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Sample records for cladding thermal failure

  1. Thermal hydraulic-Mechanic Integrated Simulation for Advanced Cladding Thermal Shock Fracture Analysis during Reflood Phase in LBLOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Seong Min; Lee, You Ho; Cho, Jae Wan; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This study suggested thermal hydraulic-mechanical integrated stress based methodology for analyzing the behavior of ATF type claddings by SiC-Duplex cladding LBLOCA simulation. Also, this paper showed that this methodology could predict real experimental result well. That concept for enhanced safety of LWR called Advanced Accident-Tolerance Fuel Cladding (ATF cladding, ATF) is researched actively. However, current nuclear fuel cladding design criteria for zircaloy cannot be apply to ATF directly because those criteria are mainly based on limiting their oxidation. So, the new methodology for ATF design criteria is necessary. In this study, stress based analysis methodology for ATF cladding design criteria is suggested. By simulating LBLOCA scenario of SiC cladding which is the one of the most promising candidate of ATF. Also we'll confirm our result briefly through comparing some facts from other experiments. This result is validating now. Some of results show good performance with 1-D failure analysis code for SiC fuel cladding that already developed and validated by Lee et al,. It will present in meeting. Furthermore, this simulation presented the possibility of understanding the behavior of cladding deeper. If designer can predict the dangerous region and the time precisely, it may be helpful for designing nuclear fuel cladding geometry and set safety criteria.

  2. Thermal stress in the edge cladding of Nova glass laser disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, J.H.; Kong, M.K.; Gerhard, M.A.

    1987-09-28

    We calculated thermal stresses in Nova glass laser disks having light-absorbing edge cladding glass attached to the periphery with an epoxy adhesive. Our closed-form solutions indicated that, because the epoxy adhesive is only 25 ..mu..m across, it does not significantly affect the thermal stress in the disk or cladding glass. Our numerical results showed a peak tensile stress in the cladding glass of 24 MPa when the cladding glass had a uniform absorption coefficient of 7.5 cm/sup -1/. This peak value is reduced to 19 MPa if surface parasitic oscillation heating is eliminated by tilting the disk edges. The peak tensile stresses exceed the typical 7 to 14-MPa working stress for glass; however, we have not observed any disk or cladding glass failures at peak Nova fluences of 20 J/cm/sup 2/. We have observed delamination of the epoxy adhesive bond at fluences several times that which would occur on Nova. Replacement laser disks will incorporate cladding with a reduced absorption coefficient of 4.5 cm/sup -1/. Recent experiments show that this reduced absorption coefficient is satisfactory.

  3. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in thermal reactor fuel pins using the Sleuth computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatham, N.; Hughes, H.; Ellis, W.E.; Shaw, T.L. (AEA Technology, Windscale (UK))

    1990-04-01

    This Paper describes the modelling of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCI) in thermal reactor fuel pins using the Sleuth Computer code. The code is based on the fundamental physical mechanisms causing PCI (differential thermal expansion, fuel swelling, cladding creep-down, etc.) coupled with an estimate of strain concentrations over fuel cracks. It uses the classical 1 1/2 dimensional method which subdivides the fuel both axially and radially. While Sleuth was originally developed to predict PCI failure/survival, it has evolved into a general fuel performance code. The latest version, Sleuth 86, which is a modular form with mnemonic variable names, has proved to be an ideal vehicle for testing new sub-models which have been required as the experimental data base has been expanded. (author).

  4. Study of the response of Zircaloy- 4 cladding to thermal shock during water quenching after double sided steam oxidation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawarn, Tapan K., E-mail: sawarn@barc.gov.in; Banerjee, Suparna; Kumar, Sunil

    2016-05-15

    This study investigates the failure of embrittled Zircaloy-4 cladding in a simulated loss of coolant accident condition and correlates it with the evolved stratified microstructure. Isothermal steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding at high temperatures (900–1200 °C) with soaking periods in the range 60–900 s followed by water quenching was carried out. The combined oxide + oxygen stabilized α-Zr layer thickness and the fraction of the load bearing phase (recrystallised α-Zr grains + prior β-Zr or only prior β-Zr) of clad tube specimens were correlated with the %ECR calculated using Baker-Just equation. Average oxygen concentration of the load bearing phase corresponding to different oxidation conditions was calculated from the average microhardness using an empirical correlation. The results of these experiments are presented in this paper. Thermal shock sustainability of the clad was correlated with the %ECR, combined oxide+α-Zr(O) layer thickness, fraction of the load bearing phase and its average oxygen concentration. - Highlights: • Response of the embrittled Zircaloy-4 clad towards thermal shock, simulated under LOCA condition was investigated. • Thermal shock sustainability of the clad was correlated with its evolved stratified microstructure. • Cladding fails at %ECR value ≥ 29. • To resist the thermal shock, clad should have load bearing phase fraction > 0.44 and average oxygen concentration < 0.69 wt%.

  5. Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongbing [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

    2014-01-09

    Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear

  6. Effective thermal conductivity method for predicting spent nuclear fuel cladding temperatures in a dry fill gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahney, Robert

    1997-12-19

    This paper summarizes the development of a reliable methodology for the prediction of peak spent nuclear fuel cladding temperature within the waste disposal package. The effective thermal conductivity method replaces other older methodologies.

  7. High Temperature Resistance Claddings for Nuclear Thermal Rockets Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program will develop a series of nano-/micro-composite coated nuclear reactor facing components using MesoCoat's CermaCladTM process. This proposed SBIR program...

  8. Investigation of stainless steel clad fuel rod failures and fuel performance in the Connecticut Yankee Reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R. W.

    1981-11-01

    Significant levels of fuel rod failures were observed in the batch 8 fuel assemblies of the Connecticut Yankee reactor. Failure of 304 stainless steel cladding in a PWR environment was not expected. Therefore a detailed poolside and hot cell examination program was conducted to determine the cause of failure and identify differences between batch 8 fuel and previous batches which had operated without failures. Hot cell work conducted consisted of detailed nondestructive and destructive examination of fuel rods from batches 7 and 8. The results indicate that the batch 8 failure mechanism was stress corrosion cracking initiating on the clad outer surface. The sources of cladding stresses are believed to be (a) fuel pellet chips wedged in the cladding gap, (b) swelling of highly nondensifying batch 8 fuel and (c) potentially harmful effects of a power change event that occurred near the end of the second cycle of irradiation for batch 8.

  9. Thermal load histories for North American roof assembles using various cladding materials including wood-thermoplastic composite shingles

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. E. Winandy

    2006-01-01

    Since 1991, thermal load histories for various roof cladding types have been monitored in outdoor attic structures that simulate classic North American light-framed construction. In this paper, the 2005 thermal loads for wood-based composite roof sheathing, wood rafters, and attics under wood-plastic composite shingles are compared to common North American roof...

  10. Examination of cadmium safety rod thermal test specimens and failure mechanism evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.K.; Peacock, H.B.; Iyer, N.C.

    1992-01-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental cadmium safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. Companion reports describe the experiments and a structural evaluation (finite element analysis) of the safety rod. This report deals primarily with the examination of the test specimens, evaluation of possible failure mechanisms, and confirmatory separate effects experiments. It is concluded that the failures observed in the cadmium safety rod thermal tests which occurred at low temperature (T < 600{degrees}C) with slow thermal ramp rates (slow cladding strain rates) resulted from localized dissolution of the stainless steel cladding by the cadmium/aluminum solution and subsequent ductility exhaustion and rupture. The slow thermal ramp rate is believed to be the root cause for the failures; specifically, the slow ramp rate led to localized cladding shear deformation which ruptured the protective oxide film on the cladding inner surface and allowed dissolution to initiate. The test results and proposed failure mechanism support the conclusion that the rods would not fail below 500{degrees}C even at slow ramp rates. The safety rod thermal test specimen failures which occurred at high temperature (T > 800{degrees}C) with fast thermal ramp rates are concluded to be mechanical in nature without significant environmental degradation. Based on these tests, tasks were initiated to design and manufacture B{sub 4}C safety rods to replace the cadmium safety rods. The B{sub 4}C safety rods have been manufactured at this time and it is currently planned to charge them to the reactor in the near future. 60 refs.

  11. EFFECT OF THE SCREENS RADIANT REFLECTANCE ON THERMAL TRANSPORT PROCESS IN THE CLADDING STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Sizov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses variants of the heat insulating layers disposition in relation to the cladding load-carrying structures and demonstrates prime advantages and drawbacks of the three variants. The authors notice that from the heat-engineering viewpoint the variant with exterior side winterization is the most favourable. However, utilizing micromodules as heat-insulating layers screened with leafing aluminum makes it necessary to account for the screens reflecting power. It allows reducing the irradiating component in the combined value of thermal transport through the enclosure and consequently raises the structure thermal resistance or, with parity of these values, leads to lower thickness of the heat-insulating layer. The known data applied for calculating the total heat transmission helps demonstrate reduction of the general heat flux value by 1.4 times, and the heat transmission resistance by 1.76 m2 deg./W. This allows reducing thickness of the heat-insulating layer (with regard of two screens by 0.07 m. Computations illustrate the fact that account for the radiant reflectance of screening enables lowering the rated heat flux passing through the enclosure. Which again allows decreasing the structure thermal resistance and its general thickness (by 70 mm at the expense of small thickness of the heat insulation of micromodules. The humidity regime calculations establish good acceptability of the enclosure service conditions in winter. The period will see no real water vapour condensation. The plotted diagrams of the cladding heat-and-humidity conditions demonstrate that condensation zones do not affect the layer of thermal insulation (micromodules. And the condensation zone with reduction of the heat-insulating layer appears only during ‘severe’ outside temperature conditions of a cold month. Reduced to 230 mm thickness of the wall construction allows utilizing ‘old’ stock of forms with prefabricated panels in parallel with energy

  12. Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction Failure Threshold for Reactivity Initiated Accidents for Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Carl E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Kenneth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been requested by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the reactivity initiated accident (RIA) tests that have recently been performed in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and CABRI (French research reactor) on uranium dioxide (UO2) and mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide (MOX) fuels, and to propose pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) failure thresholds for RIA events. This report discusses how PNNL developed PCMI failure thresholds for RIA based on least squares (LSQ) regression fits to the RIA test data from cold-worked stress relief annealed (CWSRA) and recrystallized annealed (RXA) cladding alloys under pressurized water reactor (PWR) hot zero power (HZP) conditions and boiling water reactor (BWR) cold zero power (CZP) conditions.

  13. Thermal effects in Yb-doped double-cladding Distributed Modal Filtering rod-type fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Poli, Federica; Jørgensen, Mette Marie

    2012-01-01

    element method. A DMF fiber design, which is single-mode in the 1030 nm–1064 nm region, is considered, and the effects of thermal load on the transmission characteristics are evaluated. Results show a blue-shift of the single-mode window and the single-mode bandwidth narrowing as the absorbed pump power......The effects of thermally-induced refractive index change in Yb-doped Distributed Modal Filtering (DMF) photonic crystal fibers are investigated, where high-order mode suppression is obtained by resonant coupling with high index elements in the cladding. The temperature distribution on the fiber...... cross-section is calculated with an analytical model, for different pump power values. The consequent refractive index change, due to the thermo-optical effect, is applied to the cross-section of the DMF fiber, whose guiding properties are studied with a full-vector modal solver based on the finite...

  14. Experimental Study on Hygrothermal Deformation of External Thermal Insulation Cladding Systems with Glazed Hollow Bead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houren Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzes the thermal and strain behavior of external thermal insulation cladding systems (ETICS with Glazed Hollow Beads (GHB thermal insulation mortar under hygrothermal cycles weather test in order to measure its durability under extreme weather (i.e., sunlight and rain. Thermometers and strain gauges are placed into different wall layers to gather thermal and strain data and another instrument measures the crack dimensions after every 4 cycles. The results showed that the finishing coat shrank at early stage (elastic deformation and then the finishing coat tends to expand and become damaged at later stage (plastic deformation. The deformation of insulation layer is similar to that of the finishing coat but its variation amplitude is smaller. Deformation of substrate expanded with heat and contracted with cold due to the small temperature variation. The length and width of cracks on the finishing coat grew as the experiment progressed but with a decreasing growth rate and the cracks stopped growing around 70 cycles.

  15. Brazing of Carbon Carbon Composites to Cu-clad Molybdenum for Thermal Management Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.; Shpargel, T> P.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced carbon carbon composites were joined to copper-clad molybdenum (Cu/Mo) using four active metal brazes containing Ti (Cu ABA, Cusin-1 ABA, Ticuni, and Ticusil) for potential use in thermal management applications. The brazed joints were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Knoop microhardness measurements across the joint region. Metallurgically sound C-C/Cu/Mo joints, devoid of interfacial cracks formed in all cases. The joint interfaces were preferentially enriched in Ti, with Cu ABA joints exhibiting the largest interfacial Ti concentrations. The microhardness measurements revealed hardness gradients across the joint region, with a peak hardness of 300-350 KHN in Cusin-1 ABA and Ticusil joints and 200-250 KHN in Cu ABA and Ticuni joints, respectively.

  16. Effect of thermal fatigue on the wear resistance of graphite cast iron with bionic units processed by laser cladding WC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Zhengjun; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chuanwei; Meng, Chao; Cong, Dalong

    2013-04-01

    Thermal fatigue and wear exist simultaneously during the service life of brake discs. Previous researchers only studied thermal fatigue resistance or abrasion resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI), rather than combining them together. In this paper, wear resistance after thermal fatigue of CGI was investigated basing on the principle of bionics, which was close to actual service condition of the brake discs. In the meanwhile, the effect of thermal fatigue on wear resistance was also discussed. Non-smooth bionic units were fabricated by laser cladding WC powder with different proportions (50 wt.%, 60 wt.%, 70 wt.%). Microstructure and microhardness of the units were investigated, and wear mass losses of the samples were also compared. The results indicate that thermal fatigue has a negative effect on the wear resistance. After the same thermal fatigue cycles times, the wear resistance of laser cladding WC samples is superior to that of laser remelting ones and their wear resistance enhances with the increase of WC content.

  17. Effects of thermal aging on microstructure and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Suzuki, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    The effects of thermal aging of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels on the microstructure and hardness of the claddings were investigated using atom probe tomography and nanoindentation testing. The claddings were aged at 400 °C for periods of 100–10,000 h. The fluctuation in Cr concentration in the δ-ferrite phase, which was caused by spinodal decomposition, progressed rapidly after aging for 100 h, and gradually for aging durations greater than 1000 h. On the other hand, NiSiMn clusters, initially formed after aging for less than 1000 h, had the highest number density after aging for 2000 h, and coarsened after aging for 10,000 h. The hardness of the δ-ferrite phase also increased rapidly for short period of aging, and saturated after aging for longer than 1000 h. This trend was similar to the observed Cr fluctuation concentration, but different from the trend seen in the formation of the NiSiMn clusters. These results strongly suggest that the primary factor responsible for the hardening of the δ-ferrite phase owing to thermal aging is Cr spinodal decomposition.

  18. EPRI fuel cladding integrity program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the EPRI fuel program is to supplement the fuel vendor research to assure that utility economic and operational interests are met. To accomplish such objectives, EPRI has conducted research and development efforts to (1) reduce fuel failure rates and mitigate the impact of fuel failures on plant operation, (2) provide technology to extend burnup and reduce fuel cycle cost. The scope of R&D includes fuel and cladding. In this paper, only R&D related to cladding integrity will be covered. Specific areas aimed at improving fuel cladding integrity include: (1) Fuel Reliability Data Base; (2) Operational Guidance for Defective Fuel; (3) Impact of Water Chemistry on Cladding Integrity; (4) Cladding Corrosion Data and Model; (5) Cladding Mechanical Properties; and (6) Transient Fuel Cladding Response.

  19. Simulation with DIONISIO 1.0 of thermal and mechanical pellet-cladding interaction in nuclear fuel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soba, Alejandro; Denis, Alicia

    2008-02-01

    The code DIONISIO 1.0 describes most of the main phenomena occurring in a fuel rod throughout its life under normal operation conditions of a nuclear thermal reactor. Starting from the power history, DIONISIO predicts the temperature distribution in the domain, elastic and plastic stress and strain, creep, swelling and densification, release of fission gases, caesium and iodine to the rod free volume, gas mixing, pressure increase, restructuring and grain growth in the UO 2 pellet, irradiation growth of the Zircaloy cladding, oxide layer growth on its surface, hydrogen uptake and the effects of a corrosive atmosphere either internal or external. In particular, the models of thermal conductance of the gap and of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction incorporated to the code constitute two realistic tools. The possibility of gap closure (including partial contact between rough surfaces) and reopening during burnup is allowed. The non-linear differential equations are integrated by the finite element method in two-dimensions assuming cylindrical symmetry. Good results are obtained for the simulation of several irradiation tests.

  20. Impact analysis of the thermal mechanical coupling characteristics of graphite morphologies during laser cladding of gray cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Peng; Liu, Yancong; Fan, Changfeng; Zhan, Xianghua; Xu, Pengyun; Liu, Tuo

    2017-05-01

    Cladding and numerical experiments on thermodynamic coupling were conducted to determine the thermal response features and microcracks of graphite and environment phases during surface laser cladding of gray cast iron. A micromodel of graphite-environment phase was established using numerical methods. On the basis of this model, a quantitative analysis on the thermal mechanical coupling characteristics of microstructures was realized, the relationship with microcracks at tip of graphite was established, and the influence of morphological difference on local stress concentration was obtained. Results showed considerable stress concentration at the tip of graphite during cooling stage, and on the whole, the stress concentration at both ends of graphite was in direct proportion to the length of the graphite. Moreover, sufficiently short graphite resulted in further increase in stress concentration. The influence caused by tip angle was more considerable than that of length, and sharpness was in direct proportion to stress concentration. For stress fields at both ends of dimer graphite, collinear distribution easily caused stress concentration, and more obvious stress concentration was observed when the two tips were closer. The interactive effect was weak and the influence on stress concentration was minimal when two graphite pieces were in parallel or vertical distribution.

  1. Structural cladding /clad structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure...... of materials, the structural features and the construction details of building systems in selected architectural works. With a particular focus at heavy constructions made of solid wood and masonry, and light weight constructions made of wooden frame structures and steel profiles, it is the intention...... tightness in constructions. At the same time a need for longevity and effortless maintenance have lead to contemporary architectural structures, where the exterior walls and the building envelope most often are made of several layers of advanced materials and separate building elements. In most contemporary...

  2. Thermal improved subconstructions for cladding with attached rear-ventilated facades; Thermisch optimierte Unterkonstruktionen fuer hinterlueftete Fassaden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fregnan, F.; Binz, A. [Fachhochschule beider Basel (FHBB), Institut fuer Energie, Basel (Switzerland); Hofer, P. [Geo Partner AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Nuetzi, H.-P. [Swiss Federal Office of Energy, Berne (Switzerland); Schneiter, P. [Ernst Schweizer AG, Hedingen (Switzerland); Zimmermann, M. [Eidgenoessische Materialpruefungs- und Forschungsanstalt (EMPA), Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    On behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), a competition was organised with the objective to improve in a thermal way subconstructions for cladding with rear-ventilation facades. For that purpose one had to take into account that thermal insulation was at least 20 centimetres and that new approaches or improved systems already existing could be used in the construction and offered good prospects on the market. Among the ten contributions that were submitted three were considered to be particularly reasoned, perfected and relevant to be proposed to the SFOE in support of as pilot- and demonstration-projects. By publishing the results, the organisers hope that existing constructions of facades with an insulation of less than 20 centimetres as well will profit from these interesting ideas and get improvement. (author)

  3. Effects of heat transfer coefficient treatments on thermal shock fracture prediction for LWR fuel claddings in water quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho; Lee, Jeong Ik; Cheon, Hee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Accurate modeling of thermal shock induced stresses has become ever most important to emerging accident-tolerant ceramic cladding concepts, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and SiC coated zircaloy. Since fractures of ceramic (entirely ceramic or coated) occur by excessive tensile stresses with linear elasticity, modeling transient stress distribution in the material provides a direct indication of the structural integrity. Indeed, even for the current zircaloy cladding material, the oxide layer formed on the surface - where cracks starts to develop upon water quenching - essentially behaves as a brittle ceramic. Hence, enhanced understanding of thermal shock fracture of a brittle material would fundamentally contribute to safety of nuclear reactors for both the current fuel design and that of the coming future. Understanding thermal shock fracture of a brittle material requires heat transfer rate between the solid and the fluid for transient temperature fields of the solid, and structural response of the solid under the obtained transient temperature fields. In water quenching, a solid experiences dynamic time-varying heat transfer rates with phase changes of the fluid over a short quenching period. Yet, such a dynamic change of heat transfer rates during the water quenching transience has been overlooked in assessments of mechanisms, predictability, and uncertainties for thermal shock fracture. Rather, a time-constant heat transfer coefficient, named 'effective heat transfer coefficient' has become a conventional input to thermal shock fracture analysis. No single constant heat transfer could suffice to depict the actual stress evolution subject to dynamic heat transfer coefficient changes with fluid phase changes. Use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient will remarkably increase predictability of thermal shock fracture of brittle materials and complete the picture of stress evolution in the quenched solid. The presented result

  4. Evolutionary developments of advanced PWR nuclear fuels and cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae, E-mail: ktkim@dongguk.ac.kr

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are provided. • Evolution of PWR advanced fuel in U.S.A. and in Korea is described. • Cutting-edge design features against grid-to-rod fretting and debris are explained. • High performance data of advanced grids, debris filters and claddings are given. -- Abstract: The evolutionary developments of advanced PWR fuels and cladding materials are explained with outstanding design features of nuclear fuel assembly components and zirconium-base cladding materials. The advanced PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are also provided along with verification tests, which can be used as guidelines for newcomers planning to develop an advanced fuel for the first time. The up-to-date advanced fuels with the advanced cladding materials may provide a high level of economic utilization and reliable performance even under current and upcoming aggressive operating conditions. To be specific, nuclear fuel vendors may achieve high fuel burnup capability of between 45,000 and 65,000 MWD/MTU batch average, overpower thermal margin of as much as 15% and longer cycle length up to 24 months on the one hand and fuel failure rates of around 10{sup −6} on the other hand. However, there is still a need for better understanding of grid-to-rod fretting wear mechanisms leading to major PWR fuel defects in the world and subsequently a driving force for developing innovative spacer grid designs with zero fretting wear-induced fuel failure.

  5. Effects of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of three-wire stainless steel weld overlay cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-05-01

    Thermal aging of three-wire series-arc stainless steel weld overlay cladding at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h resulted in an appreciable decrease (16%) in the Charpy V-notch (CVN) upper-shelf energy (USE), but the effect on the 41-J transition temperature shift was very small (3{degrees}C). The combined effect of aging and neutron irradiation at 288{degrees}C to a fluence of 5 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) was a 22% reduction in the USE and a 29{degrees}C shift in the 41-J transition temperature. The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties was very small. However, the combined effect of irradiation and aging was an increase in the yield strength (6 to 34% at test temperatures from 288 to {minus}125{degrees}C) but no apparent change in ultimate tensile strength or total elongation. Neutron irradiation reduced the initiation fracture toughness (J{sub Ic}) much more than did thermal aging alone. Irradiation slightly decreased the tearing modulus, but no reduction was caused by thermal aging alone. Other results from tensile, CVN, and fracture toughness specimens showed that the effects of thermal aging at 288 or 343{degrees}C for 20,000 h each were very small and similar to those at 288{degrees}C for 1605 h. The effects of long-term thermal exposure time (50,000 h and greater) at 288{degrees}C will be investigated as the specimens become available in 1996 and beyond.

  6. Thermal-hydraulics analysis of a PWR reactor using zircaloy and carbide silicon reinforced with type S fibers as fuel claddings: Simulation of a channel blockage transient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuck, Vinicius; Ramos, Mario C.; Faria, Rochkhudson B.; Reis, Patricia A.L.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: rochkdefaria@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: matuck747@gmail.com, E-mail: patricialire@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    A detailed thermal-hydraulic reactor model using as reference data from the Angra 2 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) has been developed and SiC reinforced with Hi-Nicalon type S fibers (SiC HNS) was used as fuel cladding. The goal is to compare its behavior from the thermal viewpoint with the Zircaloy, at the steady- state and transient conditions. The RELAP-3D was used to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis and a blockage transient has been investigated at full power operation. The transient considered is related to total obstruction of a core cooling channel of one fuel assembly. The calculations were performed using a point kinetic model. The reactor behavior after this transient was analyzed and the time evolution of cladding and coolant temperatures mass flow and void fraction are presented. (author)

  7. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the δ-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the δ-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the γ-austenite and δ-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  8. Design optimization of multi-layer Silicon Carbide cladding for light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho, E-mail: euo@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, MSC01 1120 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); NO, Hee Cheon, E-mail: hcno@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Ik, E-mail: jeongiklee@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • SiC cladding designs are optimized with a multi-layer structural analysis code. • Layer radial thickness fraction that minimizes cladding fracture probability exists. • The demonstrated procedure is applicable for multi-layer SiC cladding design. • Duplex SiC with the inner composite fraction ∼0.4 is optimal in a reference case. • Increasing composite thermal conductivity markedly decreases SiC cladding stress. - Abstract: A parametric study that demonstrates a methodology for determining the optimum bilayer composition in a duplex SiC cladding is discussed. The structural performance of multi-layer SiC cladding design is significantly affected by radial thickness fraction of each layer. This study shows that there exists an optimal composite/monolith radial thickness fraction that minimizes failure probability for a duplex SiC cladding in steady-state operation. An exemplary reference case study shows that the duplex cladding with the inner composite fraction ∼0.4 and the outer CVD-SiC fraction ∼0.6 is found to be the optimal SiC cladding design for the current PWRs with the reference material choice for CVD-SiC and fiber reinforced composite. A marginal increase in the composite fraction from the presented optimal designs may lead to increase structural integrity by introducing some unquantified merits such as increasing damage tolerance. The major factors that affect the optimum cladding designs are temperature gradients and internal gas pressure. Clad wall thickness, thermal conductivity, and Weibull modulus are among the key design parameters/material properties.

  9. Subpicometer thermal shifts in silicon photonic micro-ring resonators with sol-gel claddings (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namnabat, Soha; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Jones, Adam M.; Himmelhuber, Roland; DeRose, Christopher T.; Pomerene, Andrew; Lentine, Tony L.; Norwood, Robert A.

    2017-02-01

    Electronic interconnects are reaching their limit in terms of speed, dimensions and permissible power consumption. This has been a major concern in data centers and large scale computing platforms, creating limits to their scalability especially with respect to power consumption. Silicon photonic-electronic integration is viewed as a viable alternative that enables reliability, high efficiency, low cost and small footprint. In particular, silicon with its high refractive index, has enabled the integration a many individual optical elements (ring resonators) in small areas. Though silicon has a high thermo-optic coefficient (1.8×10^-4/°C) compared to silica, small thermal fluctuations can affect the optical performance especially for WDM applications. Therefore, a passive athermal solution for silicon photonic devices is required in order to reduce thermal sensitivity and power consumption. We have achieved this goal by replacing the silica top cladding with negative thermo-optic coefficient (TOC) materials. While polymers and titanium dioxide(titania) have a negative TOC, polymers can't handle high temperature processing and titania needs very tight thickness control and expensive deposition under vacuum. In this work we propose to use a sol-gel inorganic-organic hybrid material that has the benefits of both worlds. We were able to find optimum curing conditions to athermalize ring resonators by studying various sol-gel curing times and curing temperatures. Our athermal rings operate in a wide temperature range from 5C - 100C with thermal shifts below 1pm/C and low loss. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our athermal approach does not deleteriously effect critical device parameters, such as insertion loss and resonator Q factors.

  10. Survey of Thermal-Fluids Evaluation and Confirmatory Experimental Validation Requirements of Accident Tolerant Cladding Concepts with Focus on Boiling Heat Transfer Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wysocki, Aaron J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ali, Amir [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liu, Maolong [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Blandford, Edward [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is working closely with the nuclear industry to develop fuel and cladding candidates with potentially enhanced accident tolerance, also known as accident tolerant fuel (ATF). Thermal-fluids characteristics are a vital element of a holistic engineering evaluation of ATF concepts. One vital characteristic related to boiling heat transfer is the critical heat flux (CHF). CHF plays a vital role in determining safety margins during normal operation and also in the progression of potential transient or accident scenarios. This deliverable is a scoping survey of thermal-fluids evaluation and confirmatory experimental validation requirements of accident tolerant cladding concepts with a focus on boiling heat transfer characteristics. The key takeaway messages of this report are: 1. CHF prediction accuracy is important and the correlations may have significant uncertainty. 2. Surface conditions are important factors for CHF, primarily the wettability that is characterized by contact angle. Smaller contact angle indicates greater wettability, which increases the CHF. Surface roughness also impacts wettability. Results in the literature for pool boiling experiments indicate changes in CHF by up to 60% for several ATF cladding candidates. 3. The measured wettability of FeCrAl (i.e., contact angle and roughness) indicates that CHF should be investigated further through pool boiling and flow boiling experiments. 4. Initial measurements of static advancing contact angle and surface roughness indicate that FeCrAl is expected to have a higher CHF than Zircaloy. The measured contact angle of different FeCrAl alloy samples depends on oxide layer thickness and composition. The static advancing contact angle tends to decrease as the oxide layer thickness increases.

  11. Investigation of casing connection failure mechanisms in thermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, J. [C-FER Technologies, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Thermal well technologies use casing strings that consist of casing joints linked by threaded connections that are cemented over the wellbore's length in order to provide structural support and hydraulic isolation to the wellbore. Studies have demonstrated that over 80 per cent of uphole casing failures occur at the casing joint connections, and are caused by thread rupture or structural damage. This study discussed thermal well failures related to casing connection damage. Finite element analyses (FEA) were then conducted to consider various critical load conditions with a generic premium casing connection. The study considered structural integrity losses, fatigue, and leakage during connection installation. Results of the study were then used to optimize casing connection designs. The study showed that thermal cycle and curvature loading can have an impact on the structural and sealing performance of premium connections. Connection structural performance should be evaluated in order to determine appropriate designs for thermal well applications. It was concluded that the connection shoulder region is a critical area for material fatigue failure. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Turbine blade failure in a thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Goutam; Chowdhury, Sandip Ghosh; Ray, Ashok Kumar; Das, Swapan Kumar; Bhattacharya, Deepak Kumar [Materials Characterisation Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (CSIR), Jamshedpur-831 007 (India)

    2003-02-01

    The failure of a LP (low pressure) turbine blade of a 220 MW thermal power plant is presented. The blade was made of martensitic stainless steel and the structure was tempered martensite. There was no evidence of degradation of blade material. The fracture took place at the aerofoil region, 113-mm from the root. Throughout the blade surface Si rich phases were detected. Several pits/grooves were found on the edges of the blades and chloride was detected in these pits. These were responsible for the crevice type corrosion. The probable carriers of CI{sup -} were Ca and K, which were found on the blade. The failure mode was intergranular type. Possibly the ultimate failure was due to corrosion-fatigue. (Author)

  13. Thermal stress failure criteria for a structural epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Patrice; Desnoyers, Nichola

    2011-09-01

    Representative failure data for structural epoxies can be very difficult to find for the optomechanical engineer. Usually, test data is only available for shear configuration at room temperature and fast pull rate. On the other hand, the slowly induced stress at extreme temperature is for many optical systems the worse-case scenario. Since one of the most referenced epoxy for optical assembly is the 3M™ Scotch-Weld™ Epoxy Adhesive EC-2216 B/A Gray, better understanding its behavior can benefit a broad range of applications. The objective of this paper is two-fold. First, review data for critical parameters such as Young's modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion. Secondly, derive failure criteria from correlation between a thermal stress experiment and a finite element model. Instead of pulling out a standard tensile specimen, it is proposed to test thin bondline geometry to replicate an optical device usage. Four test plates are assembled at the Institut National d'Optique (INO) in Quebec City, Canada with bondlines of 50 μm and 133 μm. To detect the failure of the epoxy, the low level vibration signature of a cantilever Invar plate is monitored as temperature changes. Following the finite element analysis, a failure criterion is found to better match the experimental results than generic lap shear data.

  14. Lightweight Concrete Containing Phase Change Materials (PCMs): A Numerical Investigation on the Thermal Behaviour of Cladding Panels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patrick Bamonte; Alessio Caverzan; Nataša Kalaba; Marco Lamperti Tornaghi

    2017-01-01

    ...., lightweight concrete with aggregates containing PCMs. The amount of embedded PCMs has no equal in the literature, and this calls for a detailed assessment of its thermal performance within a typical building element...

  15. Thermal effect-resilient design of large mode area double-cladding Yb-doped photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Poli, Federica; Johansen, Mette Marie

    2013-01-01

    The effects of thermally-induced refractive index change on the guiding properties of different large mode area fibers have been numerically analyzed. A simple but accurate model has been applied to obtain the refractive index change in the fiber cross-section, and a full-vector modal solver based...... on the finite-element method has been used to calculate the guided modes of the fibers operating at high power levels. The results demonstrate that resonant structures added to the fiber cross-section can be exploited to provide efficient suppression of high-order modes with a good resilience to thermal effects....

  16. Glass-clad single crystalline fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C. C.; Hsu, K. Y.; Huang, C. W.; Jheng, D. Y.; Wang, S. C.; Lin, S. L.; Yang, M. H.; Lee, Y. W.; Huang, D. W.; Huang, S. L.

    2012-06-01

    Yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) has been widely used as a solid-state laser host because of its superior optical, thermal, mechanical properties, as well as its plurality in hosting active ions with a wide range of ionic radii. Drawing YAG into single crystalline fiber has the potential to further scale up the attainable power level with high mode quality. The recent advancement on the codrawing laser-heated pedestal growth (CDLHPG) technique can produce glass-clad YAG crystalline fibers for laser applications. The drawing speed can reach 10 cm/min for mass production. The CDLHPG technique has shown advantages on transition-metal ion doped YAG and short-fluorescent-lifetime ion doped YAG host. Compared to silica fiber lasers, the crystalline core offers high emission cross section for transition metal ions because of the unique local matrix. The challenges on the development of glass-clad YAG fibers, including core crystallinity, diameter uniformity, dopant segregation, residual strain, post-growth thermal treatment, and the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the crystalline core and glass clad are discussed. Chromium, ytterbium, and neodymium ions doped YAG fiber lasers have been successfully achieved with high efficiency and low threshold power. Power scaling with a clad-pump/side-coupling scheme using single clad or double clad YAG fibers is also discussed.

  17. French investigations of high burnup effect on LOCA thermomecanical behavior. Part two. Oxidation and quenching experiments under simulated LOCA conditions with high burnup clad material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GrandJean, C. [IPSN, Cadarache (France); Cauvin, R.; Lebuffe, C. [EDF/SCMI, Chinon (France)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    In the frame of the high burnup fuel studies to support a possible extension of the current discharge burnup limit, experimental programs have been undertaken, jointly by EDF and IPSN in order to study the thermal-shock behavior of high burnup fuel claddings under typical LOCA conditions. The TAGUS program used unirradiated cladding samples, bare or bearing a pre-corrosion state simulating the end-of-life state of high burnup fuel claddings: the TAGCIR program used actually irradiated cladding samples taken from high burnup rods irradiated over 5 cycles in a commercial EDF PWR and having reached a rod burnup close to 60 GWd/tU. The thermal-shock failure tests consisted in oxidizing the cladding samples under steam flow, on both inner and outer faces or on the outer face alone, and subjecting them to a final water quench. The heating was provided by an inductive furnace the power of which being regulated through monitoring of the sample surface temperature with use of a single-wave optical pyrometer. Analysis of the irradiated tests (TAGCIR series) evidenced an increased oxidation rate as compared to similar tests on unirradiated samples. Results of the quenching tests series on unirradiated and irradiated samples are plotted under the usual presentation of failure maps relative to the oxidation parameters ECR (equivalent cladding reacted) or e{sub {beta}} (thickness of the remaining beta phase layer) as a function of the oxidation temperature. Comparison of the failure limits for irradiated specimens to those for unirradiated specimens indicates a lower brittleness under two side oxidation and possibly the opposite under one-side oxidation. The tentative analysis of the oxidation and quenching tests results on irradiated samples reveals the important role played by the hydrogen charged during in-reactor corrosion on the oxidation kinetics and the failure bearing capability of the cladding under LOCA transient conditions.

  18. Thermal creep properties of Ti-stabilized DIN 1.4970 (15-15Ti) austenitic stainless steel pressurized cladding tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cautaerts, Niels; Delville, Rémi; Dietz, Wolfgang; Verwerft, Marc

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a large database of thermal creep data from pressurized unirradiated DIN 1.4970 Ti-stabilized austenitic stainless steel (i.e. EN 1515CrNiMoTiB or ;15-15Ti;) cladding tubes from more than 1000 bi-axial creep tests conducted during the fast reactor R&D program of the DeBeNe (Deutschland-Belgium-Netherlands) consortium between the 1960's to the late 1980's. The data comprises creep rate and time-to-rupture between 600 and 750 °C and a large range of stresses. The data spans tests on material from around 70 different heats and 30 different melts. Around one fourth of the data was obtained from cold worked material, the rest was obtained on cold worked + aged (800 °C, 2 h) material. The data are graphically presented in log-log graphs. The creep rate data is fit with a sinh correlation, the time to rupture data is fit with a modified exponential function through the Larson-Miller parameter. Local equivalent parameters to Norton's law are calculated and compared to literature values for these types of steels and related to possible creep mechanisms. Some time to rupture data above 950 °C is compared to literature dynamic recrystallization data. Time to rupture data between 600 and 750 °C is also compared to literature data from 316 steel. Time to rupture was correlated directly to creep rate with the Monkman-Grant relationship at different temperatures.

  19. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus [lnspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-06-15

    Based on this study, the following conclusions and recommendations can be made: Due to significant differences in the thermal and mechanical properties between the austenitic cladding and the ferritic base metal, residual stresses are induced in the cladding and the underlying base metal. These stresses are left in clad components even after Post-Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT). The different restraint conditions of the clad component have a minor influence on the magnitude of the cladding residual stresses in the cladding layer. The thickness of the clad object is the main impacting geometrical dimension in developing cladding residual stresses. A clad object having a base material thickness exceeding 10 times the cladding thickness would be practically sufficient to introduce cladding residual stresses of a thick reactor pressure vessel. For a clad component that received PWHT, the peak tensile stress is in the cladding layer, and the residual stresses in the underlying base material are negligible. However, for clad components not receiving PWHT, for instance the repair welding of the cladding, the cladding residual stresses of tensile type exist even in the base material. This implies a higher risk for underclad cracking for clad repairs that received no PWHT. For certain clad geometries, like nozzles, the profile of the cladding residual stresses depends on the clad thickness and position, and significant tensile stresses can also exist in the base material. Based on different measurements reported in the literature, a value of 150 GPa can be used as Young's Modulus of the austenitic cladding material at room temperature. The control measurements of small samples from the irradiated reactor pressure vessel head did not reveal a significant difference of Young's Modulus between the irradiated and the unirradiated cladding material condition. No significant differences between the axial and tangential cladding residual stresses are reported in the

  20. Coupled Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Analysis of Failure Propagation in Lithium-ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-07-28

    This is a presentation given at the 12th World Congress for Computational Mechanics on coupled mechanical-electrochemical-thermal analysis of failure propagation in lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles.

  1. Effect of Thermal Stresses on the Failure Criteria of Fiber Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, Martin Klitgaard; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    2010-01-01

    When composite laminates are operated at cryogenic temperatures, thermal stresses arise. This is due to the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion of different plies and also between the fiber and matrix. While the former is taken into account in the composite structural analysis...... for the fiber and matrix are known, the exact failure envelope is developed. Using the micromechanics results, the Tsai-Wu failure envelope is modified to account for the micro-thermal stresses. The approach is demonstrated using two example structures at cryogenic temperature....

  2. GRAIN-SCALE FAILURE IN THERMAL SPALLATION DRILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, S C; Lomov, I; Roberts, J J

    2012-01-19

    Geothermal power promises clean, renewable, reliable and potentially widely-available energy, but is limited by high initial capital costs. New drilling technologies are required to make geothermal power financially competitive with other energy sources. One potential solution is offered by Thermal Spallation Drilling (TSD) - a novel drilling technique in which small particles (spalls) are released from the rock surface by rapid heating. While TSD has the potential to improve drilling rates of brittle granitic rocks, the coupled thermomechanical processes involved in TSD are poorly described, making system control and optimization difficult for this drilling technology. In this paper, we discuss results from a new modeling effort investigating thermal spallation drilling. In particular, we describe an explicit model that simulates the grain-scale mechanics of thermal spallation and use this model to examine existing theories concerning spalling mechanisms. We will report how borehole conditions influence spall production, and discuss implications for macro-scale models of drilling systems.

  3. A review of typical thermal fatigue failure models for solder joints of electronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Sun, Ruifeng; Wang, Yongdong

    2017-09-01

    For electronic components, cyclic plastic strain makes it easier to accumulate fatigue damage than elastic strain. When the solder joints undertake thermal expansion or cold contraction, different thermal strain of the electronic component and its corresponding substrate is caused by the different coefficient of thermal expansion of the electronic component and its corresponding substrate, leading to the phenomenon of stress concentration. So repeatedly, cracks began to sprout and gradually extend [1]. In this paper, the typical thermal fatigue failure models of solder joints of electronic components are classified and the methods of obtaining the parameters in the model are summarized based on domestic and foreign literature research.

  4. Failure modes of vacuum plasma spray tungsten coating created on carbon fibre composites under thermal loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, T.; Bekris, N.; Coad, J. P.; Grisolia, C.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.; Matthews, G. F.; Philipps, V.; Wessel, E.

    2009-07-01

    Vacuum plasma spray tungsten (VPS-W) coating created on a carbon fibre reinforced composite (CFC) was tested under two thermal load schemes in the electron beam facility to examine the operation limits and failure modes. In cyclic ELM-like short transient thermal loads, the VPS-W coating was destroyed sub-layer by sub-layer at 0.33 GW/m 2 for 1 ms pulse duration. At longer single pulses, simulating steady-state thermal loads, the coating was destroyed at surface temperatures above 2700 °C by melting of the rhenium containing multilayer at the interface between VPS-W and CFC. The operation limits and failure modes of the VPS-W coating in the thermal load schemes are discussed in detail.

  5. Failure Analysis to Identify Thermal Runaway of Bypass Diodes in Fielded Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Chuanxiao, Uchida, Yasunori; Johnston, Steve; Hacke, Peter; Wohlgemuth, John; Al-Jassim, Mowafak

    2017-03-14

    We studied a bypass diode recuperated from fielded modules in a rooftop installation to determine the failure mechanism. The field-failed diode showed similar characteristics to thermal runaway, specifically X-ray tomography evidence of migrated metal. We also observed burn marks on the silicon surface like those lab-stressed for thermal runaway. Reaction products are more soluble than silicon and the surface is oxygen rich.

  6. Failure of Local Thermal Equilibrium in Quantum Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, F.; Behunin, R. O.; Henkel, C.; Busch, K.; Dalvit, D. A. R.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress in manipulating atomic and condensed matter systems has instigated a surge of interest in nonequilibrium physics, including many-body dynamics of trapped ultracold atoms and ions, near-field radiative heat transfer, and quantum friction. Under most circumstances the complexity of such nonequilibrium systems requires a number of approximations to make theoretical descriptions tractable. In particular, it is often assumed that spatially separated components of a system thermalize with their immediate surroundings, although the global state of the system is out of equilibrium. This powerful assumption reduces the complexity of nonequilibrium systems to the local application of well-founded equilibrium concepts. While this technique appears to be consistent for the description of some phenomena, we show that it fails for quantum friction by underestimating by approximately 80% the magnitude of the drag force. Our results show that the correlations among the components of driven, but steady-state, quantum systems invalidate the assumption of local thermal equilibrium, calling for a critical reexamination of this approach for describing the physics of nonequilibrium systems.

  7. Failure of Local Thermal Equilibrium in Quantum Friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, F; Behunin, R O; Henkel, C; Busch, K; Dalvit, D A R

    2016-09-02

    Recent progress in manipulating atomic and condensed matter systems has instigated a surge of interest in nonequilibrium physics, including many-body dynamics of trapped ultracold atoms and ions, near-field radiative heat transfer, and quantum friction. Under most circumstances the complexity of such nonequilibrium systems requires a number of approximations to make theoretical descriptions tractable. In particular, it is often assumed that spatially separated components of a system thermalize with their immediate surroundings, although the global state of the system is out of equilibrium. This powerful assumption reduces the complexity of nonequilibrium systems to the local application of well-founded equilibrium concepts. While this technique appears to be consistent for the description of some phenomena, we show that it fails for quantum friction by underestimating by approximately 80% the magnitude of the drag force. Our results show that the correlations among the components of driven, but steady-state, quantum systems invalidate the assumption of local thermal equilibrium, calling for a critical reexamination of this approach for describing the physics of nonequilibrium systems.

  8. Experimental assessment of fuel-cladding interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Elizabeth Sooby [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-29

    A range of fuel concepts designed to better tolerate accident scenarios and reactor transients are currently undergoing fundamental development at national laboratories as well as university and industrial partners. Pellet-clad mechanical and chemical interaction can be expected to affect fuel failure rates experienced during steady state operation, as well as dramatically impact the response of the fuel form under loss of coolant and other accident scenarios. The importance of this aspect of fuel design prompted research initiated by AFC in FY14 to begin exploratory efforts to characterize this phenomenon for candidate fuelcladding systems of immediate interest. Continued efforts in FY15 and FY17 aimed to better understand and simulate initial pellet-clad interaction with little-to-no pressure on the pellet-clad interface. Reported here are the results from 1000 h heat treatments at 400, 500, and 600°C of diffusion couples pairing UN with a FeCrAl alloy, SiC, and Zr-based cladding candidate sealed in evacuated quartz ampoules. No gross reactions were observed, though trace elemental contaminants were identified.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation on cladding of corrosion-erosion resistant materials by a high power direct diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Parisa

    of developed MMC coatings were examined under highly accelerated slurry erosion, corrosion, and wear as the most frequently encountered failure modes of mechanical components. The microstructure, mechanical properties, and the level of induced residual stress on the coating after cladding procedure are closely related to cladding process variables. Study about the effect of processing parameters on clad quality and experienced thermal history and thermally-induced stress evolution requires both theoretical and experimental understanding of the associated physical phenomena. Numerical modeling offers a cost-efficient way to better understand the related complex physics in laser cladding process. It helps to reveal the effects and significance of each processing parameters on the desired characteristics of clad parts. Successful numerical simulation can provide unique insight into complex laser cladding process, efficiently calculate the complex procedure, and help to obtain coating parts with quality integrity. Therefore, current study develops a three-dimensional (3D) transient and uncoupled thermo-elastic-plastic model to study thermal history, molten pool evolution, thermally induced residual stress, and the effect of utilizing an induction heater as a second heat source on the mechanical properties and microstructural properties of final cladded coating.

  10. TEC – Thin Environmental Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Tomasi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Permasteelisa Group developed with Fiberline Composites a new curtain wall system (Thin Environmental Cladding or TEC, making use of pultruded GFRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer material instead of traditional aluminum. Main advantages using GFRP instead of aluminum are the increased thermal performance and the limited environmental impact. Selling point of the selected GFRP resin is the light transmission, which results in pultruded profiles that allow the visible light to pass through them, creating great aesthetical effects. However, GFRP components present also weaknesses, such as high acoustic transmittance (due to the reduced weight and anisotropy of the material, low stiffness if compared with aluminum (resulting in higher facade deflection and sensible fire behavior (as combustible material. This paper will describe the design of the TEC-facade, highlighting the functional role of glass within the facade concept with regards to its acoustic, structural, aesthetics and fire behavior.

  11. Thermal hydrotherapy improves quality of life and hemodynamic function in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Andreas; Lüdtke, Rainer; Bühring, Malte; Spahn, Günther; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav J

    2003-10-01

    Chronic heart failure is characterized by increased peripheral vascular resistance and reduced peripheral perfusion due to adrenergic and renin angiotensin activation and impaired endothelial function. Recent studies have shown that nonpharmacological peripheral vasodilation with thermal therapy by means of warm-water baths and sauna has beneficial effects in chronic heart failure. European hydrotherapy (according to Kneipp) additionally uses short cold water stimuli, which lead to prolonged vasodilation and adaptive responses. Studies on the efficacy of hydrotherapy in chronic heart failure are lacking. We studied 15 patients (5 men, 10 women, mean (+/- SD) age 64.3 +/- 1.8 years) with mild chronic heart failure (NYHA functional class II to III, ejection fraction 30%-40%). Patients were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of intensive home-based hydrotherapy or 6 weeks restriction in a crossover intervention trial. Quality of life and heart-failure--related symptoms were assessed by means of a validated questionnaire (PLC). Graded bicycle exercise test with incremental workloads (0, 50, 75, 100 watts) was performed at the end of each treatment period. The hydrotherapeutic program consisted of a structured combination of daily home-based external warm- and cold-water applications. Baseline characteristics were balanced between the groups. With hydrotherapy, a significant (P hydrotherapy; blood pressure decreased nonsignificantly at rest and during exercise. The hydrotherapeutic treatment was well accepted and no relevant adverse effects were observed. A home-based hydrotherapeutic thermal treatment program improves quality of life, heart-failure-related symptoms and heart rate response to exercise in patients with mild chronic heart failure. The results of this investigation suggest a beneficial adaptive response to repeated brief cold stimuli in addition to enhanced peripheral perfusion due to thermal hydrotherapy in patients with chronic heart failure.

  12. A Thermal Runaway Failure Model for Low-Voltage BME Ceramic Capacitors with Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Reliability of base metal electrode (BME) multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) that until recently were used mostly in commercial applications, have been improved substantially by using new materials and processes. Currently, the inception of intrinsic wear-out failures in high quality capacitors became much greater than the mission duration in most high-reliability applications. However, in capacitors with defects degradation processes might accelerate substantially and cause infant mortality failures. In this work, a physical model that relates the presence of defects to reduction of breakdown voltages and decreasing times to failure has been suggested. The effect of the defect size has been analyzed using a thermal runaway model of failures. Adequacy of highly accelerated life testing (HALT) to predict reliability at normal operating conditions and limitations of voltage acceleration are considered. The applicability of the model to BME capacitors with cracks is discussed and validated experimentally.

  13. Integrated failure detection and management for the Space Station Freedom external active thermal control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesloh, Nick; Hill, Tim; Kosyk, Kathy

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the integrated approach toward failure detection, isolation, and recovery/reconfiguration to be used for the Space Station Freedom External Active Thermal Control System (EATCS). The on-board and on-ground diagnostic capabilities of the EATCS are discussed. Time and safety critical features, as well as noncritical failures, and the detection coverage for each provided by existing capabilities are reviewed. The allocation of responsibility between on-board software and ground-based systems, to be shown during ground testing at the Johnson Space Center, is described. Failure isolation capabilities allocated to the ground include some functionality originally found on orbit but moved to the ground to reduce on-board resource requirements. Complex failures requiring the analysis of multiple external variables, such as environmental conditions, heat loads, or station attitude, are also allocated to ground personnel.

  14. Development of data base with mechanical properties of un- and pre-irradiated VVER cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmolov, V.; Yegorova, L.; Kaplar, E.; Lioutov, K. [Nuclear Safety Inst. of Russian Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation). Kurchatov Inst.; Smirnov, V.; Prokhorov, V.; Goryachev, A. [State Research Centre, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation). Research Inst. of Atomic Reactors

    1998-03-01

    Analysis of recent RIA test with PWR and VVER high burnup fuel, performed at CABRI, NSRR, IGR reactors has shown that the data base with mechanical properties of the preirradiated cladding is necessary to interpret the obtained results. During 1997 the corresponding cycle of investigations for VVER clad material was performed by specialists of NSI RRC KI and RIAR in cooperation with NRC (USA), IPSN (France) in two directions: measurements of mechanical properties of Zr-1%Nb preirradiated cladding versus temperature and strain rate; measurements of failure parameters for gas pressurized cladding tubes. Preliminary results of these investigations are presented in this paper.

  15. FAILURE MECHANISMS OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES AND llMPROVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADNAN PARLAK

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available MechanicaJ properties of high performance ceramics have been improved to the point where their use in heat engines is possible. The high temperature strength and low thermal expansion properties of bigh performance ceramics offer an advantage over metals in the development of non-water cooling engine. However, because bard environment in diesel engine combustion chamber, solving the problem of durabiUty of TBC is important. DurabiUty of thermal barrier coatings(TBC is liınited by two main failure mechanisms: Therınal expansion nlİsmatch betwcen bond coat and top coat and bond coat oxidation. Both of these can cause failure of the ceramic top coat. Developments of recent years sholv that bond coats \\Vith higher oxidation resistance tend to have better coating system cyclic lives

  16. Results of irradiated cladding tests and clad plate experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Two aspects critical to the fracture behavior of three-wire stainless steel cladding were investigated by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program: (1) radiation effects on cladding strength and toughness, and (2) the response of mechanically loaded, flawed structures in the presence of cladding (clad plate experiments). Postirradiation testing results show that, in the test temperature range from /minus/125 to 288/degree/C, the yield strength increased, and ductility insignificantly increased, while there was almost no change in ultimate tensile strength. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during Charpy impact testing. Radiation damage decreased the Charpy upper-shelf energy by 15 to 20% and resulted in up to 28/degree/C shifts of the Charpy impact transition temperature. Results of irradiated 12.5-mm-thick compact specimens (0.5TCS) show consistent decreases in the ductile fracture toughness, J/sub Ic/, and the tearing modulus. Results from clad plate tests have shown that (1) a tough surface layer composed of cladding and/or heat-affected zone has arrested running flaws under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured, and (2) the residual load-bearing capacity of clad plates with large subclad flaws significantly exceeded that of an unclad plate. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Thermal clothing to reduce heart failure morbidity during winter: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ian; Beevers, Andrea; Fraser, John F; Platts, David

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine whether providing thermal clothing improved the health of patients with heart failure during winter. Design Parallel group randomised controlled trial. Setting Large public hospital in Brisbane during winter 2016. Participants 91 patients with systolic or diastolic heart failure who were over 50 years old. Intervention 47 patients were randomised to receive thermal clothes (socks, top and hat) and 44 received usual care. Patients could not be blinded to their randomised group. All patients’ data were available for the primary outcome which was collected blind to randomised group. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the mean number of days in hospital during winter. Secondary outcomes included quality of life and sleep, and blood tests were collected for cardiovascular risk factors. Participants completed clothing diaries in midwinter which were used to estimate their overall clothing insulation using the ‘clo’. Monitors inside the participants’ homes recorded indoor temperatures throughout winter. Results The mean number of days in hospital during winter was 4.2 in the usual care group and 3.0 in the thermal clothing group (mean difference –1.2 days, 95% CI –4.8 to 2.5 days). Most participants (85%) in the thermal clothing group reported using the thermals. There was an increase in overall clothing insulation at night in the thermal clothing group (mean difference 0.13 clo, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.23). Most participants in both groups did not wear sufficient clothing (defined as a clo below 1) and regularly experienced indoor temperatures below 18°C during midwinter. Conclusions There was no clear statistical improvement in health in the thermal clothing group. Efforts to improve health during winter may need to focus on passive interventions such as home insulation rather than interventions that target behaviour change. Trial registration number ACTRN12615001023549; Results. PMID:28993390

  18. Thermal clothing to reduce heart failure morbidity during winter: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Adrian Gerard; Stewart, Ian; Beevers, Andrea; Fraser, John F; Platts, David

    2017-10-08

    To examine whether providing thermal clothing improved the health of patients with heart failure during winter. Parallel group randomised controlled trial. Large public hospital in Brisbane during winter 2016. 91 patients with systolic or diastolic heart failure who were over 50 years old. 47 patients were randomised to receive thermal clothes (socks, top and hat) and 44 received usual care. Patients could not be blinded to their randomised group. All patients' data were available for the primary outcome which was collected blind to randomised group. The primary outcome was the mean number of days in hospital during winter. Secondary outcomes included quality of life and sleep, and blood tests were collected for cardiovascular risk factors. Participants completed clothing diaries in midwinter which were used to estimate their overall clothing insulation using the 'clo'. Monitors inside the participants' homes recorded indoor temperatures throughout winter. The mean number of days in hospital during winter was 4.2 in the usual care group and 3.0 in the thermal clothing group (mean difference -1.2 days, 95% CI -4.8 to 2.5 days). Most participants (85%) in the thermal clothing group reported using the thermals. There was an increase in overall clothing insulation at night in the thermal clothing group (mean difference 0.13 clo, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.23). Most participants in both groups did not wear sufficient clothing (defined as a clo below 1) and regularly experienced indoor temperatures below 18°C during midwinter. There was no clear statistical improvement in health in the thermal clothing group. Efforts to improve health during winter may need to focus on passive interventions such as home insulation rather than interventions that target behaviour change. ACTRN12615001023549; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  19. Experimental Study on Thermal Vacuum Environment Sensitivity of Spacecraft Antenna's Typical Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Yanqiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of space applications, spacecraft antenna has become an indispensable part of any space system. The spacecraft antenna affects and constrains the performance and functionality of the entire wireless communication system as well as the entire spacecraft. Spacecraft antenna has to withstand the noise, vibration, shock and acceleration as launched, and weightlessness, high vacuum, radiation, extreme hot and cold alternating space environment on-orbit[1].The influence of different environmental factors on the typical failure modes of spacecraft antenna is different. The environmental adaptability of the spacecraft antenna depends mainly on its structural design, material, process and other factors. In this paper, the influence of different environmental factors on the typical failure modes of the spacecraft antenna is studied. The sensitivity analysis of the typical failure modes of the thermal vacuum environment is verified by experiments, which provides support for the development of the spacecraft antenna.

  20. Structural analysis of the SNAP-8 developmental reactor fuel element cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalcher, A.W.

    1969-04-15

    Primary, secondary, and thermal stresses were calculated and evaluated for the SNAP-8 developmental reactor fuel element cladding. The effects of fabrication and assembly stresses, as well as test and operational stresses were included in the analysis. With the assumption that fuel-swelling-induced stresses are nil, the analytical results indicate that the cladding assembly is structurally adequate for the proposed operation.

  1. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  2. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, B.J.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report 'Alloy Development for High Burnup Cladding.' Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs.

  3. TEC – Thin Environmental Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Tomasi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Corresponding author: Alan Tomasi, Group R&D Project Manager, Permasteelisa S.p.A., viale E. Mattei 21/23 | 31029 Vittorio Veneto, Treviso, Italy. Tel.: +39 0438 505207; E-mail: a.tomasi@permasteelisagroup.com; www.permasteelisagroup.com Permasteelisa Group developed with Fiberline Composites a new curtain wall system (Thin Environmental Cladding or TEC, making use of pultruded GFRP (Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer material instead of traditional aluminum. Main advantages using GFRP instead of aluminum are the increased thermal performance and the limited environmental impact. Selling point of the selected GFRP resin is the light transmission, which results in pultruded profiles that allow the visible light to pass through them, creating great aesthetical effects. However, GFRP components present also weaknesses, such as high acoustic transmittance (due to the reduced weight and anisotropy of the material, low stiffness if compared with aluminum (resulting in higher facade deflection and sensible fire behavior (as combustible material. This paper will describe the design of the TEC-facade, highlighting the functional role of glass within the facade concept with regards to its acoustic, structural, aesthetics and fire behavior.

  4. Thermally induced local failures in quasi-one-dimensional systems: collapse in carbon nanotubes, neckling in nanowires, bubbles in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisoli, Cristiano [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lookman, Turab [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saxena, Avadh [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abraham, Douglas [RUDOLF PEIERLS CENTRE

    2009-01-01

    Quasi one dimensional systems can suffer local structural failures-broadly defined-along their length: for instance, carbon nanotubes can collapse, nanowires can show bottlenecks below which conductance drops, bubbles open in DNA. We present a formalism to explore the occurrence of those thermally activated failures in complete generality, to calculate the average length between them as a function of the thermodynamic observables.

  5. Stone cladding engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa Camposinhos, Rui de

    2014-01-01

    This volume presents new methodologies for the design of dimension stone based on the concepts of structural design while preserving the excellence of stonemasonry practice in façade engineering. Straightforward formulae are provided for computing action on cladding, with special emphasis on the effect of seismic forces, including an extensive general methodology applied to non-structural elements. Based on the Load and Resistance Factor Design Format (LRDF), minimum slab thickness formulae are presented that take into consideration stress concentrations analysis based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) for the most commonly used modern anchorage systems. Calculation examples allow designers to solve several anchorage engineering problems in a detailed and objective manner, underlining the key parameters. The design of the anchorage metal parts, either in stainless steel or aluminum, is also presented.

  6. Ice-clad volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitt, Richard B.; Edwards, B.R.; Fountain, Andrew G.; Huggel, C.; Carey, Mark; Clague, John J.; Kääb, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An icy volcano even if called extinct or dormant may be active at depth. Magma creeps up, crystallizes, releases gas. After decades or millennia the pressure from magmatic gas exceeds the resistance of overlying rock and the volcano erupts. Repeated eruptions build a cone that pokes one or two kilometers or more above its surroundings - a point of cool climate supporting glaciers. Ice-clad volcanic peaks ring the northern Pacific and reach south to Chile, New Zealand, and Antarctica. Others punctuate Iceland and Africa (Fig 4.1). To climb is irresistible - if only “because it’s there” in George Mallory’s words. Among the intrepid ascents of icy volcanoes we count Alexander von Humboldt’s attempt on 6270-meter Chimborazo in 1802 and Edward Whymper’s success there 78 years later. By then Cotopaxi steamed to the north.

  7. Friction surface cladding: development of a solid state cladding process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stelt, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Many industries including automotive, aerospace, electronics, shipbuilding, offshore, railway and heavy equipment employ surface modification technologies to change the surface properties of a manufactured product. Often, the surface is covered (coated) with a dissimilar clad layer for this purpose

  8. Microstrain Determination in Individual Grains of Laser Deposited Cladding Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Oliveira, Uazir O. B.; Ocelik, Vaclav; De Hosson, Jeff T. M.; Chandra, T; Tsuzaki, K; Militzer, M; Ravindran, C

    2007-01-01

    The laser cladding technique makes the deposition of thick metallic, wear and corrosion resistant coatings feasible on weaker substrates. During the process, localized high thermal gradients generate internal stresses that may cause cracking when these overcome the fracture stress. To explain the

  9. Accident-tolerant oxide fuel and cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Robert D.

    2017-05-30

    Systems and methods for accident tolerant oxide fuel. One or more disks can be placed between fuel pellets comprising UO.sub.2, wherein such disks possess a higher thermal conductivity material than that of the UO.sub.2 to provide enhanced heat rejection thereof. Additionally, a cladding coating comprising zircaloy coated with a material that provides stability and high melting capability can be provided. The pellets can be configured as annular pellets having an annulus filled with the higher thermal conductivity material. The material coating the zircaloy can be, for example, Zr.sub.5Si.sub.4 or another silicide such as, for example, a Zr-Silicide that limits corrosion. The aforementioned higher thermal conductivity material can be, for example, Si, Zr.sub.xSi.sub.y, Zr, or Al.sub.2O.sub.3.

  10. Advanced Failure Determination Measurement Techniques Used in Thermal Fatigue Life Testing of Electronic Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, A. P.; Cornford, S. L.; Gross, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal fatigue life testing of various electronic packaging technologies is being performed by the Reliability Technology Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These testing efforts are in progress to improve uderstanding of the reliability issues associated with low volume packaging technologies for space applications and to develop qualification and acceptance approaches for these technologies. The work described here outlines the electrical failure detection techniques used during testing by documenting the circuits and components used to make these measurements, the sensitivity of the measurements, and the applicability of each specific measurement.

  11. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible.

  12. Final report on accident tolerant fuel performance analysis of APMT-Steel Clad/UO₂ fuel and APMT-Steel Clad/UN-U₃Si₅ fuel concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-12

    In FY2014 our group completed and documented analysis of new Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) concepts using BISON. We have modeled the viability of moving from Zircaloy to stainless steel cladding in traditional light water reactors (LWRs). We have explored the reactivity penalty of this change using the MCNP-based burnup code Monteburns, while attempting to minimize this penalty by increasing the fuel pellet radius and decreasing the cladding thickness. Fuel performance simulations using BISON have also been performed to quantify changes to structural integrity resulting from thinner stainless steel claddings. We account for thermal and irradiation creep, fission gas swelling, thermal swelling and fuel relocation in the models for both Zircaloy and stainless steel claddings. Additional models that account for the lower oxidation stainless steel APMT are also invoked where available. Irradiation data for HT9 is used as a fallback in the absence of appropriate models. In this study the isotopic vectors within each natural element are varied to assess potential reactivity gains if advanced enrichment capabilities were levied towards cladding technologies. Recommendations on cladding thicknesses for a robust cladding as well as the constitutive components of a less penalizing composition are provided. In the first section (section 1-3), we present results accepted for publication in the 2014 TOPFUEL conference regarding the APMT/UO₂ ATF concept (J. Galloway & C. Unal, Accident Tolerant and Neutronically Favorable LWR Cladding, Proceedings of WRFPM 2014, Sendai, Japan, Paper No.1000050). Next we discuss our preliminary findings from the thermo-mechanical analysis of UN-U₃Si₅ fuel with APMT clad. In this analysis we used models developed from limited data that need to be updated when the irradiation data from ATF-1 test is available. Initial results indicate a swelling rate less than 1.5% is needed to prevent excessive clad stress.

  13. Cladding material, tube including such cladding material and methods of forming the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    A multi-layered cladding material including a ceramic matrix composite and a metallic material, and a tube formed from the cladding material. The metallic material forms an inner liner of the tube and enables hermetic sealing of thereof. The metallic material at ends of the tube may be exposed and have an increased thickness enabling end cap welding. The metallic material may, optionally, be formed to infiltrate voids in the ceramic matrix composite, the ceramic matrix composite encapsulated by the metallic material. The ceramic matrix composite includes a fiber reinforcement and provides increased mechanical strength, stiffness, thermal shock resistance and high temperature load capacity to the metallic material of the inner liner. The tube may be used as a containment vessel for nuclear fuel used in a nuclear power plant or other reactor. Methods for forming the tube comprising the ceramic matrix composite and the metallic material are also disclosed.

  14. Review of experimental data for modelling LWR fuel cladding behaviour under loss of coolant accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    Extensive range of experiments has been conducted in the past to quantitatively identify and understand the behaviour of fuel rod under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors (LWRs). The obtained experimental data provide the basis for the current emergency core cooling system acceptance criteria under LOCA conditions for LWRs. The results of recent experiments indicate that the cladding alloy composition and high burnup effects influence LOCA acceptance criteria margins. In this report, we review some past important and recent experimental results. We first discuss the background to acceptance criteria for LOCA, namely, clad embrittlement phenomenology, clad embrittlement criteria (limitations on maximum clad oxidation and peak clad temperature) and the experimental bases for the criteria. Two broad kinds of test have been carried out under LOCA conditions: (i) Separate effect tests to study clad oxidation, clad deformation and rupture, and zirconium alloy allotropic phase transition during LOCA. (ii) Integral LOCA tests, in which the entire LOCA sequence is simulated on a single rod or a multi-rod array in a fuel bundle, in laboratory or in a tests and results are discussed and empirical correlations deduced from these tests and quantitative models are conferred. In particular, the impact of niobium in zirconium base clad and hydrogen content of the clad on allotropic phase transformation during LOCA and also the burst stress are discussed. We review some recent LOCA integral test results with emphasis on thermal shock tests. Finally, suggestions for modelling and further evaluation of certain experimental results are made.

  15. Clad thickness variation N-Reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.A.

    1966-05-12

    The current specifications for the cladding on {open_quotes}N{close_quotes} fuels were established early in the course of process development and were predicted on several basic considerations. Among these were: (a) a desire to provide an adequate safety factor in cladding thickness to insure against corrosion penetration and rupture from uranium swelling stresses; (b) an apprehension that the striations in the zircaloy cladding of the U/zircaloy interface and on the exterior surface might serve as stress-raisers, leading to untimely failures of the jacket; and (c) then existing process capability - the need to maintain a specified ratio between zircaloy and uranium in the billet assembly to effect satisfactory coextrusion. It now appears appropriate to review these specifications in an effort to determine whether some of them may be revised, with attendant gains in economy and/or operating smoothness.

  16. Experimental and statistical investigation of thermally induced failure in reactor fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunsford, J.L.; Imprescia, R.J.; Bowman, A.L.; Radosevich, C.E.

    1980-10-01

    An incomplete experimental study into the failure statistics of fuel particle for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is described. Fuel particles failure was induced by thermal ramping from room temperature to temperatures in the vicinity of 2273/sup 0/K to 2773/sup 0/K in 2 to 30 h and detected by the appearance of /sup 85/Kr in the helium carrier gas used to sweep the furnace. The concentration of krypton, a beta emitter, was detected by measuring the current that resulted when the helium sweep gas was passed through an ionization chamber. TRISO fuel particles gave a krypton concentration profile as a function of time that built up in several minutes and decayed in a fraction of an hour. This profile, which was temperature independent, was similar to the impulse response of the ionization chamber, suggesting that the TRISO particles failed instantaneously and completely. BISO fuel particles gave a krypton concentration profile as a function of time that built up in a fraction of an hour and decayed in a fraction of a day. This profile was strongly temperature dependent, suggesting that krypton release was diffusion controlled, i.e., that the krypton was diffusing through a sound coat, or that the BISO coating failed but that the krypton was unable to escape the kernel without diffusion, or that a combination of pre- and postfailure diffusion accompanied partial or complete failure.

  17. Sliding wear studies of microwave clad versus unclad surface of stainless steel 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshata M. K.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Small and large scale (gas power plant, hydro power plant, automobile industries are suffering by failure of component. Sometimes, it is also observed that the component which was failed due to these reasons are very much costly and replacement of those also very difficult due to the complex geometry. By using Microwave hybrid heating, WC-12Co based clads were developed on austenitic stainless steel (SS304. Microwave clads were developed by introducing the preplaced, preheated powder for a duration of 15 min to microwave radiation at 2.45GHz frequency and 900 W power in domestic microwave applicator. By using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM, the developed clads were characterized. By using pin-on-disk, wear performance of the WC-12Co based clads and unclad samples were tested. It is observed that developed clad samples performed superior wear resistance than unclad samples.

  18. Clad Treatment in KARMA Code and Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-yeup; Lee, Hae-chan; Woo, Hae-seuk [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Zirconium is the main components in clad materials. The subgroup parameters of zirconium were generated with effective cross section which obtained by using flux distribution in clad region. It decreases absorption reaction rate differences with reference MCNP results. Use of composite nuclide is acceptable to increase efficiency but should be limited to specific target composition. Therefore, the use of the composite nuclide of Zircaloy-2 should be limited when HANA clad material is used for clad. Either using explicit components or generating composite nuclide for HANA is suggested. This paper investigates the clad analysis model for KARMA whether current method is applicable to HANA clad material.

  19. Evaluation of missing pellet surface geometry on cladding stress distribution and magnitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Nathan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Montgomery, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sunderland, Dion [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); ANATECH Corp, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Pytel, Martin [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Stress concentrations are related to pellet defect geometries. • The presence of radial cracks cause increases in stress concentration. • Increasing the size of MPS causes an increase hoop stress concentrations. - Abstract: Missing pellet surface (MPS) defects are local geometric defects in nuclear fuel pellets that result from pellet mishandling or manufacturing. The presence of MPS defects can cause significant clad stress concentrations that can lead to through-wall cladding failure for certain combinations of fuel burnup, and reactor power level or power change. Consequently, the impact of MPS defects has limited the rate of power increase, or ramp rate, in both pressurized and boiling water reactors (PWRs and BWRs, respectively). Improved three-dimensional (3-D) fuel performance models of MPS defect geometry can provide better understanding of the probability for pellet clad mechanical interaction (PCMI), and correspondingly the available margin against cladding failure by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The Consortium of Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) has been developing the Bison-CASL fuel performance code to consider the inherently multi-physics and multi-dimensional mechanisms that control fuel behavior, including cladding stress concentrations resulting from MPS defects. This paper evaluates the cladding hoop stress distributions as a function of MPS defect geometry with discrete pellet radial cracks for a set of typical operating conditions in a PWR fuel rod. The results provide a first step toward a probabilistic approach to assess cladding failure during power maneuvers. This analysis provides insight into how varying pellet defect geometries affect the distribution of the cladding stress, as well as the temperature distributions within the fuel and clad; and are used to develop stress concentration factors for comparing 2-D and 3-D models.

  20. Macroscopic behavior of fast reactor fuel subjected to simulated thermal transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.

    1983-06-01

    High-speed cinematography has been used to characterize the macroscopic behavior of irradiated and unirradiated fuel subjected to thermal transients prototypical of fast reactor transients. The results demonstrate that as the cladding melts, the fuel can disperse via spallation if the fuel contains in excess of approx. 16 ..mu..moles/gm of fission gas. Once the cladding has melted, the macroscopic behavior (time to failure and dispersive nature) was strongly influenced by the presence of volatile fission products and the heating rate.

  1. Mechanical behavior of fast reactor fuel pin cladding subjected to simulated overpower transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D.; Hunter, C.W.

    1978-06-01

    Cladding mechanical property data for analysis and prediction of fuel pin transient behavior were obtained under experimental conditions in which the temperature ramps of reactor transients were simulated. All cladding specimens were 20% CW Type 316 stainless steel and were cut from EBR-II irradiated fuel pins. It was determined that irradiation degraded the cladding ductility and failure strength. Specimens that had been adjacent to the fuel exhibited the poorest properties. Correlations were developed to describe the effect of neutron fluence on the mechanical behavior of the cladding. Metallographic examinations were conducted to characterize the failure mode and to establish the nature of internal and external surface corrosion. Various mechanisms for the fuel adjacency effect were examined and results for helium concentration profiles were presented. Results from the simulated transient tests were compared with TREAT test results.

  2. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Power Generation, Inc proposed a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  3. Technical basis for storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes the technical bases to establish safe conditions for dry storage of Zircaloy-clad fuel. Dry storage of fuel with zirconium alloy cladding has been licensed in Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, and Switzerland. In addition, dry storage demonstrations, hot cell tests, and modeling have been conducted using Zircaloy-clad fuel. The demonstrations have included irradiated boiling water reactor, pressurized heavy-water reactor, and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. Irradiated fuel has been emplaced in and retrieved from metal casks, dry wells, silos, and a vault. Dry storage tests and demonstrations have involved {similar_to}5,000 fuel rods, and {similar_to}600 rods have been monitored during dry storage in inert gases with maximum cladding temperatures ranging from 50 to 570{sup 0}C. Although some tests and demonstrations are still in progress, there is currently no evidence that any rods exposed to inert gases have failed (one PWR rod exposed to an air cover gas failed at {similar_to}70{sup 0}C). Based on this favorable experience, it is concluded that there is sufficient information on fuel rod behavior, storage conditions, and potential cladding failure mechanisms to support licensing of dry storage in the United States. This licensing position includes a requirement for inert cover gases and a maximum cladding temperature guideline of 380{sup 0}C for Zircaloy-clad fuel. Using an inert cover gas assures that even if fuel with cladding defects were placed in dry storage, or if defects develop during storage, the defects would not propagate. Tests and demonstrations involving Zircaloy-clad rods and assemblies with maximum cladding temperatures above 400{sup 0}C are in progress. When the results from these tests have been evaluated, the viability of higher temperature limits should be examined. Acceptable conditions for storage in air and dry storage of consolidated fuel are issues yet to be resolved.

  4. Comparison of ring compression testing to three point bend testing for unirradiated ZIRLO cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-04-01

    Safe shipment and storage of nuclear reactor discharged fuel requires an understanding of how the fuel may perform under the various conditions that can be encountered. One specific focus of concern is performance during a shipment drop accident. Tests at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are being performed to characterize the properties of fuel clad relative to a mechanical accident condition such as a container drop. Unirradiated ZIRLO tubing samples have been charged with a range of hydride levels to simulate actual fuel rod levels. Samples of the hydrogen charged tubes were exposed to a radial hydride growth treatment (RHGT) consisting of heating to 400°C, applying initial hoop stresses of 90 to 170 MPa with controlled cooling and producing hydride precipitates. Initial samples have been tested using both a) ring compression test (RCT) which is shown to be sensitive to radial hydride and b) three-point bend tests which are less sensitive to radial hydride effects. Hydrides are generated in Zirconium based fuel cladding as a result of coolant (water) oxidation of the clad, hydrogen release, and a portion of the released (nascent) hydrogen absorbed into the clad and eventually exceeding the hydrogen solubility limit. The orientation of the hydrides relative to the subsequent normal and accident strains has a significant impact on the failure susceptability. In this study the impacts of stress, temperature and hydrogen levels are evaluated in reference to the propensity for hydride reorientation from the circumferential to the radial orientation. In addition the effects of radial hydrides on the Quasi Ductile Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT) were measured. The results suggest that a) the severity of the radial hydride impact is related to the hydrogen level-peak temperature combination (for example at a peak drying temperature of 400°C; 800 PPM hydrogen has less of an impact/ less radial hydride fraction than 200 PPM hydrogen for the same thermal

  5. Multispectral pyrometry for surface temperature measurement of oxidized Zircaloy claddings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvry, B.; Cheymol, G.; Ramiandrisoa, L.; Javaudin, B.; Gallou, C.; Maskrot, H.; Horny, N.; Duvaut, T.; Destouches, C.; Ferry, L.; Gonnier, C.

    2017-06-01

    Non-contact temperature measurement in a nuclear reactor is still a huge challenge because of the numerous constraints to consider, such as the high temperature, the steam atmosphere, and irradiation. A device is currently developed at CEA to study the nuclear fuel claddings behavior during a Loss-of-Coolant Accident. As a first step of development, we designed and tested an optical pyrometry procedure to measure the surface temperature of nuclear fuel claddings without any contact, under air, in the temperature range 700-850 °C. The temperature of Zircaloy-4 cladding samples was retrieved at various temperature levels. We used Multispectral Radiation Thermometry with the hypothesis of a constant emissivity profile in the spectral ranges 1-1.3 μm and 1.45-1.6 μm. To allow for comparisons, a reference temperature was provided by a thermocouple welded on the cladding surface. Because of thermal losses induced by the presence of the thermocouple, a heat transfer simulation was also performed to estimate the bias. We found a good agreement between the pyrometry measurement and the temperature reference, validating the constant emissivity profile hypothesis used in the MRT estimation. The expanded measurement uncertainty (k = 2) of the temperature obtained by the pyrometry method was ±4 °C, for temperatures between 700 and 850 °C. Emissivity values, between 0.86 and 0.91 were obtained.

  6. Evolution of thermal stress and failure probability during reduction and re-oxidation of solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Jiang, Wenchun; Luo, Yun; Zhang, Yucai; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2017-12-01

    The reduction and re-oxidation of anode have significant effects on the integrity of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sealed by the glass-ceramic (GC). The mechanical failure is mainly controlled by the stress distribution. Therefore, a three dimensional model of SOFC is established to investigate the stress evolution during the reduction and re-oxidation by finite element method (FEM) in this paper, and the failure probability is calculated using the Weibull method. The results demonstrate that the reduction of anode can decrease the thermal stresses and reduce the failure probability due to the volumetric contraction and porosity increasing. The re-oxidation can result in a remarkable increase of the thermal stresses, and the failure probabilities of anode, cathode, electrolyte and GC all increase to 1, which is mainly due to the large linear strain rather than the porosity decreasing. The cathode and electrolyte fail as soon as the linear strains are about 0.03% and 0.07%. Therefore, the re-oxidation should be controlled to ensure the integrity, and a lower re-oxidation temperature can decrease the stress and failure probability.

  7. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  8. Fabrication and testing of U–7Mo monolithic plate fuel with Zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqualini, E.E. [Laboratorio de Nanotecnología Nuclear, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martín, Prov. Buenos Aires (Argentina); Robinson, A.B. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Porter, D.L., E-mail: Douglas.Porter@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Wachs, D.M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Finlay, M.R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear fuel designs are being developed to replace highly enriched fuel used in research and test reactors with fuels of low enrichment. In the most challenging cases, U–(7–10 wt%)Mo monolithic plate fuels are proposed. One of the considered designs includes aluminum-alloy cladding, which provides some challenges in fabrication and fuel/cladding interaction during service. Zircaloy cladding, specifically Zry–4, was investigated as an alternative cladding, and development of a fabrication method was performed by researchers with the Comisión Nacionalde Energia Atómica (CNEA) in Argentina, resulting in test fuel plates (Zry–4 clad U–7Mo) which were subsequently tested in the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Because Zry–4 and U–(7–10)Mo have similar high-temperature mechanical properties, fabrication was simplified in that the fuel foil and cladding could be co-rolled and bonded. The challenge was to prevent a thermal-expansion mismatch, which could destroy the fuel/cladding bond before complete bonding was achieved; the solution was to prevent the composites from cooling significantly during or between roll passes. The final product performed very well in-reactor, showing good bonding, very little fuel/cladding interaction—either from fabrication or in-reactor testing—and little swelling, especially no detectable heterogeneous bubble formation at the fuel/cladding interface tested to a fission density of up to 2.7E+21 (average) fissions/cm{sup 3}, 3.8E+21 (peak).

  9. Structural Analysis of Surface-Modified Oxidation-Resistant Zirconium Alloy Cladding for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho; No, Hee Cheon; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    While the current zirconium-based alloy cladding (Zircaloy, here after) has served well for fission-product barrier and heat transfer medium for the nuclear fuel of light water reactors (LWRs) in steady-states, concerns surrounding its mechanical behavior during accidents have drawn serious attentions. In accidents, strength degradation of the current-zirconium based alloy cladding manifests at temperature around ∼800 .deg. C, which results in fuel ballooning. Above 1000 .deg. C, zircaloy undergoes rapid oxidation with steam. Formation of brittle oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) and underlying oxygen-saturated α-zircaloy as a consequence of steam oxidation leads to loss of cladding ductility. Indeed, the loss of zircaloy ductility upon the steam oxidation has been taken as a measure of fuel failure criteria as stated in 10 CFR 50.46. In addition, zircaloy steam oxidation is an exothermic reaction, which is an energy source that sharply accelerates temperature increase under loss of coolant accidents, decreasing allowable coping time for loss of coolant accidents, decreasing allowable coping time for loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) before significant fuel/core melting starts. Hydrogen generated as a result of zircaloy oxidation could cause an explosion if certain conditions are met. In steady-state operation, zircaloy embrittlement limits the burnup of the fuel rod to assure remaining cladding ductility to cope with accidents. As a way to suppress hydrogen generation and cladding embrittlement by oxidation, ideas of cladding coating with an oxidation-preventive layer have emerged. Indeed, among a numbers of 'accident-tolerant-fuel (ATF)' concepts, the concept of coating the current fuel rod. Some signs of success on the lab-scale oxidation-prevention have been confirmed with a few coating candidates. Yet, relatively less attention has been given to structural integrity of coated zirconium-based alloy cladding. It is important to note that oxidation

  10. Failure investigation of a secondary super heater tube in a 140 MW thermal power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanu Saha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the findings of a detailed investigation into the failure of a secondary super heater tube in a 140 MW thermal power plant. Preliminary macroscopic examinations along with visual examination, dimensional measurement and chemical analysis were carried out to deduce the probable cause of failure. In addition optical microscopy was a necessary supplement to understand the cause of failure. It was concluded that the tube had failed due to severe creep damage caused by high metal temperature during service. The probable causes of high metal temperature may be in sufficient flow of steam due to partial blockage, presence of thick oxide scale on ID surface, high flue gas temperature etc. rupture.

  11. Advanced Fuels Campaign Cladding & Coatings Meeting Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not Listed

    2013-03-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) organized a Cladding and Coatings operational meeting February 12-13, 2013, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, industry, and universities attended the two-day meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss advanced cladding and cladding coating research and development (R&D); review experimental testing capabilities for assessing accident tolerant fuels; and review industry/university plans and experience in light water reactor (LWR) cladding and coating R&D.

  12. Results of the Gallium-Clad Phase 3 and Phase 4 tasks (canceled prior to completion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R.N.

    1998-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Gallium-Clad interactions Phase 3 and 4 tasks. Both tasks were to involve examining the out-of-pile stability of residual gallium in short fuel rods with an imposed thermal gradient. The thermal environment was to be created by an electrical heater in the center of the fuel rod and coolant flow on the rod outer cladding. Both tasks were canceled due to difficulties with fuel pellet fabrication, delays in the preparation of the test apparatus, and changes in the Fissile Materials Disposition program budget.

  13. Rigorous modeling of cladding modes in photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Bang, Ole

    We study the cladding modes of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a finite size cladding using a finite element method. The cladding consists of seven rings of air holes with bulk silica outside.......We study the cladding modes of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a finite size cladding using a finite element method. The cladding consists of seven rings of air holes with bulk silica outside....

  14. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign - Baseline Studies for Ring Compression Testing of High-Burnup Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Burtseva, T. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Liu, Y. Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-11-23

    Structural analyses of high-burnup fuel require cladding mechanical properties and failure limits to assess fuel behavior during long-term dry cask storage and transportation. Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage subject cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to in-reactor operation and pool storage. Under these conditions, radial hydrides may precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). On the basis of previous test results, susceptibility to radial-hydride precipitation depends on cladding material, microstructure, and pre-drying distribution of hydrides across the cladding wall, as well as peak hoop stresses and temperatures during drying operations and storage. Susceptibility to embrittlement depends on the extent of radial-hydride precipitation and the thickness of the outer-surface hydride rim. These results highlight the importance of determining the DBTT for high-burnup cladding as a function of peak drying-storage temperatures and stresses and including the relevant mechanical properties in cask structural analyses. Additional testing is needed at lower (and perhaps more realistic) peak drying-storage temperatures and stresses, for which the DBTT is expected to decrease.

  15. Technical development of double-clad process for thin strip casting of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, H.L.; Forkel, C.E.; Knudson, D.L.

    1984-08-01

    This report documents the technical development for a patent disclosure of a double-clad process for the continuous casting of thin-strip carbon steel. The fundamental idea of the disclosure is to form a product strip by depositing molten steel between two, cooled, clad strips of the same material. The claimed benefits include: (a) the conservation of energy in steel making through the elimination of soaking pits and reheat cycles, and (b) an improved surface on both sides of the as-cast product such that it will be suitable for direct feed to a cold-reduction mill. However, the process as conceived is not necessarily limited to the casting of carbon steel, but may be also applied to other metals and alloys. The work is described under three headings as follows. Preliminary Considerations and Scoping Analysis presents the basic idea of the double-clad, thin-strip casting process; the energy conservation potential; scoping heat transfer calculations for the casting process; and independent review of this work. Thermal Analysis for Roller Configuration of Double-Clad Process, presents the development, results, and independent review of a finite-element thermal analysis for the casting process as originally conceived (using only chilled rollers in direct contact with the clad material of the product strip). Further Considerations for Belt Configuration of Double-Clad Process deals with a modified equipment design which interposes two product support belts, one on each side of the product, between the clad strip and the rollers. In addition to the process description, this section presents the preliminary mechanical calculations for the endless metal belts and the work scope and results for the computer model revision and thermal analysis for the modified concept.

  16. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  17. Vanadium as barrier to prevent inter diffusion between metallic fuel and clad material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Soo; Lee, Seok Hee; Kalita, Deep Jyoti; Woo, Sung Pil; Yoon, Young Soo [Yonsei Univ., Shinchondong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Hwan; Baek, Jong Hyuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) has been considered as next generation nuclear reactor because of its ability of recycling nuclear fuel. Specially, U Zr metal fuel in nuclear reactor has advantages such as ease of fabrication, high thermal conductivity, proliferation resistance and a good stability for sodium which have proven efficient in extending the fusion possibility. In spite of advantages, metal fuel can be inconvenient to use cladding. Actinide elements cause a FCCI (Fuel Clad Chemical Interaction) and eutectic reaction with Fe as nuclear cladding components at just above 650 .deg. C. Since nuclear cladding thickness is decreased during the combusting U Zr metal fuel, the interaction place in the cladding is brittle and less strength. It was reported that the eutectic melting between U Pu Zr and Fe occurs above 650 .deg. C. For such reasons, liner related materials and process have been studied by many research groups. In order to apply this nuclear cladding liner, Zr and V metals show better properties to preventing FCCI. Although liner materials prevent FCCI to an extent, it cannot block it perfectly. In this study, we attempt a combination of vanadium (V) and vanadium foil double layer in between a 420J2(Fe based 12Cr steel) and misch metal. The V thin film was deposited with various RF power. The results of diffusion couple tests at 660 .deg. C for 25 hours showed that a combination of the V thin films and foil exhibited a better shielding for FCCI.

  18. RIA simulation tests using driver tube for ATF cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, N. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, R. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linton, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, K. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) is a potential failure mechanism for accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding candidates during a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA). This report summarizes Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 research activities that were undertaken to evaluate the PCMI-like hoop-strain-driven mechanical response of ATF cladding candidates. To achieve various RIA-like conditions, a modified-burst test (MBT) device was developed to produce different mechanical pulses. The calibration of the MBT instrument was accomplished by performing mechanical tests on unirradiated Generation-I iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloy samples. Shakedown tests were also conducted in both FY 2016 and FY 2017 using unirradiated hydrided ZIRLO™ tube samples. This milestone report focuses on testing of ATF materials, but the benchmark tests with hydrided ZIRLO™ tube samples are documented in a recent journal article.a For the calibration and benchmark tests, the hoop strain was monitored using strain gauges attached to the sample surface in the hoop direction. A novel digital image correlation (DIC) system composed of a single high-speed camera and an array of six mirrors was developed for the MBT instrument to better resolve the failure behavior of samples and to provide useful data for validation of high-fidelity modeling and simulation tools. The DIC system enable a 360° view of a sample’s outer surface. This feature was added to the instrument to determine the precise failure location on a sample’s surface for strain predictions. The DIC system was tested on several silicon carbide fiber/silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite tube samples at various pressurization rates of the driver tube (which correspond to the strain rates for the samples). The hoop strains for various loading conditions were determined for the SiC/SiC composite tube samples. Future work is planned to enhance understanding of the failure behavior of the ATF cladding candidates of age

  19. Testing Method for External Cladding Systems - Incerc Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simion, A.; Dragne, H.

    2017-06-01

    This research presents a new testing method in a natural scale for external cladding systems tested on buildings with minimum than 3 floors [1]. The testing method is unique in Romania and it is similar about many fire testing current methods from European Union states. Also, presents the fire propagation and the effect of fire smoke on the building façade composed of thermal insulation. Laboratory of testing and research for building fire safety from National Institute INCERC Bucharest, provides a test method for determining the fire performance characteristics of non-loadbearing external cladding systems and external wall insulation systems when applied to the face of a building and exposed to an external fire under controlled conditions [2]. The fire exposure is representative of an external fire source or a fully-developed (post-flashover) fire in a room, venting through an opening such as a window aperture that exposes the cladding to the effects of external flames, or an external fire source. On the future, fire tests will be experimented for answer demande a number of high-profile fires where the external facade of tall buildings provided a route for vertical fire spread.

  20. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of FeCrAl cladding with updated properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-30

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, suitability for normal operation must also be demonstrated. This research is focused on modeling the integral thermo-mechanical performance of FeCrAl-cladded fuel during normal reactor operation. Preliminary analysis has been performed to assess FeCrAl alloys (namely Alkrothal 720 and APMT) as a suitable fuel cladding replacement for Zr-alloys, using the MOOSE-based, finite-element fuel performance code BISON and the best available thermal-mechanical and irradiation-induced constitutive properties. These simulations identify the effects of the mechanical-stress and irradiation response of FeCrAl, and provide a comparison with Zr-alloys. In comparing these clad materials, fuel rods have been simulated for normal reactor operation and simple steady-state operation. Normal reactor operating conditions target the cladding performance over the rod lifetime (~4 cycles) for the highest-power rod in the highest-power fuel assembly under reactor power maneuvering. The power histories and axial temperature profiles input into BISON were generated from a neutronics study on full-core reactivity equivalence for FeCrAl using the 3D full core simulator NESTLE. Evolution of the FeCrAl cladding behavior over time is evaluated by using steady-state operating conditions such as a simple axial power profile, a constant cladding surface temperature, and a constant fuel power history. The fuel rod designs and

  1. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Eng, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lepage, R. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  2. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Eng, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lepage, R. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1.What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2.Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3.What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  3. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world’s highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding and Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 oC). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed.

  4. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world's highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate an appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding and Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 °C). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed.

  5. Metal-clad waveguide sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, Nina

    This work concerns planar optical waveguide sensors for biosensing applications, with the focus on deep-probe sensing for micron-scale biological objects like bacteria and whole cells. In the last two decades planar metal-clad waveguides have been brieflyintroduced in the literature applied...... for various biosensing applications, however a thorough study of the sensor configurations has not been presented, but is the main subject of this thesis. Optical sensors are generally well suited for bio-sensing asthey show high sensitivity and give an immediate response for minute changes in the refractive...... index of a sample, due to the high sensitivity of optical bio-sensors detection of non-labeled biological objects can be performed. The majority of opticalsensors presented in the literature and commercially available optical sensors are based on evanescent wave sensing, however most of these sensors...

  6. Effects of Lower Drying-Storage Temperature on the Ductility of High-Burnup PWR Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Burtseva, T. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-08-30

    The purpose of this research effort is to determine the effects of canister and/or cask drying and storage on radial hydride precipitation in, and potential embrittlement of, high-burnup (HBU) pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding alloys during cooling for a range of peak drying-storage temperatures (PCT) and hoop stresses. Extensive precipitation of radial hydrides could lower the failure hoop stresses and strains, relative to limits established for as-irradiated cladding from discharged fuel rods stored in pools, at temperatures below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  7. Mechanical and fracture behavior of nuclear fuel cladding in terms of transport and temporary dry storage; Comportamiento mecanio y en fractura de vainas de combustible nuclear en condiciones de transporte y almacenamiento temporal en seco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Hervias, J.; Martin Rengel, M. A.; Gomez, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the most relevant results of a research project on the mechanical and fracture behavior of cladding in transport and dry storage conditions are summarized. the project is being carried out at Universidad Politecnica de Madrid in collaboration with ENUSA, ENRESA and CSN. Non-irradiated cladding is investigated. The main objective is to determine a failure criterion of cladding as a function of hydrogen content, temperature and strain rate. (Author)

  8. Friction Surface Cladding of AA1050 on AA2024-T351; influence of clad layer thickness and tool rotation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shaojie; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko

    2015-01-01

    Friction Surfacing Cladding (FSC) is a recently developed solid state process to deposit thin metallic clad layers on a substrate. The process employs a rotating tool with a central opening to supply clad material and support the distribution and bonding of the clad material to the substrate. The

  9. Reduction of Liquid Clad Formation Due to Solid State Diffusion in Clad Brazing Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michael J.; Whitney, Mark A.; Wells, Mary A.; Winkler, Sooky

    2016-12-01

    Warm forming operations have shown promise in expanding automotive heat exchanger designs by increasing forming limits of clad brazing sheet. The impact of isothermal holds below the clad melting temperature on subsequent brazeability has not previously been studied in detail. The effect of these holds on brazeability, as measured by the clad thickness loss due to solid state diffusion of Si out of the clad layer prior to clad melting, was assessed through parallel DSC and optical microscopy measurements, as well as through the use of a previously developed model. EPMA measurements were also performed to support the other measures. Overall, the same trends were predicted by DSC, microscopy, and the theoretical model; however, the DSC predictions were unable to accurately predict remaining clad thickness prior to melting, even after correcting the data for clad-core interactions. Microscopy measurements showed very good agreement with the model predictions, although there were slight discrepancies at short hold times due to the inability of the model to account for clad loss during heating to the brazing temperature. Further microscopy measurements showed that when the heating rate is set below a critical value, there is a reduction in the clad thickness from the as-received condition.

  10. Optimization of metal-clad waveguide sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, N.; Horvath, R.; Pedersen, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper deals with the optimization of metal-clad waveguides for sensor applications to achieve high sensitivity for adlayer and refractive index measurements. By using the Fresnel reflection coefficients both the angular shift and the width of the resonances in the sensorgrams are taken...... into account. Our optimization shows that it is possible for metal-clad waveguides to achieve a sensitivity improvement of 600% compared to surface-plasmon-resonance sensors....

  11. Failure Mechanisms of SAC/Fe-Ni Solder Joints During Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-Yin; Liu, Zhi-Quan; Li, Cai-Fu

    2017-08-01

    Thermal cycling tests have been conducted on Sn-Ag-Cu/Fe- xNi ( x = 73 wt.% or 45 wt.%) and Sn-Ag-Cu/Cu solder joints according to the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council industrial standard to study their interfacial reliability under thermal stress. The interfacial intermetallic compounds formed for solder joints on Cu, Fe-73Ni, and Fe-45Ni were 4.5 μm, 1.7 μm, and 1.4 μm thick, respectively, after 3000 cycles, demonstrating excellent diffusion barrier effect of Fe-Ni under bump metallization (UBM). Also, two deformation modes, viz. solder extrusion and fatigue crack formation, were observed by scanning electron microscopy and three-dimensional x-ray microscopy. Solder extrusion dominated for solder joints on Cu, while fatigue cracks dominated for solder joints on Fe-45Ni and both modes were detected for those on Fe-73Ni. Solder joints on Fe-Ni presented inferior reliability during thermal cycling compared with those on Cu, with characteristic lifetime of 3441 h, 3190 h, and 1247 h for Cu, Fe-73Ni, and Fe-45Ni UBM, respectively. This degradation of the interfacial reliability for solder joints on Fe-Ni is attributed to the mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at interconnection level. The CTE mismatch at microstructure level was also analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction for clearer identification of recrystallization-related deformation mechanisms.

  12. Modeling and simulation of hydrogen behavior in Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason D. Hales; Various

    2014-09-01

    As a result of corrosion during normal operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium-alloy fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride platelets, which can severely degrade the cladding ductility. Under a heterogeneous temperature distribution, hydrides tend to accumulate in the colder areas, creating local spots of degraded cladding that can favor crack initiation. Therefore, an estimation of the local hydride distribution is necessary to help predict the risk of cladding failure. The hydride distribution is governed by three competing phenomena. Hydrogen in solid solution diffuses under a concentration gradient due to Fick’s law and under a temperature gradient due to the Soret effect. Precipitation of the hydride platelets occurs once the hydrogen solubility limit is reached. A model of these phenomena was implemented in the 3D fuel performance code BISON in order to calculate the hydrogen distribution for arbitrary geometries, such as a nuclear fuel rod, and is now available for BISON users. Simulations have been performed on simple geometries to validate the model and its implementation. The simulations predict that before precipitation occurs, hydrogen tends to accumulate in the colder spots due to the Soret effect. Once the solubility limit is reached, hydrogen precipitates and forms a rim close to the outer edge of the cladding. The simulations also predict that the reactor shut down has little effect on already precipitated hydrides but causes the remaining hydrogen to precipitate homogeneously into hydrides.

  13. Modeling and simulation of hydrogen behavior in Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courty, Olivier, E-mail: o.courty@gmail.com [Pennsylvania State University, 45 Bd Gouvion Saint Cyr, 75017 Paris (France); Motta, Arthur T., E-mail: atm2@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, 227 Reber Building, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hales, Jason D., E-mail: jason.hales@inl.gov [Fuels Modeling and Simulation Department, Idaho National Laboratory (United States)

    2014-09-15

    As a result of corrosion during normal operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium-alloy fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride platelets, which can severely degrade the cladding ductility. Under a heterogeneous temperature distribution, hydrides tend to accumulate in the colder areas, creating local spots of degraded cladding that can favor crack initiation. Therefore, an estimation of the local hydride distribution is necessary to help predict the risk of cladding failure. The hydride distribution is governed by three competing phenomena. Hydrogen in solid solution diffuses under a concentration gradient due to Fick’s law and under a temperature gradient due to the Soret effect. Precipitation of the hydride platelets occurs once the hydrogen solubility limit is reached. A model of these phenomena was implemented in the 3D fuel performance code BISON in order to calculate the hydrogen distribution for arbitrary geometries, such as a nuclear fuel rod, and is now available for BISON users. Simulations have been performed on simple geometries to validate the model and its implementation. The simulations predict that before precipitation occurs, hydrogen tends to accumulate in the colder spots due to the Soret effect. Once the solubility limit is reached, hydrogen precipitates and forms a rim close to the outer edge of the cladding. The simulations also predict that the reactor shut down has little effect on already precipitated hydrides but causes the remaining hydrogen to precipitate homogeneously into hydrides.

  14. Deformation analysis of landslides: progressive failure, rate effects and thermal interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Pérez de Agreda, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the awards, the conference also hosted the First Heim Lecture, delivered by Prof. E. Alonso Evaluating landslide risk and its consequences is hardly achieved by “safety factor” concepts, which essentially rely on static equilibrium concepts and forces. Rather, expected displacements, velocities and accelerations are key magnitudes which help to establish the risk of failure and assist in the management of its consequences. The paper focuses on three key aspects for landslide...

  15. A Mechanistic Study of Failure of Concrete Subjected to Cyclic Thermal Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    34 Theimocouples ........................... 8 Figure 2. Schematic Dilatometer Traces for Wet and Dry Mortar Specimens .................... 9 Figure 3...7 TABLE IV. Shrinkages for Mortars from Dilatometer Experiments ............................. 15 TABLE V. CTE’s for the Mortar Series...type as experienced with AV-8B Harrier aircraft - an explosive spalling failure as it is experienced when concrete is heated too quickly (1,5). During

  16. Processing and characterization of core-clad tellurite glass preforms and fibers fabricated by rotational casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massera, J.; Haldeman, A.; Milanese, D.; Gebavi, H.; Ferraris, M.; Foy, P.; Hawkins, W.; Ballato, J.; Stolen, R.; Petit, L.; Richardson, K.

    2010-03-01

    We report results on the processing and characterization of tellurite-based glass preforms (core and cladding bulk glasses) and fibers within the TeO 2-Bi 2O 3-ZnO glass system. The core-clad fiber has been drawn from a core-clad preform prepared via rotational casting. Using Cu as a tracer to assess interface quality between the core and clad layers, we show excellent cladding layer thickness uniformity across lengths of up to 40 mm in a 65 mm long perform. No measurable diffusion of Cu between the core and the clad has been observed, within the accuracy of measurement, indicating good stability and interface quality during casting of melted glass. Micro-Raman spectroscopy has been used to identify subtle post-draw structural modification induced in the preform following the fiber drawing. These changes have been attributed to modification to the bulk glass' thermal history upon drawing and small scale molecular orientation of chain units within the tellurite glass matrix produced during the fiber drawing process. The resulting fiber was found to have an index step of (0.009 ± 0.002) between the fiber core and clad composition at 632 nm and propagation losses of (3.2 ± 0.1) dB/m at 632 nm and (2.1 ± 0.1) dB/m at 1.5 μm. The primary source of loss in the near-IR (NIR) is associated with residual hydroxyl (OH -) groups in the bulk preform which remain in the glass fiber.

  17. Hydrides reorientation investigation of high burn-up PWR fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valance, Stéphane; Bertsch, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    The direction of formation of hydride in fuel cladding tube is a major issue for the assessment of the cladding remaining ductility after service. This behavior is quite well known for fresh material, but few results exist for irradiated material. The reorientation behavior of a Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding (AREVA duplex DX-D4) at a burn-up of around 72 GWd t-1 is investigated here. The increase of the fraction of reoriented hydrides through repeated thermo-mechanical loading is inspected; as well, the possibility to recover a state with a minimized quantity of reoriented hydrides is tested using pure thermal loading cycles. The study is completed by a qualitative assessment of the hydrogen density in the duplex layer, where a dependence of the hydrides density on the hoop stress state is observed.

  18. Cladding single crystal YAG fibers grown by laser heated pedestal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Subhabrata; Nie, Craig D.; Harrington, James A.; Chick, Theresa; Chakrabarty, Ayan; Trembath-Reichert, Stephen; Chapman, James; Rand, Stephen C.

    2016-03-01

    Rare-earth doped single-crystal (SC) Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) fibers are excellent candidates for high power lasers. These SC fiber optics combine the favorable low Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) gain coefficient and excellent thermal properties to make them an attractive alternative to glass fiber lasers and amplifiers. Various rare-earth doped SC fibers have been grown using the laser heated pedestal growth (LHPG) technique. Several cladding methods, including in-situ and post-growth cladding techniques, are discussed in this paper. A rod-in-tube approach has been used by to grow a fiber with an Erbium doped SC YAG fiber core inserted in a SC YAG tube. The result is a radial gradient in the distribution of rare-earth ions. Post cladding methods include sol-gel deposited polycrystalline.

  19. SiC/SiC Cladding Materials Properties Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Mary A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Singh, Gyanender P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    When a new class of material is considered for a nuclear core structure, the in-pile performance is usually assessed based on multi-physics modeling in coordination with experiments. This report aims to provide data for the mechanical and physical properties and environmental resistance of silicon carbide (SiC) fiber–reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites for use in modeling for their application as accidenttolerant fuel cladding for light water reactors (LWRs). The properties are specific for tube geometry, although many properties can be predicted from planar specimen data. This report presents various properties, including mechanical properties, thermal properties, chemical stability under normal and offnormal operation conditions, hermeticity, and irradiation resistance. Table S.1 summarizes those properties mainly for nuclear-grade SiC/SiC composites fabricated via chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). While most of the important properties are available, this work found that data for the in-pile hydrothermal corrosion resistance of SiC materials and for thermal properties of tube materials are lacking for evaluation of SiC-based cladding for LWR applications.

  20. Novel Accident-Tolerant Fuel Meat and Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert D. Mariani; Pavel G Medvedev; Douglas L Porter; Steven L Hayes; James I. Cole; Xian-Ming Bai

    2013-09-01

    A novel accident-tolerant fuel meat and cladding are here proposed. The fuel meat design incorporates annular fuel with inserts and discs that are fabricated from a material having high thermal conductivity, for example niobium. The inserts are rods or tubes. Discs separate the fuel pellets. Using the BISON fuel performance code it was found that the peak fuel temperature can be lowered by more than 600 degrees C for one set of conditions with niobium metal as the thermal conductor. In addition to improved safety margin, several advantages are expected from the lower temperature such as decreased fission gas release and fuel cracking. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. An enrichment of only 7.5% fully compensates the lost reactivity of the displaced UO2. Slightly higher enrichments, such as 9%, allow uprates and increased burnups to offset the initial costs for retooling. The design has applications for fast reactors and transuranic burning, which may accelerate its development. A zirconium silicide coating is also described for accident tolerant applications. A self-limiting degradation behavior for this coating is expected to produce a glassy, self-healing layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature, with some similarities to MoSi2 and other silicides. Both the fuel and coating may benefit from the existing technology infrastructure and the associated wide expertise for a more rapid development in comparison to other, more novel fuels and cladding.

  1. Interpretation of Simultaneous Mechanical-Electrical-Thermal Failure in a Lithium-Ion Battery Module: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Stock, Mark J.; Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas; Gruchalla, Kenny

    2016-12-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are currently the state-of- the-art power sources for electric vehicles, and their safety behavior when subjected to abuse, such as a mechanical impact, is of critical concern. A coupled mechanical-electrical-thermal model for simulating the behavior of a lithium-ion battery under a mechanical crush has been developed. We present a series of production-quality visualizations to illustrate the complex mechanical and electrical interactions in this model.

  2. A CFD model for analysis of performance, water and thermal distribution, and mechanical related failure in PEM fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive three–dimensional, multi–phase, non-isothermal model of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell that incorporates significant physical processes and key parameters affecting the fuel cell performance. The model construction involves equations derivation, boundary conditions setting, and solution algorithm flow chart. Equations in gas flow channels, gas diffusion layers (GDLs, catalyst layers (CLs, and membrane as well as equations governing cell potential and hygro-thermal stresses are described. The algorithm flow chart starts from input of the desired cell current density, initialization, iteration of the equations solution, and finalizations by calculating the cell potential. In order to analyze performance, water and thermal distribution, and mechanical related failure in the cell, the equations are solved using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD code. Performance analysis includes a performance curve which plots the cell potential (Volt against nominal current density (A/cm2 as well as losses. Velocity vectors of gas and liquid water, liquid water saturation, and water content profile are calculated. Thermal distribution is then calculated together with hygro-thermal stresses and deformation. The CFD model was executed under boundary conditions of 20°C room temperature, 35% relative humidity, and 1 MPA pressure on the lower surface. Parameters values of membrane electrode assembly (MEA and other base conditions are selected. A cell with dimension of 1 mm x 1 mm x 50 mm is used as the object of analysis. The nominal current density of 1.4 A/cm2 is given as the input of the CFD calculation. The results show that the model represents well the performance curve obtained through experiment. Moreover, it can be concluded that the model can help in understanding complex process in the cell which is hard to be studied experimentally, and also provides computer aided tool for design and optimization of PEM

  3. Construction of in-situ creep strain test facility for the SFR fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Heo, Hyeong Min; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Sung Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, in-situ laser inspection creep test machine was developed for the measuring the creep strain of SFR fuel cladding materials. Ferritic-martensitic steels are being considered as an attractive candidate material for a fuel cladding of a SFR due to their low expansion coefficients, high thermal conductivities and excellent irradiation resistances to a void swelling. HT9 steel (12CrMoVW) is initially developed as a material for power plants in Europe in the 1960. This steel has experienced to expose up to 200dpa in FFTE and EBR-II. Ferritic-Martensitic steel's maximum creep strength in existence is 180Mpa for 106 hour 600 .deg., but HT9 steel is 60Mpa. Because SFR is difficult to secure in developing and applying materials, HT9 steel has accumulated validated data and is suitable for SFR component. And also, because of its superior dimensional stability against fast neutron irradiation, Ferritic-martensitic steel of 9Cr and 12Cr steels, such as HT9 and FC92(12Cr-2W) are preferable to utilize in the fuel cladding of an SFR in KAERI. The pressurized thermal creep test of HT9 and FC92 claddings are being conducted in KAERI, but the change of creep strain in cladding is not easy to measure during the creep test due to its pressurized and closed conditions. In this paper, in-situ laser inspection pressurized creep test machine developed for SFR fuel cladding specimens is described. Moreover, the creep strain rate of HT9 at 650 .deg. C was examined from the in-situ laser inspection pressurized creep test machine.

  4. Thermal behavior analysis of PWR fuel during RIA at various fuel burnups using modified theatre code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaz Amjad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fuel irradiation and burnup causes geometrical and dimensional changes in the fuel rod which affects its thermal resistance and ultimately affects the fuel rod behavior during steady-state and transient conditions. The consistent analysis of fuel rod thermal performance is essential for precise evaluation of reactor safety in operational transients and accidents. In this work, analysis of PWR fuel rod thermal performance is carried out under steady-state and transient conditions at different fuel burnups. The analysis is performed by using thermal hydraulic code, THEATRe. The code is modified by adding burnup dependent fuel rod behavior models. The original code uses as-fabricated fuel rod dimensions during steady-state and transient conditions which can be modified to perform more consistent reactor safety analysis. AP1000 reactor is considered as a reference reactor for this analysis. The effect of burnup on steady-state fuel rod parameters has been investigated. For transient analysis, hypothetical reactivity initiated accident was simulated by considering a triangular power pulse of variable pulse height (relative to the full power reactor operating conditions and pulse width at different fuel burnups which corresponds to fresh fuel, low and medium burnup fuels. The effect of power pulse height, pulse width and fuel burnup on fuel rod temperatures has been investigated. The results of reactivity initiated accident analysis show that the fuel failure mechanisms are different for fresh fuel and fuel at different burnup levels. The fuel failure in fresh fuel is expected due to fuel melting as fuel temperature increases with increase in pulse energy (pulse height. However, at relatively higher burnups, the fuel failure is expected due to cladding failure caused by strong pellet clad mechanical interaction, where, the contact pressure increases beyond the cladding yield strength.

  5. Microstructure of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available -steel substrate. A 4.4 kW Rofin DY044 diode pumped Nd:YAG laser coupled to a Kuka KR60L30 articulated arm robot and Precitec YW50 welding head with 300 mm focal length was used. Powder cladding was performed with Praxair Fe211-1 (420), Praxair Fe211-5 (400... dilution, low heat input, less distortion, increased mechanical and corrosion properties excellent repeatability and control of process parameters. Solidification of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel is primarily austenitic. Microstructures...

  6. CLADS analysis deliverables. Volume II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.L.; Frede, W.G.; Schleuter, M.E.; Grant, S.E.; Glass, H.H.; Atkinson, K.C.

    1985-08-01

    The functional specification for the Laboratory Technical Information System is contained in Volumes I and II of the CLADS Analysis Deliverables. This specification is the result of applying Structured Analysis and Information Analysis to the Materials Evaluation Laboratory during the analysis phase of this project. Volume I includes 22 data flow diagrams (DFDs), a complete data dictionary containing data elements, data flows, and dialog definitions. Definitions also are included for 77 automated stores or files. These deliverables comprise the user's functional system specification and will be used as input to subsequent project phases, including software design. Volume II of the CLADS Analysis Deliverables covers Data Flow and Element Definitions.

  7. Prediction of Failure Due to Thermal Aging, Corrosion and Environmental Fracture in Amorphous and Titanium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C

    2003-04-15

    DARPA is exploring a number of advanced materials for military applications, including amorphous metals and titanium-based alloys. Equipment made from these materials can undergo degradation due to thermal aging, uniform corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, denting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, hydrogen induced cracking and microbial influenced corrosion. Amorphous alloys have exceptional resistance to corrosion, due in part to the absence of grain boundaries, but can undergo crystallization and other phase instabilities during heating and welding. Titanium alloys are extremely corrosion resistant due to the formation of a tenacious passive film of titanium oxide, but is prone to hydrogen absorption in crevices, and hydrogen induced cracking after hydrogen absorption. Accurate predictions of equipment reliability, necessary for strategic planning, requires integrated models that account for all relevant modes of attack, and that can make probabilistic predictions. Once developed, model parameters must be determined experimentally, and the validity of models must be established through careful laboratory and field tests. Such validation testing requires state-of-the-art surface analytical techniques, as well as electrochemical and fracture mechanics tests. The interaction between those processes that perturb the local environment on a surface and those that alter metallurgical condition must be integrated in predictive models. The material and environment come together to drive various modes of corrosive attack (Figure 1). Models must be supported through comprehensive materials testing capabilities. Such capabilities are available at LLNL and include: the Long Term Corrosion Test Facility (LTCTF) where large numbers of standard samples can be exposed to realistic test media at several temperature levels; a reverse DC machine that can be used to monitor the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in situ; and banks of potentiostats with

  8. Tensile and burst tests in support of the cadmium safety rod failure evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.K.

    1992-02-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. This report discusses confirmatory separate effects tests conducted to support the evaluation of failures observed in the safety rod thermal tests. As part of the failure evaluation, the potential for liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of the safety rod cladding by cadmium (Cd) -- aluminum (Al) solutions was examined. Based on the test conditions, literature data, and U-Bend tests, its was concluded that the SS304 safety rod cladding would not be subject to LME by liquid Cd-Al solutions under conditions relevant to the safety rod thermal tests or gamma heating accident. To confirm this conclusion, tensile tests on SS304 specimens were performed in both air and liquid Cd-Al solutions with the range of strain rates, temperatures, and loading conditions spanning the range relevant to the safety rod thermal tests and gamma heating accident.

  9. Evaluation of the onset of failure under mechanical and thermal stresses on luting agent for metal-ceramic and metal crowns by finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Agnihotri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term clinical failures of cemented prosthesis depend, to a large extent, on the integrity of the luting agent. The causative factors that lead to microfracture and, hence, failure of the luting agents are the stresses acting inside the oral cavity. Therefore, the present study was designed to develop an understanding of the relationship between stresses in the tooth and the failure potential of the luting agent. Two-dimensional finite element stress analysis was performed on the mandibular second premolar. The behavior of zinc-phosphate and glass-ionomer were studied under different crowns (metal-ceramic and metal crown and loading conditions (mechanical force of 450 N acting vertically over the occlusal surface, thermal loads of 60° and 0°C. It was observed from the study that failure threshold of the luting agent was influenced both by the elastic modulus of the luting agent and by the type of the crown.

  10. Thick tool steel coatings with laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; de Oliveira, U.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; DeHosson, JTM; Brebbia, CA; Nishida, SI

    2007-01-01

    This paper concentrates on thick and crack-free laser clad coatings (up to 3 mm). The coating material is a chromium-molybdenum-tungsten-vanadium alloyed high-speed steel that shows high wear resistance, high compressive strength, good toughness, very good dimensional stability on heat treatment and

  11. Study and Behaviour of Prefabricated Composite Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Avinash, P.; Thiagarajan, N.; Santhi, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    The incessant population rise entailed for an expeditious construction at competitive prices that steered the customary path to the light weight structural components. This lead to construction of structural components using ferrocement. The load bearing structural cladding, sizing 3200x900x100 mm, is chosen for the study, which, is analyzed using the software ABAQUS 6.14 in accordance with the IS:875-87 Part1, IS:875-87 Part2, ACI 549R-97, ACI 318R-08 and NZS:3101-06 Part1 standards. The Ferrocement claddings (FCs) are fabricated to a scaled dimension of 400x115x38 mm. The light weight-high strength phenomena are corroborated by incorporating Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer Laminates (GFRPL) of thickness 6mm, engineered with the aid of hand layup (wet layup) technique wielding epoxy resin, followed by curing under room temperature. The epoxy resin is employed for fastening ferrocement cladding with the Glass fiber reinforced polymer laminate, with the contemporary methodology. The compressive load carrying capacity of the amalgamated assembly, both in presence and absence of Glass Fibre Reinforced polymer laminates (GFRPL) on either side of Ferrocement cladding, has been experimented.

  12. Functionally graded materials with laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; Pei, Y.T.; Brebbia, CA

    2001-01-01

    Al-40 w/o Si functionally graded materials (FGMs) were produced by a onestep laser cladding process on cast Al-alloy substrate as a possible solution for interfacial problems often present in laser coatings. The microstructure of the FGMs consists of a large amount of silicon primary particles

  13. Plasmonic waveguides cladded by hyperbolic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishii, Satoshi; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.

    2014-01-01

    Strongly anisotropic media with hyperbolic dispersion can be used for claddings of plasmonic waveguides (PWs). In order to analyze the fundamental properties of such waveguides, we analytically study 1D waveguides arranged from a hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) in a HMM-Insulator-HMM (HIH) structure...

  14. CLAD/BCLAD Examinations. Test Specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, Sacramento.

    This draft handbook provides descriptions and summaries of the six tests that California elementary and secondary teachers must pass to earn the Crosscultural, Language, and Academic Development (CLAD) or Bilingual, Crosscultural, Language, and Academic Development (BCLAD) certificates. The six tests include: (1) "Language Structure and…

  15. Assembly and Delivery of Rabbit Capsules for Irradiation of Silicon Carbide Cladding Tube Specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Neutron irradiation of silicon carbide (SiC)-based fuel cladding under a high radial heat flux presents a critical challenge for SiC cladding concepts in light water reactors (LWRs). Fission heating in the fuel provides a high heat flux through the cladding, which, combined with the degraded thermal conductivity of SiC under irradiation, results in a large temperature gradient through the thickness of the cladding. The strong temperature dependence of swelling in SiC creates a complex stress profile in SiCbased cladding tubes as a result of differential swelling. The Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Program within the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is supporting research efforts to improve the scientific understanding of the effects of irradiation on SiC cladding tubes. Ultimately, the results of this project will provide experimental validation of multi-physics models for SiC-based fuel cladding during LWR operation. The first objective of this project is to irradiate tube specimens using a previously developed design that allows for irradiation testing of miniature SiC tube specimens subjected to a high radial heat flux. The previous “rabbit” capsule design uses the gamma heating in the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to drive a high heat flux through the cladding tube specimens. A compressible aluminum foil allows for a constant thermal contact conductance between the cladding tubes and the rabbit housing despite swelling of the SiC tubes. To allow separation of the effects of irradiation from those due to differential swelling under a high heat flux, a new design was developed under the NSUF program. This design allows for irradiation of similar SiC cladding tube specimens without a high radial heat flux. This report briefly describes the irradiation experiment design concepts, summarizes the irradiation test matrix, and reports on the successful delivery of six rabbit capsules to the HFIR. Rabbits of both low and high

  16. Evolution of transmission spectra of double cladding fiber during etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Oleg V.; Tian, Fei; Du, Henry

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of optical transmission through a double cladding fiber-optic structure during etching. The structure is formed by a section of SM630 fiber with inner depressed cladding between standard SMF-28 fibers. Its transmission spectrum exhibits two resonance dips at wavelengths where two cladding modes have almost equal propagation constants. We measure transmission spectra with decreasing thickness of the cladding and show that the resonance dips shift to shorter wavelengths, while new dips of lower order modes appear from long wavelength side. We calculate propagation constants of cladding modes and resonance wavelengths, which we compare with the experiment.

  17. Rheology of Prepreg and Properties of Silica/bismaleimide Matrix Copper Clad Laminate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAI Shankai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the silica surface treated by coupling agents KH550, KH560 and KH570 on the rheological properties of bismaleimide (BMI resin system were investigated. The rigidity, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE and thermal stability of the copper clad laminate (CCL were studied by DMA, TMA and TGA. The resin system containing silica surface treated by KH-560, comparing to KH550, KH570 and without surface treatment resin system has better rheological properties and low melt viscosity. The comprehensive properties of the copper clad laminate can be effectively improved by the introduction of silica in the resin system, exhibiting higher storage modulus and lower CTE compare to no silica in the CCL. When the silica mass fraction is 50%, the storage modulus is increased by 83% at 50℃, and the CTE below the glass transition temperature is decreased by 153%.

  18. Research on laser cladding control system based on fuzzy PID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanwei; Yu, Zhengyang

    2017-12-01

    Laser cladding technology has a high demand for control system, and the domestic laser cladding control system mostly uses the traditional PID control algorithm. Therefore, the laser cladding control system has a lot of room for improvement. This feature is suitable for laser cladding technology, Based on fuzzy PID three closed-loop control system, and compared with the conventional PID; At the same time, the laser cladding experiment and friction and wear experiment were carried out under the premise of ensuring the reasonable control system. Experiments show that compared with the conventional PID algorithm in fuzzy the PID algorithm under the surface of the cladding layer is more smooth, the surface roughness increases, and the wear resistance of the cladding layer is also enhanced.

  19. Numerical study to represent non-isothermal melt-crystallization kinetics at laser-powder cladding

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Niziev, VG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available model for direct metal deposition with coaxial powder injection. He et al. [9] used that model for investigation of transport phenomena. Modeling of heat-and-mass transfer during plasma deposition manu- facturing has some similar solutions [10... in plasma torch formation and decreases powder capture efficiency that influences negatively on laser cladding. The effect of fluid motion due to Marangoni forces is modeled by in- troducing an enhanced thermal conductivity factor in the melt pool region...

  20. Processing and Characterization of Polycrystalline Yag (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet) Core-Clad Fibers - Postprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    conductivity; all of which are superior to that of silica -glass fibers. As a consequence, techniques which enable the fabrication of poly- and...clad fiber, ceramic processing 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT: SAR 8. NUMBER OF PAGES 10 19a. NAME OF...scattering threshold, and its high thermal conductivity; all of which are superior to that of silica -glass fibers. As a consequence, techniques which

  1. Fatigue failure kinetics and structural changes in lead-free interconnects due to mechanical and thermal cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Brent Alan

    Environmental and human health concerns drove European parliament to mandate the Reduction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) for electronics. This was enacted in July 2006 and has practically eliminated lead in solder interconnects. There is concern in the electronics packaging community because modern lead-free solder is rich in tin. Presently, near-eutectic tin-silver-copper solders are favored by industry. These solders are stiffer than the lead-tin near-eutectic alloys, have a higher melting temperature, fewer slip systems, and form intermetallic compounds (IMC) with Cu, Ni and Ag, each of which tend to have a negative effect on lifetime. In order to design more reliable interconnects, the experimental observation of cracking mechanisms is necessary for the correct application of existing theories. The goal of this research is to observe the failure modes resulting from mode II strain and to determine the damage mechanisms which describe fatigue failures in 95.5 Sn- 4.0 Ag - 0.5 Cu wt% (SAC405) lead-free solder interconnects. In this work the initiation sites and crack paths were characterized for SAC405 ball-grid array (BGA) interconnects with electroless-nickel immersion-gold (ENIG) pad-finish. The interconnects were arranged in a perimeter array and tested in fully assembled packages. Evaluation methods included monotonic and displacement controlled mechanical shear fatigue tests, and temperature cycling. The specimens were characterized using metallogaphy, including optical and electron microscopy as well as energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and precise real-time electrical resistance structural health monitoring (SHM). In mechanical shear fatigue tests, strain was applied by the substrates, simulating dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between the board and chip-carrier. This type of strain caused cracks to initiate in the soft Sn-rich solder and grow near the interface between the solder and intermetallic compounds (IMC). The growth near

  2. Expert Meeting Report: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation to the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on thestructure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased air tightness and improved water management (Hutcheon 1964, Lstiburek 2007). The intent of the meeting was to review the current state of industry knowledge regarding cladding attachment over exterior insulation with a specific focus on: 1. Gravity load resistance, 2. Wind load resistance. The presentations explorethese topics from an engineering design, laboratory testing, field monitoring, as well as practical construction perspective. By bringing various groups together (who have been conduction research or have experience in this area), a more holistic review of the design limits and current code language proposals can be completed and additional gaps identified. The results of which will help informdesign standards and criteria.

  3. Expert Meeting Report: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation (BSC Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-10-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation to the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased air tightness and improved water management (Hutcheon 1964, Lstiburek 2007). The intent of the meeting was to review the current state of industry knowledge regarding cladding attachment over exterior insulation with a specific focus on: 1. Gravity load resistance, 2. Wind load resistance. The presentations explore these topics from an engineering design, laboratory testing, field monitoring, as well as practical construction perspective. By bringing various groups together (who have been conduction research or have experience in this area), a more holistic review of the design limits and current code language proposals can be completed and additional gaps identified. The results of which will help inform design standards and criteria.

  4. CLADS Analysis Deliverables. Volume I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.L.; Frede, W.G.; Schleuter, M.E.; Grant, S.E.; Glass, H.H.; Atkinson, K.C.

    1985-08-01

    The functional specification for the Laboratory Technical Information System is contained in Volumes I and II of the CLADS Analysis Deliverables. This specification is the result of applying Structured Analysis and Information Analysis to the Materials Evaluation Laboratory during the analysis phase of this project. Volume I includes 22 data flow diagrams (DFDs), a complete data dictionary containing data elements, data flows, and dialog definitions. Definitions also are included for 77 automated stores or files. These deliverables comprise the user's functional system specification and will be used as input to subsequent project phases, including software design. Volume I of the CLADS Analysis Deliverables contains Physical diagrams, Mini Specs, Automated Files, Manual Stores, and Dialog Definitions.

  5. Surface modification techniques for increased corrosion tolerance of zirconium fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, James Patrick, IV

    Corrosion is a major issue in applications involving materials in normal and severe environments, especially when it involves corrosive fluids, high temperatures, and radiation. Left unaddressed, corrosion can lead to catastrophic failures, resulting in economic and environmental liabilities. In nuclear applications, where metals and alloys, such as steel and zirconium, are extensively employed inside and outside of the nuclear reactor, corrosion accelerated by high temperatures, neutron radiation, and corrosive atmospheres, corrosion becomes even more concerning. The objectives of this research are to study and develop surface modification techniques to protect zirconium cladding by the incorporation of a specific barrier coating, and to understand the issues related to the compatibility of the coatings examined in this work. The final goal of this study is to recommend a coating and process that can be scaled-up for the consideration of manufacturing and economic limits. This dissertation study builds on previous accident tolerant fuel cladding research, but is unique in that advanced corrosion methods are tested and considerations for implementation by industry are practiced and discussed. This work will introduce unique studies involving the materials and methods for accident tolerant fuel cladding research by developing, demonstrating, and considering materials and processes for modifying the surface of zircaloy fuel cladding. This innovative research suggests that improvements in the technique to modify the surface of zirconium fuel cladding are likely. Three elements selected for the investigation of their compatibility on zircaloy fuel cladding are aluminum, silicon, and chromium. These materials are also currently being investigated at other labs as alternate alloys and coatings for accident tolerant fuel cladding. This dissertation also investigates the compatibility of these three elements as surface modifiers, by comparing their microstructural and

  6. Investigation of semiconductor clad optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchman, T. E.; Carson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been proposed for fabricating integrated optical devices using semiconductors, lithium niobate, and glasses as waveguides and substrates. The use of glass waveguides and their interaction with thin semiconductor cladding layers was studied. Though the interactions of these multilayer waveguide structures have been analyzed here using glass, they may be applicable to other types of materials as well. The primary reason for using glass is that it provides a simple, inexpensive way to construct waveguides and devices.

  7. Thermal Analysis of a TREAT Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadias, Dionissios [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wright, Arthur E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-07-09

    The objective of this study was to explore options as to reduce peak cladding temperatures despite an increase in peak fuel temperatures. A 3D thermal-hydraulic model for a single TREAT fuel assembly was benchmarked to reproduce results obtained with previous thermal models developed for a TREAT HEU fuel assembly. In exercising this model, and variants thereof depending on the scope of analysis, various options were explored to reduce the peak cladding temperatures.

  8. Alloy development for high burnup cladding (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    An overview on current alloy development for high burnup PWR fuel cladding is given. It is mainly based on literature data. First, the reasons for an increase of the current mean discharge burnup from 35 MWd / kg(U) to 70 MWd / kg(U) are outlined. From the material data, it is shown that a batch average burnup of 60-70 MWd / kg(U), as aimed by many fuel vendors, can not be achieved with stand (=ASTM-) Zry-4 cladding tubes without violating accepted design criteria. Specifically criteria which limit maximum oxide scale thickness and maximum hydrogen content, and to a less degree, maximum creep and growth rate, can not be achieved. The development potential of standard Zry-4 is shown. Even when taking advantage of this potential, it is shown that an 'improved' Zry-4 is reaching its limits when it achieves the target burnup. The behavior of some Zr alloys outside the ASTM range is shown, and the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 alloy groups (ZrSn+transition metals, ZrNb, ZrSnNb+transition metals) which are currently considered to have the development potential for high burnup cladding materials are depicted. Finally, conclusions are drawn. (author). 14 refs., 11 tabs., 82 figs.

  9. Research Progress on Laser Cladding Amorphous Coatings on Metallic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Ming-hui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and property of amorphous alloy as well as the limitations of the traditional manufacturing methods for the bulk amorphous alloy were briefly introduced in this paper.Combined with characteristics of the laser cladding technique,the research status of the laser cladding Fe-based,Zr-based,Ni-based,Cu-based and Al-based amorphous coatings on the metal substrates were mainly summarized.The effects of factors such as laser processing parameter,micro-alloying element type and content and reinforcing phase on the laser cladding amorphous coatings were also involved.Finally,the main problems and the future research directions of the composition design and control of the laser-cladded amorphous coating,the design and optimization of the laser cladding process,and the basic theory of the laser cladding amorphous coatings were also put forward finally.

  10. Synthesis of the Novel MAX Phases for the Future Nuclear Fuel Cladding and Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Hyeok [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taehee; Lee, Taegyu; Ryu, H. J. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    With these properties, the MAX phases are expected to be used for the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) cladding and oxidation/corrosion resistance materials. Especially, the MAX phase can be used for the Gen-IV, SFR and HTGR, component materials which have to possess the thermal and corrosion resistance. The zirconium has been used to the nuclear industry for fuel cladding because of the small thermal neutron cross-section. Zr-based MAX phase was discovered by group Lapauw et al. They observed the Zr{sub 2}AlC and Zr{sub 3}AlC{sub 2} with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and backscattered electron detector. Fabrication of the Zr-containing MAX phase was investigated for nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials applications. A MAX phase with the Zr{sub 3}AlC{sub 2} structure was synthesized by spark plasma sintering of a powder mixture targeting (Zr{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}){sub 4}AlC{sub 3}. The formation of MAX phases was confirmed by XRD and EDS of sintered samples. In the future work, the electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are required to certain analyze the elements composition and formation of the MAX phase.

  11. Reflood experiments in rod bundles with flow blockages due to clad ballooning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S.K.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, B.J.; Park, J.K.; Youn, Y.J.; Choi, H.S.; Song, C.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Clad ballooning and the resulting partial flow blockage are one of the major thermal-hydraulic concerns associated with the coolability of partially blocked cores during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Several in-pile tests have shown that fuel relocation causes a local power accumulation and a high thermal coupling between the clad and fuel debris in the ballooned regions. However, previous experiments in the 1980s did not take into account the fuel relocation phenomena and resulting local power increase in the ballooned regions. The present paper presents the results of systematic investigations on the coolability of rod bundles with flow blockages. The experiments were mainly performed in 5 x 5 rod bundles, 2 x 2 rod bundles and other test facilities. The experiments include a reflood heat transfer, single-phase convective heat transfer, flow redistributions phenomena, and droplet break-up behavior. The effects of the fuel relocation and resulting local power increase were investigated using a 5 x 5 rod bundle. The fuel relocation phenomena increase the peak cladding temperature.

  12. Calibration of a fuel-to-cladding gap conductance model for fast reactor fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.B.

    1978-05-01

    The report presents refined methods for calculation of fuel temperatures in PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuel in Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) fuel pins. Of primary concern is the calculation of the temperature changes across the fuel-to-cladding gap of pins with fuel burnups that range from 60 to 10,900 MWd/MTM (0.006 to 1.12 at.%). Described in particular are: (1) a proposed set of heat transfer formulations and corresponding material properties for modeling radial heat transfer through the fuel and cladding; and (2) the calibration of a fuel-to-cladding gap conductance model, as part of a thermal performance computer code (SIEX-M1) which incorporates the proposed heat transfer expressions, using integral thermal performance data from two unique in-reactor experiments. The test data used are from the HEDL P-19 and P-20 experiments which were irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number Two (EBR-II), for the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL).

  13. Propagation characteristics of a partially metal-clad optical guide: metal-clad optical strip line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Y; Kamiya, T; Yanai, H

    1975-02-01

    Experimental investigations of the partially metal-clad optical guide were performed. The optical guide consisted of a silicon substrate, an SiO(2) low index dielectric layer, an Al(2)O(3) high index dielectric layer, and a partial cladding layer of Al. The far-field patterns of the output beam from the second prism coupler were consistent with the calculated transverse field distributions using the effective index-of-refraction method. The experimental results on the coupling angles, confinement at the curved section, and attenuation constants are also reported.

  14. A Large-scale Finite Element Model on Micromechanical Damage and Failure of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites Including Thermal Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P. F.; Li, X. K.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study micromechanical progressive failure properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites with thermal residual stress by finite element analysis (FEA). Composite microstructures with hexagonal fiber distribution are used for the representative volume element (RVE), where an initial fiber breakage is assumed. Fiber breakage with random fiber strength is predicted using Monte Carlo simulation, progressive matrix damage is predicted by proposing a continuum damage mechanics model and interface failure is simulated using Xu and Needleman's cohesive model. Temperature dependent thermal expansion coefficients for epoxy matrix are used. FEA by developing numerical codes using ANSYS finite element software is divided into two steps: 1. Thermal residual stresses due to mismatch between fiber and matrix are calculated; 2. Longitudinal tensile load is further exerted on the RVE to perform progressive failure analysis of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Numerical convergence is solved by introducing the viscous damping effect properly. The extended Mori-Tanaka method that considers interface debonding is used to get homogenized mechanical responses of composites. Three main results by FEA are obtained: 1. the real-time matrix cracking, fiber breakage and interface debonding with increasing tensile strain is simulated. 2. the stress concentration coefficients on neighbouring fibers near the initial broken fiber and the axial fiber stress distribution along the broken fiber are predicted, compared with the results using the global and local load-sharing models based on the shear-lag theory. 3. the tensile strength of composite by FEA is compared with those by the shear-lag theory and experiments. Finally, the tensile stress-strain curve of composites by FEA is applied to the progressive failure analysis of composite pressure vessel.

  15. Improving Rail Wear and RCF Performance using Laser Cladding

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, S.R.; Fretwell-Smith, S.; Goodwin, P.S.; Smith, L.; Lewis, R.; Aslam, M.; Fletcher, D.I.; Murray, K.; Lambert, R.

    2016-01-01

    Laser cladding has been considered as a method for improving the wear and RCF performance of standard grade rail. This paper presents results of small scale tests carried out to assess the wear and RCF performance of rail which had been laser clad. Using the laser cladding process premium metals can be deposited on to the working surface of standard rail with the aim of enhancing the wear and RCF life of the rail. Various laser clad samples were tested using a twin-disc method. The candidate ...

  16. Causal Analysis For Occurrence Report OR NA-SS-SNL-2000-2015-0005 Unexpected Type of Failure of Thermal Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, Elizabeth H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    On 6/26/2015 at approximately 1445 in 894/136, a pulse thermal battery (approximately the size of a commercial size C cell) experienced an unexpected failure following an electrical performance test that is routinely conducted on thermal batteries. A dedicated tester for this operation was used and it ran the test until the nominal 28-volt output of the battery had dropped to 5 volts, usually indicative of the battery being spent and safe enough to move. The failure occurred while a test operator was transferring the battery from the testing primary containment box to another primary containment box within the same room; initial indications are that the battery experienced an over-pressurization failure which led to the battery's base plate being expelled and the operator receiving a non-recordable injury (bruising to the palm of the hand) from the pressure of the expulsion. The operator was wearing the prescribed PPE (safety glasses and high temperature glove) and was handling the battery appropriately with an open, flat hand. Pictures of the scene are below.

  17. Rheological evaluation of pretreated cladding removal waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.; Chan, M.K.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    Cladding removal waste (CRW) contains concentrations of transuranic (TRU) elements in the 80 to 350 nCi/g range. This waste will require pretreatment before it can be disposed of as glass or grout at Hanford. The CRW will be pretreated with a rare earth strike and solids removal by centrifugation to segregate the TRU fraction from the non-TRU fraction of the waste. The centrifuge centrate will be neutralized with sodium hydroxide. This neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) is expected to be suitable for grouting. The TRU solids removed by centrifugation will be vitrified. The goal of the Rheological Evaluation of Pretreated Cladding Removal Waste Program was to evaluate those rheological and transport properties critical to assuring successful handling of the NCRW and TRU solids streams and to demonstrate transfers in a semi-prototypic pumping environment. This goal was achieved by a combination of laboratory and pilot-scale evaluations. The results obtained during these evaluations were correlated with classical rheological models and scaled-up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The Program used simulated NCRW and TRU solid slurries. Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) provided 150 gallons of simulated CRW and 5 gallons of simulated TRU solid slurry. The simulated CRW was neutralized by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The physical and rheological properties of the NCRW and TRU solid slurries were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCRW allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic or yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The TRU solids slurry contained very few solids. This slurry exhibited the properties associated with a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid.

  18. COMPARISON OF CLADDING CREEP RUPTURE MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Macheret

    2000-06-12

    The objective of this calculation is to compare several creep rupture correlations for use in calculating creep strain accrued by the Zircaloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel when it has been emplaced in the repository. These correlations are used to calculate creep strain values that are then compared to a large set of experimentally measured creep strain data, taken from four different research articles, making it possible to determine the best fitting correlation. The scope of the calculation extends to six different creep rupture correlations.

  19. Preliminary developments of miniplate-type fuel of U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb alloy dispersed and cladded in zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantagalli, Natalia Mattar; Faeda, Kelly Cristina Martins; Braga, Daniel Martins; Paula, Joao Bosco de; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa, E-mail: natalia.cantagalli@prof.una.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear fuel based on uranium metal alloys is utilized in research and test reactors. For the purpose of the reduction of fuel enrichment, high densities of uranium-235 in this kind of fuel are needed. This can be achieved when uranium alloys are used containing elements such as Zr, Mo and Nb. The construction of fuel element with high-uranium density requires materials with low cross sections for neutron absorption, stability under irradiation and thermal cycling, as also absence of the chemical interactions between the fuel and cladding elements. In case of U-Zr-Nb alloys, zircaloy (Zry) cladding is a better option due to the fact that they have a higher chemical compatibility with zirconium alloys when compared with the use of aluminum alloys. This study aims to develop plate type nuclear fuel using the U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb alloy dispersed in Zry. Powders of the U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb alloy were obtained by hydriding-dehydriding process. Uranium alloy and Zry powders were homogenized, compacted in pellets, placed between two Zry plates as a sandwich. This assembly was hot rolled forming the dispersion fuel plate which was characterized by density and microhardness measurements, phases evaluation, grain sizes, pores and precipitates presences. It was observed by visual inspection that the fuel plate showed no failures and a perfect metallurgical bonding. Results obtained by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) show that there is no interaction between the U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb alloy and Zry matrix revealing a fuel with properties of high stability. (author)

  20. Metal clad aramid fibers for aerospace wire and cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarsky, Edward W.; Dunham, Michael G.; Hunt, James E.; Santoleri, E. David; Allen, David B.

    1995-01-01

    High strength light weight metal clad aramid fibers can provide significant weight savings when used to replace conventional metal wire in aerospace cable. An overview of metal clad aramid fiber materials and information on performance and use in braided electrical shielding and signal conductors is provided.

  1. Cladding of Advanced Al Alloys Employing Friction Stir Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stelt, A.A.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an advanced solid state cladding process, based on Friction Stir Welding, is presented. The Friction Surface Cladding (FSC) technology enables the deposition of a solid-state coating using filler material on a substrate with good metallurgical bonding. A relatively soft AA1050 filler

  2. Long-range plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    waveguides. We show that the proposed structures support long-range surface plasmon modes, which exist when the permittivity of the core matches the transverse effective permittivity component of the metamaterial cladding. In this regime, the surface plasmon polaritons of each cladding layer are strongly...

  3. Material Selection for Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Alternative cladding materials to Zr-based alloys are being investigated for accident tolerance, which can be defined as > 100X improvement (compared to Zr-based alloys) in oxidation resistance to steam or steam-H2 environments at ≥ 1200°C for short times. After reviewing a wide range of candidates, current steam oxidation testing is being conducted on Mo, MAX phases and FeCrAl alloys. Recently reported low mass losses for Mo in steam at 800°C could not be reproduced. Both FeCrAl and MAX phase Ti2AlC form a protective alumina scale in steam. However, commercial Ti2AlC that was not single phase, formed a much thicker oxide at 1200°C in steam and significant TiO2, and therefore Ti2AlC may be challenging to form as a cladding or a coating. Alloy development for FeCrAl is seeking to maintain its steam oxidation resistance to 1475°C, while reducing its Cr content to minimize susceptibility to irradiation-assisted α´ formation. The composition effects and critical limits to retaining protective scale formation at > 1400°C are still being evaluated.

  4. Hydride reorientation and its impact on ambient temperature mechanical properties of high burn-up irradiated and unirradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 nuclear fuel cladding with an inner liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzoux, Q.; Bouffioux, P.; Machiels, A.; Yagnik, S.; Bourdiliau, B.; Mallet, C.; Mozzani, N.; Colas, K.

    2017-10-01

    Precipitation of radial hydrides in zirconium-based alloy cladding concomitant with the cooling of spent nuclear fuel during dry storage can potentially compromise cladding integrity during its subsequent handling and transportation. This paper investigates hydride reorientation and its impact on ductility in unirradiated and irradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 cladding with an inner liner (cladding for boiling water reactors) subjected to hydride reorientation treatments. Cooling from 400 °C, hydride reorientation occurs in recrystallized Zircaloy-2 with liner at a lower effective stress in irradiated samples (below 40 MPa) than in unirradiated specimens (between 40 and 80 MPa). Despite significant hydride reorientation, unirradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 with liner cladding containing ∼200 wppm hydrogen shows a high diametral strain at fracture (>15%) during burst tests at ambient temperature. This ductile behavior is due to (1) the lower yield stress of the recrystallized cladding materials in comparison to hydride fracture strength (corrected by the compression stress arising from the precipitation) and (2) the hydride or hydrogen-depleted zone as a result of segregation of hydrogen into the liner layer. In irradiated Zircaloy-2 with liner cladding containing ∼340 wppm hydrogen, the conservation of some ductility during ring tensile tests at ambient temperature after reorientation treatment at 400 °C with cooling rates of ∼60 °C/h is also attributed to the existence of a hydride-depleted zone. Treatments at lower cooling rates (∼6 °C/h and 0.6 °C/h) promote greater levels of hydrogen segregation into the liner and allow for increased irradiation defect annealing, both of which result in a significant increase in ductility. Based on this investigation, given the very low cooling rates typical of dry storage systems, it can be concluded that the thermal transients associated with dry storage should not degrade, and more likely should actually

  5. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  6. Fuel/cladding compatibility of U-10Zr and U-5Fs fuels with advanced alloy cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, E. L.; Porter, D. L.

    1985-05-01

    This study was concerned with the fuel/cladding interaction observed in diffusion couples of U-10 wt % Zr, U-5 wt % Fs fuels with HT-9, T91, D9, and 316 cladding at 650{sup 0}C and U-10 wt % Zr fuel with the cladding materials at 750{sup 0}C (U-5Fs forms a eutectic with these cladding alloys at temperatures just over 700{sup 0}C). The results presented here represent complete qualitative and semiquantitative findings for diffusion couples exposed for 720 hrs along with preliminary results of 2880 h exposures. The most important result of technological importance to IFR feasibility was that U-10 wt % Zr fuel was found to not significantly interact chemically with the cladding alloys. Moreover, energy-dispersive x-ray analyses demonstrated that metallographically observed banding in the fuel near the fuel/cladding interface was not related to chemical interdiffusion, but was related to zirconium migration towards the fuel/cladding interface. The zirconium migration may be related to oxygen availability at this location. The 2880 h samples were consistent with 720 h findings, indicating that essentially no fuel/cladding interdiffusion occurred, but showing additional zirconium migration.

  7. Oxidation investigation of cladding specimens for regular and accident tolerant fuel rods under LOCA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyuk, S. S.; Deryabin, I. A.; Kiselev, D. S.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu A.; Mokrushin, A. A.; Parshin, N. Ya; Popov, E. B.; Soldatkin, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    The high-temperature oxidation tests were carried out for the regular fuel rod claddings specimens made of sponge-based zirconium alloy (E110G) and for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) ones – pure vacuum melted molybdenum (VCPM) and niobium alloy (Nb-1%Zr). The tests were carried out under the ambient pressure p ∼ 0.1 MPa in pure water steam. The experimental data on the oxidation characteristics were obtained for E110G specimens in the temperature range T = 1100 ‑ 1500 °C, that for VCPM and Nb-1%Zr are investigated under extended temperature-duration range (more than 1 hour). The thermal effects of molybdenum (QSMR) and niobium (QSNR) interactions with steam were defined and the derived oxidation rate constants for refractory metals were compared with the known ones. Based on the computations performed with PARAM-TG code the high-temperature oxidation characteristics of model fuel assemblies of large-scale facilities under LOCA conditions with regular and ATF claddings were compared. It was shown that Zr-steam interaction of fuel rod cladding (QSZR) is more intensive compared with VCPM and Nb-1%Zr ones under investigated conditions.

  8. Initial and Long-Term Movement of Cladding Installed Over Exterior Rigid Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P.

    2014-09-01

    Changes in the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) from 2009 to 2012 have resulted in the use of exterior rigid insulation becoming part of the prescriptive code requirements. With more jurisdictions adopting the 2012 IECC builders are going to finding themselves required to incorporate exterior insulation in the construction of their exterior wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location. However, there has been a significant resistance to its widespread implementation due to a lack of research and understanding of the mechanisms involved and potential creep effects of the assembly under the sustained dead load of a cladding. This research was an extension on previous research conducted by BSC in 2011, and 2012. Each year the understanding of the system discrete load component interactions, as well as impacts of environmental loading has increased. The focus of the research was to examine more closely the impacts of screw fastener bending on the total system capacity, effects of thermal expansion and contraction of materials on the compressive forces in the assembly, as well as to analyze a full years worth of cladding movement data from assemblies constructed in an exposed outdoor environment.

  9. Bragg grating induced cladding mode coupling due to asymmetrical index modulation in depressed cladding fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Martin Ole; Grüne-Nielsen, Lars; Soccolich, C.F.

    1998-01-01

    UV-written Bragg gratings find wide spread use as wavelength selective components. In reflection high extinction ratios are routinely obtained. However, coupling to cladding modes gives excess loss on the short wavelength side of the main reflection. Different fiber-designs have been proposed...... to reduce this problem. None of these designs seems to give complete solutions. In particular, the otherwise promising depressed cladding design gives a pronounced coupling to one LP01 mode, this has been referred to as a Ghost grating. To find the modes of the fiber we have established a numerical mode......-solver based on the staircase-approximation method. The Bragg grating causes coupling between the fundamental LP01 mode and higher order LP1p modes that satisfy phase-matching. The coupling strength is determined by the overlap integral of the LP01, the LP1p mode, and the UV-induced index perturbation. For LP0...

  10. Investigations on dry sliding of laser cladded aluminum bronze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freiße Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the tribological behaviour of laser cladded aluminum bronze tool surfaces for dry metal forming. In a first part of this work a process window for cladding aluminum bronze on steel substrate was investigated to ensure a low dilution. Therefore, the cladding speed, the powder feed rate, the laser power and the distance between the process head and the substrate were varied. The target of the second part was to investigate the influence of different process parameters on the tribological behaviour of the cladded tracks. The laser claddings were carried out on both aluminum bronze and cold work tool steel as substrate materials. Two different particle sizes of the cladding powder material were used. The cladding speed was varied and a post-processing laser remelting treatment was applied. It is shown that the tribological behaviour of the surface in a dry oscillating ball-on-plate test is highly dependent on the substrate material. In the third part a deep drawing tool was additively manufactured by direct laser deposition. Furthermore, the tool was applied to form circular cups with and without lubrication.

  11. Influence of texture on fracture toughness of zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, V. [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Andersson, Stefan [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-06-01

    The correlation between texture and fracture toughness of Zircaloy 2 cladding has been investigated in connection with axial cracks in fuel rods. The texture of the cladding determines the anisotropy of plasticity of the cladding which, in turn, should influence the strain conditions at the crack-tip. Plastic strains in the cladding under uniaxial tension were characterised by means of the anisotropy constants F, G and H calculated according to Hill`s theory. Test temperatures between 20 and 300 deg C do not influence the F, G and H values. Any significant effect of hydrogen (about 500 wtppm) on the anisotropy constants F, G and H has not been revealed at a test temperature of 300 deg C. The results, obtained for stress-relieved and recrystallized cladding with different texture, show an obvious influence of texture on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy cladding. A higher fracture toughness has been found for cladding with more radial texture. With a 2 page summary in Swedish. 32 refs, 18 figs.

  12. Bending of pipes with inconel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachpitz, Leonardo; Menezes, Carlos Eduardo B.; Vieira, Carlos R. Tavares [Primus Processamento de Tubos S.A. (PROTUBO), Macae, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The high-frequency induction bending process, using API pipes coated with Inconel 625 reconciled to a mechanical transformation for a higher degree of resistance, was developed through a careful specification and control of the manufacturing parameters and inherent heat treatments. The effects of this technology were investigated by a qualification process consisting of a sequence of tests and acceptance criteria typically required by the offshore industry, and through the obtained results was proved the effectiveness of this entire manufacturing process, without causing interference in the properties and the quality of the inconel cladding, adding a gain of resistance to the base material, guaranteed by the requirements of the API 5L Standard. (author)

  13. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The hot and cold cracking tendencies of some early iron aluminide alloy compositions have limited their use in applications where good weldability is required. Using hot crack testing techniques invented at ORNL, and experimental determinations of preheat and postweld heat treatment needed to avoid cold cracking, we have developed iron aluminide filler metal compositions which can be successfully used to weld overlay clad various substrate materials, including 9Cr-1Mo steel, 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel, and 300-series austenitic stainless steels. Dilution must be carefully controlled to avoid crack-sensitive deposit compositions. The technique used to produce the current filler metal compositions is aspiration-casting, i.e. drawing the liquid from the melt into glass rods. Future development efforts will involve fabrication of composite wires of similar compositions to permit mechanized gas tungsten arc (GTA) and/or gas metal arc (GMA) welding.

  14. Crack resistance curve determination of zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, J.; Alam, A.; Zubler, R

    2009-03-15

    Fracture mechanics properties of fuel claddings are of relevance with respect to fuel rod integrity. The integrity of a fuel rod, in turn, is important for the fuel performance, for the safe handling of fuel rods, for the prevention of leakages and subsequent dissemination of fuel, for the avoidance of unnecessary dose rates, and for safe operation. Different factors can strongly deteriorate the mechanical fuel rod properties: irradiation damage, thermo-mechanical impact, corrosion or hydrogen uptake. To investigate the mechanical properties of fuel rod claddings which are used in Swiss nuclear power plants, PSI has initiated a program for mechanical testing. A major issue was the interaction between specific loading devices and the tested cladding tube, e.g. in the form of bending or friction. Particular for Zircaloy is the hexagonal closed packed structure of the zirconium crystallographic lattice. This structure implies plastic deformation mechanisms with specific, preferred orientations. Further, the manufacturing procedure of Zircaloy claddings induces a specific texture which plays a salient role with respect to the embrittlement by irradiation or integration of hydrogen in the form of hydrides. Both, the induced microstructure as well as the plastic deformation behaviour play a role for the mechanical properties. At PSI, in a first step inactive thin walled Zircaloy tubes and, for comparison reasons, plates were tested. The validity of the mechanical testing of the non standard tube and plate geometries had to be verified. The used Zircaloy-4 cladding tube sections and small plates of the same wall thickness have been notched, fatigue pre-cracked and tensile tested to evaluate the fracture toughness properties at room temperature, 300 {sup o}C and 350 {sup o}C. The crack propagation has been determined optically. The test results of the plates have been further used to validate FEM calculations. For each sample a complete crack resistance (J-R) curve could

  15. Deep-probe metal-clad waveguide biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, Nina; Horvath, Robert; Thinggaard, S.

    2007-01-01

    Two types of metal-clad waveguide biosensors, so-called dip-type and peak-type, are analyzed and tested. Their performances are benchmarked against the well-known surface-plasmon resonance biosensor, showing improved probe characteristics for adlayer thicknesses above 150-200 nm. The dip-type metal......-clad waveguide sensor is shown to be the best all-round alternative to the surface-plasmon resonance biosensor. Both metal-clad waveguides are tested experimentally for cell detection, showing a detection linut of 8-9 cells/mm(2). (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  16. Critical Analysis of Dry Storage Temperature Limits for Zircaloy-Clad Spent Nuclear Fuel Based on Diffusion Controlled Cavity Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, T.A.; Rosen, R.S.; Kassner, M.E.

    1999-12-01

    Interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) rods is of critical concern because a shortage of existing SNF wet storage capacity combined with delays in the availability of a permanent disposal repository has led to an increasing number of SNF rods being placed into interim dry storage. Safe interim dry storage must be maintained for a minimum of twenty years according to the Standard Review Plan for Dry Cask Storage Systems [1] and the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR Part 72 [2]. Interim dry storage licensees must meet certain safety conditions when storing SNF rods to ensure that there is a ''very low probability (e.g. 0.5%) of cladding breach during long-term storage'' [1]. Commercial SNF typically consists of uranium oxide pellets surrounded by a thin cladding. The cladding is usually an {alpha}-zirconium based alloy know as ''Zircaloy''. In dry storage, the SNF rods are confined in one of several types of cask systems approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ''The cask system must be designed to prevent degradation of fuel cladding that results in a type of cladding breach, such as axial-splits or ductile fracture, where irradiated UO{sub 2} particles may be released. In addition, the fuel cladding should not degrade to the point where more than one percent of the fuel rods suffer pinhole or hairline crack type failure under normal storage conditions [1].'' The NRC has approved two models [3,4] for use by proposed dry storage licensees to determine the maximum initial temperature limit for nuclear fuel rods in dry storage that supposedly meet the above criteria and yield consistent temperature limits. Though these two models are based on the same fundamental failure theory, different assumptions have been made including the choice of values for material constants in the failure equation. This report will examine and compare the similarities and inconsistencies of these two models

  17. Effect of Partial Cladding Pattern of Aluminum 7075 T651 on Corrosion and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rendell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion resistance of aluminum 7075 T651 in full clad (Alclad, partial clad, and bare (unclad forms was compared after 300 hours of corrosion exposure in an acidic salt spray cabinet test at 36°C. After corrosion exposure, severe to moderate exfoliation corrosion was observed on the unprotected medium sized test panel, light general corrosion was observed on the partially clad panel, and patches of corrosion not penetrating the clad layer were observed on the fully clad panel. After corrosion tests, the tensile strength of partially clad, fully clad, and unprotected panels decreased by 3.4%, 4.0%, and 5.3%, respectively.

  18. Cleavage fracture of large scale cladded mock-ups. preliminary analyses by the local approach of cleavage fracture; Rupture par clivage de maquettes revetues. Analyse preliminaire par l`approche locale de la rupture par clivage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moinereau, D.; Rousselier, G.; Bethmont, M.

    1993-07-01

    Innocuity of underclad flaws in the reactor pressure vessels regarding the risk of fast fracture must be demonstrated in the French safety analyses, particularly in case of severe overcooling transient. The safety analyses are usually performed with elastic and elasto-plastic analyses taking into account the effect of the stainless steel cladding. A new method called ``the local approach of cleavage fracture`` is considered here. This method allows evaluating the probability of failure of a component submitted to a mechanical or thermal loading. EDF has started a structural integrity verification program including experiments on large size cladded specimens and interpretation of the test results. The purpose of this program is to evaluate the different methods of fracture analysis used in safety studies. Four tests in four point bending have been performed at low temperature on mock-ups containing an underclad crack. In each case, the crack instability is obtained by cleavage fracture is base metal, without crack arrest, at a temperature of about - 170 deg C. The experimental results and the main mechanical analyses are presented in other papers. We present in this paper the preliminary interpretations of the test results using the local approach in cleavage fracture. Each test is interpreted by two-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic computations using the Weibull model with the parameters proposed by FRAMATOME (m = 22, {sigma}{sub u} = 2630 MPa). The probability of failure is evaluated with different meshes in each test. The results show an important effect of the size of the elements near the crack tip and of the Weibull stress {sigma}{sub w} calculation method. The effects are confirmed on a CT specimen. (authors). 11 figs., 7 refs.

  19. Interdiffusion between U-Zr fuel vs selected cladding steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, D. D.; Dayananda, M. A.

    1994-08-01

    To better understand fuel-cladding compatibility issues as affected by diffusion processes in Argonne National Laboratory’s Integral Fast Reactors, interdiffusion studies were carried out with solid-solid diffusion couples assembled with a U-23 at. pct Zr alloy and cladding steels, such as 316, D9, and HT9. All diffusion couples were annealed at 700 °C and examined metallographically and by scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis for diffusion structure development. The development of diffusion layers in the couples for various cladding steels is compared and discussed in light of the relative diffusion behavior of the individual elements, intermetallic formation, and experimental diffusion paths. In the context of fuel-cladding compatibility, HT9 is considered superior to 316 and D9, as it develops the smallest diffusion zone with the fewest number of phases.

  20. High Temperature Steam Corrosion of Cladding for Nuclear Applications: Experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Kevin M; Garnier, John E; Sergey Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff; George W. Griffith; Shannong M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-01-01

    Stability of cladding materials under off-normal conditions is an important issue for the safe operation of light water nuclear reactors. Metals, ceramics, and metal/ceramic composites are being investigated as substitutes for traditional zirconium-based cladding. To support down-selection of these advanced materials and designs, a test apparatus was constructed to study the onset and evolution of cladding oxidation, and deformation behavior of cladding materials, under loss-of-coolant accident scenarios. Preliminary oxidation tests were conducted in dry oxygen and in saturated steam/air environments at 1000OC. Tube samples of Zr-702, Zr-702 reinforced with 1 ply of a ß-SiC CMC overbraid, and sintered a-SiC were tested. Samples were induction heated by coupling to a molybdenum susceptor inside the tubes. The deformation behavior of He-pressurized tubes of Zr-702 and SiC CMC-reinforced Zr-702, heated to rupture, was also examined.

  1. Chalcogenide optical microwires cladded with fluorine-based CYTOP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lizhu; Abdukerim, Nurmemet; Rochette, Martin

    2016-08-22

    We demonstrate optical transmission results of highly nonlinear As2Se3 optical microwires cladded with fluorine-based CYTOP, and compare them with microwires cladded with typical hydrogen-based polymers. In the linear optics regime, the CYTOP-cladded microwire transmits light in the spectral range from 1.3 µm up to >2.5 µm without trace of absorption peaks such as those observed using hydrogen-based polymer claddings. The microwire is also pumped in the nonlinear optics regime, showing multiple-orders of four-wave mixing and supercontinuum generation spanning from 1.0 µm to >4.3 µm. We conclude that with such a broadband transparency and high nonlinearity, the As2Se3-CYTOP microwire is an appealing solution for nonlinear optical processing in the mid-infrared.

  2. A Multi-Scale Modeling of Laser Cladding Process (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cao, J; Choi, J

    2006-01-01

    Laser cladding is an additive manufacturing process that a laser generates a melt-pool on the substrate material while a second material, as a powder or a wire form, is injected into that melt-pool...

  3. Failure analysis of a first stage IN738 gas turbine blade tip cracking in a thermal power plant

    OpenAIRE

    Rani, Sushila; Atul K. Agrawal; Rastogi, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    This research paper deals with the investigation of causes of failure of the first stage gas turbine blade of 30 MW gas turbine having tip cracks at the trailing as well as leading edge. This blade is made of nickel based super alloy IN738LC, having directional solidified grain structure and contains aluminide coating (Pt–Al2) by diffusion process. The main focus of the paper is evaluation of tip crack at the trailing edge and further degradation of blade coating. The investigations included ...

  4. Influence of microstructure modification on the circumferential creep of Zr–Nb–Sn–Fe cladding tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gu Beom; Kim, In Won; Hong, Sun Ig, E-mail: sihong@cnu.ac.kr

    2016-01-15

    Out-of-reactor, non-irradiated thermal creep performances and lives of annealed and stress-relieved Zr-1.02Nb-0.69Sn-0.12Fe cladding tubes were studied and compared. The creep rates of annealed Zr-1.02Nb-0.69Sn-0.12Fe cladding tubes were appreciably slower than those of stress-relieved annealed counterpart. The stress exponent increased slightly from 5.1 to 6.1 in the stress-relieved cladding to 5.3–6.3 in the annealed cladding. The creep activation energy of the annealed Zr-1.02Nb-0.69Sn-0.12Fe alloy (300–330 kJ/mol) was larger compared to that of the stress-relieved alloy (210–260 kJ/mol). The creep activation energy of annealed alloy is close to that of self-diffusion in α-Zr (336 kJ/mol). The smaller activation energy in the stress-relieved alloy is attributed to the increasing contribution of faster diffusion path such as grain boundaries and dislocations. The presence of dislocation arrays with higher dislocation density and smaller grain size in the stress-relived alloy was confirmed by TEM analysis. The creep rupture time increased dramatically in the annealed Zr–1Nb- 0.7Sn-0.1Fe alloy compared to that of stress-relieved alloy, supporting the decrease of creep rate by annealing. The creep life of Zr-1.02Nb-0.69Sn-0.12Fe claddings can be extended through microstructure modification by annealing at intermediate temperatures in which dislocation creep dominates. - Highlights: • Effect of microstructure modification on creep in Zr–Nb–Sn–Fe tubes was studied. • Creep activation energy in annealed tubes was larger than in stress-relieved tubes. • Lower dislocation density in lager grains was observed after creep in annealed tubes. • Larson–Miller parameter of annealed tube was larger than that of stress-relieved one. • Creep life of tubes was extended through microstructure modification by annealing.

  5. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO2 and/or H2S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  6. An investigation of FeCrAl cladding behavior under normal operating and loss of coolant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, K. A.; Barani, T.; Pizzocri, D.; Hales, J. D.; Terrani, K. A.; Pastore, G.

    2017-08-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are candidates to be used as nuclear fuel cladding for increased accident tolerance. An analysis of the response of FeCrAl under normal operating and loss of coolant conditions has been performed using fuel performance modeling. In particular, recent information on FeCrAl material properties and phenomena from separate effects tests has been implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and analyses of integral fuel rod behavior with FeCrAl cladding have been performed. BISON simulations included both light water reactor normal operation and loss-of-coolant accidental transients. In order to model fuel rod behavior during accidents, a cladding failure criterion is desirable. For FeCrAl alloys, a failure criterion is developed using recent burst experiments under loss of coolant like conditions. The added material models are utilized to perform comparative studies with Zircaloy-4 under normal operating conditions and oxidizing and non-oxidizing out-of-pile loss of coolant conditions. The results indicate that for all conditions studied, FeCrAl behaves similarly to Zircaloy-4 with the exception of improved oxidation performance. Further experiments are required to confirm these observations.

  7. Uranium and cesium diffusion in fuel cladding of electrogenerating channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, I. V.; Ivanov, A. S.; Churin, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    The results of reactor tests of a carbonitride fuel in a single-crystal cladding from a molybdenum-based alloy can be used in substantiating the operational reliability of fuels in developing a project of a megawatt space nuclear power plant. The results of experimental studies of uranium and cesium penetration into the single-crystal cladding of fuel elements with a carbonitride fuel are interpreted. Those fuel elements passed nuclear power tests in the Ya-82 pilot plant for 8300 h at a temperature of about 1500°C. It is shown that the diffusion coefficients for uranium diffusion into the cladding are virtually coincident with the diffusion coefficients measured earlier for uranium diffusion into polycrystalline molybdenum. It is found that the penetration of uranium into the cladding is likely to occur only in the case of a direct contact between the cladding and fuel. The experimentally observed nonmonotonic uranium-concentration profiles are explained in terms of predominant uranium diffusion along grain boundaries. It is shown that a substantially nonmonotonic behavior observed in our experiment for the uranium-concentration profile may be explained by the presence of a polycrystalline structure of the cladding in the surface region from its inner side. The diffusion coefficient is estimated for the grain-boundary diffusion of uranium. The diffusion coefficients for cesium are estimated on the basis of experimental data obtained in the present study.

  8. Failure analysis of a first stage IN738 gas turbine blade tip cracking in a thermal power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushila Rani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research paper deals with the investigation of causes of failure of the first stage gas turbine blade of 30 MW gas turbine having tip cracks at the trailing as well as leading edge. This blade is made of nickel based super alloy IN738LC, having directional solidified grain structure and contains aluminide coating (Pt–Al2 by diffusion process. The main focus of the paper is evaluation of tip crack at the trailing edge and further degradation of blade coating. The investigations included the visual observations, material composition analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. During examination of the failed blade, it is found that the blade surface is completely degraded due to overheating. Corrosion pits are formed on the blade surface, these pits act as a notch to produce stress concentrations and cracks is initiated due to fatigue which further propagate due to hot corrosion. It is also reported that the Al-Pt coating is completely degraded, heavily oxidized. From these investigations, it is concluded that the failure of gas turbine blade takes place due to the combined effect of surface degradation caused by overheating, oxidation, hot corrosion and degradation of coating heavily oxidized.

  9. The effect of particle size on the heat affected zone during laser cladding of Ni-Cr-Si-B alloy on C45 carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Daichi; Abe, Nobuyuki; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yoshihiko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Tatsumi, Yoshihiro; Yoneyama, Mikio

    2018-02-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most useful surface coating methods for improving the wear and corrosion resistance of material surfaces. Although the heat input associated with laser cladding is small, a heat affected zone (HAZ) is still generated within the substrate because this is a thermal process. In order to reduce the area of the HAZ, the heat input must therefore be reduced. In the present study, we examined the effects of the powdered raw material particle size on the heat input and the extent of the HAZ during powder bed laser cladding. Ni-Cr-Si-B alloy layers were produced on C45 carbon steel substrates in conjunction with alloy powders having average particle sizes of 30, 40 and 55 μm, while measuring the HAZ area by optical microscopy. The heat input required for layer formation was found to decrease as smaller particles were used, such that the HAZ area was also reduced.

  10. A one-dimensional analysis of the distribution of temperature, stress and strain in the co-axial laser cladding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanna, Nusrat; Crouch, Roger; Naher, Sumsun

    2017-10-01

    The co-axial Laser Cladding (LC) is one of the most advanced surface treatment processes where generally a superior powder or wire material is deposited on the substrate to improve surface properties by using laser heat source. In this work, a physical model of the clad and the substrate has been presented. An attempt has been made to describe the simplified relation of temperature, stress and strain with time by using the established theoretical knowledge of generation of stress and strain after thermal treatment. The simplified relation of temperature, stress and strain with time has been explained with the help of schematic diagrams. The finding of this study will help to understand the temperature, stress and strain behaviour with time in the Laser Cladding process.

  11. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  12. Joule heating induced thermomigration failure in un-powered microbumps due to thermal crosstalk in 2.5D IC technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Menglu; Tu, K. N., E-mail: kntu@ucla.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095-1595 (United States); Kim, Dong Wook; Gu, Sam [Qualcomm, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; Barnard, Harold [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-08-21

    Thermal-crosstalk induced thermomigration failure in un-powered microbumps has been found in 2.5D integrated circuit (IC) circuit. In 2.5D IC, a Si interposer was used between a polymer substrate and a device chip which has transistors. The interposer has no transistors. If transistors are added to the interposer chip, it becomes 3D IC. In our test structure, there are two Si chips placed horizontally on a Si interposer. The vertical connections between the interposer and the Si chips are through microbumps. We powered one daisy chain of the microbumps under one Si chip; however, the un-powered microbumps in the neighboring chip are failed with big holes in the solder layer. We find that Joule heating from the powered microbumps is transferred horizontally to the bottom of the neighboring un-powered microbumps, and creates a large temperature gradient, in the order of 1000 °C/cm, through the un-powered microbumps in the neighboring chip, so the latter failed by thermomigration. In addition, we used synchrotron radiation tomography to compare three sets of microbumps in the test structure: microbumps under electromigration, microbumps under thermomigration, and microbumps under a constant temperature thermal annealing. The results show that the microbumps under thermomigration have the largest damage. Furthermore, simulation of temperature distribution in the test structure supports the finding of thermomigration.

  13. Weld residual stresses near the bimetallic interface in clad RPV steel: A comparison between deep-hole drilling and neutron diffraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, M.N., E-mail: mjames@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Marine Science and Engineering, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Newby, M.; Doubell, P. [Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd, Lower Germiston Road, Rosherville, Johannesburg (South Africa); Hattingh, D.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Serasli, K.; Smith, D.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Queen' s Building, University Walk, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Identification of residual stress trends across bimetallic interface in stainless clad RPV. • Comparison between deep hole drilling (DHD – stress components in two directions) and neutron diffraction (ND – stress components in three directions). • Results indicate that both techniques can assess the trends in residual stress across the interface. • Neutron diffraction gives more detailed information on transient residual stress peaks. - Abstract: The inner surface of ferritic steel reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is clad with strip welded austenitic stainless steel primarily to increase the long-term corrosion resistance of the ferritic vessel. The strip welding process used in the cladding operation induces significant residual stresses in the clad layer and in the RPV steel substrate, arising both from the thermal cycle and from the very different thermal and mechanical properties of the austenitic clad layer and the ferritic RPV steel. This work measures residual stresses using the deep hole drilling (DHD) and neutron diffraction (ND) techniques and compares residual stress data obtained by the two methods in a stainless clad coupon of A533B Class 2 steel. The results give confidence that both techniques are capable of assessing the trends in residual stresses, and their magnitudes. Significant differences are that the ND data shows greater values of the tensile stress peaks (∼100 MPa) than the DHD data but has a higher systematic error associated with it. The stress peaks are sharper with the ND technique and also differ in spatial position by around 1 mm compared with the DHD technique.

  14. Revitalization of Lightweight Cladding of Buildings and Its Impact on Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liška, Pavel; Nečasová, Barbora; Kovářová, Barbora; Novotný, Michal

    2017-12-01

    The presented study reveals that the revitalization of lightweight claddings installed before 1990 can have a positive impact on the environment and on the reduction of greenhouse gases in particular. The main focus is placed on the revitalization of a structural system known as OD-001, commonly called the ‘Boleticky panel’ system, which was frequently utilised all around the Czech Republic in the period before 1990. Only revitalization methods utilizing contemporary structural designs and current materials were verified during this study. The ‘Boleticky panel’ system was the type of façade cladding most frequently installed on administrative buildings in what was then Czechoslovakia. It is a panel system where load-bearing structure of the panel itself consists of closed profiles that are suspended from the building’s load-bearing structure. This type of system saw a great deal of use for more than 20 years. From today’s point of view, its thermal and technical properties are completely unsatisfactory and the gradual structural degradation of such systems, with a direct impact on their mechanical resistance, has been monitored over the last few years. However, these defects can be completely eliminated by the selection of a suitable type of revitalization. Cladding revitalization can be divided into three main categories. Each category represents a different level of impact on the structure of the above described cladding system. The first category only involves the replacement of windows, while the second consists in the replacement both of the windows and the existing panel sections. The third category of revitalization entails the complete removal of the existing cladding system and its replacement with a new one. The Life Cycle Assessment method (LCA) was used for environmental impact assessment. The aims and intentions of this method are not to search for the most economical or technically perfect product, service or technology, but to find the

  15. Sensitivity analysis of FeCrAl cladding and U3Si2 fuel under accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this milestone report is to highlight the results of sensitivity analyses performed on two accident tol- erant fuel concepts: U3Si2 fuel and FeCrAl cladding. The BISON fuel performance code under development at Idaho National Laboratory was coupled to Sandia National Laboratories’ DAKOTA software to perform the sensitivity analyses. Both Loss of Coolant (LOCA) and Station blackout (SBO) scenarios were analyzed using main effects studies. The results indicate that for FeCrAl cladding the input parameters with greatest influence on the output metrics of interest (fuel centerline temperature and cladding hoop strain) during the LOCA were the isotropic swelling and fuel enrichment. For U3Si2 the important inputs were found to be the intergranular diffusion coefficient, specific heat, and fuel thermal conductivity. For the SBO scenario, Young’s modulus was found to be influential in FeCrAl in addition to the isotropic swelling and fuel enrichment. Contrarily to the LOCA case, the specific heat of U3Si2 was found to have no effect during the SBO. The intergranular diffusion coefficient and fuel thermal conductivity were still found to be of importance. The results of the sensitivity analyses have identified areas where further research is required including fission gas behavior in U3Si2 and irradiation swelling in FeCrAl. Moreover, the results highlight the need to perform the sensitivity analyses on full length fuel rods for SBO scenarios.

  16. Neutronic Analysis on Potential Accident Tolerant Fuel-Cladding Combination U3Si2-FeCrAl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengli Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutronic performance is investigated for a potential accident tolerant fuel (ATF, which consists of U3Si2 fuel and FeCrAl cladding. In comparison with current UO2-Zr system, FeCrAl has a better oxidation resistance but a larger thermal neutron absorption cross section. U3Si2 has a higher thermal conductivity and a higher uranium density, which can compensate the reactivity suppressed by FeCrAl. Based on neutronic investigations, a possible U3Si2-FeCrAl fuel-cladding system is taken into consideration. Fundamental properties of the suggested fuel-cladding combination are investigated in a fuel assembly. These properties include moderator and fuel temperature coefficients, control rods worth, radial power distribution (in a fuel rod, and different void reactivity coefficients. The present work proves that the new combination has less reactivity variation during its service lifetime. Although, compared with the current system, it has a little larger deviation on power distribution and a little less negative temperature coefficient and void reactivity coefficient and its control rods worth is less important, variations of these parameters are less important during the service lifetime of fuel. Hence, U3Si2-FeCrAl system is a potential ATF candidate from a neutronic view.

  17. Metallography and fuel cladding chemical interaction in fast flux test facility irradiated metallic U-10Zr MFF-3 and MFF-5 fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W. J.; Chichester, H. M.; Porter, D. L.; Wootan, D. W.

    2016-05-01

    Abstract The Mechanistic Fuel Failure (MFF) series of metal fuel irradiations conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) provides an important potential comparison between data generated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) and that expected in a larger-scale fast reactor. The irradiations were the beginning tests to qualify U-10wt%Zr as a driver fuel for FFTF. The FFTF core, with a 91.4 cm tall fuel column and a chopped cosine neutron flux profile, operated with a peak cladding temperature at the top of the fuel column, but developed peak burnup at the centerline of the core. This places the peak fuel temperature midway between the core center and the top of fuel, lower in the fuel column than in previous EBR-II experiments that had a 32-cm height core. The MFF-3 and MFF-5 qualification assemblies operated in FFTF to >10 at% burnup, and performed very well with no cladding breaches. The MFF-3 assembly operated to 13.8 at% burnup with a peak inner cladding temperature of 643°C, and the MFF-5 assembly operated to 10.1 at% burnup with a peak inner cladding temperature of 651°C. Because of the very high operating temperatures for both the fuel and the cladding, data from the MFF assemblies are most comparable to the data obtained from the EBR-II X447 experiment, which experienced two pin breaches. The X447 breaches were strongly influenced by a large amount of fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). The MFF pins benefitted from different axial locations of high burnup and peak cladding temperature, which helped to reduce interdiffusion between rare earth fission products and stainless steel cladding. Post-irradiation examination evidence illustrates this advantage. Comparing other performance data of the long MFF pins to prior EBR-II test data, the MFF fuel inside the cladding grew less axially, and the gas release data did not reveal a definitive difference.

  18. Development of advanced LWR fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H. [and others

    2000-04-01

    This report describes the results from evaluating the preliminary Zr-based alloys to develop the advanced Zr-based alloys for the nuclear fuel claddings, which should have good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties at high burn-up over 70,000MWD/MTU. It also includes the results from the basic studies for optimizing the processes which are involved in the development of the advanced Zr-based alloys. Ten(10) kinds of candidates for the alloys of which performance is over that of the existing Zircaloy-4 or ZIRLO alloy were selected out of the preliminary alloys of 150 kinds which were newly designed and repeatedly manufactured and evaluated to find out the promising alloys. First of all, the corrosion tests on the preliminary alloys were carried out to evaluate their performance in both pure water and LiOH solution at 360 deg C and in steam at 400 deg C. The tensile tests were performed on the alloys which proved to be good in the corrosion resistance. The creep behaviors were tested at 400 deg C for 10 days with the application of constant load on the samples which showed good performance in the corrosion resistance and tensile properties. The effect of the final heat treatment and A-parameters as well as Sn or Nb on the corrosion resistance, tensile properties, hardness, microstructures of the alloys was evaluated for some alloys interested. The other basic researches on the oxides, electrochemical properties, corrosion mechanism, and the establishment of the phase diagrams of some alloys were also carried out.

  19. Performance and failure analysis of concentrator solar cells after intensive stressing with thermal, electrical, and combined load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltermann, Fabian; Ziegler, Lisa; Wiesenfarth, Maike; Wilde, Jürgen; Bett, Andreas W.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we investigated the impact of intensive heat loads on concentrator solar cells assemblies. As test samples, we employed lattice-matched and lattice-mismatched triple-junction solar cells made of GaInP/GaInAs/Ge. The thermal loads were induced by different manners. We used drying cabinets, external power supplies, and a combination of both to achieve maximum test temperatures of 180 °C. For the performance analysis, we utilized flash light solar simulators and an electroluminescence (EL) imaging tool. Our experiments revealed a significant difference depending on the applied manner of heating. The highest impact was observed for the pure heat treatment in drying cabinets. This was particularly visible in the spatial EL images, but also in the IV curves. In contrast, running the concentrator solar cells as forward-biased diodes using an external current supply of 2000 mA, which corresponds to 2000 suns, did not lead to any significant changes in EL and IV curves. However, deformation of the front metallization was observed. In conclusion, pure heat treatment can be considered as a cost-efficient alternative to pinpoint weak points in solar cell receivers.

  20. POST CRITICAL HEAT TRANSFER AND FUEL CLADDING OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Caha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of heat transfer coefficient in the post critical heat flux region in nuclear reactor safety is very important. Although the nuclear reactors normally operate at conditions where critical heat flux (CHF is not reached, accidents where dryout occur are possible. Most serious postulated accidents are a loss of coolant accident or reactivity initiated accident which can lead to CHF or post CHF conditions and possible disruption of core integrity. Moreover, this is also influenced by an oxide layer on the cladding surface. The paper deals with the study of mathematical models and correlations used for heat transfer calculation, especially in post dryout region, and fuel cladding oxidation kinetics of currently operated nuclear reactors. The study is focused on increasing of accuracy and reliability of safety limit calculations (e.g. DNBR or fuel cladding temperature. The paper presents coupled code which was developed for the solution of forced convection flow in heated channel and oxidation of fuel cladding. The code is capable of calculating temperature distribution in the coolant, cladding and fuel and also the thickness of an oxide layer.

  1. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    This interim report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for coating large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for coating inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. The final project report will feature an experimental evaluation of the performance of the two selected cladding techniques.

  2. IN-PILE PERFORMANCE OF HANA CLADDING TESTED IN HALDEN REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HYUN-GIL KIM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An in-pile performance test of HANA claddings was conducted at up to 67 GWD/MTU in the Halden research reactor in Norway over a 6.5 year period. Four types of HANA claddings (HANA-3, HANA-4, HANA-5, and HANA-6 and a reference Zircaloy-4 cladding were used for the in-pile test. The evaluation parameters of the HANA claddings were the corrosion behavior, dimensional changes, hydrogen uptake, and tensile strength after the claddings were tested under the simulated operation conditions of a Korean commercial reactor. The oxide thickness ranged from 15 to 37 mm at a high flux region in the test rods, and all HANA claddings showed corrosion resistance superior to the Zircaloy-4 cladding. The creep-down rate of all HANA claddings was lower than that of the Zircaloy-4 cladding. In addition, the hydrogen content of the HANA claddings ranged from 54 to 96 wppm at the high heat flux region of the test rods, whereas the hydrogen content of the Zircaloy-4 cladding was 119 wppm. The tensile strength of the HANA and Zircaloy-4 claddings was similarly increased when compared to the un-irradiated claddings owing to the radiation-induced hardening.

  3. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanical performance of fuel rods of a BWR during a power ramp using the FUELSIM code; Evaluacion del desempeno termomecanico de barras de combustible de un reactor BWR durante una rampa de potencia utilizando el codigo FUELSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R.

    2010-07-01

    To avoid the risk to environment due to release of radioactive material, because of occurrence of an accident, it is the priority of the design and performance of the diverse systems of safety of a commercial nuclear power plant. The safety of nuclear power plants requires, therefore, monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behavior under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. The main application of the thermal-mechanical analysis codes is the prediction of occurrence of conditions and/or phenomena that could lead to the deterioration or even mechanical failure of the fuel rod cladding, as, for example, the pellet-cladding interaction. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, fuel preconditioning operations refer to the operational procedures employed to reduce the fuel rod failure probability due to fuel-cladding interaction, specially during reactor startup. Preconditioning simulations are therefore necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR 5/6, as those two nuclear reactors in Laguna Verde, Veracruz, is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with an array 8 x 8

  4. Flux Density through Guides with Microstructured Twisted Clad DB Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Baqir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the study of flux density through a newly proposed twisted clad guide containing DB medium. The inner core and the outer clad sections are usual dielectrics, and the introduced twisted windings at the core-clad interface are treated under DB boundary conditions. The pitch angle of twist is supposed to greatly contribute towards the control over the dispersion characteristics of the guide. The eigenvalue equation for the guiding structure is deduced, and the analytical investigations are made to explore the propagation patterns of flux densities corresponding to the sustained low-order hybrid modes under the situation of varying pitch angles. The emphasis has been put on the effects due to the DB twisted pitch on the propagation of energy flux density through the guide.

  5. Chemical Dissolution of Simulant FCA Cladding and Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pierce, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has received some fast critical assembly (FCA) fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for disposition. Among the JAEA FCA fuel are approximately 7090 rectangular Stainless Steel clad fuel elements. Each element has an internal Pu-10.6Al alloy metal wafer. The thickness of each element is either 1/16 inch or 1/32 inch. The dimensions of each element ranges from 2 inches x 1 inch to 2 inches x 4 inches. This report discusses the potential chemical dissolution of the FCA clad material or stainless steel. This technology uses nitric acid-potassium fluoride (HNO3-KF) flowsheets of H-Canyon to dissolve the FCA elements from a rack of materials. Historically, dissolution flowsheets have aimed to maximize Pu dissolution rates while minimizing stainless steel dissolution (corrosion) rates. Because the FCA cladding is made of stainless steel, this work sought to accelerate stainless steel dissolution.

  6. A new cladding embrittlement criterion derived from ring compression tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herb, Joachim, E-mail: Joachim.Herb@grs.de; Sievers, Jürgen, E-mail: Juergen.Sievers@grs.de; Sonnenburg, Heinz-Günther, E-mail: Heinz-Guenther.Sonnenburg@grs.de

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Using FEM it was possible to simulate measured ring compression test data. • The FEM provides burst stresses from Zry-4, M5 and ZIRLO cladding. • The ratio of burst stresses to yield stresses was correlated. • The ratio depends linearly on the state of oxidation and hydriding. • The ratio of stresses at unity can be applied as embrittlement criterion. - Abstract: It is of regulatory interest to prevent the breaking of fuel rods in LOCA transients. In current regulations this is accomplished by limiting the oxidation during LOCA to such an extent that still some residual ductility is preserved in the fuel rod cladding. The current oxidation limit in German as well as in US regulations is set to 17% ECR (Equivalent Cladding Reacted) which aims at maintaining a residual ductility for oxidized claddings. Recent ANL tests have shown that the combination of both oxidation and additionally hydrogen up-take affects the transition to zero-ductility. Furthermore, the oxidation during LOCA transient is accompanied by a significant up-take of hydrogen (secondary hydriding) if the fuel rod bursts during this transient. This secondary hydriding affects the cladding in the vicinity of the burst opening. These findings necessitate a new criterion for preserving cladding's strength. This paper describes a method how to derive a criterion which assures the required residual mechanical strength of the cladding for LOCA transients. This method utilizes the experimental results of 102 ring compression tests (RCT) conducted at ANL and KIT. RCTs of various cladding materials, oxidation levels and hydrogen content were considered. The basic approach was to compare the RCT test data with finite element analyses using the code ADINA. Starting with the cladding oxidation model of Leistikov, both the layer structure of the cladding and the distribution of the oxygen among these layers were determined. The mechanical properties of these layers were taken from

  7. Complete Non-Radioactive Operability Tests for Cladding Hull Chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Emory D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Jared A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hylton, Tom D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brunson, Ronald Ray [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunt, Rodney Dale [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bradley, Eric Craig [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Non-radioactive operability tests were made to test the metal chlorination reactor and condenser and their accessories using batch chlorinations of non-radioactive cladding samples and to identify optimum operating practices and components that need further modifications prior to installation of the equipment into the hot cell for tests on actual used nuclear fuel (UNF) cladding. The operability tests included (1) modifications to provide the desired heating and reactor temperature profile; and (2) three batch chlorination tests using, respectively, 100, 250, and 500 g of cladding. During the batch chlorinations, metal corrosion of the equipment was assessed, pressurization of the gas inlet was examined and the best method for maintaining solid salt product transfer through the condenser was determined. Also, additional accessing equipment for collection of residual ash and positioning of the unit within the hot cell were identified, designed, and are being fabricated.

  8. Characterization Of Cladding Hull Wastes From Used Nuclear Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang K.H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Used cladding hulls from pressurized water reactor (PWR are characterized to provide useful information for the treatment and disposal of cladding hull wastes. The radioactivity and the mass of gamma emitting nuclides increases with an increase in the fuel burn-up and their removal ratios are found to be more than 99 wt.% except Co-60 and Cs-137. In the result of measuring the concentrations of U and Pu included in the cladding hull wastes, most of the residues are remained on the surface and the removal ratio of U and Pu are revealed to be over 99.98 wt.% for the fuel burn-up of 35,000 MWd/tU. An electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA line scanning shows that radioactive fission products are penetrated into the Zr oxide layer, which is proportional to the fuel burn-up. The oxidative decladding process exhibits more efficient removal ratio of radionuclides.

  9. Low-Stress Silicon Cladding for Surface Finishing Large UVOIR Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I research, ZeCoat Corporation demonstrated a low-stress silicon cladding process for surface finishing large UVOIR mirrors. A polishable cladding is...

  10. In-situ crack repair by laser cladding

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available . Successful sealing of simulated cracks was achieved under extreme conditions. Not only was water squirting out occasionally, but water was continually running down the peened crack to the weld pool. Laser cladding was shown to be a robust process under... to the simulated crack prior to the cladding of the first layer to avoid excessive water squirting out. Adequate laser power is required to ensure proper fusion into the base material due to water squirting out of the crack adjacent to the weld pool. As a...

  11. Irradiation experience with HT9-clad metallic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.

    1991-12-31

    the safe and reliable performance of metallic fuel is currently under study and demonstration in the Integral Fast Reactor program. In-reactor tests of HT9-clad metallic fuel have now reached maturity and have all shown good performance characteristics to burnups exceeding 17.5 at. % in the lead assembly. Because this low-swelling tempered martensitic alloy is the cladding of choice for high fluence applications, the experimental observations and performance modelling efforts reported in this paper play an important role in demonstrating reliability.

  12. Initial and Long-Term Movement of Cladding Installed Over Exterior Rigid Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Peter [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Changes in the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) from 2009 to 2012 have resulted in the use of exterior rigid insulation becoming part of the prescriptive code requirements. With more jurisdictions adopting the 2012 IECC builders will be required to incorporate exterior insulation in the construction of their exterior wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location. This research was an extension on previous research conducted by Building Science Corporation in 2011, and 2012. Each year the understanding of the system discrete load component interactions, as well as impacts of environmental loading, has increased. The focus of the research was to examine more closely the impacts of screw fastener bending on the total system capacity, effects of thermal expansion and contraction of materials on the compressive forces in the assembly, as well as to analyze a full year’s worth of cladding movement data from assemblies constructed in an exposed outdoor environment.

  13. Selective laser processing of ink-jet printed nano-scaled tin-clad copper particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung, K.C.; Plura, T.S. [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2010-11-15

    The deposition of tin-clad nano-size copper particles was carried out by means of ink-jet printing. Curing the particles on Polyimide (PI) turned them into soldered structures using an Nd-YAG laser. Area coverage of 55% was achieved for a single-layer print. Subsequent laser sintering increased this value to 95%. A Butanol-based copper ink and an aqueous tin (Sn)-clad Copper (Cu) ink were produced and were ink-jetted in this work. These nano-metallic inks showed excellent suspension stability with particle weight concentrations as high as 5%. The ink components were examined by measuring the particle size distribution in a dispersed condition, and the melting temperature. A piezo ink-jet print head was used to deposit the inks onto a moveable substrate. The thermal effect of the laser irradiation allowed approaching and connecting adjacent particles by melting the particle's tin coating. The results were examined with regard to structure and soldering properties using EDX, SEM and optical microscopy. (orig.)

  14. Selective laser processing of ink-jet printed nano-scaled tin-clad copper particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, K. C.; Plura, T. S.

    2010-11-01

    The deposition of tin-clad nano-size copper particles was carried out by means of ink-jet printing. Curing the particles on Polyimide (PI) turned them into soldered structures using an Nd-YAG laser. Area coverage of 55% was achieved for a single-layer print. Subsequent laser sintering increased this value to 95%. A Butanol-based copper ink and an aqueous tin (Sn)-clad Copper (Cu) ink were produced and were ink-jetted in this work. These nano-metallic inks showed excellent suspension stability with particle weight concentrations as high as 5%. The ink components were examined by measuring the particle size distribution in a dispersed condition, and the melting temperature. A piezo ink-jet print head was used to deposit the inks onto a moveable substrate. The thermal effect of the laser irradiation allowed approaching and connecting adjacent particles by melting the particle’s tin coating. The results were examined with regard to structure and soldering properties using EDX, SEM and optical microscopy.

  15. Report on Reactor Physics Assessment of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Maldonado, G. Ivan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-28

    This work focuses on ATF concepts being researched at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), expanding on previous studies of using alternate cladding materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The neutronic performance of two leading alternate cladding materials were assessed in boiling water reactors (BWRs): iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based composite cladding. This report fulfills ORNL Milestone M3FT-15OR0202332 within the fiscal year 2015 (FY15)

  16. Ceramic Coatings for Clad (The C3 Project): Advanced Accident-Tolerant Ceramic Coatings for Zr-Alloy Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickafus, Kurt E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Miller, Larry [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Weber, Bill [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Patel, Maulik [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Wolfe, Doug [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Fratoni, Max [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Raj, Rishi [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Plunkett, Kenneth [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hollis, Kendall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Andy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Chris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Comstock, Robert [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Partezana, Jonna [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Whittle, Karl [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Preuss, Michael [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Withers, Philip [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Donnelly, Stephen [Univ. of Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Riley, Daniel [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Syndney (Australia)

    2017-02-14

    The goal of this NEUP-IRP project is to develop a fuel concept based on an advanced ceramic coating for Zr-alloy cladding. The coated cladding must exhibit demonstrably improved performance compared to conventional Zr-alloy clad in the following respects: During normal service, the ceramic coating should decrease cladding oxidation and hydrogen pickup (the latter leads to hydriding and embrittlement). During a reactor transient (e.g., a loss of coolant accident), the ceramic coating must minimize or at least significantly delay oxidation of the Zr-alloy cladding, thus reducing the amount of hydrogen generated and the oxygen ingress into the cladding. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: To produce durable ceramic coatings on Zr-alloy clad using two possible routes: (i) MAX phase ceramic coatings or similar nitride or carbide coatings; and (ii) graded interface architecture (multilayer) ceramic coatings, using, for instance, an oxide such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the outer protective layer. To characterize the structural and physical properties of the coated clad samples produced in 1. above, especially the corrosion properties under simulated normal and transient reactor operating conditions. To perform computational analyses to assess the effects of such coatings on fuel performance and reactor neutronics, and to perform fuel cycle analyses to assess the economic viability of modifying conventional Zr-alloy cladding with ceramic coatings. This project meets a number of the goals outlined in the NEUP-IRP call for proposals, including: Improve the fuel/cladding system through innovative designs (e.g. coatings/liners for zirconium-based cladding) Reduce or eliminate hydrogen generation Increase resistance to bulk steam oxidation Achievement of our goals and objectives, as defined above, will lead to safer light-water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel assemblies, due to improved cladding properties and built-in accident resistance, as well as

  17. 78 FR 9676 - Clad Steel Plate From Japan: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... them from products metalized in other manners (e.g., by normal electroplating). The various cladding... welding (e.g., electrocladding), in which the cladding metal (nickel, chromium, etc.) is applied to the...). Stainless clad steel plate is manufactured to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM...

  18. Gradient microstructure in laser clad TiC-reinforced Ni-alloy composite coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Zuo, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    A gradient TiC–(Ni alloy) composite coating was produced by one step laser cladding with pre-placed mixture powder on a 1045 steel substrate. The clad layers consisted of TiC particles, γ-Ni primary dendrites and interdendritic eutectics. From the bottom to the top of the clad layer produced at 2000

  19. 10J water-cooled DPSSL system based on Yb:YAG crystal edge-cladded by Cr:YAG ceramics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian-Gang; Yan, Xiongwei; Jiang, Xinying; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Mingzhong; Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo

    2017-05-01

    Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) has been attracting the interests of the researchers around the world, because of the promising to the future energy. The Yb:YAG was broadly used in the research field of high-peak power and large energy laser with repetition-rate for IFE because of its outstanding performance, including significant thermal and mechanical capacities, long upper energy level lifetime, high quantum efficiency and highly doping capacity. But it exhibits high saturation fluence at room temperature because of the small emission and absorption cross-section. And at the same time this gain material exhibits self-absorption of laser because of the thermal population at lower laser level at room temperature. Ant it appears to have been solved by means of the cryogenic temperature, but the total efficiency of the laser system will be decreased as the use of cryogenic temperature. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) effect of the amplifier can be relaxed by means of edge-cladded absorption material. And the difficulties of edge cladding can be will solved as the emergence of ceramics. But at present the ceramics exhibits high scattering and many disfigurements, which limited the application in the high-power large-energy laser system. So the edge-cladding of Yb:YAG crystal will be a key issue for solution the ASE in amplifier. In this paper, we will introduce a 10J water-cooled DPSSL system, based on Yb:YAG crystal at room temperature. In this system a new edge cladding method has been used, that the Yb:YAG crystal was edge cladded by Cr:YAG ceramics, which was used as the absorption material of ASE. The amplifier was an active mirror water-cooled room temperature amplifier. With the help of this edge cladding the ASE has been lowered, and about 5 times small signal gain has been obtained in a single pass amplification, which was much higher than the earlier of 2 times. And the wavefront aberrance of the laser beam was also reduced due to the thermal

  20. Development of Mechanical Loading Device for testing the zirconium cladding under the pellet-cladding interaction conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Solonin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a tendency of transition to the long-term cycles of operation with fuel and to the new transitional modes. This fact requires extra experimental validation for design of fuel rods. New operating conditions are expanding operability requirements of claddings.To implement the experimental techniques the Mechanical Loading Device (MLD was developed, capable of providing the conditions of stress-strain state similar to the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI during operation of the reactor.Complex strain state of a fuel rod cladding is simulated by the impacting force on the plunger and then on the simulator of the fuel pellet. The simulator is made of interposer of zirconium and the inset made of ceramic - aluminum oxide. Mechanical properties of the aluminum oxide are similar to the material of the fuel pellet - uranium dioxide. Experiments conducted on the layout and the MLD as such have shown that a stress-strain state matches with that of under operating conditions of the fuel rod in the reactor.The developed device and test method allows us to simulate a wide range of reactor transient modes. Claddings can be used both in the delivered state, and with the further preparation, including the exposure in nuclear reactor. MLD design enables us to carry out experiments with the presence of an aggressive environment inside the cladding, simulating the presence of gaseous fission products in the fuel rod.For further the development of this research it is necessary to design the laboratory complex for MLD. Extra computational verification experiment is needed as well. In particular, stresses in the cladding achieved during the experiment ought to be calculated. Calculated stresses are required to make project justification on the performance capability of fuel rods.

  1. Building America Case Study: Initial and Long-Term Movement of Cladding Installed Over Exterior Rigid Insulation (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-10-01

    Changes in the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) from 2009 to 2012 have resulted in the use of exterior rigid insulation becoming part of the prescriptive code requirements. With more jurisdictions adopting the 2012 IECC builders are going to finding themselves required to incorporate exterior insulation in the construction of their exterior wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location. However, there has been a significant resistance to its widespread implementation due to a lack of research and understanding of the mechanisms involved and potential creep effects of the assembly under the sustained dead load of a cladding. This research was an extension on previous research conducted by BSC in 2011, and 2012. Each year the understanding of the system discrete load component interactions, as well as impacts of environmental loading has increased. The focus of the research was to examine more closely the impacts of screw fastener bending on the total system capacity, effects of thermal expansion and contraction of materials on the compressive forces in the assembly, as well as to analyze a full years worth of cladding movement data from assemblies constructed in an exposed outdoor environment.

  2. Modeling of the PWR fuel mechanical behaviour and particularly study of the pellet-cladding interaction in a fuel rod; Contribution a la modelisation du comportement mecanique des combustibles REP sous irradiation, avec en particulier le traitement de l`interaction pastille-gaine dans un crayon combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourdequin, N.

    1995-05-01

    In Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power plants, fuel cladding constitutes the first containment barrier against radioactive contamination. Computer codes, developed with the help of a large experimental knowledge, try to predict cladding failures which must be limited in order to maintain a maximal safety level. Until now, fuel rod design calculus with unidimensional codes were adequate to prevent cladding failures in standard PWR`s operating conditions. But now, the need of nuclear power plant availability increases. That leads to more constraining operating condition in which cladding failures are strongly influenced by the fuel rod mechanical behaviour, mainly at high power level. Then, the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) becomes important, and is characterized by local effects which description expects a multidimensional modelization. This is the aim of the TOUTATIS 2D-3D code, that this thesis contributes to develop. This code allows to predict non-axisymmetric behaviour too, as rod buckling which has been observed in some irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS. By another way, PCI is influenced by under irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS which includes a densification model and a swelling model. The latter can only be used in standard operating conditions. However, the processing structure of this modulus provides the possibility to include any type of model corresponding with other operating conditions. In last, we show the result of these fuel volume variations on the cladding mechanical conditions. (author). 25 refs., 89 figs., 2 tabs., 12 photos., 5 appends.

  3. Foam coating on aluminum alloy with laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; van Heeswijk, V.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Csach, K.

    dThis article concentrates on the creation of a foam layer on an Al-Si substrate with laser technology. The cladding of At-Si powder in the front of a laser track has been separated from the side injection of mixture of Al-Si/TiH2 powder (foaming agent), which allows for fine tuning of the main

  4. Interfacial adhesion of laser clad functionally graded materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y. T.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. T. M.

    2003-01-01

    Specially designed samples of laser clad AlSi40 functionally graded materials (FGM) are made for evaluating the interfacial adhesion. To obtain the interfacial bond strength notches are made right at the interface of the FGMs. In-situ microstructural observations during straining in a field-emission

  5. Laser cladding process development for high carbon steel substrates

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lengopeng, T

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available spot diameter and powder feed rate were kept constant throughout the experiment. The effect of multiple layers (up to a total of six clad layers built-up) and post-weld heat treatment by a defocussed laser beam on the HAZ width and hardness were...

  6. Widely tunable femtosecond solitonic radiation in photonic crystal fiber cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, J. H.; Sokolov, A. V.; Benabid, F.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a means to generate tunable ultrashort optical pulses. We demonstrate that dispersive waves generated by solitons within the small-core features of a photonic crystal fiber cladding can be used to obtain femtosecond pulses tunable over an octave-wide spectral range. The generation...

  7. Elimination of Start/Stop defects in laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Eekma, M.; Hemmati, I.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser cladding represents an advanced hard facing technology for the deposition of hard, corrosion and wear resistant layers of controlled thickness onto a selected area of metallic substrate. When a circular geometry is required, the beginning and the end of the laser track coincide in the same

  8. Finite-width plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic multilayer cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Engineering plasmonic metamaterials with anisotropic optical dispersion enables us to tailor the properties of metamaterial-based waveguides. We investigate plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings with hyperbolic dispersion. Without using any......, are strongly absorbed. By avoiding the resonant widths in the design of the actual waveguides, the strong absorption can be eliminated. (C) 2015 Optical Society of America...

  9. Ultrahigh temperature-sensitive silicon MZI with titania cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Moo eLee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a possibility of intensifying temperature sensitivity of a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI by using a highly negative thermo-optic property of titania (TiO2. Temperature sensitivity of an asymmetric silicon MZI with a titania cladding is experimentally measured from +18pm/C to -340 pm/C depending on design parameters of MZI.

  10. Spatial mode-selective waveguide with hyperbolic cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Y.; Xi, Z.; Xu, M.; Bäumer, S.M.B.; Adam, A.J.L.; Urbach, H.P.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs) are anisotropic materials with a permittivity tensor that has both positive and negative eigenvalues. Here we report that by using a type II HMM as a cladding material, a waveguide that only supports higher-order modes can be achieved, while the lower-order modes

  11. A state of the Art report on Manufacturing technology of high burn-up fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Ho; Nam, Cheol; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Byung Kwon; Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Myung Ho; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    1999-09-01

    In order to manufacturing the prototype fuel cladding, overall manufacturing processes and technologies should be thoroughly understood on the manufacturing processes and technologies of foreign cladding tubes. Generally, the important technology related to fuel cladding tube manufacturing processes for PWRs/PHWRs is divided into three stages. The first stage is to produce the zirconium sponge from zirconium sand, the second stage is to produce the zircaloy shell or TREX from zirconium sponge ingot and finally, cladding is produced from TREX or zircaloy shell. Therefore, the manufacturing processes including the first and second stages are described in brief in this technology report in order to understand the whole fuel cladding manufacturing processes. (author)

  12. Integrated Computational Modeling of Water Side Corrosion in Zirconium Metal Clad Under Nominal LWR Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanfar, Asghar; Thomas, John; Van der Ven, Anton; Xu, Donghua; Youssef, Mostafa; Yang, Jing; Yildiz, Bilge; Marian, Jaime

    2016-11-01

    A mesoscopic chemical reaction kinetics model to predict the formation of zirconium oxide and hydride accumulation light-water reactor (LWR) fuel clad is presented. The model is designed to include thermodynamic information from ab initio electronic structure methods as well as parametric information in terms of diffusion coefficients, thermal conductivities and reaction constants. In contrast to approaches where the experimentally observed time exponents are captured by the models by design, our approach is designed to be predictive and to provide an improved understanding of the corrosion process. We calculate the time evolution of the oxide/metal interface and evaluate the order of the chemical reactions that are conducive to a t 1/3 dependence. We also show calculations of hydrogen cluster accumulation as a function of temperature and depth using spatially dependent cluster dynamics. Strategies to further cohesively integrate the different elements of the model are provided.

  13. Scratch Behaviors of Cr-Coated Zr-Based Fuel Claddings for Accident-Tolerant Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Il-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As the progression of Fukushima accident is worsened by the runaway reaction at a high temperature above 1200 .deg. C, it is essential to ensure the stabilities of coating layers on conventional Zr-based alloys during normal operations as well as severe accident conditions. This is because the failures of coating layer result in galvanic corrosion phenomenon by potential difference between coating layer and Zr alloy. Also, it is possible to damage the coating layer during handling and manufacturing process by contacting structural components of a fuel assembly. So, adhesion strength is one of the key factors determining the reliability of the coating layer on conventional Zr-based alloy. In this study, two kinds of Cr-coated Zr-based claddings were prepared using arc ion plating (AIP) and direct laser (DL) coating methods. The objective is to evaluate the scratch deformation behaviors of each coating layers on Zr alloys. Large area spallation below normal load of about 15 N appeared to be the predominant mode of failure in the AIP coating during scratch test. However, no tensile crack were found in entire stroke length. In DL coating, small plastic deformation and grooving behavior are more dominant scratching results. It was observed that the change of the slope of the COF curve did not coincide with the failure of coating layer.

  14. Fiber laser cladding of nickel-based alloy on cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-González, F.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Penide, J.; Lusquiños, F.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Boutinguiza, M.; Pou, J.

    2016-06-01

    Gray cast iron is a ferrous alloy characterized by a carbon-rich phase in form of lamellar graphite in an iron matrix while ductile cast iron presents a carbon-rich phase in form of spheroidal graphite. Graphite presents a higher laser beam absorption than iron matrix and its morphology has also a strong influence on thermal conductivity of the material. The laser cladding process of cast iron is complicated by its heterogeneous microstructure which generates non-homogeneous thermal fields. In this research work, a comparison between different types of cast iron substrates (with different graphite morphology) has been carried out to analyze its impact on the process results. A fiber laser was used to generate a NiCrBSi coating over flat substrates of gray cast iron (EN-GJL-250) and nodular cast iron (EN-GJS-400-15). The relationship between processing parameters (laser irradiance and scanning speed) and geometry of a single laser track was examined. Moreover, microstructure and composition were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The hardness and elastic modulus were analyzed by means of micro- and nanoindentation. A hardfacing coating was generated by fiber laser cladding. Suitable processing parameters to generate the Ni-based alloy coating were determined. For the same processing parameters, gray cast iron samples present higher dilution than cast iron samples. The elastic modulus is similar for the coating and the substrate, while the Ni-based coating obtained presents a significantly superior hardness than cast iron.

  15. An attempt for a unified description of mechanical testing on Zircaloy-4 cladding subjected to simulated LOCA transient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desquines Jean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA, an important safety requirement is that the reflooding of the core by the emergency core cooling system should not lead to a complete rupture of the fuel rods. Several types of mechanical tests are usually performed in the industry to determine the degree of cladding embrittlement, such as ring compression tests or four-point bending of rodlets. Many other tests can be found in the open literature. However, there is presently no real intrinsic understanding of the failure conditions in these tests which would allow translation of the results from one kind of mechanical testing to another. The present study is an attempt to provide a unified description of the failure not directly depending on the tested geometry. This effort aims at providing a better understanding of the link between several existing safety criteria relying on very different mechanical testing. To achieve this objective, the failure mechanisms of pre-oxidized and pre-hydrided cladding samples are characterized by comparing the behavior of two different mechanical tests: Axial Tensile (AT test and “C”-shaped Ring Compression Test (CCT. The failure of samples in both cases can be described by usual linear elastic fracture mechanics theory. Using interrupted mechanical tests, metallographic examinations have evidenced that a set of parallel cracks are nucleated at the inner and outer surface of the samples just before failure, crossing both the oxide layer and the oxygen rich alpha layer. The stress intensity factors for multiple crack geometry are determined for both AT and CCT samples using finite element calculations. After each mechanical test performed on high temperature steam oxidized samples, metallography is then used to individually determine the crack depth and crack spacing. Using these two important parameters and considering the applied load at fracture, the stress intensity factor at failure is derived for each tested

  16. Effect of Co - based Alloy on Properties of Laser Cladding Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Jiang, Z. P.; Li, H. Z.

    2017-11-01

    A large number of laser cladding experiments have been carried out using 20CrMnTi steel as substrate and Co-based alloy as cladding material. The influence of Co-based alloy on the laser cladding properties of 20CrMnTi steel was studied by analyzing the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cladding crack susceptibility, dilution rate, microstructure and friction and wear properties. The results show that the high-power laser cladding of Co-based material can obtain a flat defect-free cladding layer with compact structure and low crack susceptibility. A multi-layer cladding strategy with variable power can be used to fabricate thin wall structures without collapse Parts, the surface smooth without pores.

  17. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form

  18. Development and properties of aluminum-clad graphite/epoxy tubes for space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. R.; Kural, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the development and properties of seamless aluminum-clad P75/Epoxy tubes and the unique manufacturing method used in their production. Thermo-mechanical properties of the tubes were determined analytically and verified by tests. These properties were shown to be suitable for space structures that require high stiffness, low weight and thermal expansion, and dimensional stability during operational life. A special feature of the tubes is the ability to tune the tube for thermal expansion after fabrication by a chemical milling process. The tubes are also resistant to atomic oxygen and handling damage. The toughness of the tubes was demonstrated by impact testing. Cyclic thermal testing showed no adverse effects on the expansion and stiffness behavior of the tubes. The paper also includes a discussion of a joining method that uses aluminum end fittings and an efficient scarf joint configuration. Additional studies considered various adhesives and fitting materials. Joint allowables were higher for titanium and B4C particulate magnesium fittings. The effect of different adhesives under static loading conditions favored the high-strength adhesives.

  19. Multiresponse Optimization of Laser Cladding Steel + VC Using Grey Relational Analysis in the Taguchi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Laser cladding of metal matrix composite coatings (MMCs) has become an effective and economic method to improve the wear resistance of mechanical components. The clad quality characteristics such as clad height, carbide fraction, carbide dissolution, and matrix hardness in MMCs determine the wear resistance of the coatings. These clad quality characteristics are influenced greatly by the laser cladding processing parameters. In this study, American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 420 + 20% vanadium carbide (VC) was deposited on mild steel with a high powder direct diode laser. The Taguchi-based Grey relational method was used to optimize the laser cladding processing parameters (laser power, scanning speed, and powder feed rate) with the consideration of multiple clad characteristics related to wear resistance (clad height, carbide volume fraction, and Fe-matrix hardness). A Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was designed to study the effects of processing parameters on each response. The contribution and significance of each processing parameter on each clad characteristic were investigated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA). The Grey relational grade acquired from Grey relational analysis was used as the performance characteristic to obtain the optimal combination of processing parameters. Based on the optimal processing parameters, the phases and microstructure of the laser-cladded coating were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).

  20. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Guoping [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  1. Laser cladding crack repair of austenitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available @ 2 bar pressure Fig. 6: Crack sealing and overlay of 6.0mm plate 4 Typical hardness of the 316L crack seal layers is 160 HV1kg. Crack sealing can be performed with more noble Ni-base alloys to improved... of surface compressive stresses will avoid initiation of SCC. Due to primary austenitic solidification of laser cladded 316L, no delta ferrite is present in the microstructure. Although the susceptibility...

  2. Analysis and Experimental Qualification of an Irradiation Capsule Design for Testing Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cladding in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kurt R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is currently investigating a number of advanced nuclear fuel cladding concepts to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactors. Alumina-forming ferritic alloys (e.g., FeCrAl) are some of the leading candidates to replace traditional zirconium alloys due to their superior oxidation resistance, provided no prohibitive irradiation-induced embrittlement occurs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed experimental designs to irradiate thin-walled cladding tubes with representative pressurized water reactor geometry in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) under relevant temperatures. These designs allow for post-irradiation examination (PIE) of cladding that closely resembles expected commercially viable geometries and microstructures. The experiments were designed using relatively inexpensive rabbit capsules for the irradiation vehicle. The simplistic designs combined with the extremely high neutron flux in the HFIR allow for rapid testing of a large test matrix, thus reducing the time and cost needed to advanced cladding materials closer to commercialization. The designs are flexible in that they allow for testing FeCrAl alloys, stainless steels, Inconel alloys, and zirconium alloys (as a reference material) both with and without hydrides. This will allow a direct comparison of the irradiation performance of advanced cladding materials with traditional zirconium alloys. PIE will include studies of dimensional change, microstructure variation, mechanical performance, etc. This work describes the capsule design, neutronic and thermal analyses, and flow testing that were performed to support the qualification of this new irradiation vehicle.

  3. Design of the Capsule (13M-01K) for Irradiation of Fuel Cladding Materials in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Yang, Seong Woo; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Nuclear-grade zirconium alloys contain more than 95% Zr, and therefore most of their properties are similar to those of pure zirconium. ZIRLO material, used in fuel rod cladding, structural and flow mixing grids, instrumentation tubes, and guide thimbles, increases margin-to-fuel-rod-corrosion limits and enhances fuel assembly structural stability. The demonstrated corrosion resistance and enhanced structural stability of ZIRLO cladding enable longer cycle lengths at higher temperatures without reducing operating margins. An instrumented capsule (13M-01K) was designed and fabricated for evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of Zirlo material, which is commonly used for cladding of nuclear fuel. This capsule is now being irradiated for 2 cycles at CT test hole of HANARO, which was started at Jan 27 and will be ended at Mar 31, 2014. The structure of the capsule was based on the previous capsule (11M-22K capsule) which was successfully irradiated at the same hole of HANARO. In the capsule, 182 specimens such as tensile specimens of plate type and ring type specimens were placed. Most of them are made of Zirlo, but a few are HANA material that is developed in KAERI. The irradiation test was requested by 4 universities including Dong-Kook and Han-Yang etc. The capsule is composed of 5 layers, each of which had Al holder containing several specimens and an independent electric heater, thermocouples etc. During the irradiation test, temperatures of the specimens and fast neutron fluence were measured by 14 thermocouples and 5 sets of Ni-Ti-Fe neutron fluence monitors installed in the capsule. The capsule is irradiated for 2 cycles (28 days) at the CT test hole of HANARO of a 30MW thermal output at 350-390 .deg. C up to a fast neutron fluence of 9.6Χ10{sup 20} (n/cm{sup 2}) (E>1.0 Mev). In this capsule, the two kinds of irradiation tests are performed at quite different temperatures. At upper 3 layers of the capsule, specimens for irradiation at high

  4. Quench behavior of a no-insulation coil wound with stainless steel cladding REBCO tape at 4.2 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwanglok; Kim, Kwangmin; Bhattarai, Kabindra R.; Radcliff, Kyle; Jang, Jae Young; Hwang, Young Jin; Lee, SangGap; Yoon, Sangwon; Hahn, Seungyong

    2017-07-01

    A single pancake no-insulation (NI) coil was wound in a hermetic way with REBCO tape having a thin (1-2 μm) cladding layer of stainless steel. With an electric heater embedded at the innermost turn of the coil, heater-induced quench tests were performed under a background field of 15 T in a bath of liquid helium at 4.2 K. Despite the large average contact surface resistance of 1.63 {{m}}{{Ω }} cm2 , > 20 times larger than those of pure NI coils, ‘thermal recovery’ was observed at a coil current density (J e ) below 700 A mm-2 mainly due to the local current sharing. The coil experienced nine consecutive ‘thermal runaway’ quenches at J e of 700-820 A mm-2 (power supply limit), yet no discernible coil degradation or damage was observed. The results demonstrated that the stainless steel cladding REBCO tape may be effective at reducing the charging delay of high field NI REBCO magnets without sacrificing the self-protecting feature.

  5. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF FeCrAl CLADDING AND U-Si FUEL FOR ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUEL CONCEPTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, J. D.; Gamble, K. A.

    2015-09-01

    Since the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, enhancing the accident tolerance of light water reactors (LWRs) has become an important research topic. In particular, the community is actively developing enhanced fuels and cladding for LWRs to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools. Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period during design-basis and beyond design-basis events while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations and operational transients. This paper presents early work in developing thermal and mechanical models for two materials that may have promise: U-Si for fuel, and FeCrAl for cladding. These materials would not necessarily be used together in the same fuel system, but individually have promising characteristics. BISON, the finite element-based fuel performance code in development at Idaho National Laboratory, was used to compare results from normal operation conditions with Zr-4/UO2 behavior. In addition, sensitivity studies are presented for evaluating the relative importance of material parameters such as ductility and thermal conductivity in FeCrAl and U-Si in order to provide guidance on future experiments for these materials.

  6. Failure and impact behavior of facade panels made of glass fiber reinforced cement(GRC)

    OpenAIRE

    Enfedaque Diaz, Alejandro; Cendón Franco, David Angel; Galvez Diaz-Rubio, Francisco; Sanchez Galvez, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    GRC is a cementitious composite material made up of a cement mortar matrix and chopped glass fibers. Due to its outstanding mechanical properties, GRC has been widely used to produce cladding panels and some civil engineering elements. Impact failure of cladding panels made of GRC may occur during production if some tool falls onto the panel, due to stone or other objects impacting at low velocities or caused by debris projected after a blast. Impact failure of a front panel of a building may...

  7. Effect of cladding procedures on mechanical properties of heat treated dissimilar joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mateša

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The specimens plated by different cladding procedures (hot rolling, submerged arc welding surfacing using strip electrode (SAW and explosion welding were heat treated by annealing (650 ºC through 2 hours. Charpy impact energy testing, as well as shear strength testing of clad joints were performed. Testing results indicated significance of cladding procedure and determined heat treatment infl uences on stated mechanical properties.

  8. Air-clad fibers: pump absorption assisted by chaotic wave dynamics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2007-01-01

    Wave chaos is a concept which has already proved its practical usefulness in design of double-clad fibers for cladding-pumped fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers. In general, classically chaotic geometries will favor strong pump absorption and we address the extent of chaotic wave dynamics in typical...... air-clad structures may thus suppress the pump-absorption efficiency η below the ergodic scaling law η∞ Ac/Acl, where Ac and Acl are the areas of the rare-earth doped core and the cladding, respectively....

  9. Raman probes based on optically-poled double-clad fiber and coupler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara; Margulis, Walter; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Two fiber Raman probes are presented, one based on an optically-poled double-clad fiber and the second based on an optically-poled double-clad fiber coupler respectively. Optical poling of the core of the fiber allows for the generation of enough 532nm light to perform Raman spectroscopy...... of a sample of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), when illuminating the waveguide with 1064nm laser light. The Raman signal is collected in the inner cladding, from which it is retrieved with either a bulk dichroic mirror or a double-clad fiber coupler. The coupler allows for a substantial reduction of the fiber...

  10. Influence of operating and water-chemistry parameters on fuel cladding corrosion and deposition of corrosion products on cladding surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritsky, V.G.; Berezina, I.G.; Rodionov, Y.A., E-mail: kritsky@givnipiet.spb.ru, E-mail: alemaskina@givnipiet.ru [Leading Inst. ' VNIPIET' , Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    data available at an NPP and correct the water chemistry so that the pressure drop across the reactor is kept at a stable level by adjusting the concentrations of KOH, H{sub 2}, and NH{sub 3}. The parameters that have been included in the model are the following: operating parameters: reactor thermal power and concentration of boric acid; standards of water chemistry; parameters determining the system redox-potential: concentrations of hydrogen and ammonia; parameters of the physicochemical model of mass transfer; and parameters characterizing the composition of corrosion products in coolant. The deposits along fuel rod bring to sub-boiling and results in acceleration of corrosion products and boron precipitation on the fuel cladding surface increase of nuclide activation period and coolant radioactivity. Activity of Co-58 is the indicator of deposits growth acceleration. (author)

  11. GAPCON-THERMAL-3 verification and comparison to in-reactor data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Panisko, F.E.; Mohr, C.L.

    1978-01-01

    The GAPCON-THERMAL-3 computer code is an outgrowth of the GAPCON series, written in response to a need to predict the interacting path-dependent thermal and mechanical behavior of oxide fuel rods. Previous GAPCON versions did not include a comprehensive path-dependent prediction of cladding stress and strain that was connected to the thermal history. GAPCON-THERMAL-3 includes an incremental, finite element solution for the cladding that includes elastic, plastic, and creep contributions. The stress-strain increments for each time step reflect the thermal-mechanical state of the fuel at that time, so that the evolution of fuel and cladding displacements and temperatures through time is truly interconnected and path dependent.

  12. Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2012-11-26

    This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

  13. Fuel failures in the Connecticut Yankee reactor (Haddam Neck). Addendum to NP-2119

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, L.F.A.; Howl, D.; Naylor, J.; Pitek, M.T.; Clink, L.J.

    1984-05-01

    Significant levels of fuel rod failures were observed in the batch 8 fuel assemblies of the Connecticut Yankee reactor. Results of detailed poolside and hot cell examinations, reported earlier in NP-2119, indicated the failure mechanism was stress corrosion cracking initiating on the clad outer surface. The sources of cladding stresses were believed to be (a) fuel pellet chips wedged in the cladding gap, (b) swelling of highly nondensifying batch 8 fuel, and (c) potentially harmful effects of a power change event that occurred near the end of the second cycle of irradiation for batch 8. This report reviews the 1977-78 experience and conclusions of the earlier investigations against the background of the total operational experience of the reactor from initial startup to the present time. It provides more details on operating conditions and uses the results of SLEUTH-SEER analyses to interpret the effects of operational maneuvers. The investigation adds more evidence for the importance of the ramp effects.

  14. EPRI-NASA Cooperative Project on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloys. [nuclear fuel failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubicciotti, D.; Jones, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Examinations of the inside surface of irradiated fuel cladding from two reactors show the Zircaloy cladding is exposed to a number of aggressive substances, among them iodine, cadmium, and iron-contaminated cesium. Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of well characterized samples of Zircaloy sheet and tubing was studied. Results indicate that a threshold stress must be exceeded for iodine SCC to occur. The existence of a threshold stress indicates that crack formation probably is the key step in iodine SCC. Investigation of the crack formation process showed that the cracks responsible for SCC failure nucleated at locations in the metal surface that contained higher than average concentrations of alloying elements and impurities. A four-stage model of iodine SCC is proposed based on the experimental results and the relevance of the observations to pellet cladding interaction failures is discussed.

  15. Standard specification for architectural flat glass clad polycarbonate

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers the quality requirements for cut sizes of glass clad polycarbonate (GCP) for use in buildings as security, detention, hurricane/cyclic wind-resistant, and blast and ballistic-resistant glazing applications. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  16. Metallography and fuel cladding chemical interaction in fast flux test facility irradiated metallic U-10Zr MFF-3 and MFF-5 fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W.J., E-mail: jon.carmack@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Chichester, H.M., E-mail: heather.chichester@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Porter, D.L., E-mail: douglas.porter@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Wootan, D.W., E-mail: david.wootan@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The Mechanistic Fuel Failure (MFF) series of metal fuel irradiations conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) provides an important comparison between data generated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) and that expected in a larger-scale fast reactor. The MFF fuel operated with a peak cladding temperature at the top of the fuel column, but developed peak burnup at the centerline of the core. This places the peak fuel temperature midway between the core center and the top of fuel, lower in the fuel column than in EBR-II experiments. Data from the MFF-3 and MFF-5 assemblies are most comparable to the data obtained from the EBR-II X447 experiment. The two X447 pin breaches were strongly influenced by fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) at the top of the fuel column. Post irradiation examination data from MFF-3 and MFF-5 are presented and compared to historical EBR-II data. - Highlights: • Irradiation and post irradiation examination of full-length metallic fast reactor fuel. • Fuel cladding chemical interaction formation in full-length metallic fast reactor fuel. • Correlation of FCCI with temperature and burnup. • Comparison of full-length reactor fuel performance with test reactor fuel performance.

  17. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  18. Dielectric tube waveguides with absorptive cladding for broadband, low-dispersion and low loss THz guiding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Hualong; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole

    2015-01-01

    and dielectrics in this frequency range. Here we report on a novel twist on the classical tube waveguide where we deliberately introduce a thick and highly lossy cladding layer. By this we attenuate the field in the cladding and thus prevent interference with the core field. This mechanism breaks the well...

  19. Microstructure and wear resistance of NiCrBSi laser clad layer on titanium alloy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, R.L.; Yang, D.Z.; Guo, L.X.; Dong, S.L. [Harbin Inst. of Technol. (China). Sch. of Mater. Sci. and Eng.

    2000-10-23

    Laser cladding of NiCrBSi powders on Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrate was performed, and microstructure, microhardness and wear resistance of the clad layers were evaluated. Results show that the laser clad layer is divided into three regions: the clad, the dilution and the heat-affected zones. In the clad zone, fine particles of TiB{sub 2}, TiC and M{sub 23}(CB){sub 6} are distributed in the matrix of the primary {gamma}-Ni and the multi-phase eutectics consisting of {gamma}-Ni, Ni{sub 3}B and silicides. Microhardness of the clad zone is very high, being approximately HV 1000. The dilution zone is a mixture of melted Ni-base and Ti-base alloys, and possesses a characteristic of directional crystallization. The heat-affected zone has an acicular martensitic structure, and the microhardness is HV 360-380. Compared to titanium alloy, the wear resistance of clad layer is improved. The mechanism of wearing of clad layer is a mixed type of slight peeling-off and abrasion. (orig.)

  20. An Examination of Collaborative Learning Assessment through Dialogue (CLAD) in Traditional and Hybrid Human Development Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Wanda C.; Green, Peter J.; Fitch, Trey

    2010-01-01

    This investigation assessed the effectiveness of using Collaborative Learning Assessment through Dialogue (CLAD) (Fitch & Hulgin, 2007) with students in undergraduate human development courses. The key parts of CLAD are student collaboration, active learning, and altering the role of the instructor to a guide who enhances learning opportunities.…

  1. Thick metallic coatings produced by coaxial and side laser cladding : Processing and properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelík, V.; De Hosson, J.T.M.

    2010-01-01

    Cobalt and iron-based, defect-free coatings with thicknesses from 1 to 3.3. mm were created by a laser cladding process on different steel substrates. Extensive laser cladding experiments with a gradual change of laser power were used to study relations between main processing parameters and

  2. Core temperature in super-Gaussian pumped air-clad photonic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we investigate the core temperature of air-clad photonic crystal fiber (PCF) lasers pumped by a super-Gaussian (SG) source of order four. The results are compared with conventional double-clad fiber (DCF) lasers pumped by the same super-Gaussian and by top-hat pump profiles.

  3. Microstructure and property of Fe-Co-B-Si-C-Nb amorphous composite coating fabricated by laser cladding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y. Y.; Li, Z. G.; Li, R. F.; Li, M.; Daze, X. L.; Feng, K.; Wu, Y. X.

    2013-09-01

    Laser cladding of Fe34Co34B20Si5C3Nb4 on a low carbon steel substrate was conducted using coaxial powder feeding method. Microstructure, phase and microhardness were investigated by scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe micro-analysis and microhardness tester. Amorphous coating with NbC particles embedded in the matrix was formed. Differential scanning calorimetry curve showed that the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the onset crystallization temperature (Tx) were 799 K and 850 K, respectively. The supercooled liquid region (ΔTx = Tx - Tg) was as large as 51 K, which implied the high thermal stability of the supercooled liquid against crystallization. Due to the NbC particles embedded in the amorphous matrix, the mean value of the microhardness of the coating prepared by laser cladding was higher than that of the bulk metallic glass formed by the copper mold casting method. The contribution of NbC particles to the total microhardness was theoretically estimated. The estimated hardness of the composite coating agreed well with the tested value.

  4. Development of eutectic free cladding materials for metallic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Yuda, Ryoichi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan); Ohuchi, Atsushi [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co. Ltd., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Amaya, Masaki [Global Nuclear Fuel-Japan Co., Ltd, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Historically, it is well known that U base metallic fuel has a lower eutectic temperature with stainless steel cladding. In the phase diagram for the U-Fe binary system, the eutectic temperature is 998K. The eutectic reaction is a limiting factor for raising reactor operation temperature. For the purpose of development of eutectic-free cladding materials, three kinds of diffusion-couple tests with 10 mass%Zr alloy were conducted at a temperature of 1027K for 2250 hrs. We selected the following materials: (a) nitrogen charged zirconium foils, (b) vanadium foils of commercial grade, and (c) nitrogen charged ferritic stainless steel (HT-9). The results showed that typical Zr with layer was observed in all of these materials. Zr with layer appeared to act as a barrier against inter-diffusion of U, Fe. The barrier provided immunity to the eutectic reaction. Discussion was made on C-14 problems in relation to another desirable thermodynamic characteristics of Zr such as carbon-14 immobilization. EPMA analysis indicated relatively high nitrogen concentration at the barrier. The barrier is probably composed of ZrN. (author)

  5. Cladding and Structural Materials for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, G S; Allen, T R; Ila, D; C,; Levi,; Morgan, D; Motta, A; Wang, L; Wirth, B

    2011-06-30

    The goal of this consortium is to address key materials issues in the most promising advanced reactor concepts that have yet to be resolved or that are beyond the existing experience base of dose or burnup. The research program consists of three major thrusts: 1) high-dose radiation stability of advanced fast reactor fuel cladding alloys, 2) irradiation creep at high temperature, and 3) innovative cladding concepts embodying functionally-graded barrier materials. This NERI-Consortium final report represents the collective efforts of a large number of individuals over a period of three and a half years and included 9 PIs, 4 scientists, 3 post-docs and 12 students from the seven participating institutions and 8 partners from 5 national laboratories and 3 industrial institutions (see table). University participants met semi-annually and participants and partners met annually for meetings lasting 2-3 days and designed to disseminate and discuss results, update partners, address outstanding issues and maintain focus and direction toward achieving the objectives of the program. The participants felt that this was a highly successful program to address broader issues that can only be done by the assembly of a range of talent and capabilities at a more substantial funding level than the traditional NERI or NEUP grant. As evidence of the success, this group, collectively, has published 20 articles in archival journals and made 57 presentations at international conferences on the results of this consortium.

  6. Introduction of an Innovative Cladding Panel System for Multi-Story Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hathairat Maneetes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An Energy Dissipating Cladding System has been developed for use in buildings designed based on the concept of damage-controlled structure in seismic design. This innovative cladding panel system is capable of functioning both as a structural brace, as well as a source of energy dissipation, without demanding inelastic action and ductility from the basic lateral force resisting system. The structural systems of many modern buildings typically have large openings to accommodate glazing systems, and a popular type of construction uses spandrel precast cladding panels at each floor level that supports strip window systems. The present study focuses on developing spandrel type precast concrete cladding panels as supplementary energy dissipating devices that are added to the basic structural system. Through a series of analytical studies, the result of evaluating the ability of the proposed Energy Dissipating Cladding system to improve the earthquake resistance of the buildings is presented here.

  7. Numerical and experimental analysis of the residual stress field in cladded components; Numerische und experimentelle Bestimmung des Eigenspannungszustands in plattierten Komponenten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegele, Dieter; Brand, Marcus; Hohe, Joerg [Fraunhofer Inst. fuer Werkstoffmechanik, Freiburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The inner surface of a ferritic reactor pressure vessel is protected against corrosion by an austenitic cladding that is usually performed by a double-pass welding in order to avoid under-clad defects und to improve the microstructural properties of the cladding material. On the other hand the different thermal expansion coefficients of the cladding and the base metal induce a complex residual stress field. This has a non-negligible influence on the fracture mechanical assessment of postulated flaws within or under the cladding. The determination of the residual stress field was achieved by numerical simulation of the cladding process. The calibration of the used equivalent heat sources for the modelling of the heat input within the simulation was performed using measured data of the temperature field in a KTA compliant cladding process of test plates made of plant-representative materials. The simulation of the welding process used the temperature dependent material characteristics taking into account the transformation behaviour of the ferritic base metal. The resulting residual stress field shows significant tensile stresses within the cladding with a subsequent compressive stress field under the cladding. The calculated residual stress field is in good agreement with the experimental data. A comparison of the calculated residual stress field using the process simulation with the results of a simplified modelling assuming an increased stress-free temperature in the range of the operation temperature shows also a good agreement, esp. using the materials characteristics of KTA. [German] Die Innenoberflaeche von Reaktordruckbehaeltern aus ferritischen Werkstoffen wird zum Schutz gegen Korrosion mit einer austenitischen Plattierung versehen. Diese wird ueblicherweise als zweilagige Schweissplattierung ausgefuehrt, um die Bildung von Unterplattierungsfehlern zu vermeiden und die mikrostrukturellen Eigenschaften des Plattierungswerkstoffs zu verbessern. Auf der

  8. 77 FR 38825 - Clad Steel Plate From Japan; Scheduling of a Full Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... COMMISSION Clad Steel Plate From Japan; Scheduling of a Full Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Clad Steel Plate From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... revocation of the antidumping duty order on clad steel plate from Japan would be likely to lead to...

  9. CLADDING DEGRADATION COMPONENT IN WASTE FORM DEGRADATION MODEL IN TSPA-SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Siegmann; R.P. Rechard

    2001-01-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a total system performance assessment for a site recommendation (TSPA-SR), if suitable, on Yucca Mountain for disposal of radioactive waste. Discussed here is the Cladding Degradation Component of the Waste Form Degradation Model (WF Model), of the TSPA-SR. The Cladding Degradation Component determines the degradation rate of the Zircaloy cladding on commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) and, thereby, the CSNF matrix exposed and radioisotopes available for dissolution in any water present. Since the 1950s, most CSNF has been clad with less than 1 mm (usually between 600 and 900 {micro}m) of Zircaloy, a zirconium alloy. Zircaloy cladding is not a designed engineered barrier of the Yucca Mountain disposal system, but rather is an existing characteristic of the CSNF that is important to determining the release rate of radioisotopes once the waste package (WP) has breached. Although studies of cladding degradation from fluoride [F] began at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as early as 1984, cladding as a characteristic of the waste was not considered in TSPAs, conducted in the early 1990s. However, enough information on cladding performance has accumulated in the literature such that cladding was considered in 1993 when examining the performance of DOE spent nuclear (DSNF) and most recently in TSPA for the viability assessment (TSPA-VA). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently uses cladding data as the basis for extending the period of wet storage, for licensing dry storage facilities, and for licensing shipping casks for CNSF.

  10. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. These models are expected to improve the calculations of several important aspects of fuel rod behavior. First, an improved mapping was established from a compilation of PIE results from severe fuel damage tests of the configuration of melted metallic cladding that is retained by an oxide layer. The improved mapping accounts for the relocation of melted cladding in the circumferential direction. Then, rules based on PIE results were established for calculating the effect of cladding that has relocated from above on the oxidation and integrity of the lower intact cladding upon which it solidifies. Next, three different methods were identified for calculating the extent of dissolution of the oxidic part of the cladding due to its contact with the metallic part. The extent of dissolution effects the stress and thus the integrity of the oxidic part of the cladding. Then, an empirical equation was presented for calculating the stress in the oxidic part of the cladding and evaluating its integrity based on this calculated stress. This empirical equation replaces the current criterion for loss of integrity which is based on temperature and extent of oxidation. Finally, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The implementation of these models is expected to eliminate the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled, Improvements in Modeling of Cladding Oxidation and Meltdown.

  11. Equipment stainless steel entire versus steels bimetallics clad or overlay; Utilizacao de equipamentos de processo construidos em aco inoxidavel integral versus acos bimetalicos cladeado ou 'overlay'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Itamar da Silva; Lima, Jadival Carneiro de; Leal, Murilo Fonseca; Cardoso, Amauri dos Santos; Jorjan, Roberto [PETROBRAS S.A., Sao Francisco do Conde, BA (Brazil). Refinaria Landulfo Alves Mataripen (RLAM)

    2008-07-01

    This study does not recommend the use of a pressure vessel made of integral stainless steel, due to the failure mechanisms under stress corrosion assisted by chlorides or polythionic acid. Are presented case studies of literature and analysis of reports of proceedings of RLAM reactors, showing that the materials produced by bimetallic clad overlay or are more appropriate, in terms of integrity, for use in equipment that the internal environment requires austenitic stainless steel specification.

  12. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  13. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ... patient with heart failure or cardiomyopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ...

  14. Failure analysis of fire resistant fluid (FRF piping used in hydraulic control system at oil-fired thermal power generation plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Akram

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a case study regarding frequent forced outages in an oil-fired power generating station due to failure of fire resistant fluid (FRF piping of material ASTM A-304. This analysis was done to find out the most probable cause of failure and to rectify the problem. Methods for finding and analyzing the cracks include nondestructive testing techniques such as visual testing (VT and dye penetrant testing (PT along with that periodic monitoring after rectification of problem. The study revealed that pitting and pit to crack transitions were formed in stainless steel piping containing high pressure (system pressure 115 bars fire resistant fluid. However, after replacement of piping the pitting and cracking reoccurred. It was observed that due to possible exposure to chlorinated moisture in surrounding environment pitting was formed which then transformed into cracks. The research work discussed in this paper illustrates the procedure used in detection of the problem and measures taken to solve the problem.

  15. Fuel behavior in severe accidents and Mo-alloy based cladding designs to improve accident tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Bo [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States). Nucler Power Sector

    2013-03-15

    The severe accidents at TMI-2 and Fukushima-Daiichi led to core meltdown and hydrogen explosions. The main source of energy causing core melting is the decay heat from {beta}-, {beta}+, and {gamma} decays of short-lived isotopes following a power scram. The exothermic reaction of Zr-alloy cladding can further increase the cladding temperature leading to rapid cladding corrosion and hydrogen production. The most effective mitigation to minimize core damage in a severe accident is to extend the duration of heat removal capacity via battery-supported passive cooling for as long as practically possible. Replacing the Zr-alloy cladding with a higher heat resistant cladding with lower enthalpy release rate may also provide additional coping time for accident management. Such a heat resistant cladding may also overcome the current licensing concerns about Zr-alloy hydriding and post quench ductility issues in a design base loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Zr-alloy cladding, while has been optimized for normal operation in high pressure water and steam of light water reactors, will rapidly lose its corrosion resistance and tensile and creep strength in high pressure steam. Evaluation of alternate cladding materials and designs have been performed to search for a new fuel cladding design which will substantially improve the safety margins at elevated temperatures during a severe accident, while maintaining the excellent fuel performance attributes of the current Zr-alloy cladding. The screening criteria for the evaluation include neutronic properties, material availability, adaptability and operability in current LWRs, resistance to melting. The new designs also need to be fabricable, maintain sufficient strength and resist to attack by high pressure steam. Engineering metals, alloys and ceramics which can meet some or most of these requirements are limited. Following review of the properties of potential candidates, it is concluded that molybdenum alloys may potentially

  16. Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorsal, Anders; Wiggers, Henrik; McMurray, John J V

    2018-01-01

    This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint.......This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint....

  17. On Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    assigned to the Acquisition Chief Process Office at SAF/AQ. He holds degrees in electrical engineering, engineering management , and systems engineering...failure. Failure Types Exposure to Loss Opportunity to Learn Optimal Low High Negative High Low Acquisition project leaders would obviously prefer to...of failure a major defense acquisi- Acquisition project leaders would obviously prefer to succeed but should remember that failure is inevitable

  18. Frictional Behavior of Fe-based Cladding Candidates for PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Thak Sang [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge (United States)

    2014-10-15

    After the recent nuclear disaster at Fukushima Daiichi reactors, there is a growing consensus on the development of new fuel systems (i.e., accident-tolerant fuel, ATF) that have high safety margins under design-basis accident (DBA) and beyond design-basis accident (BDBA). A common objective of various developing candidates is to archive the outstanding corrosion-resistance under severe accidents such as DBA and DBDA conditions for decreasing hydrogen production and increasing coping time to respond to severe accidents. ATF could be defined as new fuel/cladding system with enhanced accident tolerant to loss of active cooling in the core for a considerably longer time period under severe accidents while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations. This means that, in normal operating conditions, new fuel systems should be applicable to current operating PWRs for suppressing various degradation mechanisms of current fuel assembly without excessive design changes. When considering that one of the major degradation mechanisms of PWR fuel assemblies is a grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF), it is necessary to examine the tribological behavior of various ATF candidates at initial development stage. In this study, friction and reciprocating wear behavior of two kinds of Fe-based ATF candidates were examined with a reciprocating wear tests at room temperature (RT) air and water. The objective is to examine the compatibilities of these Fe-based alloys against current Zr-based alloy properties, which is used as major structural materials of PWR fuel assemblies. The reciprocating wear behaviors of Fe-based accident-tolerant fuel cladding candidates against current Zr-based alloy has been studied using a reciprocating sliding wear tester in room temperature air and water. Frictional behavior and wear depth were used for evaluating the applicability and compatibilities of Fe-based candidates without significant design changes of PWR fuel assemblies

  19. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  20. Fiber fuse behavior in kW-level continuous-wave double-clad field laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun-Yi, Sun; Qi-Rong, Xiao; Dan, Li; Xue-Jiao, Wang; Hai-Tao, Zhang; Ma-Li, Gong; Ping, Yan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, original experimental data for fiber fuse in kW-level continuous-wave (CW) high power double-clad fiber (DCF) laser are reported. The propagating velocity of the fuse is 9.68 m/s in a 3.1-kW Yb-doped DCF laser. Three other cases in Yb-doped DCF are also observed. We think that the ignition of fiber fuse is caused by thermal mechanism, and the formation of bullet-shaped tracks is attributed to the optical discharge and temperature gradient. The inducements of initial fuse and formation of bullet-shaped voids are analyzed. This investigation of fiber fuse helps better understand the fiber fuse behavior, in order to avoid the catastrophic destruction caused by fiber fuse in high power fiber laser. Project supported by the Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on High Energy Laser and China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 2014HEL02) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61307057).

  1. A Review to the Laser Cladding of Self-Lubricating Composite Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quazi, M. M.; Fazal, M. A.; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Yusof, Farazila; Masjuki, H. H.; Arslan, A.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid lubricants are extremely viable in reducing wear damage and friction of mating components. However, due to the relentless pressure and the recent trend towards higher operating environments in advanced automotive and aerospace turbo-machineries, these lubricants cease to perform and hence, an alternate system is required for maintaining the self-lubricating environment. From the viewpoint of tribologist, wear is related to near-surface regions and hence, surface coatings are considered suitable for improving the functioning of tribo-pairs. Wear resistant coatings can be fabricated with the addition of various solid lubricants so as to reduce friction drag. In order to protect bulk substrates, self-lubricating wear resistant composite coatings have been fabricated by employing various surface coating techniques such as electrochemical process, physical and chemical vapor depositions, thermal and plasma spraying, laser cladding etc. Studies related to laser-based surface engineering approaches have remained vibrant and are recognized in altering the near surface regions. In this work, the latest developments in laser based self-lubricating composite coatings are highlighted. Furthermore, the effect of additives, laser processing parameters and their corresponding influence on mechanical and tribological performance is briefly reviewed.

  2. Innovative coating of nanostructured vanadium carbide on the F/M cladding tube inner surface for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Phillpot, Simon [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-11-29

    Fuel cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) have been acknowledged as a critical issue in a metallic fuel/steel cladding system due to the formation of low melting intermetallic eutectic compounds between the fuel and cladding steel, resulting in reduction in cladding wall thickness as well as a formation of eutectic compounds that can initiate melting in the fuel at lower temperature. In order to mitigate FCCI, diffusion barrier coatings on the cladding inner surface have been considered. In order to generate the required coating techniques, pack cementation, electroplating, and electrophoretic deposition have been investigated. However, these methods require a high processing temperature of above 700 oC, resulting in decarburization and decomposition of the martensites in a ferritic/martensitic (F/M) cladding steel. Alternatively, organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) can be a promising process due to its low processing temperature of below 600 oC. The aim of the project is to conduct applied and fundamental research towards the development of diffusion barrier coatings on the inner surface of F/M fuel cladding tubes. Advanced cladding steels such as T91, HT9 and NF616 have been developed and extensively studied as advanced cladding materials due to their excellent irradiation and corrosion resistance. However, the FCCI accelerated by the elevated temperature and high neutron exposure anticipated in fast reactors, can have severe detrimental effects on the cladding steels through the diffusion of Fe into fuel and lanthanides towards into the claddings. To test the functionality of developed coating layer, the diffusion couple experiments were focused on using T91 as cladding and Ce as a surrogate lanthanum fission product. By using the customized OMCVD coating equipment, thin and compact layers with a few micron between 1.5 µm and 8 µm thick and average grain size of 200 nm and 5 µm were successfully obtained at the specimen coated between 300oC and

  3. Three-dimensional fuel pin model validation by prediction of hydrogen distribution in cladding and comparison with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Avramova, Maria [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Lacroix, E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Manera, Annalisa [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Walter, D. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Williamson, R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gamble, K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-10-29

    To correctly describe and predict this hydrogen distribution there is a need for multi-physics coupling to provide accurate three-dimensional azimuthal, radial, and axial temperature distributions in the cladding. Coupled high-fidelity reactor-physics codes with a sub-channel code as well as with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool have been used to calculate detailed temperature distributions. These high-fidelity coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics code systems are coupled further with the fuel-performance BISON code with a kernel (module) for hydrogen. Both hydrogen migration and precipitation/dissolution are included in the model. Results from this multi-physics analysis is validated utilizing calculations of hydrogen distribution using models informed by data from hydrogen experiments and PIE data.

  4. Thermal mechanical analysis of applications with internal heat generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Srisharan Garg

    The radioactive tracer Technetium-99m is widely used in medical imaging and is derived from its parent isotope Molybedenum-99 (Mo-99) by radioactive decay. The majority of Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) produced internationally is extracted from high enriched uranium (HEU) dispersion targets that have been irradiated. To alleviate proliferation risks associated with HEU-based targets, the use of non-HEU sources is being mandated. However, the conversion of HEU to LEU based dispersion targets affects the Mo-99 available for chemical extraction. A possible approach to increase the uranium density, to recover the loss in Mo-99 production-per-target, is to use an LEU metal foil placed within an aluminum cladding to form a composite structure. The target is expected to contain the fission products and to dissipate the generated heat to the reactor coolant. In the event of interfacial separation, an increase in the thermal resistance could lead to an unacceptable rise in the LEU temperature and stresses in the target. The target can be deemed structurally safe as long as the thermally induced stresses are within the yield strength of the cladding and welds. As with the thermal and structural safety of the annular target, the thermally induced deflection of the BORALRTM-based control blades, used by the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURRRTM ), during reactor operation has been analyzed. The boron, which is the neutron absorber in BORAL, and aluminum mixture (BORAL meat) and the aluminum cladding are bonded together through powder metallurgy to establish an adherent bonded plate. As the BORAL absorbs both neutron particles and gamma rays, there is volumetric heat generation and a corresponding rise in temperature. Since the BORAL meat and aluminum cladding materials have different thermal expansion coefficients, the blade may have a tendency to deform as the blade temperature changes and the materials expand at different rates. In addition to the composite nature of the

  5. New metric for optimizing Continuous Loop Averaging Deconvolution (CLAD) sequences under the 1/f noise model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xian; Yuan, Han; Chen, Wufan; Wang, Tao; Ding, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Continuous loop averaging deconvolution (CLAD) is one of the proven methods for recovering transient auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) in rapid stimulation paradigms, which requires an elaborated stimulus sequence design to attenuate impacts from noise in data. The present study aimed to develop a new metric in gauging a CLAD sequence in terms of noise gain factor (NGF), which has been proposed previously but with less effectiveness in the presence of pink (1/f) noise. We derived the new metric by explicitly introducing the 1/f model into the proposed time-continuous sequence. We selected several representative CLAD sequences to test their noise property on typical EEG recordings, as well as on five real CLAD electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings to retrieve the middle latency responses. We also demonstrated the merit of the new metric in generating and quantifying optimized sequences using a classic genetic algorithm. The new metric shows evident improvements in measuring actual noise gains at different frequencies, and better performance than the original NGF in various aspects. The new metric is a generalized NGF measurement that can better quantify the performance of a CLAD sequence, and provide a more efficient mean of generating CLAD sequences via the incorporation with optimization algorithms. The present study can facilitate the specific application of CLAD paradigm with desired sequences in the clinic.

  6. Transparent conducting oxide clad limited area epitaxy semipolar III-nitride laser diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Myzaferi, A.

    2016-08-11

    The bottom cladding design of semipolar III-nitride laser diodes is limited by stress relaxation via misfit dislocations that form via the glide of pre-existing threading dislocations (TDs), whereas the top cladding is limited by the growth time and temperature of the p-type layers. These design limitations have individually been addressed by using limited area epitaxy (LAE) to block TD glide in n-type AlGaN bottom cladding layers and by using transparent conducting oxide (TCO) top cladding layers to reduce the growth time and temperature of the p-type layers. In addition, a TCO-based top cladding should have significantly lower resistivity than a conventional p-type (Al)GaN top cladding. In this work, LAE and indium-tin-oxide cladding layers are used simultaneously in a (202⎯⎯1) III-nitride laser structure. Lasing was achieved at 446 nm with a threshold current density of 8.5 kA/cm2 and a threshold voltage of 8.4 V.

  7. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Tobias; Rommel, Daniel; Scherm, Florian; Gorywoda, Marek; Glatzel, Uwe

    2017-03-10

    Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co-28Cr-9W-1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE) study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  8. Examination of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel after extended pool storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E.R.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lowry, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results from metallurgical examinations of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods from two bundles (0551 and 0074) of Shippingport PWR Core 1 blanket fuel after extended water storage. Both bundles were exposed to water in the reactor from late 1957 until discharge. The estimated average burnups were 346 GJ/kgU (4000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0551 and 1550 GJ/kgU (18,000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0074. Fuel rods from bundle 0551 were stored in deionized water for nearly 21 yr prior to examination in 1980, representing the world's oldest pool-stored Zircaloy-clad fuel. Bundle 0074 has been stored in deionized water since reactor discharge in 1964. Data from the current metallurgical examinations enable a direct assessment of extended pool storage effects because the metallurgical condition of similar fuel rods was investigated and documented soon after reactor discharge. Data from current and past examinations were compared, and no significant degradation of the Zircaloy cladding was indicated after almost 21 yr in water storage. The cladding dimensions and mechanical properties, fission gas release, hydrogen contents of the cladding, and external oxide film thicknesses that were measured during the current examinations were all within the range of measurements made on fuel bundles soon after reactor discharge. The appearance of the external surfaces and the microstructures of the fuel and cladding were also similar to those reported previously. In addition, no evidence of accelerated corrosion or hydride redistribution in the cladding was observed.

  9. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co–28Cr–9W–1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  10. Early implementation of SiC cladding fuel performance models in BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-18

    SiC-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) [5–8] are being developed and evaluated internationally as potential LWR cladding options. These development activities include interests within both the DOE-NE LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and the DOE-NE Advanced Fuels Campaign. The LWRS Program considers SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) as offering potentially revolutionary gains as a cladding material, with possible benefits including more efficient normal operating conditions and higher safety margins under accident conditions [9]. Within the Advanced Fuels Campaign, SiC-based composites are a candidate ATF cladding material that could achieve several goals, such as reducing the rates of heat and hydrogen generation due to lower cladding oxidation rates in HT steam [10]. This work focuses on the application of SiC cladding as an ATF cladding material in PWRs, but these work efforts also support the general development and assessment of SiC as an LWR cladding material in a much broader sense.

  11. Allowable peak heat-up cladding temperature for spent fuel integrity during interim-dry storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Nam Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate allowable peak cladding temperature and hoop stress for maintenance of cladding integrity during interim-dry storage and subsequent transport, zirconium alloy cladding tubes were hydrogen-charged to generate 250 ppm and 500 ppm hydrogen contents, simulating spent nuclear fuel degradation. The hydrogen-charged specimens were heated to four peak temperatures of 250°C, 300°C, 350°C, and 400°C, and then cooled to room temperature at cooling rates of 0.3 °C/min under three tensile hoop stresses of 80 MPa, 100 MPa, and 120 MPa. The cool-down specimens showed that high peak heat-up temperature led to lower hydrogen content and that larger tensile hoop stress generated larger radial hydride fraction and consequently lower plastic elongation. Based on these out-of-pile cladding tube test results only, it may be said that peak cladding temperature should be limited to a level < 250°C, regardless of the cladding hoop stress, to ensure cladding integrity during interim-dry storage and subsequent transport.

  12. Optical pyrometry measurement on oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvry, B.; Ramiandrisoa, L.; Cheymol, C.; Horny, N.; Duvaut, T.; Gallou, C.; Maskrot, H.; Destouches, C.; Ferry, L.; Gonnier, C.

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve the safety of nuclear power plant, loss-of-coolant accident experiments are implemented in research reactor. In this framework, we develop an optical pyrometry device to measure surface temperature (700-1200°C) of Zircaloy cladding without contact. The whole set-up of the simplified device (under air, without radiation) and the measurement procedure including data treatment based on bichromatic pyrometry are presented, as well as results for various temperature levels. Temperature retrieval based on the hypothesis of emissivity ratio equal to a constant, is scanned over a large wavelength range. A rather constant surface temperature is obtained on the spectral range of measurement, confirming the relevancy of emissivity hypothesis. Differences between this non-contact temperature measurement and a complementary thermocouple temperature measurement are also discussed.

  13. Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuser, Brent [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Stubbins, James [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Kozlowski, Tomasz [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Uddin, Rizwan [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Trinkle, Dallas [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Downar, Thoms [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); ang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Phillpot, Simon [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sabharwall, piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-25

    The DOE NEUP sponsored IRP on accident tolerant fuel (ATF) entitled Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel involved three academic institutions, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and ATI Materials (ATI). Detailed descriptions of the work at the University of Illinois (UIUC, prime), the University of Florida (UF), the University of Michigan (UMich), and INL are included in this document as separate sections. This summary provides a synopsis of the work performed across the IRP team. Two ATF solution pathways were initially proposed, coatings on monolithic Zr-based LWR cladding material and selfhealing modifications of Zr-based alloys. The coating pathway was extensively investigated, both experimentally and in computations. Experimental activities related to ATF coatings were centered at UIUC, UF, and UMich and involved coating development and testing, and ion irradiation. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic aspects of ATF coatings were the focus of computational work at UIUC and UMich, while materials science aspects were the focus of computational work at UF and INL. ATI provided monolithic Zircaloy 2 and 4 material and a binary Zr-Y alloy material. The selfhealing pathway was investigated with advanced computations only. Beryllium was identified as a valid self-healing additive early in this work. However, all attempts to fabricate a Zr-Be alloy failed. Several avenues of fabrication were explored. ATI ultimately declined our fabrication request over health concerns associated with Be (we note that Be was not part of the original work scope and the ATI SOW). Likewise, Ames Laboratory declined our fabrication request, citing known litigation dating to the 1980s and 1990s involving the U.S. Federal government and U.S. National Laboratory employees involving the use of Be. Materion (formerly, Brush Wellman) also declined our fabrication request, citing the difficulty in working with a highly reactive Zr and Be

  14. Effect of Specific Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nickel-Base Intermetallic Alloy Deposited by Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Reena; Kumar, Santosh; Chandra, Kamlesh; Vishwanadh, B.; Kishore, R.; Viswanadham, C. S.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.

    2012-12-01

    This article describes the microstructural features and mechanical properties of nickel-base intermetallic alloy laser-clad layers on stainless steel-316 L substrate, with specific attention on the effect of laser-specific energy input (defined as the energy required per unit of the clad mass, kJ/g) on the microstructure and properties of the clad layer, keeping the other laser-cladding parameters same. Defect-free clad layers were observed, in which various solidified zones could be distinguished: planar crystallization near the substrate/clad interface, followed by cellular and dendritic morphology towards the surface of the clad layer. The clad layers were characterized by the presence of a hard molybdenum-rich hexagonal close-packed (hcp) intermetallic Laves phase dispersed in a relatively softer face-centered cubic (fcc) gamma solid solution or a fine lamellar eutectic phase mixture of an intermetallic Laves phase and gamma solid solution. The microstructure and properties of the clad layers showed a strong correlation with the laser-specific energy input. As the specific energy input increased, the dilution of the clad layer increased and the microstructure changed from a hypereutectic structure (with a compact dispersion of characteristic primary hard intermetallic Laves phase in eutectic phase mixture) to near eutectic or hypoeutectic structure (with reduced fraction of primary hard intermetallic Laves phase) with a corresponding decrease in the clad layer hardness.

  15. Study of the temperature distribution on welded thin plates of duplex steel to be used for the external clad of a cask for transportation of radiopharmaceuticals products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betini, Evandro G.; Ceoni, Francisco C.; Mucsi, Cristiano S.; Politano, Rodolfo; Rossi, Jesualdo L., E-mail: egbetini@ipen.br, E-mail: fceoni@hotmail.com, E-mail: csmucsi@ipen.br, E-mail: politano@ipen.br, E-mail: jelrossi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Orlando, Marcos T.D., E-mail: mtdorlando@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (CCE/DFIS/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas. Departamento de Fisica

    2015-07-01

    The clad material for a proprietary transport device for radiopharmaceutical products is the main focus of the present work. The production of {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc transport cask requires a receptacle or cask where the UNS S32304 duplex steel sheet has shown that it meets high demands as the required mechanical strength and the spread of impact or shock waves mitigation. This work reports the experimental efforts in recording the thermal distribution on autogenous thin plates of UNS S32304 steel during welding. The UNS S32304 duplex steel is the most probable candidate for the external clad of the containment package for the transport of radioactive substances so it is highly relevant the understanding of all its physical parameters and its behavior under the thermal cycle imposed by a welding process. For the welding of the UNS S32304 autogenous plates the GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding) process was used with a pure argon arc protection atmosphere in order to simulate a butt joint weld on a thin duplex steel plate without filler metal. The thermal cycles were recorded by means of K-type thermocouples embedded by electrical spot welding near the weld region and connected to a multi-channel data acquisition system. The obtained results validate the reliability of the experimental apparatus for the future complete analysis of the welding experiment and further comparison to numerical analysis. (author)

  16. Optimization of the deposition process of corrosion resistant Stellite 6 coatings produced by laser cladding; Optimizacion del proceso de aporte de recubrimientos anticorrosion de Stellite 6 producidos mediante plaqueado laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicario, I.; Soriano, C.; Sanz, C.; Bayon, R.; Leunda, J.

    2009-07-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most efficient surface treatment technologies in the industry. It uses a laser heat source to deposit a thin layer of a desired material on a moving substrate, whose properties have to be improved, achieving a metallurgical bonding between them with low heat affected zone and low dilution, compared to other conventional technologies such as PTA, TIG welding or thermal Spraying. In this sense, it is remarkable that there are 3 main application fields for laser cladding technology: restoration of refurbishment of damaged parts, surface coating against corrosion or wear, and rapid proto typing. the present work described a study of the optimization of the laser cladding of Co based coatings (Diamalloy 4060NS) on medium carbon steel C45 (AISI 1945). After laser treatment, the surface of the substrate materials is improved in terms of resistance against corrosion; this confirmed in the analysis performed afterwards. it is also shown that the corrosion barrier properties have direct correlation with the laser cladding variables. (Author) 10 refs.

  17. The influence of heat treatment by annealing on clad plates residual stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mateša

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of applied clad procedure as well as heat treatment by annealing (650 °C/2h on level and nature of residual stresses was researched. Three clad procedures are used i.e. hot rolling, submerged arc welding (SAW with strip electrode and explosion welding. The relaxed deformation measurement on clad plate surfaces was performed by applying centre-hole drilling method using special measuring electrical resistance strain gauges (rosettes. After performed measuring, size and nature of residual stresses were determined using analytical method. Depending of residual stresses on depth of drilled blind-hole is studied.

  18. Special microstructured fibers with irregular and regular claddings for supercontinuum generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkovich, Vladimir P.; Vaca Pereira G., M.; Villatoro, Joel; Sotsky, Alexander B.; Illarramendi, Maria Asunción; Zubia, Joseba

    2017-08-01

    In this report, we inform in detail on fabrication of a special (3 rings of air-holes) index-giuding air-silica microstructured optical fiber (IG MOF) with different air-hole diameters in the cladding (irregular cladding) and its application for a broadband supercontinuum (SC) generation by femtosecond laser pulses. For comparison, supercontinuum generation in a special nonlinear air-silica IG MOF with regular cladding is also investigated. Dispersion properties of the investigated fibers were numerically predicted and experimentally verified. Broadband SC generation from visual wavelengths up to 1600 nm in such fibers, both with the length of 1 m, was observed.

  19. Gradient microstructure in laser clad TiC-reinforced Ni-alloy composite coating

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Y.T.; Zuo, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    A gradient TiC–(Ni alloy) composite coating was produced by one step laser cladding with pre-placed mixture powder on a 1045 steel substrate. The clad layers consisted of TiC particles, γ-Ni primary dendrites and interdendritic eutectics. From the bottom to the top of the clad layer produced at 2000 W laser power and 6 mm s−1 scanning speed, TiC particles exhibited a continuous increase both in size (from 0.8 to 4.8 µm) and in volume fraction (from 1.72 to 32.8%). Their morphology changes fro...

  20. CO2 laser-fabricated cladding light strippers for high-power fiber lasers and amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Keiron; Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Daniel, Jae; Swain, Robert; Mies, Eric; Rees, Simon; Andrew Clarkson, W; Haub, John

    2016-04-10

    We present and characterize a simple CO2 laser processing technique for the fabrication of compact all-glass optical fiber cladding light strippers. We investigate the cladding light loss as a function of radiation angle of incidence and demonstrate devices in a 400 μm diameter fiber with cladding losses of greater than 20 dB for a 7 cm device length. The core losses are also measured giving a loss of laser diode with minimal heating of the fiber coating and packaging adhesives.

  1. Experimental verification of microbending theory using mode coupling to discrete cladding modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, C. B.; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Andreasen, S. B.

    1989-01-01

    a microbending theory in which coupling between the guided mode and a number of discrete cladding modes is considered. Very good agreement between theory and measurement is achieved. The consequences of the existence of discrete cladding modes with regard to the proper choice of artificial microbending spectrum......The existence of discrete cladding modes in single-mode fibers is illustrated by inducing periodically repeated microbends along the fiber axis and performing spectral measurements of the loss are performed. In order to explain the results of the measurements, it is necessary to apply...

  2. Contraceptive failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2002-01-01

    Most studies focusing on contraceptive failure in relation to pregnancy have focused on contraceptive failure among women having induced abortions, thereby neglecting those women who, despite contraceptive failure, accept the pregnancy and intend to carry the fetus to term. To get a more complete...... picture of the problem of contraceptive failure, this study focuses on contraceptive failure among women with diverse pregnancy outcomes. In all, 3520 pregnant women attending Odense University Hospital were included: 373 had induced abortions, 435 had spontaneous abortions, 97 had ectopic pregnancies......, and 2614 received antenatal care. The variables studied comprise age, partner relationship, number of births, occupational and economical situation, and contraceptive use.Contraceptive failure, defined as contraceptive use (condom, diaphragm, IUD, oral contraception, or another modern method...

  3. The state-of-the-art laser bio-cladding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jichang; Fuh, J. Y. H.; Lü, L.

    2010-11-01

    The current state and future trend of laser bio-cladding technology are discussed. Laser bio-cladding is used in implants including fabrication of metal scaffolds and bio-coating on the scaffolds. Scaffolds have been fabricated from stainless steel, Co-based alloy or Ti alloy using laser cladding, and new laser-deposited Ti alloys have been developed. Calcium phosphate bioceramic coatings have been deposited on scaffolds with laser to improve the wear resistence and corrosion resistence of implants and to induce bone regeneration. The types of biomaterial devices currently available in the market include replacement heart valve prosthesis, dental implants, hip/knee implants, catheters, pacemakers, oxygenators and vascular grafts. Laser bio-cladding process is attracting more and more attentions of people.

  4. Low-Stress Silicon Cladding for Surface Finishing Large UVOIR Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I research, ZeCoat Corporation will develop an affordable, low-stress silicon cladding process which is super-polishable for large UVOIR mirrors. The...

  5. The Development of Expansion Plug Wedge Test for Clad Tubing Structure Mechanical Property Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [ORNL

    2016-01-12

    To determine the tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding in a hot cell, a simple test was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is described fully in US Patent Application 20060070455, “Expanded plug method for developing circumferential mechanical properties of tubular materials.” This method is designed for testing fuel rod cladding ductility in a hot cell using an expandable plug to stretch a small ring of irradiated cladding material. The specimen strain is determined using the measured diametrical expansion of the ring. This method removes many complexities associated with specimen preparation and testing. The advantages are the simplicity of measuring the test component assembly in the hot cell and the direct measurement of the specimen’s strain. It was also found that cladding strength could be determined from the test results.

  6. The Effect of Rare Earth on the Structure and Performance of Laser Clad Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ruiliang; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Dong, Qing

    Laser cladding is one kind of advanced surface modification technology and has the abroad prospect in making the wear-resistant coating on metal substrates. However, the application of laser cladding technology does not achieve the people's expectation in the practical production because of many defects such as cracks, pores and so on. The addiction of rare earth can effectively reduce the number of cracks in the clad coating and enhance the coating wear-resistance. In the paper, the effects of rare earth on metallurgical quality, microstructure, phase structure and wear-resistance are analyzed in turns. The preliminary discussion is also carried out on the effect mechanism of rare earth. At last, the development tendency of rare earth in the laser cladding has been briefly elaborated.

  7. Mode coupling in multimode step-index plastic-clad silica fibers with corrugated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savović, Svetislav; Djordjevich, Alexandar

    2017-12-01

    The state of mode coupling in step-index plastic-clad silica fibers with corrugated surfaces is investigated in this article using the power flow equation. The coupling coefficient in this equation was obtained using our previously reported method. This enabled us to obtain the length of the corrugated piece of the fiber at which equilibrium mode distribution is achieved as well as the length at which a steady state distribution is established. It was found that the plastic-clad silica fibers with corrugated surfaces showed much stronger mode coupling than plastic-clad silica fibers without corrugated surfaces. Consequently, the equilibrium as well as steady state mode distributions were achieved at shorter fiber lengths in plastic-clad silica fibers with corrugated surfaces than in the same type of optical fibers without corrugated surfaces.

  8. Residual stress analysis of laser cladding repair for nuclear steam generator damaged tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Won Jin; Lee, Sang Cheol; Lee, Seon Ho [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Laser cladding technology was studied as a method for upgrading the present repair procedures of damaged tubes in a nuclear steam generator and Doosan subsequently developed and designed a new Laser Cladding Repair System. One of the important features of this newly developed Laser Cladding Repair System is that molten metal can be deposited on damaged tube surfaces using a laser beam and filler wire without the need to install sleeves inside the tube. Laser cladding qualification tests on the steam generator tube material, Alloy 600, were performed according to ASME Section IX. Residual stress analyses were performed for weld metal and heat affected zone of as-welded and PWHT with SYSWELD software.

  9. Microstructure and properties of laser clad coatings studied by orientation imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Furar, I.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), based on electron backscatter diffraction in scanning electron microscopy, was employed to examine in detail the relationship between laser cladding processing parameters and he properties and the microstructure of single and overlapping laser

  10. Compatibility study between U-UO{sub 2} cermet fuel and T91 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Sudhir, E-mail: sudhir@barc.gov.in [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kaity, Santu; Khan, K.B. [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sengupta, Pranesh; Dey, G.K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-12-01

    Cermet is a new fuel concept for the fast reactor system and is ideally designed to combine beneficial properties of both ceramic and metal. In order to understand fuel clad chemical compatibility, diffusion couples were prepared with U-UO{sub 2} cermet fuel and T91 cladding material. These diffusion couples were annealed at 923–1073 K for 1000 h and 1223 K for 50 h, subsequently their microstructures were examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and electron probe microanalyser (EPMA). It was observed that the interaction between the fuel and constituents of T91 clad was limited to a very small region up to the temperature 993 K and discrete U{sub 6}(Fe,Cr) and U(Fe,Cr){sub 2} intermetallic phases developed. Eutectic microstructure was observed in the reaction zone at 1223 K. The activation energy for reaction at the fuel clad interface was determined.

  11. Development and study the performance of PBA cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic biosensor for urea detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botewad, S. N.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Muley, G. G., E-mail: gajananggm@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Sant Gadge Baba Amravati University, Amravati, Maharashtra, India-444602 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The fabrication and study of a cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic urea biosensor based on evanescent wave absorbance has been presented. The sensor was prepared using cladding modification technique by removing a small portion of cladding of an optical fiber and modifying with an active cladding of porous polyaniline-boric acid (PBA) matrix to immobilize enzyme-urease through cross-linking via glutaraldehyde. The nature of as-synthesized and deposited PBA film on fiber optic sensing element was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The performance of the developed sensor was studied for different urea concentrations in solutions prepared in phosphate buffer.

  12. Study of the uniform corrosion of an aluminium alloy used for the fuel cladding of the Jules Horowitz experimental reactor; Etude de la corrosion uniforme d'un alliage d'aluminium utilise comme gainage du combustible nucleaire du reacteur experimental Jules Horowitz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintergerst, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material testing reactor, an aluminium base alloy, AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. Taking into account the thermal properties of the alloy and of its oxide, the corrosion of the fuel cans presents many problems. The aim of this thesis is to provide a growing kinetic of the oxide layer at the surface of the AlFeNi fuel can in order to predict the life time of fuel element. Thus the mechanism of degradation of the cladding will be describe in order to integrate the different parameters of the operating reactor. (A.L.B.)

  13. Derivative effect of laser cladding on interface stability of YSZ@Ni coating on GH4169 alloy: An experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haizhong; Li, Bingtian; Tan, Yong; Li, Guifa; Shu, Xiaoyong; Peng, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia YSZ@Ni core-shell nanoparticles were used to prepare a thermal barrier coating (TBC) on a GH4169 alloy by laser cladding. Microstructural analysis showed that the TBC was composed of two parts: a ceramic and a bonding layer. In places where the ZrO2/Al2O3 eutectic structure was present in the ceramic layer, the Ni atoms diffused into the bonding layer, as confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The derivative effect of laser cladding results in the original YSZ@Ni core-shell nanoparticles being translated into the Al2O3 crystal, activating the YSZ. The mechanism of ceramic/metal interface cohesion was studied in depth via first-principles and molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that the trend in the diffusion coefficients of Ni, Fe, Al, and Ti is DNi > DFe > DTi > DAl in the melting or solidification process of the material. The enthalpy of formation for Al2O3 is less than that of TiO2, resulting in a thermally grown oxide (TGO) Al2O3 phase transformation. With regard to the electronic structure, the trend in Mulliken population is QO-Ni > QZr-O > QO-Al. Although the bonding is slightly weakened between ZrO2/Al2O3 (QZr-O = 0.158 metal matrix. Thus, by comparing the connective and diffusive processes, our findings lay the groundwork for detailed and comprehensive studies of the laser cladding process for the production of composite materials.

  14. Performance Evaluation of 316L-Q345R Stainless Steel Clad Plate

    OpenAIRE

    JIN He-rong; YANG Xu-kun; YI Ya-li

    2016-01-01

    Performance of 316L-Q345R stainless steel clad plate prepared by vacuum hot-rolling was evaluated from two aspects of the microstructure and micro-hardness. Microstructure topography and constituent of clad plate were investigated by scanning electron microscope and energy spectrum analysis, and changing rules of phase structure and constituent were also studied. Relationship between microstructure and hardness was studied by testing the hardness of interface between stainless steel and carbo...

  15. Microstructure and wear-resistance of laser clad TiC particle-reinforced coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lei, T.C.; Ouyang, J.H.; Pei, Y.T.; Zhou, Y.

    A TiC-Ni alloy composite coating was clad to 1045 steel substrate using a 2kW CO2 laser. The microstructural constituents of the clad layer are found to be gamma-Ni and TiCp in the dendrites, and a fine eutectic of gamma-Ni plus (Fe, Cr)(23)C-6 in the interdendritic areas. Partial dissolution and

  16. A Procedure to Address the Fuel Rod Failures during LB-LOCA Transient in Atucha-2 NPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Adorni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the specific event scenario and on the purpose of the analysis, the availability of calculation methods that are not implemented in the standard system thermal hydraulic codes might be required. This may imply the use of a dedicated fuel rod thermomechanical computer code. This paper provides an outline of the methodology for the analysis of the 2A LB-LOCA accident in Atucha-2 NPP and describes the procedure adopted for the use of the fuel rod thermomechanical code. The methodology implies the application of best estimate thermalhydraulics, neutron physics, and fuel pin performance computer codes, with the objective to verify the compliance with the specific acceptance criteria. The fuel pin performance code is applied with the main objective to evaluate the extent of cladding failures during the transient. The procedure consists of a deterministic calculation by the fuel performance code of each individual fuel rod during its lifetime and in the subsequent LB-LOCA transient calculations. The boundary and initial conditions are provided by core physics and three-dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic system codes calculations. The procedure is completed by the sensitivity calculations and the application of the probabilistic method, which are outside the scope of the current paper.

  17. Review and perspective: Sapphire optical fiber cladding development for harsh environment sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Buric, Michael; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Nakano, Jinichiro; Liu, Bo; Chorpening, Benjamin T.

    2018-03-01

    The potential to use single-crystal sapphire optical fiber as an alternative to silica optical fibers for sensing in high-temperature, high-pressure, and chemically aggressive harsh environments has been recognized for several decades. A key technological barrier to the widespread deployment of harsh environment sensors constructed with sapphire optical fibers has been the lack of an optical cladding that is durable under these conditions. However, researchers have not yet succeeded in incorporating a high-temperature cladding process into the typical fabrication process for single-crystal sapphire fibers, which generally involves seed-initiated fiber growth from the molten oxide state. While a number of advances in fabrication of a cladding after fiber-growth have been made over the last four decades, none have successfully transitioned to a commercial manufacturing process. This paper reviews the various strategies and techniques for fabricating an optically clad sapphire fiber which have been proposed and explored in published research. The limitations of current approaches and future prospects for sapphire fiber cladding are discussed, including fabrication methods and materials. The aim is to provide an understanding of the past research into optical cladding of sapphire fibers and to assess possible material systems for future research on this challenging problem for harsh environment sensors.

  18. Study on the Standard Establishment for the Integrity Assessment of Nuclear Fuel Cladding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S-S; Kim, S-H; Jung, Y-K; Yang, C-Y; Kim, I-G; Choi, Y-H; Kim, H-J; Kim, M-W; Rho, B-H [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    Fuel cladding material plays important role as a primary structure under the high temperature, high pressure and neutron environment of nuclear power plant. According to this environment, cladding material can be experienced several type aging phenomena including the neutron irradiation embrittlement. On the other hand, although the early nuclear power plant was designed to fitting into the 40MWd/KgU burn-up, the currently power plant intends to go to the high burn-up range. In this case, the safety criteria which was established at low burn-up needs to conform the applicability at the high burn-up. In this study, the safety criteria of fuel cladding material was reviewed to assess the cladding material integrity, and the material characteristics of cladding were reviewed. The current LOCA criterial was also reviewed, and the basic study for re-establishment of LOCA criteria was performed. The time concept safety criteria was also discussed to prevent the breakaway oxidation. Through the this study, safety issues will be produced and be helpful for integrity insurance of nuclear fuel cladding material. This report is the final report.

  19. Study on the standard establishment for the integrity assessment of nuclear fuel cladding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S. S.; Kim, S. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Yang, C. Y.; Kim, I. G.; Choi, Y. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, M. W.; Rho, B. H. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    Fuel cladding material plays important role as a primary structure under the high temperature, high pressure and neutron environment of nuclear power plant. According to this environment, cladding material can be experienced several type aging phenomena including the neutron irradiation embrittlement. On the other hand, although the early nuclear power plant was designed to fitting into the 40MWd/KgU burn-up, the currently power plant intends to go to the high burn-up range. In this case, the safety criteria which was established at low burn-up needs to conform the applicability at the high burn-up. In this study, the safety criteria of fuel cladding material was reviewed to assess the cladding material integrity, and the material characteristics of cladding were reviewed. The current LOCA criterial was also reviewed, and the basic study for re-establishment of LOCA criteria was performed. The time concept safety criteria was also discussed to prevent the breakaway oxidation. Through the this study, safety issues will be produced and be helpful for integrity insurance of nuclear fuel cladding material. This report is 2nd term report.

  20. Evaluation of the fabricability of advanced iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohn, W.R.; Topolski, M.J. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States). Research and Development Div.

    1993-07-01

    Researchers at Babcock & Wilcox Alliance Research Center have investigated methods to produce bimetallic tubing consisting of iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel for practical use in fossil fueled energy equipment. In the course of this work, the compatibility of iron aluminide with four candidate austenitic stainless steel substrates was first evaluated using diffusion couples. Based on these results, a combination of iron aluminide and 304 stainless steel was selected for further development. Two composite billets of this combination were then prepared and extruded in separate trails at 2200F and 2000F. Both extrusions yielded 2-inch OD clad tubes, each approximately 18 feet long. Results of the evaluation show that the tube extruded at 2000F had a sound, integrally bonded clad layer throughout its entire length. However, the tube extruded at 2200F exhibited regions of disbonding between the clad layer and the substrate. In supplement to this work, an assessment of the technical and economic merits of iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel components in power generation systems was conducted by B&W Fossil Power Division. Future activities should include an investigation of lower extrusion processing temperatures to optimize the fabrication of high quality iron-aluminide clad tubing.

  1. Progress and Challenges of Ultrasonic Testing for Stress in Remanufacturing Laser Cladding Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao-Ling; Dong, Shi-Yun; Xu, Bin-Shi; Cao, Yong

    2018-02-13

    Stress in laser cladding coating is an important factor affecting the safe operation of remanufacturing components. Ultrasonic testing has become a popular approach in the nondestructive evaluation of stress, because it has the advantages of safety, nondestructiveness, and online detection. This paper provides a review of ultrasonic testing for stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating. It summarizes the recent research outcomes on ultrasonic testing for stress, and analyzes the mechanism of ultrasonic testing for stress. Remanufacturing laser cladding coating shows typical anisotropic behaviors. The ultrasonic testing signal in laser cladding coating is influenced by many complex factors, such as microstructure, defect, temperature, and surface roughness, among others. At present, ultrasonic testing for stress in laser cladding coating can only be done roughly. This paper discusses the active mechanism of micro/macro factors in the reliability of stress measurement, as well as the impact of stress measurement on the quality and safety of remanufacturing components. Based on the discussion, this paper proposes strategies to nondestructively, rapidly, and accurately measure stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating.

  2. Fine Grained Tungsten Claddings for Cermet Based NTP Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In October 2011, NASA initiated the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) program to evaluate the feasibility and affordability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion...

  3. Active Metal Brazing and Characterization of Brazed Joints in C-C and C-SiC Composites to Copper-Clad-Molybdenum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites with CVI and resin-derived matrices, and C/SiC composites reinforced with T-300 carbon fibers in a CVI SiC matrix were joined to Cu-clad Mo using two Ag-Cu braze alloys, Cusil-ABA (1.75% Ti) and Ticusil (4.5% Ti). The brazed joints revealed good interfacial bonding, preferential precipitation of Ti at the composite/braze interface, and a tendency toward delamination in resin-derived C/C composite. Extensive braze penetration of the inter-fiber channels in the CVI C/C composites was observed. The Knoop microhardness (HK) distribution across the C/C joints indicated sharp gradients at the interface, and a higher hardness in Ticusil than in Cusil-ABA. For the C/SiC composite to Cu-clad-Mo joints, the effect of composite surface preparation revealed that ground samples did not crack whereas unground samples cracked. Calculated strain energy in brazed joints in both systems is comparable to the strain energy in a number of other ceramic/metal systems. Theoretical predictions of the effective thermal resistance suggest that such joined systems may be promising for thermal management applications.

  4. Laser stereolithography by multilayer cladding of metal powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendrzejewski, Rafal; Rabczuk, Grazyna T.; Zaremba, R.; Sliwinski, Gerard

    1998-07-01

    3D-structures obtained by means of laser cladding of the metal alloy powders: bronze B10 and stellite 6 and the process parameters are studied experimentally. The structures are made trace-on-trace by remelting of the metal powder injected into the focusing region of the 1.2 kW CO2 laser beam. For the powder and sample feeding rates of 8-22 g/min and 0.4-1.2 m/min, respectively, and the applied beam intensities not exceeding 2 X 105 W cm-2 the process is stable and regular traces connected via fusion zones are produced for each material. The thickness of these zones does not exceed several per cent of the layer height. The process results in the efficient formation of multilayer structures. From their geometry the effect of energy coupling and interaction parameters are deduced. Moreover, the microanalysis by means of SEM- and optical photographs of samples produced under different experimental conditions confirms the expected mechanical properties, low porosity and highly homogenous structure of the multilayers. In addition to the known material stellite 6 the bronze B10 is originally proposed for a rapid prototyping.

  5. Fundamental study of failure mechanisms of pressure vessels under thermo-mechanical cycling in multiphase environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penso Mula, Jorge Antonio

    Cracking and bulging in welded and internally lined pressure vessels that work in thermal-mechanical cycling services have been well known problems in the petrochemical, power and nuclear industries. Published literature and industry surveys show that similar problems have been occurring during the last 50 years. Understanding the causes of cracking and bulging would lead to improvements in the reliability of these pressure vessels. This study attempts to add information required for improving the knowledge and fundamental understanding of these problems. Cracking and bulging, most often in the weld areas, commonly experienced in delayed coking units (e.g. coke drums) in oil refineries are typical examples. The coke drum was selected for this study because of the existing field experience and past industrial investigation results that were available to serve as the baseline references for the analytical studies performed for this dissertation. Another reason for selecting the delayed coking units for this study was due to their high economical yields. Shutting down these units would cause a high negative economic impact on the refinery operations. Several failure mechanisms were hypothesized. The finite element method was used to analyze these significant variables and to verify the hypotheses. In conclusion, a fundamental explanation of the occurrence of bulging and cracking in pressure vessels in multiphase environments has been developed. Several important factors have been identified, including the high convection coefficient of the boiling layer during filling and quenching, the mismatch in physical, thermal and mechanical properties in the dissimilar weld of the clad plates and process conditions such as heating and quenching rate and warming time. Material selection for coke drums should consider not only fatigue strength but also corrosion resistance at high temperatures and low temperatures. Cracking occurs due to low cycle fatigue and corrosion. The FEA

  6. Validation and evaluation of common large-area display set (CLADS) performance specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, David J.; Gorenflo, Ronald L.

    1998-09-01

    Battelle is under contract with Warner Robins Air Logistics Center to design a Common Large Area Display Set (CLADS) for use in multiple Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C4I) applications that currently use 19- inch Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs). Battelle engineers have built and fully tested pre-production prototypes of the CLADS design for AWACS, and are completing pre-production prototype displays for three other platforms simultaneously. With the CLADS design, any display technology that can be packaged to meet the form, fit, and function requirements defined by the Common Large Area Display Head Assembly (CLADHA) performance specification is a candidate for CLADS applications. This technology independent feature reduced the risk of CLADS development, permits life long technology insertion upgrades without unnecessary redesign, and addresses many of the obsolescence problems associated with COTS technology-based acquisition. Performance and environmental testing were performed on the AWACS CLADS and continues on other platforms as a part of the performance specification validation process. A simulator assessment and flight assessment were successfully completed for the AWACS CLADS, and lessons learned from these assessments are being incorporated into the performance specifications. Draft CLADS specifications were released to potential display integrators and manufacturers for review in 1997, and the final version of the performance specifications are scheduled to be released to display integrators and manufacturers in May, 1998. Initial USAF applications include replacements for the E-3 AWACS color monitor assembly, E-8 Joint STARS graphics display unit, and ABCCC airborne color display. Initial U.S. Navy applications include the E-2C ACIS display. For these applications, reliability and maintainability are key objectives. The common design will reduce the cost of operation and maintenance by an estimated 3.3M per year on E-3 AWACS

  7. BISON Investigation of the Effect of the Fuel- Cladding Contact Irregularities on the Peak Cladding Temperature and FCCI Observed in AFC-3A Rodlet 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedev, Pavel G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The primary objective of this report is to document results of BISON analyses supporting Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) activities. Specifically, the present report seeks to provide explanation for the microstructural features observed during post irradiation examination of the helium-bonded annular U-10Zr fuel irradiated during the AFC-3A experiment. Post irradiation examination of the AFC-3A rodlet revealed microstructural features indicative of the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) at the fuel-cladding interface. Presence of large voids was also observed in the same locations. BISON analyses were performed to examine stress and temperature profiles and to investigate possible correlation between the voids and FCCI. It was found that presence of the large voids lead to a formation of circumferential temperature gradients in the fuel that may have redirected migrating lanthanides to the locations where fuel and cladding are in contact. Resulting localized increase of lanthanide concentration is expected to accelerate FCCI. The results of this work provide important guidance to the post irradiation examination studies. Specifically, the hypothesis of lanthanides being redirected from the voids to the locations where the fuel and the cladding are in contact should be verified by conducting quantitative electron microscopy or Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer (EPMA). The results also highlight the need for computer models capable of simulating lanthanide diffusion in metallic fuel and establish a basis for validation of such models.

  8. 21-in. technology-independent common display set (CLADS) design for rugged workstation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenflo, Ronald L.; Hermann, David J.

    1997-07-01

    Battelle is under contract with Warner Robins Air Logistics Center to design a Common Large Area Display Set (CLADS) for use in multiple command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence applications that currently use 19-inch cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Battelle engineers have now demonstrated that the modular CLADS design is applicable to a large number of existing and future rugged workstation applications, and that the design is technology independent. Any display technology that can be packaged to meet the form, fit, and function requirements defined by the common large area display head assembly performance specification is a candidate for CLADS applications. This has already reduced the risk of CLADS development, permits life long technology insertion upgrades without unnecessary redesign, and addresses many of the obsolescence problems associated with COTS technology-based acquisition. For each platform, only the unique form and fit requirements are included in a CLADS application integration kit, while the unique functional interfaces are provided by an application video interface module. All other parts of the design are common to all CLADS installations and are therefore required in higher quantities which means lower costs. A performance specification tree lists the specifications for each of the platforms as well as the specifications for the modules used for each platform. Detailed specifications have been drafted and will be released to potential display integrators and manufacturers for review in the coming weeks. Initial USAF applications include replacements for the E-3 AWACS color monitor assembly, E-8 Joint STARS graphics display unit, and ABCCC airborne color display. Initial US Navy applications include the E-2C ACIS display. For these applications, reliability and maintainability are key objectives. The common design will reduce the cost of operation and maintenance by an estimated 3.3 million dollars per year on E-3 AWACS alone. As

  9. High Temperature Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions Between TRIGA Fuels and 304 Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Emmanuel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keiser, Jr., Dennis D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Forsmann, Bryan [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Janney, Dawn E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Henley, Jody [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Woolstenhulme, Eric C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    High-temperature fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) fuel elements and the 304 stainless steel (304SS) are of interest to develop an understanding of the fuel behavior during transient reactor scenarios. TRIGA fuels are composed of uranium (U) particles dispersed in a zirconium-hydride (Zr-H) matrix. In reactor, the fuel is encased in 304-stainless-steel (304SS) or Incoloy 800 clad tubes. At high temperatures, the fuel can readily interact with the cladding, resulting in FCCI. A number of FCCI can take place in this system. Interactions can be expected between the cladding and the Zr-H matrix, and/or between the cladding and the U-particles. Other interactions may be expected between the Zr-H matrix and the U-particles. Furthermore, the fuel contains erbium-oxide (Er-O) additions. Interactions can also be expected between the Er-O, the cladding, the Zr-H and the U-particles. The overall result is that very complex interactions may take place as a result of fuel and cladding exposures to high temperatures. This report discusses the characterization of the baseline fuel microstructure in the as-received state (prior to exposure to high temperature), characterization of the fuel after annealing at 950C for 24 hours and the results from diffusion couple experiments carries out at 1000C for 5 and 24 hours. Characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with sample preparation via focused ion beam in situ-liftout-technique.

  10. The R&D PERFROI Project on Thermal Mechanical and Thermal Hydraulics Behaviors of a Fuel Rod Assembly during a Loss of Coolant Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repetto, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Dominguez, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Durville, B. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Carnemolla, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Campello, D. [Institut National des Sciences Appliques, Lyon (France); Tardiff, N. [Institut National des Sciences Appliques, Lyon (France); Gradeck, M. [Univ. de Lorraine, Nancy, France. LEMTA

    2015-09-04

    The safety principle in case of a LOCA is to preserve the short and long term coolability of the core. The associated safety requirements are to ensure the resistance of the fuel rods upon quench and post-quench loads and to maintain a coolable geometry in the core. An R&D program has been launched by IRSN with the support of EDF, to perform both experimental and modeling activities in the frame of the LOCA transient, on technical issues such as: - flow blockage within a fuel rods bundle and its potential impact on coolability, - fuel fragment relocation in the ballooned areas: its potential impact on cladding PCT (Peak Cladding Temperature) and on the maximum oxidation rate, - potential loss of cladding integrity upon quench and post-quench loads. The PERFROI project (2014-2019) focusing on the first above issue, is structured in two axes: 1. axis 1: thermal mechanical behavior of deformation and rupture of cladding taking into account the contact between fuel rods; specific research at LaMCoS laboratory focus on the hydrogen behavior in cladding alloys and its impact on the mechanical behavior of the rod; and, 2. axis 2: thermal hydraulics study of a partially blocked region of the core (ballooned area taking into account the fuel relocation with local over power), during cooling phase by water injection; More detailed activities foreseen in collaboration with LEMTA laboratory will focus on the characterization of two phase flows with heat transfer in deformed structures.

  11. Transmission of laser pulses with high output beam quality using step-index fibers having large cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalin, Azer P; Joshi, Sachin

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus and method for transmission of laser pulses with high output beam quality using large core step-index silica optical fibers having thick cladding, are described. The thick cladding suppresses diffusion of modal power to higher order modes at the core-cladding interface, thereby enabling higher beam quality, M.sup.2, than are observed for large core, thin cladding optical fibers. For a given NA and core size, the thicker the cladding, the better the output beam quality. Mode coupling coefficients, D, has been found to scale approximately as the inverse square of the cladding dimension and the inverse square root of the wavelength. Output from a 2 m long silica optical fiber having a 100 .mu.m core and a 660 .mu.m cladding was found to be close to single mode, with an M.sup.2=1.6. Another thick cladding fiber (400 .mu.m core and 720 .mu.m clad) was used to transmit 1064 nm pulses of nanosecond duration with high beam quality to form gas sparks at the focused output (focused intensity of >100 GW/cm.sup.2), wherein the energy in the core was 20 mJ delivered for 50 ns pulses) without damaging the silica fiber.

  12. Watt-level, all-fiber, ultrafast Er/Yb-codoped double-clad fiber laser mode-locked by reduced graphene oxide interacting with a weak evanescent field

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Lei; Li, Yujia

    2015-01-01

    We propose a Watt-level, all-fiber, ultrafast Er/Yb-codoped double-clad fiber laser passively mode-locked by reduced graphene oxide (rGO) interacting with a weak evanescent field of photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The rGO solution is filled into the cladding holes of the PCF based on total reflection, and after evaporation, the rGO flakes bear only 1/107 of the total energy in laser system, which enhances the thermal damage threshold and decreases the accumulated nonlinearity. By incorporating the saturable absorber into an Er/Yb-codoped fiber ring cavity, stable conventional soliton with a duration of 573 fs is generated, and a average output power up to 1.14 W is obtained.

  13. DETERMINATION OF THERMAL RESPONSE OF CARRARA AND SNEZNIKOVSKY MARBLE USED AS A BUILDING MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Petráňová

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Physical weathering of marble, widely used as a cladding material on buildings, is one of the most common damaging mechanism caused by anisotropic thermal expansion of calcite grains. The extent of marble deterioration depends mainly on stone fabric and texture. Dry cuboids of Carrara marble and marble from Dolni Morava quarry were subjected to microscopic analysis and thermal cycling, to determine the thermal expansion related to stone fabric and predominant lattice orientation of grains (i.e. texture.

  14. Structural cladding /clad structures:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2013-01-01

    tendencies, which can be traced in the use of materials, the structural features and the construction details of building systems in selected architectural works. With a particular focus at heavy constructions made of solid wood and masonry, and light weight constructions made of wooden frame structures......With point of departure in the present challenges found in the construction industry, which concern a reduced use of energy in buildings and consumption of material resources – this paper forms a tectonic inquiry into contemporary building practice. The aim is to look at specific performative...

  15. As-Run Thermal Analysis of the GTL-1 Experiment Irradiated in the ATR South Flux Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna P. Guillen

    2011-05-01

    The GTL-1 experiment was conducted to assess corrosion the performance of the proposed Boosted Fast Flux Loop booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 W/cm2 to 593 W/cm2. Miniplates fabricated with three different fuel variations (without fines, annealed, and with standard powder) performed equally well, with negligible irradiation-induced swelling and a normal fission density gradient. Both the standard and the modified prefilm procedures produced hydroxide films that adequately protected the miniplates from failure. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Results of the thermal analysis are given at four times during the cycle: BOC at 0 effective full power days (EFPD), middle of cycle (MOC) at 18 EFPD, MOC at 36 EFPD, and end of cycle at 48.9 EFPD. The highest temperatures and heat fluxes occur at the BOC and decrease in a linear manner throughout the cycle. Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average measured hydroxide thickness on each miniplate. The hydroxide layers are the largest on miniplates nearest to the core midplane, where heat flux and temperature are highest. The hydroxide layer thickness averages 20.4 {mu}m on the six hottest miniplates (B3, B4, C1, C2, C3, and C4). This tends to exacerbate the heating of these miniplates, since a thicker hydroxide layer reduces the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant. These six hottest miniplates have the following thermal characteristics at BOC: (1) Peak fuel centerline temperature >300 C; (2) Peak cladding temperature >200 C; (3) Peak hydroxide temperature >190 C; (4

  16. GAPCON-THERMAL-3 code description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Mohr, C.L.; Panisko, F.E.; Stewart, K.B.

    1978-01-01

    GAPCON-3 is a computer program that predicts the thermal and mechanical behavior of an operating fuel rod during its normal lifetime. The code calculates temperatures, dimensions, stresses, and strains for the fuel and the cladding in both the radial and axial directions for each step of the user specified power history. The method of weighted residuals is for the steady state temperature calculation, and is combined with a finite difference approximation of the time derivative for transient conditions. The stress strain analysis employs an iterative axisymmetric finite element procedure that includes plasticity and creep for normal and pellet-clad mechanical interaction loads. GAPCON-3 can solve steady state and operational transient problems. Comparisons of GAPCON-3 predictions to both closed form analytical solutions and actual inpile instrumented fuel rod data have demonstrated the ability of the code to calculate fuel rod behavior. GAPCON-3 features a restart capability and an associated plot package unavailable in previous GAPCON series codes.

  17. Cladding glass ceramic for use in high powered lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Alexander J.; Campbell, John H.

    1998-01-01

    A Cu-doped/Fe-doped low expansion glass ceramic composition comprising in Wt. %: SiO{sub 2} 50--65; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} 18--27; P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 0--10; Li{sub 2}O 2--6; Na{sub 2}O 0--2; K{sub 2}O 0--2; B{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1; MgO 0--4; ZnO 0--5; CaO 0--4; BaO 0--5; TiO{sub 2} 1--3; ZrO{sub 3} 1--3; As{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; CuO 0--3; and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1 wherein the total amount of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} is 80--89 wt. %, and said glass ceramic contains as a dopant 0.1--3 wt. % CuO, 0.1--1 wt. % Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or a combined CuO+Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} amount of 0.1--4 wt. %. The glass ceramic composition is suitable for use as a cladding material for solid laser energy storage mediums as well as for use in beam attenuators for measuring laser energy level and beam blocks or beam dumps used for absorbing excess or unused laser energy.

  18. Ion beam mixed oxidation protective coating on Zry-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae-Won, E-mail: pjw@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Jae-Un; Park, Jeong-Yong

    2016-06-15

    In this study, SiC was coated on the surface of Zry-4 cladding to improve the oxidation protectiveness. In the coating of SiC onto Zry-4, the prime concern was adhesion at an elevated temperature. Here, a 70 keV N ion beam was irradiated onto a SiC coating layer of ∼100 nm in thickness; this was deposited via the e-beam evaporation method. Additional coating to a target thickness was then carried out. The films deposited without ion-beam mixing (IBM) often peeled-off at an elevated temperature, while the IBM SiC film always adhered to Zry-4, even after heating to ∼1000 °C; at such a temperature, however, cracks formed in the film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the deposited SiC film contained about 20 at.% of O, while after annealing in air, 76 at.% of O was found on the surface layer. This implied that both the surface of SiC film and Zry-4 in the crack lines were oxidized. Comparing the Zr3d peak positions across the interface, a shift of binding energy by ∼1 eV was detected, representing that, in view of favorable thermodynamics, SiC/Zry-4 seems to be an acceptable system to apply IBM. To heal the crack, the process of IBM for a 1 μm thick coating and annealing was repeated. High-resolution field emission secondary electron microscopy (FE-SEM) showed that the crack lines, the main places at which oxidation occurred, were gradually covered as the process was repeated, ensuring enhanced oxidation protectiveness.

  19. Modified ring stretch tensile testing of Zr-1Nb cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, A.B.; Majumdar, S.; Ruther, W.E.; Billone, M.C.; Chung, H.M.; Neimark, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    In a round robin effort between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire in France, and the Russian Research Centre-Kurchatov Institute, Argonne National Laboratory conducted 16 modified ring stretch tensile tests on unirradiated samples of zr-1Nb cladding, which is used in Russian VVER reactors. Test were conducted at two temperatures (25 and 400 C) and two strain rates (0.001 and 1 s{sup {minus}1}). At 25 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), uniform elongation (UE), and total elongation (TE) were 201 MPa, 331 MPa, 18.2%, and 57.6%, respectively. At 400 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 109 MPa, 185 MPa, 15.4%, and 67.7%, respectively. Finally, at 400 C and 1 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 134 MPa, 189 MPa, 18.9%, and 53.4%, respectively. The high strain rate tests at room temperature were not successful. Test results proved to be very sensitive to the amount of lubrication used on the inserts; because of the large contact area between the inserts and specimen, too little lubrication leads to significantly higher strengths and lower elongations being reported. It is also important to note that only 70 to 80% of the elongation takes place in the gauge section, depending on specimen geometry. The appropriate percentage can be estimated from a simple model or can be calculated from finite-element analysis.

  20. Experimental Investigation on the APR1400 In-Core Instrumentation Penetration Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Sang Mo; Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Hwan Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The reactor vessel material is SA508, Grade 3, Class 1, and its thickness is 180.6 mm (reactor vessel 175 mm and cladding 5.6 mm). The penetration tube material is Inconel-690, which is installed by boring a vertical hole into the reactor vessel, inserting the tube through the hole, and welding the tube to the vessel inner surface. The weld materials are Inconel Welding Electrode 152 (ENiCrFe-7) for shielded metal arc welding and Inconel Filler Metal 52 (ERNiCrFe-7) for gas tungsten arc welding. They are generally used in nuclear power plants as the Inconel-690 welding materials. A vertical length of the weld is 43 mm. The tube outer diameter at the weld is 76.20 mm but its length depends on the installation positions at the reactor lower head. A thimble tube in the penetration tube has the dimensions of 8.94 mm in inner diameter and 11.43 mm in outer diameter. An annulus (19.05 mm in diameter) between the penetration tube and thimble tube is filled with RCS (reactor cooling system) water at system pressure. An ICI assembly is inserted into the thimble tube which is filled with containment air at atmospheric pressure. Therefore, if in-vessel penetration failure occurs during a severe accident, there are two paths available for melt flow: RCS water-filled annulus outside the thimble tube and air-filled channel inside the thimble tube. The penetration failure mechanism can be divided into two categories; tube ejection out of the reactor lower head and tube rupture outside the vessel. Tube ejection begins with degrading the penetration tube weld strength to zero as the weld is exposed to temperatures as high as its melting point, which is called weld failure, and then overcoming any binding force in the hole of the vessel wall that results from differential thermal expansion of the tube and vessel materials. Tube rupture assumes that the debris bed has melted the penetration tube inside the vessel and melt migrates down into the tube to a location outside the vessel

  1. The effect of axial fuel rod power profile on fuel temperature and cladding strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyu-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The most limiting design criteria for nuclear reactor normal operating conditions (ANS Condition I are known to be rod internal pressure and cladding oxidation, while those for nuclear reactor transient operating conditions (ANS Conditon II to be fuel centerline temperature and transient cladding total tensile strain. However, the design margins against fuel temperature and transient cladding tensile strain become smaller since power uprating is being or will be utilized for the most of nuclear power reactors to enhance the economics of nuclear power. In order to secure sufficient design margins against fuel temperature and cladding total tensile strain even for power uprating, the current axial rod power profiles used in the reactor transient analysis were optimized to reduce over-conservatism, considering that 118% overpower of a steady-state peak rod average power was not exceeded during the reactor transients. The comparison of the current axial rod power profiles and the optimized ones indicates that the latter reduces the fuel centerline temperature and cladding total tensile strain by 26°C and 0.02%, respectively.

  2. Corrosion inhibition of steam generator tubesheet by Alloy 690 cladding in secondary side environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Do Haeng; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Han, Jung Ho; Shim, Hee Sang

    2013-11-01

    Denting is a phenomenon that a steam generator tube is distorted by a volume expansion of corrosion products of the tube support and tubesheet materials adjacent to the tube. Although denting has been mitigated by a modification of the design and material of the tube support structures, it has been an inevitable concern in the crevice region of the top of tubesheet. This paper provides a new technology to prevent denting by cladding the secondary surface of the tubesheet with a corrosion resistant material. In this study, Alloy 690 material was cladded onto the surface of an SA508 tubesheet to a thickness of about 9 mm. The corrosion rates of the original SA508 tubesheet and the Alloy 690 clad material were measured in acidic and alkaline simulated environments. Using Alloy 690 cladding, the corrosion rate of the tubesheet within a magnetite sludge pile decreased by a factor of 680 in 0.1 M NiCl2 solution at 300 °C, and by a factor of 58 in 2 M NaOH solution at 315 °C. This means that denting can drastically be prevented by cladding the secondary tubesheet surface with corrosion resistant materials.

  3. Corrosion inhibition of steam generator tubesheet by Alloy 690 cladding in secondary side environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Do Haeng, E-mail: dhhur@kaeri.re.kr; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Han, Jung Ho; Shim, Hee Sang

    2013-11-15

    Denting is a phenomenon that a steam generator tube is distorted by a volume expansion of corrosion products of the tube support and tubesheet materials adjacent to the tube. Although denting has been mitigated by a modification of the design and material of the tube support structures, it has been an inevitable concern in the crevice region of the top of tubesheet. This paper provides a new technology to prevent denting by cladding the secondary surface of the tubesheet with a corrosion resistant material. In this study, Alloy 690 material was cladded onto the surface of an SA508 tubesheet to a thickness of about 9 mm. The corrosion rates of the original SA508 tubesheet and the Alloy 690 clad material were measured in acidic and alkaline simulated environments. Using Alloy 690 cladding, the corrosion rate of the tubesheet within a magnetite sludge pile decreased by a factor of 680 in 0.1 M NiCl{sub 2} solution at 300 °C, and by a factor of 58 in 2 M NaOH solution at 315 °C. This means that denting can drastically be prevented by cladding the secondary tubesheet surface with corrosion resistant materials.

  4. Tm-doped fiber laser resonantly diode-cladding-pumped at 1620 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburgh, G. A.; Zhang, J.; Dubinskii, M.

    2017-12-01

    We report the first demonstration of an efficient, high power, resonantly (in-band) diode-cladding-pumped Tm-doped fiber laser operating on the 3F4  ⇒  3H6 transition of Tm3+ ion. The laser, pumped by a fiber coupled laser diode module at ~1620 nm, delivered ~15 W of power at 1930 nm with a slope efficiency of 67% versus the absorbed pump power. This presents, to the best of our knowledge, the highest slope efficiency and the highest output power reported so far for resonantly diode-cladding-pumped 2 µm fiber lasers based on double-clad Tm-doped silica fibers. These very preliminary results, obtained with commercial double-clad Tm-doped fibers, unoptimized for in-band pumping at the peak of resonant absorption, indicate a very high potential of resonantly diode-cladding-pumped Tm fiber lasers for major power scaling unaffected by photodarkening. Fiber optimization for resonant pumping at the maximum of the Tm3+   3H6  ⇒  3F4 absorption band in silica (1610–1710 nm) can lead to a new generation of Tm fiber lasers with power and wall-plug efficiency, competing with those of high power tandem-pumped Tm-doped fiber lasers, but potentially with a lighter weight and smaller dimensions.

  5. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed Ali, Samar Reda; Hussein, Abdel Hamid Ahmed; Nofal, Adel Abdel Menam Saleh; Elgazzar, Haytham Abdelrafea; Sabour, Hassan Abdel

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β) titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC) and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm−2. An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times. PMID:29036935

  6. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Reda Al-Sayed Ali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm−2. An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times.

  7. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [ORNL

    2016-08-31

    This report is issued as the first revision to FCRD-MRWFD-2016-000297. Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using non-radioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.

  8. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; Bruffey, Stephanie H [ORNL; DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [ORNL; Walker, Trenton Baird [ORNL

    2016-08-31

    Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using nonradioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.

  9. Modelling of the intergranular damage of fuel rod cladding under condition of fuel-cladding interactions; Modelisation de l'endommagement intergranulaire des gaines de combustibles en condition d'interaction pastille-gaine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diard, O.; Leclercq, S.; Rousselier, G.; Cailletaud, G. [Centre des Materiaux, ENSMP, Evry (France)

    2001-04-01

    The following topics were dealt with: intergranular damage modelling for Zircaloy-4 fuel rod cladding under fuel-cladding interaction conditions, stress corrosion due to fission products (esp. iodine), inhomogeneous mechanical and chemical damaging effects, microstructural simulations with respect to constraint analysis, intergranular microcavitation and brittle phase formation.

  10. Learning from corrosion. What are the demands of the operation, what is feasible weldingly at the corrosion protection by cladding?; Von Korrosion lernen. Welche Herausforderungen stellt der Betrieb, was ist schweisstechnisch beim Korrosionsschutz durch Cladding machbar?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Thomas; Trotha, Ghita von; Molitor, Dominik [CheMin GmbH, Augsburg (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    The weld cladding of pipe walls and single tubes with nickel-base alloys is a precautionary measure for the new construction of evaporators or super-heaters in incinerators with difficult fuels. Under this aspect, the authors of this contribution report on some aspects of corrosion of claddings in order to learn about the corrosion protection. Welding optimizations are presented.

  11. THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE LASER CLAD COATINGS WITH Ni BASED MATRIX WITH WC PARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zita Iždinská

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the influence of the processing conditions on the microstructure and abrasive wear behavior of composite laser clad coatings with Ni based matrix reinforced with 50% WC particles is analyzed. Composite powder was applied in the form of coatings onto a mild steel substrate (Fe–0.17% C by different laser powers and cladding speeds. The microstructure of the coatings was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Tribological properties of coatings were evaluated by pin-on-disc wear test. It appeared that the hardness of the matrix of composite coatings decreases with increasing cladding speed. However, wear resistance of composite coatings with decreasing hardness of Ni based matrix increases. Significantly enhanced wear resistance of WC composite coatings in comparison with Ni based coatings is attributed to the hard phase structures in composite coatings.

  12. Fuel Performance Calculations for FeCrAl Cladding in BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Sweet, Ryan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Maldonado, G. Ivan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study expands upon previous neutronics analyses of the reactivity impact of alternate cladding concepts in boiling water reactor (BWR) cores and directs focus toward contrasting fuel performance characteristics of FeCrAl cladding against those of traditional Zircaloy. Using neutronics results from a modern version of the 3D nodal simulator NESTLE, linear power histories were generated and supplied to the BISON-CASL code for fuel performance evaluations. BISON-CASL (formerly Peregrine) expands on material libraries implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and the MOOSE framework by providing proprietary material data. By creating material libraries for Zircaloy and FeCrAl cladding, the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod (e.g., strains, centerline fuel temperature, and time to gap closure) were investigated and contrasted.

  13. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

  14. FABRICATION AND MATERIAL ISSUES FOR THE APPLICATION OF SiC COMPOSITES TO LWR FUEL CLADDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEON-JU KIM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication methods and requirements of the fiber, interphase, and matrix of nuclear grade SiCf/SiC composites are briefly reviewed. A CVI-processed SiCf/SiC composite with a PyC or (PyC-SiCn interphase utilizing Hi-Nicalon Type S or Tyranno SA3 fiber is currently the best combination in terms of the irradiation performance. We also describe important material issues for the application of SiC composites to LWR fuel cladding. The kinetics of the SiC corrosion under LWR conditions needs to be clarified to confirm the possibility of a burn-up extension and the cost-benefit effect of the SiC composite cladding. In addition, the development of end-plug joining technology and fission products retention capability of the ceramic composite tube would be key challenges for the successful application of SiC composite cladding.

  15. High power operation of cladding pumped holmium-doped silica fibre lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemming, Alexander; Bennetts, Shayne; Simakov, Nikita; Davidson, Alan; Haub, John; Carter, Adrian

    2013-02-25

    We report the highest power operation of a resonantly cladding-pumped, holmium-doped silica fibre laser. The cladding pumped all-glass fibre utilises a fluorine doped glass layer to provide low loss cladding guidance of the 1.95 µm pump radiation. The operation of both single mode and large-mode area fibre lasers was demonstrated, with up to 140 W of output power achieved. A slope efficiency of 59% versus launched pump power was demonstrated. The free running emission was measured to be 2.12-2.15 µm demonstrating the potential of this architecture to address the long wavelength operation of silica based fibre lasers with high efficiency.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Field and Residual Stress Distribution for Laser Cladding Remanufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hua

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional finite element model was employed to simulate the cladding process of Ni-Cr-B-Si coatings on 16MnR steel under different parameters of laser power, scanning speed, and spot diameter. The temperature and residual stress distribution, the depth of the heat affected zone (HAZ, and the optimized parameters for laser cladding remanufacturing technology were obtained. The orthogonal experiment and intuitive analysis on the depth of the HAZ were performed to study the influence of different cladding parameters. A new criterion based on the ratio of the maximum tensile residual stress and fracture strength of the substrate was proposed for optimization of the remanufacturing parameters. The result showed well agreement with that of the HAZ analysis.

  17. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings - phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Stanko, G.J. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1996-08-01

    In Phase I a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase II (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA-8511, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, 800HT, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy will be exposed for 4000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The results will be presented for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 4000 hours of exposure.

  18. Microstructural modifications in an explosively welded Ti/Ti clad material: I. Bonding interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, M.; Chiba, A.; Imamura, K. (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan)); Minato, H.; Shudo, J. (Nippon Steel Corp., Kitakyushu (Japan) Daido Special Steel Corp., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-03-01

    Microstructural modifications of the bonding interface in an explosively welded Ti/Ti clad material using the preset angle standoff configuration with various flyer plate speeds have been studied. Explosive welding was completed at flyer plate speed over 420 m/s. The wavelength and amplitude of the wavy interface increased with increasing flyer plate speed up to 1060 m/s. The planar interface was obtained at flyer plate speed of 1150 m/s. The trace of melting was observed at the bonding interface in the present experimental conditions. It is concluded that the melting layer is responsible for the bonding of explosively welded Ti/Ti clad materials. An anomaly hardening zone was formed at the bonding interface in the clad material welded at flyer plate speed of 1150 m/s. The origin of the observed anomalous hardening has also been discussed.

  19. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK•CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 °C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2, TiO2, ZrSiO4) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 °C, solution annealing at 1050 °C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 °C, final annealing at 1050 °C, straightening and final aging at 800 °C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO2 were loaded in the Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial and final reduction rates, temperature, duration, atmosphere and furnace). Specific non

  20. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Ting; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2017-07-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%-40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V8C7, M7C3, and M23C6 were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content. No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. The corrosion resistance of the clads was decreased with the increase in the VC content, demonstrating the negative effect of VC on the corrosion resistance of AISI 420 stainless steel

  1. Preliminary assessment of the fracture behavior of weld material in full-thickness clad beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Iskander, S.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-10-01

    This report describes a testing program that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV wall (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients due to welding and cladding applications, as well as material inhomogeneities in welded regions due to reheating in multiple weld passes. A summary of the testing program includes a description of the specimen geometry, material properties, the testing procedure, and the experimental results form three specimens. The yield strength of the weld material was determined to be 36% higher than the yield strength of the base material. An irradiation-induced increase in yield strength of the weld material could result in a yield stress that exceeds the upper limit where code curves are valid. The high yield strength for prototypic weld material may have implications for RPV structural integrity assessments. Analyses of the test data are discussed, including comparisons of measured displacements with finite-element analysis results, applications of toughness estimation techniques, and interpretations of constraint conditions implied by stress-based constraint methodologies. Metallurgical conditions in the region of the cladding heat-affected zone are proposed as a possible explanation for the lower-bound fracture toughness measured with one of the shallow-crack clad beam specimens. Fracture toughness data from the three clad beam specimens are compared with other shallow- and deep-crack uniaxial beam and cruciform data generated previously from A 533 Grade B plate material.

  2. Microstructure and phase evolution in laser clad chromium carbide-NiCrMoNb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, L., E-mail: venkatesh@arci.res.in [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India); Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Samajdar, I. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Tak, Manish [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India); Doherty, Roger D. [Department of Materials Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundakaram, Ravi C.; Prasad, K. Satya; Joshi, S.V. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Microstructural development during laser cladding has been studied. • In this multi component system Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} is found to be the stable carbide phase. • Phases were identified by EBSD since XRD results were not conclusive. • Increase in laser power and/or scanning speed reduced the carbide content. • Hardness seems to depend on phase content as well as microstructure. - Abstract: Microstructural development in laser clad layers of Chromium carbide (Cr{sub x}C{sub y})-NiCrMoNb on SA 516 steel has been investigated. Although the starting powder contained both Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} and Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, the clad layers showed only the presence of Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}. Microtexture measurements by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed primary dendritic Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} with Ni rich FCC metallic phase being present in the interdendritic spaces. Further annealing of the laser clad layers and furnace melting of the starting powder confirmed that Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} is the primary as well as stable carbide phase in this multi component system. Increase in laser power and scanning speed progressively reduced carbide content in the laser clad layers. Increased scanning speed, which enhances the cooling rate, also led to reduction in the secondary arm spacing (λ{sub 2}) of the Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} dendrites. The clad layer hardness increased with carbide content and with decreased dendrite arm spacing.

  3. Microscopic analysis of oxide formed on ZIRLO cladding tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ho Yeon; Bahn, Chi Bum [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The oxide transition has been proposed to be caused by accumulated stresses during oxide growth and interconnected porosity. The metal/oxide interface roughness is linked to location of cracks, formation of the cracks is also associated with the transition of the oxide and large compressive stresses caused by oxide volume expansion. The cracks found in the oxide are mainly oriented parallel to the metal/oxide interface. They are more likely to work as obstacles for diffusion of oxidizing species rather than as easy diffusion paths. Bossis et al. reported a porous outer layer in a pretransition oxide by ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) experiments. Cox et al. anticipated that porosity provides connected paths between external oxidizing medium and the underlying metal. Ni et al. reported interconnected nanopores along with grain boundaries in the oxide and concluded that development of interlinked porosity down to the metal/oxide interface is a key mechanism for the transition in oxidation kinetics. Microscopic examinations by SEM, TEM with FIB technique and XRD analysis were conducted to characterize the oxide formed on ZIRLO cladding tube samples oxidized in an autoclave of a recirculation loop at 360 .deg. C and 20MPa for 300 hour under simulating primary water chemistry conditions. The samples have an oxide thickness ranging from 0.9 to 1.25 μm range. Lateral cracks and columnar grains are dominant near the metal/oxide interface while round-shaped cracks (or cavities) and equiaxed grains are dominant near the water/oxide interface. A very large lateral crack is observed just above the metal/oxide interface summit that is least advanced. However, there is the possibility that the width of this crack was extended during the FIB sectioning. Local sub-oxide layer is shown as faint part on darkfield TEM image along the metal/oxide interface and it has Zr:O ratio of 1:1 (between 45 and 55 at.%) with about 20nm width.

  4. The effect of cladding speed on phase constitution and properties of AISI 431 stainless steel laser deposited coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmati, I.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    Shorter processing time has given impetus to laser cladding technology and therefore in this research the AISI 431 martensitic stainless steel coatings are laser deposited at high cladding speeds, i.e. up to 117 mm/s. The analysis of phase constitution and functional properties of the coatings are

  5. Thick Co-based coating on cast iron by side laser cladding : Analysis of processing conditions and coating properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; de Oliveira, U.; de Boer, M.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to create Co-based coatings (compositionally close to Stellite 6) on compacted graphite and gray cast iron,substrates with a high power laser (2 kW continuous Nd:YAG) cladding process. The relationships between the relevant laser cladding parameters (i.e. laser beam

  6. Failure Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, K. P.; Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1999-01-01

    The present appendix contains the derivation of ten different limit state equations divided on three different failure modes. Five of the limit state equations can be used independently of the characteristics of the subsoil, whereas the remaining five can be used for either drained or undrained s...

  7. Experimental study of a Q-switched ytterbium-doped double-clad fiber laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzueto S, G.; Estudillo A, M. [FIMEE, Campus Salamanca, Universidad de Guanajuato, Domicilio conocido, Comunidad de Palo Blanco, 36885, A.P. 215-A, Salamanca, Guanajuato (Mexico); Martinez R, A.; Torres G, I. [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Lomas del Bosque 115, 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Selvas A, R. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, UANL, Cd. Universitaria, 66450, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)]. e-mail: gilberto.anzueto@gmail. com

    2008-07-01

    We report an experimental characterization of a Q-switched operation of an all-fiber laser using , 30 m of a double-clad ytterbium-doped fiber spliced to a piece of single-mode un-doped holey fiber. Loss modulation in the splicing point between the active and un-doped fiber due to a substantial coupling of light into lossy cladding modes stimulates pulsed operation of the fiber laser. Pulse energy of {approx}2.5 {mu}J was estimated and the repetition rate was measured in the range of 4-16 KHz. (Author)

  8. Identification of Bloch-modes in hollow-core Photonic Crystal Fiber cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couny, F.; Benabid, F.; Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    length of fiber. A detailed study of the modes near the edges of the band gap shows that it is formed by the influence of three types of resonator: the glass interstitial apex, the silica strut which joins the neighboring apexes, and the air hole. The cladding electromagnetic field which survives......We report on the experimental visualization of the cladding Bloch-modes of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Both spectral and spatial field information is extracted using the approach, which is based on measurement of the near-field and Fresnel-zone that results after propagation over a short...

  9. Direct Laser Cladding of Cobalt on Ti-6Al-4V with a Compositionally Graded Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Dutta Majumdar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct laser cladding of cobalt on Ti-6Al-4V with and without a graded interface has been attempted using a continuous wave CO2 laser. Graded interface is developed by depositing a thin copper layer on Ti-6Al-4V substrate prior to multiple laser cladding of cobalt on it. Presence of copper interlayer was found to suppress the formation of brittle intermetallics of Ti and Co. The effect of process parameters on the microstructures, compositions, and phases of the interface was studied in details. Finally, the mechanical and electrochemical properties of the interface processed under optimum process parameters are reported.

  10. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhe [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States); Yu, Ting [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States); School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Kovacevic, Radovan, E-mail: kovacevi@smu.edu [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • The coatings of 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC were fabricated by high power direct diode laser. • The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was increased with the increase in the VC fraction. • No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. • The corrosion resistance of the cladded layer was decreased with the increase in the VC fraction. - Abstract: Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%–40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V{sub 8}C{sub 7}, M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content

  11. Microstructure of laser-clad SiC-(Ni alloy) composite coating

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Y.T.; Ouyang, J.H.; Lei, T.C.; Zhou, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The laser cladding technique was used to produce Ni alloy coatings with different SiC particle (SiCp) contents on steel 1045. The complete dissolution of SiCp took place during laser melting and led to a microstructural evolution of the coatings associated with the SiCp content. M7X3 or M23X6-type carboborides and Ni-base solid solution are found as the main microstructural constituents of the clad layers, and the volume fraction of the carboborides increases with increasing SiCp content. Whe...

  12. Development and Validation of Accident Models for FeCrAl Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this milestone report is to present the work completed in regards to material model development for FeCrAl cladding and highlight the results of applying these models to Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) and Station Blackouts (SBO). With the limited experimental data available (essentially only the data used to create the models) true validation is not possible. In the absence of another alternative, qualitative comparisons during postulated accident scenarios between FeCrAl and Zircaloy-4 cladded rods have been completed demonstrating the superior performance of FeCrAl.

  13. Design and optimization of the combination film in 10kW diode laser cladding source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-bo; Lin, Xing-chen; Hao, Ming-ming; Zhang, Jin-sheng; Ning, Yong-qiang

    2015-08-01

    According to the special requirements of combination film in 10kW diode laser cladding source, the polarization combination film at 915nm was designed and grew. Film system is designed at different film materials based on the design theory. The non-QWOT film is optimized using the needle optimization and double sided coating by Optilayer software. The film was used in the 10kW diode laser source after high temperature aging testing. The film formed by Ta2O5 is very stable under IBAD, which can meet the reliability of 10kW diode laser cladding source in industry

  14. Sensitive on-chip methane detection with a cryptophane-A cladded Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullo, Firehun Tsige; Lindecrantz, Susan; Jágerská, Jana; Hansen, Jørn H; Engqvist, Magnus; Solbø, Stian Andre; Hellesø, Olav Gaute

    2015-11-30

    We report a methane sensor based on an integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which is cladded by a styrene-acrylonitrile film incorporating cryptophane-A. Cryptophane-A is a supramolecular compound able to selectively trap methane, and its presence in the cladding leads to a 17-fold sensitivity enhancement. Our approach, based on 3 cm-long low-loss Si3N4 rib waveguides, results in a detection limit as low as 17 ppm. This is 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than typically achieved with chip-scale low-cost sensors.

  15. Overview of lower length scale model development for accident tolerant fuels regarding U3Si2 fuel and FeCrAl cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-09-01

    U3Si2 and FeCrAl have been proposed as fuel and cladding concepts, respectively, for accident tolerance fuels with higher tolerance to accident scenarios compared to UO2. However, a lot of key physics and material properties regarding their in-pile performance are yet to be explored. To accelerate the understanding and reduce the cost of experimental studies, multiscale modeling and simulation are used to develop physics-based materials models to assist engineering scale fuel performance modeling. In this report, the lower-length-scale efforts in method and material model development supported by the Accident Tolerance Fuel (ATF) high-impact-problem (HIP) under the NEAMS program are summarized. Significant progresses have been made regarding interatomic potential, phase field models for phase decomposition and gas bubble formation, and thermal conductivity for U3Si2 fuel, and precipitation in FeCrAl cladding. The accomplishments are very useful by providing atomistic and mesoscale tools, improving the current understanding, and delivering engineering scale models for these two ATF concepts.

  16. What Is Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  17. What Causes Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  18. Living with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  19. Suppression of dilution in Ni-Cr-Si-B alloy cladding layer by controlling diode laser beam profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Daichi; Funada, Yoshinori; Abe, Nobuyuki; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yoshihiko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Tatsumi, Yoshihiro; Yoneyama, Mikio

    2018-02-01

    A Ni-Cr-Si-B alloy layer was produced on a type 304 stainless steel plate by laser cladding. In order to produce cladding layer with smooth surface and low dilution, influence of laser beam profile on cladding layer was investigated. A laser beam with a constant spatial intensity at the focus spot was used to suppress droplet formation during the cladding layer formation. This line spot, formed with a focussing unit designed by our group, suppressed droplet generation. The layer formed using this line spot with a constant spatial intensity had a much smoother surface compared to a layer formed using a line spot with a Gaussian-like beam. In addition, the dilution of the former layer was much smaller. These results indicated that a line spot with a constant spatial intensity was more effective in producing a cladding layer with smooth surface and low dilution because it suppressed droplet generation.

  20. Development of dispersion U(Mo)/Al–Si miniplates fabricated at 500 °C with Al 6061 as cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirandou, M.I., E-mail: mirandou@cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia Materiales-GAEN-CNEA, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Aricó, S.F. [Gerencia Materiales-GAEN-CNEA, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto Sabato UNSAM-CNEA, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Balart, S.N. [Gerencia Materiales-GAEN-CNEA, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fabro, J.O. [Departamento ECRI, Gerencia de Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, CNEA, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-02-15

    In the frame of U(Mo) dispersion fuel elements qualification, Si additions to Al matrix arose as a promising solution to the unacceptable failures found when pure Al is used. Analysis of as-fabricated fuel plates made with Al–Si matrices demonstrated that good irradiation behavior is correlated with the formation during fabrication of a Si-containing interaction layer around the U(Mo) particles. Thus, the analysis of the influence of fabrication parameters becomes important. Studies on Al–Si dispersion miniplates fabricated in CNEA, Argentina, have been initiated to determine how to obtain the better interaction layer characteristics with the lesser modifications to the fabrication process and the smaller amount of Si in the matrix. In this work results for miniplates made of atomized U–7 wt%Mo particles dispersed in Al–2 wt%Si and Al–4 wt%Si matrices, obtained by mixing pure Al and Si powders, and Al 6061 as cladding are presented. Interaction layer grown during fabrication process (500 °C) consists of Si-containing phases being U(Al, Si){sub 3} its principal component. Its uniformity is not satisfactory due to the formation of an oxide layer.

  1. Development of Cladding Materials for Evacuated Panel Superinsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, K.E.; Weaver, F.J.; Cumberbatch, G.M.; Begnoche, B.; Brodie, V.; Lamb, W.; Reitz, R.; Caldwell, P.; Meyer, C.

    1999-11-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was among E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Company, VacuPanel, Inc., and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. Evacuated panel superinsulations have thermal resistivities (R) substantially above that of conventional existing insulation without the environmental problems of some insulations such as foam insulations blown with Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs).

  2. Failure Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Robyn; Nikora, Allen

    2005-01-01

    Three questions to which software developers want accurate, precise answers are "How can the software system fail?", "mat bad things will happen if the software fails?t', and "How many failures will the software experience?". Numerous techniques have been devised to answer these questions; three of the best known are: 1) Software Fault Tree Analysis (SFTA) 2) Software Failure Modes, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (SFMECA 3) Software Fault/Failure Modeling. SFTA and SFMECA have been successfully used to analyze the flight software for a number of robotic planetary exploration missions, including Galileo, Cassini, and Deep Space 1. Given the increasing interest in reusing software components from mission to mission, one of us has developed techniques for reusing the corresponding portions of the SFTA and SFMECA, reducing the effort required to conduct these analyses. SFTA has also been shown to be effective in analyzing the security aspects of software systems; intrusion mechanisms and effects can easily be modeled using these techniques. The Bi- Directional Safety Analysis (BDSA) method combines a forward search (similar to SFMECA) from potential failure modes to their effects, with a backward search (similar to SFTA) from feasible hazards to the contributing causes of each hazard. BDSA offers an efficient way to identify latent failures. Recent work has extended BDSA to product-line applications such as flight-instrumentation displays and developed tool support for the reuse of the failure-analysis artifacts within a product line. BDSA has also been streamlined to support those projects having tight cost and/or schedule constraints for their failure analysis efforts. We discuss lessons learned from practice, describe available tools, and identi@ some future directions for the topic. A substantial amount of research has been devoted to estimating the number of failures that a software system will experience during test and operations, as well as the number of

  3. Metallization failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, R.

    1971-01-01

    Metallization-related failure mechanisms were shown to be a major cause of integrated circuit failures under accelerated stress conditions, as well as in actual use under field operation. The integrated circuit industry is aware of the problem and is attempting to solve it in one of two ways: (1) better understanding of the aluminum system, which is the most widely used metallization material for silicon integrated circuits both as a single level and multilevel metallization, or (2) evaluating alternative metal systems. Aluminum metallization offers many advantages, but also has limitations particularly at elevated temperatures and high current densities. As an alternative, multilayer systems of the general form, silicon device-metal-inorganic insulator-metal, are being considered to produce large scale integrated arrays. The merits and restrictions of metallization systems in current usage and systems under development are defined.

  4. FRAPCON-2: A Computer Code for the Calculation of Steady State Thermal-Mechanical Behavior of Oxide Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, G. A; Bohn, M. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Williford, R. E.; Lanning, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    FRAPCON-2 is a FORTRAN IV computer code that calculates the steady state response of light Mater reactor fuel rods during long-term burnup. The code calculates the temperature, pressure, deformation, and tai lure histories of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include (a) heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, (b) cladding elastic and plastic deformation, (c) fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, (d) fission gas release, (e} fuel rod internal gas pressure, (f) heat transfer between fuel and cladding, (g) cladding oxidation, and (h) heat transfer from cladding to coolant. The code contains necessary material properties, water properties, and heat transfer correlations. FRAPCON-2 is programmed for use on the CDC Cyber 175 and 176 computers. The FRAPCON-2 code Is designed to generate initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by either the FRAP-T6 computer code or the thermal-hydraulic code, RELAP4/MOD7 Version 2.

  5. Behaviour of honey bees and bumble bees beneath three different greenhouse claddings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacquiere, T.; Aa-Furnée, van der J.; Cornelissen, B.; Donders, J.N.L.C.

    2006-01-01

    Several new cladding materials for greenhouses are tested and some already introduced in greenhouse horticulture, aiming at maximizing the transmission of photosynthetic radiation and reducing the loss of heat. As a part of the evaluation this research focuses on the suitability of different

  6. Effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of weld overlay cladding for reactor pressure vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Tohru; Udagawa, Makoto; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Onizawa, Kunio

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of high fluence neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of two types of cladding materials fabricated using the submerged-arc welding and electroslag welding methods. The tensile tests, Charpy impact tests, and fracture toughness tests were conducted before and after the neutron irradiation with a fluence of 1 × 1024 n/m2 at 290 °C. With neutron irradiation, we could observe an increase in the yield strength and ultimate strength, and a decrease in the total elongation. All cladding materials exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during the Charpy impact tests. A reduction in the Charpy upper-shelf energy and an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was observed with neutron irradiation. There was no obvious decrease in the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (JIc) of the cladding materials upon irradiation with high neutron fluence. The tearing modulus was found to decrease with neutron irradiation; the submerged-arc-welded cladding materials exhibited low JIc values at high temperatures.

  7. 78 FR 10265 - Pricing for the 2013 Commemorative Coin Programs-Silver and Clad Coin Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2013 Commemorative Coin Programs--Silver and Clad Coin Options AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is...

  8. Fabrication and evaluation of evanescent wave absorption based polyaniline-cladding modified fiber optic urea biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botewad, S. N.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Muley, G. G.

    2018-01-01

    The fabrication and study of cladding modified intrinsic fiber optic urea biosensor has been reported in the present investigation. A simple cladding modification technique was used to construct the sensor by uncladding the small portion from optical fiber. Further bare core was decorated by supportive porous, chemically and optically sensitive matrix material polyaniline (PANI) as an active cladding for enzyme residency. Enzyme-urease (Urs) was cross-linked on the active cladding region via glutaraldehyde solution. Confirmation of the prepared PANI in proper form determined by ultraviolet-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic techniques. X-ray diffraction technique was employed for nature and compatibility examination of PANI. Sensor parameters such as sensitivity, selectivity, stability and lower detection limit have been analyzed by absorption variation study in evanescent wave field. The response of prepared sensor was studied towards urea in the wide concentration range 100 nM-100 mM and confirmed its lowest detection limit as 100 nM. The stability of sensor was found 28 days with little variation in response. The fabricated sensor has not shown any response towards interference species like glucose, ascorbic acid, L-alanine, L-arginine and their combination with urea solution and hence found selective for urea solution only.

  9. Single-mode waveguides with SU-8 polymer core and cladding for MOEMS applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Maria; Zauner, Dan; Boisen, Anja

    2007-01-01

    Fabrication and optical characterization of singlemode polymeric embedded waveguides are performed. A specific material combination (SU-8 2005 as core and the modified SU-8 mr-L 6050XP as cladding) is chosen in order to obtain a small refractive index difference for single-mode propagation combin...

  10. Mechanical Properties and Interfacial Structure of Ti/Al Clad Plates Generated by Differential Temperature Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zichen; Xiao, Hong; Li, Na; Yu, Chao; Ren, Zhongkai

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a Ti/Al clad plate was prepared by differential temperature rolling, where only the titanium layer is heated. The effects of the rolling reduction and Ti layer heating temperature on the shear strength and interface of Ti/Al clad plates were investigated. The results indicate that when the titanium layer was heated to 800° and the rolling reduction was 50%, the shear strength of the titanium/aluminum clad plates interface reached 107.5 MPa, which is close to the shear strength of aluminum matrix, and the fracture surface presented ductile fracture characteristics. During the heating process, an oxide layer was produced on the surface of the titanium plates. However, the oxide layer was completely broken with a large rolling reduction, and then, aluminum metal extruded into the cracks and made contact with fresh titanium metal. Under the action of high pressure and high temperature, Ti and Al atoms mutually diffuse so that the Ti/Al clad plates achieved a strong metallurgical bond.

  11. Industry Application Emergency Core Cooling System Cladding Acceptance Criteria Early Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Youngblood, Robert W. [FPoliSolutions LLC, Murrysville, PA (United States); Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhao, Haihua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frepoli, Cesare [FPoliSolutions LLC, Murrysville, PA (United States); Yurko, Joseph P. [FPoliSolutions LLC, Murrysville, PA (United States); Swindlehurst, Gregg [GS Nuclear Consulting, Charlotte, NC (United States); Zoino, Angelo [Univ. of Rome Tor Vergata (Italy)

    2015-09-01

    The U. S. NRC is currently proposing rulemaking designated as “10 CFR 50.46c” to revise the loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA)/emergency core cooling system (ECCS) acceptance criteria to include the effects of higher burnup on cladding performance as well as to address other technical issues. The NRC is also currently resolving the public comments with the final rule expected to be issued in April 2016. The impact of the final 50.46c rule on the industry may involve updating of fuel vendor LOCA evaluation models, NRC review and approval, and licensee submittal of new LOCA evaluations or re-analyses and associated technical specification revisions for NRC review and approval. The rule implementation process, both industry and NRC activities, is expected to take 4-6 years following the rule effective date. As motivated by the new rule, the need to use advanced cladding designs may be a result. A loss of operational margin may result due to the more restrictive cladding embrittlement criteria. Initial and future compliance with the rule may significantly increase vendor workload and licensee cost as a spectrum of fuel rod initial burnup states may need to be analyzed to demonstrate compliance. Consequently, there will be an increased focus on licensee decision making related to LOCA analysis to minimize cost and impact, and to manage margin. The proposed rule would apply to a light water reactor and to all cladding types.

  12. Investigation of Hot Rolling Influence on the Explosive-Welded Clad Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghui ZHAO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure, the shear strength and tensile strength of stainless steel explosive-welded clad plate at different rolling reduction were studied. The mechanical properties of the explosive-welded and explosive-rolled clad plates were experimentally measured. Simultaneously, the microstructures of the clad plate were investigated by the Ultra deep microscope and the tensile fracture surface were observed by the scan electron microscope (SEM. It was observed that the tensile strength has been increased considerably, whereas the elongation percentage has been reduced with the increase of hot rolling reduction. In the tensile shear test, the bond strength is higher than the strength of the ferritic stainless steel layer and meets the relevant known standard criterion. Microstructural evaluations showed that the grain of the stainless steel and steel refined with the increase of thickness reduction. Examination of the tensile fracture surfaces reveal that, after hot rolling, the fracture in the low alloy steel and ferritic stainless steel clad plates is of the ductile type.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12409

  13. Current status of materials development of nuclear fuel cladding tubes for light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Zhengang, E-mail: duan_zg@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Yang, Huilong [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Satoh, Yuhki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Murakami, Kenta; Kano, Sho; Zhao, Zishou; Shen, Jingjie [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki, E-mail: abe.hiroaki@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Zirconium-based (Zr-based) alloys have been widely used as materials for the key components in light water reactors (LWRs), such as fuel claddings which suffer from waterside corrosion, hydrogen uptakes and strength loss at elevated temperature, especially during accident scenarios like the lost-of-coolant accident (LOCA). For the purpose of providing a safer, nuclear leakage resistant and economically viable LWRs, three general approaches have been proposed so far to develop the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) claddings: optimization of metallurgical composition and processing of Zr-based alloys, coatings on existing Zr-based alloys and replacement of current Zr-based alloys. In this manuscript, an attempt has been made to systematically present the historic development of Zr-based cladding, including the impacts of alloying elements on the material properties. Subsequently, the research investigations on coating layer on the surface of Zr-based claddings, mainly referring coating materials and fabrication methods, have been broadly reviewed. The last section of this review provides the introduction to alternative materials (Non-Zr) to Zr-based alloys for LWRs, such as advanced steels, Mo-based, and SiC-based materials.

  14. HF-based clad etching of fibre Bragg grating and its utilization in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-09

    Feb 9, 2014 ... This paper presents a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensor to study the concentration of laser dye in dye–ethanol solution. The FBG used in this experiment is indigenously developed using 255 nm UV radiations from copper vapour laser. The cladding of the FBG was partially removed using HF-based ...

  15. Laser cladding of Zr-based coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    based coating made of Zr powder was fabricated on AZ91D magnesium alloy by laser cladding. The microstructure of the coating was characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM techniques. The wear resistance of the coating was evaluated under dry ...

  16. Microhardness and Stress Analysis of Laser-Cladded AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad K.; Edrisy, Afsaneh; Urbanic, Jill; Pineault, James

    2017-03-01

    Laser cladding is a surface treatment process which is starting to be employed as a novel additive manufacturing. Rapid cooling during the non-equilibrium solidification process generates non-equilibrium microstructures and significant amounts of internal residual stresses. This paper investigates the laser cladding of 420 martensitic stainless steel of two single beads produced by different process parameters (e.g., laser power, laser speed, and powder feed rate). Metallographic sample preparation from the cross section revealed three distinct zones: the bead zone, the dilution zone, and the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The tensile residual stresses were in the range of 310-486 MPa on the surface and the upper part of the bead zone. The compressive stresses were in the range of 420-1000 MPa for the rest of the bead zone and the dilution zone. The HAZ also showed tensile residual stresses in the range of 140-320 MPa for both samples. The post-cladding heat treatment performed at 565 °C for an hour had significantly reduced the tensile stresses at the surface and in the subsurface and homogenized the compressive stress throughout the bead and dilution zones. The microstructures, residual stresses, and microhardness profiles were correlated for better understanding of the laser-cladding process.

  17. Microstructure of laser-clad SiC-(Ni alloy) composite coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Ouyang, J.H.; Lei, T.C.; Zhou, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The laser cladding technique was used to produce Ni alloy coatings with different SiC particle (SiCp) contents on steel 1045. The complete dissolution of SiCp took place during laser melting and led to a microstructural evolution of the coatings associated with the SiCp content. M7X3 or M23X6-type

  18. Tribological behaviour of laser-clad TiCp composite coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, J.H.; Pei, Y.T.; Lei, T.C.; Zhou, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The wear behaviour of laser-clad TiC-Ni alloy coatings was studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and pin-on-ring friction and wear tests. TiC particles can act as hard barriers to resist the scoring and plastic deformation of the matrix and then

  19. Electrochemical profiling of multi-clad aluminium sheets used in automotive heat exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Kirill; Ambat, Rajan; Peguet, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to understand the mechanisms of corrosion propagation across the multi-clad structure of Al alloys sheets as a function of local alloy composition and microstructure, with and without brazing treatment. Electro-chemical behaviour at different depths was profi...

  20. Tilted fiber grating accelerometer incorporating an abrupt biconical taper for cladding to core recoupling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tuan Guo; Liyang Shao; Hwa-Yaw Tam; Peter A. Krug; Jacques Albert

    2009-01-01

    ...) combined with an abrupt biconical taper. The electric-arc-heating induced taper is located a short distance upstream from the TFBG and functions as a bridge to recouple the TFBG-excited lower-order cladding modes back into the fiber core...

  1. A Multi-Layered Ceramic Composite for Impermeable Fuel Cladding for COmmercial Wate Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinroth, Herbert

    2008-03-03

    A triplex nuclear fuel cladding is developed to further improve the passive safety of commercial nuclear plants, to increase the burnup and durablity of nuclear fuel, to improve the power density and economics of nuclear power, and to reduce the amount of spent fuel requiring disposal or recycle.

  2. Air-guiding photonic bandgap fiber with improved triangular air-silica photonic crystal cladding

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, M.; Shum, P

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a small-core air-guiding photonic crystal fiber whose cladding is made of improved air-silica photonic crystal with non-circular air holes placed in triangular lattice. The fiber achieves un-disturbed bandgap guidance over 350nm wavelength range.

  3. Spectral and fluorescence lifetime endoscopic system using a double-clad photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A; Poulon, F; Melouki, F; Zanello, M; Varlet, P; Habert, R; Devaux, B; Kudlinski, A; Abi Haidar, D

    2016-11-15

    We present a customized small-core double-clad photonic crystal fiber for spectral and fluorescence lifetime measurements of human samples. In this Letter, the new fiber has been characterized on different fluorophores and samples of human brain tumor; a comparison to a bi-fiber homemade system and a commercial fiber probe was made.

  4. Microstructure and abrasive wear studies of laser clad Al-Si/SiC composite coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anandkumar, R.; Colaco, R.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Vilar, R.; Gyulai, J; Szabo, PJ

    2007-01-01

    Surface coatings of Al-Si/SiC metal-matrix composites were deposited on Al-7 wt. % Si alloy substrates by laser cladding. The microstructure of the coatings was characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructure of the coating

  5. High-performace cladding-pumped erbium-doped fibre laser and amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotov, L V; Likhachev, M E; Bubnov, M M; Medvedkov, O I; Lipatov, D S; Vechkanov, N N; Guryanov, Aleksei N

    2012-05-31

    We report cladding-pumped erbium-doped fibre laser and amplifier configurations. Through fibre design optimisation, we have achieved a record-high laser slope efficiency, 40 % with respect to absorbed pump power ({lambda} = 976 nm), and an output power of 7.5 W. The erbium-doped fibre amplifier efficiency reaches 32 %.

  6. Wall Cladding Effects and Occupants' Perception of Indoor Temperature of Typical Student Apartments in Surabaya, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediastika, Christina E.; Hariyono, Johan

    2017-11-01

    Three types of apartment claddings in Surabaya, Indonesia were studied to analyze their effect into bedroom temperature. They were glass windows in a niche, glass door in a balcony, and glass windows on a plain wall with glass door in a balcony. On-site temperature measurement was recorded and complemented with questionnaire surveys of occupants' perception regarding room temperature. The study showed that an apartment cladding with the largest proportion of opaque material combined with a balcony offered an indoor temperature of up to 9 °C lower than the outdoor compared to the other cladding types. Nevertheless, 72 % of occupants participated in this study, who use air conditioners during night time, including one with the cladding with the largest temperature difference claimed that the indoor temperature before air-conditioners was still too warm, which triggered air-conditioners initial time more than 10 minutes to achieve the desired indoor temperature. It indicated that the opaque material time lag played a significant role in heating the room during night time when the air-conditioner is about to be operated.

  7. Environmental Impacts of Metal Cladding Operations and Remedial Measures: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, P. P.; Sawmliana, C.; Singh, R. K.

    2014-04-01

    In metal cladding operations, a mixture of 11 % TNT flakes, 44 % ammonium nitrate (non-explosive) and 45 % dehydrated salt (non-explosive) are mixed uniformly to produce an explosive mixture with velocity of detonation 1,800-2,000 m/s. To study the environmental impacts of such operations which led to serious complaints from neighbouring villagers and even closure of some units, a study was carried out to investigate the levels of ground vibration, air overpressure and noise generated by blasting operations of different explosive charge quantities during the metal cladding operations and their impacts on the surrounding villages. Following the safety norms of Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB, Model Rules of the Factories Act on Noise Pollution Control) [1] and Directorate General of Mines Safety (DGMS, Damage to the structures due to blast induced ground vibration in the mining areas) [2] of India, generalised guidelines for such safe operations were framed. This paper describes the operational aspects of metal cladding, experimental results and scientific analyses of data to propose certain guidelines for safe metal cladding operations.

  8. Laser cladding of Al-Si/SiC composite coatings : Microstructure and abrasive wear behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anandkumar, R.; Almeida, A.; Vilar, R.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2007-01-01

    Surface coatings of an Al-Si-SiC composite were produced on UNS A03560 cast Al-alloy substrates by laser cladding using a mixture of powders of Al-12 wt.% Si alloy and SiC. The microstructure of the coatings depends considerably on the processing parameters. For a specific energy of 26 MJ/m2 the

  9. Investigation on Nano-Self-Lubricant Coating Synthesized by Laser Cladding and Ion Sulfurization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The composite processing between laser cladding and low temperature (300°C ion sulfurization was applied to prepare wear resistant and self-lubricating coating. The microstructure, morphology, phase composition, valence states, and wear resistance of the composite coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscope (AFM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS, and friction and wear apparatus. The results indicate that the laser cladding Ni-based coatings and the maximum hardness of 46.5 HRC were obtained when the percent of pure W powder was 10%, composed of columnar dendrites crystals and ultrafine dendritic structure. After ion sulfurization at 300°C for 4 h, the loose and porous composite coating is formed with nanograins and the granularity of all grains is less than 100 nm, which consists of γ-(Fe, Ni, M23C6 carbides, FeS, FeS2, and WS2. Furthermore, the wear resistance of the composite coating is better than the laser cladding Ni55 + 10%W coating, and the friction coefficient and mass losses under the conditions of dry and oil lubrication are lower than those of laser cladding Ni55 + 10%W coating.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Pump Absorption in Coiled and Twisted Double-Clad Fibers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koška, Pavel; Peterka, Pavel; Doya, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2016), s. 4401508 ISSN 1077-260X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-35256S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15122 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : double-clad optical fibers * beam propagation method * fiber amplifiers Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.971, year: 2016

  11. Fiber optic gas sensors with vanadium oxide and tungsten oxide nanoparticle coated claddings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renganathan, B.; Sastikumar, D.; Raj, S. Gokul; Ganesan, A. R.

    2014-03-01

    Fiber optic gas sensors with nanoparticles of V2O5 and WO3 as the cladding of a PMMA fiber have been proposed in this work. The spectral response of these sensors for detection of ammonia, methanol and ethanol under various concentrations has been studied at room temperature. The time response characteristics of the sensors are also presented.

  12. Field Test of a Remote Multi-Path CLaDS Methane Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Plant

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Existing technologies for quantifying methane emissions are often limited to single point sensors, making large area environmental observations challenging. We demonstrate the operation of a remote, multi-path system using Chirped Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy (CLaDS for quantification of atmospheric methane concentrations over extended areas, a technology that shows potential for monitoring emissions from wetlands.

  13. Microstructural development during laser cladding of low-C martensitic stainless steel.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat input plays an important role in the microstructural development of 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel. The microstructure of low-C 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel resulting from laser cladding was investigated. For 410L a ferritic...

  14. Instrumentation. Nondestructive Examination for Verification of Canister and Cladding Integrity - FY2013 Status Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jones, Anthony M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pardini, Allan F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Denslow, Kayte M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crawford, Susan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larche, Michael R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This report documents FY13 efforts for two instrumentation subtasks under storage and transportation. These instrumentation tasks relate to developing effective nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods and techniques to (1) verify the integrity of metal canisters for the storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and to (2) characterize hydrogen effects in UNF cladding to facilitate safe storage and retrieval.

  15. Improving Accident Tolerance of Nuclear Fuel with Coated Mo-alloy Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In severe loss of coolant accidents (LOCA, similar to those experienced at Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island Unit 1, the zirconium alloy fuel cladding materials are rapidly heated due to nuclear decay heating and rapid exothermic oxidation of zirconium with steam. This heating causes the cladding to rapidly react with steam, lose strength, burst or collapse, and generate large quantities of hydrogen gas. Although maintaining core cooling remains the highest priority in accident management, an accident tolerant fuel (ATF design may extend coping and recovery time for operators to restore emergency power, and cooling, and achieve safe shutdown. An ATF is required to possess high resistance to steam oxidation to reduce hydrogen generation and sufficient mechanical strength to maintain fuel rod integrity and core coolability. The initiative undertaken by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing an ATF cladding with capability to maintain its integrity in 1,200–1,500°C steam for at least 24 hours. This ATF cladding utilizes thin-walled Mo-alloys coated with oxidation-resistant surface layers. The basic design consists of a thin-walled Mo alloy structural tube with a metallurgically bonded, oxidation-resistant outer layer. Two options are being investigated: a commercially available iron, chromium, and aluminum alloy with excellent high temperature oxidation resistance, and a Zr alloy with demonstrated corrosion resistance. As these composite claddings will incorporate either no Zr, or thin Zr outer layers, hydrogen generation under severe LOCA conditions will be greatly reduced. Key technical challenges and uncertainties specific to Mo alloy fuel cladding include: economic core design, industrial scale fabricability, radiation embrittlement, and corrosion and oxidation resistance during normal operation, transients, and severe accidents. Progress in each aspect has been made and key results are

  16. Femtosecond laser inscription of optical circuits in the cladding of optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Jason R.

    The aim of this dissertation was to address the question of whether the cladding of single-mode fibers (SMFs) could be modified to enable optical fibers to serve as a more integrated, highly functional platform for optical circuit devices that can efficiently interconnect with the pre-existing fiber core waveguide. The approach adopted in this dissertation was to employ femtosecond laser direct writing (FLDW), an inherently 3D fabrication technique that harnesses non-linear laser-material interactions to modify the fused silica fiber cladding. A fiber mounting and alignment technique was developed along with oil-immersion focusing to address the strong aberrations caused by the cylindrical fiber shape. The development of real-time device monitoring during the FLDW was instrumental to overcome the acute coupling sensitivity to laser alignment errors of +/-1 ?m positional uncertainty, and thereby opened a new practical direction for the precise fabrication of optical devices inside optical fibers. These powerful and flexible laser fabrication and characterization techniques were successfully employed to optimize optical waveguiding devices positioned within the core and cladding of optical fibers. X-, S-Bend, and directional couplers were developed to enable efficient coupling between the laser-formed cladding devices and the pre-existing core waveguide, enabling up to 62% power transfer over bandwidths up to 300 nm at telecommunication wavelengths. Precise alignment of femtosecond laser modification tracks were positioned inside or near the core waveguide of SMFs was further shown to enable a flexible reshaping of the optical properties to create multimode guiding sections arbitrarily along the fiber length. This core waveguide modification facilitated the precise formation of multimode interferometers along the core waveguide to precisely tailor the modal profiles, and control the spectral and polarization response. In-fiber multimode interference (MMI) splitters

  17. SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for “accident tolerant” nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designs being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between loading points

  18. Thermal stress fracture of ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal stress failures of ceramic coatings are discussed in terms of fracture mechanics concepts. The effects of transient and residual stresses on single and multiple cycle failure mechanisms are considered. A specific example of a zirconia thermal barrier coating is presented and its endurance calculated using the proposed relationships.

  19. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  20. Acute kidney failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney injury. Alternative Names Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute Images Kidney anatomy References Devarajan P. Biomarkers for assessment of renal ...

  1. Industry Application ECCS / LOCA Integrated Cladding/Emergency Core Cooling System Performance: Demonstration of LOTUS-Baseline Coupled Analysis of the South Texas Plant Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Szilard, Ronaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Epiney, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Parisi, Carlo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Vaghetto, Rodolfo [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Vanni, Alessandro [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Neptune, Kaleb [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Under the auspices of the DOE LWRS Program RISMC Industry Application ECCS/LOCA, INL has engaged staff from both South Texas Project (STP) and the Texas A&M University (TAMU) to produce a generic pressurized water reactor (PWR) model including reactor core, clad/fuel design and systems thermal hydraulics based on the South Texas Project (STP) nuclear power plant, a 4-Loop Westinghouse PWR. A RISMC toolkit, named LOCA Toolkit for the U.S. (LOTUS), has been developed for use in this generic PWR plant model to assess safety margins for the proposed NRC 10 CFR 50.46c rule, Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) performance during LOCA. This demonstration includes coupled analysis of core design, fuel design, thermalhydraulics and systems analysis, using advanced risk analysis tools and methods to investigate a wide range of results. Within this context, a multi-physics best estimate plus uncertainty (MPBEPU) methodology framework is proposed.

  2. Thermal management for LED applications

    CERN Document Server

    Poppe, András

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Management for LED Applications provides state-of-the-art information on recent developments in thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems and their applications. Coverage begins with an overview of the basics of thermal management including thermal design for LEDs, thermal characterization and testing of LEDs, and issues related to failure mechanisms and reliability and performance in harsh environments. Advances and recent developments in thermal management round out the book with discussions on advances in TIMs (thermal interface materials) for LED applications, advances in forced convection cooling of LEDs, and advances in heat sinks for LED assemblies. This book also: Presents a comprehensive overview of the basics of thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems Discusses both design and thermal management considerations when manufacturing LEDs and LED-based systems Covers reliability and performance of LEDs in harsh environments Has a hands-on applications a...

  3. Investigation and basic evaluation for ultra-high burnup fuel cladding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Nagase, Fumihisa; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Suga, Masataka [Kokan Keisoku Co., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    In ultra-high burnup of the power reactor, it is an essential problem to develop the cladding with excellent durability. First, development history and approach of the safety assessment of Zircaloy for the high burnup fuel were summarized in the report. Second, the basic evaluation and investigation were carried out on the material with high practicability in order to select the candidate materials for the ultra-high burnup fuel. In addition, the basic research on modification technology of the cladding surface was carried out from the viewpoint of the addition of safety margin as a cladding. From the development history of the zirconium alloy including the Zircaloy, it is hard to estimate the results of in-pile test from those of the conventional corrosion test (out-pile test). Therefore, the development of the new testing technology that can simulate the actual environment and the elucidation of the corrosion-controlling factor of the cladding are desired. In cases of RIA (Reactivity Initiated Accident) and LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident), it seems that the loss of ductility in zirconium alloys under heavy irradiation and boiling of high temperature water restricts the extension of fuel burnup. From preliminary evaluation on the high corrosion-resistance materials (austenitic stainless steel, iron or nickel base superalloys, titanium alloy, niobium alloy, vanadium alloy and ferritic stainless steel), stabilized austenitic stainless steels with a capability of future improvement and high-purity niobium alloys with a expectation of the good corrosion resistance were selected as candidate materials of ultra-high burnup cladding. (author)

  4. Modelling and Prediction of Stainless Steel Clad Bead Geometry Deposited by GMAW Using Regression and Artificial Neural Network Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sreeraj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the corrosion-resistant properties of carbon steel, usually cladding process is used. It is a process of depositing a thick layer of corrosion-resistant material over carbon steel plate. Most of the engineering applications require high strength and corrosion resistant materials for long-term reliability and performance. Cladding these properties can be achieved with minimum cost. The main problem faced in cladding is the selection of optimum combinations of process parameters for achieving quality clad and hence good clad bead geometry. This paper highlights an experimental study to predict various input process parameters (welding current, welding speed, gun angle, contact tip-to-work distance, andpinch to getoptimum dilutionin stainless steel cladding of low carbon structural steel plates using Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW. Experiments were conducted based on central composite rotatable design with full replication technique, and mathematical models were developed using multiple regression method. The developed models have been checked for adequacy and significance. Using Artificial Neural Network (ANN the parameters were predicted, and percentage of error was calculated between predicted and actual values. The direct and interaction effects of process parameters on clad bead geometry are presented in graphical form.

  5. Effect of Cobalt on Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Ni-Based Alloy Coating Fabricated by Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiming Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ni-based alloy powders with different contents of cobalt (Co have been deposited on a 42CrMo steel substrate surface using a fiber laser. The effects of Co content on the microstructure, composition, hardness, and wear properties of the claddings were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, a hardness tester, and a wear tester. The results show that the phases in the cladding layers are mainly γ, M7(C, B3, M23(C, B6, and M2B. With the increase in Co content, the amounts of M7(C, B3, M23(C, B6, and M2B gradually decrease, and the width of the eutectic structure in the cladding layer also gradually decreases. The microhardness decreases but the wear resistance of the cladding layer gradually improves with the increase of Co content. The wear resistance of the NiCo30 cladding layer is 3.6 times that of the NiCo00 cladding layer. With the increase of Co content, the wear mechanism of the cladding layer is changed from abrasive wear to adhesive wear.

  6. Electrochemical Migration Behavior of Copper-Clad Laminate and Electroless Nickel/Immersion Gold Printed Circuit Boards under Thin Electrolyte Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Yi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical migration (ECM behavior of copper-clad laminate (PCB-Cu and electroless nickel/immersion gold printed circuit boards (PCB-ENIG under thin electrolyte layers of different thicknesses containing 0.1 M Na2SO4 was studied. Results showed that, under the bias voltage of 12 V, the reverse migration of ions occurred. For PCB-Cu, both copper dendrites and sulfate precipitates were found on the surface of FR-4 (board material between two plates. Moreover, the Cu dendrite was produced between the two plates and migrated toward cathode. Compared to PCB-Cu, PCB-ENIG exhibited a higher tendency of ECM failure and suffered from seriously short circuit failure under high relative humidity (RH environment. SKP results demonstrated that surface potentials of the anode plates were greater than those of the cathode plates, and those potentials of the two plates exhibited a descending trend as the RH increased. At the end of the paper, an electrochemical migration corrosion failure model of PCB was proposed.

  7. Electrochemical Migration Behavior of Copper-Clad Laminate and Electroless Nickel/Immersion Gold Printed Circuit Boards under Thin Electrolyte Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Pan; Xiao, Kui; Ding, Kangkang; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-01-01

    The electrochemical migration (ECM) behavior of copper-clad laminate (PCB-Cu) and electroless nickel/immersion gold printed circuit boards (PCB-ENIG) under thin electrolyte layers of different thicknesses containing 0.1 M Na2SO4 was studied. Results showed that, under the bias voltage of 12 V, the reverse migration of ions occurred. For PCB-Cu, both copper dendrites and sulfate precipitates were found on the surface of FR-4 (board material) between two plates. Moreover, the Cu dendrite was produced between the two plates and migrated toward cathode. Compared to PCB-Cu, PCB-ENIG exhibited a higher tendency of ECM failure and suffered from seriously short circuit failure under high relative humidity (RH) environment. SKP results demonstrated that surface potentials of the anode plates were greater than those of the cathode plates, and those potentials of the two plates exhibited a descending trend as the RH increased. At the end of the paper, an electrochemical migration corrosion failure model of PCB was proposed. PMID:28772497

  8. Parametric Study and Multi-Criteria Optimization in Laser Cladding by a High Power Direct Diode Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Parisa; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-12-01

    In laser cladding, the performance of the deposited layers subjected to severe working conditions (e.g., wear and high temperature conditions) depends on the mechanical properties, the metallurgical bond to the substrate, and the percentage of dilution. The clad geometry and mechanical characteristics of the deposited layer are influenced greatly by the type of laser used as a heat source and process parameters used. Nowadays, the quality of fabricated coating by laser cladding and the efficiency of this process has improved thanks to the development of high-power diode lasers, with power up to 10 kW. In this study, the laser cladding by a high power direct diode laser (HPDDL) as a new heat source in laser cladding was investigated in detail. The high alloy tool steel material (AISI H13) as feedstock was deposited on mild steel (ASTM A36) by a HPDDL up to 8kW laser and with new design lateral feeding nozzle. The influences of the main process parameters (laser power, powder flow rate, and scanning speed) on the clad-bead geometry (specifically layer height and depth of the heat affected zone), and clad microhardness were studied. Multiple regression analysis was used to develop the analytical models for desired output properties according to input process parameters. The Analysis of Variance was applied to check the accuracy of the developed models. The response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function were used for multi-criteria optimization of the cladding process. In order to investigate the effect of process parameters on the molten pool evolution, in-situ monitoring was utilized. Finally, the validation results for optimized process conditions show the predicted results were in a good agreement with measured values. The multi-criteria optimization makes it possible to acquire an efficient process for a combination of clad geometrical and mechanical characteristics control.

  9. A procedure for addressing the fuel rod failures during LB-LOCA transient in Atucha-2 NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorni, Martina; Del Nevo, Alessandro; Parisi, Carlo; D' Auria, Francesco [University of Pisa, San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), Via Diotisalvi 2, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Mazzantini, Oscar [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., UGCNAII, 2806 Lima (Argentina)

    2009-06-15

    of calculation methods that are not implemented in the standard system thermal hydraulic codes, as for burst temperature, burst strain and flow blockage calculations. This may imply the use of a dedicated fuel rod thermo-mechanical computer code. This paper provides an outline of the methodology for the analysis of the 2A LB-LOCA scenario in Atucha-2 NPP and describes the procedure adopted for the use of the fuel rod thermo-mechanical code. The methodology implies the application of best estimate thermal-hydraulic, neutron physics and fuel pin performance computer codes, with the objective to verify the compliance with the specific acceptance criteria. The methodology also involves the evaluation of the uncertainty to address the assessment of the safety margins. The fuel pin performance code is applied with the main objective to evaluate the extent of cladding failures during the transient. The procedure consists in a deterministic calculation by the fuel performance code of the characteristics of each individual fuel rod during its lifetime and in the subsequent LBLOCA transient calculations. The boundary and initial condition (e.g. pin power axial profiles) are provided by an independent three dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic system code (RELAP5-3D{sup C}). The procedure is completed by the sensitivity calculations and the uncertainty evaluation. (authors)

  10. Thermal control of solid breeder blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Ying, A.; Gorbis, Z.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A.

    1991-12-31

    An assessment of the thermal control mechanisms applicable to solid breeder blanket designs under ITER-like operating conditions is presented in this paper. Four cases are considered: a helium gap; a sintered block Be region; a sintered block helium region with a metallic felt at the Be/clad interface; and a Be packed bed region. For these cases, typical operating are explored to determine the ranges of wall load which can be accommodated while maintaining the breeder within its allowable operating temperature window. The corresponding region thicknesses are calculated to help identify practicality and design tolerances.

  11. Thermal control of solid breeder blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Ying, A.; Gorbis, Z.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    An assessment of the thermal control mechanisms applicable to solid breeder blanket designs under ITER-like operating conditions is presented in this paper. Four cases are considered: a helium gap; a sintered block Be region; a sintered block helium region with a metallic felt at the Be/clad interface; and a Be packed bed region. For these cases, typical operating are explored to determine the ranges of wall load which can be accommodated while maintaining the breeder within its allowable operating temperature window. The corresponding region thicknesses are calculated to help identify practicality and design tolerances.

  12. Heart failure - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure; Right-sided heart failure - cor pulmonale; Cardiomyopathy - heart failure; HF ... Disease Section. Heart Failure as a newly approved diagnosis for cardiac rehabilitation: challenges and opportunities. J Am ...

  13. Status Report on the Fabrication of Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction Test Articles for ATR Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-28

    FeCrAl alloys are a promising new class of alloys for light water reactor (LWR) applications due to their superior oxidation and corrosion resistance in high temperature environments. The current R&D efforts have focused on the alloy composition and processing routes to generate nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys with optimized properties for enhanced accident tolerance while maintaining properties needed for normal operation conditions. Therefore, the composition and processing routes must be optimized to maintain the high temperature steam oxidation (typically achieved by increasing the Cr and Al content) while still exhibiting properties conducive to normal operation in a LWR (such as radiation tolerance where reducing Cr content is favorable). Within this balancing act is the addition of understanding the influence on composition and processing routes on the FeCrAl alloys for fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI). Currently, limited knowledge exists on FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system. To overcome the knowledge gaps on the FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system a series of fueled irradiation tests have been developed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) housed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The first series of tests has already been reported. These tests used miniaturized 17x17 PWR fuel geometry rodlets of second-generation FeCrAl alloys fueled with industrial Westinghouse UO2 fuel. These rodlets were encapsulated within a stainless steel housing.To provide high fidelity experiments and more robust testing, a new series of rodlets have been developed deemed the Accident Tolerant Fuel Experiment #1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory FCCI test (ATF-1 ORNL FCCI). The main driving factor, which is discussed in detail, was to provide a radiation environment where prototypical fuel-clad interface temperatures are met while still maintaining constant contact between industrial fuel and the candidate cladding alloys

  14. Optimization of pulsed TIG cladding process of stellite alloy on carbon steel using RSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madadi, F., E-mail: f.madadi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafizadeh, F. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, M., E-mail: shamanian@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-05

    Highlights: > This study is useful to optimize the welding process variables in order to control the heat input and cooling rates such that the hardness and dilution of the clad could be estimated. > Central composite rotatable design technique with five-level, four-factor full-factorial design matrix and mathematical models was used to predict hardness and dilution of pulsed gas tungsten arc weld cladding of stellite6 on carbon steel with high accuracy. > The welding current is an effective parameter affecting heat input and melting. In this regard, it is the most important process parameter which influences the dilution. Increase welding current leads to increase in dilution percentage and vice versa. The effect of percentage on time is less important when compared to the other factors. > The results predicted by mathematical models were close to those obtained by experiments. The confirmation tests also indicated high correlation between the mentioned values. > All of the chosen pulse GTAW parameters were significant and showed a noticeable influence on clad dilution. - Abstract: Stellite 6 is a cobalt-base alloy which is resistant to wear and corrosion and retains these properties at high temperatures. The exceptional wear resistance of Stellite 6 is mainly due to the unique inherent characteristics of the hard carbides dispersed in a Co-Cr alloy matrix. In this study, pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) cladding process was carried out to deposit Stellite 6 on plain carbon steel plate. The beneficial effects of this cladding process are low heat input, low distortion, controlled weld bead volume, less hot cracking tendency, less absorption of gases by weld pool and better control of the fusion zone. The dilution effect is a key issue in the quality of cladded layers and, in this regard, the pulsed current tungsten inert gas (PCTIG) was performed to decrease excess heat input and melting of substrate. This paper deals with the investigation of the hardness and

  15. Corrosion Characteristics of Ni-Based Hardfacing Alloy Deposited on Stainless Steel Substrate by Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Reena; Abraham, Geogy; Kumar, Santosh; Bhattacharyya, Kaustava; Keskar, Nachiket; Kushwaha, R. P.; Rao, Ramana; Tewari, R.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, corrosion characteristics of a nickel-based Ni-Mo-Cr-Si hardfacing alloy having 32Mo, 15Cr, and 3Si (wt pct) as alloying elements, deposited on stainless steel SS316L substrate by laser cladding, have been presented. Corrosion behavior of the laser clad layer was evaluated in reducing (0.1 M HCl) and oxidizing (0.5 M HNO3) environments, in comparison with the reference substrate SS316L, using electrochemical potentiodynamic technique at room temperature. The corrosion mechanisms have been evaluated on the basis of microstructural and microchemical analysis using scanning electron microscopy attached with energy-dispersive spectrometry. Passivity behavior of the laser clad layer was studied in 0.5 M H2SO4, using the potentiostatic technique and analyzing the passive layer by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Laser clad layer of Ni-Mo-Cr-Si exhibited higher pitting corrosion resistance in chloride (reducing) environment, indicated by much higher breakdown potential ( 0.8 VSCE) and the absence of pitting as compared to substrate SS316L ( 0.3 VSCE). However, in oxidizing (0.5 M HNO3) environment, both the laser clad layer and substrate SS316L showed excellent and similar corrosion resistance exhibiting high breakdown potential ( 0.85 VSCE) and wide passivation range ( 0.8 VSCE) with low passive current density ( 4 to 7 × 10-6 A/cm2). The stable passive layer formed on laser clad layer of Ni-Mo-Cr-Si after exposure in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at constant potential 0.6 VSCE (within the passive range), consisted oxides of Mo as Mo+4 (MoO2) and Mo+6 (MoO4)-2, Cr as Cr3+ (mixture of both Cr2O3 and Cr (OH)3), and Si as Si4+(SiO2), which have contributed to passivation and repassivation and therefore excellent corrosion behavior.

  16. Sustainability of Metal Structures via Spray-Clad Remanufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory M.; Sampath, Sanjay

    2018-01-01

    Structural reclamation and remanufacturing is an important future design consideration to allow sustainable recovery of degraded structural metals. Heavy machinery and infrastructure components subjected to extended use and/or environment induced degradation require costly and time-consuming replacement. If these parts can be remanufactured to original tolerances, and returned to service with "as good or better" performance, significant reductions in materials, cost, and environmental impact can be achieved. Localized additive restoration via thermal or cold spray methods is a promising approach in recovering and restoring original design strength of degraded metals. The advent of high velocity spray deposition technologies has allowed deposition of near full density materials. In this review, the fundamental scientific and technological elements of such local additive restoration is contemplated including materials, processes, and methodologies to assess the capabilities of such remanufactured systems. This points to sustainable material reclamation, as well as a route toward resource and process sustainability.

  17. Mechanical analysis of surface-coated zircaloy cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youho Lee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A structural model for stress distributions of coated Zircaloy subjected to realistic incore pressure difference, thermal expansion, irradiation-induced axial growth, and creep has been developed in this study. In normal operation, the structural integrity of coating layers is anticipated to be significantly challenged with increasing burnup. Strain mismatch between the zircaloy and the coated layer, due to their different irradiation-induced axial growth, and creep deformation are found to be the most dominant causes of stress. This study suggests that the compatibility of the high temperature irradiation-induced strains (axial growth and creep between zircaloy and the coating layer and the capability to undergo plastic strain should be taken as key metrics, along with the traditional focus on chemical protectiveness.

  18. Mechanical analysis of surface-coated zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, You Ho; Lee, Jeong Ik; No, Hee Cheon [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    A structural model for stress distributions of coated Zircaloy subjected to realistic incore pressure difference, thermal expansion, irradiation-induced axial growth, and creep has been developed in this study. In normal operation, the structural integrity of coating layers is anticipated to be significantly challenged with increasing burnup. Strain mismatch between the zircaloy and the coated layer, due to their different irradiation-induced axial growth, and creep deformation are found to be the most dominant causes of stress. This study suggests that the compatibility of the high temperature irradiation-induced strains (axial growth and creep) between zircaloy and the coating layer and the capability to undergo plastic strain should be taken as key metrics, along with the traditional focus on chemical protectiveness.

  19. Dual-cladding high-birefringence and high-nonlinearity photonic crystal fiber with As2S3 core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuedian; He, Menghui; Chang, Min; Chen, Hui; Chen, Nan; Qi, Ningning; Yuan, Manman; Qin, Xiaofei

    2018-03-01

    A novel dual-cladding photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with elliptical As2S3 core has been proposed to obtain high-birefringence and high-nonlinearity in PCFs. As2S3 has a high refractive index and a high nonlinear refractive index, as a result, it has a desired application on strengthening birefringence and nonlinearity. Then outer cladding of the PCF contains a hexagonal array of circular air holes. A circular array of circular air holes is introduced near the core as the inner cladding. We find that inner cladding could heighten birefringence and nonlinearity obviously. The simulation results show that the birefringence is as high as 0.307 at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and the nonlinearities of X- and Y-polarized reach 28660 km-1 W-1 and 38080 km-1 W-1 at the same wavelength, respectively.

  20. An empirical-statistical model for laser cladding of WC-12Co powder on AISI 321 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanmanesh, Mohammad; Abdollah-Pour, Hassan; Mohammadian-Semnani, Hamidreza; Shoja-Razavi, Reza

    2017-12-01

    In this study, laser cladding of WC-12Co powder on AISI 321 steel substrate was optimized using an empirical-statistical viewpoint. The correlations that exist between key parameters of the process (i.e., laser power, scanning speed, powder feeding rate) and geometrical characteristics for single clads (i.e. height, width, dilution, and wetting angle) were predicted and analyzed by regression method (RA). The preliminary geometrical considerations allowed to choose the processing parameters which led to high quality clads with minimum porosity. All considerations finally resulted in the development of a processing map that shows the optimum parameters for laser cladding process of WC-12Co powder on AISI 321 stainless steel.

  1. Duplex stainless steel surface bay laser cladding; Modificacion de las propiedades superficiales de aceros inoxidables Duplex mediante recubrimientos por laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amigo, V.; Pineda, Y.; Segovia, F.; Vicente, A.

    2004-07-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most promising techniques to restore damaged surfaces and achieve properties similar to those of the base metal. In this work, duplex stainless steels have been cladded by a nickel alloy under different processing conditions. The influence of the beam speed and defocusing variables ha been evaluated in the microstructure both of the cladding and heat affected zone, HAZ. These results have been correlated to mechanical properties by means of microhardness measurements from cladding area to base metal through the interface. This technique has shown to be very appropriate to obtain controlled mechanical properties as they are determined by the solidification microstructure, originated by the transfer of mass and heat in the system. (Author) 21 refs.

  2. Enraizamento de cladódios jovens de Hylocereus undatus H. coletados de plantas produzidas a partir de sementes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antônio Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Identificar o melhor material vegetativo e o tamanho ideal para obter boas mudas de Hylocereus undatus diante do enraizamento por estaquia de cladódios jovens inteiros de cinco centímetros de comprimento e de tamanhos inferiores. Metodologia: Foi verificado enraizamento e desenvolvimento de mudas Pitaia de cladódios. No período de fevereiro a maio de 2011, no laboratório de microbiologia da Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros - campus Janaúba/MG. Os cladódios de Hylocereus undatus foram colocados em bandeja com substrato plantmax. Colocados para enraizar após seccionamento e com tratamentos de cladódios: (T1: 2,5cm; T2: 3cm; T3: 4cm; T4: 5cm, com quatro repetições por tratamento, e cinco cladódios para cada repetição. Resultados: Não houve diferença no número de estacas enraizadas e comprimento de raiz. Os cladódios jovens menores que 5 cm são capazes de gerar novas raízes, com 85,17 % das estacas com 2,5cm enraizadas, 91,25 % com 3cm e 4 e 5 cm tiveram 99,5 %. Verificou-se que não houve diferença no enraizamento dos cladódios jovens, com o aumento deles. Nos resultados apontam cladódios de 2.5 a 5 cm, só diferem dos 2,5 cm. Os cladódios maiores de 5 cm são mais aptos à propagação por estaquia de pitaia vermelha, pois apresentam 100 % de enraizamento. Conclusão: O tamanho dos cladódios não influenciou de forma direta no enraizamento. Sendo que o tamanho igual a 5 cm ou inferiores são também indicados para a obtenção de mudas de Hylocereus undatus. Verificou-se também não haver necessidade de usar hormônios para o enraizamento dos cladódios jovens.

  3. Apollo experience report: Detection and minimization of ignition hazards from water/glycol contamination of silver-clad electrical circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    The potential flammability hazard when a water/glycol solution contacts defectively insulated silver-clad copper circuitry or electrical components carrying a direct current is described. The chemical reactions and means for detecting them are explained. Methods for detecting and cleaning contaminated areas and the use of inhibitors to arrest chemical reactivity are also explained. Preventive measures to minimize hazards are given. Photomicrographs of the chemical reactions occurring on silver clad wires are also included.

  4. Assessment of standard compliance of Central European plastics-based wall cladding using multi-criteria decision making (MCDM)

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, Daniel; Luible, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Plastics are increasingly combined with renewable fibers to form materials such as wood-plastic composites (WPCs). These bio-based materials have gained the interest of the resource-intensive building industry and are currently used mainly for decking and cladding. Despite their environmental friendliness, WPC façades are still underrepresented in the market. This fact raises the question of whether WPC cladding is currently well positioned in the market and whether its attributes are adverti...

  5. The effect of cladding speed on phase constitution and properties of AISI 431 stainless steel laser deposited coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmati, I.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    Shorter processing time has given impetus to laser cladding technology and therefore in this research the AISI 431 martensitic stainless steel coatings are laser deposited at high cladding speeds, i.e. up to 117 mm/s. The analysis of phase constitution and functional properties of the coatings are performed by optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and hardness and sliding wear tests. The outcome of this research shows that an extreme refinement of the solidification structur...

  6. Comparative Study of Thermal Shock Behavior with Fabrication Method of SiC{sub f}/SiC Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Hee; Park, Kwang Heon [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Weon Ju; Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Dae Jong; Lee, Hyeon Geun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    An active search is ongoing for an alternative material to be used for manufacturing of nuclear fuel cladding. Studies are currently aimed at improving the safety of this cladding. In particular, ceramic-based nuclear fuel cladding, such as SiC, is receiving much attention due to the excellent radiation resistance, high strength, chemical durability against oxidation and corrosion, and excellent thermal conduction of ceramics. SiC{sub f}f/SiC composite cladding is required to maintain soundness against destruction and corrosion, and have excellent thermal conductivity to remove sufficiently the heat generated by nuclear fuel in output operation. For the reason, SiCf/SiC composite layers with densification are needed in SiC fiber bundle. As manufacturing methods to fill SiC matrix phase, there are Liquid Silicon Infiltration (LSI), Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI), Slurry Infiltration and Hot Pressure Sintering (SI-HPS), Polymer Infiltration and Pyrolysis (PIP), and Hybrid processes in combination of multiple processes (CVI+PIP, CVI{sub R}S and PIP+RS). This study conducted a comparison analysis, based on the manufacturing method, of the thermal shock behavior of metal cladding that had an SiC composite protective film added. The SiC{sub f}/SiC composite layer and the Zry-4 surface were separated, and cracks occurred in the SiC{sub f}/SiC composite. In the case of the cladding that had the SiC{sub f}/SiC composite protective film manufactured by the CVI process, there was no microcrack inside the SiC{sub f}/SiC composite. A microcracks that penetrated the fiber was observed inside the SiC{sub f}/SiC composite when it was manufactured using the PIP process; this was due to the absence of an interphase coating that increased the fracture toughness of the fiber.

  7. Optimization of laser cladding of cold spray coatings with B4C and Ni powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, V. M.; Golyshev, A. A.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.; Filippov, A. A.; Ryashin, N. S.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, a combined method is considered for the production of a metal-matrix composite coating based on Ni and B4C. The coating is created by consistently applied methods: cold spray and laser cladding. The conditions of obtaining cermet layers are investigated depending on the parameters of laser cladding and cold spray. It is shown that the laser track structure significantly changes in accordance to the size of ceramic particles ranging 3-75 µm and its concentration. It is shown that the most perspective layers for additive manufacturing could be obtain from cold spray coatings with ceramic concentrations more than 50% by weight treated in the heat-conductivity laser mode.

  8. Evaluation of Aerogel Clad Optical Fibers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1448-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitland, Duncan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Droege, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    Fiber-optic based sensors will be needed for in situ monitoring of degradation products in various components of nuclear weapons. These sensors typically consist of a transducer located at the measurement site whose optical properties are modulated by interaction with the targeted degradation product. The interrogating light source and the detector for determining sensor response are located remotely. These two subsystems are connected by fiber optic cables. LLNL has developed a new technology, aerogel clad optical fibers, that have the advantage of accepting incident rays over a much wider angular range than normal glass clad fibers. These fibers are also capable of transmitting light more efficiently. These advantages can lead to a factor of 2-4 improvement in sensitivity and detection limit.

  9. High power double-scale pulses from a gain-guided double-clad fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Gao, Gan; Li, Qinghua; Gong, Mali

    2017-03-01

    Generation of high power double-scale pulses from a gain-guided double-clad fiber laser is experimentally demonstrated. By employing the Yb-doped 10/130 double-clad fiber as the gain medium, the laser realizes an output power of 5.1 W and pulse energy of 0.175 µJ at repetition rate of 29.14 MHz. To the best of our knowledge, this average output power is the highest among the reported double-scale pulse oscillators. The autocorrelation trace of pulses contains the short (98 fs) and long (29.5 ps) components, and the spectral bandwidth of the pulse is 27.3 nm. Such double-scale pulses are well suited for seeding the high power MOPA (master oscillator power amplifier) systems, nonlinear frequency conversion and optical coherence tomography.

  10. Development of a metal-clad advanced composite shear web design concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced composite web concept was developed for potential application to the Space Shuttle Orbiter main engine thrust structure. The program consisted of design synthesis, analysis, detail design, element testing, and large scale component testing. A concept was sought that offered significant weight saving by the use of Boron/Epoxy (B/E) reinforced titanium plate structure. The desired concept was one that was practical and that utilized metal to efficiently improve structural reliability. The resulting development of a unique titanium-clad B/E shear web design concept is described. Three large scale components were fabricated and tested to demonstrate the performance of the concept: a titanium-clad plus or minus 45 deg B/E web laminate stiffened with vertical B/E reinforced aluminum stiffeners.

  11. Extensive Characterisation of Copper-clad Plates, Bonded by the Explosive Technique, for ITER Electrical Joints

    CERN Document Server

    Langeslag, S A E; Libeyre, P; Gung, C Y

    2015-01-01

    Cable-in-conduit conductors will be extensively implemented in the large superconducting magnet coils foreseen to confine the plasma in the ITER experiment. The design of the various magnet systems imposes the use of electrical joints to connect unit lengths of superconducting coils by inter-pancake coupling. These twin-box lap type joints, produced by compacting each cable end in into a copper - stainless steel bimetallic box, are required to be highly performing in terms of electrical and mechanical prop- erties. To ascertain the suitability of the first copper-clad plates, recently produced, the performance of several plates is studied. Validation of the bonded interface is carried out by determining microstructural, tensile and shear characteristics. These measure- ments confirm the suitability of explosion bonded copper-clad plates for an overall joint application. Additionally, an extensive study is conducted on the suitability of certain copper purity grades for the various joint types.

  12. Zircaloy cladding performance under spent fuel disposal conditions; Progress report, May 1--October 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pescatore, C.; Cowgill, M.G.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1990-04-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Waste Materials and Environment Modeling (WMEM) Program has been assigned the task of helping the DOE formulate and certify analytical tools needed to support and/or strengthen the Waste Package Licensing Strategy. One objective of the WMEM program is to perform qualitative and quantitative analyses of irradiated Zircaloy cladding. This progress report presents the early findings of an on-going literature evaluation and the results of the numerical implementation of two models of Zircaloy creep. The report only addresses cladding degradation modes within intact, dry waste containers. Additional degradation modes will be considered when the study is expanded to include moist environments and partly failed containers. Further updates of the present analyses will also be provided.

  13. Development of Cone Wedge Ring Expansion Test to Evaluate Mechanical Properties of Clad Tubing Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    To determine the hoop tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding in a hot cell, a cone wedge ring expansion test method was developed. A four-piece wedge insert was designed with tapered angles matched to the cone shape of a loading piston. The ring specimen was expanded in the radial direction by the lateral expansion of the wedges under the downward movement of the piston. The advantages of the proposed method are that implementation of the test setup in a hot cell is simple and easy, and that it enables a direct strain measurement of the test specimen from the piston’s vertical displacement soon after the wedge-clad contact resistance is initiated.

  14. Analysis of Nickel Based Hardfacing Materials Manufactured by Laser Cladding for Sodium Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, P.; Blanc, C.; Demirci, I.; Dal, M.; Malot, T.; Maskrot, H.

    For improving the operational capacity, the maintenance and the decommissioning of the future French Sodium Fast Reactor ASTRID which is under study, it is asked to find or develop a cobalt free hardfacing alloy and the associated manufacturing process that will give satisfying wear performances. This article presents recent results obtained on some selected nickel-based hardfacing alloys manufactured by laser cladding, particularly on Tribaloy 700 alloy. A process parameter search is made and associated the microstructural analysis of the resulting clads. A particular attention is made on the solidification of the main precipitates (chromium carbides, boron carbides, Laves phases,…) that will mainly contribute to the wear properties of the material. Finally, the wear resistance of some samples is evaluated in simple wear conditions evidencing promising results on tribology behavior of Tribaloy 700.

  15. Flat-Cladding Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors for Large Strain Amplitude Fatigue Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xijia Gu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully developed a flat-cladding fiber Bragg grating sensor for large cyclic strain amplitude tests of up to ±8,000 με. The increased contact area between the flat-cladding fiber and substrate, together with the application of a new bonding process, has significantly increased the bonding strength. In the push-pull fatigue tests of an aluminum alloy, the plastic strain amplitudes measured by three optical fiber sensors differ only by 0.43% at a cyclic strain amplitude of ±7,000 με and 1.9% at a cyclic strain amplitude of ±8,000 με. We also applied the sensor on an extruded magnesium alloy for evaluating the peculiar asymmetric hysteresis loops. The results obtained were in good agreement with those measured from the extensometer, a further validation of the sensor.

  16. Characterization of LWRS Hybrid SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Fuel Cladding after Gamma Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella J van Rooyen

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the gamma irradiation tests conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was to obtain a better understanding of chemical interactions and potential changes in microstructural properties of a mock-up hybrid nuclear fuel cladding rodlet design (unfueled) in a simulated PWR water environment under irradiation conditions. The hybrid fuel rodlet design is being investigated under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program for further development and testing of one of the possible advanced LWR nuclear fuel cladding designs. The gamma irradiation tests were performed in preparation for neutron irradiation tests planned for a silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic matrix composite (CMC) zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) hybrid fuel rodlet that may be tested in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) if the design is selected for further development and testing

  17. Cold spraying of aluminum bronze on profiled submillimeter cermet structures formed by laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryashin, N. S.; Malikov, A. G.; Shikalov, V. S.; Gulyaev, I. P.; Kuchumov, B. M.; Klinkov, S. V.; Kosarev, V. F.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents results of the cold spraying of aluminum bronze coatings on substrates profiled with WC/Ni tracks obtained by laser cladding. Reinforcing cermet frames shaped as grids with varied mesh sizes were clad on stainless steel substrates using a CO2 laser machine "Siberia" (ITAM SB RAS, Russia). As a result, surfaces/substrates with heterogeneous shape, composition, and mechanical properties were obtained. Aluminum bronze coatings were deposited from 5lF-NS powder (Oerlikon Metco, Switzerland) on those substrates using cold spraying equipment (ITAM SB RAS). Data of profiling, microstructure diagnostics, EDS analysis, and mechanical tests of obtained composites is reported. Surface relief of the sprayed coatings dependence on substrate structure has been demonstrated.

  18. High Temperature Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Performance of Laser Cladding WC/Ni Composite Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Jiao-xi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two different types of agglomerate and angular WC/Ni matrix composite coatings were deposited by laser cladding. The high temperature wear resistance of these composite coatings was tested with a ring-on-disc MMG-10 apparatus. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS for elemental composition. The results show that the high temperature wear resistance of the laser clad WC/Ni-based composite coatings is improved significantly with WC mass fraction increasing. The 60% agglomerate WC/Ni composite coating has optimal high temperature wear resistance. High temperature wear mechanism of 60% WC/Ni composite coating is from abrasive wear of low temperature into composite function of the oxidation wear and abrasive wear.

  19. Delayed hydride cracking in zircaloy fuel cladding-an IAEA coordinated research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C. [AECL, Chalk River (Canada); Grigoriev, V. [Studsvik, Nykoeping (Sweden); Inozemtsev, V. [IAEA, Vienna (Austria); Markelov, V. [VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation); Roth, M. [INR, Saclay (France); Makarevicius, V. [LEI, Kaunas (Lithuania); Kim, Y. S. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ali, Kanwar Liagat [PINS, TU Wien (Austria); Chakravartty, J. K. [BARC, Mumbai (India); Mizrahi, R. [CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lalgudi, R. [IPEN, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2008-10-15

    The rate of delayed hydride cracking (DHC), V, has been measured in cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy 4 fuel cladding using the Pin Loading Tension technique. At 250 .deg. C the mean value of V from 69 specimens was 3.3({+-}0.8)x10-8 m/s while the temperature dependence up to 275 .deg. C was described by Aexp(-Q/RT), where Q is 48.3 kJ/mol. No cracking or cracking at very low rates was observed at higher temperatures. The fracture surface consisted of flat fracture with no striations. The results are compared with previous results on fuel cladding and pressure tubes.

  20. Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-13

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  1. ODS Ferritic/martensitic alloys for Sodium Fast Reactor fuel pin cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuisson, Philippe; Carlan, Yann de; Garat, Véronique; Blat, Martine

    2012-09-01

    The development of ODS materials for the cladding for Sodium Fast Reactors is a key issue to achieve the objectives required for the GEN IV reactors. CEA, AREVA and EDF have launched in 2007 an important program to determine the optimal fabrication parameters, and to measure and understand the microstructure and properties before, under and after irradiation of such cladding materials. The aim of this paper is to present the French program and the major results obtained recently at CEA on Fe-9/14/18Cr1WTiY2O3 ferritic/martensitic ODS materials. The first step of the program was to consolidate Fe-9/14/18Cr ODS materials as plates and bars to study the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the new alloys. The second step consists in producing tubes at a geometry representative of the cladding of new Sodium Fast Reactors. The optimization of the fabrication route at the laboratory scale is conducted and different tubes were produced. Their microstructure depends on the martensitic (Fe-9Cr) or ferritic (Fe-14Cr) structure. To join the plug to the tube, the reference process is the welding resistance. A specific approach is developed to model the process and support the development of the welds performed within the "SOPRANO" facility. The development at CEA of Fe-9/14/18Cr new ODS materials for the cladding for GENIV Sodium Fast Reactors is in progress. The first microstructural and mechanical characterizations are very encouraging and the full assessment and qualification of this new alloys and products will pass through the irradiation of specimens, tubes, fuel pins and subassemblies up to high doses.

  2. Tunable polarization beam splitting based on a symmetrical metal-cladding waveguide structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Cao, Zhuangqi; Li, Honggen; Shen, Qishun; Yuan, Wen; Xiao, Pingping

    2009-08-03

    Electrical tuning of polarization beam splitting is demonstrated in the structure of symmetrical metal-cladding waveguide by introducing optically nonlinear material into both the coupling prism and the guiding layer. Due to the anisotropy of the coupling material, different excitation conditions for TE and TM modes are obtained, which results in polarization-dependent reflections and transmissions. And the splitting effect of the two orthogonally polarized beams can be manipulated through an electrical modulation of the guiding layer properties.

  3. Fourth-order dispersion mediated solitonic radiations in HC-PCF cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benabid, F.; Biancalana, F.; Light, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    We observe experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, the simultaneous emission of two strong conjugate resonant dispersive waves emitted by optical solitons. The effect is observed in a small waveguiding glass-feature within the cladding of a Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. ...... demonstrate theoretically that the phenomenon is attributed to the unusually high forth-order dispersion coefficient of the waveguiding feature....

  4. Localized In Situ Cladding Annealing for Post Fabrication Trimming of Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-21

    In-Situ Cladding Annealing for Post-Fabrication Trimming of Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuits Steven Spector1, Jeffrey M. Knecht, and Paul W...calibration process rather than adjusting it continuously by applying power to a heater during operation of the circuit . When compared to other methods...is especially well suited to the low-cost integration of large numbers of optical components. One great challenge to fully realizing this potential

  5. All fiber nonlinear microscopy at 1550 nm using a double-clad fiber coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrillat-Bottonet, Thomas; Strupler, Mathias; Leduc, Mikael; Majeau, Lucas; Godbout, Nicolas; Boudoux, Caroline

    2017-02-01

    Nonlinear microscopy has already shown its impact in biological research, namely in the fields of neurobiology, immunology, cancer research and embryology. Typically, these microscopes operate under free space propagation, using a dichroic mirror to separate the nonlinear signals from the excitation laser. While powerful such implementations are difficult to translate from the laboratory to a clinical setting where the environment is less controlled. Therefore, we propose an alignment-free all-fiber nonlinear microscopy system at 1550 nm based on double-clad fibers (DCF). As sectioning is performed through nonlinear effects, nonlinear microscopy does not require a detection pinhole, and. the DCF inner cladding can be used for efficient collection of nonlinear signals. The built system allows for multiplexing second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excitation fluorescence (2PEF), collected from the inner cladding; and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), detected from the core acting as the confocal pinhole. Finally, an asymmetric double-clad fiber coupler (DCFC) is used to address efficiently both DCF channels. This all-fiber system is more compact and less sensitive to alignment, but requires carefully managing the transmission of the femtosecond pulse in the fiber. This is addressed using dispersion compensation fiber, pulse compression and solitonic propagation. Additionally, with a source centered at 1550 nm, we benefit from reduced sample scattering thus increasing the depth of field in comparison with systems operating at 800 nm. Overall we believe that the developed system could be transferred in clinics to enable in-vivo and in-situ imaging of human patient.

  6. Introduction of Explosive Cladding Technology for the Manufacturing of Hydraulic Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovišević, V.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The microhardness, microstructure and bond strength of the interface of a bi-metallic joint on the cross-section of the testing hydraulic cylinder were investigated. Experimental findings of related to both method of cladding obtained with metallographic and mechanical investigations of the interface between the CuSn6 bronze and the TS5 (Č.1213 steel cylinder, are given.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Weld Bead Geometry, Quality, and Productivity for Stainless Steel Claddings Deposited by FCAW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J. H. F.; Costa, S. C.; Paiva, A. P.; Balestrassi, P. P.

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, industrial settings are seeing a rise in the use of stainless steel claddings. The anti-corrosive surfaces are made from low cost materials such as carbon steel or low alloy steels. To ensure the final quality of claddings, however, it is important to know how the welding parameters affect the process's outcome. Beads should be defect free and deposited with the desired geometry, with efficiency, and with a minimal waste of material. The objective of this study then is to analyze how the flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) parameters influence geometry, productivity, and the surface quality of the stainless steel claddings. It examines AISI 1020 carbon steel cladded with 316L stainless steel. Geometry was analyzed in terms of bead width, penetration, reinforcement, and dilution. Productivity was analyzed according to deposition rate and process yield, and surface quality according to surface appearance and slag formation. The FCAW parameters chosen included the wire feed rate, voltage, welding speed, and contact-tip-workpiece distance. To analyze the parameters' influences, mathematical models were developed based on response surface methodology. The results show that all parameters were significant. The degrees of importance among them varied according to the responses of interest. What also proved to be significant was the interaction between parameters. It was found that the combined effect of two parameters significantly affected a response; even when taken individually, the two might produce little effect. Finally, the development of Pareto frontiers confirmed the existence of conflicts of interest in this process, suggesting the application of multi-objective optimization techniques to the sequence of this study.

  8. Bragg Gratings Induced in Birefringent Optical Fiber with an Elliptical Stress Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Meshkovskiy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of writing of type I and high-performance type II fiber Bragg gratings in birefringent optical fiber with an elliptical stress cladding by a single 20 ns pulse of KrF excimer laser (248 nm. The gratings’ efficiency produced by a single pulse was up to 100%. Experimental results on visualization of these gratings are presented.

  9. Optimization of Ni-Based WC/Co/Cr Composite Coatings Produced by Multilayer Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Angelastro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a surface coating technique, laser cladding (LC has been developed for improving wear, corrosion, and fatigue properties of mechanical components. The main advantage of this process is the capability of introducing hard particles such as SiC, TiC, and WC as reinforcements in the metallic matrix such as Ni-based alloy, Co-based alloy, and Fe-based alloy to form ceramic-metal composite coatings, which have very high hardness and good wear resistance. In this paper, Ni-based alloy (Colmonoy 227-F and Tungsten Carbides/Cobalt/Chromium (WC/Co/Cr composite coatings were fabricated by the multilayer laser cladding technique (MLC. An optimization procedure was implemented to obtain the combination of process parameters that minimizes the porosity and produces good adhesion to a stainless steel substrate. The optimization procedure was worked out with a mathematical model that was supported by an experimental analysis, which studied the shape of the clad track generated by melting coaxially fed powders with a laser. Microstructural and microhardness analysis completed the set of test performed on the coatings.

  10. CONSERVATION OF STONE CLADDING ON THE FAÇADE OF ROYAL PALACE IN CASERTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Titomanlio

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The beauty of cultural heritage and monumental architecture, is often linked to their non-structural elements and decorative stones façades cladding. The collapse of these elements causes significant consequences that interest the social, the economic, the historical and the technical fields. Several regulatory documents and literature studies contain methods to address the question of relief and of the risk analysis and due to the non – structural stones security. Among the references are widespread international regulatory documents prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency of the United States by Applied Technology Council and California. In Italy there are some indications contained in the Norme Tecniche per le Costruzioni and the Direttiva del Presidente del Consiglio dei Ministri in 2007, finalize to the reduction of seismic risk assessment of cultural heritage. The paper, using normative references and scientific researches, allows to analyze on Royal Palace of Caserta the safety and the preservation of cultural heritage and the vulnerability of non-structural stones façade cladding. Using sophisticated equipments of Laboratory ARS of the Second University of Naples, it was possible to analyze the collapse of stone elements due to degradation caused by natural phenomena of deterioration (age of the building, type of materials, geometries , mode of fixing of the elements themselves. The paper explains the collapse mechanisms of stones façade cladding of Luigi Vanvitelli Palace.

  11. New optical fiber type: microporous sol-gel-clad optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skutnik, Bolesh J.

    1999-04-01

    A new type of optical fiber has been developed. It is made with all pure silica in both the core and cladding. This is possible because the cladding is a micro porous silica produced by a modified sol-gel technology. The formation and characteristics of this new optical fiber type are described. In particular the optical and mechanical properties are illustrated and described. The strength and fatigue of these optical fibers are very good, even without additional protective jackets. Unjacketed fibers have mean Weibull strengths in bending of 6.5 to 7.6 GPa with Weibull slopes in the 40 to 60 range. Fatigue results for fibers tested in ambient air, ambient water and boiling water are presented. The dynamic and static fatigue parameters are around 20. The micro porous structure of the sol-gel cladding provides sites for attaching different moieties which could activate biochemical reactions or be useful as sensing sites. Based on preliminary experiments, some possibilities are presented. In general this new structure can provide opportunities for as yet unidentified applications where chemicals and or light must be brought in close contact with body tissue to effect beneficial reactions there.

  12. Mechanical response of FFTF reference and P1 cladding tubes under transient heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngahl, C.A.; Ariman, T.; Lepacek, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Burst tests of Type 316 stainless steel cladding tube samples subjected to increasing temperature and relatively constant internal pressure were conducted to assist in the pretest analysis of the P1 experiment performed in the Sodium Loop Safety Facility. This paper reports and analyzes the burst test results and those of subsequent transient heating work. The use of a modified extensometer in obtaining mechanical response data for stainless steel in the high temperature range is illustrated, some of such data is provided, and the potential of further experiments and analysis is indicated. Tubing of the same design as Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) cladding (20% cold worked, 0.230 in. OD, 15 mil wall) was tested as-received and after annealing or electrolytic thinning. P1 tubing (38% cold worked, 0.230 in. OD, 10 mil wall) was tested before and after aging under conditions anticipated in the P1 reactor experiment. The P1 cladding was designed to simulate FFTF tubing that had experienced irradiation embrittlement and attack by cesium oxide and sodium impurities.

  13. Nanocrystalline diamond protects Zr cladding surface against oxygen and hydrogen uptake: Nuclear fuel durability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škarohlíd, Jan; Ashcheulov, Petr; Škoda, Radek; Taylor, Andrew; Čtvrtlík, Radim; Tomáštík, Jan; Fendrych, František; Kopeček, Jaromír; Cháb, Vladimír; Cichoň, Stanislav; Sajdl, Petr; Macák, Jan; Xu, Peng; Partezana, Jonna M; Lorinčík, Jan; Prehradná, Jana; Steinbrück, Martin; Kratochvílová, Irena

    2017-07-25

    In this work, we demonstrate and describe an effective method of protecting zirconium fuel cladding against oxygen and hydrogen uptake at both accident and working temperatures in water-cooled nuclear reactor environments. Zr alloy samples were coated with nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers of different thicknesses, grown in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition apparatus. In addition to showing that such an NCD layer prevents the Zr alloy from directly interacting with water, we show that carbon released from the NCD film enters the underlying Zr material and changes its properties, such that uptake of oxygen and hydrogen is significantly decreased. After 100-170 days of exposure to hot water at 360 °C, the oxidation of the NCD-coated Zr plates was typically decreased by 40%. Protective NCD layers may prolong the lifetime of nuclear cladding and consequently enhance nuclear fuel burnup. NCD may also serve as a passive element for nuclear safety. NCD-coated ZIRLO claddings have been selected as a candidate for Accident Tolerant Fuel in commercially operated reactors in 2020.

  14. Development of Cold Spray Coatings for Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Light Weight Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Benjamin; Yeom, Hwasung; Johnson, Greg; Dabney, Tyler; Walters, Jorie; Romero, Javier; Shah, Hemant; Xu, Peng; Sridharan, Kumar

    2017-11-01

    The cold spray coating process has been developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for the deposition of oxidation-resistant coatings on zirconium alloy light water reactor fuel cladding with the goal of improving accident tolerance during loss of coolant scenarios. Coatings of metallic (Cr), alloy (FeCrAl), and ceramic (Ti2AlC) materials were successfully deposited on zirconium alloy flats and cladding tube sections by optimizing the powder size, gas preheat temperature, pressure and composition, and other process parameters. The coatings were dense and exhibited excellent adhesion to the substrate. Evaluation of the samples after high-temperature oxidation tests at temperatures up to 1300°C showed that the cold spray coatings significantly mitigate oxidation kinetics because of the formation of thin passive oxide layers on the surface. The results of the study indicate that the cold spray coating process is a viable near-term option for developing accident-tolerant zirconium alloy fuel cladding.

  15. Development of Cold Spray Coatings for Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Benjamin; Yeom, Hwasung; Johnson, Greg; Dabney, Tyler; Walters, Jorie; Romero, Javier; Shah, Hemant; Xu, Peng; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    The cold spray coating process has been developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for the deposition of oxidation-resistant coatings on zirconium alloy light water reactor fuel cladding with the goal of improving accident tolerance during loss of coolant scenarios. Coatings of metallic (Cr), alloy (FeCrAl), and ceramic (Ti2AlC) materials were successfully deposited on zirconium alloy flats and cladding tube sections by optimizing the powder size, gas preheat temperature, pressure and composition, and other process parameters. The coatings were dense and exhibited excellent adhesion to the substrate. Evaluation of the samples after high-temperature oxidation tests at temperatures up to 1300°C showed that the cold spray coatings significantly mitigate oxidation kinetics because of the formation of thin passive oxide layers on the surface. The results of the study indicate that the cold spray coating process is a viable near-term option for developing accident-tolerant zirconium alloy fuel cladding.

  16. Iron-chrome-aluminum alloy cladding for increasing safety in nuclear power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebak Raul B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After a tsunami caused plant black out at Fukushima, followed by hydrogen explosions, the US Department of Energy partnered with fuel vendors to study safer alternatives to the current UO2-zirconium alloy system. This accident tolerant fuel alternative should better tolerate loss of cooling in the core for a considerably longer time while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operation conditions. General electric, Oak ridge national laboratory, and their partners are proposing to replace zirconium alloy cladding in current commercial light water power reactors with an iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl cladding such as APMT or C26M. Extensive testing and evaluation is being conducted to determine the suitability of FeCrAl under normal operation conditions and under severe accident conditions. Results show that FeCrAl has excellent corrosion resistance under normal operation conditions and FeCrAl is several orders of magnitude more resistant than zirconium alloys to degradation by superheated steam under accident conditions, generating less heat of oxidation and lower amount of combustible hydrogen gas. Higher neutron absorption and tritium release effects can be minimized by design changes. The implementation of FeCrAl cladding is a near term solution to enhance the safety of the current fleet of commercial light water power reactors.

  17. The influence of strain rate and hydrogen on the plane-strain ductility of Zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, T.M.; Motta, A.T.; Koss, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The authors studied the ductility of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding under loading conditions prototypical of those found in reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), i.e.: near plane-strain deformation in the hoop direction (transverse to the cladding axis) at room temperature and 300 C and high strain rates. To conduct these studies, they developed a specimen configuration in which near plane-strain deformation is achieved in the gage section, and a testing methodology that allows one to determine both the limit strain at the onset of localized necking and the fracture strain. The experiments indicate that there is little effect of strain rate (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) on the ductility of unhydrided Zircaloy tubing deformed under near plane-strain conditions at either room temperature or 300 C. Preliminary experiments on cladding containing 190 ppm hydrogen show only a small loss of fracture strain but no clear effect on limit strain. The experiments also indicate that there is a significant loss of Zircaloy ductility when surface flaws are present in the form of thickness imperfections.

  18. Microstructure and properties of laser clad coatings studied by orientation imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocelik, V.; Furar, I. [Department of Applied Physics, Materials Innovation Institute (M2i), University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, Groningen 9747 AG (Netherlands); De Hosson, J.Th.M., E-mail: j.t.m.de.hosson@rug.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Materials Innovation Institute (M2i), University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, Groningen 9747 AG (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    In this work orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), based on electron backscatter diffraction in scanning electron microscopy, was employed to examine in detail the relationship between laser cladding processing parameters and he properties and the microstructure of single and overlapping laser tracks. The study was performed on thick ({approx}1 mm) Co-based coatings prepared by 2 kW Nd:YAG laser cladding a 42CrMo4 steel substrate using different laser beam scanning speeds (1.0-15 mm s{sup -1}). It was found that the directional growth of individual primary grains led to the formation of a typical solidification fiber texture. The dependence of this texture on the processing speed and the shape of the solidification front were investigated in detail. Strong epitaxial growth of Co grains on austenitic steel substrate grains was found, which did not depend on the laser beam scanning velocity. During laser cladding a strong temperature gradient exists just below the coating-substrate interface that promotes the formation of a Greninger-Troiano orientation relationship between martensitic plates and the original austenitic grain inside the heat affected zone: {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}{sub {gamma}} {approx} 1{sup o} to {l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace}{sub {alpha}} and <1-bar 21-bar >{sub {gamma}} {approx} 2{sup o} to <11-bar 0>{sub {alpha}}. Relatively drastic changes in grain size at the internal coating interfaces did not exhibit sharp changes in microhardness.

  19. Geometry modeling of single track cladding deposited by high power diode laser with rectangular beam spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaming; Qin, Xunpeng; Huang, Song; Hu, Zeqi; Ni, Mao

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the relationship between the process parameters and geometrical characteristics of the sectional profile for the single track cladding (STC) deposited by High Power Diode Laser (HPDL) with rectangle beam spot (RBS). To obtain the geometry parameters, namely cladding width Wc and height Hc of the sectional profile, a full factorial design (FFD) of experiment was used to conduct the experiments with a total of 27. The pre-placed powder technique has been employed during laser cladding. The influence of the process parameters including laser power, powder thickness and scanning speed on the Wc and Hc was analyzed in detail. A nonlinear fitting model was used to fit the relationship between the process parameters and geometry parameters. And a circular arc was adopted to describe the geometry profile of the cross-section of STC. The above models were confirmed by all the experiments. The results indicated that the geometrical characteristics of the sectional profile of STC can be described as the circular arc, and the other geometry parameters of the sectional profile can be calculated only using Wc and Hc. Meanwhile, the Wc and Hc can be predicted through the process parameters.

  20. Conservation of Stone Cladding on the FAÇADE of Royal Palace in Caserta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titomanlio, I.

    2013-07-01

    The beauty of cultural heritage and monumental architecture, is often linked to their non-structural elements and decorative stones façades cladding. The collapse of these elements causes significant consequences that interest the social, the economic, the historical and the technical fields. Several regulatory documents and literature studies contain methods to address the question of relief and of the risk analysis and due to the non - structural stones security. Among the references are widespread international regulatory documents prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency of the United States by Applied Technology Council and California. In Italy there are some indications contained in the Norme Tecniche per le Costruzioni and the Direttiva del Presidente del Consiglio dei Ministri in 2007, finalize to the reduction of seismic risk assessment of cultural heritage. The paper, using normative references and scientific researches, allows to analyze on Royal Palace of Caserta the safety and the preservation of cultural heritage and the vulnerability of non-structural stones façade cladding. Using sophisticated equipments of Laboratory ARS of the Second University of Naples, it was possible to analyze the collapse of stone elements due to degradation caused by natural phenomena of deterioration (age of the building, type of materials, geometries , mode of fixing of the elements themselves). The paper explains the collapse mechanisms of stones façade cladding of Luigi Vanvitelli Palace.

  1. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.; Girshik, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, laboratory experiments were performed on a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings by exposing them to fireside corrosion tests which simulated a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, RA253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, Ta-modified 310, NF 709, 690 clad, 671 clad, and 800HT for up to approximately 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy were exposed for 4,483, 11,348, and 15,883 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after the full 15,883 hours of exposure. A previous topical report has been issued for the 4,483 hours of exposure.

  2. Surface modification of AISI H13 tool steel by laser cladding with NiTi powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhafzan, B.; Aqida, S. N.; Chikarakara, E.; Brabazon, D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents laser cladding of NiTi powder on AISI H13 tool steel surface for surface properties enhancement. The cladding process was conducted using Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 laser system with wavelength of 10.6 µm. NiTi powder was pre-placed on H13 tool steel surface. The laser beam was focused with a spot size of 90 µm on the sample surface. Laser parameters were set to 1515 and 1138 W peak power, 18 and 24 % duty cycle and 2300-3500 Hz laser pulse repetition frequency. Hardness properties of the modified layer were characterized by Wilson Hardness tester. Metallographic study and chemical composition were conducted using field emission scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDXS) analysis. Results showed that hardness of NiTi clad layer increased three times that of the substrate material. The EDXS analysis detected NiTi phase presence in the modified layer up to 9.8 wt%. The metallographic study shows high metallurgical bonding between substrate and modified layer. These findings are significant to both increased hardness and erosion resistance of high-wear-resistant components and elongating their lifetime.

  3. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Krawchuk, M.T.; Van Weele, S.F. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A number of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings have previously been exposed in Phase I to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. This program is exposing samples of TP 347, RA-85H, HR-3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, NF-709, 690 clad, and 671 clad, which showed good corrosion resistance from Phase 1, to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and are being controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. The exposure will continue for 4000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. After the three exposure times, the samples will be metallurgically examined to determine the wastage rates and mode of attack. The probes were commissioned November 16, 1994. The temperatures are being recorded every 15 minutes, and the weighted average temperature calculated for each sample. Each of the alloys is being exposed to a temperature in each of two temperature bands-1150 to 1260{degrees}F and 1260 to 1325{degrees}F. After 2000 hours of exposure, one of the corrosion probes was cleaned and the wall thicknesses were ultrasonically measured. The alloy performance from the field probes will be discussed.

  4. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-06-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

  5. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-01

    In Phase 1 a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347 RA-85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 Ta modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for approximately 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were assembled on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, the probe was installed in the reheater activity of the boiler and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. The results will be presented for the preliminary metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 16,000 hours of exposure. Continued metallurgical and interpretive analysis is still on going.

  6. Steam generator tube failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  7. Modification of MELCOR for severe accident analysis of candidate accident tolerant cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, Brad J., E-mail: brad.merrill@inl.gov; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M., E-mail: shannon.bragg-sitton@inl.gov; Humrickhouse, Paul W., E-mail: paul.humrickhouse@inl.gov

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) systems are currently under development for LWRs. • Many performance analysis tools are specifically developed for UO{sub 2}–Zr alloy fuel. • Modifications were made to the MELCOR code for candidate ATF cladding. • Preliminary analysis results for SiC and FeCrAl cladding concepts are presented. - Abstract: A number of materials are currently under development as candidate accident tolerant fuel and cladding for application in the current fleet of commercial light water reactors (LWRs). The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the nuclear industry. Continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to the industry’s success. Enhancing the accident tolerance of light water reactors became a topic of serious discussion following the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex. The overall goal for the development of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) systems for LWRs is to identify alternative fuel system technologies to further enhance the safety, competitiveness, and economics of commercial nuclear power. Designed for use in the current fleet of commercial LWRs, or in reactor concepts with design certifications (GEN-III+), to achieve their goal enhanced ATF must endure loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer period of time than the current fuel system, while maintaining or improving performance during normal operation. Many available nuclear fuel performance analysis tools are specifically developed for the current UO{sub 2}–Zirconium alloy fuel system. The MELCOR severe-accident analysis code, under development at the Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico (SNL-NM) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is one of these tools. This paper describes modifications

  8. Evaluations of Mo-alloy for light water reactor fuel cladding to enhance accident tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Bo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum based alloy is selected as a candidate to enhance tolerance of fuel to severe loss of coolant accidents due to its high melting temperature of ∼2600 °C and ability to maintain sufficient mechanical strength at temperatures exceeding 1200 °C. An outer layer of either a Zr-alloy or Al-containing stainless steel is designed to provide corrosion resistance under normal operation and oxidation resistance in steam exceeding 1000 °C for 24 hours under severe loss of coolant accidents. Due to its higher neutron absorption cross-sections, the Mo-alloy cladding is designed to be less than half the thickness of the current Zr-alloy cladding. A feasibility study has been undertaken to demonstrate (1 fabricability of long, thin wall Mo-alloy tubes, (2 formability of a protective outer coating, (3 weldability of Mo tube to endcaps, (4 corrosion resistance in autoclaves with simulated LWR coolant, (5 oxidation resistance to steam at 1000–1500 °C, and (6 sufficient axial and diametral strength and ductility. High purity Mo as well as Mo + La2O3 ODS alloy have been successfully fabricated into ∼2-meter long tubes for the feasibility study. Preliminary results are encouraging, and hence rodlets with Mo-alloy cladding containing fuel pellets have been under preparation for irradiation at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR in Idaho National Laboratory. Additional efforts are underway to enhance the Mo cladding mechanical properties via process optimization. Oxidation tests to temperatures up to 1500 °C, and burst and creep tests up to 1000 °C are also underway. In addition, some Mo disks in close contact with UO2 from a previous irradiation program (to >100 GWd/MTU at the Halden Reactor have been subjected to post-irradiation examination to evaluate the chemical compatibility of Mo with irradiated UO2 and fission products. This paper will provide an update on results from the feasibility study and discuss the attributes of the

  9. Simulation and design of a multistage 10W thulium-doped double clad silica fiber amplifier at 2050nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Clément; Tench, Robert E.; Jaouën, Yves; Williams, Glen M.

    2017-02-01

    A careful comparison of experiment and theory is important both for basic research and systematic engineering design of Thulium fiber amplifiers operating in the 2 μm region for applications such as LIDAR or spectroscopy (e.g. CO2 atmospheric absorption at 2051.4 nm). In this paper we report the design and performance of a multistage high-power PM Tm-doped fiber amplifier, cladding pumped at 793 nm. The design is the result of a careful comparison of numerical simulation, based on a three level model including ion-ion interactions, and experiment. Our simulation model is based on precise measurements of the cross sections and other parameters for both 6 and 10 μm core diameter fibers. Good agreement for several single and multistage amplifier topologies and operating conditions will be presented. Origins of the difference between theory and experiment are discussed, with emphasis on the accuracy of the cross sections and the cross relaxation parameters. Finally based on our simulation tool, we will demonstrate a design with an output power greater than 10 W for a multistage amplifier with a single-frequency signal at 2050 nm. The power stage was constructed with a 6 μm active fiber showing a 64 % optical slope efficiency. The output power is found to be within 5 % of the simulated results and is limited only by the available launched pump power of 24 W. No stimulated Brillouin scattering is observed at the highest output power level for an active fiber well thermalized.

  10. Living with Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  11. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  12. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain proper fluid ... marrow and strengthen the bones. The term kidney (renal) failure describes a situation in which the kidneys have ...

  13. Acute Liver Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute liver failure Overview Acute liver failure is loss of liver function that occurs rapidly — in days or weeks — usually in a person who has no pre-existing liver disease. Acute liver failure is less common than ...

  14. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken once ...

  15. Enhancement of pump absorption efficiency by bending and twisting of double clad rare earth doped fibers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koška, Pavel; Peterka, Pavel; Doya, Valérie; Aubrecht, Jan; Kasik, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej

    2017-05-01

    High-power operation of fiber lasers was enabled by the invention of cladding-pumping in a double-clad fiber structure. Because of existence of so called skew rays in the inner clad of the fiber, pump absorption saturates along the fiber and pumping becomes inefficient. First studies of pump absorption efficiency enhancement were focused on fibers with broken circular symmetry of inner cladding eliminating skew rays [1,2]. Later, techniques of unconventional fiber coiling were proposed [3]. However, theoretical studies were limited to the assumption of a straight fiber. Even recently, the rigorous model accounting for fiber bending and twisting was described [4-6]. It was found that bending of the fiber influences modal spectra of the pump radiation and twisting provides quite efficient mode-scrambling. These effects in a synergic manner significantly enhances pump absorption rate in double clad fibers and improves laser system efficiency. In our contribution we review results of numerical modelling of pump absorption in various types of double-clad fibers, e.g., with cross section shape of hexagon, stadium, and circle; two-fiber bundle (so-called GTWave fiber structure) a panda fibers are also analyzed. We investigate pump field modal spectra evolution in hexagonally shaped fiber in straight, bended, and simultaneously bended and twisted fiber which brings new quality to understanding of the mode-scrambling and pump absorption enhancement. Finally, we evaluate the impact of enhanced pump absorption on signal gain in the fiber. These results can have practical impact in construction of fiber lasers: with pump absorption efficiency optimized by our new model (the other models did not take into account fiber twist), the double-clad fiber of shorter length can be used in the fiber lasers and amplifiers. In such a way the harmful influence of background losses and nonlinear effects can be minimized. [1] Doya, V., Legrand, O., Mortessagne, F., "Optimized absorption in a

  16. Enhancing surface integrity and corrosion resistance of laser cladded Cr-Ni alloys by hard turning and low plasticity burnishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peirong; Liu, Zhanqiang

    2017-07-01

    In this research, the enhancements of surface integrity and corrosion resistance of the laser cladded parts by combined hard turning with low plasticity burnishing (LPB) were presented by both potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods. The investigated results indicated that the corrosion resistance of the laser cladded parts could be improved by combined hard turning with LPB than by sole hard turning. An innovative model was proposed to explain the corrosion mechanism of the laser cladded parts after hybrid machining. Both surface adsorption and passive film were observed to dominate the corrosion resistance of the hybrid machined Cr-Ni alloys by laser cladding. The surface integrity led to the inhomogeneity of passive film, and then altered the corrosion resistance of the machined samples. In terms of the surface integrity factors, residual compressive stresses and surface finish were found to play more important roles in improving the corrosion resistance than the grain refinement and microhardness of the machined surface layer materials did. Based on the research results, anti-corrosion parts with laser cladded alloys could be fabricated by hybrid machining using the combination of hard turning and LPB.

  17. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico, A., E-mail: alvaro.rico@urjc.es [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Martin-Rengel, M.A., E-mail: mamartin@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J., E-mail: jesus.ruiz@upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J. [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Sanchez, F.J., E-mail: javier.gomez@amsimulation.com [Advanced Material Simulation, S.L, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  18. Characterizing the magnetic memory signals on the surface of plasma transferred arc cladding coating under fatigue loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haihong; Han, Gang; Qian, Zhengchun; Liu, Zhifeng

    2017-12-01

    The metal magnetic memory signals were measured during dynamic tension tests on the surfaces of the cladding coatings by plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding and the 0.45% C steel. Results showed that the slope of the normal component Hp(y) of magnetic signal and the average value of the tangential component Hp(x) reflect the magnetization of the specimens. The signals increased sharply in the few initial cycles; and then fluctuated around a constant value during fatigue process until fracture. For the PTA cladding coating, the slope of Hp(y) was steeper and the average of Hp(x) was smaller, compared with the 0.45% C steel. The hysteresis curves of cladding layer, bonding layer and substrate were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer testing, and then saturation magnetization, initial susceptibility and coercivity were further calculated. The stress-magnetization curves were also plotted based on the J-A model, which showed that the PTA cladding coating has smaller remanence and coercivity compared with the 0.45% C steel. The microstructures of cladding coating confirmed that the dendritic structure and second-phase of alloy hinder the magnetic domain motion, which was the main factor influencing the variation of magnetic signal during the fatigue tests.

  19. Thermal assessment of Shippingport pressurized water reactor blanket fuel assemblies within a multi-canister overpack within the canister storage building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEARD, F.J.

    1999-04-09

    A series of analyses were performed to assess the thermal performance characteristics of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies as loaded within a Multi-Canister Overpack within the Canister Storage Building. A two-dimensional finite element was developed, with enough detail to model the individual fuel plates: including the fuel wafers, cladding, and flow channels.

  20. Renal failure following hospitalization for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the number of patients with heart failure readmitted for renal failure to IU Health Bloomington within 30 days of hospital discharge in 2010, and to determine whether there are factors that might have been identified before the original discharge that would have prevented the readmission. The goal of the research is to identify factors from previous admissions of patients with heart failure that would have possibly predicted a subsequent admission for renal failure, so that interventions can be developed to prevent such readmissions. The results from this study are applicable to all primary care settings. A retrospective descriptive design was employed. Subjects were patients diagnosed with heart failure in 2010 and subsequently readmitted with renal failure within 30 days of their previous hospital admission. A retrospective chart review was completed extracting the variables blood urea nitrogen levels upon patients' discharge and readmission, serum creatinine levels upon discharge and readmission, weight in kilograms upon discharge and readmission, total intake and output during the first hospitalization, diuretic medication dosage, history of renal failure, history of renal insufficiency, and death. Renal failure may be a predictable complication of heart failure. Although there are varying secondary pathophysiologies, which could account for readmission with renal failure and the severity of the renal failure, more attention should be paid to the variables identified in this study. Case managers can play a crucial role in identifying potential patients with renal failure and, where possible, collaborating with other health care providers to proactively preventing renal complications in patients with heart failure.