of two minimally invasive treatments for localized restoration defects and compared these with no treatment and total replacement as negative and positive controls, respectively. Restorations were assessed by two calibrated examiners according to modified U.S. Public Health Service criteria, including marginal adaptation, anatomic form, secondary caries, and roughness. At five years, recall was examined in 45 patients with 108 restorations (67.5%. The results suggest that repair treatment is as effective as total replacement of restorations with localized defects, reducing biological costs to the patient and providing new tools to the clinician. Refinishing restoration is a useful treatment for localized anatomic form defects.

  2. Características cefalométricas de pacientes portadores de más oclusões Classe I e Classe II de Angle Cephalometric characteristics of patients with Angle Class I and Class II malocclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Lacerda dos Santos

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: o presente estudo comparou algumas medidas cefalométricas relacionadas às características faciais em pacientes com má oclusão Classe I, Classe II 1ª divisão e Classe II 2ª divisão. METODOLOGIA: foram selecionadas 130 telerradiografias de pacientes leucodermas em fase inicial de tratamento ortodôntico, com idades entre 10 e 16 anos (média de 12,6 anos; e divididos em 3 grupos. As medidas cefalométricas utilizadas neste estudo foram: ANB, ı-SN, IMPA, AML, Ls-ı, Li-ī e EI. A análise de variância e o teste de Tukey foram realizados nas medidas ANB, IMPA, AML, ı-SN e Li-ī. Para as demais variáveis (EI e Ls-ı foi utilizado o teste de Kruskal Wallis e Dunn. RESULTADOS: os resultados mostraram que as medidas Ls-ı e EI tiveram diferença estatisticamente significativa entre os grupos I e II-1 e entre os grupos II-1 e II-2 (p AIM: The present study compared some cephalometric measurements related to facial characteristics in patients having Class I, Class II division 1, and Class II division 2 malocclusions. METHODS: One hundred and thirty teleradiographs of Caucasian patients aged 10-16 years (mean age of 12.6 years under initial orthodontic treatment were selected for study and divided into 3 groups. The cephalometric measurements used in the present study were the following: ANB, ı-SN, IMPA, AML, Ls-ı, Li-ī, and EI. Variance analysis and Tukey's test were carried out for ANB, IMPA, AML, ı-SN, and Li-ī measurements, whereas Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests were used for EI and Ls-ı. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were found for EI and Ls-ı measurements when Group II-1 was compared to Group I and Group II-2 (p < 0.05. ANB and IMPA measurements also had statistically significant differences when Group I was compared to Group II-1 and Group II-2 (p < 0.05. The measurement ı-SN had statistically significant differences between the 3 groups (p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: One can conclude that the measurement

  3. Clinical, immunological and genetic features in eleven Algerian patients with major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djidjik Réda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presenting processed antigens to CD4+ lymphocytes during the immune response involves major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. MHC class II genes transcription is regulated by four transcription factors: CIITA, RFXANK, RFX5 and RFXAP. Defects in these factors result in major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency, a primary combined immunodeficiency frequent in North Africa. Autosomal recessive mutations in the RFXANK gene have been reported as being the principal defect found in North African patients with this disorder. In this paper, we describe clinical, immunological and genetic features of 11 unrelated Algerian patients whose monocytes display a total absence of MHC class II molecules. They shared mainly the same clinical picture which included protracted diarrhoea and respiratory tract recurrent infections. Genetic analysis revealed that 9 of the 11 patients had the same RFXANK founder mutation, a 26 bp deletion (named I5E6-25_I5E6+1, also known as 752delG26. Immunological and genetic findings in our series may facilitate genetic counselling implementation for Algerian consanguineous families. Further studies need to be conducted to determine 752delG26 heterozygous mutation frequency in Algerian population.

  4. Bioavailability Enhancement Techniques for BCS Class II Drugs: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honey Kansara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, nearly 40% of the new chemical entities (NCEs identified by pharmaceutical industry screening programs have failed to be developed because of poor water-solubility, which makes their formulation difficult or even impossible. The solubility issues complicating the delivery of these new drugs also affect the delivery of many existing drugs. The various traditional and novel techniques that that can be used for solubility enhancement of BCS Class II drugs are briefly discussed in this article. The Traditional techniques that has been discussed in this article includes use of co-solvents, Hydrotropy, Micronization, change in dielectric constant of solvent, amorphousforms, chemical modification of drug, use of surfactants, inclusion complex, alteration of pH ofsolvent, use of hydrates or solvates, use of soluble prodrugs, application of ultrasonic waves, functional polymer technology, controlled precipitation technology, evaporative precipitation in aqueous solution, use of precipitation inhibitors, solvent deposition, precipitation, selective adsorption on insoluble carriers. Novel drug delivery technologies developed in recent years for solubility enhancement of insoluble drugs are size reduction technologies, lipid based delivery system, micellar technologies,porous micro particle technology. Solid Dispersion Technique and various types of solid dispersion systems have also been explained briefly.

  5. Performance assessment for the class L-II disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This draft radiological performance assessment (PA) for the proposed Class L-II Disposal Facility (CIIDF) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. This PA considers the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) over the operating life of the facility and the long-term performance of the facility in providing protection to public health and the environment. The performance objectives contained in the order require that the facility be managed to accomplish the following: (1) Protect public health and safety in accordance with standards specified in environmental health orders and other DOE orders. (2) Ensure that external exposure to the waste and concentrations of radioactive material that may be released into surface water, groundwater, soil, plants, and animals results in an effective dose equivalent (EDE) that does not exceed 25 mrem/year to a member of the public. Releases to the atmosphere shall meet the requirements of 40 CFR Pt. 61. Reasonable effort should be made to maintain releases of radioactivity in effluents to the general environment as low as reasonably achievable. (1) Ensure that the committed EDEs received by individual who inadvertently may intrude into the facility after the loss of active institutional control (100 years) will not exceed 100 mrem/year for continuous exposure of 500 mrem for a single acute exposure. (4) Protect groundwater resources, consistent with federal, state, and local requirements.

  6. The Early Expansion and Evolutionary Dynamics of POU Class Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, David A.; Gates, Ruth D.; Jacobs, David K.

    2014-01-01

    The POU genes represent a diverse class of animal-specific transcription factors that play important roles in neurogenesis, pluripotency, and cell-type specification. Although previous attempts have been made to reconstruct the evolution of the POU class, these studies have been limited by a small number of representative taxa, and a lack of sequences from basally branching organisms. In this study, we performed comparative analyses on available genomes and sequences recovered through “gene fishing” to better resolve the topology of the POU gene tree. We then used ancestral state reconstruction to map the most likely changes in amino acid evolution for the conserved domains. Our work suggests that four of the six POU families evolved before the last common ancestor of living animals—doubling previous estimates—and were followed by extensive clade-specific gene loss. Amino acid changes are distributed unequally across the gene tree, consistent with a neofunctionalization model of protein evolution. We consider our results in the context of early animal evolution, and the role of POU5 genes in maintaining stem cell pluripotency. PMID:25261405

  7. Vaccination against lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in MHC class II-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2011-01-01

    response could be elicited in MHC class II-deficient mice by vaccination with adenovirus encoding lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) glycoprotein tethered to MHC class II-associated invariant chain. Moreover, the response induced conferred significant cytolytic CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection...

  8. 40 CFR 144.22 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells. 144.22 Section 144.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... of Underground Injection by Rule § 144.22 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells. (a) An existing Class II enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage injection well is authorized...

  9. 40 CFR 82.15 - Prohibitions for class II controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibitions for class II controlled substances. 82.15 Section 82.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.15 Prohibitions for class II...

  10. 40 CFR 82.16 - Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances. 82.16 Section 82.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.16 Phaseout schedule of class II...

  11. Long-term pharyngeal airway changes after bionator treatment in adolescents with skeletal Class II malocclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Seimin; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Chung, Chooryung J.; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term changes in the pharyngeal airway dimensions after functional appliance treatment in adolescents with skeletal Class II malocclusions. Methods Pharyngeal airway dimensions were compared between subjects with skeletal Class II malocclusions (n = 24; mean age: 11.6 ± 1.29 years) treated with a Class II bionator and age-matched control subjects with skeletal Class I occlusions (n = 24; mean age: 11.0 ± 1.21 years) using a series of lateral...

  12. Homologues of the engrailed gene from five molluscan classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, C G; Jacobs, D K; Kostriken, R; Vogler, A P; Baker, R; DeSalle, R

    1995-05-22

    We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify, clone, and sequence 10 engrailed homeodomains from 8 species in the five major molluscan classes, including the serially organized chiton (Polyplacophora) lineage. The Drosophila melanogaster gene engrailed (en) is one of several genes involved in embryonic segment polarity determination. Studies of engrailed sequence and expression in molluscs are of interest due to questions regarding the evolution and homology of segmentation in these taxa. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence comparisons reflect evolutionary conservation within helices of the en homeodomain and ancient divergences in the region 3' to the homeodomain. PMID:7774719

  13. Natalizumab-related anaphylactoid reactions in MS patients are associated with HLA class II alleles

    OpenAIRE

    De la Hera, Belén; Urcelay, Elena; Brassat, David; Chan, Andrew; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Salmen, Anke; Villar, Luisa Maria; Álvarez-Cermeño, José Carlos; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Fernández, Oscar; Oliver, Begoña; Saiz, Albert; Ara, Jose Ramón; Vigo, Ana G.; Arroyo, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to investigate potential associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II alleles and the development of anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with natalizumab. Methods: HLA class I and II genotyping was performed in patients with MS who experienced anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions and in patients who did not develop infusion-related allergic reactions following natalizumab administration. Results:...

  14. HLA Class II Haplotypic Association and DQCAR Microsatellite Polymorphisms in Croatian Patients with Psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Grubić, Z.; Žunec, R.; Kaštelan, M.; Čečuk-Jeličić, E.; Gruber, F; Kaštelan, A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate polymorphism of HLA class II haplotypic associations (HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1) and DQCAR alleles in 78 Croatian patients with psoriasis. Patients were divided into two groups according to a family history of disease and age of onset: type I (positive family history and early onset) and type II (negative family history and late onset). The difference in frequency of HLA class II haplotypic associations between type I patients an...

  15. Analysis of the role of Arabidopsis class I TCP genes AtTCP7, AtTCP8, AtTCP22, and AtTCP23 in leaf development

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar-Martínez, José A.; Sinha, Neelima

    2013-01-01

    TCP family of plant-specific transcription factors regulates plant form through control of cell proliferation and differentiation. This gene family is comprised of two groups, class I and class II. While the role of class II TCP genes in plant development is well known, data about the function of some class I TCP genes is lacking. We studied a group of phylogenetically related class I TCP genes: AtTCP7, AtTCP8, AtTCP22, and AtTCP23. The similar expression pattern in young growing leaves found...

  16. Negative relationships between cellular immune response, Mhc class II heterozygosity and secondary sexual trait in the montane water vole

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Charbonnel, N.; Bryja, Josef; Galan, M.; Deter, J.; Tollenaere, C.; Chaval, Y.; Morand, S.; Cosson, J.-F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2010), s. 279-290. ISSN 1752-4571 Grant ostatní: 6th Framework Programme(XE) GOCE-2003-010284 EDEN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : abundance cycles * Dqa and Drb * immunocompetence handicap * Mhc class II genes * parasite-mediated balancing selection * sexual selection Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.145, year: 2010

  17. Contrasting Epidemic Histories Reveal Pathogen-Mediated Balancing Selection on Class II MHC Diversity in a Wild Songbird

    OpenAIRE

    Hawley, Dana M; Fleischer, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which pathogens maintain the extraordinary polymorphism at vertebrate Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes via balancing selection has intrigued evolutionary biologists for over half a century, but direct tests remain challenging. Here we examine whether a well-characterized epidemic of Mycoplasmal conjunctivitis resulted in balancing selection on class II MHC in a wild songbird host, the house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus). First, we confirmed the potential for pathogen-...

  18. Selection, diversity and evolutionary patterns of the MHC class II DAB in free-ranging Neotropical marsupials

    OpenAIRE

    Otten Celine; Meyer-Lucht Yvonne; Püttker Thomas; Sommer Simone

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Research on the genetic architecture and diversity of the MHC has focused mainly on eutherian mammals, birds and fish. So far, studies on model marsupials used in laboratory investigations indicated very little or even no variation in MHC class II genes. However, natural levels of diversity and selection are unknown in marsupials as studies on wild populations are virtually absent. We used two endemic South American mouse opossums, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Marmosops in...

  19. Parallel evolution of TCP and B-class genes in Commelinaceae flower bilateral symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston Jill C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flower bilateral symmetry (zygomorphy has evolved multiple times independently across angiosperms and is correlated with increased pollinator specialization and speciation rates. Functional and expression analyses in distantly related core eudicots and monocots implicate independent recruitment of class II TCP genes in the evolution of flower bilateral symmetry. Furthermore, available evidence suggests that monocot flower bilateral symmetry might also have evolved through changes in B-class homeotic MADS-box gene function. Methods In order to test the non-exclusive hypotheses that changes in TCP and B-class gene developmental function underlie flower symmetry evolution in the monocot family Commelinaceae, we compared expression patterns of teosinte branched1 (TB1-like, DEFICIENS (DEF-like, and GLOBOSA (GLO-like genes in morphologically distinct bilaterally symmetrical flowers of Commelina communis and Commelina dianthifolia, and radially symmetrical flowers of Tradescantia pallida. Results Expression data demonstrate that TB1-like genes are asymmetrically expressed in tepals of bilaterally symmetrical Commelina, but not radially symmetrical Tradescantia, flowers. Furthermore, DEF-like genes are expressed in showy inner tepals, staminodes and stamens of all three species, but not in the distinct outer tepal-like ventral inner tepals of C. communis. Conclusions Together with other studies, these data suggest parallel recruitment of TB1-like genes in the independent evolution of flower bilateral symmetry at early stages of Commelina flower development, and the later stage homeotic transformation of C. communis inner tepals into outer tepals through the loss of DEF-like gene expression.

  20. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.; Dzierszinski, Florence S.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4+ T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms...

  1. MHC class II antigen expression was different from MHC class I antigen expression in irradiated and recovering rat thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We exposed rats to a heavy, but sublethal, dose of X-radiation that was calculated as the maximum that left them alive. Immediately after irradiation the rats lost body and thymus weight. The number of thymocytes decreased and the structure of the thymus was destroyed. The thymus weights then increased rapidly for a few days from day 7 followed by a slower increase. Immunohistochemically, the recovery of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-positive cells in the thymus was slower than that of MHC class I-positive cells. Recovery of MHC class II-positive and ED1-positive cells in the thymus was slow, especially in the medulla. Thymus structure appeared similar to normal control animals on day 14, although the number of MHC class II- and ED1-positive cells in the medulla was lower than that of controls even 21 days after radiation exposure. The delay in recovery of MHC class II-positive stromal cells might affect the regeneration of thymocyte subpopulations after irradiation. (author)

  2. Hypothesis: Targeted Ikkβ deletion upregulates MIF signaling responsiveness and MHC class II expression in mouse hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Koch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Katherine S Koch, Hyam L LeffertHepatocyte Growth Control and Stem Cell Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, CA, USAAbstract: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is causally related to the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease but its hepatocellular mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Scattered reports in the literature hint at functional connections between the expression of MIF and major histocompatibility complex (MHC Class II molecules. Not surprisingly, these relationships have not yet been explored in hepatocytes because MIF and MHC Class II cell surface receptors are commonly expressed by other cell types including various antigen presenting cells of the immune system. On the other hand, mounting evidence suggests that heteromeric MIF receptors share a common molecule with intracellular MHC Class II complexes, viz., CD74, which also serves as the MHC Class II chaperone; and, while it is unclear what cancer-related role(s MHC Class II receptors might play, increasing evidence suggests that MIF and CD74 are also implicated in the biology of hepatocellular carcinoma. These reports are provocative for two reasons: firstly, Ikkβ Δhep mice carrying hepatocyte-targeted deletions of Ikkβ, an IκB kinase complex subunit required for the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB, have been shown to display heightened susceptibilities to hepatotoxins and chemical hepatocarcinogens; secondly, microarray profiling observations indicate that Ikkβ Δhep hepatocytes constitutively and “ectopically” overexpress genes, particularly CD74, CD44 (a MIF-receptor subunit and MHC Class II I-A/E β and I-A α chains, and gene families that regulate host immune process and immune defense responses. These findings together suggest that Ikkβ Δhep mice might express functional MIF and MHC Class II receptors, leading to increased hepatocellular sensitivity to

  3. Influence of kinship and MHC class II genotype on visual traits in zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Cornelia; Gebhardt, Katharina; Hartmann, Alexander K; Sigman, Lauren; Gerlach, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Kin recognition can drive kin selection and the evolution of social behaviour. In zebrafish (Danio rerio, Hamilton 1822), kin recognition is based on olfactory and visual imprinting processes. If larvae are exposed to visual and chemical cues of kin at day 5 and 6 post fertilization they will recognize kin throughout life, while exposure to non-kin fails to trigger any recognition. Chemical imprinting signals are transcribed by polymorphic genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) code; however, the underlying mechanism for visual imprinting remains unclear. Here we provide evidence for the existence of family-specific differences in morphometry and pigmentation pattern of six day old zebrafish larvae. While rump, tail and body pigmentation were dependent on relatedness, iris pigmentation and morphometry were also influenced by MHC class II genotype. Our study revealed that the MHC not only influences the chemical signature of individuals, but also their visual appearance. PMID:23251449

  4. Special classes of iron(II) azole spin crossover compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Koningsbruggen, Petra J. van; Gutlich, P.; Goodwin, HA

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, selected results obtained so far on Fe(II) spin crossover compounds of 1,2,4-triazole, isoxazole and tetrazole derivatives are summarized and analysed. These materials include the only compounds known to have Fe(II)N(6) spin crossover chromophores consisting of six chemically identical heterocyclic ligands. Particular attention is paid to the coordination modes for substituted 1,2,4-triazole derivatives towards Fe(II) resulting in polynuclear and mononuclear compounds exhibit...

  5. Identification of class B and class C floral organ identity genes from rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H G; Jeon, J S; Lee, S; An, G

    1998-12-01

    The functions of two rice MADS-box genes were studied by the loss-of-function approach. The first gene, OsMADS4, shows a significant homology to members in the PISTILLATA (PI) family, which is required to specify petal and stamen identity. The second gene, OsMADS3, is highly homologous to the members in the AGAMOUS (AG) family that is essential for the normal development of the internal two whorls, the stamen and carpel, of the flower. These two rice MADS box cDNA clones were connected to the maize ubiquitin promoter in an antisense orientation and the fusion molecules were introduced to rice plants by the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method. Transgenic plants expressing antisense OsMADS4 displayed alterations of the second and third whorls. The second-whorl lodicules, which are equivalent to the petals of dicot plants in grasses, were altered into palea/lemma-like organs, and the third whorl stamens were changed to carpel-like organs. Loss-of-function analysis of OsMADS3 showed alterations in the third and fourth whorls. In the third whorl, the filaments of the transgenic plants were changed into thick and fleshy bodies, similar to lodicules. Rather than making a carpel, the fourth whorl produced several abnormal flowers. These phenotypes are similar to those of the agamous and plena mutants in Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum, respectively. These results suggest that OsMADS4 belongs to the class B gene family and OsMADS3 belongs to the class C gene family of floral organ identity determination. PMID:9869408

  6. Kinetics of expression of interleukin 2 receptors on class I and class II restricted murine T cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) expression has been examined on various class I and class II restricted, influenza specific murine T cell clones. Expression and relative levels of IL-2R were examined by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter analysis utilizing 3 anti-murine IL-2R monoclonal antibodies. Receptor expression was analyzed by scatchard analysis using radiolabeled recombinant human interleukin 2 to access the number of high and low affinity IL-2R per cell as well as the affinity of binding. The clones tested bound all 3 monoclonal antibodies and were inhibited in an IL-2 dependent proliferation assay by the addition of the antibodies to the culture. There was, however, differing degrees of inhibition ranging up to 99%, depending on the clone and the antibody used. IL-2R expression was detectable as early as 4-6 hours after antigenic stimulation of quiescent cells. After maximal levels of receptors were expressed, which was about 24 hours after stimulation, expression of IL-2R decreased with time on all clones examined (both class I and class II restricted). Differing rates of receptor loss is seen however, with some class II restricted clones retaining relatively high levels of receptors

  7. A new class of wheat gliadin genes and proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olin D Anderson

    Full Text Available The utility of mining DNA sequence data to understand the structure and expression of cereal prolamin genes is demonstrated by the identification of a new class of wheat prolamins. This previously unrecognized wheat prolamin class, given the name δ-gliadins, is the most direct ortholog of barley γ3-hordeins. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the orthologous δ-gliadins and γ3-hordeins form a distinct prolamin branch that existed separate from the γ-gliadins and γ-hordeins in an ancestral Triticeae prior to the branching of wheat and barley. The expressed δ-gliadins are encoded by a single gene in each of the hexaploid wheat genomes. This single δ-gliadin/γ3-hordein ortholog may be a general feature of the Triticeae tribe since examination of ESTs from three barley cultivars also confirms a single γ3-hordein gene. Analysis of ESTs and cDNAs shows that the genes are expressed in at least five hexaploid wheat cultivars in addition to diploids Triticum monococcum and Aegilops tauschii. The latter two sequences also allow assignment of the δ-gliadin genes to the A and D genomes, respectively, with the third sequence type assumed to be from the B genome. Two wheat cultivars for which there are sufficient ESTs show different patterns of expression, i.e., with cv Chinese Spring expressing the genes from the A and B genomes, while cv Recital has ESTs from the A and D genomes. Genomic sequences of Chinese Spring show that the D genome gene is inactivated by tandem premature stop codons. A fourth δ-gliadin sequence occurs in the D genome of both Chinese Spring and Ae. tauschii, but no ESTs match this sequence and limited genomic sequences indicates a pseudogene containing frame shifts and premature stop codons. Sequencing of BACs covering a 3 Mb region from Ae. tauschii locates the δ-gliadin gene to the complex Gli-1 plus Glu-3 region on chromosome 1.

  8. Both qualitative and quantitative genetic variation of MHC class II molecules may influence susceptibility to autoimmune diseases: the case of endemic pemphigus foliaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovezan, Bruno Zagonel; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza

    2013-09-01

    The MHC class II transactivator (CIITA) is a key regulator in expression of the HLA class II genes. It is well known that HLA-DRB1 genotypes have a strong influence on the risk of multifactorial autoimmune diseases, but the effect of CIITA genotypes remains controversial. We tested in a case-control study whether CIITA polymorphisms influence the risk of developing endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF) and whether CIITA and HLA-DRB1 interact as regards susceptibility to the disease. The rs4774 SNP is not associated to EPF, while rs3087456 in the CIITA gene promoter is associated with susceptibility [odds ratio (OR) = 2.6, p EPF. PMID:23777927

  9. Expression of MHC class II antigens in human B-cell leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Guy, K.; Krajewski, A S; Dewar, A E

    1986-01-01

    In this review we have summarized our experiences of serological analysis of MHC class II antigen expression in human B cell malignant disease. Cells from a large number of cases of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) have been examined for expression of class II antigens. Using a number of monoclonal antibodies which in some cases are specific for class II subregion products (DP, DQ and DR), MHC class II antigens were detected by indirect immunofluores...

  10. A New Humanized HLA Transgenic Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis Expressing Class II on Mouse CD4 T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mangalam, Ashutosh; Rodriguez, Moses; David, Chella

    2007-01-01

    Among all the genetic factors associated with MS susceptibility, strongest association has been seen with expression of certain MHC class II molecules, although analysis of their exact function remains complicated. In general expression of class II is restricted to professional antigen presenting cells, however human but not mice CD4+ T cells express class II on their surface. Functional studies of classII+CD4+ T cells have been hampered due to lack of proper animal model. Here we describe de...

  11. Dual MHC class I and class II restriction of a single T cell receptor: distinct modes of tolerance induction by two classes of autoantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsov, I; Vukmanović, S

    1999-02-15

    In the final stages of thymic development, immature T cells undergo three distinct processes (positive selection, negative selection, and lineage commitment) that all depend on interactions of thymocyte TCRs with MHC molecules. It is currently thought that TCRs are preferentially restricted by either MHC class I or class II molecules. In this report, we present direct evidence that the TCR previously described as H-Y/H-2Db specific cross-reacts with H-2IAb if expressed in CD4+ cells. We also demonstrate an increase in thymocyte numbers in H-Y TCR-trangenic mice deficient in MHC class II, suggesting a relatively discrete form of negative selection by MHC class II compared with that induced by H-Y/H-2Db. We propose that inability to generate CD4+ T cells expressing H-Y TCR in different experimental settings may be due to tolerance to self-MHC class II. These results, therefore, support an intriguing possibility that tolerance to self may influence and/or interfere with the outcome of the lineage commitment. PMID:9973472

  12. 25 CFR 547.6 - What are the minimum technical standards for enrolling and enabling Class II gaming system...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and enabling Class II gaming system components? 547.6 Section 547.6 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR GAMING EQUIPMENT USED... enabling Class II gaming system components? (a) General requirements. Class II gaming systems shall...

  13. 76 FR 40377 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Class II Special...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... without spermicidal lubricant containing nonoxynol-9 are classified in class II. They were originally... final rule (64 FR 13254, March 17, 1999). Because the packaging requirements for condoms are similar...

  14. A novel HURRAH protocol reveals high numbers of monomorphic MHC class II loci and two asymmetric multi-locus haplotypes in the Pere David's deer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Hong Wan

    Full Text Available The Père David's deer is a highly inbred, but recovered, species, making it interesting to consider their adaptive molecular evolution from an immunological perspective. Prior to this study, genomic sequencing was the only method for isolating all functional MHC genes within a certain species. Here, we report a novel protocol for isolating MHC class II loci from a species, and its use to investigate the adaptive evolution of this endangered deer at the level of multi-locus haplotypes. This protocol was designated "HURRAH" based on its various steps and used to estimate the total number of MHC class II loci. We confirmed the validity of this novel protocol in the giant panda and then used it to examine the Père David's deer. Our results revealed that the Père David's deer possesses nine MHC class II loci and therefore has more functional MHC class II loci than the eight genome-sequenced mammals for which full MHC data are currently available. This could potentially account at least in part for the strong survival ability of this species in the face of severe bottlenecking. The results from the HURRAH protocol also revealed that: (1 All of the identified MHC class II loci were monomorphic at their antigen-binding regions, although DRA was dimorphic at its cytoplasmic tail; and (2 these genes constituted two asymmetric functional MHC class II multi-locus haplotypes: DRA1*01 ∼ DRB1 ∼ DRB3 ∼ DQA1 ∼ DQB2 (H1 and DRA1*02 ∼ DRB2 ∼ DRB4 ∼ DQA2 ∼ DQB1 (H2. The latter finding indicates that the current members of the deer species have lost the powerful ancestral MHC class II haplotypes of nine or more loci, and have instead fixed two relatively weak haplotypes containing five genes. As a result, the Père David's deer are currently at risk for increased susceptibility to infectious pathogens.

  15. Correction of an adult Class II division 2 individual using fixed functional appliance: A noncompliance approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrinivas Basavaraddi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the application of fixed functional appliance in the treatment of an adult female having Class II division 2 malocclusion with retroclination of upper incisors. Fixed functional appliance was used to correct the overjet after the uprighting of upper incisors. Fixed functional appliance was fitted on a rigid rectangular arch wire. Application of fixed functional appliance achieved a good Class I molar relationship along with Class I canine relationship with normal overjet and overbite. Fixed functional appliance is effective in the treatment of Class II malocclusions, even in adult patients, and can serve as an alternate choice of treatment instead of orthognathic surgery. This is a case; wherein, fixed functional appliance was successfully used to relieve deep bite and overjet that was ensued after leveling and aligning. We demonstrate that fixed functional appliance can act as a “noncompliant corrector” and use of Class II elastics can be avoided.

  16. SKELETODENTAL CHANGES DURING THE PUBERTAL GROWTH SPURT IN CLASS II DIV I FEMALES: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shirazi Sh. Etemad Moghadam

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the quantity and character of growth changes in the skeletodental complex of class II div I malocclusion during the pubertal growth spurt in females. Longitudinal hand-wrist radiographs were obtained from each subject and the onset anil end of the pubertal growth spurt was determined. Accordingly two lateral cephaliograms were taken, superimposed and analyzed. This sample consisted of 36 girls (18 class I ami 18 class II div I malocclusions, with no history of orthodontic treatment. Tl"e results indicate that true changes exist during the short period of pubertal growth spurt, which differ in amount ami direction, in various parts of the face am! cranium; also the pubertal growth spurt may have different effects on identical parameters, when compared between class I and class II div I subjects.

  17. Data on HLA class I/II profile in Brazilian pemphigus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Brochado, Maria José; Nascimento, Daniela Francisca; Saloum Deghaide, Neifi Hassan; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2016-09-01

    Pemphigus are blistering autoimmune diseases related with genetic and environmental factors. Here we describe HLA genotyping in pemphigus patients. First, we review the HLA class I/II data on pemphigus reported in Brazilian samples and then present the HLA class I (-A, -B, -C) and class II (-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1) alleles related to susceptibility/resistance to pemphigus by comparing 86 patients with pemphigus foliaceus, 83 patients with pemphigus vulgaris, and 1592 controls from the northeastern region of the state of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. The data presented here are related to the manuscript "Differential HLA class I and class II associations in Pemphigus Foliaceus and Pemphigus Vulgaris patients from a prevalent Southeastern Brazilian region" Brochado et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:27331116

  18. The Class II/1 anomaly of hereditary etiology vs. Thumb-sucking etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Pădure, H; Negru, AR; Stanciu, D

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The etiology of class II division 1 Angle anomaly comprises many entities, including heredity and the vicious habit of sucking the finger. A close connection between the etiology and the clinical features needs to be outlined, in order to have a more appropriate treatment approach. Aim: This study aims to find common clinical features for two groups of Class II division 1 etiological factors (heredity and the vicious habit of sucking the finger), outlining a characteristic dento-fa...

  19. Use of cyanoacrylate as barrier in guided tissue regeneration in class II furcation defects

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen L Mueller Storrer; Gabriela dos Santos Kummer; Shaban Mirco; Joao Cesar Zielak

    2014-01-01

    The guided bone regeneration (GBR) is a technique that uses resorbable and non-resorbable membranes in association with other filling biomaterials. GBR is one of the optional treatments for therapy of class II furcation defects. The current case report evaluates clinically and radiographically the use of the cyanoacrylate membrane (Glubran ®2) associated with organic bovine bone (GenOx) for the treatment of vestibular class II furcation defect on the lower left molar. Conclusion: The GBR is a...

  20. Camouflage of Severe Skeletal Class II Gummy Smile Patient Treated Nonsurgically with Mini Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Irfan Qamruddin; Fazal Shahid; Mohammad Khursheed Alam; Wafa Zehra Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal class II has always been a challenge in orthodontics and often needs assistance of surgical orthodontics in nongrowing patients when it presents with severe discrepancy. Difficulty increases more when vertical dysplasia is also associated with sagittal discrepancy. The advent of mini implants in orthodontics has broadened the spectrum of camouflage treatment. This case report presents a 16-year-old nongrowing girl with severe class II because of retrognathic mandible, and anterior de...

  1. Neurotrophins inhibit major histocompatibility class II inducibility of microglia: Involvement of the p75 neurotrophin receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Harald; Misgeld, Thomas; Matsumuro, Kenji; Wekerle, Hartmut

    1998-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are rare in the healthy brain tissue, but are heavily expressed on microglial cells after inflammatory or neurodegenerative processes. We studied the conditions leading to the induction of MHC class II molecules in microglia by using explant cultures of neonatal rat hippocampus, a model of interacting neuronal networks. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-dependent MHC class II inducibility in microglia cells was very low, but strongly increased in the hippoc...

  2. Maxillary first molar extraction in Class II malocclusion: Follow-up studies on treatment effects

    OpenAIRE

    Livas, Christos

    2015-01-01

    This PhD research investigated treatment effects of extraction of one and two maxillary first molars in Class II subdivision and Class II/1 malocclusion cases respectively from a longer time perspective. Private practice records were scrutinized to evaluate aspects of a treatment technique combining maxillary first molar extraction(s) and Begg brackets; outcome stability, influence on the position of maxillary third molars, interference of adjacent anatomical structures in closing extraction ...

  3. Wide tissue distribution of axolotl class II molecules occurs independently of thyroxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völk, H; Charlemagne, J; Tournefier, A; Ferrone, S; Jost, R; Parisot, R; Kaufman, J

    1998-04-01

    Unlike most salamanders, the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) fails to produce enough thyroxin to undergo anatomical metamorphosis, although a "cryptic metamorphosis" involving a change from fetal to adult hemoglobins has been described. To understand to what extent the development of the axolotl hemopoietic system is linked to anatomical metamorphosis, we examined the appearance and thyroxin dependence of class II molecules on thymus, blood, and spleen cells, using both flow cytometry and biosynthetic labeling followed by immunoprecipitation. Class II molecules are present on B cells as early as 7 weeks after hatching, the first time analyzed. At this time, most thymocytes, all T cells, and all erythrocytes lack class II molecules, but first thymocytes at 17 weeks, then T cells at 22 weeks, and finally erythrocytes at 26-27 weeks virtually all bear class II molecules. Class II molecules and adult hemoglobin appear at roughly the same time in erythrocytes. These data are most easily explained by populations of class II-negative cells being replaced by populations of class II-positive cells, and they show that the hemopoietic system matures at a variety of times unrelated to the increase of thyroxin that drives anatomical metamorphosis. We found that administration of thyroxin during axolotl ontogeny does not accelerate or otherwise affect the acquisition of class II molecules, nor does administration of drugs that inhibit thyroxin (sodium perchlorate, thiourea, methimazole, and 1-methyl imidazole) retard or abolish this acquisition, suggesting that the programs for anatomical metamorphosis and some aspects of hemopoietic development are entirely separate. PMID:9510551

  4. Factors affecting buccal corridor space in Angle′s Class II Division 1 malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Buccal corridor space has been thought of primarily in terms of maxillary width, but there is also evidence that they are heavily influenced by the antero-posterior position of maxilla. The present study was undertaken with an aim of evaluating and comparing the dental and skeletal factors related to buccal corridor space in individuals having Class I and Class II Division 1 malocclusions. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects of which 40 were males and 40 were females in the age group of 20-30 years were selected as per inclusion criteria and were grouped as Group I having Class I malocclusion and as Group II having Class II malocclusions based on angle ANB. 12 linear and 2 angular cephalometric measurements and 4 study cast measurements were used to correlate with the buccal corridor linear ratio (BCLR, calculated on smile photograph using the Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software (Adobe Systems Inc., San Jose, California, USA. The data obtained was statistically evaluated using independent t-test and multiple linear regression analysis. Result: Buccal corridor space is larger in individuals with Class II Division 1 malocclusion when compared with individuals with Class I malocclusions. There exists a significant difference in buccal corridor space between males and females. Conclusion: The present study helps in establishing the correlation between certain factors and the amount of buccal corridor space in individuals having skeletal Class II pattern.

  5. 40 CFR 82.23 - Transfers of allowances of class II controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transfers of allowances of class II controlled substances. 82.23 Section 82.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.23 Transfers of allowances of class...

  6. Characterization of structural features controlling the receptiveness of empty class II MHC molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rupp, Bernd; Günther, Sebastian; Makhmoor, Talat;

    2011-01-01

    MHC class II molecules (MHC II) play a pivotal role in the cell-surface presentation of antigens for surveillance by T cells. Antigen loading takes place inside the cell in endosomal compartments and loss of the peptide ligand rapidly leads to the formation of a non-receptive state of the MHC mol...

  7. Molecular basis for the control of motor-based transport of MHC class II compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocha, Nuno

    2008-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class II is critical for immune responses against pathogens and tumors. Antigen loading occurs primarily in lysosomal-related organelles (LROs) known as MIICs. Ultimately, the MHC II-peptide complexes are transported for cell surface display. Here, we study intracellular

  8. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Nielsen, Morten; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02:01 and HLA-DRB1*01:01 molecules were identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. Immunization of transgenic HLA-A*02:01/HLA-DRB1*01:01 mice with four of these double binding peptides gave ...

  9. Management of severe Class II malocclusion with sequential modified twin block and fixed orthodontic appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal Chowdhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional appliance is an effective way of treating skeletal Class II malocclusion in children and adolescents. A 12 months stepwise mandibular advancement protocol with Herbst appliance has been proved to enhance condylar growth and improve mandibular prognathism. The present case report documents a 12-year-old boy presenting with Angle's Class II, division 1 malocclusion associated with excessive overjet (11 mm, 100% deep bite, and retrognathic mandible. He was treated by a phase I growth modification therapy using twin block appliance with lip pads in a stepwise mandibular advancement protocol followed by a phase II preadjusted Edgewise appliance therapy.

  10. Successful treatment of Class II malocclusion with bidental protrusion using standard edgewise prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ayaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report deals with the successful orthodontic treatment of a 14-year-old female patient having Class II malocclusion with bidental protrusion using standard edgewise prescription. She reported with forwardly placed upper front teeth and difficulty in closing lips. She had prognathic maxilla, retrognathic mandible, and full cusp Class II molar and canine relation bilaterally with overjet of 7 mm. She was in cervical vertebrae maturation indicator Stage IV. The case was treated by fixed extraction mechanotherapy. Interarch Class II mechanics was used to retract the upper incisor and to mesialize the lower molars. Simultaneously, Class I mechanics was used to upright lower incisors. Tip back bend, curve of Spee, and extra palatal root torque were incorporated in upper archwire to maintain molars in upright position and prevent extrusion and deepening of bite, respectively. There was satisfactory improvement in facial profile at the end of 24 months. After a follow-up of 6 months, occlusion was stable.

  11. HLA Class I and II Blocks Are Associated to Susceptibility, Clinical Subtypes and Autoantibodies in Mexican Systemic Sclerosis (SSc Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana S Rodriguez-Reyna

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA polymorphism studies in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc have yielded variable results. These studies need to consider the genetic admixture of the studied population. Here we used our previously reported definition of genetic admixture of Mexicans using HLA class I and II DNA blocks to map genetic susceptibility to develop SSc and its complications.We included 159 patients from a cohort of Mexican Mestizo SSc patients. We performed clinical evaluation, obtained SSc-associated antibodies, and determined HLA class I and class II alleles using sequence-based, high-resolution techniques to evaluate the contribution of these genes to SSc susceptibility, their correlation with the clinical and autoantibody profile and the prevalence of Amerindian, Caucasian and African alleles, blocks and haplotypes in this population.Our study revealed that class I block HLA-C*12:03-B*18:01 was important to map susceptibility to diffuse cutaneous (dc SSc, HLA-C*07:01-B*08:01 block to map the susceptibility role of HLA-B*08:01 to develop SSc, and the C*07:02-B*39:05 and C*07:02-B*39:06 blocks to map the protective role of C*07:02 in SSc. We also confirmed previous associations of HLA-DRB1*11:04 and -DRB1*01 to susceptibility to develop SSc. Importantly, we mapped the protective role of DQB1*03:01 using three Amerindian blocks. We also found a significant association for the presence of anti-Topoisomerase I antibody with HLA-DQB1*04:02, present in an Amerindian block (DRB1*08:02-DQB1*04:02, and we found several alleles associated to internal organ damage. The admixture estimations revealed a lower proportion of the Amerindian genetic component among SSc patients.This is the first report of the diversity of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotypes Mexican patients with SSc. Our findings suggest that HLA class I and class II genes contribute to the protection and susceptibility to develop SSc and its different clinical presentations as well as

  12. Assessment of upper airways measurements in patients with mandibular skeletal Class II malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayanna Nadja e Silva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mandibular Class II malocclusions seem to interfere in upper airways measurements. The aim of this study was to assess the upper airways measurements of patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion in order to investigate the association between these measurements and the position and length of the mandible as well as mandibular growth trend, comparing the Class II group with a Class I one.Methods:A total of 80 lateral cephalograms from 80 individuals aged between 10 and 17 years old were assessed. Forty radiographs of Class I malocclusion individuals were matched by age with forty radiographs of individuals with mandibular Class II malocclusion. McNamara Jr., Ricketts, Downs and Jarabak's measurements were used for cephalometric evaluation. Data were submitted to descriptive and inferential statistical analysis by means of SPSS 20.0 statistical package. Student's t-test, Pearson correlation and intraclass correlation coefficient were used. A 95% confidence interval and 5% significance level were adopted to interpret the results.Results:There were differences between groups. Oropharynx and nasopharynx sizes as well as mandibular position and length were found to be reduced in Class II individuals. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the size of the oropharynx and Xi-Pm, Co-Gn and SNB measurements. In addition, the size of the nasopharynx was found to be correlated with Xi-Pm, Co-Gn, facial depth, SNB, facial axis and FMA.Conclusion: Individuals with mandibular Class II malocclusion were shown to have upper airways measurements diminished. There was a correlation between mandibular length and position and the size of oropharynx and nasopharynx.

  13. Evaluation of the dental arch asymmetry in natural normal occlusion and Class II malocclusion individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Estevão Scanavini

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify the presence and degree of asymmetry of dental arches in Brazilian individuals with natural normal occlusion and Class II, Divisions 1 and 2 malocclusions. METHODS: The study evaluated the symmetry of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches of 180 pairs of dental casts, divided into: Group I = 60 pairs of natural normal occlusion individuals; Group II = 60 pairs of Class II, Division 1 malocclusion individuals; and Group III = 60 pairs of Class II, Division 2 malocclusion individuals. A device was used to measure dental midline deviation and the canine tip in the dental arches (in degrees. It was also verified the distance of the upper canines from the palatal suture, intercanine distance, and anteroposterior upper and lower first molar position. RESULTS: Dental arches of individuals from all groups presented asymmetry, regardless of the presence of malocclusion. Group I showed a lower asymmetry degree in relation to Groups II and III. The asymmetry in Groups II and III was similar. CONCLUSION: The dental arches of individuals with natural normal occlusion and with Class II, Division 1 and Division 2 malocclusions showed asymmetry. The asymmetry degree was higher in the mandibular dental arches than in the maxillary dental arches in all 3 evaluated groups.

  14. Testes de toxicidade aguda através de bioensaios no extrato solubilizado dos resíduos classe II A - não inertes e classe II B - inertes Acute toxicity tests by bioassays applied to the solubilized extracts of solid wastes class II A - non inerts and class II B - inerts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nébora Liz Vendramin Brasil Rodrigues

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A grande diversidade de substâncias potencialmente tóxicas contribuem para a deterioração do meio ambiente. O objetivo deste trabalho foi propor a utilização de bioensaios, através de testes de toxicidade aguda com Daphnia magna e Vibrio fischeri, como mais um parâmetro a ser analisado no extrato solubilizado dos resíduos que, segundo a NBR 10004/04 fossem classificados como classe II A - não inertes ou classe II B - inertes. Realizaram-se, também, testes de toxicidade no drenado dos aterros classe II A e II B. Verificou-se que a toxicidade foi constatada nos extratos solubilizados dos 18 resíduos analisados e que, apenas três das amostras estariam próprias para lançamento, ou seja os resíduos 04, 14 e 15. Já, a toxicidade encontrada no drenado dos aterros, ficou muito superior do que a toxicidade de cada extrato solubilizado analisado separadamente.A great diversity of substances potencially toxic contributes to the deterioration of the environment. The aim of this research was to propose the use of bioassays using Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri, as another parameter to be analyzed in the solubilized extraction of waste according to NBR 10004/04 and classified as class II A - non inerts or class II B - inerts. Besides, another test was performed to measure the level of toxicity in the drainage of the landfill class II A and II B. It was verified that the toxicity found in the solubilized extracts of the 18 wastes analysed.Only 3 wastes (04, 14 and 15 were within the emission limits. On the other hand the toxicity found in the drainage of the landfill, from which all the samples came from, was much higher than the individual one.

  15. Alternative Ii-independent antigen-processing pathway in leukemic blasts involves TAP-dependent peptide loading of HLA class II complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. van Luijn; M.E.D. Chamuleau; M.E. Ressing; E.J. Wiertz; S. Ostrand-Rosenberg; Y. Souwer; A. Zevenbergen; G.J. Ossenkoppele; A.A. van de Loosdrecht; S.M. Ham

    2010-01-01

    During HLA class II synthesis in antigen-presenting cells, the invariant chain (Ii) not only stabilizes HLA class II complexes in the endoplasmic reticulum, but also mediates their transport to specialized lysosomal antigen-loading compartments termed MIICs. This study explores an alternative HLA cl

  16. Reduced classes and curve counting on surfaces II: calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Kool, M

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the "surface part" of the reduced residue stable pair theory on the canonical bundle $K_S$ of a projective surface $S$. For fixed curve class $\\beta\\in H^2(S)$ the results are entirely topological, depending on $\\beta^2, \\beta.c_1(S), c_1(S)^2, c_2(S), b_1(S)$ and invariants of the ring structure on $H^*(S)$ such as the Pfaffian of $\\beta$ considered as an element of $\\Lambda^2 H^1(S)^*$. We also give conditions under which this calculates the full 3-fold reduced residue theory of $K_S$. This is related to the reduced residue Gromov-Witten theory of $S$ via the MNOP conjecture. When the surface has no holomorphic 2-forms this can be expressed as saying that certain Gromov-Witten invariants of $S$ are topological. Our method uses the results of \\cite{KT1} to express the reduced virtual cycle in terms of Euler classes of bundles over a natural smooth ambient space.

  17. Rapid duplication and loss of nbs-encoding genes in eurosids II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eurosids basically evolved from the core Eudicots Rosids. The Rosids consist of two large assemblages, Eurosids I (Fabids) and Eurosids II (Malvids), which belong to the largest group of Angiosperms, comprising of >40,000 and ∼ 15,000 species, respectively. Although the evolutionary patterns of the largest class of disease resistance genes consisting of a nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) have been studied in many species, systemic research of NBS-encoding genes has not been performed in different orders of Eurosids II. Here, five Eurosids II species, Gossypium raimondii, Theobroma cacao, Carica papaya, Citrus clementina, and Arabidopsis thaliana, distributing in three orders, were used to gain insights into the evolutionary patterns of the NBS-encoding genes. Our data showed that frequent copy number variations of NBS-encoding genes were found among these species. Phylogenetic tree analysis and the numbers of the NBS-encoding genes in the common ancestor of these species showed that species-specific NBS clades, including multi-copy and single copy numbers are dominant among these genes. However, not a single clade was found with only five copies, which come from all of the five species, respectively, suggesting rapid turn-over with birth and death of the NBS-encoding genes among Eurosids II species. In addition, a strong positive correlation was observed between the Toll/interleukin receptor (TIR)) type NBS-encoding genes and species-specific genes, indicating rapid gene loss and duplication. Whereas, non- TIR type NBS-encoding genes in these five species showed two distinct evolutionary patterns. (author)

  18. MHC class II proteins contain a potential binding site for the verotoxin receptor glycolipid CD77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, T; Boyd, B; Price, M; Lingwood, C; Maloney, M

    2001-11-01

    Globotriaosyl ceramide or CD77 functions as a cell surface receptor for toxins of the Shiga toxin/verotoxin family and as a marker for germinal center stage B-cells. The B-cell protein CD19 and the interferon-alpha receptor possess verotoxin-like amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains, and CD77 has been shown to function in CD19-mediated adhesion and interferon-induced growth inhibition. The Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Daudi, is similar to germinal center B-cells in their expression of CD77, CD19 and MHC class II molecules. Using the multiple sequence alignment program, ClustalW, we have identified a verotoxin-like amino acid sequence on the beta-chain of human and murine MHC class II molecules. Binding of CD77 at this site could modulate the peptide-binding properties of these MHC class II molecules. Using Western blot analysis of whole cell extracts, we found that CD77-positive Daudi cells have higher levels of HLA-D proteins than VT500 cells, a Daudi-derived CD77-deficient mutant cell line. In contrast, MHC class II-mediated adhesion and surface expression are similar in the two cell lines. Therefore, CD77 could play a functional or regulatory role in MHC class II-mediated functions specifically relating to antigen presentation by B-cells to T helper cells. PMID:11838965

  19. Alveolar bone thickness and lower incisor position in skeletal Class I and Class II malocclusions assessed with cone-beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Baysal, Asli; Ucar, Faruk Izzet; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmis; Ozer, Torun; Uysal, Tancan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate lower incisor position and bony support between patients with Class II average- and high-angle malocclusions and compare with the patients presenting Class I malocclusions. Methods CBCT records of 79 patients were divided into 2 groups according to sagittal jaw relationships: Class I and II. Each group was further divided into average- and high-angle subgroups. Six angular and 6 linear measurements were performed. Independent samples t-test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn post...

  20. Fixed Lingual Mandibular Growth Modificator: a new appliance for Class II correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Hasan Alali

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This article demonstrates the description and use of a new appliance for Class II correction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case report of a 10-year 5 month-old girl who presented with a skeletally-based Class II division 1 malocclusion (ANB = 6.5º on a slightly low-angle pattern, with ML-NSL angle of 30º and ML-NL angle of 22.5º. Overjet was increased (7 mm and associated with a deep bite. RESULTS: Overjet and overbite reduction was undertaken with the new appliance, Fixed Lingual Mandibular Growth Modificator (FLMGM. CONCLUSION: FLMGM may be effective in stimulating the growth of the mandible and correcting skeletal Class II malocclusions. Clinicians can benefit from the unique clinical advantages that FLMGM provides, such as easy handling and full integration with bracketed appliance at any phase.

  1. Functional recombinant MHC class II molecules and high-throughput peptide-binding assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Sune; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper; Nielsen, Lise-Lotte B; Buus, Søren

    2009-01-01

    . coli , extracted into urea, and purified under denaturing and non-reducing conditions using conventional column chromatography. Subsequently, diluting the two chains into a folding reaction with appropriate peptide resulted in efficient peptide-MHC-II complex formation. Several different formats of......BACKGROUND: Molecules of the class II major histocompability complex (MHC-II) specifically bind and present exogenously derived peptide epitopes to CD4+ T helper cells. The extreme polymorphism of the MHC-II hampers the complete analysis of peptide binding. It is also a significant hurdle in the...... generation of MHC-II molecules as reagents to study and manipulate specific T helper cell responses. Methods to generate functional MHC-II molecules recombinantly, and measure their interaction with peptides, would be highly desirable; however, no consensus methodology has yet emerged. RESULTS: We generated...

  2. Association of class II human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens with rheumatic fever.

    OpenAIRE

    Ayoub, E M; Barrett, D J; Maclaren, N K; Krischer, J P

    1986-01-01

    The association of class I and II HLA antigens with rheumatic fever and its manifestations was examined in 72 patients, including 48 blacks and 24 Caucasians. No significant association was found between class I antigens and rheumatic fever. In contrast, HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR4 phenotypes were encountered in a significantly higher frequency in black and Caucasian patients with rheumatic fever, respectively, compared with the control populations (P less than 0.005). The most significant associatio...

  3. Factors affecting buccal corridor space in Angle′s Class II Division 1 malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Rashmi Bhat; Ravi M. Subrahmanya

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Buccal corridor space has been thought of primarily in terms of maxillary width, but there is also evidence that they are heavily influenced by the antero-posterior position of maxilla. The present study was undertaken with an aim of evaluating and comparing the dental and skeletal factors related to buccal corridor space in individuals having Class I and Class II Division 1 malocclusions. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects of which 40 were males and 40 w...

  4. Relationship between vertical facial patterns and dental arch form in class II malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Grippaudo, Cristina; Oliva, Bruno; Greco, Anna Lucia; Sferra, Simone; Deli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between dental arch form and the vertical facial pattern determined by the angle between the mandibular plane and the anterior cranial base (Sella-nasion/mandibular plane angle (SN-MP)) in skeletal class II untreated patients. Methods A sample of 73 Caucasians patients with untreated skeletal class II in permanent dentition was divided into three groups according to the values of the angle SN-MP. An evaluation of the arch fo...

  5. Is traditional treatment a good option for an adult with a Class II deepbite malocclusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo Quintão, Catia Cardoso; Miguel, Jose Augusto Mendes; Brunharo, Ione Portela; Zanardi, Gustavo; Feu, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    The Tweed-Merrifield directional force technique is a useful treatment approach for a patient with a Class II malocclusion with dentoalveolar protrusion. The purpose of this case report was to present the diagnosis and treatment descriptions of a patient with an Angle Class II malocclusion complicated by tooth losses, severe dentoalveolar protrusion, and skeletal discrepancy. Treatment involved extraction of the maxillary first premolars, high-pull headgear to enhance anchorage, and high-pull J-hook headgear to retract and intrude the maxillary anterior segments. A successful outcome was achieved with traditional orthodontic treatment in this borderline surgical case. PMID:22196191

  6. Stability of molar relationship after non-extraction Class II malocclusion treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Darwin Vaz de Lima; Karina Maria Salvatore de Freitas; Marcos Roberto de Freitas; Guilherme Janson; José Fernando Castanha Henriques; Arnaldo Pinzan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the stability of molar relationship after non-extraction treatment of Class II malocclusion. METHODS: The sample comprised 39 subjects (16 females, 23 males) with initial Class II malocclusion treated with no extractions, using fixed appliances. Mean age at the beginning of treatment was 12.94 years, at the end of treatment was 15.14 years and at post-retention stage was 21.18 years. Mean treatment time was 2.19 years and mean time of post-treatment eva...

  7. Diversity at the major histocompatibility complex Class II in the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Mette; Woodward, Rachael E; Sanderson, Claire E; Eldridge, Mark D B; Belov, Katherine

    2012-07-01

    The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is the sole survivor of a previously widely distributed and diverse lineage of ornithorhynchid monotremes. Its dependence on healthy water systems imposes an inherent sensitivity to habitat degradation and climate change. Here, we compare genetic diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II-DZB gene and 3 MHC-associated microsatellite markers with diversity at 6 neutral microsatellite markers in 70 platypuses from across their range, including the mainland of Australia and the isolated populations of Tasmania, King Island, and Kangaroo Island. Overall, high DZB diversity was observed in the platypus, with 57 DZB β1 alleles characterized. Significant positive selection was detected within the DZB peptide-binding region, promoting variation in this domain. Low levels of genetic diversity were detected at all markers in the 2 island populations, King Island (endemic) and Kangaroo Island (introduced), with the King Island platypuses monomorphic at the DZB locus. Loss of MHC diversity on King Island is of concern, as the population may have compromised immunological fitness and reduced ability to resist changing environmental conditions. PMID:22563128

  8. Restriction fragment length polymorphism within the class I gene loci of the equine major histocompatibility complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen standard bred horses were serotyped as homozygous for 1 of 6 Equine Leukocyte Antigen (ELA) specificities. DNA was purified from peripheral leukocytes and digested with Hind III or Pvu II. Southern blot hybridization analysis was carried out using a 32P-labeled mouse cDNA probe (PH2IIa) specific for class I MHC genes. Both enzymes generated blots that contained a large number of bands (23 to 30) per horse. Significant polymorphism existed among most fragment sizes, while a dozen highly conserved band sizes suggested the presence of Qa/tla - like genes. Only 2 animals (both W6's) showed identical band patterns. Polymorphism was greatest between horses of different serotypes and was significantly decreased within serotypes. Unique bands were present on both blots for both W1's and W6's and may account for the serologic specificity seen in ELA W1 and W6 horses. This study is consistent with the findings in other higher vertebrates and implies that the MHC of the horse includes a highly polymorphic class I multigene family

  9. A Review of Class I and Class II Pet Food Recalls Involving Chemical Contaminants from 1996 to 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Rumbeiha, Wilson; Morrison, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    Commercial pet food in USA is generally safe, but adulteration does occur. Adulterated food has to be recalled to protect pets and public health. All stakeholders, including food firms, distributors, and government agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) participate in food recall. The objective of this review is to describe the pet food recall procedure from start to finish, and to review class I and II pet food recalls from 1996 to 2008, with a specific focus on those due to...

  10. Effect of gliadin and other food peptides on expression of MHC class II molecules by HT-29 cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Mothes, T; Bendix, U; Pfannschmidt, C; Lehmann, I

    1995-01-01

    Expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecules by enterocytes is known to be enhanced in coeliac disease and other disorders characterised by intestinal inflammation--an effect thought to be mediated via intestinal lymphocytes. To investigate if food peptides can exert direct effects on class II expression, the influence of gliadins, casein, and beta lactoglobulin on an intestinal epithelial cell line (HT-29) was examined in the absence of immune cells. Class II expression wa...

  11. Towards universal structure-based prediction of class II MHC epitopes for diverse allotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Bordner

    Full Text Available The binding of peptide fragments of antigens to class II MHC proteins is a crucial step in initiating a helper T cell immune response. The discovery of these peptide epitopes is important for understanding the normal immune response and its misregulation in autoimmunity and allergies and also for vaccine design. In spite of their biomedical importance, the high diversity of class II MHC proteins combined with the large number of possible peptide sequences make comprehensive experimental determination of epitopes for all MHC allotypes infeasible. Computational methods can address this need by predicting epitopes for a particular MHC allotype. We present a structure-based method for predicting class II epitopes that combines molecular mechanics docking of a fully flexible peptide into the MHC binding cleft followed by binding affinity prediction using a machine learning classifier trained on interaction energy components calculated from the docking solution. Although the primary advantage of structure-based prediction methods over the commonly employed sequence-based methods is their applicability to essentially any MHC allotype, this has not yet been convincingly demonstrated. In order to test the transferability of the prediction method to different MHC proteins, we trained the scoring method on binding data for DRB1*0101 and used it to make predictions for multiple MHC allotypes with distinct peptide binding specificities including representatives from the other human class II MHC loci, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ, as well as for two murine allotypes. The results showed that the prediction method was able to achieve significant discrimination between epitope and non-epitope peptides for all MHC allotypes examined, based on AUC values in the range 0.632-0.821. We also discuss how accounting for peptide binding in multiple registers to class II MHC largely explains the systematically worse performance of prediction methods for class II MHC compared with

  12. Towards universal structure-based prediction of class II MHC epitopes for diverse allotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordner, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    The binding of peptide fragments of antigens to class II MHC proteins is a crucial step in initiating a helper T cell immune response. The discovery of these peptide epitopes is important for understanding the normal immune response and its misregulation in autoimmunity and allergies and also for vaccine design. In spite of their biomedical importance, the high diversity of class II MHC proteins combined with the large number of possible peptide sequences make comprehensive experimental determination of epitopes for all MHC allotypes infeasible. Computational methods can address this need by predicting epitopes for a particular MHC allotype. We present a structure-based method for predicting class II epitopes that combines molecular mechanics docking of a fully flexible peptide into the MHC binding cleft followed by binding affinity prediction using a machine learning classifier trained on interaction energy components calculated from the docking solution. Although the primary advantage of structure-based prediction methods over the commonly employed sequence-based methods is their applicability to essentially any MHC allotype, this has not yet been convincingly demonstrated. In order to test the transferability of the prediction method to different MHC proteins, we trained the scoring method on binding data for DRB1*0101 and used it to make predictions for multiple MHC allotypes with distinct peptide binding specificities including representatives from the other human class II MHC loci, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ, as well as for two murine allotypes. The results showed that the prediction method was able to achieve significant discrimination between epitope and non-epitope peptides for all MHC allotypes examined, based on AUC values in the range 0.632-0.821. We also discuss how accounting for peptide binding in multiple registers to class II MHC largely explains the systematically worse performance of prediction methods for class II MHC compared with those for class I MHC

  13. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA): a screening study to measure class II skeletal pattern, TMJ PDS and use of systemic corticosteroids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mandall, Nicky A

    2010-03-01

    To screen patients with oligoarticular and polyarticular forms of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) to determine (i) the severity of their class II skeletal pattern; (ii) temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms and (iii) use of systemic corticosteroids.

  14. Biochemical Characterization of the Split Class II Ribonucleotide Reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Crona

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can grow under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Its flexibility with respect to oxygen load is reflected by the fact that its genome encodes all three existing classes of ribonucleotides reductase (RNR: the oxygen-dependent class I RNR, the oxygen-indifferent class II RNR, and the oxygen-sensitive class III RNR. The P. aeruginosa class II RNR is expressed as two separate polypeptides (NrdJa and NrdJb, a unique example of a split RNR enzyme in a free-living organism. A split class II RNR is also found in a few closely related γ-Proteobacteria. We have characterized the P. aeruginosa class II RNR and show that both subunits are required for formation of a biologically functional enzyme that can sustain vitamin B12-dependent growth. Binding of the B12 coenzyme as well as substrate and allosteric effectors resides in the NrdJa subunit, whereas the NrdJb subunit mediates efficient reductive dithiol exchange during catalysis. A combination of activity assays and activity-independent methods like surface plasmon resonance and gas phase electrophoretic macromolecule analysis suggests that the enzymatically active form of the enzyme is a (NrdJa-NrdJb2 homodimer of heterodimers, and a combination of hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments and molecular modeling suggests a plausible region in NrdJa that interacts with NrdJb. Our detailed characterization of the split NrdJ from P. aeruginosa provides insight into the biochemical function of a unique enzyme known to have central roles in biofilm formation and anaerobic growth.

  15. Association of HLA class II alleles and CTLA-4 polymorphism with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana J EI Wafai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is a progressive complex autoimmune disease in which combinations of environmental as well as genetic factors contribute to T-cell mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells of the pancreas. HLA class II alleles on chromosome 6p21 [insulin dependent diabetes mellitus 1 (IDDM1], especially DR and DQ, show strong association with T1DM. In addition, several studies have suggested that polymorphisms in the CTLA-4 gene (IDDM12 on chromosome 2q33 form part of the genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to analyze HLA alleles of the DQB1 and DRB1 genes using polymerase chain reaction using sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP technique and to investigate the asso-ciation of the A49G CTLA-4 polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in Lebanese T1DM patients. The study was conduc-ted on 39 Lebanese T1DM patients. Results of HLA typing showed an increased frequency of the HLA-DQB1FNx010201, HLA-DQB1FNx010302, HLA-DRB1FNx010301 and HLA-DRB1FNx010401 alleles, sugges-ting risk association and thus can be considered as susceptibility alleles. On the other hand, strong protection against the disease was conferred by the HLA-DRB1FNx01110101, HLA-DQB1FNx010301 and HLADQB1FNx010601 alleles. RFLP analysis of the A49G polymorphism showed a significant increase in the G allele and GG genotype frequencies in patients, suggesting that CTLA-4 may be considered as a susceptibility gene for the development of T1DM in the Lebanese population. Analysis of the two polymorphisms showed no detectable association between the two genes. However, a significant negative association of the G allele with the DQB1FNx010201 allele was ob-served. This might indicate that the two genetic risk factors, namely HLA and CTLA-4, act independently of each other with no additive effect.

  16. Novel streptomycin and spectinomycin resistance gene as a gene cassette within a class 1 integron isolated from Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aadA genes, encoding resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin, have been found as gene cassettes in different gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial species. The present study has revealed the sequence of a new gene, aadA5, integrated as a gene cassette together with the trimethoprim r...... resistance gene dfr7 in a class 1 integron. The integron was located on a plasmid and was identified in a pathogenic porcine Escherichia coli isolate....

  17. Major histocompatibility complex class II-associated p41 invariant chain fragment is a strong inhibitor of lysosomal cathepsin L

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) is associated with major histocompatibility complex class II molecules during early stages of their intracellular transport. In an acidic endosomal/lysosomal compartment, it is proteolytically cleaved and removed from class II heterodimers. Participation of aspartic and cysteine proteases has been observed in in vitro degradation of Ii, but the specific enzymes responsible for its in vivo processing are as yet undefined. We have previously isolated a noncovalent compl...

  18. Comparison of interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns using cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumsarn, Nattida; Patanaporn, Virush; Jotikasthira, Dhirawat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated and compared interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods Pretreatment CBCT images of 24 Thai orthodontic patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns were included in the study. Three measurements were chosen for investigation: the mesiodistal distance between the roots, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness. All distances were recorded at five different levels from the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Descriptive statistical analysis and t-tests were performed, with the significance level for all tests set at p<0.05. Results Patients with a Class II skeletal pattern showed significantly greater maxillary mesiodistal distances (between the first and second premolars) and widths of the buccolingual alveolar process (between the first and second molars) than Class I skeletal pattern patients at 10 mm above the CEJ. The maxillary buccal cortical bone thicknesses between the second premolar and first molar at 8 mm above the CEJ in Class II patients were likewise significantly greater than in Class I patients. Patients with a Class I skeletal pattern showed significantly wider mandibular buccolingual alveolar processes than did Class II patients (between the first and second molars) at 4, 6, and 8 mm below the CEJ. Conclusion In both the maxilla and mandible, the mesiodistal distances, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness tended to increase from the CEJ to the apex in both Class I and Class II skeletal patterns. PMID:27358819

  19. A class V chitinase from Arabidopsis thaliana: gene responses, enzymatic properties, and crystallographic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohnuma, Takayuki; Numata, Tomoyuki; Osawa, Takuo;

    2011-01-01

    Expression of a class V chitinase gene (At4g19810, AtChiC) in Arabidopsis thaliana was examined by quantitative real-time PCR and by analyzing microarray data available at Genevestigator. The gene expression was induced by the plant stress-related hormones abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA...... common to class V chitinases from higher plants....

  20. Lack of association between parenchymal neurocysticercosis and HLA Class I and Class II antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Picchioni Bompeixe

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis, caused by encysted larvae of the tapeworm Taenia solium, is the most common infection of the central nervous system and a major public health problem in many countries. Prevalence in the region of Curitiba, located in the southern Brazilian State of Paraná, is one of the highest in the world. The genetics of host susceptibility to neurocysticercosis (NCC is still obscure. To investigate if major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes influence individual susceptibility to NCC, we performed a case-control association analysis. Fifty-two Caucasoid patients and 149 matched controls were typed for antigens of the HLA-A, B, C, DR and DQ loci. All patients had computerized tomography and clinical features compatible with parenchymal NCC. Indirect immunofluorescence of cerebrospinal fluid showed that 19 (37% of the patients presented anti-cysticercus antibodies at titers ³ 1:10. Frequencies of HLA specificities in the whole group of patients and in the subgroup with antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid were compared to those of the control group. No significant difference was found. These results do not support the hypothesis of HLA gene participation in susceptibility to parenchymal neurocysticercosis.A neurocisticercose, causada pelo cisticerco, a larva do cestóide Taenia solium, é a infecção mais comum do sistema nervoso central e constitui importante problema de saúde pública em muitos países. A sua prevalência na região de Curitiba, localizada no Estado do Paraná, foi estimada em 9%, situando-se entre as mais elevadas do mundo. Os aspectos genéticos de suscetibilidade à neurocisticercose (NCC ainda são pouco conhecidos. Com o objetivo de investigar se genes do MHC influenciam a suscetibilidade individual à NCC, realizamos uma análise de associação caso-controle. Cinqüenta e dois pacientes caucasóides e 149 indivíduos-controle pareados foram tipados para antígenos dos locos HLA-A, B, C, DR e DQ. Todos os

  1. 37 GHz Methanol Masers : Horsemen of the Apocalypse for the Class II Methanol Maser Phase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  2. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Sobolev, A. M. [Astronomical Observatory, Ural Federal University, Lenin avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Lo, N., E-mail: Simon.Ellingsen@utas.edu.au [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago, Casilla 36-D (Chile)

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  3. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  4. 37 GHz methanol masers : Horsemen of the Apocalypse for the class II methanol maser phase?

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, S P; Sobolev, A M; Voronkov, M A; Caswell, J L; Lo, N

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3 and 38.5 GHz towards a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched towards regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesised to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  5. Oral HPV infection and MHC class II deficiency (A study of two cases with atypical outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guirat-Dhouib Naouel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex class II deficiency, also referred to as bare lymphocyte syndrome is a rare primary Immunodeficiency disorder characterized by a profondly deficient human leukocyte antigen class II expression and a lack of cellular and humoral immune responses to foreign antigens. Clinical manifestations include extreme susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections. The infections begin in the first year of life and involve usually the respiratory system and the gastrointestinal tract. Severe malabsorption with failure to thrive ensues, often leading to death in early childhood. Bone marrow transplantation is the curative treatment. Case reports Here we report two cases with a late outcome MHC class II deficiency. They had a long term history of recurrent bronchopulmonary and gastrointestinal infections. Bone marrow transplantation could not be performed because no compatible donor had been identified. At the age of 12 years, they developed oral papillomatous lesions related to HPV (human papillomavirus. The diagnosis of HPV infection was done by histological examination. HPV typing performed on the tissue obtained at biopsy showed HPV type 6. The lesions were partially removed after two months of laser treatment. Conclusions Viral infections are common in patients with MHC class II and remain the main cause of death. Besides warts caused by HPV infection do not exhibit a propensity for malignant transformation; they can cause great psychosocial morbidity.

  6. 78 FR 14015 - Medical Devices; Exemption From Premarket Notification; Class II Devices; Powered Patient Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ..., 1998 (63 FR 3142). Section 510(m)(2) of the FD&C Act provides that FDA may exempt a device from..., p. 3.) In the Federal Register of June 1, 2012 (77 FR 32642), FDA published a notice announcing that... against the criteria laid out in the Class II 510(k) Exemption Guidance and in 63 FR 3142, and agrees...

  7. The effect of anterior inclined plane treatment on the dentoskeletal of Class II division 1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emami Meibodi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of Class II malocclusions are due to underdeveloped mandible with increased overjet and overbite. Lack of incisal contact results in the extrusion of the upper and lower anterior dentoalveolar complex, which helps to lock the mandible and prevent its normal growth and development, and this abnormality is exaggerated by soft tissue imbalance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the skeletal and dental changes in patients treated with anterior inclined plane appliance in growing patients with moderate Class II Division 1 having deep overbite. In this study, 25 patients, including 15 girls and 10 boys, with a mean age of 9 ±1.2 years were selected; all of them presented with moderate Class II deep bite with increased overjet and normal or horizontal growth pattern. Pre- and post-treatment X-rays and photos for an average of 8 months were taken. The statistical assessment of the data suggested that there were no significant changes in the vertical skeletal parameters. The mandibular incisors were protruded, whereas the maxillary incisors were retruded. Overbite and overjet were also reduced. There was significant increase in the mandibular length. The results revealed that in mixed dentition patients, the inclined plane corrected Class II discrepancies mostly through dentoskeletal changes.

  8. 75 FR 17093 - Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices; Designation of Special Controls for Certain Class II...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... Physical Medicine Devices; Designation of Special Controls for Certain Class II Devices and Exemption From... and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend certain neurological device and physical medicine.... Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is publishing a notice of availability of...

  9. High-resolution analysis of the murine MHC class II immunopeptidome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofron, Adriana; Ritz, Danilo; Neri, Dario; Fugmann, Tim

    2016-02-01

    The reliable identification of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II is fundamental for the study of the host immune response against pathogens and the pathogenesis of autoimmune conditions. Here, we describe an improved methodology combining immuno-affinity enrichment of MHC class II complexes, optimized elution conditions and quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry-based characterization of the immunopeptidome. The methodology allowed the identification of over 1000 peptides with 1% false discovery rate from 10(8) murine A20 lymphoma cells. The study revealed the I-A(d) -specific motif in high resolution after multisequence alignment. The methodology was generally applied to the purification of MHC class II from cell lines and murine spleens. We identified 2963 peptides from BALB/c and 2712 from C57BL/6 mouse spleens. The identification of peptides bound to MHC class II in vitro and in vivo will facilitate the characterization of T-cell specificities, as well as the development of biotherapeutics and vaccines. PMID:26495903

  10. Very few indications justify early treatment for severe Class II malocclusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Yijin

    2004-01-01

    DESIGN: This was a single-centre two-phased, parallel, randomised clinical trial (RCT) conducted over a period of more than 10 years. INTERVENTION: Children were enrolled who had severe (=7 mm overjet) Class II malocclusions and who were developmentally at least a year before their peak pubertal gro

  11. 77 FR 58473 - Minimum Technical Standards for Class II Gaming Systems and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... Class II Games. 73 FR 60508. The rule added a new part to the Commission's regulations establishing a.... 75 FR 70680. On April 4, 2011, after consulting with tribes and reviewing all comments, the NIGC... review. 76 FR 18457. Part 547 was included in the third regulatory group reviewed pursuant to the NRR....

  12. Current Teaching of Proximal Retention Grooves for Class II Amalgam Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David L.

    1992-01-01

    A survey gathered information on methods of class II amalgam preparation taught in 59 dental schools. Focus was on the teaching and testing of proximal retention groove use, stated rationale for placing retention grooves, and the relationship of the instruction to board criteria for cavity preparation. (MSE)

  13. Guided tissue regeneration in the treatment of class II furcation defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Miranda DELIBERADOR

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Numerous surgical techniques have been evaluated toattempt the regeneration of furcation defects. Objective and literature review: Among the regenerative techniques, guided tissue regeneration(GTR has been largely used in the treatment of class II furcation defects, the main indication for GTR. Several clinical studies have compared the GTR technique with surgical debridement alone for the treatment of class II furcation defects in mandibular molars. A number of membrane materials have been tested in those studies.Varying results have been observed using non-absorbable expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE membranes. In some studies, the difference between the treatments was not clinically significant. When second generation absorbable membranes were used, the clinicalresults were also variable. However, some clinical studies foundfavorable results using the GTR technique, especially when a polylactic acid membrane was used. Similar modest results were observed when absorbable and non-absorbable membranes were compared clinically in the treatment of class II furcation defects in mandibular molars.Significant differences were not found between the membranes for most of the clinical parameters evaluated.Conclusion: Considering the literature, it can be concluded that the use of GTR for the treatment of mandibular molars with class II furcation defects yielded highly variable and unpredictable results.

  14. 40 CFR 82.19 - Apportionment of baseline consumption allowances for class II controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apportionment of baseline consumption allowances for class II controlled substances. 82.19 Section 82.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls §...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Class II Controlled Substances a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class II Controlled Substances a B Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. B Appendix B to Subpart A...

  16. 40 CFR 82.24 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements for class II controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordkeeping and reporting requirements for class II controlled substances. 82.24 Section 82.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.24 Recordkeeping...

  17. 40 CFR 82.17 - Apportionment of baseline production allowances for class II controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apportionment of baseline production allowances for class II controlled substances. 82.17 Section 82.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls §...

  18. ZAP-70 and p72syk are signaling response elements through MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanner, S B; Grosmaire, L S; Blake, J;

    1995-01-01

    -activated human T-cells. In both tonsillar B-lymphocytes and B-cell leukemia lines, p72syk was rapidly phosphorylated on tyrosine residues following HLA-DR cross-linking. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p72syk induced through ligation of either the B-cell antigen receptor or class II molecules was potently inhibited...... intracellular calcium. Similar responses have been observed in B-cells following stimulation of MHC class II molecules, including the increased production of intracellular cAMP. In this report, we demonstrate that the ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase is a responsive signaling element following cross-linking of HLA-DR in...... antibody induced receptor ligation, bacterial superantigen (SEA and SEB) treatment of HLA-DR+ T-cells stimulated ZAP-70 tyrosine phosphorylation, consistent with class II transmembrane signaling by ligation of HLA-DR and V beta in cis. Modulation of the TCR/CD3 led to abrogation of class II induced ZAP-70...

  19. 78 FR 42942 - Clean Water Act Class II: Proposed Administrative Settlement, Penalty Assessment and Opportunity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... corporate audit agreement pursuant to EPA's policy on Incentives for Self- Policing: Discovery, Disclosure, Correction and Prevention of Violations (Audit Policy), 65 FR 19618 (Apr. 11, 2000), regarding 88 office... AGENCY Clean Water Act Class II: Proposed Administrative Settlement, Penalty Assessment and...

  20. 75 FR 4552 - Clean Water Act Class II: Proposed Administrative Settlement, Penalty Assessment, and Opportunity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ... Violations Final Policy Statement (Audit Policy), 65 FR 19618 (Apr. 11, 2000). Hydro also provided supplemental audit reports in 2006 and 2007. EPA and Hydro have signed an administrative Consent Agreement... AGENCY Clean Water Act Class II: Proposed Administrative Settlement, Penalty Assessment, and...

  1. 78 FR 5800 - Clean Water Act Class II: Proposed Administrative Settlement, Penalty Assessment and Opportunity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ..., Correction and Prevention of Violations (Audit Policy), 65 FR 19,618 (April 11, 2000). EPA determined that AboveNet's disclosures satisfied all the conditions set forth in the Audit Policy, and therefore qualify... AGENCY Clean Water Act Class II: Proposed Administrative Settlement, Penalty Assessment and...

  2. Activation of ERα signaling differentially modulates IFN-γ induced HLA-class II expression in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A Mostafa

    Full Text Available The coordinate regulation of HLA class II (HLA-II is controlled by the class II transactivator, CIITA, and is crucial for the development of anti-tumor immunity. HLA-II in breast carcinoma is associated with increased IFN-γ levels, reduced expression of the estrogen receptor (ER and reduced age at diagnosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that estradiol (E₂ and ERα signaling contribute to the regulation of IFN-γ inducible HLA-II in breast cancer cells. Using a panel of established ER⁻ and ER⁺ breast cancer cell lines, we showed that E₂ attenuated HLA-DR in two ER⁺ lines (MCF-7 and BT-474, but not in T47D, while it augmented expression in ER⁻ lines, SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB-231. To further study the mechanism(s, we used paired transfectants: ERα⁺ MC2 (MDA-MB-231 c10A transfected with the wild type ERα gene and ERα⁻ VC5 (MDA-MB-231 c10A transfected with the empty vector, treated or not with E₂ and IFN-γ. HLA-II and CIITA were severely reduced in MC2 compared to VC5 and were further exacerbated by E₂ treatment. Reduced expression occurred at the level of the IFN-γ inducible CIITA promoter IV. The anti-estrogen ICI 182,780 and gene silencing with ESR1 siRNA reversed the E2 inhibitory effects, signifying an antagonistic role for activated ERα on CIITA pIV activity. Moreover, STAT1 signaling, necessary for CIITA pIV activation, and selected STAT1 regulated genes were variably downregulated by E₂ in transfected and endogenous ERα positive breast cancer cells, whereas STAT1 signaling was noticeably augmented in ERα⁻ breast cancer cells. Collectively, these results imply immune escape mechanisms in ERα⁺ breast cancer may be facilitated through an ERα suppressive mechanism on IFN-γ signaling.

  3. Oligoclonal band phenotypes in MS differ in their HLA class II association, while specific KIR ligands at HLA class I show association to MS in general

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsen, Marte W; Viken, Marte K; Celius, Elisabeth G;

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been reported to have different HLA class II allele profiles depending on oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid, but HLA class I alleles and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands have not been studied. We investigated the...... association of HLA alleles and KIR ligands according to OCB status in MS patients (n=3876). Specific KIR ligands were associated with patients when compared to controls (n=3148), supporting a role for NK cells in MS pathogenesis. HLA class I alleles and KIR ligands did not differ between OCB phenotypes, but...... HLA class II associations were convincingly replicated....

  4. Predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Lin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptides binding to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class II molecules are crucial for initiation and regulation of immune responses. Predicting peptides that bind to a specific MHC molecule plays an important role in determining potential candidates for vaccines. The binding groove in class II MHC is open at both ends, allowing peptides longer than 9-mer to bind. Finding the consensus motif facilitating the binding of peptides to a MHC class II molecule is difficult because of different lengths of binding peptides and varying location of 9-mer binding core. The level of difficulty increases when the molecule is promiscuous and binds to a large number of low affinity peptides. In this paper, we propose two approaches using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEA for predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. One uses the information from both binders and non-binders for self-discovery of motifs. The other, in addition, uses information from experimentally determined motifs for guided-discovery of motifs. Results The proposed methods are intended for finding peptides binding to MHC class II I-Ag7 molecule – a promiscuous binder to a large number of low affinity peptides. Cross-validation results across experiments on two motifs derived for I-Ag7 datasets demonstrate better generalization abilities and accuracies of the present method over earlier approaches. Further, the proposed method was validated and compared on two publicly available benchmark datasets: (1 an ensemble of qualitative HLA-DRB1*0401 peptide data obtained from five different sources, and (2 quantitative peptide data obtained for sixteen different alleles comprising of three mouse alleles and thirteen HLA alleles. The proposed method outperformed earlier methods on most datasets, indicating that it is well suited for finding peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. Conclusion We present two MOEA-based algorithms for finding motifs

  5. A randomized controlled 27 years follow up of three resin composites in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the durability of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations during 27 years. Methods: Thirty participants, 25 female and 5 male (mean age 38.2 years, range 25–63), received at least three (one set) as similar as possible Class II restorations of moderate...... size. The three cavities were chosen at random to be restored with a chemical-cured (Clearfil Posterior) and two visible light-cured resin composites (Adaptic II, Occlusin). A chemical-cured enamel bonding agent (Clearfil New Bond) was applied after Ca(OH)2 covering of dentin and enamel etch. Marginal.......1%), followed by occlusal wear (21.6%) and material fracture (18.9%). Non-acceptable color match was seen in 24 (28.3%) of the restorations (AII 2, CP 16, O 6). Cox regression-analysis showed significant influence of the covariates tooth type, caries risk, and bruxing activity of the participants. Conclusions...

  6. Subclassification of Recursive Partitioning Analysis Class II Patients With Brain Metastases Treated Radiosurgically

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: BCD06275@nifty.com [Katsuta Hospital Mito GammaHouse, Hitachi-naka (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Medical Center East, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, Yasunori [Clinical Research Center, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Serizawa, Toru [Tokyo Gamma Unit Center, Tsukiji Neurologic Clinic, Tokyo (Japan); Kawabe, Takuya [Katsuta Hospital Mito GammaHouse, Hitachi-naka (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Higuchi, Yoshinori [Department of Neurosurgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Nagano, Osamu [Gamma Knife House, Chiba Cardiovascular Center, Ichihara (Japan); Barfod, Bierta E. [Katsuta Hospital Mito GammaHouse, Hitachi-naka (Japan); Ono, Junichi [Gamma Knife House, Chiba Cardiovascular Center, Ichihara (Japan); Kasuya, Hidetoshi [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Medical Center East, Tokyo (Japan); Urakawa, Yoichi [Katsuta Hospital Mito GammaHouse, Hitachi-naka (Japan)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Although the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class is generally used for predicting survival periods of patients with brain metastases (METs), the majority of such patients are Class II and clinical factors vary quite widely within this category. This prompted us to divide RPA Class II patients into three subclasses. Methods and Materials: This was a two-institution, institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study using two databases: the Mito series (2,000 consecutive patients, comprising 787 women and 1,213 men; mean age, 65 years [range, 19-96 years]) and the Chiba series (1,753 patients, comprising 673 female and 1,080 male patients; mean age, 65 years [range, 7-94 years]). Both patient series underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery alone, without whole-brain radiotherapy, for brain METs during the same 10-year period, July 1998 through June 2008. The Cox proportional hazard model with a step-wise selection procedure was used for multivariate analysis. Results: In the Mito series, four factors were identified as favoring longer survival: Karnofsky Performance Status (90% to 100% vs. 70% to 80%), tumor numbers (solitary vs. multiple), primary tumor status (controlled vs. not controlled), and non-brain METs (no vs. yes). This new index is the sum of scores (0 and 1) of these four factors: RPA Class II-a, score of 0 or 1; RPA Class II-b, score of 2; and RPA Class II-c, score of 3 or 4. Next, using the Chiba series, we tested whether our index is valid for a different patient group. This new system showed highly statistically significant differences among subclasses in both the Mito series and the Chiba series (p < 0.001 for all subclasses). In addition, this new index was confirmed to be applicable to Class II patients with four major primary tumor sites, that is, lung, breast, alimentary tract, and urogenital organs. Conclusions: Our new grading system should be considered when designing future clinical trials involving brain MET

  7. Targeted and random bacterial gene disruption using a group II intron (targetron) vector containing a retrotransposition-activated selectable marker

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Jin; Karberg, Michael; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2003-01-01

    Mobile group II introns have been used to develop a novel class of gene targeting vectors, targetrons, which employ base pairing for DNA target recognition and can thus be programmed to insert into any desired target DNA. Here, we have developed a targetron containing a retrotransposition-activated selectable marker (RAM), which enables one-step bacterial gene disruption at near 100% efficiency after selection. The targetron can be generated via PCR without cloning, and after intron integrati...

  8. 76 FR 6622 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... cooling systems for aesthetic use may comply with the requirement of special controls for class II devices..., FDA is publishing a final rule classifying contact cooling systems for aesthetic use into class II... current thinking on contact cooling systems for aesthetic use. It does not create or confer any rights...

  9. HLA class II expression by Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg cells is an independent prognostic factor in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepstra, Arjan; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.; Karim-Kos, Henrike E.; van den Berg, Anke; te Meerman, Gerard J.; Niens, Marijke; Nolte, Ilja M.; Bastiaannet, Esther; Schaapveld, Michael; Vellenga, Edo; Poppema, Sibrand

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The neoplastic Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg ( HRS) cells in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma ( cHL) are derived from B cells. The frequency of HLA class II downregulation and its effect on prognosis are unknown. Patients and Methods Immunohistochemistry results for HLA class II were evaluated in 292 p

  10. 40 CFR 144.21 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. 144.21 Section 144.21 Protection of Environment... hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. (a) An existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... decision; or (9) For Class II wells (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage), five years...

  11. 75 FR 70271 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT).'' This guidance document describes a means by which non-powered suction apparatus devices intended for NPWT may comply with the requirement of special controls for class II devices... suction apparatus devices intended for NPWT into class II (special controls). This guidance document...

  12. 25 CFR 547.12 - What are the minimum technical standards for downloading on a Class II gaming system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... on a Class II gaming system? 547.12 Section 547.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR GAMING EQUIPMENT USED WITH THE PLAY... gaming system? This section provides standards for downloading on a Class II gaming system. (a)...

  13. 25 CFR 547.7 - What are the minimum technical hardware standards applicable to Class II gaming systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... authority. (k) Door access detection. All components of the Class II gaming system that are locked in order... Class II gaming system component that reads account access media shall be located within a secure... direct control of a gaming operation employee or agent shall be located within a secure, locked...

  14. 25 CFR 547.9 - What are the minimum technical standards for Class II gaming system accounting functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR GAMING EQUIPMENT USED WITH THE PLAY... instrument accepted by the Class II gaming system shall be tracked independently per financial instrument... attendant pay. Each type of financial instrument paid by the Class II Gaming System shall be...

  15. The Microfloral Analysis of Secondary Caries Biofilm around Class I and Class II Composite and Amalgam Fillings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Si-su

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary caries is responsible for 60 percent of all replacement restorations in the typical dental practice. The diversity of the bacterial sources and the different types of filling materials could play a role in secondary caries. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the microbial spectrum of secondary caries biofilms around amalgam and composite resin restorations. Methods Clinical samples were collected from freshly extracted teeth diagnosed with clinical secondary caries. Samples were categorized into four groups according to the types of restoration materials and the classification of the cavity. Biofilms were harvested from the tooth-restoration interface using a dental explorer and after dilution were incubated on special agars. The bacteria were identified using the biochemical appraisal system. Statistical calculations were carried out using SPSS11.5 software to analyze the prevalence of the bacteria involved in secondary caries. Results Samples from a total of four groups were collected: two groups were collected from amalgam restorations, each had 21 samples from both Class I and Class II caries; and the other two groups were from composite resin restorations, each had 13 samples from both class I and class II caries. Our results showed: (1 Anaerobic species were dominant in both restoration materials. (2 In terms of the types of individual bacteria, no significant differences were found among the four groups according to the geometric mean of the detected bacteria (P > 0.05. However, there were significant differences among the detected bacteria within each group (P 0.05, but showed significant differences among the detected bacteria in each group (P 0.05, however, the detection rate of each bacterium within each group was statistically different among the detected bacteria (P Conclusions The proportion of obligatory anaerobic species was much greater than the facultative anaerobic species in the

  16. The algR gene, which regulates mucoidy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, belongs to a class of environmentally responsive genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Deretic, V; Dikshit, R; Konyecsni, W M; Chakrabarty, A. M.; Misra, T K

    1989-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa capsule, composed of polysaccharide alginate, is an important Pseudomonas virulence factor encountered primarily in cystic fibrosis. The regulatory algR gene positively controls transcription of a key alginate biosynthetic gene, algD. The algR gene was subcloned and sequenced by creating a set of nested deletions in M13 bacteriophage. DNA sequence analysis of algR revealed the homology of its gene product with a recently recognized class of environmentally responsiv...

  17. Orthodontic treatment of nongrowing patient with class II division 2 malocclusion by Herbst appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljković Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inheritance is most casual etiological factor of Class II division 2 malocclusion. This kind of malocclusion is very difficult for treatment specially in older patients. Case report. In the female patient, 20 years old, at the beginning of the treatment at the School of Dentistry in Belgrade, lateral cephalogram showed skeletal and dentoalveolar Class II division 2 malocclusion. She was in the Herbst treatment for 8 months and 12 months more with a fixed multibracket appliance. The measurements were performed on lateral cephalograms before and after the treatment: ii, is, mi, ms, Pg and ss. The distance from these points to occlusal perpendicular line (Olp were measured and compared from cephalogram before to cephalogram after the treatment. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ tomograms were compared from before and after the treatment by superimposition. Correction was found in molar and incisor relation, overjet and overbite. There were found sagital skeletal changes and soft tissue profile improvement. Conclusion. Herbst appliance is effective in the treatment of Class II malocclusions, even in adult patients. Dental and skeletal changes as a result of Herbst treatment could be good choice instead of camouflage orthodontics or surgical decision.

  18. Cephalometric assessment of lips in skeletal class ii patients by steiner's line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Steiner's (S) Line has been used as reference line to assess anteroposterior position of lips cephalometrically and has been an effective diagnostic aid in this era of soft tissue paradigm. Norms for Sline has been established for different populations and it has been used widely to assess treatment outcomes in Skeletal Class II malocclusion, however anteroposterior position of lips and determinants of lip position in Skeletal Class II has not been explored. Study Design: This Prospective study was aimed to find out the anteroposterior position of lips on cephalograph using S-line in patients with retrognathic pro-file and to establish correlation between determinants of lip prominence. Data was collected using nonprobability convenience sampling technique following the selection criteria. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 65 subjects, with retrognathic profile as judged by orthodontists in consensus and confirmed by lateral cephalogram (ANB > 4 degree). S-Line was drawn on lateral cephalograph to assess the prominence of upper Lip and lower lip. SPSS 17.0 was used for statistical evaluation. Results: Antero-posterior position of upper and lower lip in patients with retrognathic profile with reference to S-line was 1.96 +- 2.6 mm and 3.09 +- 3.16 mm respectively. Moreover it was found that statistically significant correlation existed between lower lip prominence as assessed by S-line and upper lip prominence using the same reference line (r = 0.411), Lower incisor inclination (r = 0.535) and Skeletal Class II as assessed by ANB angle (r = 0.27). Upper lip prominence as assessed S-line was found to be statistically significantly correlated with lower incisor inclination and lower lip prominence. Discussion: Results were compliant with the previous studies.Conclusion: In the present study both upper and lower lips were more prominent in Skeletal Class II patients as compared to Steiner's norms for skeletal class I. (author)

  19. An Undergraduate Laboratory Class Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology to Mutate Drosophila Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, Vanesa; Chapapas, Holly; Cisneros, Marilyn; Deaton, Carol; Deichmann, Sophia; Gadek, Chauncey; Lovato, TyAnna L.; Chechenova, Maria B.; Guerin, Paul; Cripps, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology is used in the manipulation of genome sequences and gene expression. Because of the ease and rapidity with which genes can be mutated using CRISPR/Cas9, we sought to determine if a single-semester undergraduate class could be successfully taught, wherein students isolate mutants for specific genes using…

  20. 40 CFR Figure C-2 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-2 to Subpart C of Part 53... Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-2 Figure C-2 to Subpart C of Part...

  1. Shared HLA Class II in Six Autoimmune Diseases in Latin America: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cruz-Tapias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and genetic susceptibility of autoimmune diseases (ADs may vary depending on latitudinal gradient and ethnicity. The aims of this study were to identify common human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II alleles that contribute to susceptibility to six ADs in Latin Americans through a meta-analysis and to review additional clinical, immunological, and genetic characteristics of those ADs sharing HLA alleles. DRB1∗03:01 (OR: 4.04; 95%CI: 1.41–11.53 was found to be a risk factor for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Sjögren's syndrome (SS, and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. DRB1∗04:05 (OR: 4.64; 95%CI: 2.14–10.05 influences autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and T1D; DRB1∗04:01 (OR: 3.86; 95%CI: 2.32–6.42 is a susceptibility factor for RA and T1D. Opposite associations were found between multiple sclerosis (MS and T1D. DQB1∗06:02 and DRB1∗15 alleles were risk factors for MS but protective factors for T1D. Likewise, DQB1∗06:03 allele was a risk factor for AIH but a protective one for T1D. Several common autoantibodies and clinical associations as well as additional shared genes have been reported in these ADs, which are reviewed herein. These results indicate that in Latin Americans ADs share major loci and immune characteristics.

  2. Wild-type phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (PRS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a bacterial class II PRS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardala Breda

    Full Text Available The 5-phospho-α-D-ribose 1-diphosphate (PRPP metabolite plays essential roles in several biosynthetic pathways, including histidine, tryptophan, nucleotides, and, in mycobacteria, cell wall precursors. PRPP is synthesized from α-D-ribose 5-phosphate (R5P and ATP by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis prsA gene product, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (MtPRS. Here, we report amplification, cloning, expression and purification of wild-type MtPRS. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking results suggest that MtPRS predominates as a hexamer, presenting varied oligomeric states due to distinct ligand binding. MtPRS activity measurements were carried out by a novel coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay. MtPRS enzyme activity could be detected in the absence of P(i. ADP, GDP and UMP inhibit MtPRS activity. Steady-state kinetics results indicate that MtPRS has broad substrate specificity, being able to accept ATP, GTP, CTP, and UTP as diphosphoryl group donors. Fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest that the enzyme mechanism for purine diphosphoryl donors follows a random order of substrate addition, and for pyrimidine diphosphoryl donors follows an ordered mechanism of substrate addition in which R5P binds first to free enzyme. An ordered mechanism for product dissociation is followed by MtPRS, in which PRPP is the first product to be released followed by the nucleoside monophosphate products to yield free enzyme for the next round of catalysis. The broad specificity for diphosphoryl group donors and detection of enzyme activity in the absence of P(i would suggest that MtPRS belongs to Class II PRS proteins. On the other hand, the hexameric quaternary structure and allosteric ADP inhibition would place MtPRS in Class I PRSs. Further data are needed to classify MtPRS as belonging to a particular family of PRS proteins. The data here presented should help augment our understanding of MtPRS mode of action. Current efforts are toward experimental structure

  3. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino;

    2012-01-01

    were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n......PURPOSE: A 128-gene signature has been proposed to predict outcome in patients with stages II and III colorectal cancers. In the present study, we aimed to reproduce and validate the 128-gene signature in external and independent material. METHODS: Gene expression data from the original material......¿=¿76) colon cancers, was reproduced. The stages II and III colon cancers were subsequently classified as either stage I-like (good prognosis) or stage IV-like (poor prognosis) and assessed by the 36 months cumulative incidence of relapse. RESULTS: In the GEO data set, results were reproducible in stage...

  4. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigens in human Schwann cell cultures and effects of infection with Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, N M; Mirsky, R; Grange, J M; Jessen, K R

    1987-06-01

    Recent experiments on rats have raised the possibility that Schwann cells can present antigens to T lymphocytes. We have investigated whether this mechanism might be relevant in leprosy by determining under what conditions human Schwann cells express class I and class II antigens, and whether infection with Mycobacterium leprae affects this expression. The distribution of these antigens was examined on human Schwann cells in dissociated cell cultures derived from human fetal peripheral nerves. We find that both Schwann cells and fibroblastic cells in these cultures normally express class I antigens but not class II antigens. When Schwann cells are infected with live Mycobacterium leprae for 48 h, 73% of Schwann cells phagocytose the bacteria. Mycobacterium leprae prevents 3H-thymidine incorporation into cultured human Schwann cells, but does not affect class I expression in these cells. Treatment of normal and Mycobacterium leprae infected cultures with gamma-interferon for 72 h induces class II expression on most Schwann cells but not on the majority of fibroblastic cells. The fact that human Schwann cells infected with Mycobacterium leprae can be induced by gamma-interferon to express class II antigens suggests that they may be able to present Mycobacterium leprae antigens to T lymphocytes and thus initiate immune responses against the bacteria. We suggest that a failure of this response, such as that seen within nerve trunks in lepromatous leprosy, is caused by deficient class II expression on Schwann cells. This deficiency in class II expression, in turn, may be caused by the reduced gamma-interferon production characteristic of lepromatous leprosy. PMID:3115648

  5. Group II intron-based gene targeting reactions in eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Mastroianni

    Full Text Available Mobile group II introns insert site-specifically into DNA target sites by a mechanism termed retrohoming in which the excised intron RNA reverse splices into a DNA strand and is reverse transcribed by the intron-encoded protein. Retrohoming is mediated by a ribonucleoprotein particle that contains the intron-encoded protein and excised intron RNA, with target specificity determined largely by base pairing of the intron RNA to the DNA target sequence. This feature enabled the development of mobile group II introns into bacterial gene targeting vectors ("targetrons" with programmable target specificity. Thus far, however, efficient group II intron-based gene targeting reactions have not been demonstrated in eukaryotes.By using a plasmid-based Xenopus laevis oocyte microinjection assay, we show that group II intron RNPs can integrate efficiently into target DNAs in a eukaryotic nucleus, but the reaction is limited by low Mg(2+ concentrations. By supplying additional Mg(2+, site-specific integration occurs in up to 38% of plasmid target sites. The integration products isolated from X. laevis nuclei are sensitive to restriction enzymes specific for double-stranded DNA, indicating second-strand synthesis via host enzymes. We also show that group II intron RNPs containing either lariat or linear intron RNA can introduce a double-strand break into a plasmid target site, thereby stimulating homologous recombination with a co-transformed DNA fragment at frequencies up to 4.8% of target sites. Chromatinization of the target DNA inhibits both types of targeting reactions, presumably by impeding RNP access. However, by using similar RNP microinjection methods, we show efficient Mg(2+-dependent group II intron integration into plasmid target sites in zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos and into plasmid and chromosomal target sites in Drosophila melanogster embryos, indicating that DNA replication can mitigate effects of chromatinization.Our results provide an

  6. Typing of HLA class II and class I antigens using PHA-activated, IL-2-propagated T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, B; Cohen, I; Sherman, L; Brautbar, C; Kedar, E

    1988-06-28

    We describe here a simple procedure, by which HLA class II antigens can be accurately and reliably identified in those patients where there is minimal or absent expression of HLA-DR,DQw antigens on B cells, or when the total number of leukocytes recovered from the patients do not permit reliable typing. Ficoll-Hypaque-separated peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes, fresh or cryopreserved, were activated by PHA and then propagated in IL-2-containing medium until enough cells for typing were obtained (usually 7-14 days). At this stage, the cultured cells were shown to be primarily T cells (greater than 90% CD3+). Since the activated T cells propagate in the presence of IL-2, even a small number (10(4] of fresh or cryopreserved patients' cells suffice for this protocol. To date we have been able to successfully HLA-DR,DQw type 34/34 bone marrow transplantation candidates and 12/12 long-term dialysis patients, who were untypable using fresh cells. HLA-DR,DQw antigens on activated T cells from normal individuals were identical to those found on their uncultured B cells. In addition, class I antigens that were undetectable on the uncultured cells of one patient could be identified on activated T cells. The HLA antigens identified on the patients' activated T cells were confirmed by phenotypic analysis of cells from family members. PMID:3260612

  7. Long-term surgical versus functional Class II correction: a comparison of identical twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhibber, Aditya; Upadhyay, Madhur; Uribe, Flavio; Nanda, Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this twin case comparison was to assess the short- and long-term effects of nonsurgical treatment vs orthognathic surgical treatment for Class II correction. Two identical twins (age 13 years 3 months) were treated for Class II correction where one patient was treated nonsurgically using a fixed functional appliance, while the other was treated using orthognathic mandibular advancement surgery. The patients were recalled and evaluated 5 years in retention. Comparing changes in the short and long term, surgical treatment led to superior skeletal results compared to the nonsurgical twin. However, the soft tissue profile was remarkably similar for both patients suggesting that soft tissue profile changes may not necessarily follow similar changes in the bony skeletal structures. PMID:25075777

  8. Camouflage of Severe Skeletal Class II Gummy Smile Patient Treated Nonsurgically with Mini Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Qamruddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal class II has always been a challenge in orthodontics and often needs assistance of surgical orthodontics in nongrowing patients when it presents with severe discrepancy. Difficulty increases more when vertical dysplasia is also associated with sagittal discrepancy. The advent of mini implants in orthodontics has broadened the spectrum of camouflage treatment. This case report presents a 16-year-old nongrowing girl with severe class II because of retrognathic mandible, and anterior dentoalveolar protrusion sagittally and vertically resulted in severe overjet of 13 mm and excessive display of incisors and gums. Both maxillary central incisors were trimmed by general practitioner few years back to reduce visibility. Treatment involved use of micro implant for retraction and intrusion of anterior maxillary dentoalveolar segment while lower incisors were proclined to obtain normal overjet, and overbite and pleasing soft tissue profile. Smile esthetics was further improved with composite restoration of incisal edges of both central incisors.

  9. In vitro evaluation of the marginal microleakage of class II amalgam restoration associated with dentin adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVEIRA Fabiana Sodré de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The marginal microleakage of class II amalgam restorations (Dispersalloy associated with copal varnish (Copalite and with two dentin bonding agents (Scotchbond Multi-uso Plus and Multi Bond Alpha was evaluated in vitro and compared by two methods: scores and linear measurements. Forty-five sound premolars were used, on which two separated class II cavities were prepared on the M and D surfaces. After the restoration, the specimens were thermocycled and stored in a solution of 0.5% basic fuchsin during 24 hours. The analysis allowed to conclude that none of the three restorative systems were able to eliminate the marginal microleakage. Nevertheless, the leakage was significantly smaller on the restorations associated with dentin bonding agents when compared to copal varnish. The linear measurement method was more sensitive than the score criteria.

  10. Expansion design for a radioactive sources handling laboratory type II class B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radioactive Wastes Research Laboratory (RWRL) of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico), at the moment has three sections: instrumental analysis, radioactive material processes, counting and a license type II class C, to manipulate radioactive material. This license limits the open sources handling to 300 kBq for radionuclides of very high radio-toxicity as the Ra-226, for what is being projected the license extension to type II class B, to be able to manage until 370 MBq of this radionuclides type, and the Laboratory, since the location where is the RWRL have unused area. This work presents a proposal of the RWRL expansion, taking into account the current laboratory sections, as well as the established specifications by the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS). The current planes of the RWRL and the expansion proposal of the laboratory are presented. (Author)

  11. The HLA Class II Associations with Rheumatic Heart Disease in South Indian Patients: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bajoria, Divya; Menon, Thangam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) occurs in 30-45% of the patients with rheumatic fever (RF) and it leads to chronic valvular lesions. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) might confer a susceptibility to RHD. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalent HLA class II DR/DQ allelic types which were associated with rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in a small group of south Indian patients and to compare them with those in the control subjects.

  12. The application of NISA II FEM package in seismic qualification of small class IE electric motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the IEEE standards 323/1974 and 344/1975, seismic qualification of class IE equipment is appropriate combination of test and analysis methods. Complex equipment and assemblies are usually tested through seismic testing. The analysis is recommended for simple equipment that can be easily modeled to correctly predict its response. This article deals with the application of NISA II FEM package in 3D FE modeling and mode shape calculations of small power low voltage electric motors. (author)

  13. Unilateral Maxillary First Molar Extraction in Class II Subdivision: An Unconventional Treatment Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booij, J. W.; Livas, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetrical intra-arch relationship in Class II subdivision malocclusion poses challenges in the treatment planning and mechanotherapy of such cases. This case report demonstrates a treatment technique engaging unilateral extraction of a maxillary first molar and Begg fixed appliances. The outcome stability and the enhancing effect on the eruption of the third molar in the extraction segment were confirmed by a 4-year follow-up examination. PMID:27200194

  14. Compensatory orthodontic treatment of Angle Class II malocclusion with posterior open bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Newton Torres

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present case report addresses the treatment of an Angle Class II malocclusion in an adult female patient, long face pattern, with posterior open bite and dental arches extremely expanded, due to previous treatment. The patient and parents rejection to a treatment with orthognathic surgery led to orthodontic camouflage of the skeletal discrepancies. This clinical case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as one of the requirements to become a BBO Diplomate.

  15. FOXP3 interactions with histone acetyltransferase and class II histone deacetylases are required for repression

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bin; Samanta, Arabinda; Song, Xiaomin; Iacono, Kathryn T.; Bembas, Kathryn; Tao, Ran; Basu, Samik; Riley, James L.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Shen, Yuan; Saouaf, Sandra J.; Mark I. Greene

    2007-01-01

    The forkhead family protein FOXP3 acts as a repressor of transcription and is both an essential and sufficient regulator of the development and function of regulatory T cells. The molecular mechanism by which FOXP3-mediated transcriptional repression occurs remains unclear. Here, we report that transcriptional repression by FOXP3 involves a histone acetyltransferase–deacetylase complex that includes histone acetyltransferase TIP60 (Tat-interactive protein, 60 kDa) and class II histone deacety...

  16. Evaluation of the position of lower incisors in the mandibular symphysis of individuals with Class II malocclusion and Pattern II profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djalma Roque Woitchunas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the position of mandibular incisors in the mandibular symphysis of individuals with Class II malocclusion and Pattern II profiles. METHODS: The sample consisted of 40 Caucasian patients (20 male and 20 female with Class II malocclusion and Pattern II profile from 10 to 18 years of age (mean age of 12.84 years who were selected from the records of the School of Dentistry of Universidade de Passo Fundo, Brazil. The linear cephalometric measurements used in this study were Ricketts' 1- AP, Interlandi's line I and Vigorito's 1-VT; and the angular measurement studied was the mandibular plane angle (IMPA. RESULTS: Mandibular incisors of individuals with Class II malocclusion and Pattern II profile tended to be buccally inclined and protruded.

  17. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I and II Alleles and Overall Survival in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Follicular Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yani Lu; Amr M Abdou; Cerhan, James R.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Richard K Severson; Scott Davis; Wendy Cozen; Nathaniel Rothman; Leslie Bernstein; Stephen Chanock; Patricia Hartge; Wang, Sophia S.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variation in the 6p21 chromosomal region, including human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), has been linked to both etiology and clinical outcomes of lymphomas. We estimated the effects of HLA class I (A, B, and C), class II DRB1 alleles, and the ancestral haplotype (AH) 8.1 (HLAA*01-B*08-DRB1*03-TNF-308A) on overall survival (OS) among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL) in a population-based study of non-Hodgk...

  18. Two steps in the evolution of Antennapedia-class vertebrate homeobox genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kappen, C. (Christian); Schughart, K; Ruddle, F H

    1989-01-01

    Antennapedia-class vertebrate homeobox genes have been classified with regard to their chromosomal locations and nucleotide sequence similarities within the 183-base-pair homeobox domain. The results of these comparisons support the view that in mammals and most likely the vertebrates, four clusters of homeobox genes exist that were created by duplications of an entire primordial gene cluster. We present evidence that this primordial cluster arose by local gene duplications of homeoboxes that...

  19. Class II malocclusion treatment using Jasper Jumper appliance associated to intermaxillary elastics: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francyle Simões Herrera-Sanches

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Skeletal, dental and profile discrepancies can be amended by using functional orthodontic appliances. OBJECTIVE: This study is a report of the treatment of a patient, 11 years and 4 months old, with Class II, division 1, malocclusion, convex profile, protrusion of upper incisors, pronounced overjet and overbite, and mild crowding. METHODS: The patient was treated with a Jasper Jumper associated to fixed appliances for 6 months and Class II intermaxillary elastics (3/16in during the last 4 months. After debonding, a Hawley retainer was used during daytime and a modified Bionator for night use during one year. In the lower dental arch a bonded lingual retainer was used. This treatment combination improved the profile, as well as the overjet, overbite and molar relation. RESULTS: There was clockwise mandibular rotation and increase of lower anterior facial height. The lower incisors were protruded and extruded and the lower molars were extruded. The centric occlusal relation was checked and it was coincident to the maximum usual intercuspation. CONCLUSION: It was demonstrated that the Jasper Jumper is an efficient alternative to Class II malocclusion treatment, providing improvement in the facial profile, although the changes are more dentoalveolar than skeletal.

  20. Dental, skeletal asymmetries and functional characteristics in Class II subdivision malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; He, Y; Wang, Y; Chen, T; Xu, Y; Xu, X; Zeng, H; Feng, J; Xiang, Z; Xue, C; Han, X; Bai, D

    2015-08-01

    Treatment outcomes of Angle Class II subdivision malocclusions may be compromised because of the uncertainty of the aetiology. Previous studies have reported controversial ideas about the origins, but the existence of a primary contributor still remains unknown. Functional factors have been mentioned as a probable cause, but until now, there have been no supporting data. This study was a cross-sectional investigation of the characteristics of Angle Class II subdivision malocclusion, including dental, skeletal and functional factors, by comparison of the subdivision group and the normal occlusion group. The evaluations of dental and skeletal asymmetries of both groups were carried out by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and analysis of dental casts. The functional deviations were evaluated by cast mounting and measuring. In the subdivision group, the asymmetric position of the glenoid fossa was found to be the most significant skeletal asymmetry. No dentoalveolar asymmetry was found in this group. The most important finding was that, in subdivision malocclusions, functional deviation resulting in pseudoasymmetry occurred in 32.86% of the study participants. This deviation is probably related to the disharmonious arch width between maxillary and mandibular dental arches in the premolar section. The origin of Angle Class II subdivision malocclusion is multifactorial, with dental, skeletal and functional factors included. Functional deviation occurs, probably due to dental arch width disharmony. Asymmetric position of the glenoid fossa may account for most of the skeletal asymmetry. PMID:25944587

  1. Expansion design for a Laboratory of Radioactive Sources Handling type II, class B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the expansion design of the Radioactive Wastes Research Laboratory (RWRL) installation authorized by the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (Mexico) as type II class C, to manage 40 different radionuclides, approximately. The RWRL has 4 areas at the present time: a laboratory of instrumental analysis, one of radioactive material processes, other of counting and a chemical reagents stock, which is not integrated to the operation license of the RWRL. With the purpose of expanding the operation license of the RWRL to an installation type II class B, to manage until 370 MBq of high radio toxicity radionuclides, is presented in this work an expansion proposal of the RWRL. The expansion proposal is based in: (1) the Mexican Nuclear Standard NOM-027-Nucl-1996 for installations type II class B, (2) the current distribution of water, light, electricity, extraction, gas, air and vacuum services of RWRL, and (3) the available areas inside the building that the RWRL occupies. The proposal contemplates the creation of additional new areas for RWRL: 3 laboratories, 2 dressing rooms, 2 bathrooms and 2 warehouses, one for radioactive materials and another for reagents chemical radiologically inactive. Architectural, electric, hydraulic, extraction and gas planes corresponding to the expansion of RWRL were realized. Inside the proposal the budget required to carry out the mentioned expansion is also presented. (Author)

  2. The Position of Hyoici Bone in Skeletal Class I, II and III Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravanmehr H

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the position of hyoid bone was compared in three skeletal groups of class I, II and III. The study was based on evaluating 77 lateral cephalometric radiographs, 40 girls and 37 boys, which were divided into 3 groups. Group 1, 2, and 3 consist of 26, 25, and 26 radiographs. 19 cephalometric landmarks and 10 planes were used in order to tracing the radiographs. In all patients, 9 skeletal and 4 cervical vertebrae parameters were measured to determine the hyoid bone. These parameters were compared between three skeletal groups regardless of sex and then, in another statistical analysis, parameters were compared based on patients sex. Statistical analysis showed that in class III patients, the hyoid bone was positioned more anteriorly than two other groups. Also in this group, the hyoid bone had less inclination and it was more horizontal in relation to mandibular plane. In skeletal class II patients this bone was positioned more superiorly than two other groups. Due to these findings it can be concluded that perimandibular muscles and bones could affect the growth of mandible. In addition, comparison of the parameters between two sexes revealed that the hyoid bone was positioned more anteriorly and inferiorly in boys. Also it was shown that in the girls, the position of hyoid bone was closer to the position of this bone in skeletal class I patients.

  3. Fish Health Data - Captive Broodstock Gene Rescue Program for Odd Year Class Elwha River Pink Salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct captive brood stock gene rescue program for Elwha River odd-year class pink salmon. All fresh mortalities larger than 100 mm are sent to Fish Health for...

  4. Fish Culture Data - Captive Broodstock Gene Rescue Program for Odd Year Class Elwha River Pink Salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct captive brood stock gene rescue program for Elwha River odd-year class pink salmon. Raw data on rearing density, loading density, water temperature, ration,...

  5. Production Data - Captive Broodstock Gene Rescue Program for Odd Year Class Elwha River Pink Salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct captive brood stock gene rescue program for Elwha River odd-year class pink salmon. Information on the number of smolts received into the program is...

  6. Broodyear Data - Captive Broodstock Gene Rescue Program for Odd Year Class Elwha River Pink Salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct captive brood stock gene rescue program for Elwha River odd-year class pink salmon. Data is collected by broodyear on % survival to adult, % maturity as two...

  7. Growth Data - Captive Broodstock Gene Rescue Program for Odd Year Class Elwha River Pink Salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct captive brood stock gene rescue program for Elwha River odd-year class pink salmon. The fork length to the nearest mm and weight to the nearest gram of a...

  8. Susceptibility of amphibians to chytridiomycosis is associated with MHC class II conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cashins, Scott D; Grogan, Laura; Skerratt, Lee F; Hunter, David; McFadden, Michael; Scheele, Benjamin; Brannelly, Laura A; Macris, Amy; Harlow, Peter S; Bell, Sara; Berger, Lee; Waldman, Bruce

    2015-04-22

    The pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can cause precipitous population declines in its amphibian hosts. Responses of individuals to infection vary greatly with the capacity of their immune system to respond to the pathogen. We used a combination of comparative and experimental approaches to identify major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) alleles encoding molecules that foster the survival of Bd-infected amphibians. We found that Bd-resistant amphibians across four continents share common amino acids in three binding pockets of the MHC-II antigen-binding groove. Moreover, strong signals of selection acting on these specific sites were evident among all species co-existing with the pathogen. In the laboratory, we experimentally inoculated Australian tree frogs with Bd to test how each binding pocket conformation influences disease resistance. Only the conformation of MHC-II pocket 9 of surviving subjects matched those of Bd-resistant species. This MHC-II conformation thus may determine amphibian resistance to Bd, although other MHC-II binding pockets also may contribute to resistance. Rescuing amphibian biodiversity will depend on our understanding of amphibian immune defence mechanisms against Bd. The identification of adaptive genetic markers for Bd resistance represents an important step forward towards that goal. PMID:25808889

  9. Antibodies against a class II HLA-peptide complex raised by active immunization of mice with antigen mimicking peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Tuxen, R; Riise, Erik Skjold

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease linked to the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes DRB1*1501, DRB5*0101 and DQB1*0602. T cells reactive towards the DRB1*1501 in complex with various peptides derived from myelin basic protein (MBP), which is the major component of myelin......, have been found in the peripheral blood of MS patients. These autoreactive T cells are believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of MS. In this article, antibodies against the HLA complex DR2b (DRA1*0101/DRB1*1501) in complex with the MBP-derived peptide MBP(85-99) have been generated by immunization...

  10. Orthodontic Camouflage Treatment in an Adult Patient with a Class II, Division 1 Malocclusion – A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Naragond, Appasaheb; Kenganal, Smitha; Sagarkar, Roshan; Sugaradday,

    2012-01-01

    Since so many decades, various treatment modalities have been presented for the treatment for the class II, div 1 malocclusions. In recent times, we have seen enormously increasing numbers of young adults who desire the shortest, cost effective and a non surgical correction of Class II malocclusions and they accept dental camouflage as a treatment option to mask the skeletal discrepancy. This case report presents one such case of a 22 year old non-growing female who had a skeletal Class II, d...

  11. MHC class II molecules deliver costimulatory signals in human T cells through a functional linkage with IL-2-receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Kanner, S B; Ledbetter, J A;

    1993-01-01

    a regulatory function in T cell activation. Here, we show that cross-linking HLA-DR and -DP but not -DQ molecules by immobilized mAb enhanced proliferative T cell responses to IL-2. In contrast, class II stimulation had no effect on IL-4-induced proliferation. The costimulatory effect was most......Ab induced tyrosine phosphorylation of specific substrates including PLC-gamma 1. Combined stimulation of IL-2R and class II molecules had an additive effect on tyrosine phosphorylation. Pretreatment of T cells with a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A, inhibited IL-2 and class II...

  12. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Dzierszinski, Florence S

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4(+) T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4(+) T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  13. Exclusion of the alpha 1(II) collagen structural gene as the mutant locus in type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, P; Ogilvie, D.; Smith, R.; Sykes, B

    1985-01-01

    We have used a high frequency site polymorphism within the human pro-alpha 1(II) collagen gene (COL2A1) in order to examine the segregation of this gene within a large pedigree with type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The EDS gene and the collagen gene segregate independently within the pedigree and therefore COL2A1 can be excluded as the mutant locus.

  14. Self-esteem in adolescents with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion in a Peruvian sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florián-Vargas, Karla; Honores, Marcos J. Carruitero; Bernabé, Eduardo; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare self-esteem scores in 12 to 16-year-old adolescents with different Angle malocclusion types in a Peruvian sample. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 276 adolescents (159, 52 and 65 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusions, respectively) from Trujillo, Peru. Participants were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and were also clinically examined, so as to have Angle malocclusion classification determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare RSES scores among adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions, with participants' demographic factors being controlled. Results: Mean RSES scores for adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions were 20.47 ± 3.96, 21.96 ± 3.27 and 21.26 ± 4.81, respectively. The ANCOVA test showed that adolescents with Class II malocclusion had a significantly higher RSES score than those with Class I malocclusion, but there were no differences between other malocclusion groups. Supplemental analysis suggested that only those with Class II, Division 2 malocclusion might have greater self-esteem when compared to adolescents with Class I malocclusion. Conclusion: This study shows that, in general, self-esteem did not vary according to adolescents' malocclusion in the sample studied. Surprisingly, only adolescents with Class II malocclusion, particularly Class II, Division 2, reported better self-esteem than those with Class I malocclusion. A more detailed analysis assessing the impact of anterior occlusal features should be conducted. PMID:27275616

  15. Self-esteem in adolescents with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion in a Peruvian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Florián-Vargas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare self-esteem scores in 12 to 16-year-old adolescents with different Angle malocclusion types in a Peruvian sample. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 276 adolescents (159, 52 and 65 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusions, respectively from Trujillo, Peru. Participants were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES and were also clinically examined, so as to have Angle malocclusion classification determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA was used to compare RSES scores among adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions, with participants' demographic factors being controlled. Results: Mean RSES scores for adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions were 20.47 ± 3.96, 21.96 ± 3.27 and 21.26 ± 4.81, respectively. The ANCOVA test showed that adolescents with Class II malocclusion had a significantly higher RSES score than those with Class I malocclusion, but there were no differences between other malocclusion groups. Supplemental analysis suggested that only those with Class II, Division 2 malocclusion might have greater self-esteem when compared to adolescents with Class I malocclusion. Conclusion: This study shows that, in general, self-esteem did not vary according to adolescents' malocclusion in the sample studied. Surprisingly, only adolescents with Class II malocclusion, particularly Class II, Division 2, reported better self-esteem than those with Class I malocclusion. A more detailed analysis assessing the impact of anterior occlusal features should be conducted.

  16. AN MHC class I immune evasion gene of Marek's disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a widespread a-herpesvirus of chickens that causes T cell tumors. Acute, but not latent, MDV infection has previously been shown to lead to downregulation of cell-surface MHC class I (Virology 282:198–205 (2001)), but the gene(s) involved have not been identified. Here...

  17. The Dimanganese(II) Site of Bacillus subtilis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (MIT); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    Class Ib ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) use a dimanganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor, Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet}, in their homodimeric NrdF ({beta}2) subunit to initiate reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The structure of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} form of NrdF is an important component in understanding O{sub 2}-mediated formation of the active metallocofactor, a subject of much interest because a unique flavodoxin, NrdI, is required for cofactor assembly. Biochemical studies and sequence alignments suggest that NrdF and NrdI proteins diverge into three phylogenetically distinct groups. The only crystal structure to date of a NrdF with a fully ordered and occupied dimanganese site is that of Escherichia coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, prototypical of the enzymes from actinobacteria and proteobacteria. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, representative of the enzymes from a second group, from Bacillus and Staphylococcus. The structures of the metal clusters in the {beta}2 dimer are distinct from those observed in E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF. These differences illustrate the key role that solvent molecules and protein residues in the second coordination sphere of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} cluster play in determining conformations of carboxylate residues at the metal sites and demonstrate that diverse coordination geometries are capable of serving as starting points for Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly in class Ib RNRs.

  18. Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 binds to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) is a 22-kDa exotoxin produced by strains of Staphylococcus aureus and implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome. In common with other staphylococcal exotoxins, TSST-1 has diverse immunological effects. These include the induction of interleukin 2 receptor expression, interleukin 2 synthesis, proliferation of human T lymphocytes, and stimulation of interleukin 1 synthesis by human monocytes. In the present study, the authors demonstrate that TSST-1 binds with saturation kinetics and with a dissociation constant of 17-43 nM to a single class of binding sites on human mononuclear cells. There was a strong correlation between the number of TSST-1 binding sites and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Affinity chromatography of 125I-labeled cell membranes over TSST-1-agarose resulted in the recovery of two bands of 35 kDa and 31 kDa that comigrated, respectively, with the α and β chains of HLA-DR and that could be immunoprecipitated with anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibodies. Binding of TSST-1 was demonstrated to HLA-DR and HLA-DQ L-cell transfectants. These results indicate that major histocompatibility complex class II molecules represent the major binding site for TSST-1 on human cells

  19. Cephalometric effects of the use of 10-hour Force Theory for Class II treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marise de Castro Cabrera

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the cephalometric effects promoted by the orthodontic treatment of Class II malocclusion patients with the use of the 10-Hour Force Theory, that consists in the use of fixed appliances with 8 hours a day using a cervical headgear appliance and 16 hours a day using Class II elastics, 8 hours on the first mandibular molar and 8 hours in the second mandibular molar. METHODS: Sample comprised 31 patients with mean initial age of 14.90 years, final mean age of 17.25 years and mean treatment time of 2.35 years. The lateral cephalograms in pre-treatment and post-treatment stages were evaluated. Evaluation of cephalometric changes between initial and final treatment phases was performed by paired t test. RESULTS: The cases treated with the 10-Hour Force Theory presented a slight restriction of anterior displacement of the maxilla, increase in the effective length of the mandible, significant improvement of the maxillomandibular relationship, significant increase in anterior lower face height, distal tipping of the maxillary premolar crowns, extrusion and distal tipping of the roots of maxillary molars, significant proclination and protrusion of mandibular incisors, significant extrusion and mesialization of mandibular molars, besides a significant correction of the molar relationship, overjet and overbite. CONCLUSION: The use of the 10-Hour Force Theory in treatment of Class II malocclusion provided satisfactory results.OBJETIVO: esse estudo objetivou avaliar os efeitos cefalométricos promovidos pelo tratamento ortodôntico de pacientes com má oclusão de Classe II com o uso da Teoria de Força das 10 Horas, que consiste no uso de aparelho ortodôntico fixo, 8 horas diárias de uso de aparelho extrabucal cervical e 16 horas de uso de elásticos de Classe II, sendo 8 horas com apoio no primeiro molar inferior e 8 horas com apoio no segundo molar inferior. MÉTODOS: a amostra consistiu de 31 pacientes, com idade m

  20. Cloning and expression of alpha class glutathione S-transferase gene from the small hermaphroditic fish Rivulus marmoratus (Cyprinodontiformes, Rivulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Mi; Chang, Sung Yeoul; Jung, Sang-Oun; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2005-01-01

    In order to assess its potential as a biomarker of aquatic pollution, an alpha class glutathione S-transferase gene (GSTalpha gene) was cloned from the small hermaphroditic fish Rivulus marmoratus. The R. marmoratus GSTalpha gene spanned 1.3 kb, consisting of 6 exons encoding 221 amino acid residues. It showed high similarity to zebrafish GST. We named this R. marmoratus GSTalpha gene as rm-GSTalpha. The cDNA of the rm-GSTalpha gene was also investigated for its phylogeny, tissue-specific and chemical-induced expression. Rm-GSTalpha was subcloned into a 6 x His-tagged pCRT7 TOPO TA expression vector to produce the recombinant 6 x His-tagged rm-GST protein. This will be used in future to raise an rm-GSTalpha antibody for use in the study of phase II metabolism involved in detoxification. We also exposed R. marmoratus to 300 microg/l of 4-nonylphenol in water, and found approximately 4-fold induction of R. marmoratus GSTalpha mRNA in the treated animals. In this paper, we discuss the characteristics of the R. marmoratus GSTalpha gene as well as its potential use in relation to environmental pollution. PMID:16081109

  1. DPA1*02012: A DPA1*0201-related Mhc class II allele in West Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, C.G.; May, J.; Spauke, D.; Schnittger, L. [Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    DNA techniques such as sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (SSOP) hybridizations, restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses, and DNA sequencing have greatly supported the characterization of Mhc class II allelic polymorphism. Here the authors describe a DPA 1 allele which has been identified in two male individuals from Liberia and Benin, West Africa, during a survey study on Mhc class II associations with the different manifestations after infection with Onchocerca volvulus. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  2. "HUMAN LEUKOCYTE CLASS I AND II ANTIGENS IN IRANIAN PATIENTS WITH COMMON VARIABLE IMMUNODEFICIENCY"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "A. Aghamohammadi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID is a heterogeneous heritable disease characterized by arrest in B cell differentiation. An association between CVID and two HLA haplotypes, haplotype I (HLA-A1, HLA-B8, HLA-DR3 and haplotype II (HLA-A29, HLA-B44, HLADR7has been previously documented. In the present study, we have attempted to find an association between susceptibility to CVID and HLA class I and II antigens in Iranian population. Seventeen Iranian patients with CVID (mean age 17, range 3-28 years; 12 male and 5 female, including two couples of brothers and 100 healthy controls were studied. All subjects were typed for HLA class 1, and 12 patients and all controls were typed for HLA class II, using microdroplet lymphocytotoxicity technique. Out of 12 CVID patients typed for HLA-DR and DQ specificities, five patients presented DR-1, which showed an increased frequency in patient (41.6% vs. 12% in controls, and 3 presented DQ-2, which also showed an increased frequency (25% vs. 4% in controls, both of which reached statistical significance (P = 0.018 and P = 0.026, respectively. HLA-DR10 was present in 2 patients (16.6%, which was markedly more frequent compared to controls, but this difference was not significant statistically. Our results suggest that HLA-DR1 and DQ-2 may contribute to susceptibility to CVID. We did not find any significant association between HLA-A1, B8 and DR3 that has been previously reported to be associated with CVID.

  3. Early prevention and intervention of Class II division 1 in growing patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthi, V. Naga; Kanya, S. Dhivya; Babu, K. Pradeep; Mathew, Anoop; Kumar, A. Nanda

    2016-01-01

    Early screening and diagnosis help in preventing and intercepting the severity of the malocclusion which helps in addressing the esthetic and functional concerns. Growth modulation such as mandibular advancement has been an effective procedure in orthodontics. Mandibular growth advancer (MGA) and PowerScope are gaining popularity recently as these are effective in achieving the mandibular advancement and ease of fabrication, placement, and wear. MGA was fabricated by making the upper and lower splints separately and are placed in the oral cavity by joining the two splints in the new construction bite using cold cure, MGA when worn during growth phase helps in condylar remodeling in the temporomandibular joint thus helps in advancement of the mandible. The proclination of the upper anteriors in Class II division 1 can be moved lingually by activating the labial bow in the splint. Dr. Andy Hayes worked in conjunction with American orthodontics developed PowerScope. PowerScope delivers Class II correction with a combination of patient comfort and ease of use that was unmatched among other appliances. This ready to use chairside solution required no laboratory setup, making for a much quicker, and easier installation process and appointment. PowerScopes high quality, fixed one-piece design requires no patient compliance. These superior qualities of PowerScope help in correction of Class II skeletal growing patient in conjunction with fixed orthodontic therapy. MGA and PowerScope were chosen as a functional appliance for this study, which shows decreased ANB angle and effective mandible length was increased. PMID:27195234

  4. β class II tubulin predominates in normal and tumor breast tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antimitotic chemotherapeutic agents target tubulin, the major protein in mitotic spindles. Tubulin isotype composition is thought to be both diagnostic of tumor progression and a determinant of the cellular response to chemotherapy. This implies that there is a difference in isotype composition between normal and tumor tissues. To determine whether such a difference occurs in breast tissues, total tubulin was fractionated from lysates of paired normal and tumor breast tissues, and the amounts of β-tubulin classes I + IV, II, and III were measured by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only primary tumor tissues, before chemotherapy, were examined. Her2/neu protein amplification occurs in about 30% of breast tumors and is considered a marker for poor prognosis. To gain insight into whether tubulin isotype levels might be correlated with prognosis, ELISAs were used to quantify Her2/neu protein levels in these tissues. β-Tubulin isotype distributions in normal and tumor breast tissues were similar. The most abundant β-tubulin isotypes in these tissues were β-tubulin classes II and I + IV. Her2/neu levels in tumor tissues were 5–30-fold those in normal tissues, although there was no correlation between the Her2/neu biomarker and tubulin isotype levels. These results suggest that tubulin isotype levels, alone or in combination with Her2/neu protein levels, might not be diagnostic of tumorigenesis in breast cancer. However, the presence of a broad distribution of these tubulin isotypes (for example, 40–75% β-tubulin class II) in breast tissue, in conjunction with other factors, might still be relevant to disease progression and cellular response to antimitotic drugs

  5. Early prevention and intervention of Class II division 1 in growing patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthi, V Naga; Kanya, S Dhivya; Babu, K Pradeep; Mathew, Anoop; Kumar, A Nanda

    2016-04-01

    Early screening and diagnosis help in preventing and intercepting the severity of the malocclusion which helps in addressing the esthetic and functional concerns. Growth modulation such as mandibular advancement has been an effective procedure in orthodontics. Mandibular growth advancer (MGA) and PowerScope are gaining popularity recently as these are effective in achieving the mandibular advancement and ease of fabrication, placement, and wear. MGA was fabricated by making the upper and lower splints separately and are placed in the oral cavity by joining the two splints in the new construction bite using cold cure, MGA when worn during growth phase helps in condylar remodeling in the temporomandibular joint thus helps in advancement of the mandible. The proclination of the upper anteriors in Class II division 1 can be moved lingually by activating the labial bow in the splint. Dr. Andy Hayes worked in conjunction with American orthodontics developed PowerScope. PowerScope delivers Class II correction with a combination of patient comfort and ease of use that was unmatched among other appliances. This ready to use chairside solution required no laboratory setup, making for a much quicker, and easier installation process and appointment. PowerScopes high quality, fixed one-piece design requires no patient compliance. These superior qualities of PowerScope help in correction of Class II skeletal growing patient in conjunction with fixed orthodontic therapy. MGA and PowerScope were chosen as a functional appliance for this study, which shows decreased ANB angle and effective mandible length was increased. PMID:27195234

  6. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against MHC class II-associated p41 invariant chain fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies directed against human MHC class II-associated p41 invariant chain fragment have been generated. Mice were immunized with human recombinant Ii-isoform p26. For hybridoma production mouse splenocytes and myeloma cells were fused. Hybridoma cells were screened using ELISA and immunoblotting. Three cell lines (42B10, 42G11 and 43C8) were used for production of specific antibodies, which reacted with p41 fragment and did not bind to cathepsins L or S or their proenyzmes. As primary antibody for immunofluorescence staining of lymph node tissue sections clone 2C12 MAb was selected. Specific localization of p41 fragment in certain cells in lymph nodes was observed. (author)

  7. Intracellular transport of MHC class II and associated invariant chain in antigen presenting cells from AP-3-deficient mocha mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, L M; Richter, S S; Miller, J

    2001-06-15

    MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation requires trafficking of newly synthesized class II-invariant chain complexes from the trans-Golgi network to endosomal, peptide-loading compartments. This transport is mediated by dileucine-like motifs within the cytosolic tail of the invariant chain. Although these signals have been well characterized, the cytosolic proteins that interact with these dileucine signals and mediate Golgi sorting and endosomal transport have not been identified. Recently, an adaptor complex, AP-3, has been identified that interacts with dileucine motifs and mediates endosomal/lysosomal transport in yeast, Drosophila, and mammals. In this report, we have assessed class II-invariant chain trafficking in a strain of mice (mocha) which lacks expression of AP-3. Our studies demonstrate that the lack of AP-3 does not affect the kinetics of invariant chain degradation, the route of class II-invariant chain transport, or the rate and extent of class II-peptide binding as assessed by the generation of SDS-stable dimers. The possible role of other known or unknown adaptor complexes in class II-invariant chain transport is discussed. PMID:11520080

  8. Development and morphology of class II Kenyon cells in the mushroom bodies of the honey bee, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Sarah M; Abrams, Andrew I; Strausfeld, Nicholas J

    2004-06-28

    Class II Kenyon cells, defined by their early birthdate and unique dendritic arborizations, have been observed in the mushroom bodies of evolutionarily divergent insects. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, Class II (also called clawed) Kenyon cells are well known for their extensive reorganization that occurs during metamorphosis. The present account reports for the first time the occurrence of mushroom body reorganization during metamorphosis in holometabolous insect species outside of the Diptera. In the honey bee, Apis mellifera, Class II Kenyon cells show signs of degeneration and undergo a subtle reshaping of their axons during metamorphosis. Unlike in Drosophila, reorganization of Class II Kenyon cells in the honey bee does not involve the loss of axon branches. In contrast, the mushroom bodies of closely related hymenopteran species, the polistine wasps, undergo a much more dramatic restructuring near the end of metamorphosis. Immunohistochemistry, dextran fills, and Golgi impregnations illuminate the heterogeneous nature of Class II Kenyon cells in the developing and adult honey bee brain, with subpopulations differing in the location of dendritic arbors within the calyx, and branching pattern in the lobes. Furthermore, polyclonal antibodies against the catalytic subunit of Drosophila protein kinase A (anti-DC0) label an unusual and previously undescribed trajectory for these neurons. The observed variations in morphology indicate that subpopulations of Class II Kenyon cells in the honey bee can likely be further defined by significant differences in their specific connections and functions within the mushroom bodies. PMID:15174077

  9. Surgical correction of class II skeletal malocclusion in an adult patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan Balachander

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Correction of skeletal deformities in adult patients with orthodontics is limited. Orthognathic surgery is the best option for cases when camouflage treatment is questionable and growth modulation is not possible. This case report illustrates the benefit of the team approach in correcting vertical maxillary excess along with class II skeletal deformity. A cosmetic correction was achieved by superior repositioning of maxilla with LeFort I osteotomy and augmentation genioplasty, along with orthodontic treatment. The patient′s facial appearance was markedly improved along with functional and stable occlusion

  10. Microleakage of Class II Combined Amalgam-Composite Restorations Using Different Composites and Bonding Agents

    OpenAIRE

    F. Sharafeddin; H. Moradian

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage of composite restorations with and without a cervical amalgam base and to compare the results of dif-ferent composites and bonding agents.Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty mesio-occlusal (MO) and disto-occlusal (DO) Class II cavities were prepared on sixty extracted permanent premolar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 30 and restored as follows:In group A, the mesio-occlusal cavity ...

  11. Role of PU.1 in MHC Class II Expression via CIITA Transcription in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ryosuke; Kasakura, Kazumi; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Hara, Mutsuko; Maeda, Keiko; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Yashiro, Takuya; Nishiyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    The cofactor CIITA is a master regulator of MHC class II expression and several transcription factors regulating the cell type-specific expression of CIITA have been identified. Although the MHC class II expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) is also mediated by CIITA, the transcription factors involved in the CIITA expression in pDCs are largely unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the role of a hematopoietic lineage-specific transcription factor, PU.1, in CIITA transcription in pDCs. The introduction of PU.1 siRNA into mouse pDCs and a human pDC cell line, CAL-1, reduced the mRNA levels of MHC class II and CIITA. When the binding of PU.1 to the 3rd promoter of CIITA (pIII) in CAL-1 and mouse pDCs was analyzed by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, a significant amount of PU.1 binding to the pIII was detected, which was definitely decreased in PU.1 siRNA-transfected cells. Reporter assays showed that PU.1 knockdown reduced the pIII promoter activity and that three Ets-motifs in the human pIII promoter were candidates of cis-enhancing elements. By electrophoretic mobility shift assays, it was confirmed that two Ets-motifs, GGAA (-181/-178) and AGAA (-114/-111), among three candidates, were directly bound with PU.1. When mouse pDCs and CAL-1 cells were stimulated by GM-CSF, mRNA levels of PU.1, pIII-driven CIITA, total CIITA, MHC class II, and the amount of PU.1 binding to pIII were significantly increased. The GM-CSF-mediated up-regulation of these mRNAs was canceled in PU.1 siRNA-introduced cells. Taking these results together, we conclude that PU.1 transactivates the pIII through direct binding to Ets-motifs in the promoter in pDCs. PMID:27105023

  12. Partial MHC class II constructs inhibit MIF/CD74 binding and downstream effects

    OpenAIRE

    Benedek, Gil; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Andrew, Shayne; Leng, Lin; Burrows, Gregory G.; Bourdette, Dennis; Offner, Halina; Bucala, Richard; Vandenbark, Arthur A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and its receptor, CD74, are pivotal regulators of the immune system. Here we demonstrate for the first time that partial MHC class II constructs comprised of linked β1α1 domains with covalently attached antigenic peptides (also referred to as recombinant T-cell receptor ligands - RTLs) can inhibit MIF activity by not only blocking the binding of rhMIF to immunopurified CD74, but also down-regulating CD74 cell-surface expression. This bi-functional ...

  13. Internal and Marginal Fit of Modern Indirect Class II Composite Inlays

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp C. Pott; Agnieszka Rzasa; Meike Stiesch; Michael Eisenburger

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This in vitro study investigates the marginal and internal fit of indirect class II composite restorations. Two different processes for chair-side restorations were compared. In group A, the restorations were fabricated using CAD/CAM technology (Cerec, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim) and in group B they were made by hand (GrandioSO Inlay System, VOCO GmbH, Germany, Cuxhaven). Methods: For a metal tooth with a MOD cavity each 10 restorations were made for groups A and B. For each res...

  14. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II Equivalent Samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II Equivalent Samplers F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53—Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class...

  15. Nucleotide sequence of the Pseudomonas fluorescens signal peptidase II gene (lsp) and flanking genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaki, L; Beers, R; Wu, H.C.

    1990-01-01

    The lsp gene encoding prolipoprotein signal peptidase (signal peptidase II) is organized into an operon consisting of ileS and three open reading frames, designated genes x, orf149, and orf316 in both Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes. A plasmid, pBROC128, containing a 5.8-kb fragment of Pseudomonas fluorescens DNA was found to confer pseudomonic acid resistance on E. coli host cells and to contain the structural gene of ileS from P. fluorescens. In addition, E. coli strains carryin...

  16. Surface markers of T cells causing lethal graft-vs-host disease to class I vs class II H-2 differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information was sought on the phenotype of lymphoid cells causing lethal graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) in irradiated mice expressing whole or partial H-2 differences. In all strain combinations tested, pretreating donor lymph node (LN) cells with anti-Thy-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAb) plus complement (C) abolished mortality. With GVHD directed to class I H-2 differences, pretreating LN cells with anti-Lyt-2 MAb prevented mortality, whereas MAb specific for Ly-1 or L3T4 cell surface determinants caused severe mortality. These data imply that lethal GVHD directed to class I H-2 differences is mediated by L3T4-, Lyt-2+ cells; this subset of T cells was shown previously to control GVHD directed to multiple minor histocompatibility antigens, i.e., antigens seen in the context of self-class I molecules. With whole H-2 differences, GVHD appeared to be controlled largely but not exclusively by L3T4+, Lyt-2- T cells. This T cell subset was also the predominant cause of GVHD directed to class II differences. With class II incompatibilities, depleting donor cells of L3T4+ T cells, either by pretreatment with anti-L3T4 MAb + C or by fluorescence activated cell sorter selection, greatly reduced but did not completely abolish GVHD. These data might imply that L3T4-, Lyt-2+ cells have some capacity to elicit anti-class II GVHD. A more likely possibility, however, is that the residual GVHD to class II differences observed with Lyt-2+-enriched cells reflected minor contamination with L3T4+ cells

  17. Synthetic gene transfer vectors II: back to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Jean-Paul

    2012-07-17

    The discovery of RNA interference has given a new lease on life to both the chemistry of oligonucleotides and chemical approaches for the intracellular delivery of nucleic acids. In particular, delivery of siRNA, whether in vitro for screening and target validation purposes or in humans as a new class of drugs, may revolutionize our approach to therapy. Their impact could equal that of the bioproduction and various uses of monoclonal antibodies today. Unfortunately, global pharmaceutical companies again seem to be waiting to buy the next Genentech or Genzyme of gene silencing rather than investing research and development into this promising area of research. Gene silencing encounters barriers similar to gene addition and hence may benefit from the extra decade of experience brought by gene therapy. "Chemical" transfection of cells in culture has become routine, and this Account discusses some of the reasons this success has not extended to nonviral gene therapy trials, most of which do not progress beyond the phase 2 stage. The author also discusses a (much debated) mechanism of nucleic acid cell entry and subsequent release of the polycationic particles into the cytoplasm. Both topics should be useful to those interested in delivery of siRNA. The move from gene therapy toward siRNA as an oligonucleotide-based therapy strategy provides a much wider range of druggable targets. Even though these molecules are a hundredfold smaller than a gene, they are delivered via similar cellular mechanisms. Their complexes with cationic polymers are less stable than those with a higher number of phosphate groups, which may be compensated by siRNA concatemerization or by chemical conjugation with the cationic carrier. Thus chemistry is again desperately needed. PMID:22311735

  18. 25 CFR 547.10 - What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the fault is. (ii) Financial storage component full Reported when a financial instrument acceptor or... component is full. (iii) Financial output component empty Reported when a financial instrument dispenser is...) Disable all financial instrument disbursement, unless a test mode is entered. (2) The Class II...

  19. MHC class II-associated proteins in B-cell exosomes and potential functional implications for exosome biogenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschow, S.I.; Balkom, B.W.M. van; Aalberts, M.; Heck, A.J.R. van; Wauben, M.; Stoorvogel, W.

    2010-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells secrete major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) carrying exosomes with unclear physiological function(s). Exosomes are first generated as the intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) of a specific type of multivesicular body, and are then secreted by fusion of th

  20. Selection, diversity and evolutionary patterns of the MHC class II DAB in free-ranging Neotropical marsupials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otten Celine

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on the genetic architecture and diversity of the MHC has focused mainly on eutherian mammals, birds and fish. So far, studies on model marsupials used in laboratory investigations indicated very little or even no variation in MHC class II genes. However, natural levels of diversity and selection are unknown in marsupials as studies on wild populations are virtually absent. We used two endemic South American mouse opossums, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Marmosops incanus, to investigate characteristic features of MHC selection. This study is the first investigation of MHC selection in free-ranging Neotropical marsupials. In addition, the evolutionary history of MHC lineages within the group of marsupials was examined. Results G. microtarsus showed extensive levels of MHC diversity within and among individuals as 47 MHC-DAB alleles and high levels of sequence divergence were detected at a minimum of four loci. Positively selected codon sites were identified, of which most were congruent with human antigen binding sites. The diversity in M. incanus was rather low with only eight observed alleles at presumably two loci. However, these alleles also revealed high sequence divergence. Again, positive selection was identified on specific codon sites, all congruent with human ABS and with positively selected sites observed in G. microtarsus. In a phylogenetic comparison alleles of M. incanus interspersed widely within alleles of G. microtarsus with four alleles being present in both species. Conclusion Our investigations revealed extensive MHC class II polymorphism in a natural marsupial population, contrary to previous assumptions. Furthermore, our study confirms for the first time in marsupials the presence of three characteristic features common at MHC loci of eutherian mammals, birds and fish: large allelic sequence divergence, positive selection on specific sites and trans-specific polymorphism.

  1. Stem cell-like gene expression in ovarian cancer predicts type II subtype and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Schwede

    Full Text Available Although ovarian cancer is often initially chemotherapy-sensitive, the vast majority of tumors eventually relapse and patients die of increasingly aggressive disease. Cancer stem cells are believed to have properties that allow them to survive therapy and may drive recurrent tumor growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells are a rare cell population and difficult to isolate experimentally. Genes that are expressed by stem cells may characterize a subset of less differentiated tumors and aid in prognostic classification of ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study was the genomic identification and characterization of a subtype of ovarian cancer that has stem cell-like gene expression. Using human and mouse gene signatures of embryonic, adult, or cancer stem cells, we performed an unsupervised bipartition class discovery on expression profiles from 145 serous ovarian tumors to identify a stem-like and more differentiated subgroup. Subtypes were reproducible and were further characterized in four independent, heterogeneous ovarian cancer datasets. We identified a stem-like subtype characterized by a 51-gene signature, which is significantly enriched in tumors with properties of Type II ovarian cancer; high grade, serous tumors, and poor survival. Conversely, the differentiated tumors share properties with Type I, including lower grade and mixed histological subtypes. The stem cell-like signature was prognostic within high-stage serous ovarian cancer, classifying a small subset of high-stage tumors with better prognosis, in the differentiated subtype. In multivariate models that adjusted for common clinical factors (including grade, stage, age, the subtype classification was still a significant predictor of relapse. The prognostic stem-like gene signature yields new insights into prognostic differences in ovarian cancer, provides a genomic context for defining Type I/II subtypes, and potential gene targets which following further

  2. Antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory of Class II hydrophobin from wild strain Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalesi, Mohammadreza; Jahanbani, Raheleh; Riveros-Galan, David; Sheikh-Hassani, Vahid; Sheikh-Zeinoddin, Mahmoud; Sahihi, Mehdi; Winterburn, James; Derdelinckx, Guy; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-10-01

    There are several possible uses of the Class II hydrophobin HFBII in clinical applications. To fully understand and exploit this potential however, the antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory potential of this protein need to be better understood and have not been previously reported. In this study, the Class II hydrophobin HFBII was produced by the cultivation of wild type Trichoderma reesei. The crude hydrophobin extract obtained from the fermentation process was purified using reversed-phase liquid chromatography and the identity of the purified HFBII verified by MALDI-TOF (molecular weight: 7.2kDa). Subsequently the antioxidant activities of different concentrations of HFBII (0.01-0.40mg/mL) were determined. The results show that for HFBII concentrations of 0.04mg/mL and upwards the protein significantly reduced the presence of ABTS(+) radicals in the medium, the IC50 value found to be 0.13mg/mL. Computational modeling highlighted the role of the amino acid residues located in the conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the surface of the HFBII molecule and the interactions with the aromatic rings of ABTS. The ACE-inhibitory effect of HFBII was found to occur from 0.5mg/mL and upwards, making the combination of HFBII with strong ACE-inhibitors attractive for use in the healthcare industry. PMID:27211298

  3. Clinical effects of fixed functional Herbst appliance in the treatment of class II/1 malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljković Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sagittal mandible deficiency is the most common cause of skeletal Class II malocclusion. Treatment objective is to stimulate sagittal mandible growth. Fixed functional Herbst appliance use is beneficial for shortening the time required for treatment and does not depend on patient compliance. Case outline. A 13-year-old girl was referred to the Clinic of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry in Belgrade following previous unsuccessful treatment of her skeletal Class II malocclusion using an activator. The patient's poor cooperation had led to failure of the treatment. Patient was subjected to the Herbst treatment for 6 months followed by fixed appliance for another 8 months. Lateral cephalograms before and after the treatment was performed. The remodelation of condylar and fossal articulation was assessed by superimposition of pre- and post-treatment temporomandibular joint tomograms. The promotion of oral hygiene and fluoride use was performed because orthodontic treatment carries a high caries risk and risk for periodontal disease. Skeletal and dental changes were observed after treatment (correction [Max+Mand]: molar relation 7 mm, overjet 8 mm, skeletal relation 5 mm, molars 2 mm, incisors 3 mm. Combination of Herbst and fixed appliances was effective in the treatment of dental and skeletal irregularities for a short period of time. Conclusion . In the retention period, 14 months after treatment, occlusal stability exists. Follow-up care in oral prevention is based on regular recalls at the dental office and supervision at home by the parents.

  4. Human leukocyte antigen class II susceptibility conferring alleles among non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II susceptibility conferring alleles among type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients, in comparison with healthy controls. Cross-sectional comparative study. Patients with non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus meeting World Health Organization criteria were studied. These were compared with age and gender matched healthy control subjects. For each subject (patients as well as controls), DNA was extracted from ethylene diamine tetra-acetate sample and HLA class II DRB1 typing was carried out at allele group level (DRB1*01-DRB1*16) by sequence specific primers. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results were recorded. Frequencies were determined as number of an allele divided by total number of alleles per group; p-value was computed using Pearson's chi-square test. Among the 100 patients, there were 63 males and 37 females with 68 controls. A total of 13 different HLA DRB1 alleles were detected, with DRB1*15 being the commonest in both the groups. The allele DRB1*13 had statistically significant higher frequency in patient group as compared to controls (p 0.005). HLA DRB1*13 was found with a significantly increased frequency in non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus. (author)

  5. Prediction of positive food effect: Bioavailability enhancement of BCS class II drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Siddarth; Polli, James E

    2016-06-15

    High-throughput screening methods have increased the number of poorly water-soluble, highly permeable drug candidates. Many of these candidates have increased bioavailability when administered with food (i.e., exhibit a positive food effect). Food is known to impact drug bioavailability through a variety of mechanisms, including drug solubilization and prolonged gastric residence time. In vitro dissolution media that aim to mimic in vivo gastrointestinal (GI) conditions have been developed to lessen the need for fed human bioequivalence studies. The objective of this work was to develop an in vitro lipolysis model to predict positive food effect of three BCS Class II drugs (i.e., danazol, amiodarone and ivermectin) in previously developed lipolysis media. This in vitro lipolysis model was comparatively benchmarked against FeSSIF and FaSSIF media that were modified for an in vitro lipolysis approach, as FeSSIF and FaSSIF are widely used in in vitro dissolution studies. The in vitro lipolysis model accurately predicted the in vivo positive food effect for three model BCS class II drugs. The in vitro lipolysis model has potential use as a screening test of drug candidates in early development to assess positive food effect. PMID:27067239

  6. Correlations between dentoskeletal variables and deep bite in Class II Division 1 individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Silva Marques

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the cephalometric pattern of Class II Division 1 individuals with deep bite, and to determine possible correlations between dentoskeletal variables and deep bite. Comparisons were also made between genders and cases that were to be treated both with and without premolar extraction. A total of 70 lateral cephalograms were used, from both male (n = 35 and female (n = 35 individuals with an average age of 11.6 years, who simultaneously presented with ANB > 5º and overbite > 4 mm. Statistical analysis involved parametric (t-test and non-parametric (Mann-Whitney tests for independent samples, as well as the Spearman correlation test (p < 0.05. The values of Go-Me, Ar-Pog, PM-1 and PM-CMI were higher in males (p < 0.05. However, no significant differences were found among the averages of the cephalometric measurements when the sample was divided by treatment with and without extraction. Deep bite was positively correlated to the PM-1 and SNA measurements, and negatively correlated to the Go-Me, Ar-Pog, SNB and SNGoMe measurements. The main factors associated with the determination of deep bite in Angle's Class II Division 1 cases were: greater lower anterior dentoalveolar growth and/or lower incisor extrusion, horizontal growth pattern, maxillary protrusion and mandibular retrusion.

  7. Major histocompatibility complex class II alleles and haplotypes associated with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in greyhounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiel, R E; Kennedy, L J; Nolan, C M; Mooney, C T; Callanan, J J

    2014-09-01

    Non-suppurative meningoencephalitis is a breed-restricted canine neuroinflammatory disorder affecting young greyhounds in Ireland. A genetic risk factor is suspected because of the development of disease in multiple siblings and an inability to identify a causative infectious agent. The aim of this study was to examine potential associations between dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotype and the presence of the disease. DLA three locus haplotypes were determined in 31 dogs with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis and in 115 healthy control dogs using sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. All dogs were unrelated at the parental level. Two haplotypes (DRB1*01802/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00802 and DRB1*01501/DQA1*00601/DQB1*02201) were significantly (P = 0.0099 and 0.037) associated with the presence of meningoencephalitis, with odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of 5.531 (1.168-26.19) and 3.736 (1.446-9.652), respectively. These results confirm that there is an association between DLA class II haplotype and greyhound meningoencephalitis, suggesting an immunogenetic risk factor for the development of the disease. Greyhound meningoencephalitis may be a suitable model for human neuroinflammatory diseases with an immunogenetic component. PMID:24851745

  8. Immunotoxin Against a Donor MHC Class II Molecule Induces Indefinite Survival of Murine Kidney Allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K; Nowocin, A K; Meader, L; Edwards, L A; Smith, R A; Wong, W

    2016-04-01

    Rejection of donor organs depends on the trafficking of donor passenger leukocytes to the secondary lymphoid organs of the recipient to elicit an immune response via the direct antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, the depletion of passenger leukocytes may be clinically applicable as a strategy to improve graft survival. Because major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II(+) cells are most efficient at inducing immune responses, selective depletion of this population from donor grafts may dampen the alloimmune response and prolong graft survival. In a fully MHC mismatched mouse kidney allograft model, we describe the synthesis of an immunotoxin, consisting of the F(ab')2 fragment of a monoclonal antibody against the donor MHC class II molecule I-A(k) conjugated with the plant-derived ribosomal inactivating protein gelonin. This anti-I-A(k) gelonin immunotoxin depletes I-A(k) expressing cells specifically in vitro and in vivo. When given to recipients of kidney allografts, it resulted in indefinite graft survival with normal graft function, presence of Foxp3(+) cells within donor grafts, diminished donor-specific antibody formation, and delayed rejection of subsequent donor-type skin grafts. Strategies aimed at the donor arm of the immune system using agents such as immunotoxins may be a useful adjuvant to existing recipient-orientated immunosuppression. PMID:26799449

  9. Human HLA class I- and HLA class II-restricted cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes identify a cluster of epitopes on the measles virus fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Binnendijk, R S; Versteeg-van Oosten, J P; Poelen, M C; Brugghe, H F; Hoogerhout, P; Osterhaus, A D; Uytdehaag, F G

    1993-01-01

    The transmembrane fusion (F) glycoprotein of measles virus is an important target antigen of human HLA class I- and class II-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Genetically engineered F proteins and nested sets of synthetic peptides spanning the F protein were used to determine sequences of F recognized by a number of F-specific CTL clones. Combined N- and C-terminal deletions of the respective peptides revealed that human HLA class I and HLA class II-restricted CTL efficiently recognize nonapeptides or decapeptides representing epitopes of F. Three distinct sequences recognized by three different HLA class II (DQw1, DR2, and DR4/w53)-restricted CTL clones appear to cluster between amino acids 379 and 466 of F, thus defining an important T-cell epitope area of F. Within this same region, a nonamer peptide of F was found to be recognized by an HLA-B27-restricted CTL clone, as expected on the basis of the structural homology between this peptide and other known HLA-B27 binding peptides. PMID:7680390

  10. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Ole

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule plays a central role in controlling the adaptive immune response to infections. MHC class I molecules present peptides derived from intracellular proteins to cytotoxic T cells, whereas MHC class II molecules stimulate cellular and humoral immunity through presentation of extracellularly derived peptides to helper T cells. Identification of which peptides will bind a given MHC molecule is thus of great importance for the understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and large efforts have been placed in developing algorithms capable of predicting this binding event. Results Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the training data due to redundant binding core representation. Incorporation of information about the residues flanking the peptide-binding core is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy. The method is evaluated on a large-scale benchmark consisting of six independent data sets covering 14 human MHC class II alleles, and is demonstrated to outperform other state-of-the-art MHC class II prediction methods. Conclusion The NN-align method is competitive with the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction algorithms. The method is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCII-2.0.

  11. Rational Design Synthesis and Evaluation of New Selective Inhibitors of Microbial Class II (Zinc Dependent) Fructose Bis-phosphate Aldolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Daher; M Coincon; M Fonvielle; P Gest; M Guerin; M Jackson; J Sygusch; M Therisod

    2011-12-31

    We report the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of several selective inhibitors of class II (zinc dependent) fructose bis-phosphate aldolases (Fba). The products were designed as transition-state analogues of the catalyzed reaction, structurally related to the substrate fructose bis-phosphate (or sedoheptulose bis-phosphate) and based on an N-substituted hydroxamic acid, as a chelator of the zinc ion present in active site. The compounds synthesized were tested on class II Fbas from various pathogenic microorganisms and, by comparison, on a mammalian class I Fba. The best inhibitor shows Ki against class II Fbas from various pathogens in the nM range, with very high selectivity (up to 105). Structural analyses of inhibitors in complex with aldolases rationalize and corroborate the enzymatic kinetics results. These inhibitors represent lead compounds for the preparation of new synthetic antibiotics, notably for tuberculosis prophylaxis.

  12. Epidermal control of floral organ identity by class B homeotic genes in Antirrhinum and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremova, N; Perbal, M C; Yephremov, A; Hofmann, W A; Saedler, H; Schwarz-Sommer, Z

    2001-07-01

    To assess the contribution of the epidermis to the control of petal and stamen organ identity, we have used transgenic Antirrhinum and Arabidopsis plants that expressed the Antirrhinum class B homeotic transcription factors DEFICIENS (DEF) and GLOBOSA (GLO) in the epidermis. Transgene expression was controlled by the ANTIRRHINUM FIDDLEHEAD (AFI) promoter, which directs gene expression to the L1 meristematic layer and, later, to the epidermis of differentiating organs. Transgenic epidermal DEF and GLO chimeras display similar phenotypes, suggesting similar epidermal contributions by the two class B genes in ANTIRRHINUM: Epidermal B function autonomously controls the differentiation of Antirrhinum petal epidermal cell types, but cannot fully control the pattern of cell divisions and the specification of sub-epidermal petal cell-identity by epidermal signalling. This non-autonomous control is enhanced if the endogenous class B genes can be activated from the epidermis. The developmental influence of epidermal B function in Antirrhinum stamen development is very limited. In contrast, epidermal B function in Arabidopsis can control most if not all epidermal and sub-epidermal differentiation events in petals and stamens, without any contribution from the endogenous class B genes. Possible reasons for differences in the efficacy of B-function-mediated cell communication between the two species are discussed. Interestingly, our experiments uncovered partial incompatibility between class B functional homologues. Although the DEFICIENS/PISTILLATA heterodimer is functional in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, the APETALA3/GLOBOSA heterodimer is not. PMID:11526073

  13. Integrating MRP (materiel requirements planning) II and JIT to achieve world-class status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titone, R C

    1994-05-01

    The concepts and principles of using manufacturing resource planning (MRP II) for planning are not new. Their success has been proven in numerous manufacturing companies in America. The concepts and principles of using just-in-time (JIT) inventory for execution, while more recent, have also been available for some time, and their success in Japan well documented. However, it is the effective integration of these two powerful tools that open the way to achieving world-class manufacturing status. This article will utilize a newly developed world-class manufacturing model, which will review the aspects of planning, beginning with a business plan through the production planning process and culminating with a master schedule that drives a materiel/capacity plan. The importance and interrelationship of these functions are reviewed. The model then illustrates the important aspects of executing these plans beginning with people issues, through total quality control (TQC) and pull systems. We will then utilize this new functional model to demonstrate the relationship between these various functions and the importance of integrating them with a total comprehensive manufacturing strategy that will lead to world-class manufacturing and profits. PMID:10134156

  14. Evolution of Dopamine Receptor Genes of the D1 Class in Vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Kei(Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan); Mirabeau, Olivier; Bureau, Charlotte; Blin, Maryline; Michon-Coudouel, Sophie; Demarque, Michaël; Vernier, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The receptors of the dopamine neurotransmitter belong to two unrelated classes named D1 and D2. For the D1 receptor class, only two subtypes are found in mammals, the D1A and D1B, receptors, whereas additional subtypes, named D1C, D1D, and D1X, have been found in other vertebrate species. Here, we analyzed molecular phylogeny, gene synteny, and gene expression pattern of the D1 receptor subtypes in a large range of vertebrate species, which leads us to propose a new view of the evolution of D...

  15. Structure and expression of genes encoding murine Qa-2 class I antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Mellor, A L; Antoniou, J; Robinson, P J

    1985-01-01

    DNA structural analysis of the Qa region in two BALB/c mouse substrains with different Qa-2 phenotypes reveals that a deletion of DNA has occurred in BALB/cBy (Qa-2-) mice relative to BALB/c (Qa-2+) mice. We propose that this deletion arises from unequal crossing-over and recombination between adjacent BALB/c class I genes and results in the generation of a hybrid class I gene in BALB/cBy mice. Furthermore, we suggest that this is a direct cause of the change in Qa-2 phenotype. Further suppor...

  16. Developmental robustness by obligate interaction of class B floral homeotic genes and proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Lenser

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available DEF-like and GLO-like class B floral homeotic genes encode closely related MADS-domain transcription factors that act as developmental switches involved in specifying the identity of petals and stamens during flower development. Class B gene function requires transcriptional upregulation by an autoregulatory loop that depends on obligate heterodimerization of DEF-like and GLO-like proteins. Because switch-like behavior of gene expression can be displayed by single genes already, the functional relevance of this complex circuitry has remained enigmatic. On the basis of a stochastic in silico model of class B gene and protein interactions, we suggest that obligate heterodimerization of class B floral homeotic proteins is not simply the result of neutral drift but enhanced the robustness of cell-fate organ identity decisions in the presence of stochastic noise. This finding strongly corroborates the view that the appearance of this regulatory mechanism during angiosperm phylogeny led to a canalization of flower development and evolution.

  17. Diversity of gene cassettes and the abundance of the class 1 integron-integrase gene in sediment polluted by metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Pinto, Clarisse; Costa, Patrícia S; Reis, Mariana P; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2016-05-01

    The integron-gene cassette system has typically been associated with antibiotic-resistant pathogens. However, the diversity of gene cassettes and the abundance of class 1 integrons outside of the clinical context are not fully explored. Primers targeting the conserved segments of attC recombination sites were used to amplify gene cassettes from the sediment of the Mina stream, which exhibited a higher degree of stress to metal pollution in the dry season than the rainy season. Of the 143 total analyzed sequences, 101 had no matches to proteins in the database, where cassette open reading frames could be identified by homology with database entries. There was a predominance of sequences encoding essential cellular functions. Each season that was sampled yielded a specific pool of gene cassettes. Real-time PCR revealed that 8.5 and 41.6 % of bacterial cells potentially harbored a class 1 integron in the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. In summary, our findings demonstrate that most of the gene cassettes have no ascribable function and, apparently, historically metal-contaminated sediment favors the maintenance of bacteria containing the intI1 gene. Thus, the diversity of gene cassettes is far from being fully explored deserving further attention. PMID:26961777

  18. Articulación de fones en individuos clase esqueletal I,II y III Speech patterns in skeletal class I, II and III subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pía Villanueva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar los patrones de articulación de fones consonánticos en sujetos de habla española chilena clases I, II y III esqueletal; comparar las diferencias fonéticas que existan entre clases esqueletales. MÉTODOS: se seleccionaron 54 individuos que cumplían con los criterios de inclusión determinados mediante un examen clínico intraoral y a través del análisis de Ricketts, y se conformaron los grupos de estudio de pacientes clases esqueletales I, II y III. Se les realizó un examen fonoarticulatorio estandarizado para determinar los fones modificados y el patrón articulatorio compensatorio realizado. RESULTADOS: se observaron cambios en el punto de articulación de fones consonánticos en las tres clases esqueletales, con diferencias significativas en los grupos de fones anteriores y medios entre pacientes clases I y II, sólo en el grupo de los fones anteriores entre pacientes I y III. Entre pacientes clases II y III no se observaron diferencias significativas. Se reportan modificaciones y compensaciones cualitativamente distintas entre las clases esqueletales. CONCLUSIONES: en relación a pacientes clase I, los pacientes clase II o III, presentan distinto grado de modificación en el punto de articulación de fones consonánticos. Las diferencias observadas se relacionan con los patrones esqueletales propios de cada clase.PURPOSE: to determine the consonant phonemes articulation patterns in Chilean skeletal class I, II and III Spanish speakers and compare their phonetic differences. METHODS: fifty-four skeletal class I, II and III subjects were selected, based on intraoral clinical examination and Ricketts cephalometric analysis, constituting the study groups. A standardized phonoarticulatory test was applied to each patient to determine the modified phonemes and their compensatory patterns. RESULTS: the findings indicate changes in articulation in all three groups. Significant differences were found in anterior and medium

  19. Evolution of dopamine receptor genes of the D1 class in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kei; Mirabeau, Olivier; Bureau, Charlotte; Blin, Maryline; Michon-Coudouel, Sophie; Demarque, Michaël; Vernier, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    The receptors of the dopamine neurotransmitter belong to two unrelated classes named D1 and D2. For the D1 receptor class, only two subtypes are found in mammals, the D1A and D1B, receptors, whereas additional subtypes, named D1C, D1D, and D1X, have been found in other vertebrate species. Here, we analyzed molecular phylogeny, gene synteny, and gene expression pattern of the D1 receptor subtypes in a large range of vertebrate species, which leads us to propose a new view of the evolution of D1 dopamine receptor genes. First, we show that D1C and D1D receptor sequences are encoded by orthologous genes. Second, the previously identified Cypriniform D1X sequence is a teleost-specific paralog of the D1B sequences found in all groups of jawed vertebrates. Third, zebrafish and several sauropsid species possess an additional D1-like gene, which is likely to form another orthology group of vertebrate ancestral genes, which we propose to name D1E. Ancestral jawed vertebrates are thus likely to have possessed four classes of D1 receptor genes-D1A, D1B(X), D1C(D), and D1E-which arose from large-scale gene duplications. The D1C receptor gene would have been secondarily lost in the mammalian lineage, whereas the D1E receptor gene would have been lost independently in several lineages of modern vertebrates. The D1A receptors are well conserved throughout jawed vertebrates, whereas sauropsid D1C receptors have rapidly diverged, to the point that they were misidentified as D1D. The functional significance of the D1C receptor loss is not known. It is possible that the function may have been substituted with D1A or D1B receptors in mammals, following the disappearance of D1C receptors in these species. PMID:23197594

  20. Cephalometric-radiographic study, in lateral norm, considering the established standards of white Brazilian teenagers who presented normal occlusions and mal-occlusions of Class I and Class II, 1st Division and the ones from Ricketts' analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, our purpose was make a cephalometric-radiographic study, comparing white Brazilian teenagers who presented normal occlusion and the ones who presented malocclusions of Class I and Class II, according to RICKETT'S analysis (1960). (author)

  1. Má oclusão Classe II de Angle tratada sem extrações e com controle de crescimento Angle Class II malocclusion treated without extractions and with growth control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Artese

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A má oclusão Classe II de Angle é caracterizada por uma discrepância dentária anteroposterior, que geralmente está acompanhada por alterações esqueléticas. O tratamento ortodôntico precoce permite a correção da discrepância esquelética por controle de crescimento (primeira fase, o que favorece a correção do posicionamento dentário, mais tardiamente (segunda fase. Este relato descreve o tratamento de um caso de má oclusão Classe II, divisão 2, de Angle, em duas fases, e foi apresentado à Diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, como parte dos requisitos para a obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO. O caso foi avaliado como representante da Categoria 1, ou seja, má oclusão Classe II de Angle tratada sem extrações dentárias e com controle de crescimento.Angle Class II malocclusion is characterized by an anteroposterior dental discrepancy which is generally accompanied by skeletal disharmonies. Early orthodontic treatment allows the correction of skeletal discrepancies using growth control (first phase which favors later correction of tooth positioning (second phase. This case report describes an Angle Class II, division 2, malocclusion treated in two phases and was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as part of the requirements for BBO certification. It was evaluated as a Category 1 case, i.e., Class II malocclusion treated without extractions, with growth control.

  2. Study of the number of occlusal contacts in maximum intercuspation before orthodontic treatment in subjects with Angle Class I and Class II Division 1 malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Watanabe-Kanno

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Define and compare numbers and types of occlusal contacts in maximum intercuspation. METHODS: The study consisted of clinical and photographic analysis of occlusal contacts in maximum intercuspation. Twenty-six Caucasian Brazilian subjects were selected before orthodontic treatment, 20 males and 6 females, with ages ranging between 12 and 18 years. The subjects were diagnosed and grouped as follows: 13 with Angle Class I malocclusion and 13 with Angle Class II Division 1 malocclusion. After analysis, the occlusal contacts were classified according to the established criteria as: tripodism, bipodism, monopodism (respectively, three, two or one contact point with the slope of the fossa; cuspid to a marginal ridge; cuspid to two marginal ridges; cuspid tip to opposite inclined plane; surface to surface; and edge to edge. RESULTS: The mean number of occlusal contacts per subject in Class I malocclusion was 43.38 and for Class II Division 1 malocclusion it was 44.38, this difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: There is a variety of factors that influence the number of occlusal contacts between a Class I and a Class II, Division 1 malocclusion. There is no standardization of occlusal contact type according to the studied malocclusions. A proper selection of occlusal contact types such as cuspid to fossa or cuspid to marginal ridge and its location in the teeth should be individually defined according to the demands of each case. The existence of an adequate occlusal contact leads to a correct distribution of forces, promoting periodontal health.

  3. Antimicrobial resistance, class 1 and 2 integrons and gene cassettes in avian Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Robino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy-four Escherichia coli isolates were collected from domestic, synanthropic free living birds as well as wild and exotic birds, all living in captivity. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested against a panel of 9 antibiotics, and presence of integrons (Class 1 and Class 2 and gene cassettes was analysed by PCR and sequencing, respectively. Twenty-eight isolates proved positive for Class 1 integrons and 19 for Class 2. Gene cassette arrangements were determined in 23 integron-positive isolates, which harboured one (aadA1 two (dfrA1-aadA1 or three (dfrA7-dfrA1-aadA1, dfrA1-sat1-aadA1 cassettes in their variable region. E. coli multiresistance to antimicrobials was observed in all groups examined, in particular domestic and synanthropic birds showed resistance to at least 4 antibiotics. A large number of isolates from domestic and synantropic birds proved to be Class 1 integron- positive, but unexpectedly, we observed many Class 2 integrons, usually considered less frequent.

  4. Alkali/Surfactant/Polymer Flooding in the Daqing Oilfield Class II Reservoirs Using Associating Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru-Sen Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophobically modified associating polyacrylamide (HAPAM has good compatibility with the Daqing heavy alkylbenzene sulfonate surfactant. The HAPAM alkali/surfactant/polymer (ASP system can generate ultralow interfacial tension in a wide range of alkali/surfactant concentrations and maintain stable viscosity and interfacial tension for 120 days. The HAPAM ASP system has good injectivity for the Daqing class II reservoirs (100–300 × 10−3 μm2 and can improve oil recovery by more than 25% on top of water flooding. In the presence of both the alkali and the surfactant, the surfactant interacts with the associating groups of the polymer to form more micelles, which can significantly enhance the viscosity of the ASP system. Compared with using HPAM (Mw = 2.5 MDa, using HAPAM can reduce the polymer use by more than 40%.

  5. A randomized controlled 30 years follow up of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2015-01-01

    three (one set) as similar as possible Class II restorations of moderate size.After cavity preparation, the three cavities were chosen at random to be restored with twochemical-cured (P10, Miradapt) and one light-cured resin composite (P30). A chemical-curedenamel bonding agent was applied after etching...... of the enamel. The chemical-cured resincomposites were placed in bulk and the light-cured in increments. One operator placed 99restorations (33 sets). The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified USPHS crite-ria at baseline, 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 years. Statistical analyses were...... performed by theKaplan–Meier, log-rank test and Cox regression analyses. Results. After 30 years, 5 participants with 15 restorations (15%) could not be evaluated duringthe whole evaluation. Seven participants were considered as caries risk and eight partici-pants as having active parafunctional habits...

  6. As implicações da classe II de angle e da desproporção esquelética tipo classe II no aspecto miofuncional The implications of class II angle and class II type skeletal disproportion on the myofunctional aspect

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Lisbôa Mezzomo; Patrícia Girarde Machado; Andrielle de Bitencourt Pacheco; Bruna Franciele da Trindade Gonçalves; Carla Franco Hoffmann

    2011-01-01

    TEMA: esse trabalho foi baseado na temática de que existe uma associação entre as más oclusões devido a alterações do crescimento craniofacial, e, por conseguinte, a existência de alterações miofuncionais. OBJETIVOS: estudar a associação entre as más oclusões tipo classe II desencadeadas por alterações do crescimento craniofacial e as disfunções do sistema estomatognático (alterações miofuncionais: fala, mastigação, deglutição e fonação). CONCLUSÃO: pode-se concluir que alterações estruturais...

  7. Discovery of periodic class II methanol masers associated with G339.986-0.425 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maswanganye, J. P.; van der Walt, D. J.; Goedhart, S.; Gaylard, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    10 new class II methanol masers from the 6.7-GHz Methanol Multibeam survey catalogues III and IV were selected for a monitoring programme at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz with the 26-m Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory radio telescope for 2 yr and 9 months, from 2012 August to 2015 May. In the sample, only masers associated with G339.986-0.425 were found to show periodic variability at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz. The existence of periodic variation was tested with four independent methods. The analytical method gave the best estimation of the period, which was 246 ± 1 d. The time series of G339.986-0.425 show strong correlations across velocity channels and between the 6.7- and 12.2-GHz masers. The time delay was also measured across channels and shows structure across the spectrum which is continuous between different maser components.

  8. Orthodontic camouflage via total arch movement in a Class II with idiopathic condylar resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Sung Jang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic condylar resorption (ICR, also known as idiopathic condylysis or condylar atrophy, is multifactorial pathology leading to severe mandibular retrognathism. The etiology has been shown to be multifactorial, such as avascular necrosis, traumatic injuries, hormone and autoimmune disease and it is largely difficult to distinguish the exact cause in each individual. In spite of the remarkable morphological alteration, surgical intervention is not readily recruited due to the possibility of recurrence of resorption. In order to restore balanced facial profile and occlusion. In this report, we present a camouflage treatment for skeletal Class II with ICR and facial asymmetry involving total arch movement, for the improvement facial profile and reconstruction of occlusion.

  9. Treatment effects of myofunctional appliances in different jaw rotations in Class II division 1 malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyumi V Shethiya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This retrospective study was conducted to determine skeletal, dentoalveolar changes in children treated with Twin Block or activator for the treatment of Class II Division 1 malocclusion with different jaw rotations. Materials and Methods: Standardized lateral cephalograms of 32 patients (18 boys, 14 girls between the ages of 11 and 14 years were chosen and divided into two groups, high angle (FMA >27 and low angle (FMA <20. Cephalograms were taken at T1 (pre-treatment and T2 (after one year of myofunctional therapy.These were manually traced and analysed. Results: The results showed statistically significant increase in SNB angle, VRP-Pog due to forward movement of the mandible. The overjet reduced significantly due to retroclination of upper incisors and proclination of lower incisors in both groups. Conclusion: It was concluded that both high angle and low angle groups responded equally well to myofunctional therapy showing significant skeletal and dentoalveolar changes.

  10. Partial N-terminal sequence analysis of human class II molecules expressing the DQw3 determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, F; Endo, T; Yoshii, M; Otani, F; Igarashi, M; Takenouchi, T; Ikeda, H; Ogasawara, K; Kasahara, M; Wakisaka, A

    1985-09-01

    HLA-DQ molecules were isolated from DRw9-homozygous and DR4-homozygous cell lines by using a monoclonal antibody HU-18, which recognizes class II molecules carrying the conventional DQw3 determinant. The partial N-terminal sequence analysis of the DQw3 molecules revealed that they have sequences homologous to those of murine I-A molecules. Within the limits of our sequence analysis, the DQw3 molecules from the two cell lines are identical to each other in both the alpha and beta chains. The DQ alpha as well as DQ beta chains were found to have amino acid substitutions when compared to other I-A-like molecules whose sequences have been reported. These differences may contribute to the DQw supertypic specificity. The polymorphic nature of DQ molecules is in marked contrast to that of DR molecules where DR alpha chains are highly conserved while DR beta chains have easily detectable amino acid substitutions. PMID:2411700

  11. Toward a network model of MHC class II-restricted antigen processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence C Eisenlohr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The standard model of Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII-restricted antigen processing depicts a straightforward, linear pathway: Internalized antigens are converted into peptides that load in a chaperone dependent manner onto nascent MHCII in the late endosome, the complexes subsequently trafficking to the cell surface for recognition by CD4+ T cells (TCD4+. Several variations on this theme, both moderate and radical, have come to light but these alternatives have remained peripheral, the conventional pathway generally presumed to be the primary driver of TCD4+ responses. Here we continue to press for the conceptual repositioning of these alternatives toward the center while proposing that MHCII processing be thought of less in terms of discrete pathways and more in terms of a network whose major and minor conduits are variable depending upon many factors, including the epitope, the nature of the antigen, the source of the antigen, and the identity of the antigen-presenting cell.

  12. THERMODYNAMICS OF PEPTIDE-MHC CLASS II INTERACTIONS: NOT ALL COMPLEXES ARE CREATED EQUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eFerrante

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive immune response begins when CD4+ T cells recognize antigenic peptides bound to class II molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHCII. The interaction between peptides and MHCII has been historically interpreted as a rigid docking event. However, this model has been challenged by the evidence that conformational flexibility plays an important role in peptide-MHCII complex formation. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding reaction suggests a model of complexation in which the physical-chemical nature of the peptide determines the variability in flexibility of the substates in the peptide-MHC conformational ensemble. This review discusses our understanding of the correlation between thermodynamics of peptide binding and structural features of the resulting complex as well as their impact on HLA-DM activity and on our ability to predict MHCII-restricted epitopes.

  13. Analysis of the non classical class I genes of the MHC in swine

    OpenAIRE

    Rui, Hu

    2011-01-01

    In pig, very little information is available on the three non classical MHC class I genes SLA-6, -7 and -8 (SLA-Ib genes). Our aim was to increase knowledge on SLA-Ib genes by studying their polymorphism, transcription and protein expression. Full length transcripts were characterized from thymus and brain of MeLiM pigs resulting in the annotation of 8 exons for SLA-7 and -8 and 7 exons for SLA-6. The three full length cDNAs encode molecules with a predicted folding consistent with peptide pr...

  14. Challenges in microarray class discovery: a comprehensive examination of normalization, gene selection and clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landfors Mattias

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cluster analysis, and in particular hierarchical clustering, is widely used to extract information from gene expression data. The aim is to discover new classes, or sub-classes, of either individuals or genes. Performing a cluster analysis commonly involve decisions on how to; handle missing values, standardize the data and select genes. In addition, pre-processing, involving various types of filtration and normalization procedures, can have an effect on the ability to discover biologically relevant classes. Here we consider cluster analysis in a broad sense and perform a comprehensive evaluation that covers several aspects of cluster analyses, including normalization. Result We evaluated 2780 cluster analysis methods on seven publicly available 2-channel microarray data sets with common reference designs. Each cluster analysis method differed in data normalization (5 normalizations were considered, missing value imputation (2, standardization of data (2, gene selection (19 or clustering method (11. The cluster analyses are evaluated using known classes, such as cancer types, and the adjusted Rand index. The performances of the different analyses vary between the data sets and it is difficult to give general recommendations. However, normalization, gene selection and clustering method are all variables that have a significant impact on the performance. In particular, gene selection is important and it is generally necessary to include a relatively large number of genes in order to get good performance. Selecting genes with high standard deviation or using principal component analysis are shown to be the preferred gene selection methods. Hierarchical clustering using Ward's method, k-means clustering and Mclust are the clustering methods considered in this paper that achieves the highest adjusted Rand. Normalization can have a significant positive impact on the ability to cluster individuals, and there are indications that

  15. Class I and Class II restorations of resin composite: an FE analysis of the influence of modulus of elasticity on stresses generated by occlusal loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2008-01-01

    was that the marginal stresses would decrease with increasing modulus of elasticity of the restoration. METHODS: A cylindrical tooth was modelled in enamel and dentin and fitted with a Class I or a Class II restoration of resin composite. In one scenario the restoration was bonded to the tooth, in...... another the restoration was left nonbonded. The resin composite was modelled with a modulus of elasticity of 5, 10, 15 or 20 GPa and loaded occlusally with 100 N. By means of the soft-ware program ABAQUS the von Mises stresses in enamel and dentin were calculated. RESULTS: In the bonded scenario, the...

  16. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-01-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes...

  17. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - RDX Type II Class 5 Standard, Data Set 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollard, Colin J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Sorenson, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Moran, Jesse S. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Applied Research Associates, Inc., Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whipple, Richard E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-04-11

    This document describes the results of the first reference sample material—RDX Type II Class 5—examined in the proficiency study for small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing of explosive materials for the Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program. The IDCA program is conducting proficiency testing on homemade explosives (HMEs). The reference sample materials are being studied to establish the accuracy of traditional explosives safety testing for each performing laboratory. These results will be used for comparison to results from testing HMEs. This effort, funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), ultimately will put the issues of safe handling of these materials in perspective with standard military explosives. The results of the study will add SSST testing results for a broad suite of different HMEs to the literature, potentially suggest new guidelines and methods for HME testing, and possibly establish what are the needed accuracies in SSST testing to develop safe handling practices. Described here are the results for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and scanning calorimetry analysis of a reference sample of RDX Type II Class 5. The results from each participating testing laboratory are compared using identical test material and preparation methods wherever possible. Note, however, the test procedures differ among the laboratories. These results are then compared to historical data from various sources. The performers involved are Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Air Force Research Laboratory/ RXQL (AFRL), Indian Head Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, (IHD-NSWC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). These tests are conducted as a proficiency study in order to establish some consistency in test protocols, procedures, and experiments and to understand how to compare results when test protocols are not identical.

  18. Microleakage of Class II Combined Amalgam-Composite Restorations Using Different Composites and Bonding Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sharafeddin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage of composite restorations with and without a cervical amalgam base and to compare the results of dif-ferent composites and bonding agents.Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty mesio-occlusal (MO and disto-occlusal (DO Class II cavities were prepared on sixty extracted permanent premolar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 30 and restored as follows:In group A, the mesio-occlusal cavity (MO, Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 and in the disto-occlusal (DO cavity, Prompt-L-Pop + Z250 were applied. As for group B, in the MO and DO cavities, Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX, and varnish + amalgam (In box + Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX were used respectivelywhile in group C; the teeth were restored with amalgam and varnish mesio-occlusally and with amalgam only disto-occlusally. As for group D, varnish + amalgam (in box + Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 were applied mesio-occlusally and Varnish + Amalgam (in box + Prompt–L–Pop + Z250 disto-occlusally.Marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration into various sections of the restored teeth. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for data analysis.Results: Microleakage in gingival margin was more than that in occlusal margin (P<0.05 and microleakage of combined amalgam-composite restorations was significantly lower than that of conventional composite and amalgam restorations.Conclusion: Marginal microleakage decreased by using amalgam at the base of the box in Class II composite restorations.

  19. As implicações da classe II de angle e da desproporção esquelética tipo classe II no aspecto miofuncional The implications of class II angle and class II type skeletal disproportion on the myofunctional aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Lisbôa Mezzomo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: esse trabalho foi baseado na temática de que existe uma associação entre as más oclusões devido a alterações do crescimento craniofacial, e, por conseguinte, a existência de alterações miofuncionais. OBJETIVOS: estudar a associação entre as más oclusões tipo classe II desencadeadas por alterações do crescimento craniofacial e as disfunções do sistema estomatognático (alterações miofuncionais: fala, mastigação, deglutição e fonação. CONCLUSÃO: pode-se concluir que alterações estruturais da face podem ter influência na funcionalidade das mesmas, portanto, enfatiza-se a importância do trabalho multidisciplinar entre os profissionais envolvidos em cada uma dessas aéreas para que o prognóstico desses casos seja pertinente de relevantes melhoras.BACKGROUND: this work has been based on the theme that there is an association between malocclusion due to change in craniofacial growth, and therefore, the existence of malfunctioning abnormalities. PURPOSE: to study the strong association among the malocclusion class II triggered by changes in craniofacial growth and dysfunctions of the stomatognathic system (myofunctional disorders - speech, chewing, swallowing and phonation. CONCLUSION: it may be concluded that structural changes of the face may affect its, and therefore, the importance of multidisciplinary work among professionals involved in each of those areas, is emphasized, so that the prognosis of these cases may have relevant and important improvements.

  20. Deciding factors in the treatment of Class II division 1 cases with and without single-jaw extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaf, Houb-Dine; Bahije, Loubna; Zaoui, Fatima; Abouqal, Redouane; Rerhrhaye, Wiam

    2014-06-01

    Extraction of two upper premolars in Class II division 1 occlusions often constitutes a therapeutic compromise for the orthodontic practitioner. The aim of our study was to compare the initial occlusal and cephalometric severity of Class II division 1 malocclusions in two groups of patients treated with and without extraction of two upper premolars and thus determine the factor or factors determining this therapeutic option. Examination of the casts and cephalometric analysis of 31 patients presenting a Class II division 1 malocclusion were made. The non-extraction group comprised 16 patients and the group undergoing extraction of two upper premolars comprised 15 patients. Discriminant analysis was applied using binary decision trees in order to identify the variable which best distinguished the two groups. Maxillary incisor-canine crowding was selected to discriminate between the patients at pretreatment stage; 93.5% of the patients were correctly classified using this factor. PMID:24820698

  1. Superantigen and HLA-DR ligation induce phospholipase-C gamma 1 activation in class II+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanner, S B; Odum, Niels; Grosmaire, L;

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial enterotoxin superantigens bind directly to HLA class II molecules (HLA-DR) expressed on both APC and activated human T cells, and simultaneously bind to certain V beta chains of the TCR. In this report, we compared early T cell signaling events in human alloantigen-stimulated T cells when...... activated by HLA-DR ligation through antibody cross-linking or by direct enterotoxin superantigen binding. Both types of stimuli induced tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) and an increase in intracellular calcium concentration; however......, superantigen-induced signaling was stronger than class II ligation alone. Antibody-mediated ligation of HLA-DR with CD3 resulted in augmented PLC gamma 1 activation and increased calcium mobilization, consistent with a mechanism of superantigen activity through a combination of class II and CD3/Ti signals. In...

  2. Expression Pattern of Class B Gene PAP3 in Flower Development of Pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Class B gene APETALA3 (AP3 plays a key role in the development of petals and stamens. Here, we investigated the expression pattern of PAP3 gene (genbank accession number: HM104635 in the buds of cytoplasmic male sterility line 121A and its near-isogenic restorer line 121C at four developmental stages and analyzed the possible association between Class B genes and cytoplasmic male sterility of pepper. Semi-quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR as well as RNA in situ hybridization showed increased expression of PAP3 at late phase of anther development and its higher expression in restorer line compared with sterility line indicating PAP3’s role at late developmental stage of anther and suppressed expression in sterility line. RNA in situ hybridization showed Class B gene features: high abundance in stamen and petal; lower expression in pistil; no expression in sepal. Results of transient expression in onion epidermal cells also showed PAP3 localized in the nucleus, which is consistent with the expression pattern of transcription factors of MADS-box gene family.

  3. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barquera Rodrigo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. Methods We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. Results HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031. HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670. DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001. Conclusion Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the

  4. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity) and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP) of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031). HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670). DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001). Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the first study in Mexican population where high resolutions HLA

  5. Long maximal incremental tests accurately assess aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lanzi

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare two different maximal incremental tests with different time durations [a maximal incremental ramp test with a short time duration (8-12 min (STest and a maximal incremental test with a longer time duration (20-25 min (LTest] to investigate whether an LTest accurately assesses aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men. Twenty obese men (BMI≥35 kg.m-2 without secondary pathologies (mean±SE; 36.7±1.9 yr; 41.8±0.7 kg*m-2 completed an STest (warm-up: 40 W; increment: 20 W*min-1 and an LTest [warm-up: 20% of the peak power output (PPO reached during the STest; increment: 10% PPO every 5 min until 70% PPO was reached or until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.0, followed by 15 W.min-1 until exhaustion] on a cycle-ergometer to assess the peak oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] and peak heart rate (HRpeak of each test. There were no significant differences in [Formula: see text] (STest: 3.1±0.1 L*min-1; LTest: 3.0±0.1 L*min-1 and HRpeak (STest: 174±4 bpm; LTest: 173±4 bpm between the two tests. Bland-Altman plot analyses showed good agreement and Pearson product-moment and intra-class correlation coefficients showed a strong correlation between [Formula: see text] (r=0.81 for both; p≤0.001 and HRpeak (r=0.95 for both; p≤0.001 during both tests. [Formula: see text] and HRpeak assessments were not compromised by test duration in class II and III obese men. Therefore, we suggest that the LTest is a feasible test that accurately assesses aerobic fitness and may allow for the exercise intensity prescription and individualization that will lead to improved therapeutic approaches in treating obesity and severe obesity.

  6. Dental and orthopedic effects of Bass and Herbst therapy for correction of severe class II division 1 malocclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Ömblus, Jane

    1996-01-01

    Ömblus J (1996). Dental and orthopedic effects of Bass and Herbst therapy for correction of severe Class 1I division l malocclusions. Thesis, Karolinska Institutet. Functional appliance therapy to correct Class II division I malocclusions has been a subject of debate throughout this century. The aims of this thesis, based on six publications, were to evaluate the dental and orthopedic effects of Bass appliance therapy in relation to treatment intensity, age, an...

  7. Direct Activation of Human Dendritic Cells by Particle-Bound but Not Soluble MHC Class II Ligand

    OpenAIRE

    Baleeiro, Renato; Wiesmüller, Karl Heinz; Dähne, Lars; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José; Walden, Peter

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DCs) are key activators of cellular immune responses through their capacity to induce naïve T cells and sustained effector T cell responses. This capacity is a function of their superior efficiency of antigen presentation via MHC class I and class II molecules, and the expression of co-stimulatory cell surface molecules and cytokines. Maturation of DCs is induced by microbial factors via pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, pro-inflammatory c...

  8. Gene-Based Multiclass Cancer Diagnosis with Class-Selective Rejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisrine Jrad

    2009-01-01

    rejection scheme. The state of art multiclass algorithms can be considered as a particular case of the proposed algorithm where the number of decisions is given by the classes and the loss function is defined by the Bayesian risk. Two experiments are carried out in the Bayesian and the class selective rejection frameworks. Five genes selected datasets are used to assess the performance of the proposed method. Results are discussed and accuracies are compared with those computed by the Naive Bayes, Nearest Neighbor, Linear Perceptron, Multilayer Perceptron, and Support Vector Machines classifiers.

  9. HLA Class II Antigens and Their Interactive Effect on Perinatal Mother-To-Child HIV-1 Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Luo

    Full Text Available HLA class II antigens are central in initiating antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses to HIV-1. Specific alleles have been associated with differential responses to HIV-1 infection and disease among adults. This study aims to determine the influence of HLA class II genes and their interactive effect on mother-child perinatal transmission in a drug naïve, Mother-Child HIV transmission cohort established in Kenya, Africa in 1986. Our study showed that DRB concordance between mother and child increased risk of perinatal HIV transmission by three fold (P = 0.00035/Pc = 0.0014, OR: 3.09, 95%CI, 1.64-5.83. Whereas, DPA1, DPB1 and DQB1 concordance between mother and child had no significant influence on perinatal HIV transmission. In addition, stratified analysis showed that DRB1*15:03+ phenotype (mother or child significantly increases the risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission. Without DRB1*15:03, DRB1 discordance between mother and child provided 5 fold protection (P = 0.00008, OR: 0.186, 95%CI: 0.081-0.427. However, the protective effect of DRB discordance was diminished if either the mother or the child was DRB1*15:03+ phenotype (P = 0.49-0.98, OR: 0.7-0.99, 95%CI: 0.246-2.956. DRB3+ children were less likely to be infected perinatally (P = 0.0006, Pc = 0.014; OR:0.343, 95%CI:0.183-0.642. However, there is a 4 fold increase in risk of being infected at birth if DRB3+ children were born to DRB1*15:03+ mother compared to those with DRB1*15:03- mother. Our study showed that DRB concordance/discordance, DRB1*15:03, children's DRB3 phenotype and their interactions play an important role in perinatal HIV transmission. Identification of genetic factors associated with protection or increased risk in perinatal transmission will help develop alternative prevention and treatment methods in the event of increases in drug resistance of ARV.

  10. Recidiva do apinhamento anterossuperior nas más oclusões de Classe I e Classe II tratadas ortodonticamente sem extrações Relapse of maxillary anterior crowding in Class I and Class II malocclusions orthodontically treated without extractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian J. G. Guirro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o presente estudo objetivou comparar retrospectivamente a estabilidade pós-contenção do alinhamento dos incisivos anterossuperiores em pacientes com Classe I e Classe II. MÉTODOS: a amostra consistiu de 38 pacientes de ambos os sexos, tratados sem extrações e com mecânica Edgewise, divididos em dois grupos - Grupo 1, constituído por 19 pacientes, com idade inicial média de 13,06 anos, portadores da má oclusão de Classe I com apinhamento anterossuperior inicial maior que 3mm; Grupo 2, constituído por 19 pacientes, com idade inicial de 12,54 anos, portadores da má oclusão de Classe II e, também, com apinhamento anterossuperior inicial maior que 3mm. Foram medidos nos modelos de estudo, das fases pré- e pós-tratamento e pós-contenção, o índice de irregularidade de Little, as distâncias intercaninos e entre os primeiros e segundos pré-molares, a distância intermolares e o comprimento da arcada superior. Para a comparação intragrupo nos 3 tempos de avaliação, utilizou-se os testes ANOVA e Tukey. A comparação intergrupos foi realizada pelo teste t independente. Para verificação da presença de correlação, utilizou-se o teste de correlação de Pearson. RESULTADOS: os resultados evidenciaram maior estabilidade do tratamento no Grupo 2 (Classe II, pois, durante o período pós-contenção, foi observada recidiva do apinhamento dos dentes anterossuperiores menor no Grupo 2 (0,80mm do que no Grupo 1 (1,67mm. CONCLUSÃO: concluiu-se que o tratamento do apinhamento dos dentes anterossuperiores é mais estável na má oclusão de Classe II do que na má oclusão de Classe I.OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to retrospectively compare the postretention stability of maxillary anterior incisors alignment in Class I and Class II patients. METHODS: The sample comprised 38 patients of both genders, treated with nonextraction and Edgewise mechanics, divided into two groups: Group 1, comprised of 19 patients, at a mean

  11. Changes in soft tissue profile using functional appliances in the treatment of skeletal class II malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković Zorana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The effects of orthodontic treatment are considered to be successful if the facial harmony is achieved, while the structures of soft tissue profile are in harmony with skeletal structures of neurocranium and viscerocranium. In patients with skeletal distal bite caused by mandibular retrognathism, facial esthetics is disturbed often, in terms of pronounced convexity of the profile and change in the position and relationship of the lips. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the extent of soft tissue profile changes in patients with skeletal Class II malocclusion treated with three different orthodontic appliances: Fränkel functional regulator type I (FR-I, Balters’ Bionator type I and Hotz appliance. Methods. The study included 60 patients diagnosed with skeletal Class II malocclusion caused by mandibular retrognathism, in the period of early mixed dentition. Each subgroup of 20 patients was treated with a variety of orthodontic appliances. On the lateral cephalogram, before and after treatment, the following parameters were analyzed: T angle, H angle, the height of the upper lip, the position of the upper and lower lip in relation to the esthetic line. Within the statistical analysis the mean, maximum, minimum, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, two-factor analysis of variance with repeated measures and the factor analysis of variance were calculated using ANOVA, Bonferroni test and Student’s t-test. Results. A significant decrease of angles T and H was noticed in the application of FR-I, from 21.60° to 17.15°, and from 16.45° to 13.40° (p<0.001. FR-I decreased the height of the upper lip from 26.15 mm to 25.85 mm, while Hotz appliance and Balters’ Bionator type I increased the height of the upper lip, thereby deteriorating esthetics of the patient. Conclusion. All used orthodontic appliances lead to changes in soft tissue profile in terms of improving facial esthetics, with the most distinctive

  12. Using the Generalized Index of Dissimilarity to Detect Gene-Gene Interactions in Multi-Class Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Jaeyong; Kim, Yongkang; Park, Taesung; Park, Mira

    2016-01-01

    To find genetic association between complex diseases and phenotypic traits, one important procedure is conducting a joint analysis. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) is an efficient method of examining the interactions between genes in genetic association studies. It commonly assumes a dichotomous classification of the binary phenotypes. Its usual approach to determining the genomic association is to construct a confusion matrix to estimate a classification error, where a binary risk status is determined and assigned to each genotypic multifactor class. While multi-class phenotypes are commonly observed, the current MDR approach does not handle these phenotypes appropriately because the thresholds for the risk statuses may not be clear. In this study, we suggest a new method for estimating gene-gene interactions for multi-class phenotypes. Our approach adopts the index of dissimilarity (IDS) as an evaluation measure. This is analytically equivalent to the common association measure of balanced accuracy (BA) for the binary traits, while it is not required to determine the risk status for the estimation. Moreover, it is easily expandable to the generalized index of dissimilarity (GIDS), which has an explicit form that can handle any number of categories. The performance of the proposed method was compared with those of other approaches via simulation studies in which fifteen genetic models were generated with three class outcomes. A consistently better performance was observed using the proposed method. The effect of a varying number of categories was examined. The proposed method was also illustrated using real genome-wide association studies (GWAS) data from the Korean Association Resource (KARE) project. PMID:27556585

  13. Twenty -year post-treatment assessment of class II division 1 malocclusion treated with non-extraction approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Karad

    2013-01-01

    This article describes twenty-year post-treatment assessment of a class II division 1 malocclusion case, treated in the late mixed dentition stage, with the non-extraction treatment approach - molar-inserted headgear along with a fixed appliance therapy.

  14. T cell responses affected by aminopeptidase N (CD13)-mediated trimming of major histocompatibility complex class II-bound peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S L; Pedersen, L O; Buus, S; Stryhn, A

    1996-01-01

    the exopeptidase Aminopeptidase N (APN, CD13) as one of the enzymes involved in the observed cell-surface antigen processing. The NH2-terminal end of the longer peptide could, even while bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, be digested by APN with dramatic consequences...

  15. Mutational analysis of divalent metal ion binding in the active site of class II α-mannosidase from sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis K.; Webb, Helen; Nielsen, Jonas Willum; Winther, Jakob R.; Willemoes, Martin; Harris, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    Mutational analysis of Sulfolobus solfataricus class II α-mannosidase was focused on side chains that interact with the hydroxyls of the-1 mannosyl of the substrate (Asp-534) or form ligands to the active site divalent metal ion (His-228 and His-533) judged from crystal structures of homologous...

  16. 40 CFR 147.2400 - State-administered program-Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program-Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells. 147.2400 Section 147.2400 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... between the Washington Department of Ecology and Department of Social and Health Services, Related to...

  17. 40 CFR 147.904 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule. 147.904 Section 147.904 Protection of Environment... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Kentucky § 147.904 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... the owner or operator of an existing enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage well may not be...

  18. 40 CFR 147.503 - Existing Class II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) wells authorized by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) wells authorized by rule. 147.503 Section 147.503 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. To meet...

  19. 40 CFR 147.1653 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1653 Section 147.1653 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  20. 40 CFR 147.903 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.903 Section 147.903 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  1. 40 CFR 147.1454 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule. 147.1454 Section 147.1454 Protection of Environment... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Nevada § 147.1454 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... determines that the owner or operator of an existing enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage well may not...

  2. 40 CFR 147.504 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule. 147.504 Section 147.504 Protection of Environment... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Florida § 147.504 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... the owner or operator of an existing enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage well may not be...

  3. 40 CFR 147.1154 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule. 147.1154 Section 147.1154 Protection of Environment... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Michigan § 147.1154 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... determines that the owner or operator of an existing enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage will may not...

  4. 40 CFR 147.1153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1153 Section 147.1153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  5. 40 CFR 147.304 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule. 147.304 Section 147.304 Protection of Environment... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Colorado § 147.304 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... the owner or operator of an existing enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage well may not be...

  6. 40 CFR 147.1354 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule. 147.1354 Section 147.1354 Protection of Environment... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Montana § 147.1354 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... existing enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage well may not be in compliance with the requirements...

  7. 40 CFR 147.1353 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1353 Section 147.1353 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  8. 40 CFR 147.303 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.303 Section 147.303 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  9. 40 CFR 147.104 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule. 147.104 Section 147.104 Protection of Environment... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Alaska § 147.104 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... the owner or operator of an existing enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage well may not be...

  10. 40 CFR 147.103 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.103 Section 147.103 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  11. 40 CFR 147.2153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.2153 Section 147.2153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  12. 40 CFR 147.1953 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1953 Section 147.1953 Protection of... enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection...

  13. 40 CFR 147.1453 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1453 Section 147.1453 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  14. 40 CFR 147.1654 - Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and hydrocarbon storage wells authorized by rule. 147.1654 Section 147.1654 Protection of Environment... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS New York § 147.1654 Existing Class II enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... the owner or operator of an existing enhanced recovery or hydrocarbon storage well may not be...

  15. 40 CFR 147.253 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.253 Section 147.253 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  16. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance of the...

  17. 76 FR 50436 - Class II Gaming Regulation Proposals Submitted by Poarch Band of Creek Indians on Behalf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Chapter III Class II Gaming Regulation Proposals Submitted by Poarch Band of Creek Indians on Behalf of Tribal Gaming Working Group AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission, Interior. ACTION: Request for comments. SUMMARY: The National...

  18. HLA class II (DR, DQ, DP) in patients with sarcoidosis: evidence of an increased frequency of DRw6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Milman, N; Jakobsen, B K;

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of HLA class II (DR, DQ, and DP) antigens was studied in 41 patients with symptomatic sarcoidosis (SA) and ethnically matched healthy controls. HLA-DR, -DQw1 and -DQw3 typings were performed with alloantisera in the conventional microcytotoxic test, whereas -DP typings were done...

  19. 40 CFR 82.18 - Availability of production in addition to baseline production allowances for class II controlled...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of production in addition to baseline production allowances for class II controlled substances. 82.18 Section 82.18 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and...

  20. PI3KC2{alpha}, a class II PI3K, is required for dynamin-independent internalization pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Claudia; Malmberg, Emily Kim; Salcini, Anna Elisabetta

    2010-01-01

    screen using a cell line expressing a diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR, officially known as HBEGF) anchored to GPI (DTR-GPI), which internalizes diphtheria toxin (DT, officially known as DTX) in a dynamin-independent manner, identified PI3KC2a, a class II phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), as a specific...

  1. 77 FR 16123 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... class II. These devices are intended to be used as an aid in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis... work on the final version of the guidance, submit either electronic or written comments on the draft... in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis when used in conjunction with clinical and...

  2. Marsupials and monotremes possess a novel family of MHC class I genes that is lost from the eutherian lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Feng, Zhi-Ping; Krasnec, Katina; Deakin, Janine E; Baker, Michelle L.; Miller, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes are found in the genomes of all jawed vertebrates. The evolution of this gene family is closely tied to the evolution of the vertebrate genome. Family members are frequently found in four paralogous regions, which were formed in two rounds of genome duplication in the early vertebrates, but in some species class Is have been subject to additional duplication or translocation, creating additional clusters. The gene family is tradi...

  3. Functional conservation and diversification of class E floral homeotic genes in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Rongfeng; Han, Jiakun; Zhao, Suzhen; Su, Kunmei; Wu, Feng; Du, Xiaoqiu; Xu, Qijiang; Chong, Kang; Theissen, Günter; Meng, Zheng

    2010-03-01

    Mutant analyses in different eudicotyledonous flowering plants demonstrated that SEPALLATA-like MADS-box genes are required for the specification of sepals, petals, stamens and carpels, and for floral determinacy, thus defining class E floral organ identity genes. SEP-like genes encode MADS-domain transcription factors and constitute an angiosperm-specific gene clade whose members show remarkably different degrees of redundancy and sub-functionalization within eudicots. To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of SEP-like genes throughout the angiosperms we have knocked down SEP-like genes of rice (Oryza sativa), a distant relative of eudicots within the flowering plants. Plants affected in both OsMADS7 and OsMADS8 show severe phenotypes including late flowering, homeotic changes of lodicules, stamens and carpels into palea/lemma-like organs, and a loss of floral determinacy. Simultaneous knockdown of the four rice SEP-like genes OsMADS1, OsMADS5, OsMADS7 and OsMADS8, leads to homeotic transformation of all floral organs except the lemma into leaf-like organs. This mimics the phenotype observed with the sep1 sep2 sep3 sep4 quadruple mutant of Arabidopsis. Detailed analyses of the spatial and temporal mRNA expression and protein interaction patterns corresponding to the different rice SEP-like genes show strong similarities, but also gene-specific differences. These findings reveal conservation of SEP-like genes in specifying floral determinacy and organ identities since the separation of eudicots and monocots about 150 million years ago. However, they indicate also monocot-specific neo- and sub-functionalization events and hence underscore the evolutionary dynamics of SEP-like genes. Moreover, our findings corroborate the view that the lodicules of grasses are homologous to eudicot petals. PMID:20003164

  4. Complementation of two related tumour cell classes during experimental metastasis tagged with different histochemical marker genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, W.C.; O'Connor, K. L.; Culp, L. A.

    1993-01-01

    Intercellular complementation during tumour development and metastasis was analysed for two different oncogene (ras or sis) transformants of Balb/c 3T3 cells, tagged with different histochemical marker genes (lacZ or ALP to generate LZEJ or APSI cells, respectively), by localising them after their co-injection with specific double-staining protocols. This model evaluates whether limited progression of each tumour class can be facilitated reciprocally during co-localisation and co-growth in nu...

  5. EFFECTS OF BETAHISTINE DIHYDROCHLORIDE AS ADJUVANT TO ENALAPRIL THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE CLASS II-II (NYHA SUFFERING FROM GIDDINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study adjuvant effect of betahistine dihydrochloride to ACE inhibitors in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF class II-III suffering from giddiness.Material and methods. 61 patients with CHF class II-III, ejection fraction ≤45% (Simpson suffering from giddiness were involved into randomized open parallel study. Patients were randomized to Betahistine dihydrochloride plus basic CHF therapy or only basic therapy groups. Enalapril dose titration was performed in all patients. Quality of life and giddiness severity evaluation, electrocardiogram was performed initially and after treatment. Clinical examination results, drug therapy and adverse event were registered at each visit.Results. The target ACE inhibitor dose (≥20 mg daily was reached in 97 % of patients. It led to significant reduction of dyspnea, edemas, CHF class reduction and life quality increase. Significant differences between investigated groups were not found. Reduction of giddiness severity was shown in both groups. There was a trend to more prominent improvement of life quality (р=0,08 and more frequent achievement of target ACE inhibitor dose in patients treated with betahistine dihydrochloride.Conclusion. The target ACE inhibitor dose can be achieved more than in 90% of patients with CHF class II-III without hypotension symptoms. Adjuvant usage of betahistine dihydrochloride is necessary in patients with CHF still suffering from giddiness after achievement of target ACE inhibitor dose.

  6. Identification and characterization of the human type II collagen gene (COL2A1).

    OpenAIRE

    Cheah, Kathryn; Stoker, N G; Griffin, J.R.; Grosveld, Frank; Solomon, E

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe gene contained in the human cosmid clone CosHcol1, previously designated an alpha 1(I) collagen-like gene, has now been identified. CosHcol1 hybridizes strongly to a single 5.9-kilobase mRNA species present only in tissue in which type II collagen is expressed. DNA sequence analysis shows that this clone is highly homologous to the chicken alpha 1(II) collagen gene. These data together suggest that CosHcol1 contains the human alpha 1(II) collagen gene COL2A1. The clone appears...

  7. New Periodic 6.7 GHz Class II Methanol Maser Associated with G358.460-0.391

    CERN Document Server

    Maswanganye, J P; Goedhart, S; van der Walt, D J; Booth, R S

    2014-01-01

    Eight new class II methanol masers selected from the 6.7 GHz Methanol Multibeam survey catalogues I and II were monitored at 6.7 GHz with the 26m Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) radio telescope for three years and seven months, from February 2011 to September 2014. The sources were also observed at 12.2 GHz and two were sufficiently bright to permit monitoring. One of the eight sources, namely G358.460-0.391, was found to show periodic variations at 6.7 GHz. The period was determined and tested for significance using the Lomb-Scargle, epoch-folding and Jurkevich methods, and by fitting a simple analytic function. The best estimate for the period of the 6.7 GHz class II methanol maser line associated with G358.460-0.391 is 220.0 $\\pm$ 0.2 day.

  8. Class 1 integrase, sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant and surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Nicoletta; Koczura, Ryszard; Mokracka, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are considered hot spots for multiplication and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes. In this study, we determined the presence of class 1 integron integrase and genes conferring resistance to tetracyclines and sulfonamides in the genomes of culturable bacteria isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and the river that receives the treated wastewater. Moreover, using PCR-based metagenomic approach, we quantified intI1, tet and sul genes. Wastewater treatment caused the decrease in the total number of culturable heterotrophs and bacteria resistant to tetracycline and sulfonamides, along with the decrease in the number of intI1, sul and tet gene copies per ml, with significant reduction of tet(B). On the other hand, the treatment process increased both the frequency of tetracycline- and sulfonamide-resistant bacteria and intI1-positive strains, and the relative abundance of all quantified antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and intI1 gene; in the case of tet(A) and sul2 significantly. The discharge of treated wastewater increased the number of intI1, tet and sul genes in the receiving river water both in terms of copy number per ml and relative abundance. Hence, despite the reduction of the number of ARGs and ARBs, wastewater treatment selects for bacteria with ARGs in effluent. PMID:26519797

  9. Development of self emulsifying lipid formulations of BCS class II drugs with low to medium lipophilicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannin, Vincent; Chevrier, Stéphanie; Michenaud, Matthieu; Dumont, Camille; Belotti, Silvia; Chavant, Yann; Demarne, Frédéric

    2015-11-10

    Lipid-based formulations can be effective drug delivery systems for poorly water-soluble chemical entities, provided they are designed with careful selection of the excipients, based on their role in the delivery system and in relation to drug properties. The primary factor leading to increased bioavailability is the administration of the drug in a pre-dissolved state thereby avoiding the dissolution limiting step. All model drugs tested (piroxicam, curcumin and nifedipine) belong to the same chemical space--small BCS class II molecules with logP ranging from 2 to 3. These drugs, exhibiting low to medium logP, are not soluble in lipophilic lipid-based excipients (e.g., vegetable oils). Water-soluble and water-dispersible surfactants are able to dissolve the target dose of each drug in the dosage form and efficiently keep it in solution during dispersion. In vitro digestion testing was necessary to discriminate formulations and enable selection of the most robust one. For each molecule, the system with the best performance during dispersion/digestion tests did not comprise the surfactant which delivered the highest solvent capacity for the drug. This study demonstrates the potential of surfactant-based formulations - i.e., Type IV systems from the lipid formulation classification system - for this type of hydrophobic drug. PMID:26364710

  10. Impact of physical activity and fitness in class II and III obese individuals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillot, A; Audet, M; Baillargeon, J P; Dionne, I J; Valiquette, L; Rosa-Fortin, M M; Abou Chakra, C N; Comeau, E; Langlois, M F

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to appraise current knowledge on the impact of physical activity (PA) and physical fitness (PF) on the health of class II and III obese subjects and bariatric surgery (BS) patients. All original studies were searched using four databases (Medline®, Scopus®, CINAHL and Sportdiscus). Two independent investigators selected studies assessing the impact of PA or PF on specific health outcomes (anthropometric parameters, body composition, cardiometabolic risk factors, PF, wellness) in adults with a body mass index ≥35 kg m(-2) or in BS patients. Conclusions were drawn based on a rating system of evidence. From 3,170 papers identified, 40 papers met the inclusion criteria. The vast majority of studies were recently carried out with a predominance of women. Less than one-third of these studies were experimental and only three of them were of high quality. Each study reported at least one beneficial effect of PA or PF. However, a lack of high-quality studies and heterogeneity in designs prevented us from finding high levels of evidence. In conclusion, although results support the importance of PA and PF to improve the health of this population, higher-quality trials are required to strengthen evidence-based recommendations. PMID:24712685

  11. Techniques used to Enhance Bioavailability of BCS Class II Drugs: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honey Kansara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, nearly 40% of the new chemical entities (NCEs identified by pharmaceutical industry screening programs have failed to be developed because of poor water-solubility, which makes their formulation difficult or even impossible. The solubility issues complicating the delivery of these new drugs also affect the delivery of many existing drugs. The various traditional and novel techniques that that can be used for solubility enhancement of BCS Class II drugs are briefly discussed in this article. The Traditional techniques that has been discussed in this article includes use of co-solvents, Hydrotropy, Micronization, change in dielectric constant of solvent, amorphous forms, chemical modification of drug, use of surfactants, inclusion complex, alteration of pH of solvent, use of hydrates or solvates, use of soluble prodrugs, application of ultrasonic waves, functional polymer technology, controlled precipitation technology, evaporative precipitation in aqueous solution, use of precipitation inhibitors, solvent deposition, precipitation, selective adsorption on insoluble carriers. Novel drug delivery technologies developed in recent years for solubility enhancement of insoluble drugs are size reduction technologies, lipid based delivery system, micellar technologies, porous micro particle technology. Solid Dispersion Technique and various types of solid dispersion systems have also been explained briefly.

  12. Discovery of periodic class II methanol masers associated with G339.986-0.425 region

    CERN Document Server

    Maswanganye, J P; Goedhart, S; Gaylard, M J

    2015-01-01

    Ten new class II methanol masers from the 6.7-GHz Methanol Multibeam survey catalogues III and IV were selected for a monitoring programme at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz with the 26m Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) radio telescope for two years and nine months, from August 2012 to May 2015. In the sample, only masers associated with G339.986-0.425 were found to show periodic variability at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz. The existence of periodic variation was tested with four independent methods. The analytical method gave the best estimation of the period, which was 246 $\\pm$ 1 days. The time series of G339.986-0.425 show strong correlations across velocity channels and between the 6.7 and 12.2 GHz masers. The time delay was also measured across channels and shows structure across the spectrum which is continuous between different maser components.

  13. SOLUBILITY ENHANCEMENT OF FENOFIBRATE, A BCS CLASS II DRUG, BY SELF EMULSIFYING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Sunitha Reddy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work was aimed at the enhancement of solubility of Fenofibrate a BCS class II drug by Self Emulsifying Drug Delivery systems (SEDDS. The solubility of Fenofibrate in various excipients was determined. The excipients were screened for maximum solubility and compatibility. SEDDS formulations of Fenofibrate were developed using different Oils, Surfactants and Co-Surfactant combinations. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were drawn using Triplot software and by applying Pseudoternary phase diagrams, microemulsification area was evaluated.Formulations were screened based on visual observances and phase diagrams. Seven formulations were selected for further evaluations like stability, effect of dilution, freeze-thawing, emulsion droplet size and zeta potential. Among the seven formulations three were optimized and In-Vitro dissolution was performed. The dissolution rate of SEDDS was compared with plain Fenofibrate (API. The study confirmed that the solubility and dissolution rate of Fenofibrate were remarkably increased when compared to that of plain drug. Hence SEDDS formulations can be a potential alternative to traditional oral drug delivery systems of Fenofibrate to improve its bioavailability.

  14. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens in porcine leptospiral nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, E; Del Piero, F; Aresu, L; Sciarrone, F; Vicari, N; Mattiello, S; Tagliabue, S; Fabbi, M; Scanziani, E

    2009-09-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) is required for the presentation of antigens to CD4 helper T cells. During nephritis, not only primary antigen presenting cells such as histiocytes and lymphocytes, but also cytokine-stimulated tubular epithelial cells express MHCII. Leptospirosis in fattening pigs is characterized by several degrees of nephritis, from absence of lesions to severe multifocal tubulo-interstitial inflammation. Renal tissue from 20 8-month-old pigs with spontaneous nephritis and 6 control pigs without renal lesions were investigated for leptospirosis by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). IHC for MHCII also was performed on renal samples. Serum samples were tested for different serovars of Leptospira interrogans. Control pigs were free of interstitial nephritis and negative for leptospirosis by all tests. In pigs with nephritis, serology was positive for serovar Pomona in 19/20 pigs. In 16 of these 19 pigs, leptospiral renal infection was confirmed by PCR and/or indirect IHC. Nephritic lesions were classified histologically into perivascular lymphocytic (4 pigs), lymphofollicular (6 pigs), lymphohistiocytic (8 pigs), and neutrophilic (2 pigs) pattern. MHCII expression by histiocytes and lymphocytes was observed in all lesions. Prominent MHCII expression in regenerating tubular epithelium was observed in lymphofollicular and lymphohistiocytic nephritis. No tubular colocalization between leptospiral and MHCII antigen was observed. Results suggest that during leptospiral nephritis, MHCII contributes to the intensity of the inflammatory response. Furthermore de novo MHCII expression in regenerating tubules may play a role in the defence mechanism against leptospiral tubular colonization. PMID:19179617

  15. Transport of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide in MHC Class II tubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Li Stephen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial capsular polysaccharides are virulence factors and are considered T cell-independent antigens. However, the capsular polysaccharide Sp1 from Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1 has been shown to activate CD4(+ T cells in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II-dependent manner. The mechanism of carbohydrate presentation to CD4(+ T cells is unknown. We show in live murine dendritic cells (DCs that Sp1 translocates from lysosomal compartments to the plasma membrane in MHCII-positive tubules. Sp1 cell surface presentation results in reduction of self-peptide presentation without alteration of the MHCII self peptide repertoire. In DM-deficient mice, retrograde transport of Sp1/MHCII complexes resulting in T cell-dependent immune responses to the polysaccharide in vitro and in vivo is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate the capacity of a bacterial capsular polysaccharide antigen to use DC tubules as a vehicle for its transport as an MHCII/saccharide complex to the cell surface for the induction of T cell activation. Furthermore, retrograde transport requires the functional role of DM in self peptide-carbohydrate exchange. These observations open new opportunities for the design of vaccines against microbial encapsulated pathogens.

  16. Internal and Marginal Fit of Modern Indirect Class II Composite Inlays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp C. Pott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This in vitro study investigates the marginal and internal fit of indirect class II composite restorations. Two different processes for chair-side restorations were compared. In group A, the restorations were fabricated using CAD/CAM technology (Cerec, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim and in group B they were made by hand (GrandioSO Inlay System, VOCO GmbH, Germany, Cuxhaven. Methods: For a metal tooth with a MOD cavity each 10 restorations were made for groups A and B. For each restoration, a replica of the cement-gap made from light body silicone was produced by placing the restoration into the cavity of the metal tooth. For this purpose, a special restoration-positioning machine was developed. Each replica was sectioned off in the longitudinal axis (L and in the cross axis (C. The thickness of the replicas was measured in both directions, using picture analysis software under a light reflection microscope. To evaluate the fit of the restorations, a special fitting parameter was calculated. Statistical analysis was performed with the t test. Results: The fitting-parameter in group B (L: 97.6µm±73.0µm; C: 71.8µm±46.4µm was significantly lower than that of group A (L: 155.1µm±102.3.0µm; C: 168.2µm±91.9µm (P

  17. Partial MHC class II constructs inhibit MIF/CD74 binding and downstream effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Gil; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Andrew, Shayne; Leng, Lin; Burrows, Gregory G; Bourdette, Dennis; Offner, Halina; Bucala, Richard; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2013-05-01

    MIF and its receptor, CD74, are pivotal regulators of the immune system. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that partial MHC class II constructs comprised of linked β1α1 domains with covalently attached antigenic peptides (also referred to as recombinant T-cell receptor ligands - RTLs) can inhibit MIF activity by not only blocking the binding of rhMIF to immunopurified CD74, but also downregulating CD74 cell-surface expression. This bifunctional inhibition of MIF/CD74 interactions blocked downstream MIF effects, including enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, anti-apoptotic activity, and inhibition of random migration that all contribute to the reversal of clinical and histological signs of EAE. Moreover, we demonstrate that enhanced CD74 cell-surface expression on monocytes in mice with EAE and subjects with multiple sclerosis can be downregulated by humanized RTLs, resulting in reduced MIF binding to the cells. Thus, binding of partial MHC complexes to CD74 blocks both the accessibility and availability of CD74 for MIF binding and downstream inflammatory activity. PMID:23576302

  18. Interplay among coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1, CBP, and CIITA in IFN-gamma-inducible MHC-II gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zika, Eleni; Fauquier, Lucas; Vandel, Laurence; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2005-11-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (MHC-II) genes are prototype targets of IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma activates the expression of the non-DNA-binding master regulator of MHC-II, class II transactivator (CIITA), which is crucial for enhanceosome formation and gene activation. This report shows the importance of the histone methyltransferase, coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase (CARM1/PRMT4), during IFN-gamma-induced MHC-II gene activation. It also demonstrates the coordinated regulation of CIITA, CARM1, and the acetyltransferase cyclic-AMP response element binding (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) during this process. CARM1 synergizes with CIITA in activating MHC-II transcription and synergy is abrogated when an arginine methyltransferase-defective CARM1 mutant is used. Protein-arginine methyltransferase 1 has much less effect on MHC-II transcription. Specific RNA interference reduced CARM1 expression as well as MHC-II expression. The recruitment of CARM1 to the promoter requires endogenous CIITA and results in methylation of histone H3-R17; hence, CIITA is an upstream regulator of histone methylation. Previous work has shown that CARM1 can methylate CBP at three arginine residues. Using wild-type CBP and a mutant of CBP lacking the CARM1-targeted arginine residues (R3A), we show that arginine methylation of CBP is required for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II. A kinetic analysis shows that CIITA, CARM1, and H3-R17 methylation all precede CBP loading on the MHC-II promoter during IFN-gamma treatment. These results suggest functional and temporal relationships among CIITA, CARM1, and CBP for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II. PMID:16254053

  19. Chromosomal assignments of the genes coding for human types II, III, and IV collagen: a dispersed gene family.

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, E; Hiorns, L R; Spurr, N; Kurkinen, M.; Barlow, D; Hogan, B L; Dalgleish, R.

    1985-01-01

    The human type II collagen gene, COL2A1, has been assigned to chromosome 12, the type III gene, COL3A1, to chromosome 2, and one of the type IV genes, COL4A1, to chromosome 13. These assignments were made by using cloned genes as probes on Southern blots of DNA from a panel of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids. The two genes of type I collagen, COL1A1 and COL2A1, have been mapped previously to chromosomes 17 and 7, respectively. This family of conserved genes seems therefore to be dispersed th...

  20. Plasmid metagenomics reveals multiple antibiotic resistance gene classes among the gut microbiomes of hospitalised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitwasinkul, Tossawan; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Hansen, Martin Asser; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Permpikul, Chairat; Rongrungruang, Yong; Tribuddharat, Chanwit

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are rapidly spread between pathogens and the normal flora, with plasmids playing an important role in their circulation. This study aimed to investigate antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gut microbiome of hospitalised patients. Stool samples were collected from seven inpatients at Siriraj Hospital (Bangkok, Thailand) and were compared with a sample from a healthy volunteer. Plasmids from the gut microbiomes extracted from the stool samples were subjected to high-throughput DNA sequencing (GS Junior). Newbler-assembled DNA reads were categorised into known and unknown sequences (using >80% alignment length as the cut-off), and ResFinder was used to classify the antibiotic resistance gene pools. Plasmid replicon modules were used for plasmid typing. Forty-six genes conferring resistance to several classes of antibiotics were identified in the stool samples. Several antibiotic resistance genes were shared by the patients; interestingly, most were reported previously in food animals and healthy humans. Four antibiotic resistance genes were found in the healthy subject. One gene (aph3-III) was identified in the patients and the healthy subject and was related to that in cattle. Uncommon genes of hospital origin such as blaTEM-124-like and fosA, which confer resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactams and fosfomycin, respectively, were identified. The resistance genes did not match the patients' drug treatments. In conclusion, several plasmid types were identified in the gut microbiome; however, it was difficult to link these to the antibiotic resistance genes identified. That the antibiotic resistance genes came from hospital and community environments is worrying. PMID:27530840

  1. The identification of additional zebrafish DICP genes reveals haplotype variation and linkage to MHC class I genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Nunez, Ivan; Wcisel, Dustin J; Litman, Ronda T; Litman, Gary W; Yoder, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Bony fish encode multiple multi-gene families of membrane receptors that are comprised of immunoglobulin (Ig) domains and are predicted to function in innate immunity. One of these families, the diverse immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing protein (DICP) genes, maps to three chromosomal loci in zebrafish. Most DICPs possess one or two Ig ectodomains and include membrane-bound and secreted forms. Membrane-bound DICPs include putative inhibitory and activating receptors. Recombinant DICP Ig domains bind lipids with varying specificity, a characteristic shared with mammalian CD300 and TREM family members. Numerous DICP transcripts amplified from different lines of zebrafish did not match the zebrafish reference genome sequence suggesting polymorphic and haplotypic variation. The expression of DICPs in three different lines of zebrafish has been characterized employing PCR-based strategies. Certain DICPs exhibit restricted expression in adult tissues whereas others are expressed ubiquitously. Transcripts of a subset of DICPs can be detected during embryonic development suggesting roles in embryonic immunity or other developmental processes. Transcripts representing 11 previously uncharacterized DICP sequences were identified. The assignment of two of these sequences to an unplaced genomic scaffold resulted in the identification of an alternative DICP haplotype that is linked to a MHC class I Z lineage haplotype on zebrafish chromosome 3. The linkage of DICP and MHC class I genes also is observable in the genomes of the related grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) suggesting that this is a shared character with the last common Cyprinidae ancestor. PMID:26801775

  2. MADS-box genes active in developing pollen cones of Norway spruce (Picea abies) are homologous to the B-class floral homeotic genes in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, J; Carlsbecker, A; Svensson, M E; Svenson, M; Johanson, U; Theissen, G; Engström, P

    1999-09-01

    The reproductive organs of conifers, the pollen cones and seed cones, differ in morphology from the angiosperm flower in several fundamental respects. In this report we present evidence to suggest that the two plant groups, in spite of these morphological differences and the long evolutionary distance between them, share important features in regulating the development of the reproductive organs. We present the cloning of three genes, DAL11, DAL12, and DAL13, from Norway spruce, all of which are related to the angiosperm B-class of homeotic genes. The B-class genes determine the identities of petals and stamens. They are members of a family of MADS-box genes, which also includes C-class genes that act to determine the identity of carpels and, in concert with B genes specify stamens in the angiosperm flower. Phylogenetic analyses and the presence of B-class specific C-terminal motifs in the DAL protein sequences imply homology to the B-class genes. Specific expression of all three genes in developing pollen cones suggests that the genes are involved in one aspect of B function, the regulation of development of the pollen-bearing organs. The different temporal and spatial expression patterns of the three DAL genes in the developing pollen cones indicate that the genes have attained at least in part distinct functions. The DAL11, DAL12, and 13 expression patterns in the pollen cone partly overlap with that of the previously identified DAL2 gene, which is structurally and functionally related to the angiosperm C-class genes. This result supports the hypothesis that an interaction between B- and C-type genes is required for male organ development in conifers like in the angiosperms. Taken together, our data suggests that central components in the regulatory mechanisms for reproductive organ development are conserved between conifers and angiosperms and, thus, among all seed plants. PMID:10528266

  3. Close association of RNA polymerase II and many transcription factors with Pol III genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raha, Debasish; Wang, Zhong; Moqtaderi, Zarmik; Wu, Linfeng; Zhong, Guoneng; Gerstein, Mark; Struhl, Kevin; Snyder, Michael

    2010-02-23

    Transcription of the eukaryotic genomes is carried out by three distinct RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whereby each polymerase is thought to independently transcribe a distinct set of genes. To investigate a possible relationship of RNA polymerases II and III, we mapped their in vivo binding sites throughout the human genome by using ChIP-Seq in two different cell lines, GM12878 and K562 cells. Pol III was found to bind near many known genes as well as several previously unidentified target genes. RNA-Seq studies indicate that a majority of the bound genes are expressed, although a subset are not suggestive of stalling by RNA polymerase III. Pol II was found to bind near many known Pol III genes, including tRNA, U6, HVG, hY, 7SK and previously unidentified Pol III target genes. Similarly, in vivo binding studies also reveal that a number of transcription factors normally associated with Pol II transcription, including c-Fos, c-Jun and c-Myc, also tightly associate with most Pol III-transcribed genes. Inhibition of Pol II activity using alpha-amanitin reduced expression of a number of Pol III genes (e.g., U6, hY, HVG), suggesting that Pol II plays an important role in regulating their transcription. These results indicate that, contrary to previous expectations, polymerases can often work with one another to globally coordinate gene expression. PMID:20139302

  4. The chsA gene, encoding a class-I chitin synthase from Ampelomyces quisqualis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, N; Sztejnberg, A; Yarden, O

    1996-02-01

    Degenerate oligodeoxyribonucleotide primers, designed on the basis of conserved regions of the chitin synthase gene family, were used to amplify a fragment of the Ampelomyces quisqualis (Aq) chsA gene. Subsequently, the PCR product was used as a probe in order to identify and isolate genomic clones harboring the entire chsA gene. Aq chsA is 2786-nt long, has one intron and encodes a 910-amino-acid polypeptide belonging to the class-I chitin synthases. Low-stringency Southern hybridizations to Aq genomic DNA provided evidence for the presence of additional DNA fragments resembling chsA in the fungal genome, suggesting the presence of a multigene family of chitin synthases in Aq. PMID:8626074

  5. Plasmid metagenomics reveals multiple antibiotic resistance gene classes among the gut microbiomes of hospitalised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jitwasinkul, Tossawan; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke;

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are rapidly spread between pathogens and the normal flora, with plasmids playing an important role in their circulation. This study aimed to investigate antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gut microbiome of hospitalised patients. Stool samples were collected from seven...... inpatients at Siriraj Hospital (Bangkok, Thailand) and were compared with a sample from a healthy volunteer. Plasmids from the gut microbiomes extracted from the stool samples were subjected to high-throughput DNA sequencing (GS Junior). Newbler-assembled DNA reads were categorised into known and unknown...... sequences (using >80% alignment length as the cut-off), and ResFinder was used to classify the antibiotic resistance gene pools. Plasmid replicon modules were used for plasmid typing. Forty-six genes conferring resistance to several classes of antibiotics were identified in the stool samples. Several...

  6. Cervical vertebral column morphology related to craniofacial morphology and head posture in preorthodontic children with Class II malocclusion and horizontal maxillary overjet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arntsen, Torill; Sonnesen, Ane Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    In preorthodontic children with Class II malocclusion and horizontal maxillary overjet, cervical column morphology was examined and related to craniofacial morphology and head posture for the first time.......In preorthodontic children with Class II malocclusion and horizontal maxillary overjet, cervical column morphology was examined and related to craniofacial morphology and head posture for the first time....

  7. Human leukocyte antigen-DO regulates surface presentation of human leukocyte antigen class II-restricted antigens on B cell malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, A.N.; Meijden, E.D. van der; Honders, M.W.; Pont, M.J.; Goeman, J.J.; Falkenburg, J.H.F.; Griffioen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Hematological malignancies often express surface HLA class II, making them attractive targets for CD4+ T cell therapy. We previously demonstrated that HLA class II ligands can be divided into DM-resistant and DM-sensitive antigens. In contrast to presentation of DM-resistant antigens, presentation o

  8. Meiotic genes and sexual reproduction in the green algal class Trebouxiophyceae (Chlorophyta)

    KAUST Repository

    Fučíková, Karolina

    2015-04-06

    © 2015 Phycological Society of America. Sexual reproduction is widespread in eukaryotes and is well documented in chlorophytan green algae. In this lineage, however, the Trebouxiophyceae represent a striking exception: in contrast to its relatives Chlorophyceae and Ulvophyceae this group appears to be mostly asexual, as fertilization has been rarely observed. Assessments of sexual reproduction in the Trebouxiophyceae have been based on microscopic observation of gametes fusing. New genomic data offer now the opportunity to check for the presence of meiotic genes, which represent an indirect evidence of a sexual life cycle. Using genomic and transcriptomic data for 12 taxa spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the class, we tried to clarify whether genuine asexuality or cryptic sexuality is the most likely case for the numerous putatively asexual trebouxiophytes. On the basis of these data and a bibliographic review, we conclude that the view of trebouxiophytes as primarily asexual is incorrect. In contrast to the limited number of reports of fertilization, meiotic genes were found in all genomes and transcriptomes examined, even in species presumed asexual. In the taxa examined the totality or majority of the genes were present, Helicosporidium and Auxenochlorella being the only partial exceptions (only four genes present). The evidence of sex provided by the meiotic genes is phylogenetically widespread in the class and indicates that sexual reproduction is not associated with any particular morphological or ecological trait. On the basis of the results, we expect that the existence of the meiotic genes will be documented in all trebouxiophycean genomes that will become available in the future.

  9. Proteomics computational analyses suggest that the carboxyl terminal glycoproteins of Bunyaviruses are class II viral fusion protein (beta-penetrenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Robert F

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Bunyaviridae family of enveloped RNA viruses includes five genuses, orthobunyaviruses, hantaviruses, phleboviruses, nairoviruses and tospoviruses. It has not been determined which Bunyavirus protein mediates virion:cell membrane fusion. Class II viral fusion proteins (beta-penetrenes, encoded by members of the Alphaviridae and Flaviviridae, are comprised of three antiparallel beta sheet domains with an internal fusion peptide located at the end of domain II. Proteomics computational analyses indicate that the carboxyl terminal glycoprotein (Gc encoded by Sandfly fever virus (SAN, a phlebovirus, has a significant amino acid sequence similarity with envelope protein 1 (E1, the class II fusion protein of Sindbis virus (SIN, an Alphavirus. Similar sequences and common structural/functional motifs, including domains with a high propensity to interface with bilayer membranes, are located collinearly in SAN Gc and SIN E1. Gc encoded by members of each Bunyavirus genus share several sequence and structural motifs. These results suggest that Gc of Bunyaviridae, and similar proteins of Tenuiviruses and a group of Caenorhabditis elegans retroviruses, are class II viral fusion proteins. Comparisons of divergent viral fusion proteins can reveal features essential for virion:cell fusion, and suggest drug and vaccine strategies.

  10. Expansion design for a radioactive sources handling laboratory type II class B; Diseno de ampliacion para un laboratorio de manejo de fuentes radiactivas tipo II clase B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez S, P. S. [Universidad Mexiquense del Bicentenario, Av. Industria Poniente s/n, Parque Industrial Dona Rosa, 52000 Lerma, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Monroy G, F.; Alanis, J., E-mail: salvador-21@live.com.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Touca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The Radioactive Wastes Research Laboratory (RWRL) of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico), at the moment has three sections: instrumental analysis, radioactive material processes, counting and a license type II class C, to manipulate radioactive material. This license limits the open sources handling to 300 kBq for radionuclides of very high radio-toxicity as the Ra-226, for what is being projected the license extension to type II class B, to be able to manage until 370 MBq of this radionuclides type, and the Laboratory, since the location where is the RWRL have unused area. This work presents a proposal of the RWRL expansion, taking into account the current laboratory sections, as well as the established specifications by the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS). The current planes of the RWRL and the expansion proposal of the laboratory are presented. (Author)

  11. MHC class II-associated invariant chain linkage of antigen dramatically improves cell-mediated immunity induced by adenovirus vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria; Orskov, Cathrine; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Sørensen, Maria Rathmann

    2008-01-01

    potent and versatile Ag delivery vehicles available. However, the impact of chronic infections like HIV and hepatitis C virus underscore the need for further improvements. In this study, we show that the protective immune response to an adenovirus-encoded vaccine Ag can be accelerated, enhanced......, broadened, and prolonged by tethering of the rAg to the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, adenovirus-vectored vaccines expressing lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-derived glycoprotein linked to Ii increased the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell stimulatory capacity in vitro and in vivo....... Furthermore, mice vaccinated with a single dose of adenovirus-expressing LCMV-derived glycoprotein linked to Ii were protected against lethal virus-induced choriomeningitis, lethal challenge with strains mutated in immunodominant T cell epitopes, and systemic infection with a highly invasive strain. In...

  12. Presence of erm gene classes in Gram-positive bacteria of animal and human origin in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Frimodt-Moller, N.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1999-01-01

    A classification of the different erm gene classes based on published sequences was performed, and specific primers to detect some of these classes designed. The presence of ermA (Tn554), ermB (class IV) and ermC (class VI) was determined by PCR in a total of 113 enterococcal, 77 streptococcal an...... ermA (Tn554) present in some isolates (16%). Variations in the presence of the different genes when comparing staphylococcal isolates of human and animal origin were observed....... 68 staphylococcal erythromycin resistant isolates of animal and human origin. At least one of these genes was detected in 88% of the isolates. Four isolates contained more than one ei il? gene. ermB dominated among the enterococci (88%) and streptococci (90%) and ermC among staphylococci (75%) with......A classification of the different erm gene classes based on published sequences was performed, and specific primers to detect some of these classes designed. The presence of ermA (Tn554), ermB (class IV) and ermC (class VI) was determined by PCR in a total of 113 enterococcal, 77 streptococcal and...

  13. Correlação entre a assimetria clínica e a assimetria radiográfica na Classe II, subdivisão Correlation between photographic asymmetry and radiographic asymmetry in patients with Class II subdivision malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Rita Pontes Azevedo; Guilherme Janson; José Fernando Castanha Henriques

    2004-01-01

    O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a correlação entre a assimetria clínica e a assimetria radiográfica nos pacientes com Classe II, subdivisão. A amostra consistiu de 42 indivíduos com má oclusão de Classe II, subdivisão completa, com idade média de 15,21 anos. A assimetria clínica foi avaliada medindo-se a diferença relativa da posição espacial dos pontos do tecido mole entre os lados direito e esquerdo em fotografias frontais. A assimetria radiográfica foi avaliada medindo-se a diferença r...

  14. Bio-oss in Treatment of Furcation Class II Deffects and Comparison with Coronally Positioned Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ak.Khoshkhoo Nejad

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Among periodontal defects, the furcation involvement represents one of the most chalenging scenarios due to the difficulty of achieving a predictable improvement regardless of the type of periodontal therapy. Moreover, the presence of furcation involvement has been demonstrated to considerably affect tooth prognosis. Thus, treatment of furcation defects is a challenge in clinical periodontics. The aim of periodontal treatment is not only to control infection but also to regenerate periodontal tissues lost as a consequence of periodontal disease.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare Bio-oss (Bo, an anorganic bovine bone Xenograft, in combination with coronally positioned flap to open flap debridment surgery with coronally positiond flap alone in human mandibular class II furcation defects.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial and interventional study 24 furcations, which provided 12 pairs of similar periodontal defects were evaluated. Each defect was randomly assigned to treatment with Bio-Oss in combination coronally positioned flap or open flap debridment and coronally positioned flap alone. Following basic therapy, baseline measurements were recorded including probing depth (PDD, clinical attachment level (CAL,gingival recession (REC, keratinized gingiva (KG and closed horizontal probing depth(CHPD. After 6 months, all sites were re-entered and hard tissue measurements were recorded.Hard tissue measurements were performed during surgery to determine open horizontal probing depth (OHPD and open vertical probing depth (OVPD. The data was analyzed using t-test paired sample.Results: Vertical probing depth reduction of 3.17±1.32 mm and horizontal probing depth reduction of 4.42±1.02 mm were noted for the BO group, with 2.87±0.83 mm and 2.31±0.49 mm reductions, respectively, noted for CPF alone. Both surgical procedures resulted in statistically significant probing depth reduction and gain clinical

  15. HLA class II antigens and haplotypes associated with susceptibility of leukemias and myelodysplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetical and environmental factors play an interactive role in the development of acute and chronic leukemias. HLA antigens have been considered as possible genetic risk factors. The aim of this work was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II polymorphisms and leukemias and myelodysplastic syndrome. In the present study we investigated HLA class II antigens, DR/DQ and DR51/DR52/DR53 haplotypes in 100 patients: 7 suffering from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS,37 from acute lymphoblastic leukemia(ALL,32 from acute myeloid leukemia (AML and 24 from chronic myeloid leukemia(CML. A panel of 210 healthy unrelated individuals of the same origin, from Vojvodina, served as controls. HLA phenotyping was performed by two color fluorescence method. In patients suffering from MDS was found a positive association with DR7(RR=2.598,EF=0.175 and DQ7(3(RR=4.419, EF=0.632, while negative association was found for DR15(2(RR=0.405, PF=0.172 and DQ6(1 (RR=0.889, PF=0,936.Positive association was found in the group of patients with ALL for DR7(RR=2.391,EF=0.688 and DQ2(RR=1.62, EF=0.15,while negative association was found with DQ5(1(RR=0.075, PF=0.324. In the group of patients with AML, there were positive associations with DR11(5(RR=1.732,EF=0.211,DQ2(RR= 1.594, EF=0.151 and DQ7(3 (RR=2.547,EF=0.266,while possible protective antigen was DQ5(1 (RR=0.107,RF=0.701. Higher RR than 1 and EF>0.15, in patients suffering from CML was found for DQ6(1(RR=1.661,EF=0.232, while negative association was found for DR4 (RR=0.182,PF=0.155.Possible protective haplotype in this study was DR3DQ8(3 for patients suffering from AML(RR=0.007, PF=0.501.The distribution of DR53-DR53 haplotypes showed significant difference in male patients with ALL(6% vs 0.09%, while DR52-DR52 haplotype was significantly less frequent in male patients with CML (4% vs 20.47% and female patients with MDS (1% vs 18.57%, respectively, in comparison to controls. We deduced that DR7 antigen in

  16. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Ole

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen presenting cells (APCs sample the extra cellular space and present peptides from here to T helper cells, which can be activated if the peptides are of foreign origin. The peptides are presented on the surface of the cells in complex with major histocompatibility class II (MHC II molecules. Identification of peptides that bind MHC II molecules is thus a key step in rational vaccine design and developing methods for accurate prediction of the peptide:MHC interactions play a central role in epitope discovery. The MHC class II binding groove is open at both ends making the correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance of the method is validated on a large MHC class II benchmark data set covering 14 HLA-DR (human MHC and three mouse H2-IA alleles. Results The predictive performance of the SMM-align method was demonstrated to be superior to that of the Gibbs sampler, TEPITOPE, SVRMHC, and MHCpred methods. Cross validation between peptide data set obtained from different sources demonstrated that direct incorporation of peptide length potentially results in over-fitting of the binding prediction method. Focusing on amino terminal peptide flanking residues (PFR, we demonstrate a consistent gain in predictive performance by favoring binding registers with a minimum PFR length of two amino acids. Visualizing the binding motif as obtained by the SMM-align and TEPITOPE methods highlights a series of fundamental discrepancies between the two predicted motifs. For the DRB1*1302 allele for instance, the TEPITOPE method favors basic amino acids at most anchor positions, whereas the SMM-align method identifies a preference for hydrophobic or neutral amino acids at the anchors. Conclusion

  17. Expansion design for a Laboratory of Radioactive Sources Handling type II, class B; Diseno de ampliacion para un Laboratorio de Manejo de Fuentes Radiactivas tipo II, clase B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez S, P. S.

    2014-07-01

    This work presents the expansion design of the Radioactive Wastes Research Laboratory (RWRL) installation authorized by the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (Mexico) as type II class C, to manage 40 different radionuclides, approximately. The RWRL has 4 areas at the present time: a laboratory of instrumental analysis, one of radioactive material processes, other of counting and a chemical reagents stock, which is not integrated to the operation license of the RWRL. With the purpose of expanding the operation license of the RWRL to an installation type II class B, to manage until 370 MBq of high radio toxicity radionuclides, is presented in this work an expansion proposal of the RWRL. The expansion proposal is based in: (1) the Mexican Nuclear Standard NOM-027-Nucl-1996 for installations type II class B, (2) the current distribution of water, light, electricity, extraction, gas, air and vacuum services of RWRL, and (3) the available areas inside the building that the RWRL occupies. The proposal contemplates the creation of additional new areas for RWRL: 3 laboratories, 2 dressing rooms, 2 bathrooms and 2 warehouses, one for radioactive materials and another for reagents chemical radiologically inactive. Architectural, electric, hydraulic, extraction and gas planes corresponding to the expansion of RWRL were realized. Inside the proposal the budget required to carry out the mentioned expansion is also presented. (Author)

  18. HLA Class II Allele and Haplotype Frequencies in Iranian Patients with Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Khosravi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies demonstrated significant differences in a number of HLA allele frequencies in leukemia patients and normal subjects. In this study, we have analyzed HLA class II alleles and haplotypes in 110 leukemia patients (60 acute myelogenous leukemia "AML", 50 chronic myelogenous leukemia"CML" and 180 unrelated normal subjects. Blood samples were collected from all of the patients and control subjects. DNA was extracted by salting out method and HLA typing was performed using PCR-SSP method. Significant positive association with AML was obtained for HLA-DRB1*11allele (35% vs. 24.7%, P=0.033. Two alleles including HLA-DRB4 and -DQB1*0303 were significantly less frequent in AML patients than in controls. HLA-DQB1*0303 allele was never observed in CML patients compared with allele frequency in controls (4.2%. According to haplotype analysis, HLA-DRB1*0101/DQA1*0104/-DQB1*0501 frequencies were significantly higher and -DRB1*16/-DQA1*01021/-DQB1*0501 frequencies were significantly lower in CML patients than in controls .In conclusion it is suggested that HLA-DRB1*16 allele and HLA-DRB1*15/-DQA1*0103/-DQB1*06011 and -DRB1*16/-DQA1*01021/-DQB1*0501 haplotypes predispose individuals to AML and HLA-DRB4 allele predispose to CML. Future studies are needed to confirm these results and establish the role of these associations in AML and CML.

  19. Cloning and characterization of the gene product of the form II ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase gene of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, E D; Chory, J; Kaplan, S

    1985-01-01

    We report the cloning and characterization of the gene product of the gene for the form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. We present evidence that the form II enzyme is encoded by a single gene in R. sphaeroides; however, this gene does hybridize to a second chromosomal locus.

  20. Bayesian model accounting for within-class biological variability in Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brentani Helena

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important challenge for transcript counting methods such as Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, "Digital Northern" or Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS, is to carry out statistical analyses that account for the within-class variability, i.e., variability due to the intrinsic biological differences among sampled individuals of the same class, and not only variability due to technical sampling error. Results We introduce a Bayesian model that accounts for the within-class variability by means of mixture distribution. We show that the previously available approaches of aggregation in pools ("pseudo-libraries" and the Beta-Binomial model, are particular cases of the mixture model. We illustrate our method with a brain tumor vs. normal comparison using SAGE data from public databases. We show examples of tags regarded as differentially expressed with high significance if the within-class variability is ignored, but clearly not so significant if one accounts for it. Conclusion Using available information about biological replicates, one can transform a list of candidate transcripts showing differential expression to a more reliable one. Our method is freely available, under GPL/GNU copyleft, through a user friendly web-based on-line tool or as R language scripts at supplemental web-site.

  1. HLA Class II Defects in Burkitt Lymphoma: Bryostatin-1-Induced 17 kDa Protein Restores CD4+ T-Cell Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azim Hossain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While the defects in HLA class I-mediated Ag presentation by Burkitt lymphoma (BL have been well documented, CD4+ T-cells are also poorly stimulated by HLA class II Ag presentation, and the reasons underlying this defect(s have not yet been fully resolved. Here, we show that BL cells are deficient in their ability to optimally stimulate CD4+ T cells via the HLA class II pathway. The observed defect was not associated with low levels of BL-expressed costimulatory molecules, as addition of external co-stimulation failed to result in BL-mediated CD4+ T-cell activation. We further demonstrate that BL cells express the components of the class II pathway, and the defect was not caused by faulty Ag/class II interaction, because antigenic peptides bound with measurable affinity to BL-associated class II molecules. Treatment of BL with broystatin-1, a potent modulator of protein kinase C, led to significant improvement of functional class II Ag presentation in BL. The restoration of immune recognition appeared to be linked with an increased expression of a 17 kDa peptidylprolyl-like protein. These results demonstrate the presence of a specific defect in HLA class II-mediated Ag presentation in BL and reveal that treatment with bryostatin-1 could lead to enhanced immunogenicity.

  2. No difference in the parental origin of susceptibility HLA class II haplotypes among Norwegian patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Undlien, D.E.; Akselsen, H.E.; Thorsby, E. [National Hospital, Oslo (Norway)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is an autoimmune disease affecting genetically susceptible individuals. A major part of the genetic risk is encoded by HLA class II genes. Strong susceptibility is conferred by the DRB1*04-DQA1*03-DQB1*0302 (hereafter called {open_quotes}DR4-DQ8{close_quotes}) and the DRBI*0301-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 (hereafter called {open_quotes}DR3-DQ2{close_quotes}) haplotypes, particularly when they occur together. In an interesting publication it suggests that IDDM patients inherit DR4 from their fathers and DR3 from their mothers more often than vice versa. This has also been suggested elsewhere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this observation, such as parental imprinting, fetal loss, and maternal effect associated with the presence of the DR3 antigen in the mother. Several studies have shown that children of fathers with IDDM have a higher risk of IDDM than do children of mothers with IDDM. If there is an effect of the parental origin of HLA class II-encoded IDDM susceptibility, this could potentially explain the difference. 19 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Expression of endogenous and transfected apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin II genes in an estrogen responsive chicken liver cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, R; MacDonald, C C; Burch, J B; Lazier, C B; Williams, D L

    1990-02-01

    A recently described chicken liver cell line, LMH, was characterized to evaluate responsiveness to estrogen. Expression of the endogenous apolipoprotein (apo) II gene was induced by 17 beta-estradiol when LMH cells were cultured with chicken serum. The response was low and yielded apoll mRNA at only 0.3% of the level seen in estrogenized rooster liver. Higher levels of apoll mRNA were achieved when LMH cells were transiently transfected with an expression plasmid for estrogen receptor. A transfected apoll gene was strongly expressed only when cotransfected with receptor. Expression of the endogenous vitellogenin (VTG) II gene was not detected. However, when cotransfected with a receptor expression plasmid, VTG II reporter plasmids were expressed in LMH cells in response to 17 beta-estradiol. These results suggest that estrogen responsiveness of LMH cells is limited by the availability of functional receptor. Low levels of estrogen receptor mRNA were detected in LMH cells, and receptor binding sites and mRNA were greatly increased following transient transfection with a receptor expression plasmid. Using this transient transfection protocol, several VTG II reporter plasmids were compared in LMH cells and chick embryo fibroblasts. A plasmid containing VTG II estrogen response elements linked to a heterologous promoter was regulated by estrogen in both cell types. In contrast, reporter plasmids containing the VTG II promoter were regulated by estrogen in LMH cells but were not expressed at all in chick embryo fibroblasts. These results suggest that regulation of the VTG II gene involves cell type-specific elements in addition to estrogen response elements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2330000

  4. A Randomized 10-year Prospective Follow-up of Class II Nanohybrid and Conventional Hybrid Resin Composite Restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan Wv; Pallesen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the 10-year durability of a nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations in a randomized controlled intraindividual comparison with its conventional hybrid resin composite predecessor. Materials and Methods: Each of 52 participants received at least two Class II...... restorations that were as similar as possible. The cavities were chosen at random to be restored with a nanohybrid resin composite (Excite/Tetric EvoCeram (TEC); n = 61) and a conventional hybrid (Excite/Tetric Ceram (TC); n = 61). The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified USPHS criteria at...... baseline and then annually for 10 years. The overall performance of the experimental restorations was tested after intra-individual comparison and their ranking was tested using Friedman's two-way ANOVA. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results: Four patient drop-outs with 8 restorations (4TEC, 4TC...

  5. Signal transduction by HLA class II molecules in human T cells: induction of LFA-1-dependent and independent adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Yoshizumi, H; Okamoto, Y;

    1992-01-01

    Crosslinking HLA-DR molecules by monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation and results in a secondary elevation of free cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in activated human T cells. Binding of bacterial superantigens or moAbs to DR molecules on activated T cells was...... antigen- and alloantigen-activated T cells, antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell lines, a CD8+ T-cytotoxic cell line, and T-leukemia cells (HUT78). Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor herbimycin A partly blocked class-II-induced aggregation responses. In contrast, phorbol ester (PMA)-induced aggregation was......, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor (2'5'-dideoxyadenosine), and moAbs against other adhesion molecules (CD2/CD58 [LFA-3], CD28/CD28 ligand B7, CD4, and CD44). In conclusion, HLA class-II-induced aggregation responses in activated T cells appear to involve PTK and PKC activation and to be mediated through...

  6. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) from the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Santillán, Diana D; Lacey, Eileen A; Gendron, Diane; Ortega, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) that occurs in the Gulf of California, we genotyped a 172 bp fragment of exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB locus for 80 members of this population. Twenty-two putatively functional DQB allotypes were identified, all of which were homologous with DQB sequences from other cetacean species. Up to 5 putative alleles per individual were identified, suggesting that gene duplication has occurred at this locus. Rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) and maximum likelihood analyses of models of nucleotide variation provided potential evidence of ongoing positive selection at this exon. Phylogenetic analyses of DQB alleles from B. musculus and 16 other species of cetaceans revealed trans-specific conservation of MHC variants, suggesting that selection has acted on this locus over prolonged periods of time. Collectively our findings reveal that immunogenic variation in blue whales is comparable to that in terrestrial mammals, thereby providing no evidence that marine taxa are subject to reduced pathogen-induced selective pressures. PMID:26761201

  7. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus from the Gulf of California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana D Moreno-Santillán

    Full Text Available The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus that occurs in the Gulf of California, we genotyped a 172 bp fragment of exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB locus for 80 members of this population. Twenty-two putatively functional DQB allotypes were identified, all of which were homologous with DQB sequences from other cetacean species. Up to 5 putative alleles per individual were identified, suggesting that gene duplication has occurred at this locus. Rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω and maximum likelihood analyses of models of nucleotide variation provided potential evidence of ongoing positive selection at this exon. Phylogenetic analyses of DQB alleles from B. musculus and 16 other species of cetaceans revealed trans-specific conservation of MHC variants, suggesting that selection has acted on this locus over prolonged periods of time. Collectively our findings reveal that immunogenic variation in blue whales is comparable to that in terrestrial mammals, thereby providing no evidence that marine taxa are subject to reduced pathogen-induced selective pressures.

  8. A new polymorphic and multicopy MHC gene family related to nonmammalian class I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leelayuwat, C.; Degli-Esposti, M.A.; Abraham, L.J. [Univ. of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Townend, D.C. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); Dawkins, R.L. [Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia)]|[Univ. of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)]|[Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    The authors have used genomic analysis to characterize a region of the central major histocompatibility complex (MHC) spanning {approximately} 300 kilobases (kb) between TNF and HLA-B. This region has been suggested to carry genetic factors relevant to the development of autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis (MG) and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Genomic sequence was analyzed for coding potential, using two neural network programs, GRAIL and GeneParser. A genomic probe, JAB, containing putative coding sequences (PERB11) located 60 kb centromeric of HLA-B, was used for northern analysis of human tissues. Multiple transcripts were detected. Southern analysis of genomic DNA and overlapping YAC clones, covering the region from BAT1 to HLA-F, indicated that there are at least five copies of PERB11, four of which are located within this region of the MHC. The partial cDNA sequence of PERB11 was obtained from poly-A RNA derived from skeletal muscle. The putative amino acid sequence of PERB11 shares {approximately} 30% identity to MHC class I molecules from various species, including reptiles, chickens, and frogs, as well as to other MHC class I-like molecules, such as the IgG FcR of the mouse and rat and the human Zn-{alpha}2-glycoprotein. From direct comparison of amino acid sequences, it is concluded that PERB11 is a distinct molecule more closely related to nonmammalian than known mammalian MHC class I molecules. Genomic sequence analysis of PERB11 from five MHC ancestral haplotypes (AH) indicated that the gene is polymorphic at both DNA and protein level. The results suggest that the authors have identified a novel polymorphic gene family with multiple copies within the MHC. 48 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. A new class of marine Euryarchaeota group II from the mediterranean deep chlorophyll maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Cuadrado, Ana-Belen; Garcia-Heredia, Inmaculada; Moltó, Aitor Gonzaga; López-Úbeda, Rebeca; Kimes, Nikole; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed metagenomic fosmid clones from the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM), which, by genomic parameters, correspond to the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-defined marine Euryarchaeota group IIB (MGIIB). The fosmid collections associated with this group add up to 4 Mb and correspond to at least two species within this group. From the proposed essential genes contained in the collections, we infer that large sections of the conserved regions of the genomes of these microbes have been recovered. The genomes indicate a photoheterotrophic lifestyle, similar to that of the available genome of MGIIA (assembled from an estuarine metagenome in Puget Sound, Washington Pacific coast), with a proton-pumping rhodopsin of the same kind. Several genomic features support an aerobic metabolism with diversified substrate degradation capabilities that include xenobiotics and agar. On the other hand, these MGIIB representatives are non-motile and possess similar genome size to the MGIIA-assembled genome, but with a lower GC content. The large phylogenomic gap with other known archaea indicates that this is a new class of marine Euryarchaeota for which we suggest the name Thalassoarchaea. The analysis of recruitment from available metagenomes indicates that the representatives of group IIB described here are largely found at the DCM (ca. 50 m deep), in which they are abundant (up to 0.5% of the reads), and at the surface mostly during the winter mixing, which explains formerly described 16S rRNA distribution patterns. Their uneven representation in environmental samples that are close in space and time might indicate sporadic blooms. PMID:25535935

  10. Assessment of divine proportion in the cranial structure of individuals with Angle Class II malocclusion on lateral cephalograms

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos André dos Santos da Silva; Edmundo Médici Filho; Julio Cezar de Melo Castilho; Cássia T. Lopes de Alcântara Gil

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The study of the Divine Proportion (Φ = 1.618) began with the Greeks, having as main researchers the mathematician Pythagoras and the sculptor Phidias. In Dentistry, Ricketts (1981-82) was an early to study this issue. OBJECTIVE: This study proposed to evaluate how some cephalometric measures are presented in relation to the Divine Proportion, with the total of 52 proportions, formed by 28 cephalometric landmarks. METHODS: Lateral cephalograms of 40 Class II adults patients...

  11. Absence of major histocompatibility complex class II mediated immunity in pipefish, Syngnathus typhle: evidence from deep transcriptome sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Haase, David; Roth, Olivia; Kalbe, Martin; Schmiedeskamp, Gisela; Scharsack, Jörn P; Rosenstiel, Philip; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.

    2013-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mediated adaptive immune system is the hallmark of gnathostome immune defence. Recent work suggests that cod-like fishes (Gadidae) lack important components of the MHC class II mediated immunity. Here, we report a putative independent loss of functionality of this pathway in another species, the pipefish Syngnathus typhle, that belongs to a distantly related fish family (Syngnathidae). In a deep transcriptome sequencing approach comprising several in...

  12. Class II-targeted antigen is superior to CD40-targeted antigen at stimulating humoral responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frleta, D; Demian, D; Wade, W F

    2001-02-01

    We examined the efficacy of using monoclonal antibodies to target antigen (avidin) to different surface molecules expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC). In particular, we targeted CD40 to test whether the "adjuvant" properties of CD40 signaling combined with targeted antigen would result in enhanced serologic responses. We targeted avidin to class II as a positive control and to CD11c as a negative control. These surface proteins represent an ensemble of surface molecules that signal upon ligation and that are expressed on professional APC, in particular dendritic cells (DC). We observed that targeting class II molecules on APC was superior to targeting CD40, or CD11c. However, CD40 and CD11c could function as targets for antigen bound monoclonal antibodies under certain conditions. Interestingly, inclusion of anti-CD40 mAb with the targeting anti-class II-targeted antigens negatively affects humoral response, suggesting that CD40 signaling under certain conditions may suppress processing and/or presentation of targeted antigen. PMID:11360928

  13. Cephalometric assessment of vertical control in the treatment of class II malocclusion with a combined maxillary splint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Uglik Garbui

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertical control is one of the primary objectives sought by orthodontists when treating malocclusions in hyperdivergent individuals. This investigation aimed at assessing vertical control, by cephalometric measurements, during the treatment of Angle Class II Division 1 malocclusion. Thirty cases, selected from the files of the São Leopoldo Mandic Dental Research Center, Brazil, of subjects with Angle Class II Division 1 malocclusion and facial hyperdivergence, were used in this study. The patients were treated using a combined extraoral appliance during a mean treatment time of 1.1 years. Pre- and posttreatment cephalometric measurements were compared to assess vertical control. The results were submitted to ANOVA (p = 5%. The ANOVA test revealed no statistically significant difference between the pretreatment and posttreatment values of OP (Occlusal plane angle and SN.MP. While there was a decrease in Y-axis, FMA, and PP.MP, there was an increase in SN.PP, Co-Go, AFH, PFH, and FHI. It was concluded that the divergence in the facial lower third of the patients did not increase, suggesting that the combined extraoral appliance with the line of force application directed to the resistance center of the maxilla was effective in treating Angle Class II malocclusion in hyperdivergent subjects.

  14. Changes in skeletal and dental relationship in Class II Division I malocclusion after rapid maxillary expansion: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Baratieri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess skeletal and dental changes immediately after rapid maxillary expansion (RME in Class II Division 1 malocclusion patients and after a retention period, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT imaging. METHODS: Seventeen children with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion and maxillary skeletal transverse deficiency underwent RME following the Haas protocol. CBCT were taken before treatment (T1, at the end of the active expansion phase (T2 and after a retention period of 6 months (T3. The scanned images were measured anteroposteriorly (SNA, SNB, ANB, overjet and MR and vertically (N-ANS, ANS-Me, N-Me and overbite. RESULTS: Significant differences were identified immediately after RME as the maxilla moved forward, the mandible moved downward, overjet increased and overbite decreased. During the retention period, the maxilla relapsed backwards and the mandible was displaced forward, leaving patients with an overall increase in anterior facial height. CONCLUSION: RME treatment allowed more anterior than inferior positioning of the mandible during the retention period, thus significantly improving Class II dental relationship in 75% of the patients evaluated.

  15. Platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of Class II furcation defects: a histometrical study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrícia Ferreira Suaid

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to evaluate the potential adjunctive benefits of platelet-rich plasma (PRP when used with guided-tissue regeneration (GTR and bioactive glass (BG in the treatment of Class II furcation lesions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Bilateral Class II furcation lesions were surgically created and allowed to become chronic in the mandibular third premolars of 9 dogs. The defects were randomly assigned to: A GTR+BG and B GTR+BG+PRP. Similar defects were created in the maxillary third premolars and received the same treatments after 45 days. Dogs were sacrificed 90 days after the first treatment. The histometric parameters evaluated were: connective tissue adaptation, new cementum, new bone, mineralized bone area, non-mineralized bone area, and residual BG particle area. RESULTS: Data analysis showed a superior length of new cementum and a greater mineralized bone area for group B in both periods (p<0.05. The non-mineralized bone area was greater in the control group (p<0.05 in both periods. CONCLUSION: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the use of PRP in the treatment of Class II furcation defects may enhance the amount of new cementum and provide a more mineralized bone in a shorter period of time.

  16. Finite Element Analysis of the Effect of Proximal Contour of Class II Composite Restorations on Stress Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Moghaddas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of proximal contour of class II composite restorations placed with straight or contoured matrix band using composite resins with different modulus of elasticity on stress distribution by finite element method. Methods: In order to evaluate the stress distribution of class II composite restorations using finite element method, upper right first molar and second premolar were modeled. Proximal boxes were designed and restored with universal Z250 and packable P60 composite resins (3M ESPE using two matrix systems: flat Tofflemire matrix and precurved sectional matrix. Finally models were evaluated under loads of 200 and 400 Newton at 90 degrees angle and the results were graphically illustrated in the form of Von Misses stresses. Results: In general the stress obtained under 400 Newton load was significantly greater than the stress of models under 200 Newton load. Von Misses stress distribution pattern of two different Z250 and P60 composites were very similar in all modes of loading and proximal contour. In all analyzed models there was a significant difference between models restored with Tofflemire matrix with flat contour and models restored with sectional matrix with curved contour. This difference was greater in first molar than second premolar. Conclusion: Use of a contoured matrix band results in less stress in class II composite resin restorations.

  17. Shoot meristem function and leaf polarity: the role of class III HD-ZIP genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Byrne

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The shoot apical meristem comprises an organized cluster of cells with a central region population of self-maintaining stem cells providing peripheral region cells that are recruited to form differentiated lateral organs. Leaves, the principal lateral organ of the shoot, develop as polar structures typically with distinct dorsoventrality. Interdependent interactions between the meristem and developing leaf provide essential cues that serve both to maintain the meristem and to pattern dorsoventrality in the initiating leaf. A key component of both processes are the class III HD-ZIP genes. Current findings are defining the developmental role of members of this family and are identifying multiple mechanisms controlling expression of these genes.

  18. Work Analysis of the nuclear power plant control room operators (II): The classes of situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a work analysis of nuclear power plant control room operators focused on the classes of situation they can meet during their job. Each class of situation is first described in terms of the process variables states. We then describe the goals of the operators and the variables they process in each class of situation. We report some of the most representative difficulties encountered by the operators in each class of situation. Finally, we conclude on different topics: the nature of the mental representations, the temporal dimension, the monitoring activity, and the role of the context in the work of controlling a nuclear power plant

  19. Boosting immune response with the invariant chain segments via association with non-peptide binding region of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Fangfang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on binding of invariant chain (Ii to major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules to form complexes, Ii-segment hybrids, Ii-key structure linking an epitope, or Ii class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP replaced with an epitope were used to increase immune response. It is currently unknown whether the Ii-segment cytosolic and transmembrane domains bind to the MHC non-peptide binding region (PBR and consequently influence immune response. To investigate the potential role of Ii-segments in the immune response via MHC II/peptide complexes, a few hybrids containing Ii-segments and a multiepitope (F306 from Newcastle disease virus fusion protein (F were constructed, and their binding effects on MHC II molecules and specific antibody production were compared using confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, western blotting and animal experiments. Results One of the Ii-segment/F306 hybrids, containing ND (Asn–Asp outside the F306 in the Ii-key structure (Ii-key/F306/ND, neither co-localized with MHC II molecules on plasma membrane nor bound to MHC II molecules to form complexes. However, stimulation of mice with the structure produced 4-fold higher antibody titers compared with F306 alone. The two other Ii-segment/F306 hybrids, in which the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of Ii were linked to this structure (Cyt/TM/Ii-key/F306/ND, partially co-localized on plasma membrane with MHC class II molecules and weakly bound MHC II molecules to form complexes. They induced mice to produce approximately 9-fold higher antibody titers compared with F306 alone. Furthermore, an Ii/F306 hybrid (F306 substituting CLIP co-localized well with MHC II molecules on the membrane to form complexes, although it increased antibody titer about 3-fold relative to F306 alone. Conclusions These results suggest that Ii-segments improve specific immune response by binding to the non-PBR on MHC class II molecules and enabling

  20. HLA-DR4-IE chimeric class II transgenic, murine class II-deficient mice are susceptible to experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the development of HLA-DR-associated autoimmune diseases, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice with HLA-DRA-IE alpha and HLA-DRB1*0401-IE beta chimeric genes. The transgene-encoded proteins consisted of antigen-binding domains from HLA-DRA and HLA-DRB1*0401 molecules and the remaining domains from the IE(d)-alpha and IE(d)-beta chains. The chimeric molecules showed the same antigen-binding specificity as HLA-DRB1*0401 molecules, and were functional in presenting antigens to T cell...

  1. A comparative gene analysis with rice identified orthologous group II HKT genes and their association with Na+ concentration in bread wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Ariyarathna, H. A. Chandima K.; Oldach, Klaus H; Francki, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the HKT transporter genes ascertain some of the key determinants of crop salt tolerance mechanisms, the diversity and functional role of group II HKT genes are not clearly understood in bread wheat. The advanced knowledge on rice HKT and whole genome sequence was, therefore, used in comparative gene analysis to identify orthologous wheat group II HKT genes and their role in trait variation under different saline environments. Results The four group II HKTs in rice identifi...

  2. Skeletal muscle molecular alterations precede whole-muscle dysfunction in NYHA Class II heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godard MP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael P Godard,1 Samantha A Whitman,2 Yao-Hua Song,3 Patrice Delafontaine41Department of Nutrition and Kinesiology, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO, USA; 2Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 3Cyrus Tang Hematology Center, Jiangsu Institute of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital, Soochow University, Suzhou, China; 4Tulane University School of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, New Orleans, LA, USABackground: Heart failure (HF, a debilitating disease in a growing number of adults, exerts structural and neurohormonal changes in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. However, these alterations and their affected molecular pathways remain uncharacterized. Disease progression is known to transform skeletal muscle fiber composition by unknown mechanisms. In addition, perturbation of specific hormonal pathways, including those involving skeletal muscle insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFB-5 appears to occur, likely affecting muscle metabolism and regeneration. We hypothesized that changes in IGF-1 and IGFB-5 mRNA levels correlate with the transformation of single–skeletal muscle fiber myosin heavy chain isoforms early in disease progression, making these molecules valuable markers of skeletal muscle changes in heart failure.Materials and methods: To investigate these molecules during “early” events in HF patients, we obtained skeletal muscle biopsies from New York Heart Association (NYHA Class II HF patients and controls for molecular analyses of single fibers, and we also quantified isometric strength and muscle size.Results: There were more (P < 0.05 single muscle fibers coexpressing two or more myosin heavy chains in the HF patients (30% ± 7% compared to the control subjects (13% ± 2%. IGF-1 and IGFBP-5 expression was fivefold and 15-fold lower in patients with in HF compared to control subjects (P < 0.05, respectively. Strikingly

  3. Active maize genes are unmodified and flanked by diverse classes of modified, highly repetitive DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennetzen, J L; Schrick, K; Springer, P S; Brown, W E; SanMiguel, P

    1994-08-01

    We have characterized the copy number, organization, and genomic modification of DNA sequences within and flanking several maize genes. We found that highly repetitive DNA sequences were tightly linked to most of these genes. The highly repetitive sequences were not found within the coding regions but could be found within 6 kb either 3' or 5' to the structural genes. These highly repetitive regions were each composed of unique combinations of different short repetitive sequences. Highly repetitive DNA blocks were not interrupted by any detected single copy DNA. The 13 classes of highly repetitive DNA identified were found to vary little between diverse Zea isolates. The level of DNA methylation in and near these genes was determined by scoring the digestibility of 63 recognition/cleavage sites with restriction enzymes that were sensitive to 5-methylation of cytosines in the sequences 5'-CG-3' and 5'-CNG-3'. All but four of these sites were digestible in chromosomal DNA. The four undigested sites were localized to extragenic DNA within or near highly repetitive DNA, while the other 59 sites were in low copy number DNAs. Pulsed field gel analysis indicated that the majority of cytosine modified tracts range from 20 to 200 kb in size. Single copy sequences hybridized to the unmodified domains, while highly repetitive sequences hybridized to the modified regions. Middle repetitive sequences were found in both domains. PMID:7958822

  4. Characterisation of non-classical MHC class I genes in the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2014-12-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is a carnivorous marsupial that is under threat of extinction due to an unusual transmissible disease called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). Previous studies on the classical MHC genes have provided important insights into immune responses in this endangered species; however, so far, very little is known about the non-classical MHC genes of this species, which can also play significant roles in the immune system. Here, we report characterisation of five non-classical class I genes in the Tasmanian devil, including Saha-UD, -UK, -UM, -MR1 and -CD1. Saha-UD has been isolated previously and is known to have low genetic polymorphism, though its categorisation as classical or non-classical gene has remained undetermined. In this study, we observed tissue-specific expression of Saha-UD, suggesting that it is more characteristic of a non-classical gene. Restricted tissue expression patterns were also observed for other genes, with an exception of Saha-MR1 being ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues. Saha-UK, -UM and -MR1 were found to be genetically monomorphic, while four alleles were found at Saha-CD1 with signs of positive selection detected within the α1 domain. Among the four Saha-CD1 alleles, one predominant allele (Saha-CD1*01) showed a high allele frequency of 0.906 in the Tasmanian devil population, resulting in a low heterozygosity (0.188) at this locus. Alternative splicing takes place in Saha-CD1, giving rise to a full-length transcript and a splice variant lacking intact antigen-binding, β2m-binding, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. PMID:25267059

  5. Estudo cefalométrico comparativo dos espaços naso e bucofaríngeo nas más oclusões Classe I e Classe II, Divisão 1, sem tratamento ortodôntico, com diferentes padrões de crescimento A Comparative cephalometric study of the naso and oropharyngeal space in malocclusions Class I and Class II Division 1, without orthodontic treatment with different growth patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadyr M. Penteado Virmond Alcazar

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A finalidade deste estudo foi comparar os espaços aéreos naso e bucofaríngeo em indivíduos com má oclusão Classe I e Classe II, divisão 1, segundo Angle, do gênero masculino e feminino, com idade média de 11 anos e 6 meses, com padrão de crescimento normal e vertical, não tratados ortodonticamente. A amostra desse estudo foi dividida em dois grupos: 40 pacientes apresentando Classe I e 40 pacientes com Classe II, divisão 1, cada grupo subdividido de acordo com o padrão de crescimento facial: normal e vertical. Os espaços aéreos naso e bucofaríngeo foram avaliados segundo a análise de McNamara Jr., pelas medidas NFa-NFp e BFa-BFp. A análise dos resultados obtidos revelou que, a medida do espaço bucofaríngeo para Classe I com padrão de crescimento vertical e para o espaço nasofaríngeo para Classe II com padrão normal de crescimento apresentaram-se semelhantes à medida padrão da amostra de McNamara Jr.. As outras medidas apresentaram-se estatisticamente menores. Na comparação entre os grupos, o espaço nasofaríngeo no grupo Classe I com padrão de crescimento vertical, apresentou-se menor do que nos grupos Classe I e grupo Classe II divisão 1, ambos com padrão de crescimento normal. O espaço bucofaríngeo não sofreu alteração significante de um grupo para outro. Em relação à hipertrofia da tonsila faringeana, apenas o grupo Classe I com padrão de crescimento vertical apresentou obstrução; para hipertrofia das tonsilas palatinas, apenas o grupo Classe I com padrão de crescimento vertical e Classe II com padrão de crescimento normal apresentou hipertrofia das tonsilas palatinas.The aim of this study is to compare the naso and oropharyngeal air space in people with malocclusion class I and class II division 1, according to Angle, with mean age from 8 to 15 years old with normal and vertical growth pattern not treated orthodontically. This study was divided into two groups: 40 patients with class I, and 40

  6. Molecular characterization of MHC class II in the Australian invasive cane toad reveals multiple splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Mette; Cui, Jian; Shine, Richard; Belov, Katherine

    2016-07-01

    The cane toad has gained notoriety for its invasion across the Australian landscape, with significant impacts on the native Australian fauna. The invasion has accelerated over time, with invading cane toads adapted for highly dispersive traits. This, however, has come at the cost of the immune system, with lower investment in some immune functions. To investigate the cane toad's immunogenetics, we characterized four major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class IIA and three MHC class IIB loci. Preliminary observations suggest very low allelic diversity at all loci. We also observed various splice isoforms. One isoform seen at one class IIA and two class IIB loci was missing exon 2, which is essential to peptide binding and presentation. The other isoform, observed at a class IIA locus, is likely to be a soluble MHC product. These results may suggest a significant role of alternative splicing of MHC loci in the Australian cane toad. PMID:27233954

  7. Protective and Susceptible HLA Class I Genes in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the HLA system in the pathophysiology of primary renal disease is intriguing, but not completely resolved. According to the results of studies links between HLA haplotype and renal failure has been reported. This study was conducted to determine protective and susceptible role of HLA class I genes in end stage renal disease patients. Subjects of this study were 77 individuals from Azerbaijan republic referred to Iran Red Crescent Society clinic in Baku of which were assigned into 2 group, case and control, based on renal disease. Case group were 26 patients with end stage renal disease candidate for renal transplant and controls were 51 healthy subjects. Typing of HLA class I was performed by serologic method. There was no significant difference in age and sex between control and patient groups. The most frequent detected HLA antigens were A2 (41.6%, A3(28.6%, A24(26% from A loci and B35 (46.8%, B51 (29.9%, B18 (13% from B loci. Significant association was found between susceptibility to ESRD and HLA-A33, A11, B49 (p<0.05. The findings support the idea that polymorphism of HLA class I may influence the susceptibility to ESRD. We suggested HLA antigen distribution will identify the high-risk patients who are candidates for transplantation.

  8. Organization of the human keratin type II gene cluster at 12q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S.J.; LeBlanc-Straceski, J.; Krauter, K. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    Keratin proteins constitute intermediate filaments and are the major differentiation products of mammalian epithelial cells. The epithelial keratins are classified into two groups, type I and type II, and one member of each group is expressed in a given epithelial cell differentiation stage. Mutations in type I and type II keratin genes have now been implicated in three different human genetic disorders, epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. Members of the type I keratins are mapped to human chromosome 17, and the type II keratin genes are mapped to chromosome 12. To understand the organization of the type II keratin genes on chromosome 12, we isolated several yeast artificial chromosomes carrying these keratin genes and examined them in detail. We show that eight already known type II keratin genes are located in a cluster at 12q13, and their relative organization reflects their evolutionary relationship. We also determined that a type I keratin gene, KRT8, is located next to its partner, KRT18, in this cluster. Careful examination of the cluster also revealed that there may be a number of additional keratin genes at this locus that have not been described previously. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands protect DBA/1LacJ mice from collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Jianya; Kaler, Laurie J; Mooney, Jeffery L; Subramanian, Sandhya; Hopke, Corwyn; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Rosloniec, Edward F; Burrows, Gregory G; Offner, Halina

    2008-01-15

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic effects of MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL), single-chain two domain complexes of the alpha1 and beta1 domains of MHC class II molecules genetically linked with an immunodominant peptide, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In the current study, we produced a monomeric murine I-Aq-derived RTL construct covalently linked with bovine collagen type II peptide (bCII257-270) suitable for use in DBA/1LacJ mice that develop collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, after immunization with bCII protein in CFA. In this study, we demonstrate that the I-Aq-derived RTLs reduced the incidence of the disease, suppressed the clinical and histological signs of CIA and induced long-term modulation of T cells specific for arthritogenic Ags. Our results showed that the I-Aq/bCII257-270 molecule could systemically reduce proinflammatory IL-17 and IFN-gamma production and significantly increase anti-inflammatory IL-10, IL-13, and FoxP3 gene expression in splenocytes. Moreover, I-Aq/bCII257-270 molecule could also selectively inhibit IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-23 expression in local joint tissue. This is the first report demonstrating effective prevention of joint inflammation and clinical signs of CIA with an I-Aq-derived RTL, thus supporting the possible clinical use of this approach for treating rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:18178865

  10. Class 1 Integrons Potentially Predating the Association with Tn402-Like Transposition Genes Are Present in a Sediment Microbial Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokes, Harold W.; Nesbø, Camilla L.; Holley, Marita;

    2006-01-01

    Integrons are genetic elements that contribute to lateral gene transfer in bacteria as a consequence of possessing a site-specific recombination system. This system facilitates the spread of genes when they are part of mobile cassettes. Most integrons are contained within chromosomes and are...... for bacteria, especially pathogens, which harbor class 1 integrons and their associated antibiotic resistance genes. Here, we have isolated bacteria from soil and sediment in the absence of antibiotic selection. Class 1 integrons were recovered from four different bacterial species not known to be...

  11. Changes of hyoid bone position following treatment of class II div1 malocclusion with Farmand functional appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassaei S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Unlike other bones of the head and neck, hyoid bone has no bony articulations. It is connected to mandible, cranium and pharynx through muscles and ligaments. During treatment with functional appliance in patients with class II div1 malocclusion, mandible is positioned in inferior and anterior direction. Regarding the relation between hyoid and mandibular bone, alterations of hyoid bone position can be a result of functional appliance therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes of hyoid bone position following treatment with Farmand functional appliance in patients with class II div 1 malocclusion. Materials and Methods: In this before-after clinical trial, 28 patients with class II div 1 malocclusion which were under treatment with Farmand functional appliance for 11 months were selected. Facial growth in vertical, normal or horizontal direction was determined by cephalometric measurement. Data were analyzed with Paired-t test to compare the differences of mean values pre and post treatment. Variance analysis was used to compare the three growth patterns. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Results: Hyoid bone shifted significantly forward in horizontal dimension (P<0.01 and non-significantly upward in vertical dimension. There was no significant difference among the three studied groups with respect to hyoid bone position alterations in horizontal dimension but significant difference was observed between horizontal and vertical growth pattern in vertical dimension (P<0.05. There was significant correlation between decrease of ANB angle and forward movement of hyoid bone. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treatment with Farmand functional appliance (Fa II leads to significant alterations in the position and anterior displacement of the hyoid bone.

  12. Assessment of the changes in quality of life of patients with class II and III deformities during and after orthodontic-surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baherimoghaddam, T; Tabrizi, R; Naseri, N; Pouzesh, A; Oshagh, M; Torkan, S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to assess and compare the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of patients with class II and III deformities during and after orthodontic-surgical treatment. Thirty class III and 28 class II patients were evaluated at baseline (T0), just prior to surgery (T1), at 6 months after surgery (T2), and at 12 months after debonding (T3). OHRQoL was assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Friedman two-way analysis of variance and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were performed to compare the relative changes in OHRQoL during treatment. Significant changes in the overall OHIP-14 scores were observed during and after orthodontic-surgical treatment in both groups. During the pre-surgical stage, psychological discomfort and psychological disability decreased in class III patients, and class II patients experienced a significant deterioration in psychological discomfort during the same period. Six months after surgery, patients in both groups showed improvements in psychological discomfort, social disability, and handicap. Physical disability and functional limitation showed further improvement at 12 months after debonding in class II patients. This study reaffirms that orthodontic-surgical treatment has a significant effect on the OHRQoL of class III and class II patients. PMID:26603194

  13. HLA class II immunogenetics and incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the population of Cantabria (Northern Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano-de-Diego, J; Sánchez-Velasco, P; Luzuriaga, C; Ocejo-Vinyals, J G; Paz-Miguel, J E; Leyva-Cobián, F

    1999-10-01

    HLA class II genes were analyzed to study IDDM susceptibility in Cantabria (Northern Spain). Patients showed highly significant increases in DRB1*0301 (RR = 4.581, p < 0.00005), DRB1*0401 (RR = 2.6, p < 0.05), DRB1*0402 (RR = 8.78, p < 0.05) and DRB1*0405 (RR = 14.73, p < 0.005). Highly significant diferences were in the DQA1*0301 (RR = 3.62, p < 0.000005) and DQA1*0501 (RR = 2.13, p < 0.05) alleles. DQB*0201 (RR = 4.1, p < 0.00005) and DQB1*0302 (RR = 5.42, p < 0.000005) alleles were also significantly increased. A significant increase in DRB1*0402-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (RR = 16.18, p < 0.05), DRB1*0405-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (RR = 16.12, p < 0.05), DRB1*0301-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 (RR = 4.58, p < 0.00005) and DRB1*0401-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (RR = 4.36, p < 0.005) was apparent in the diabetic group, while the DRB1*1501-DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602 and DRB1*1401-DQA *0104-DQB1*05031 protective haplotypes (RR = 0.17 and 0.09, p < 0.0005 and 0.05, respectively) were significantly lower in patients. The absence of Asp57 and the presence of Arg52 were associated with disease in a dose-dependent manner. Several genotypes encoding the identical DQalpha52/DQbeta57 phenotype carried very different RRs. Finally, the Cantabrian population has the highest incidence of IDDM reported for Spain (15.2 of 100.000 in the 0-14 age group, Poisson's 95% CI: 10.6-19.3). PMID:10566601

  14. Cloning and sequence analysis of putative type II fatty acid synthase genes from Arachis hypogaea L.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meng-Jun Li; Ai-Qin Li; Han Xia; Chuan-Zhi Zhao; Chang-Sheng Li; Shu-Bo Wan; Yu-Ping Bi; Xing-Jun Wang

    2009-06-01

    The cultivated peanut is a valuable source of dietary oil and ranks fifth among the world oil crops. Plant fatty acid biosynthesis is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) in plastids and mitochondria. By constructing a full-length cDNA library derived from immature peanut seeds and homology-based cloning, candidate genes of acyl carrier protein (ACP), malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, -ketoacyl-ACP synthase (I, II, III), -ketoacyl-ACP reductase, -hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase and enoyl-ACP reductase were isolated. Sequence alignments revealed that primary structures of type II FAS enzymes were highly conserved in higher plants and the catalytic residues were strictly conserved in Escherichia coli and higher plants. Homologue numbers of each type II FAS gene expressing in developing peanut seeds varied from 1 in KASII, KASIII and HD to 5 in ENR. The number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was quite different in each gene. Peanut type II FAS genes were predicted to target plastids except ACP2 and ACP3. The results suggested that peanut may contain two type II FAS systems in plastids and mitochondria. The type II FAS enzymes in higher plants may have similar functions as those in E. coli.

  15. Comparative evaluation of microleakage in class II cavities restored with Ceram X and Filtek P-90: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Bogra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Polymerization shrinkage in composite resins is responsible for microleakage. Methacrylate-based composite resins have linear reactive groups resulting in high polymerization shrinkage. A recently introduced composite resin Filtek P90 is based on siloxanes and oxiranes which polymerize by cationic "ring opening" polymerization resulting in reduced polymerization shrinkage. Objectives: Aim of this study was to compare microleakage in class II cavities restored with a nanoceramic restorative (Ceram X and a silorane composite (Filtek P90. Materials and Methods: Standardized class II box type cavities were prepared on mesial (Groups Ia and IIa and distal (Groups Ib and IIb surfaces of twenty extracted permanent molar teeth with gingival floor ending 1 mm coronal and apical to the cementoenamel junction, respectively. The teeth in Group Ia and Ib were restored with Ceram X and Group IIa and IIb with Filtek P90. The specimens were thermocycled and microleakage evaluated. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were statistically analyzed using Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test at the 0.05 level of significance. Results: Mean microleakage score of group la and lb was 1 ± 2.260 and 2.8 ± 1.229, respectively. And that of group Ila and llb was 0.2 ± .869 and 0.3 ± .588, respectively. When groups I and II were compared, results were statistically significant (P<0.05. Conclusion: It was concluded that silorane-based composite may be a better substitute for methacrylate-based composites.

  16. Correlação entre a assimetria clínica e a assimetria radiográfica na Classe II, subdivisão Correlation between photographic asymmetry and radiographic asymmetry in patients with Class II subdivision malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Rita Pontes Azevedo

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a correlação entre a assimetria clínica e a assimetria radiográfica nos pacientes com Classe II, subdivisão. A amostra consistiu de 42 indivíduos com má oclusão de Classe II, subdivisão completa, com idade média de 15,21 anos. A assimetria clínica foi avaliada medindo-se a diferença relativa da posição espacial dos pontos do tecido mole entre os lados direito e esquerdo em fotografias frontais. A assimetria radiográfica foi avaliada medindo-se a diferença relativa da posição espacial dos pontos dentários e esqueléticos, entre os lados direito e esquerdo nas dimensões ântero-posterior e transversal nas radiografias submentonianas e póstero-anterior. Posteriormente, o teste de correlação de Pearson foi realizado entre as assimetrias nas fotografias e as assimetrias nas radiografias. Como conclusão observou-se que a correlação entre a assimetria clínica e a assimetria radiográfica foi muito suave.The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between clinical asymmetry and radiographic asymmetry in patients with Class II subdivision malocclusion. The sample consisted of 42 individuals with complete Class II subdivision malocclusion, with a mean age of 15.21 years. Photographic asymmetry was assessed by measuring the relative difference in spatial position of soft tissue landmarks between right and left sides in frontal photographs. Radiographic asymmetry was assessed by measuring the relative difference in spatial position of dental and skeletal landmarks between right and left sides in both anteroposterior and transverse dimensions in the submentovertex and in the transverse and vertical dimensions in the postero-anterior radiographs. Pearson's correlation test was performed between the asymmetries in the photographs and the asymmetries in the radiographs. In conclusion was observed that correlation between clinical and radiographic asymmetry was very weak.

  17. The tetracycline resistance determinant Tet 39 and the sulphonamide resistance gene sulII are common among resistant Acinetobacter spp. isolated from integrated fish farms in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Petersen, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the genetic basis for tetracycline and sulphonamide resistance and the prevalence of class I and II integrons in oxytetracycline-resistant Acinetobacter spp. from integrated fish farms in Thailand. Methods: A total of 222 isolates were screened for tetracycline resistance...... Southern blots with sulII and tet(39) probes were performed on selected isolates. Results: The recently identified tetracycline resistance gene tet(39) was demonstrated in 75% (166/222) of oxytetracycline-resistant Acinetobacter spp. from integrated fish farms in Thailand. Isolates that were also...

  18. Conservation of the gene encoding streptococcal antigen I/II in oral streptococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, J K; Kelly, C G; Munro, G; Whiley, R A; Lehner, T.

    1991-01-01

    The spaP gene of Streptococcus mutans serotype c encodes a major cell surface protein, streptococcal antigen (SA) I/II, with an Mr of 185,000, that is thought to be involved in bacterial adhesion to teeth. Proteins with significant amino acid sequence homology to SA I/II have also been found in S. sobrinus and S. sanguis. The objectives of this study were to investigate the conservation of the spaP gene in the mutans groups of streptococci and to determine whether homologous genes were presen...

  19. Isolation of the human insulin-like growth factor genes: insulin-like growth factor II and insulin genes are contiguous.

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, G I; Gerhard, D S; Fong, N. M.; Sanchez-Pescador, R; Rall, L B

    1985-01-01

    Overlapping recombinant clones that encompass the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I and II genes have been isolated from a human genomic DNA library. Each gene is present once per haploid genome; the IGF-I gene spans greater than 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) and the IGF-II gene is at least 15 kbp. The exon-intron organization of these genes is similar, each having four exons, which is one more than the related insulin gene. Comparison of the restriction endonuclease cleavage maps of the IGF-II an...

  20. C- and D-class MADS-box genes from Phalaenopsis equestris (Orchidaceae) display functions in gynostemium and ovule development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You-Yi; Lee, Pei-Fang; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Wu, Wan-Lin; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lee, Yung-I; Liu, Ke-Wei; Chen, Li-Jun; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Tsai, Wen-Chieh

    2012-06-01

    Gynostemium and ovule development in orchid are unique developmental processes in the plant kingdom. Characterization of C- and D-class MADS-box genes could help reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying gynostemium and ovule development in orchids. In this study, we isolated and characterized a C- and a D-class gene, PeMADS1 and PeMADS7, respectively, from Phalaenopsis equestris. These two genes showed parallel spatial and temporal expression profiles, which suggests their cooperation in gynostemium and ovule development. Furthermore, only PeMADS1 was ectopically expressed in the petals of the gylp (gynostemium-like petal) mutant, whose petals were transformed into gynostemium-like structures. Protein-protein interaction analyses revealed that neither PeMADS1 and PeMADS7 could form a homodimer or a heterodimer. An E-class protein was needed to bridge the interaction between these two proteins. A complementation test revealed that PeMADS1 could rescue the phenotype of the AG mutant. Overexpression of PeMADS7 in Arabidopsis caused typical phenotypes of the D-class gene family. Together, these results indicated that both C-class PeMADS1 and D-class PeMADS7 play important roles in orchid gynostemium and ovule development. PMID:22499266

  1. Synonymous codon usage in different protein secondary structural classes of human genes: Implication for increased non-randomness of GC3 rich genes towards protein stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pamela Mukhopadhyay; Surajit Basak; Tapash Chandra Ghosh

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between the synonymous codon usage and different protein secondary structural classes were investigated using 401 Homo sapiens proteins extracted from Protein Data Bank (PDB). A simple Chi-square test was used to assess the significance of deviation of the observed and expected frequencies of 59 codons at the level of individual synonymous families in the four different protein secondary structural classes. It was observed that synonymous codon families show non-randomness in codon usage in four different secondary structural classes. However, when the genes were classified according to their GC3 levels there was an increase in non-randomness in high GC3 group of genes. The non-randomness in codon usage was further tested among the same protein secondary structures belonging to four different protein folding classes of high GC3 group of genes. The results show that in each of the protein secondary structural unit there exist some synonymous family that shows class specific codonusage pattern. Moreover, there is an increased non-random behaviour of synonymous codons in sheet structure of all secondary structural classes in high GC3 group of genes. Biological implications of these results have been discussed.

  2. Effects of Lifestyle Interventions That Include a Physical Activity Component in Class II and III Obese Individuals: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Baillot, Aurélie; Romain, Ahmed J.; Boisvert-Vigneault, Katherine; Audet, Mélisa; Baillargeon, Jean Patrice; Dionne, Isabelle J.; Valiquette, Louis; Chakra, Claire Nour Abou; Avignon, Antoine; Langlois, Marie-France

    2015-01-01

    Background In class II and III obese individuals, lifestyle intervention is the first step to achieve weight loss and treat obesity-related comorbidities before considering bariatric surgery. A systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression were performed to assess the impact of lifestyle interventions incorporating a physical activity (PA) component on health outcomes of class II and III obese individuals. Methods An electronic search was conducted in 4 databases (Medline, Scopus, CIN...

  3. Effect of oral-transmucosal midazolam sedation on anxiety levels of 3-4 years old children during a Class II restorative procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Aditi Kapur; Chawla, H S.; Gauba, K.; Goyal, A; Bhardwaj, N

    2014-01-01

    Aim: A double-blind randomized control trial was conducted to assess the effect of oral-transmucosal midazolam sedation on changes in anxiety levels of precooperative children during a Class II amalgam restorative procedure. Methodology: A sample of 40 healthy, American Society of Anesthesiologists I, children aged 3-4 years having at least one carious primary mandibular molar requiring a Class II amalgam restoration with no previous dental history were randomly divided into experimental and ...

  4. Frequency of Iatrogenic damage to adjacent tooth during class II cavity preparation among dental students at Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Yazdani; Hamide Kalkou; Mohammadreza Khami

    2013-01-01

      Background and Aims: Iatrogenic damage to adjacent tooth during proximal cavity preparation is one of the most common side effects in operative dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of iatrogenic damages to adjacent tooth during the preparation of proximal Class II cavities among undergraduate students at dental faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010 .   Materials and Methods: 106 posterior permanent teeth which had Class II decay with sound proximal...

  5. Molecular characterization of fruit-specific class III peroxidase genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chii-Jeng; Chan, Yuan-Li; Shien, Chin Hui; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2015-04-01

    In this study, expression of four peroxidase genes, LePrx09, LePrx17, LePrx35 and LePrxA, was identified in immature tomato fruits, and the function in the regulation of fruit growth was characterized. Analysis of amino acid sequences revealed that these genes code for class III peroxidases, containing B, D and F conserved domains, which bind heme groups, and a buried salt bridge motif. LePrx35 and LePrxA were identified as novel peroxidase genes in Solanum lycopersicum (L.). The temporal expression patterns at various fruit growth stages revealed that LePrx35 and LePrxA were expressed only in immature green (IMG) fruits, whereas LePrx17 and LePrx09 were expressed in both immature and mature green fruits. Tissue-specific expression profiles indicated that only LePrx09 was expressed in the mesocarp but not the inner tissue of immature fruits. The effects of hormone treatments and stresses on the four genes were examined; only the expression levels of LePrx17 and LePrx09 were altered. Transcription of LePrx17 was up-regulated by jasmonic acid (JA) and pathogen infection and expression of LePrx09 was induced by ethephon, salicylic acid (SA) and JA, in particular, as well as wounding, pathogen infection and H2O2 stress. Tomato plants over-expressing LePrx09 displayed enhanced resistance to H2O2 stress, suggesting that LePrx09 may participate in the H2O2 signaling pathway to regulate fruit growth and disease resistance in tomato fruits. PMID:25703772

  6. Multiple sclerosis-associated CLEC16A controls HLA class II expression via late endosome biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. van Luijn (Marvin M.); K.L. Kreft (Karim); M.L. Jongsma (Marlieke L.); S.W. Mes (Steven); A.F. Wierenga-Wolf (Annet); M. van Meurs (Marjan); M.J. Melief; Rv. der Kant (Rik van); L. Janssen (Lennert); H. Janssen (Hans); R. Tan (Rusung); J.J. Priatel (John J.); J. Neefjes (Jacques); J.D. Laman (Jon); R.Q. Hintzen (Rogier)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractC-type lectins are key players in immune regulation by driving distinct functions of antigen-presenting cells. The C-type lectin CLEC16A gene is located at 16p13, a susceptibility locus for several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. However, the function of this gene and

  7. Estudo comparativo das dimensões transversais dos arcos dentários entre jovens com oclusão normal e má oclusão de Classe II, 1ª divisão A comparative study of arch widths of white Brazilians with normal occlusion and Class II, Division 1, malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejman Roberto

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar as possíveis diferenças nas dimensões transversais dos arcos dentários superiores e inferiores entre jovens com oclusão normal e má oclusão de Classe II, 1ª divisão. METODOLOGIA: foram avaliados 170 pares de modelos em gesso de jovens brasileiros leucodermas, com dentadura permanente, sendo 76 com oclusão normal (41 do gênero feminino e 35 do masculino e média de idade de 13 anos e 6 meses e 94 com má oclusão de Classe II, 1ª divisão (58 do gênero feminino e 36 do masculino e média de idade de 13 anos e 9 meses. Este grupo com má oclusão foi dividido em duas categorias: Classe II sem apinhamento e Classe II com apinhamento. Compararam-se as distâncias intercaninos, interprimeiros pré-molares e intermolares, em ambos os arcos dentários. RESULTADOS: em relação ao grupo com oclusão normal, os jovens do gênero masculino evidenciaram as seguintes diferenças estatisticamente significantes: 1 distância intercaninos inferiores maior para o grupo com Classe II sem apinhamento; 2 distância interprimeiros pré-molares superiores menor para o grupo com Classe II sem apinhamento e 3 distâncias interprimeiros pré-molares e intermolares, superiores e inferiores, menores para o grupo com Classe II com apinhamento. Por sua vez, o gênero feminino evidenciou: 1 distâncias interprimeiros pré-molares e intermolares superiores menores para o grupo com Classe II sem apinhamento e 2 distâncias interprimeiros pré-molares e intermolares, superiores e inferiores, menores para o grupo com Classe II com apinhamento. CONCLUSÃO: de um modo geral, os jovens com má oclusão de Classe II, 1ª divisão, apresentaram uma tendência para deficiência transversal posterior dos arcos dentários, principalmente no grupo com apinhamento.AIM: to evaluate possible differences of the upper and lower dental arches widths among youths with normal occlusion and Class II, division 1, malocclusion. METHODS: the evaluation was conducted

  8. Comparison of esthetic outcome after extraction or non-extraction orthodontic treatment in class II division 1 malocclusion patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneh Lata Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The extraction of premolars as a practical form of orthodontic therapy has been accepted for many years, but there remains a controversy regarding the effect of premolar extraction to improve esthetics as well as dentoskeletal relationship. The esthetic impact of the soft-tissue profile might play a major role in deciding on premolar extraction or non-extraction treatment, particularly in borderline patients. This cephalometric study was undertaken to compare the post-treatment soft-tissue profiles of successfully managed Class II, Division 1 malocclusions treated with either all first premolar extractions or treatment with a non-extraction therapy. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 100 post-pubertal female patients of Class II Division I malocclusion. Group 1, treated with four first premolar extractions, consisted of 50 female patients with a mean age of 14 years 1 month. Group 2, treated without extractions, consisted of 50 patients with a mean age of 13 years 5 months. Pre-treatment and post-treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs were evaluated. The pre-treatment to post-treatment stage comparison and the intergroup comparison of the treatment changes were conducted between extraction and non-extraction groups of Class II malocclusion samples with t-tests. Results: The soft-tissue facial profiles of the extraction and non-extraction samples were the same following active treatment except for a more retruded lower lip and a more pronounced lower labial sulcus in those patients subjected to extraction. Conclusions: The extraction or non-extraction decision, if based on sound diagnostic criteria, seems to have no systematic detrimental effects on the facial profile.

  9. Regulatory functions of self-restricted MHC class II allopeptide-specific Th2 clones in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Waaga, Ana Maria; Gasser, Martin; Kist-van Holthe, Joana E; Najafian, Nader; Müller, Angelika; Vella, John P.; Womer, Karl L.; Chandraker, Anil; Khoury, Samia J.; Sayegh, Mohamed H.

    2001-01-01

    We studied T-cell clones generated from grafts of rejecting and tolerant animals and investigated the regulatory function of Th2 clones in vitro and in vivo. To prevent allograft rejection, we treated LEW strain recipient rats of WF strain kidney grafts with CTLA4Ig to block CD28-B7 costimulation. We then isolated epitope-specific T-cell clones from the engrafted tissue, using a donor-derived immunodominant class II MHC allopeptide presented by recipient antigen-presenting cells. Acutely reje...

  10. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    this binding event. RESULTS: Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the...... training data due to redundant binding core representation. Incorporation of information about the residues flanking the peptide-binding core is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy. The method is evaluated on a large-scale benchmark consisting of six independent data sets covering 14...

  11. 1+1+2 gravitational perturbations on LRS class II space-times: GEM vector harmonic amplitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Burston, R. B.

    2007-01-01

    This is the second in a series of papers which considers first-order gauge-invariant and covariant gravitational perturbations to locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) class II space-times. This paper shows how to decouple a complex combination of the gravito-electromagnetic (GEM) 2-vectors with the 2-tensors describing the shear of the 2/3-sheets. An arbitrary harmonic expansion is then used along with an eigen-vector/value analysis of the first-order GEM system, analogous to the first paper ...

  12. Treatment outcome for a sample of patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion treated at a regional hospital orthodontic department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burden, D J

    1998-01-01

    This retrospective study assessed the outcome of orthodontic treatment of 264 patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion (overjet greater than 6 mm). The sample comprised patients who had completed their fixed appliance orthodontic treatment at a regional hospital orthodontic unit in the Republic of Ireland. The PAR Index (Peer Assessment Rating) was used to evaluate treatment outcome using before and after treatment study casts. The results revealed that treatment for this particular type of malocclusion was highly effective with a very few patients failing to benefit from their orthodontic treatment.

  13. DNA sequence and characterization of human class II major histocompatibility complex beta chains from the DR1 haplotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, J I; Estess, P; St John, T; Saiki, R; Watling, D L; Erlich, H A; McDevitt, H O

    1985-01-01

    Two HLA class II beta-chain clones from a cell line homozygous for the DR1 haplotype have been characterized and sequenced. They represent a DR beta chain (2918.4) and a DQ beta chain (2918.8). Clone 2918.4 has been used to select mRNA from a lymphoblastoid cell line, and this was injected into Xenopus oocytes with mRNA selected with a DR alpha chain. The translation products were immunoprecipitated with a beta-chain-specific monoclonal antibody and electrophoresed on two-dimensional gels. Th...

  14. Characterization of a nonclassical class I MHC gene in a reptile, the Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Glaberman

    Full Text Available Squamates are a diverse order of vertebrates, representing more than 7,000 species. Yet, descriptions of full-length major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes in this group are nearly absent from the literature, while the number of MHC studies continues to rise in other vertebrate taxa. The lack of basic information about MHC organization in squamates inhibits investigation into the relationship between MHC polymorphism and disease, and leaves a large taxonomic gap in our understanding of amniote MHC evolution. Here, we use both cDNA and genomic sequence data to characterize a class I MHC gene (Amcr-UA from the Galápagos marine iguana, a member of the squamate subfamily Iguaninae. Amcr-UA appears to be functional since it is expressed in the blood and contains many of the conserved peptide-binding residues that are found in classical class I genes of other vertebrates. In addition, comparison of Amcr-UA to homologous sequences from other iguanine species shows that the antigen-binding portion of this gene is under purifying selection, rather than balancing selection, and therefore may have a conserved function. A striking feature of Amcr-UA is that both the cDNA and genomic sequences lack the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are necessary to anchor the class I receptor molecule into the cell membrane, suggesting that the product of this gene is secreted and consequently not involved in classical class I antigen-presentation. The truncated and conserved character of Amcr-UA lead us to define it as a nonclassical gene that is related to the few available squamate class I sequences. However, phylogenetic analysis placed Amcr-UA in a basal position relative to other published classical MHC genes from squamates, suggesting that this gene diverged near the beginning of squamate diversification.

  15. The Arabidopsis homeodomain-leucine zipper II gene family: diversity and redundancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarbelli, Angela Raffaella; Ciolfi, Andrea; Salvucci, Samanta; Ruzza, Valentino; Possenti, Marco; Carabelli, Monica; Fruscalzo, Alberto; Sessa, Giovanna; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2008-11-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains 10 genes belonging to the HD-Zip II family including ATHB2 and HAT2. Previous work has shown that ATHB2 is rapidly and strongly induced by light quality changes that provoke the shade avoidance response whereas HAT2 expression responds to auxin. Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of the HD-Zip II family. Phylogeny reconstruction revealed that almost all of the HD-Zip II genes can be subdivided into 4 clades (alpha-delta), each clade comprising 2-3 paralogs. Gene expression studies demonstrated that all the gamma and delta genes are regulated by light quality changes. Kinetics of induction, low R/FR/high R/FR reversibility and auxin response analyses strongly suggested that HAT1, HAT3 and ATHB4, as ATHB2, are under the control of the phytochrome system whereas HAT2 is up-regulated by low R/FR as a consequence of the induction of the auxin signaling pathway provoked by FR-rich light. Root and shoot digital in situ revealed that gamma and delta genes are also tightly regulated during plant development with both distinct and overlapping patterns. Phenotypes of gain of function and dominant negative lines demonstrated that one or more of the HD-Zip II gamma genes negatively regulate cell proliferation during leaf development in a high R/FR light environment. Finally, target gene analysis using a chimeric transcription factor (HD-Zip2-V-G), known to activate ATHB2 target genes in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner, revealed that all the 10 HD-Zip II genes can be recognized by the HD-Zip 2 domain in vivo, implying an intricate negative feedback network. PMID:18758690

  16. Comprehensive transcriptional profiling of NaCl-stressed Arabidopsis roots reveals novel classes of responsive genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyholos Michael K

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Roots are an attractive system for genomic and post-genomic studies of NaCl responses, due to their primary importance to agriculture, and because of their relative structural and biochemical simplicity. Excellent genomic resources have been established for the study of Arabidopsis roots, however, a comprehensive microarray analysis of the root transcriptome following NaCl exposure is required to further understand plant responses to abiotic stress and facilitate future, systems-based analyses of the underlying regulatory networks. Results We used microarrays of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 23,686 Arabidopsis genes to identify root transcripts that changed in relative abundance following 6 h, 24 h, or 48 h of hydroponic exposure to 150 mM NaCl. Enrichment analysis identified groups of structurally or functionally related genes whose members were statistically over-represented among up- or down-regulated transcripts. Our results are consistent with generally observed stress response themes, and highlight potentially important roles for underappreciated gene families, including: several groups of transporters (e.g. MATE, LeOPT1-like; signalling molecules (e.g. PERK kinases, MLO-like receptors, carbohydrate active enzymes (e.g. XTH18, transcription factors (e.g. members of ZIM, WRKY, NAC, and other proteins (e.g. 4CL-like, COMT-like, LOB-Class 1. We verified the NaCl-inducible expression of selected transcription factors and other genes by qRT-PCR. Conclusion Micorarray profiling of NaCl-treated Arabidopsis roots revealed dynamic changes in transcript abundance for at least 20% of the genome, including hundreds of transcription factors, kinases/phosphatases, hormone-related genes, and effectors of homeostasis, all of which highlight the complexity of this stress response. Our identification of these transcriptional responses, and groups of evolutionarily related genes with either similar or divergent

  17. NetMHCIIpan-3.0, a common pan-specific MHC class II prediction method including all three human MHC class II isotypes, HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael; Blicher, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    become particularly attractive as first-line methods in epitope discovery. However, only a few so-called pan-specific prediction methods capable of predicting binding to any MHC molecule with known protein sequence are currently available, and all of them are limited to HLA-DR. Here, we present the first...... pan-specific method capable of predicting peptide binding to any HLA class II molecule with a defined protein sequence. The method employs a strategy common for HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ molecules to define the peptide-binding MHC environment in terms of a pseudo sequence. This strategy allows the......MHCIIpan-3.0 method is the first pan-specific predictor covering all HLA class II molecules with known sequences including HLA-DR, HLA-DP, and HLA-DQ. The NetMHCpan-3.0 method is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCIIpan-3.0....

  18. ANALYSIS OF SEQUENCE POLYMORPHISM OF SCR CLASS I AND II ALLELES AND STUDY REGULATION OF THEIR EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana ŽALUDOVÁ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility (AI is a widespread mechanism used by flowering plants to prevent inbreeding depression and helps create and maintain genetic diversity within a species. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. and especially its modern varieties are characterized by high level of self-fertility. In an effort to increase the production current breeding is focused on the production of inbred lines for making the F1 hybrids and the self-incompatibility can be an interesting tool for production self- sterile lines. In Brassica napus, we found two recessive alleles of a gene SCR II. Different expression of both alleles does not correspond to phenotypic manifestation of self-incompatibility and we can assume that it is prevailed by repressor gene that does not lie on the S-locus. This is also reason, why the SCR gene cannot serve as a molecular marker of self-incompatibility in Brassica napus, although many authors believe that this gene is essential in AI reaction. Brassica napus belong to plants with complex genetic constitution, is composed by two genomes, A and C, which give the possibility of different interactions and makes it difficult to study compared with diploid B. rapa and B. oleracea. In further study it is therefore important to focus on the interactions between genes SCR, SRK and SLG, and their influence on others, such as supressor gene systems.

  19. The pcz1 Gene, which Encodes a Zn(II)2Cys6 Protein, Is Involved in the Control of Growth, Conidiation, and Conidial Germination in the Filamentous Fungus Penicillium roqueforti

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Gil-Durán; Juan F Rojas-Aedo; Exequiel Medina; Inmaculada Vaca; Ramón O García-Rico; Sebastián Villagrán; Gloria Levicán; Renato Chávez

    2015-01-01

    Proteins containing Zn(II)(2)Cys(6) domains are exclusively found in fungi and yeasts. Genes encoding this class of proteins are broadly distributed in fungi, but few of them have been functionally characterized. In this work, we have characterized a gene from the filamentous fungus Penicillium roqueforti that encodes a Zn(II)(2)Cys(6) protein, whose function to date remains unknown. We have named this gene pcz1. We showed that the expression of pcz1 is negatively regulated in a P. roqueforti...

  20. Dynamical systems with first- and second-class constraints. II. Local-symmetry transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the generalized Hamiltonian formalism by Dirac, local symmetries of dynamical systems with first- and second-class constraints are investigated. The method of constructing the generator of local-symmetry transformations is presented both for theories with an algebra of constraints of a special form (a majority of the physically interesting theories) and in the general case without restrictions on the algebra of constraints. It is proven that second-class constraints do not contribute to the transformation law of the local symmetry entirely stipulated by all the first-class constraints. A mechanism of the occurrence of higher derivatives of coordinates and group parameters in the symmetry transformation law in Noether close-quote s second theorem is elucidated. In the latter case it is shown that the obtained transformations of symmetry are canonical in the extended (by Ostrogradsky) phase space. It is thereby shown that in the general case the degeneracy of theories with first- and second-class constraints is due to their invariance under local-symmetry transformations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  1. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L;

    2016-01-01

    )-treated DLBCL patients (n=150), reduced HLA-DRA (<90% frequency) expression correlated with inferior overall survival (P=0.0003) and progression-free survival (P=0.0012) and with non-GCB subtype stratified by the Hans, Choi or Visco-Young algorithms (all P<0.01). In non-GCB DLBCL cases with <90% HLA-DRA, there......, including human leukocyte antigen DR alpha chain (HLA-DRA), were inversely correlated with FOXP1 transcript expression (P<0.05). FOXP1 knockdown in ABC-DLBCL cells led to increased cell-surface expression of HLA-DRA and CD74. In R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone...... was an inverse correlation with the frequency (P=0.0456) and intensity (P=0.0349) of FOXP1 expression. We propose that FOXP1 represents a novel regulator of genes targeted by the class II MHC transactivator CIITA (MHC II and CD74) and therapeutically targeting the FOXP1 pathway may improve antigen...

  2. CD40 promotes MHC class II expression on adipose tissue macrophages and regulates adipose tissue CD4+ T cells with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David L; Oatmen, Kelsie E; Mergian, Taleen A; Cho, Kae Won; DelProposto, Jennifer L; Singer, Kanakadurga; Evans-Molina, Carmella; O'Rourke, Robert W; Lumeng, Carey N

    2016-06-01

    Obesity activates both innate and adaptive immune responses in adipose tissue, but the mechanisms critical for regulating these responses remain unknown. CD40/CD40L signaling provides bidirectional costimulatory signals between antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T cells, and CD40L expression is increased in obese humans. Therefore, we examined the contribution of CD40 to the progression of obesity-induced inflammation in mice. CD40 was highly expressed on adipose tissue macrophages in mice, and CD40/CD40L signaling promoted the expression of antigen-presenting cell markers in adipose tissue macrophages. When fed a high fat diet, Cd40-deficient mice had reduced accumulation of conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconv: CD3(+)CD4(+)Foxp3(-)) in visceral fat compared with wild-type mice. By contrast, the number of regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Treg: CD3(+)CD4(+)Foxp3(+)) in lean and obese fat was similar between wild-type and knockout mice. Adipose tissue macrophage content and inflammatory gene expression in fat did not differ between obese wild-type and knockout mice; however, major histocompatibility complex class II and CD86 expression on adipose tissue macrophages was reduced in visceral fat from knockout mice. Similar results were observed in chimeric mice with hematopoietic Cd40-deficiency. Nonetheless, neither whole body nor hematopoietic disruption of CD40 ameliorated obesity-induced insulin resistance in mice. In human adipose tissue, CD40 expression was positively correlated with CD80 and CD86 expression in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings indicate that CD40 signaling in adipose tissue macrophages regulates major histocompatibility complex class II and CD86 expression to control the expansion of CD4(+) T cells; however, this is largely dispensable for the development of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in mice. PMID:26658005

  3. Maternal homozygocity for a 14 basepair insertion in exon 8 of the HLA-G gene and carriage of HLA class II alleles restricting HY immunity predispose to unexplained secondary recurrent miscarriage and low birth weight in children born to these patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ole B; Kolte, Astrid Marie; Dahl, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    Homozygous carriage of a 14 base pair (bp) insertion in exon 8 of the HLA-G gene may be associated with low levels of soluble HLA-G and recurrent miscarriage (RM). We investigated the G14bp insertion(ins)/deletion(del) polymorphism in 339 women with unexplained RM and 125 control women. In all...... patients and patients with secondary RM after a firstborn boy, 19.2% and 23.9%, respectively, were G14bp ins/ins compared with 11.2% of controls (p...

  4. COURSE OUTLINE FOR FIRST SIX WEEKS FOR SCIENCE-LEVEL II, TALENT PRESERVATION CLASSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston Independent School District, TX.

    THE FIRST 6-WEEK UNIT CONCERNS ANIMAL LIFE, AND TOPICS INCLUDE PROTOZOA, INVERTEBRATES, AND VERTEBRATES. UNIT II, "THE HUMAN BODY", INCLUDES BODY SYSTEMS, HEALTH, AND SAFETY. TEXTBOOK REFERENCES, CONTENT OUTLINE, TEACHING SUGGESTIONS, REFERENCE READINGS, AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS ARE GIVEN UNDER EACH TOPIC. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT FIRST EXPERIENCES WITH…

  5. Remarkably low affinity of CD4/peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Peter; Southcombe, Jennifer H; Santos, Ana Mafalda;

    2016-01-01

    value is two to three orders of magnitude higher than previously measured 2D Kd values for interacting leukocyte surface proteins. Calculations indicated, however, that CD4/pMHC II binding would increase rates of T-cell receptor (TCR) complex phosphorylation by threefold via the recruitment of Lck, with...

  6. 75 FR 55269 - Minimum Internal Control Standards for Class II Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... II Gaming. The final rule was published in the Federal Register on October 10, 2008 (73 FR 60492... and 542.16 for the final rule published October 10, 2008, 73 FR 60492, and delayed on October 9, 2009, 74 FR 52138, is further delayed from October 13, 2010, until October 13, 2011. The effective date...

  7. The TALE class homeobox gene Smed-prep defines the anterior compartment for head regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Daniel A; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2010-04-01

    Planaria continue to blossom as a model system for understanding all aspects of regeneration. They provide an opportunity to understand how the replacement of missing tissues from preexisting adult tissue is orchestrated at the molecular level. When amputated along any plane, planaria are capable of regenerating all missing tissue and rescaling all structures to the new size of the animal. Recently, rapid progress has been made in understanding the developmental pathways that control planarian regeneration. In particular Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is central in promoting posterior fates and inhibiting anterior identity. Currently the mechanisms that actively promote anterior identity remain unknown. Here, Smed-prep, encoding a TALE class homeodomain, is described as the first gene necessary for correct anterior fate and patterning during planarian regeneration. Smed-prep is expressed at high levels in the anterior portion of whole animals, and Smed-prep(RNAi) leads to loss of the whole brain during anterior regeneration, but not during lateral regeneration or homeostasis in intact worms. Expression of markers of different anterior fated cells are greatly reduced or lost in Smed-prep(RNAi) animals. We find that the ectopic anterior structures induced by abrogation of Wnt signaling also require Smed-prep to form. We use double knockdown experiments with the S. mediterranea ortholog of nou-darake (that when knocked down induces ectopic brain formation) to show that Smed-prep defines an anterior fated compartment within which stem cells are permitted to assume brain fate, but is not required directly for this differentiation process. Smed-prep is the first gene clearly implicated as being necessary for promoting anterior fate and the first homeobox gene implicated in establishing positional identity during regeneration. Together our results suggest that Smed-prep is required in stem cell progeny as they form the anterior regenerative blastema and is required for

  8. The TALE class homeobox gene Smed-prep defines the anterior compartment for head regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Felix

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Planaria continue to blossom as a model system for understanding all aspects of regeneration. They provide an opportunity to understand how the replacement of missing tissues from preexisting adult tissue is orchestrated at the molecular level. When amputated along any plane, planaria are capable of regenerating all missing tissue and rescaling all structures to the new size of the animal. Recently, rapid progress has been made in understanding the developmental pathways that control planarian regeneration. In particular Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is central in promoting posterior fates and inhibiting anterior identity. Currently the mechanisms that actively promote anterior identity remain unknown. Here, Smed-prep, encoding a TALE class homeodomain, is described as the first gene necessary for correct anterior fate and patterning during planarian regeneration. Smed-prep is expressed at high levels in the anterior portion of whole animals, and Smed-prep(RNAi leads to loss of the whole brain during anterior regeneration, but not during lateral regeneration or homeostasis in intact worms. Expression of markers of different anterior fated cells are greatly reduced or lost in Smed-prep(RNAi animals. We find that the ectopic anterior structures induced by abrogation of Wnt signaling also require Smed-prep to form. We use double knockdown experiments with the S. mediterranea ortholog of nou-darake (that when knocked down induces ectopic brain formation to show that Smed-prep defines an anterior fated compartment within which stem cells are permitted to assume brain fate, but is not required directly for this differentiation process. Smed-prep is the first gene clearly implicated as being necessary for promoting anterior fate and the first homeobox gene implicated in establishing positional identity during regeneration. Together our results suggest that Smed-prep is required in stem cell progeny as they form the anterior regenerative blastema and is

  9. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  10. Evolution of the 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) gene family:Conserved evolutionary pattern and two new gene classes in gymnosperms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui GAO; Dong-Mei GUO; Wen-Juan LIU; Jin-Hua RAN; Xiao-Quan WANG

    2012-01-01

    The 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) is the branch point enzyme that channels the general phenylpropanoid metabolism into specific lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis branches.Genetic engineering experiments on the 4CL gene have been carried out in many species,but the precise functions of different gene members are still unresolved.To investigate the evolutionary relationships and functional differentiation of the 4CL gene family,we made a comprehensive evolutionary analysis of this gene family from 27 species representing the major lineages of land plants.The phylogenetic analysis indicates that both vascular and seed plant 4CL genes form monophyletic groups,and that three and two 4CL classes can be recognized in gymnosperms and angiosperms,respectively.The evolutionary rate and frequency of duplication of the 4CL gene family are much more conserved than that of the CAD/SAD (cinnamyl/sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase) gene family,which catalyzes the last step in monolignol biosynthesis.This may be due to different selective pressures on these genes whose products catalyze different steps in the biosynthesis pathway.In addition,we found two new major classes of 4CL genes in gymnosperms.

  11. Marginal adaptation of class II resin composite restorations using incremental and bulk placement techniques: an ESEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idriss, S; Habib, C; Abduljabbar, T; Omar, R

    2003-10-01

    This in vitro study compared marginal gap formation in class II resin composite restorations. Forty caries-free extracted molars were prepared in a standardized manner for class II restoration by one of four methods: bulk- or incrementally-placed light-activated resin composite (Amelogen), and bulk- or incrementally-placed chemically activated composite (Rapidfill). The restored teeth, after finishing and polishing, and thermocycling, were examined using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Marginal gap measurements at predetermined facial and lingual margin sites showed no significant differences between the two sites within any of the groups. Both the light- and the chemically-activated restorations showed no significant differences in mean marginal gap sizes whether they were placed by incremental or bulk techniques. Amelogen restorations placed by both methods had significantly larger margin gaps than those of each of the Rapidfill groups (Peffect on the quality of marginal adaptation, both of the chemically activated resin composite restorations produced significantly smaller marginal gaps than both the bulk- and incrementally-placed light-activated composites. PMID:12974860

  12. Zinc Induces Dimerization of the Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecule That Leads to Cooperative Binding to a Superantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li,H.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Z.; Eislele, L.; Mourad, W.

    2007-01-01

    Dimerization of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in the MHC biological function. Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing specific T cell receptor V{beta} elements. Here we have used structural, sedimentation, and surface plasmon resonance detection approaches to investigate the molecular interactions between MAM and the class II MHC molecule HLA-DR1 in the context of a hemagglutinin peptide-(306-318) (HA). Our results revealed that zinc ion can efficiently induce the dimerization of the HLA-DR1/HA complex. Because the crystal structure of the MAM/HLA-DR1/hemagglutinin complex in the presence of EDTA is nearly identical to the structure of the complex crystallized in the presence of zinc ion, Zn{sup 2+} is evidently not directly involved in the binding between MAM and HLA-DR1. Sedimentation and surface plasmon resonance studies further revealed that MAM binds the HLA-DR1/HA complex with high affinity in a 1:1 stoichiometry, in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. However, in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, a dimerized MAM/HLA-DR1/HA complex can arise through the Zn{sup 2+}-induced DR1 dimer. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, cooperative binding of MAM to the DR1 dimer was also observed.

  13. Evaluation of gingival microleakage of class II resin composite restorations with fiber inserts: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Basavanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims/Objectives: To evaluate the effect of glass and polyethylene fiber inserts and flowable composite as a liner on the microleakage of Class II composite restorations with gingival margins on root surfaces. Materials and Methods: Class II slots were prepared on both the proximal sides of thirty freshly extracted mandibular molars and were divided into six groups, according to the type of fiber insert and use of flowable composite (Filtek Z350 as a liner. Filtek P-60 (3M/ESPE posterior composite was used to restore all cavities. The specimens were thermocycled and stained with 2% Basic Fuchsin dye, and sectioned to evaluate the dye penetration under Stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskalwallis test and Mann whitney U test. Results and Conclusion: This study showed that, fiber insert groups, with or without flowable liner, had reduced microleakage scores as compared to the control groups. However, statistically no significant difference was found between the groups with fiber inserts. Less microleakage was seen in Group IV (With flowable liner and without Fiber inserts as compared to Group I (Without flowable liner and Fiber inserts.

  14. HLA Class II Antibody Activation of Endothelial Cells Promotes Th17 and Disrupts Regulatory T Lymphocyte Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, J; Taflin, C; Cross, A R; Robledo-Sarmiento, M; Mariotto, E; Savenay, A; Carmagnat, M; Suberbielle, C; Charron, D; Haziot, A; Glotz, D; Mooney, N

    2016-05-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most successful treatment option for patients with end-stage renal disease, and chronic antibody-mediated rejection is the principal cause of allograft loss. Predictive factors for chronic rejection include high levels of HLA alloantibodies (particularly HLA class II) and activation of graft endothelial cells (ECs). The mechanistic basis for this association is unresolved. We used an experimental model of HLA-DR antibody stimulation of microvascular ECs to examine the mechanisms underlying the association between HLA class II antibodies, EC activation and allograft damage. Activation of ECs with the F(Ab')2 fragment of HLA-DR antibody led to phosphorylation of Akt, ERK and MEK and increased IL-6 production by ECs cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in an Akt-dependent manner. We previously showed that HLA-DR-expressing ECs induce polarization of Th17 and FoxP3(bright) regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets. Preactivation of ECs with anti-HLA-DR antibody redirected EC allogenicity toward a proinflammatory response by decreasing amplification of functional Treg and by further increasing IL-6-dependent Th17 expansion. Alloimmunized patient serum containing relevant HLA-DR alloantibodies selectively bound and increased EC secretion of IL-6 in cocultures with PBMCs. These data contribute to understanding of potential mechanisms of antibody-mediated endothelial damage independent of complement activation and FcR-expressing effector cells. PMID:26614587

  15. MHC Class II Derived Recombinant T Cell Receptor Ligands Protect DBA/1LacJ Mice from Collagen-Induced Arthritis1

    OpenAIRE

    Huan, Jianya; Kaler, Laurie J.; Mooney, Jeffery L.; Subramanian, Sandhya; Hopke, Corwyn; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Rosloniec, Edward F.; Burrows, Gregory G.; Offner, Halina

    2008-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic effects of MHC class II derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL), single-chain two domain complexes of the α1 and β1 domains of MHC class II molecules genetically linked with an immunodominant peptide, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In the current study, we produced a monomeric murine I-Aq-derived RTL construct covalently linked with bovine collagen type II peptide (bCII257–270) suitable for use in DBA/1LacJ mice that develop ...

  16. Force-Regulated In Situ TCR-Peptide-Bound MHC Class II Kinetics Determine Functions of CD4+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jinsung; Persaud, Stephen P; Horvath, Stephen; Allen, Paul M; Evavold, Brian D; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-10-15

    We have recently shown that two-dimensional (2D) and force-regulated kinetics of TCR-peptide-bound MHC class I (pMHC-I) interactions predict responses of CD8(+) T cells. To test whether these findings are applicable to CD4(+) T cells, we analyzed the in situ 3.L2 TCR-pMHC-II interactions for a well-characterized panel of altered peptide ligands on the T cell surface using the adhesion frequency assay with a micropipette and the thermal fluctuation and force-clamp assays with a biomembrane force probe. We found that the 2D effective TCR-pMHC-II affinity and off-rate correlate with, but better predict the T cell response than, the corresponding measurements with the surface plasmon resonance in three dimensions. The 2D affinity of the CD4 for MHC-II was very low, approaching the detection limit, making it one to two orders of magnitude lower than the affinity of CD8 for MHC-I. In addition, the signal-dependent cooperation between TCR and coreceptor for pMHC binding previously observed for CD8 was not observed for CD4. Interestingly, force elicited TCR-pMHC-II catch-slip bonds for agonists but slip-only bonds for antagonists, thereby amplifying the power of discrimination between altered peptide ligands. These results show that the force-regulated 2D binding kinetics of the 3.L2 TCR for pMHC-II determine functions of CD4(+) T cells. PMID:26336148

  17. A degree theory for a class of perturbed Fredholm maps II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calamai Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent paper we gave a notion of degree for a class of perturbations of nonlinear Fredholm maps of index zero between real infinite dimensional Banach spaces. Our purpose here is to extend that notion in order to include the degree introduced by Nussbaum for local -condensing perturbations of the identity, as well as the degree for locally compact perturbations of Fredholm maps of index zero recently defined by the first and third authors.

  18. Inducible Gene Expression in Lactobacillus reuteri LTH5531 during Type II Sourdough Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Dal Bello, Fabio; Walter, Jens; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Hertel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri LTH5531 is a dominant member of the microbiota of type II sourdough fermentations. To investigate the genetic background of the ecological performance of LTH5531, in vivo expression technology was used to identify promoters that show elevated levels of expression during growth of this organism in a type II sourdough fermentation. Thirty-eight sourdough-induced fusions were detected, and 29 genes could be identified on the basis of the available sequence information. Four...

  19. Evolutionary history of black grouse major histocompatibility complex class IIB genes revealed through single locus sequence-based genotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Strand, Tanja; Wang, Biao; Meyer-Lucht, Yvonne; Höglund, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gene duplications are frequently observed in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) of many species, and as a consequence loci belonging to the same MHC class are often too similar to tell apart. In birds, single locus genotyping of MHC genes has proven difficult due to concerted evolution homogenizing sequences at different loci. But studies on evolutionary history, mode of selection and heterozygosity correlations on the MHC cannot be performed before it is possible to analy...

  20. High-resolution analyses of two different classes of tumor cells in situ tagged with alternative histochemical marker genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, W.C.; Pretlow, T. P.; Pretlow, T. G.; Culp, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate interactions of two different tumor cell classes during the establishment of micrometastases at the single-cell level, two different BALB/c 3T3 tumor cell derivatives were established that harbor different histochemical marker genes: bacterial lacZ in a EJ-Harvey ras transformant (abbreviated LZEJ cells) and human placental alkaline phosphatase (ALP) gene in a human c-sis transformant (APSI cells). Several different histochemical staining methods were evaluated, using the distinct...