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Sample records for cladding corrosion model

  1. MODELLING OF NUCLEAR FUEL CLADDING TUBES CORROSION

    Miroslav Cech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes materials made of zirconium-based alloys used for nuclear fuel cladding fabrication. It is focused on corrosion problems their theoretical description and modeling in nuclear engineering.

  2. Semi-empirical corrosion model for Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Nadeem Elahi, Waseem; Atif Rana, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The Zircaloy-4 cladding tube in Pressurize Water Reactors (PWRs) bears corrosion due to fast neutron flux, coolant temperature, and water chemistry. The thickness of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube may be decreased due to the increase in corrosion penetration which may affect the integrity of the fuel rod. The tin content and inter-metallic particles sizes has been found significantly in the magnitude of oxide thickness. In present study we have developed a Semiempirical corrosion model by modifying the Arrhenius equation for corrosion as a function of acceleration factor for tin content and accumulative annealing. This developed model has been incorporated into fuel performance computer code. The cladding oxide thickness data obtained from the Semi-empirical corrosion model has been compared with the experimental results i.e., numerous cases of measured cladding oxide thickness from UO 2 fuel rods, irradiated in various PWRs. The results of the both studies lie within the error band of 20μm, which confirms the validity of the developed Semi-empirical corrosion model. Key words: Corrosion, Zircaloy-4, tin content, accumulative annealing factor, Semi-empirical, PWR. (author)

  3. A systematic approach for development of a PWR cladding corrosion model

    Quecedo, M.; Serna, J.J.; Weiner, R.A.; Kersting, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    A new model for the in-reactor corrosion of Improved (low-tin) Zircaloy-4 cladding irradiated in commercial pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is described. The model is based on an extensive database of PWR fuel cladding corrosion data from fuel irradiated in commercial reactors, with a range of fuel duty and coolant chemistry control strategies which bracket current PWR fuel management practices. The fuel thermal duty with these current fuel management practices is characterized by a significant amount of sub-cooled nucleate boiling (SNB) during the fuel's residence in-core, and the cladding corrosion model is very sensitive to the coolant heat transfer models used to calculate the coolant temperature at the oxide surface. The systematic approach to developing the new corrosion model therefore began with a review and evaluation of several alternative models for the forced convection and SNB coolant heat transfer. The heat transfer literature is not sufficient to determine which of these heat transfer models is most appropriate for PWR fuel rod operating conditions, and the selection of the coolant heat transfer model used in the new cladding corrosion model has been coupled with a statistical analysis of the in-reactor corrosion enhancement factors and their impact on obtaining the best fit to the cladding corrosion data. The in-reactor corrosion enhancement factors considered in this statistical analysis are based on a review of the current literature for PWR cladding corrosion phenomenology and models. Fuel operating condition factors which this literature review indicated could have a significant effect on the cladding corrosion performance were also evaluated in detail in developing the corrosion model. An iterative least squares fitting procedure was used to obtain the model coefficients and select the coolant heat transfer models and in-reactor corrosion enhancement factors. This statistical procedure was completed with an exhaustive analysis of the model

  4. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    Bradbury, M.H.; Pickering, S.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  5. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    Bradbury, M H; Pickering, S; Whitlow, W H [EURATOM (United Kingdom)

    1977-04-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  6. Cladding failure model III (CFM III). A simple model for iodine induced stress corrosion cracking of zirconium-lined barrier and standard zircaloy cladding

    Tasooji, A.; Miller, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    A previously developed unified model (SCCIG*) for predicting iodine induced SCC in standard Zircaloy cladding was modified recently into the ''SCCIG-B'' model which predicts the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of zirconium lined barrier cladding. Several published papers have presented the capability of these models for predicting various observed behaviours related to SCC. A closed form equation, called Cladding Failure Model III (CMFIII), has been derived from the SCCIG-B model. CFMIII takes the form of an explicit equation for the radial crack growth rate dc/dt as a function of hoop strain, crack depth, temperature, and surface iodine concentration in irradiated cladding (both barrier and standard Zircaloy). CMFIII has approximately the same predictive capabilities as the physically based SCCIG and/or SCCIG-B models but is computationally faster and more convenient and can be easily utilized in fuel performance codes for predicting the behaviour of barrier and standard claddings in reactor operations. (author)

  7. Corrosion in nuclear systems. 4. Comparison of the PWR Cladding Corrosion Models for Test IFA-638.1-3

    Kim, Yong-Deog; Bae, Seong-Man; Lee, Chang-Sup

    2001-01-01

    The cladding corrosion test (IFA-638) is being performed to investigate the corrosion properties of different modern PWR cladding materials. The experimental results are evaluated by the corrosion models EPRI/KWU/CE, ESCORE, NEPLC, and COCHISE. When comparing the measured and the predicted oxide thickness, the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. Considering the fresh material parts (lower parts) of each rod, the oxide thickness calculations of all models under-predicted the measured values by up to 50% after 118 days of exposure. The NEPLC model, however, showed good agreement for 263 days of exposure, while the COCHISE and EPRI/KWU/CE-ESCORE models over-predicted (about +50%) and under-predicted (about -42%), respectively. 2. The oxide layer thickness on the pre-irradiated parts (upper parts) of each rod is well predicted by the COCHISE model after 118 days of exposure, but the other models over-predicted the thickness. All the models over-predicted the oxide thickness after 263 days of exposure, and the divergency between the measured and calculated oxide thickness became larger. 3. The differences in the calculated oxide thickness between the models at low burnup (fresh parts) are attributed to the different transition point determinations of the models. 4. Comparing the measurements with the calculations from the pre-irradiated parts of each rod, the overall over-prediction could be accounted for by the fact that the post-transition regime of all four models was calibrated for standard Zircaloy-4 materials. The differences between the models were attributed to empirical variables such as the frequency factor (k 2 , B) and the activation energy (Q 2 ) in Tables I, II, and III, which were calibrated with other experimental/plant data. (authors)

  8. Corrosion characteristics of K-claddings

    Park, J. Y.; Choi, B. K.; Jung, Y. H.; Jung, Y. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Improvement of the corrosion resistance of nuclear fuel claddings is the critical issue for the successful development of the high burn-up fuel. KAERI have developed the K-claddings having a superior corrosion resistance by controlling the alloying element addition and optimizing the manufacturing process. The comparative evaluation of the corrosion resistance for K-claddings and the foreign claddings was performed and the effect of the heat treatment on the corrosion behavior of K-claddings was also examined. Corrosion tests were carried out in the conditions of 360 .deg. C pure water, PWR-simulating loop and 400 .deg. C steam, From the results of the corrosion tests, it was found that the corrosion resistance of K-claddings is superior to those of Zry4 and A claddings and K6 showed a better corrosion resistance than K3. The corrosion behavior of K-cladding was strongly influenced by the final annealing rather than the intermediate annealing, and the corrosion resistance increased with decreasing the final annealing temperature

  9. Corrosion behaviour of cladded nickel base alloys

    Brandl, W.; Ruczinski, D.; Nolde, M.; Blum, J.

    1995-01-01

    As a consequence of the high cost of nickel base alloys their use as surface layers is convenient. In this paper the properties of SA-as well as RES-cladded NiMo 16Cr16Ti and NiCr21Mo14W being produced in single and multi-layer technique are compared and discussed with respect to their corrosion behaviour. Decisive criteria describing the qualities of the claddings are the mass loss, the susceptibility against intergranular corrosion and the pitting corrosion resistance. The results prove that RES cladding is the most suitable technique to produce corrosion resistant nickel base coatings. The corrosion behaviour of a two-layer RES deposition shows a better resistance against pitting than a three layer SAW cladding. 7 refs

  10. Analysis of corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding

    Lee, Chan Bock; Kim, Ki Hang; Seo, Keum Seok; Chung, Jin Gon

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding was analyzed using the oxide measurement data of KOFA fuel irradiated up to the fuel rod burnup of 35,000 MWD/MTU for two cycles in Kori-2. Even though KOFA cladding is a standard Zircaloy-4 manufactured by Westinghouse according to the Siemens/KWU's HCW (Highly Cold Worked) standard Zircaloy-4 specification, it was expected that in-pile corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding would not be equivalent to that of Siemens/KWU's cladding due to the differences in such manufacturing processes as cold work and heat treatment. The analysis of measured KOFA cladding oxidation showed that oxidation of KOFA cladding is at least 19 % lower than the design analysis based upon Siemens/KWU's HCW standard Zircaloy-4 cladding. Lower corrosion of KOFA cladding seems to result from the differences in the manufacturing processes and chemical composition although the burnup and oxide layer thickness of the measured fuel rods is relatively low and the amount of the oxidation data base is small

  11. On LMFBR corrosion. Part II: Consideration of the in-reactor fuel-cladding system

    Bradbury, M.H.; Pickering, S.; Walker, C.T.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1976-05-01

    The scientific and technological aspects of LMFBR cladding corrosion are discussed in detail. Emphasis is placed on the influence of the irradiation environment and the effect of fuel and filler-gas impurities on the corrosion process. These studies are complemented by a concise review of out-of-pile simulation experiments that endeavour to clarify the role of the aggressive fission products cesium, tellurium and iodine. The principal models for cladding corrosion are presented and critically assessed. Areas of uncertainty are exposed and some pertinent experiments are suggested. Consideration is also given to some new observations regarding the role of stress in fuel-cladding reactions and the formation of ferrite in the corrosion zone of the cladding during irradiation. Finally, two technological solutions to the problem of cladding corrosion are proposed. These are based on the use of an oxygen buffer in the fuel and the application of a protective coating to the inner surface of the cladding

  12. Stress corrosion testing of irradiated cladding tubes

    Lunde, L.; Olshausen, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Samples from two fuel rods with different cladding have been stress corrosion tested by closed-end argon-iodine pressurization at 320 0 C. The fuel rods with stress relieved and recrystallized Zircaloy-2 had received burnups of 10.000 and 20.000 MWd/ton UO 2 , respectively. It was found that the SCC failure stress was unchanged or slightly higher for the irradiated than for the unirradiated control tubes. The tubes failed consistently in the end with the lowest irradiation dose. The diameter increase of the irradiated cladding during the test was 1.1% for the stress-relieved samples and 0.24% for the recrystallized samples. SEM examination revealed no major differences between irradiated and unirradiated cladding. A ''semi-ductile'' fracture zone in recrystallized material is described in some detail. (author)

  13. Prevention of nuclear fuel cladding materials corrosion

    Yang, K.R.; Yang, J.C.; Lee, I.C.; Kang, H.D.; Cho, S.W.; Whang, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    The only way which could be performed by the operator of nuclear power plant to minimizing the degradation of nuclear fuel cladding material is to control the water quality of primary coolant as specified standard conditions which dose not attack the cladding material. If the water quality of reactor coolant does not meet far from the specification, the failure will occure not only cladding material itself but construction material of primary system which contact with the coolant. The corrosion product of system material are circulate through the whole primary system with the coolant and activated by the neutron near the reactor core. The activated corrosion products and fission products which released from fuel rod to the coolant, so called crud, will repeate deposition and redeposition continuously on the fuel rod and construction material surface. As a result we should consider heat transfer problem. In this study following activities were performed; 1. The crud sample was taken from the spent fuel rod surface of Kori unit one and analized for radioactive element and non radioactive chemical species. 2. The failure mode of nuclear fuel cladding material was estimated by the investigation of releasing type of fission products from the fuel rod to the reactor coolant using the iodine isotopes concentration of reactor coolants. 3. A study was carried out on the sipping test results of spent fuel and a discussion was made on the water quality control records through the past three cycle operation period of Kori unit one plant. (Author)

  14. Corrosion behaviour of laser clad stainless steels

    Damborenea, J.J. de; Weerasinghe, V.M.; West, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper is focussed in the study of the properties of a clad layer of stainless steel on a mild steel. By blowing powder of the alloy into a melt pool generated by a laser of 2 KW, an homogeneous layer of 316 stainless steel can be obtained. Structure, composition and corrosion behaviour are similar to those of a stainless steel in as-received condition. (Author)

  15. Corrosion behavior of duplex and reference cladding in NPP Grohnde

    Besch, O.A.; Yagnik, S.K.; Eucken, C.M.; Bradley, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Industry Research (NFIR) Group undertook a lead test assembly (LTA) program in NPP Grohnde PWR in Germany to assess the corrosion performance of duplex and reference cladding. Two identical 16 by 16 LTAs, each containing 32 peripheral test rods, completed four reactor cycles, reaching a peak rod burnup of 46 MWd/kgU. The results from poolside examinations performed at the end of each cycle, together with power histories and coolant chemistry, are reported. Five different cladding materials were characterized during fabrication. The corrosion performance of the cladding materials was tracked in long-term tests in high-pressure, high-temperature autoclaves. The relative ranking of corrosion behavior in such tests corresponded well with the in-reactor corrosion performance. The extent and distribution of hydriding in duplex and reference specimens during the autoclave testing has been characterized. The in-reactor corrosion data indicate that the low-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R2, had an improved corrosion resistance compared to high-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R1. Two types of duplex cladding, D1 (Zr-2.5% Nb) and D2 (Zr-0.4% Fe-0.5% Sn), showed an even further improvement in corrosion resistance compared to R2 cladding. The third duplex cladding, D3 (Zr-4 + 1.0% Nb), had significantly less corrosion resistance, which was inferior to R1. The in-reactor and out-reactor corrosion performances have been ranked

  16. Comparison of corrosion behavior between fusion cladded and explosive cladded Inconel 625/plain carbon steel bimetal plates

    Zareie Rajani, H.R.; Akbari Mousavi, S.A.A.; Madani Sani, F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both explosive and fusion cladding aggravate the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625. ► Fusion cladding is more detrimental to nonuniform corrosion resistance. ► Single-layered fusion coat does not show any repassivation ability. ► Adding more layers enhance the corrosion resistance of fusion cladding Inconel 625. ► High impact energy spoils the corrosion resistance of explosive cladding Inconel 625. -- Abstract: One of the main concerns in cladding Inconel 625 superalloy on desired substrates is deterioration of corrosion resistance due to cladding process. The present study aims to compare the effect of fusion cladding and explosive cladding procedures on corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 cladding on plain carbon steel as substrate. Also, an attempt has been made to investigate the role of load ratio and numbers of fusion layers in corrosion behavior of explosive and fusion cladding Inconel 625 respectively. In all cases, the cyclic polarization as an electrochemical method has been applied to assess the corrosion behavior. According to the obtained results, both cladding methods aggravate the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625. However, the fusion cladding process is more detrimental to nonuniform corrosion resistance, where the chemical nonuniformity of fusion cladding superalloy issuing from microsegregation, development of secondary phases and contamination of clad through dilution hinders formation of a stable passive layer. Moreover, it is observed that adding more fusion layers can enhance the nonuniform corrosion resistance of fusion cladding Inconel 625, though this resistance still remains weaker than explosive cladding superalloy. Also, the results indicate that raising the impact energy in explosive cladding procedure drops the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625.

  17. Laser cladding of Zr on Mg for improved corrosion properties

    Subramanian, R.; Sircar, S.; Mazumder, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of laser cladding of Mg-2wt%Zr, and Mg-5wt%Zr powder mixture onto magnesium. The microstructure of the laser clad was studied. From the microstructural study, the epitaxial regrowth of the clad region on the underlying substrate was observed. Martensite plates of different size were observed in transmission electron microscope for MG-2wt%Zr and Mg-5wt%Zr laser clad. The corrosion properties of the laser clad were evaluated in sea water (3.5% NaCl). The position of the laser claddings in the galvanic series of metals in sea water, the anodic polarization characteristics of the laser claddings and the protective nature and the stability of the passivating film formed have been determined. The formation of pits on the surface of the laser clad subjected to corrosion is reported. The corrosion properties of the laser claddings are compared with that of the commercially used magnesium alloy AZ91B

  18. Modelling of pellet-clad interaction during power ramps

    Zhou, G.; Lindback, J.E.; Schutte, H.C.; Jernkvist, L.O.; Massih, A.R.; Massih, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    A computational method to describe the pellet-clad interaction phenomenon is presented. The method accounts for the mechanical contact between fragmented pellets and the zircaloy clad, as well as for chemical reaction of fission products with zircaloy during power ramps. Possible pellet-clad contact states, soft, hard and friction, are taken into account in the computational algorithm. The clad is treated as an elastic-plastic-viscoplastic material with irradiation hardening. Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking is described by using a fracture mechanics-based model for crack propagation. This integrated approach is used to evaluate two power ramp experiments made on boiling water reactor fuel rods in test reactors. The influence of the pellet-clad coefficient of friction on clad deformation is evaluated and discussed. Also, clad deformations, pellet-clad gap size and fission product gas release for one of the ramped rods are calculated and compared with measured data. (authors)

  19. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water

    2009-12-01

    A large variety of research reactor spent fuel with different fuel meats, different geometries and different enrichments in 235 U are presently stored underwater in basins located around the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminium or aluminium based alloys that are notoriously susceptible to corrosion in water of less than optimum quality. Some fuel is stored in the reactor pools themselves, some in auxiliary pools (or basins) close to the reactor and some stored at away-from-reactor pools. Since the early 1990s, when corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding was observed in many of the pools, corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel stored in light water filled basins has become a major concern, and programmes were implemented at the sites to improve fuel storage conditions. The IAEA has since then established a number of programmatic activities to address corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. Of special relevance was the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase I) initiated in 1996, whose results were published in IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 418. At the end of this CRP it was considered necessary that a continuation of the CRP should concentrate on fuel storage basins that had demonstrated significant corrosion problems and would therefore provide additional insight into the fundamentals of localized corrosion of aluminium. As a consequence, the IAEA started a new CRP entitled Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase II), to carry out more comprehensive research in some specific areas of corrosion of aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. In addition to this CRP, one of the activities under IAEA's Technical Cooperation Regional Project for Latin America Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors (2001-2006) was corrosion monitoring and surveillance of research

  20. Iodine stress-corrosion cracking in irradiated Zircaloy cladding

    Mattas, R.F.; Yaggee, F.L.; Neimark, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Irradiated Zircaloy cladding specimens, which had experienced fluences from 0.1 to 6 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV), were gas-pressure tested in an iodine environment to investigate their stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility. The test temperatures and hoop stresses ranged from 320 to 360 0 C and 150 to 500 MPa, respectively. The results indicate that irradiation, in general, increases the susceptibility of Zircaloy to iodine SCC. For specimens that experienced fluences >2 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV), the 24-h failure stress was 177+-18 MPa, regardless of the preirradiation metallurgical condition. An analytical model for iodine SCC has been developed which agrees reasonably well with the test results

  1. Iodine induced stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy cladding tubes

    Brunisholz, L.; Lemaignan, C.

    1984-01-01

    Iodine is considered as one of the major fission products responsible for PCI failure of Zry cladding by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Usual analysis of SCC involves both initiation and growth as sequential processes. In order to analyse initiation and growth independently and to be able to apply the procedures of fracture mechanics to the design of cladding, with respect to SCC, stress corrosion tests of Zry cladding tubes were undertaken with a small fatigue crack (approx. 200 μm) induced in the inner wall of each tube before pressurization. Details are given on the techniques used to induce the fatigue crack, the pressurization test procedure and the results obtained on stress releaved or recrystallized Zry 4 tubings. It is shown that the Ksub(ISCC) values obtained during these experiments are in good agreement with those obtained from large DCB fracture mechanics samples. Conclusions will be drawn on the applicability of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to cladding design and related safety analysis. The work now underway is aimed at obtaining better understanding of the initiation step. It includes the irradiation of Zry samples with heavy ions to simulate the effect of recoil fragments implanted in the inner surface of the cladding, that could create a brittle layer of about 10 μm

  2. The corrosion of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding in pressurized water reactors

    Van Swam, L.F.P.; Shann, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects of thermo-mechanical processing of cladding on the corrosion of Zircaloy-4 in commercial PWRs that have been investigated. Visual observations and nondestructive measurements at poolside, augmented by observations in the hot cell, indicate that the initial black oxide transforms into a grey or tan later white oxide layer at a thickness of 10 to 15 μm independent of the thermal processing history of the tubing. At an oxide layer thickness of 60 to 80 μm, the oxide may spall depending somewhat on the particular oxide morphology formed and possibly on the frequency of power and temperature changes of the fuel rods. Because spalling of oxide lowers the metal-to-oxide interface temperature of fuel rods, it reduces the corrosion rate and is beneficial from that point of view. To determine the effect of thermo-mechanical processing on in-reactor corrosion of Zircaloy-4, oxide thickness measurements at poolside and in the hot cell have been analyzed with the MATPRO corrosion model. A calibrated corrosion parameter in this model provides a measure of the corrosion susceptibility of the Zircaloy-4 cladding. It was found necessary to modify the MATPRO equations with a burnup dependent term to obtain a near constant value of the corrosion parameter over a burnup range of approximately 10 to 45 MWd/kgU. Different calculational tests were performed to confirm that the modified model accurately predicts the corrosion behavior of fuel rods

  3. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water

    2003-01-01

    This report describes research performed in ten laboratories within the framework of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water. The project consisted of exposure of standard racks of corrosion coupons in the spent fuel pools of the participating research reactor laboratories and the evaluation of the coupons after predetermined exposure times, along with periodic monitoring of the storage water. A group of experts in the field contributed a state of the art review and provided technical supervision of the project. Localized corrosion mechanisms are notoriously difficult to understand, and it was clear from the outset that obtaining consistency in the results and their interpretation from laboratory to laboratory would depend on the development of an excellent set of experimental protocols. These experimental protocols are described in the report together with guidelines for the maintenance of optimum water chemistry to minimize the corrosion of aluminium clad research reactor fuel in wet storage. A large database on corrosion of aluminium clad materials has been generated from the CRP and the SRS corrosion surveillance programme. An evaluation of these data indicates that the most important factors contributing to the corrosion of the aluminium are: (1) High water conductivity (100-200 μS/cm); (2) Aggressive impurity ion concentrations (Cl - ); (3) Deposition of cathodic particles on aluminium (Fe, etc.); (4) Sludge (containing Fe, Cl - and other ions in concentrations greater than ten times the concentrations in the water); (5) Galvanic couples between dissimilar metals (stainless steel-aluminium, aluminium-uranium, etc); (6) Scratches and imperfections (in protective oxide coating on cladding); (7) Poor water circulation. These factors operating both independently and synergistically may cause corrosion of the aluminium. The single most important key to preventing corrosion is maintaining good

  4. Water corrosion test of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yasushi

    2006-07-01

    As a part of feasibility study of ODS steel cladding, its water corrosion resistance was examined under water pool condition. Although addition of Cr is effective for preventing water corrosion, excessive Cr addition leads to embrittlement due to the Cr-rich α' precipitate formation. In the ODS steel developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Cr content is controlled in 9Cr-ODS martensite and 12Cr-ODS ferrite. In this study, water corrosion test was conducted for these ODS steels, and their results were compared with that of conventional austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. Following results were obtained in this study. (1) Corrosion rate of 9Cr-ODS martensitic and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steel are significantly small and no pitting was observed. Thus, these ODS steels have superior resistance for water corrosion under the condition of 60degC and pH8-12. (2) It was showed that 9Cr-ODS martensitic steel and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steel have comparable water corrosion resistance to that of PNC316 and PNC-FMS at 60degC for 1,000h under varying pH of 8, 10. Water corrosion resistance of these alloys is slightly larger than that of PNC316 and PNC-FMS at pH12 without significant difference of appearance and uneven condition. (author)

  5. Effect of zinc injection on BWR fuel cladding corrosion. Pt. 1. Study on an accelerated corrosion condition to evaluate corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding

    Kawamura, Hirotaka; Kanbe, Hiromu; Furuya, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Japanese BWR utilities have a plan to apply zinc injection to the primary coolant in order to reduce radioactivity accumulation on the structure. Prior to applying the zinc injection to BWR plants, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of zinc injection on corrosion resistance of fuel cladding. The objective of this report was to examine the accelerated corrosion condition for evaluation of BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance under non-irradiated conditions, as the first step of a zinc injection evaluation study. A heat transfer corrosion test facility, in which a two phase flow condition could be achieved, was designed and constructed. The effects of heat flux, void fraction and solution temperature on BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance were quantitatively investigated. The main findings were as follows. (1) In situ measurements using high speed camera and a void sensor together with one dimensional two phase flow analysis results showed that a two phase flow simulated BWR core condition can be obtained in the corrosion test facility. (2) The heat transfer corrosion test results showed that the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer increased with increasing solution temperature and was independent of heat flux and void fraction. The corrosion accelerating factor was about 2.5 times in the case of a temperature increase from 288degC to 350degC. (author)

  6. Corrosion Resistance of Laser Clads of Inconel 625 and Metco 41C

    Němeček, Stanislav; Fidler, Lukáš; Fišerová, Pavla

    The present paper explores the impact of laser cladding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of the resulting surface. Powders of Inconel 625 and austenitic Metco 41C steel were deposited on steel substrate. It was confirmed that the level of dilution has profound impact on the corrosion resistance and that dilution has to be minimized. However, the chemical composition of the cladding is altered even in the course of the cladding process, a fact which is related to the increase in the substrate temperature. The cladding process was optimized to achieve maximum corrosion resistance. The results were verified and validated using microscopic observation, chemical analysis and corrosion testing.

  7. Corrosion properties of cladding materials from Zr1Nb alloy

    Kloc, K.; Kosler, S.

    1975-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour was observed of the Zr1Nb alloy in hot water and superheated steam and the effects of impurity content, of the purity of the corrosion environment and of the heat treatment of the alloy were studied on the alloy corrosion resistance. Also studied were the absorption of hydrogen by the alloy and its behaviour in reactor situations. It was ascertained that the alloy has a good corrosion resistance up to a temperature of 350 degC. The corrosion resistance is reduced by the presence of nitrogen above 50 to 70 ppm and of carbon above 50 to 90 ppm. A graphic representation is given of the dependence of corrosion resistance on the temperature of annealing, the nitrogen content of the alloy and the time of the action of hot water or steam, as well as the dependence of the hydrogen content in the alloy on the peripheral tension of the cladding in hot water both in non-active environment and at irradiation with a neutron flux of approximately 10 20 n/cm 2 . (J.B.)

  8. Temperature and humidity effects on the corrosion of aluminium-base reactor fuel cladding materials during dry storage

    Peacock, H.B.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the high temperature (up to 200 deg. C) corrosion of aluminum cladding alloys was investigated for dry storage of spent nuclear fuels. A dependency on alloy type and temperature was determined for saturated water vapor conditions. Models were developed to allow prediction of cladding behaviour of 1100, 5052, and 6061 aluminum alloys for up to 50+ years at 100% relative humidity. Calculations show that for a closed system, corrosion stops after all moisture and oxygen is used up during corrosion reactions with aluminum alloys. (author)

  9. Evaluation of Corrosion of Aluminum Based Reactor Fuel Cladding Materials During Dry Storage

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides an evaluation of the corrosion behavior of aluminum cladding alloys and aluminum-uranium alloys at conditions relevant to dry storage. The details of the corrosion program are described and the results to date are discussed

  10. Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment

    Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki

    2002-01-01

    It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater

  11. A contribution to the question of stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel cladding in nuclear power plants

    Kupka, I.; Mrkous, P.

    1977-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the basic types of corrosion damage (uniform corrosion, intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion) and their influence on operational safety are estimated. Corrosion cracking is analyzed of austenitic stainless steel cladding taking into account the adverse impact of coolant and stress (both operational and residual) in a light water reactor primary circuit. Experimental data are given of residual stresses in the stainless steel clad material, as well as their magnitude and distribution after cladding and heat treatment. (author)

  12. Effect of water chemistry and fuel operation parameters on Zr + 1% Nb cladding corrosion

    Kritsky, V G; Petrik, N G; Berezina, I G; Doilnitsina, V V [VNIPIET, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-02-01

    In-pile corrosion of Zr + 1%Nb fuel cladding has been studied. Zr-oxide and hydroxide solubilities at various temperatures and pH values have been calculated and correlations obtained between post-transition corrosion and the solubilities nodular corrosion and fuel operation parameters, as well as between the rate of fuel cladding degradation and water chemistry. Extrapolations of fuel assemblies behaviour to higher burnups have also performed. (author). 12 refs, 11 figs.

  13. Corrosion effect of fast reactor fuel claddings on their mechanical properties

    Davydov, E.F.; Krykov, F.N.; Shamardin, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    Fast reactor fuel cladding corrosion effect on its mechanical properties was investigated. UO 2 fuel elements were irradiated in the BOP-60 reactor at the linear heat rate of 42 kw/m. Fuel cladding is made of stainless steel OKh16N15M3BR. Calculated maximum cladding temperature is 920 K. Neutron fluence in the central part of fuel elements is 6.3x10 26 m+H- 2 . To investigate the strength changes temperature dependence of corrossion depth, cladding strength reduction factors was determined. Samples plasticity reduction with corrosion layer increase is considered to be a characteristic feature

  14. Water chemistry and corrosion control of cladding and primary circuit components. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    1999-12-01

    Corrosion is the principal life limiting degradation mechanism in nuclear steam supply systems, especially taking into account the trends to increase fuel burnup, thermal rate and cycle length. Primary circuit components of water cooled power reactors have an impact on Zr-based alloys behaviour due to crud (primary circuit corrosion products) formation, transport and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. Crud deposits influence water chemistry, radiation and thermal hydraulic conditions near cladding surface, and by this way-Zr-based alloy corrosion. During the last decade, significant improvements were achieved in the reduction of the corrosion and dose rates by changing the cladding material for one more resistant to corrosion or by the improvement of water chemistry conditions. However, taking into account the above mentioned tendency for heavier fuel duties, corrosion and water chemistry, control will remain a serious task to work with for nuclear power plant operators and scientists, as well as development of generally accepted corrosion model of Zr-based alloys in a water environment in a new millennium. Upon the recommendation of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology, water chemistry and corrosion of cladding and primary circuit components are in the focus of the IAEA activities in the area of fuel technology and performance. At present the IAEA performs two co-ordinated research projects (CRPs): on On-line High Temperature Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion (WACOL) and on Activity Transport in Primary Circuits. Two CRPs deal with hydrogen and hydride degradation of the Zr-based alloys. A state-of-the-art review entitled: 'Waterside Corrosion of Zirconium Alloys in Nuclear Power Plants' was published in 1998. Technical Committee meetings on the subject were held in 1985 (Cadarache, France), 1989 (Portland, USA), 1993 (Rez, Czech Republic). During the last few years extensive exchange of experience in

  15. Corrosion behaviour of zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding in EDF power plants

    Romary, H; Deydier, D [EDF, Direction de l` Equipment SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-02-01

    Since the beginning of the French nuclear program, a surveillance of fuel has been carried out in order to evaluate the fuel behaviour under irradiation. Until now, nuclear fuels provided by suppliers have met EDF requirements concerning fuel behaviour and reliability. But, the need to minimize the costs and to increase the flexibility of the power plants led EDF to the definition of new targets: optimization of the core management and fuel cycle economy. The fuel behaviour experience shows that some of these new requirements cannot be fully fulfilled by the present standard fuel due to some technological limits. Particularly, burnup enhancement is limited by the oxidation and the hydriding of the Zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding. Also, fuel suppliers and EDF need to have a better knowledge of the Zy-4 cladding behaviour in order to define the existing margins and the limiting factors. For this reason, in-reactor fuel characterization programs have been set up by fuel suppliers and EDF for a few years. This paper presents the main results and conclusions of EDF experience on Zy-4 in-reactor corrosion behaviour. Data obtained from oxide layer or zirconia thickness measurements show that corrosion performance of Zy-4 fuel rod cladding, as irradiated until now in EDF reactors, is satisfactory but not sufficient to meet the future needs. The fuel suppliers propose in order to improve the corrosion resistance of fuel rod cladding, low tin Zy-4 cladding and then optimized Zy-4 cladding. Irradiation of these claddings are ongoing. The available corrosion data show the better in-reactor corrosion resistance of optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding compared to the standard Zy-4 cladding. The scheduled fuel surveillance program will confirm if the optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding will meet the requirements for the future high burnup and high flexibility fuel. (author). 10 refs, 19 figs, 4 tabs.

  16. Cladding creepdown model for FRAPCON-2

    Shah, V.N.; Tolli, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    This report presents a cladding deformation model developed to analyze cladding creepdown during steady state operation in both a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR). This model accounts for variations in zircaloy cladding heat treatment; cold worked and stress relieved material, typically used in a PWR, and fully recrystallized material, typically used in a BWR. The model calculates cladding creepdown as a function of hoop stress, fast neutron flux, exposure time, and temperature. This report also presents a comparison between cladding creep calculations by this model and corresponding measurements from the KWU/CE program, ORNL HOBBIE experiments, and EPRI/Westinghouse Engineering cooperative project. The comparisons show that the model calculates cladding creep strains well. The analyses of non-fueled rods by FRAPCON-2 show that the cladding creepdown model was correctly incorporated. Also, analysis of a PWR rod test case shows that the FRAPCON-2 code can analyze pellet-cladding mechanical interaction caused by cladding creepdown and fuel swelling

  17. Pressurized water reactor fuel performance problems connected with fuel cladding corrosion processes

    Dobrevski, I.; Zaharieva, N.

    2008-01-01

    Generally, Pressurized Water Reactor (WWER, PWR) Fuel Element Performance is connected with fuel cladding corrosion and crud deposition processes. By transient to extended fuel cycles in nuclear power reactors, aiming to achieve higher burnup and better fuel utilization, the role of these processes increases significantly. This evolution modifies the chemical and electrochemical conditions in the reactor primary system, including change of fuel claddings' environment. The higher duty cores are always attended with increased boiling (sub-cooled nucleate boiling) mainly on the feed fuel assemblies. This boiling process on fuel cladding surfaces can cause different consequences on fuel element cladding's environment characteristics. In the case of boiling at the cladding surfaces without or with some cover of corrosion product deposition, the behavior of gases dissolved in water phase is strongly influenced by the vapor generation. The increase of vapor partial pressure will reduce the partial pressures of dissolved gases and will cause their stripping out. By these circumstances the concentrations of dissolved gases in cladding wall water layer can dramatically decrease, including also the case by which all dissolved gases to be stripped out. On the other hand it is known that the hydrogen is added to primary coolant in order to avoid the production of oxidants by radiolysis of water. It is clear that if boiling strips out dissolved hydrogen, the creation of oxidizing conditions at the cladding surfaces will be favored. In this case the local production of oxidants will be a result from local processes of water radiolysis, by which not only both oxygen (O 2 ) and hydrogen (H 2 ) but also hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) will be produced. While these hydrogen and oxygen will be stripped out preferentially by boiling, the bigger part of hydrogen peroxide will remain in wall water phase and will act as the most important factor for creation of oxidizing conditions in fuel

  18. Corrosion issues in the long term storage of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuels

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Sindelar, R.L.; Iyer, N.C.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 8% of the spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy is clad with aluminum alloys. The spent fuel must be either reprocessed or temporarily stored in wet or dry storage systems until a decision is made on final disposition in a repository. There are corrosion issues associated with the aluminum cladding regardless of the disposition pathway selected. This paper discusses those issues and provides data and analysis to demonstrate that control of corrosion induced degradation in aluminum clad spent fuels can be achieved through relatively simple engineering practices

  19. Method of evaluation of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of clad fuel tubes

    Takase, Iwao; Yoshida, Toshimi; Ikeda, Shinzo; Masaoka, Isao; Nakajima, Junjiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, by an evaluation in out-pile test, the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of clad fuel tubes in the reactor environment. Method: A plurality of electrodes are mounted in the circumferential direction on the entire surface of cladding tubes. Of the electrodes, electrodes at two adjacent places are used as measuring terminals and electrodes at another two places adjacent thereto are used as constant-current terminals. With a specific current flowing in the constant-current terminals, measurements are made of a potential difference between the terminals to be measured, and from a variation in the potential difference the depth of cracking of the cladding tube surface is presumed to determine the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the cladding tube. To check the entire surface of the cladding tube, the cladding tube is moved by each block in the circumferential direction by a contact changeover system, repeating the measurements of the potential difference. Contact type electrodes are secured with an insulator and held in uniform contact with the cladding tube by a spring. It is detachable by use of a locking system and movable as desired. Thus the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility can be determined without mounting the cladding tube through and also a fuel failure can be prevented. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. Effect of reactor chemistry and operating variables on fuel cladding corrosion in PWRs

    Park, Moon Ghu; Lee, Sang Hee

    1997-01-01

    As the nuclear industry extends the fuel cycle length, waterside corrosion of zircaloy cladding has become a limiting factor in PWR fuel design. Many plant chemistry factors such as, higher lithium/boron concentration in the primary coolant can influence the corrosion behavior of zircaloy cladding. The chemistry effect can be amplified in higher duty fuel, particularlywhen surface boiling occurs. Local boiling can result in increased crud deposition on fuel cladding which may induce axial power offset anomalies (AOA), recently reported in several PWR units. In this study, the effect of reactor chemistry and operating variables on Zircaloy cladding corrosion is investigated and simulation studies are performed to evaluate the optimal primary chemistry condition for extended cycle operation. (author). 8 refs., 3 tabs., 16 figs

  1. Modelling cladding response to changing conditions

    Tulkki, Ville; Ikonen, Timo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland ltd (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    The cladding of the nuclear fuel is subjected to varying conditions during fuel reactor life. Load drops and reversals can be modelled by taking cladding viscoelastic behaviour into account. Viscoelastic contribution to the deformation of metals is usually considered small enough to be ignored, and in many applications it merely contributes to the primary part of the creep curve. With nuclear fuel cladding the high temperature and irradiation as well as the need to analyse the variable load all emphasise the need to also inspect the viscoelasticity of the cladding.

  2. Influence of processing variables and alloy chemistry on the corrosion behavior of ZIRLO nuclear fuel cladding

    Comstock, R.J.; Sabol, G.P.; Schoenberger, G.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the thermal heat treatments used during the fabrication of ZIRLO (Zr-1Nb-1Sn-0.1Fe) fuel clad tubing and in ZIRLO alloy chemistry were explored to develop a further understanding of the relationship between processing, microstructure, and cladding corrosion performance. Heat treatment variables included intermediate tube annealing temperatures as well as a beta-phase heat treatment during the latter stages of the tube reduction schedule. Chemistry variables included deviations in niobium and tin content from the nominal composition. The effects of both heat treatment and chemistry on corrosion behavior were assessed by autoclave tests in both pure and lithiated water and high-temperature steam. Analytical electron microscopy demonstrated that the best out-reactor corrosion performance is obtained for microstructures containing a fine distribution of beta-niobium and Zr-Nb-Fe particles. Deviations from this microstructure, such as the presence of beta-zirconium phase, tend to degrade corrosion resistance. ZIRLO fuel cladding was irradiated in four commercial reactors. In all cases, the microstructure in the cladding included beta-niobium and Zr-Nb-Fe particles. ZIRLO fuel cladding processed with a late-stage beta heat treatment to further refine the second-phase particle size exhibited in-reactor corrosion behavior that was similar to reference ZIRLO cladding. Variations of the in-reactor corrosion behavior of ZIRLO were correlated to tin content, with higher oxide thickness observed in the ZIRLO cladding containing higher tin. The results of these studies indicate that optimum corrosion performance of ZIRLO is achieved by maintaining a uniform distribution of fine second-phase particles and controlled levels of tin

  3. Corrosion and protection of spent Al-clad research reactor fuel during extended wet storage

    Ramanathan, Lalgudi V.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of spent research reactor fuel elements with different fuel meats, geometries and 235 U enrichments are presently stored under water in basins throughout the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminum (Al) or its alloy and are susceptible to corrosion. This paper presents an overview of the influence of Al alloy composition, galvanic effects (Al alloy/stainless steel), crevice effects, water parameters and synergism between these parameters as well as settled solids on the corrosion of typical Al alloys used as fuel element cladding. Pitting is the main form of corrosion and is affected by water conductivity, chloride ion content, formation of galvanic couples with rack supports and settled solid particles. The extent to which these parameters influence Al corrosion varies. This paper also presents potential conversion coatings to protect the spent fuel cladding. (author)

  4. The corrosion of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel in wet basin storage

    Howell, J.P.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the corrosion of the aluminum-clad spent fuel and the improvements that have been made in the SRS basins since 1993 which have essentially mitigated new corrosion on the fuel. It presents the results of a metallographic examination of two Mk-31A target slugs stored in the L-Reactor basin for about 5 years and a summary of results from the corrosion surveillance programs through 1996

  5. Criteria for Corrosion Protection of Aluminum-Clad Spent Nuclear Fuel in Interim Wet Storage

    Howell, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Storage of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other locations in the U. S. and around the world has been a concern over the past decade because of the long time interim storage requirements in water. Pitting corrosion of production aluminum-clad fuel in the early 1990''s at SRS was attributed to less than optimum quality water and corrective action taken has resulted in no new pitting since 1994. The knowledge gained from the corrosion surveillance testing and other investigations at SRS over the past 8 years has provided an insight into factors affecting the corrosion of aluminum in relatively high purity water. This paper reviews some of the early corrosion issues related to aluminum-clad spent fuel at SRS, including fundamentals for corrosion of aluminum alloys. It updates and summarizes the corrosion surveillance activities supporting the future storage of over 15,000 research reactor fuel assemblies from countries over the world during the next 15-20 years. Criteria are presented for providing corrosion protection for aluminum-clad spent fuel in interim storage during the next few decades while plans are developed for a more permanent disposition

  6. Corrosion of research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water

    Bendereskaya, O.S.; De, P.K.; Haddad, R.; Howell, J.P.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Laoharojanaphand, S.; Luo, S.; Ramanathan, L.V.; Ritchie, I.; Hussain, N.; Vidowsky, I.; Yakovlev, V.

    2002-01-01

    A significant amount of aluminium-clad spent nuclear fuel from research and test reactors worldwide is currently being stored in water-filled basins while awaiting final disposition. As a result of corrosion issues, which developed from the long-term wet storage of aluminium-clad fuel, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) implemented a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) in 1996 on the 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel in Water'. The investigations undertaken during the CRP involved ten institutes in nine different countries. The IAEA furnished corrosion surveillance racks with aluminium alloys generally used in the manufacture of the nuclear fuel cladding. The individual countries supplemented these racks with additional racks and coupons specific to materials in their storage basins. The racks were immersed in late 1996 in the storage basins with a wide range of water parameters, and the corrosion was monitored at periodic intervals. Results of these early observations were reported after 18 months at the second research co-ordination meeting (RCM) in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Pitting and crevice corrosion were the main forms of corrosion observed. Corrosion caused by deposition of iron and other particles on the coupon surfaces was also observed. Galvanic corrosion of stainless steel/aluminium coupled coupons and pitting corrosion caused by particle deposition was observed. Additional corrosion racks were provided to the CRP participants at the second RCM and were immersed in the individual basins by mid-1998. As in the first set of tests, water quality proved to be the key factor in controlling corrosion. The results from the second set of tests were presented at the third and final RCM held in Bangkok, Thailand in October 2000. An IAEA document giving details about this CRP and other guidelines for spent fuel storage is in pres. This paper presents some details about the CRP and the basis for its extension. (author)

  7. Report of the advanced neutron source (ANS) aluminum cladding corrosion workshop

    Hanson, G.H.; Gibson, G.W.; Griess, J.C.; Pawel, R.E.; Pace, N.E.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1989-02-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Corrosion Workshop on aluminum cladding corrosion in reactor environments is summarized. The Workshop was held to examine the aluminum cladding oxidation studies being conducted in support of the ANS design. This report was written principally to provide a record of the ideas and judgments expressed by the workshop attendees. The ANS operating heat flux is significantly higher than that in existing reactors, and early experiments indicate that there may be an aluminum cladding oxidation problem unique to higher heat fluxes or associated cladding temperatures that, if not solved, may limit the operation of the ANS to unacceptably low power levels. A brief description of the information presented by each speaker is included along with a compilation of the most significant ideas and recommended research areas. The appendixes contain a copy of the workshop agenda and a list of attendees

  8. Modelling of zirconium alloys corrosion in LWRs

    Kritskij, V.G.; Berezina, I.G.; Kritskij, A.V.; Stjagkin, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical parameters, that exerted effect on Zr+1%Nb alloy corrosion and deserved consideration during reactor operation, were defined and a model was developed to describe the influence of physical and chemical parameters on zirconium alloys corrosion in nuclear power plants. The model is based on the correlation between the zirconium oxide solubility in high-temperature water under the influence of the chemical parameters and the measured values of fuel cladding corrosion under LWR conditions. The intensity of fuel cladding corrosion in the primary circuits depends on the coolant water quality, growth of iron oxide deposits and vaporization portion. Mathematically, the oxidation rate can be expressed as a sum of heat and radiation components. The temperature dependence on the oxidation rate can be described by the Arrenius equation. The radiation component of Zr uniform corrosion equation is a function of several factors such as neutron fluency, the temperature the metallurgical composition and et. We assume that the main factor is the changing of water chemistry and the H 2 O 2 concentration play the determinative role. Probably, the influence of H 2 O 2 is based on the formation of unstable compound ZrO 3 ·nH 2 O and Zr(OH) 4 with high solubility. The validity of the used formulae was confirmed by corrosion measurements on WWER and RBMK fuel cladding. The model can be applied for calculating the reliability of nuclear fuel operation. (author)

  9. Vapor corrosion of aluminum cladding alloys and aluminum-uranium fuel materials in storage environments

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.L.; Peacock, H.B. Jr.

    1997-04-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of vapor environments on the corrosion of aluminum spent nuclear fuel (A1 SNF) has been performed. Aluminum cladding alloys and aluminum-uranium fuel alloys have been exposed to environments of air/water vapor/ionizing radiation and characterized for applications to degradation mode analysis for interim dry and repository storage systems. Models have been developed to allow predictions of the corrosion response under conditions of unlimited corrodant species. Threshold levels of water vapor under which corrosion does not occur have been identified through tests under conditions of limited corrodant species. Coupons of aluminum 1100, 5052, and 6061, the US equivalent of cladding alloys used to manufacture foreign research reactor fuels, and several aluminum-uranium alloys (aluminum-10, 18, and 33 wt% uranium) were exposed to various controlled vapor environments in air within the following ranges of conditions: Temperature -- 80 to 200 C; Relative Humidity -- 0 to 100% using atmospheric condensate water and using added nitric acid to simulate radiolysis effects; and Gamma Radiation -- none and 1.8 x 10 6 R/hr. The results of this work are part of the body of information needed for understanding the degradation of the A1 SNF waste form in a direct disposal system in the federal repository. It will provide the basis for data input to the ongoing performance assessment and criticality safety analyses. Additional testing of uranium-aluminum fuel materials at uranium contents typical of high enriched and low enriched fuels is being initiated to provide the data needed for the development of empirical models

  10. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    Blough, J.L. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1996-08-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings was exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy are being exposed for 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after approximately 4,400 hours of exposure.

  11. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  12. Meeting the challenge of extremely corrosive service: A primer on clad oilfield equipment

    Pendley, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Extremely corrosive environments, such as those often encountered in deep, hot, sour oil and gas wells, are usually characterized by the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), chlorides, and other corrosive species coupled with high temperatures (> 400 F/204 C) and high pressures (up to 20,000 psi/138 MPa). Most low alloy and stainless steel materials are not suitable for such environments. Extremely corrosive service conditions dictate the use of a corrosion-resistant alloy (CRA) in areas which are exposed to the hostile environment. However, it is often cost-prohibitive to make an entire component out of CRA material. An alternative strategy is to use a low alloy steel for the bulk of the component and clad critical surfaces with a corrosion-resistant material. Clad equipment can provide excellent corrosion resistance in hostile environments at a fraction of the cost of 100% CRA components. This paper will detail the problems posed by extremely corrosive environments and discuss how clad equipment provides a cost-effective solution

  13. Optimization of cladding parameters for resisting corrosion on low carbon steels using simulated annealing algorithm

    Balan, A. V.; Shivasankaran, N.; Magibalan, S.

    2018-04-01

    Low carbon steels used in chemical industries are frequently affected by corrosion. Cladding is a surfacing process used for depositing a thick layer of filler metal in a highly corrosive materials to achieve corrosion resistance. Flux cored arc welding (FCAW) is preferred in cladding process due to its augmented efficiency and higher deposition rate. In this cladding process, the effect of corrosion can be minimized by controlling the output responses such as minimizing dilution, penetration and maximizing bead width, reinforcement and ferrite number. This paper deals with the multi-objective optimization of flux cored arc welding responses by controlling the process parameters such as wire feed rate, welding speed, Nozzle to plate distance, welding gun angle for super duplex stainless steel material using simulated annealing technique. Regression equation has been developed and validated using ANOVA technique. The multi-objective optimization of weld bead parameters was carried out using simulated annealing to obtain optimum bead geometry for reducing corrosion. The potentiodynamic polarization test reveals the balanced formation of fine particles of ferrite and autenite content with desensitized nature of the microstructure in the optimized clad bead.

  14. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water. Additional information

    2009-12-01

    A large variety of research reactor spent fuel with different fuel meats, different geometries and different enrichments in 235 U are presently stored underwater in basins located around the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminium or aluminium based alloys that are notoriously susceptible to corrosion in water of less than optimum quality. Some fuel is stored in the reactor pools themselves, some in auxiliary pools (or basins) close to the reactor and some stored at away-from-reactor pools. Since the early 1990s, when corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding was observed in many of the pools, corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel stored in light water filled basins has become a major concern, and programmes were implemented at the sites to improve fuel storage conditions. The IAEA has since then established a number of programmatic activities to address corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. Of special relevance was the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase I) initiated in 1996, whose results were published in IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 418. At the end of this CRP it was considered necessary that a continuation of the CRP should concentrate on fuel storage basins that had demonstrated significant corrosion problems and would therefore provide additional insight into the fundamentals of localized corrosion of aluminium. As a consequence, the IAEA started a new CRP entitled Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase II), to carry out more comprehensive research in some specific areas of corrosion of aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. In addition to this CRP, one of the activities under IAEA's Technical Cooperation Regional Project for Latin America Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors (2001-2006) was corrosion monitoring and surveillance of research

  15. Laser cladding of nickel base alloy on SS316L for improved wear and corrosion behaviour

    Awasthi, Reena; Kushwaha, R.P.; Chandra, Kamlesh; Viswanadham, C.S.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.; Limaye, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Laser cladding by an Nd:YAG laser was employed to deposit Ni base alloy (Ni-Mo-Cr-Si) on stainless steel-316 L substrate. The resulting defect-free clad with minimum dilution of the substrate was characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers microhardness test. Dry sliding wear of the cladding and the substrate was evaluated using a ball-on-plate reciprocating wear tester against different counter bodies (WC and 52100 Cr steel). The reciprocating sliding wear resistance of the coating was evaluated as a function of the normal load, keeping the sliding amplitude and sliding speed constant. Wear mechanisms were analyzed by observation of wear track morphology using SEM-EDS. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of clad layer was studied in reducing environment (HCl) to estimate the general corrosion resistance of the laser clad layer in comparison with the substrate SS-316L. The clad layer showed higher wear resistance under reducing condition than that of the substrate material stainless steel 316L. (author)

  16. Chemical inhomogeneity populations in various zircaloy claddings and their association with SCC and corrosion resistance

    Tasooji, A.; Miller, A.K.; Cheung, T.Y.; Brooks, M.; Santucci, J.

    1987-01-01

    A technique has been developed that permits detection and characterization of sparsely distributed chemical inhomogeneities in Zircaloy. These inhomogeneities have previously been observed at the origins of iodine stress-corrosion cracks but are not detectable by, for example, simple scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination. The technique uses radioactive iodine to ''label'' the chemical inhomogeneities, autoradiography to detect their locations, and SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) to further characterize them. Large areas of surface have been surveyed and statistically meaningful populations of chemical inhomogeneities measured for five different lots of Zircaloy cladding. Inner surfaces and cladding cross-sectional surfaces have been studied. There are clear differences in chemical inhomogeneity size distribution and composition between the various claddings. For three of the claddings characterized in this work, the previously measured stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) threshold stresses correlate well (inversely) with the new data on their average chemical inhomogeneity sizes. Of special interest is the fact that the most SCC-resistant cladding contains far fewer iron-bearing inhomogeneities than the other claddings

  17. ''C-ring'' stress corrosion cracking scoping experiment for Zircaloy spent fuel cladding

    Smith, H.D.

    1986-03-01

    This document describes the purpose and execution of the stress corrosion cracking scoping experiment using ''C-ring'' cladding specimens. The design and operation of the ''C-ring'' stressing apparatus is described and discussed. The experimental procedures and post-experiment sample evaluation are described

  18. Gel structure of the corrosion layer on cladding pipes of nuclear fuels

    Medek, Jiří; Weishauptová, Zuzana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 393, č. 2 (2009), s. 306-310 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/0043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : cladding pipes of nuclear fuels * corrosion layer * zirconium alloys Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics Impact factor: 1.933, year: 2009

  19. Corrosion performance of optimised and advanced fuel rod cladding in PWRs at high burnups

    Jourdain, P.; Hallstadius, L.; Pati, S.R.; Smith, G.P.; Garde, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour both in-pile and out-of-pile for a number of cladding alloys developed by ABB to meet the current and future needs for fuel rod cladding with improved corrosion resistance is presented. The cladding materials include: 1) Zircaloy-4 (OPTIN) with optimised composition and processing and Zircaloy-2 optimised for Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR), (Zircaloy-2P), and 2) several alternative zirconium-based alloys with compositions outside the composition range for Zircaloys. The data presented originate from fuel rods irradiated in six PWRs to burnups up to about 66 MWd/kgU and from tests conducted in 360 o water autoclave. Also included are in-pile fuel rod growth measurements on some of the alloys. (UK)

  20. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Ting; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2017-07-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%-40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V8C7, M7C3, and M23C6 were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content. No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. The corrosion resistance of the clads was decreased with the increase in the VC content, demonstrating the negative effect of VC on the corrosion resistance of AISI 420 stainless steel

  1. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    Zhang, Zhe [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States); Yu, Ting [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States); School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Kovacevic, Radovan, E-mail: kovacevi@smu.edu [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • The coatings of 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC were fabricated by high power direct diode laser. • The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was increased with the increase in the VC fraction. • No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. • The corrosion resistance of the cladded layer was decreased with the increase in the VC fraction. - Abstract: Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%–40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V{sub 8}C{sub 7}, M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content

  2. Zircaloy cladding corrosion degradation in a Tuff repository: initial experimental plan

    Smith, H.D.

    1984-07-01

    The projected environmental history of a Tuff repository sited in an unsaturated hydrologic setting is evaluated to identify the potentially most severe corrosion conditions for Zircaloy spent fuel cladding. Three distinct corrosion periods are identified over the projected history. In two of those, liquid water may be present which is believed to produce the most severe corrosive environment for Zircaloy spent fuel cladding. In the time interval 100 to 1000 years after emplacement in the repository, the most severe condition is exposure to 170 0 C water at about 100 psi in an unbreached canister. This condition will be reproduced experimentally in an autoclave. For times after 1000 years, the most severe condition is exposure to 90 0 C water that is equilibrated with the tuff and invades breached canisters. This condition will be reproduced with a water bath system

  3. Stress corrosion crack initiation of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment during creep, relaxation, and constant strain rate tests

    Jezequel, T.; Auzoux, Q.; Le Boulch, D.; Bono, M.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C.; Chabretou, V.; Mozzani, N.; Rautenberg, M.

    2018-02-01

    During accidental power transient conditions with Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI), the synergistic effect of the stress and strain imposed on the cladding by thermal expansion of the fuel, and corrosion by iodine released as a fission product, may lead to cladding failure by Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). In this study, internal pressure tests were conducted on unirradiated cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment. The goal was to investigate the influence of loading type (constant pressure tests, constant circumferential strain rate tests, or constant circumferential strain tests) and test temperature (320, 350, or 380 °C) on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC). The experimental results obtained with different loading types were consistent with each other. The apparent threshold hoop stress for I-SCC was found to be independent of the test temperature. SEM micrographs of the tested samples showed many pits distributed over the inner surface, which tended to coalesce into large pits in which a microcrack could initiate. A model for the time-to-failure of a cladding tube was developed using finite element simulations of the viscoplastic mechanical behavior of the material and a modified Kachanov's damage growth model. The times-to-failure predicted by this model are consistent with the experimental data.

  4. Evolution of processing of GE fuel clad tubing for corrosion resistance in boiling water reactors

    Williams, C.D. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Adamson, R.B. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Marlowe, M.O. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Plaza-Meyer, E. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Proebstle, R.A. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); White, D.W. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The current modification of the primary GE in-process solution-quench heat treatment, an (alpha+beta) solution-quench carried out at a tube diameter requiring only two subsequent reduction and anneal cycles, is applicable to Zr barrier fuel clad tubing, to non-barrier fuel clad tubing, and to the TRICLAD tubing product. A combination of good in-reactor corrosion performance and degradation resistance is anticipated for these products, based on knowledge of metallurgical characteristics and supported by the demonstrated performance capability of the Zircaloy-2 materials used. (orig.)

  5. Some remarks on the analysis of stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless-steel cladding

    Kupka, I.; Nrkous, P.

    1977-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking is greatly influenced by tensile stresses in the material. The occurrence of tensile stresses in the material under consideration results from residual stresses brought about during manufacturing processes and from stress caused by operation. In the case of an austenitic steel cladding the residual stresses arise in the course of welding and thermal treatment. The technique of residual stress measurement in austenitic cladding materials is described and the results are given. Both the longitudinal and transverse components of the stresses show in all cases similar behaviour not only prior to, but also after heat treatment. (J.B.)

  6. Initial report on stress-corrosion-cracking experiments using Zircaloy-4 spent fuel cladding C-rings

    Smith, H.D.

    1988-09-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is sponsoring C-ring stress corrosion cracking scoping experiments as a first step in evaluating the potential for stress corrosion cracking of spent fuel cladding in a potential tuff repository environment. The objective is to scope the approximate behavior so that more precise pressurized tube testing can be performed over an appropriate range of stress, without expanding the long-term effort needlessly. The experiment consists of stressing, by compression with a dead weight load, C-rings fabricated from spent fuel cladding exposed to an environment of Well J-13 water held at 90/degree/C. The results indicate that stress corrosion cracking occurs at the high stress levels employed in the experiments. The cladding C-rings, tested at 90% of the stress at which elastic behavior is obtained in these specimens, broke in 25 to 64 d when tested in water. This was about one third of the time required for control tests to break in air. This is apparently the first observation of stress corrosion under the test conditions of relatively low temperature, benign environment but very high stress. The 150 ksi test stress could be applied as a result of the particular specimen geometry. By comparison, the uniaxial tensile yield stress is about 100 to 120 ksi and the ultimate stress is about 150 ksi. When a general model that fits the high stress results is extrapolated to lower stress levels, it indicates that the C-rings in experiments now running at /approximately/80% of the yield strength should take 200 to 225 d to break. 21 refs., 24 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Experimental and numerical investigation on cladding of corrosion-erosion resistant materials by a high power direct diode laser

    Farahmand, Parisa

    of developed MMC coatings were examined under highly accelerated slurry erosion, corrosion, and wear as the most frequently encountered failure modes of mechanical components. The microstructure, mechanical properties, and the level of induced residual stress on the coating after cladding procedure are closely related to cladding process variables. Study about the effect of processing parameters on clad quality and experienced thermal history and thermally-induced stress evolution requires both theoretical and experimental understanding of the associated physical phenomena. Numerical modeling offers a cost-efficient way to better understand the related complex physics in laser cladding process. It helps to reveal the effects and significance of each processing parameters on the desired characteristics of clad parts. Successful numerical simulation can provide unique insight into complex laser cladding process, efficiently calculate the complex procedure, and help to obtain coating parts with quality integrity. Therefore, current study develops a three-dimensional (3D) transient and uncoupled thermo-elastic-plastic model to study thermal history, molten pool evolution, thermally induced residual stress, and the effect of utilizing an induction heater as a second heat source on the mechanical properties and microstructural properties of final cladded coating.

  8. Modelling of ultrasonic nondestructive testing of cracks in claddings

    Bostroem, Anders; Zagbai, Theo

    2006-05-01

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry. To develop and qualify the methods extensive experimental work with test blocks is usually required. This can be very time-consuming and costly and it also requires a good physical intuition of the situation. A reliable mathematical model of the testing situation can, therefore, be very valuable and cost-effective as it can reduce experimental work significantly. A good mathematical model enhances the physical intuition and is very useful for parametric studies, as a pedagogical tool, and for the qualification of procedures and personnel. The present project has been concerned with the modelling of defects in claddings. A cladding is a layer of material that is put on for corrosion protection, in the nuclear power industry this layer is often an austenitic steel that is welded onto the surface. The cladding is usually anisotropic and to some degree it is most likely also inhomogeneous, particularly in that the direction of the anisotropy is varying. This degree of inhomogeneity is unknown but probably not very pronounced so for modelling purposes it may be a valid assumption to take the cladding to be homogeneous. However, another important complicating factor with claddings is that the interface between the cladding and the base material is often corrugated. This corrugation can have large effects on the transmission of ultrasound through the interface and can thus greatly affect the detectability of defects in the cladding. In the present project the only type of defect that is considered is a planar crack that is situated inside the cladding. The investigations are, furthermore, limited to two dimensions, and the crack is then only a straight line. The crack can be arbitrarily oriented and situated, but it must not intersect the interface to the base material. The crack can be surface-breaking, and this is often the case of most practical interest, but it should then be

  9. Modelling of ultrasonic nondestructive testing of cracks in claddings

    Bostroem, Anders; Zagbai, Theo [Calmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Mechanics

    2006-05-15

    Nondestructive testing with ultrasound is a standard procedure in the nuclear power industry. To develop and qualify the methods extensive experimental work with test blocks is usually required. This can be very time-consuming and costly and it also requires a good physical intuition of the situation. A reliable mathematical model of the testing situation can, therefore, be very valuable and cost-effective as it can reduce experimental work significantly. A good mathematical model enhances the physical intuition and is very useful for parametric studies, as a pedagogical tool, and for the qualification of procedures and personnel. The present project has been concerned with the modelling of defects in claddings. A cladding is a layer of material that is put on for corrosion protection, in the nuclear power industry this layer is often an austenitic steel that is welded onto the surface. The cladding is usually anisotropic and to some degree it is most likely also inhomogeneous, particularly in that the direction of the anisotropy is varying. This degree of inhomogeneity is unknown but probably not very pronounced so for modelling purposes it may be a valid assumption to take the cladding to be homogeneous. However, another important complicating factor with claddings is that the interface between the cladding and the base material is often corrugated. This corrugation can have large effects on the transmission of ultrasound through the interface and can thus greatly affect the detectability of defects in the cladding. In the present project the only type of defect that is considered is a planar crack that is situated inside the cladding. The investigations are, furthermore, limited to two dimensions, and the crack is then only a straight line. The crack can be arbitrarily oriented and situated, but it must not intersect the interface to the base material. The crack can be surface-breaking, and this is often the case of most practical interest, but it should then be

  10. Effect of chemical composition on corrosion resistance of Zircaloy fuel cladding tube for BWR

    Inagaki, Masahisa; Akahori, Kimihiko; Kuniya, Jirou; Masaoka, Isao; Suwa, Masateru; Maru, Akira; Yasuda, Teturou; Maki, Hideo.

    1990-01-01

    Effects of Fe and Ni contents on nodular corrosion susceptibility and hydrogen pick-up of Zircaloy were investigated. Total number of 31 Zr alloys having different chemical compositions; five Zr-Sn-Fe-Cr alloys, eight Zr-Sn-Fe-Ni alloys and eighteen Zr-Sn-Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, were melted and processed to thin plates for the corrosion tests in the environments of a high temperature (510degC) steam and a high temperature (288degC) water. In addition, four 450 kg ingots of Zr-Sn-Fe-Ni-Cr alloys were industrially melted and BWR fuel cladding tubes were manufactured through a current material processing sequence to study their producibility, tensile properties and corrosion resistance. Nodular corrosion susceptibility decreased with increasing Fe and Ni contents of Zircaloys. It was seen that the improved Zircaloys having Fe and Ni contents in the range of 0.30 [Ni]+0.15[Fe]≥0.045 (w%) showed no susceptibility to nodular corrosion. An increase of Fe content resulted in a decrease of hydrogen pick-up fraction in both steam and water environments. An increase of Fe and Ni content of Zircaloys in the range of Fe≤0.25 w% and Ni≤0.1 w% did not cause the changes in tensile properties and fabricabilities of fuel cladding tube. The fuel cladding tube of improved Zircaloy, containing more amount of Fe and Ni than the upper limit of Zircaloy-2 specification showed no susceptibility to nodular corrosion even in the 530degC steam test. (author)

  11. FUNDAMENTAL MECHANISMS OF CORROSION OF ADVANCED LIGHT WATER REACTOR FUEL CLADDING ALLOYS AT HIGH BURNUP

    Lott, Randy G.

    2003-01-01

    OAK (B204) The corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel cladding is a key factor limiting the performance of nuclear fuel elements, improved cladding alloys, which resist corrosion and radiation damage, will facilitate higher burnup core designs. The objective of this project is to understand the mechanisms by which alloy composition, heat treatment and microstructure affect corrosion rate. This knowledge can be used to predict the behavior of existing alloys outside the current experience base (for example, at high burn-up) and predict the effects of changes in operation conditions on zirconium alloy behavior. Zirconium alloys corrode by the formation f a highly adherent protective oxide layer. The working hypothesis of this project is that alloy composition, microstructure and heat treatment affect corrosion rates through their effect on the protective oxide structure and ion transport properties. The experimental task in this project is to identify these differences and understand how they affect corrosion behavior. To do this, several microstructural examination techniques including transmission electron microscope (TEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a selection of fluorescence and diffraction techniques using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) were employed

  12. Evaluation of corrosion on the fuel performance of stainless steel cladding

    de Souza Gomes Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear reactors, the use of stainless steel (SS as the cladding material offers some advantages such as good mechanical and corrosion resistance. However, its main advantage is the reduction in the amount of the hydrogen released during loss-of-coolant accident, as observed in the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Hence, research aimed at developing accident tolerant fuels should consider SS as an important alternative to existing materials. However, the available computational tools used to analyze fuel rod performance under irradiation are not capable of assessing the effectiveness of SS as the cladding material. This paper addresses the SS corrosion behavior in a modified fuel performance code in order to evaluate its effect on the global fuel performance. Then, data from the literature concerning to SS corrosion are implemented in the specific code subroutines, and the results obtained are compared to those for Zircaloy-4 (Zy-4 under the same power history. The results show that the effects of corrosion on SS are considerably different from those on Zy-4. The thickness of the oxide layer formed on the SS surface is considerably lower than that formed on Zy-4. As a consequence of this, the global fuel performance of SS under irradiation should be less affected by the corrosion.

  13. Correlation of waterside corrosion and cladding microstructure in high-burnup fuel and gadolinia rods

    Chung, H.M.

    1989-09-01

    Waterside corrosion of the Zircaloy cladding has been examined in high-burnup fuel rods from several BWRs and PWRs, as well as in 3 wt % gadolinia burnable poison rods obtained from a BWR. The corrosion behavior of the high-burnup rods was then correlated with results from a microstructural characterization of the cladding by optical, scanning-electron, and transmission-electron microscopy (OM, SEM, and TEM). OM and SEM examination of the BWR fuel cladding showed both uniform and nodular oxide layers 2 to 45 μm in thickness after burnups of 11 to 30 MWd/kgU. For one of the BWRs, which was operated at 307 degree C rather than the normal 288 degree C, a relatively thick (50 to 70 μm) uniform oxide, rather than nodular oxides, was observed after a burnup of 27 to 30 MWd/kgU. TEM characterization revealed a number of microstructural features that occurred in association with the intermetallic precipitates in the cladding metal, apparently as a result of irradiation-induced or -enhanced processes. The BWR rods that exhibited white nodular oxides contained large precipitates (300 to 700 nm in size) that were partially amorphized during service, indicating that a distribution of the large intermetallic precipitates is conductive to nodular oxidation. 23 refs., 9 figs

  14. Water Chemistry and Clad Corrosion/Deposition Including Fuel Failures. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion is a principal life limiting degradation mechanism in nuclear steam supply systems, particularly taking into account the trends in increasing fuel burnup, thermal ratings and cycle length. Further, many plants have been operating with varying water chemistry regimes for many years, and issues of crud (deposition of corrosion products on other surfaces in the primary coolant circuit) are of significant concern for operators. At the meeting of the Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWGFPT) in 2007, it was recommended that a technical meeting be held on the subject of water chemistry and clad corrosion and deposition, including the potential consequences for fuel failures. This proposal was supported by both the Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR) and the Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors (TWG-HWR), with a recommendation to hold the meeting at the National Nuclear Energy Generating Company ENERGOATOM, Ukraine. This technical meeting was part of the IAEA activities on water chemistry, which have included a series of coordinated research projects, the most recent of which, Optimisation of Water Chemistry to Ensure Reliable Water Reactor Fuel Performance at High Burnup and in Ageing Plant (FUWAC) (IAEATECDOC-1666), concluded in 2010. Previous technical meetings were held in Cadarache, France (1985), Portland, Oregon, USA (1989), Rez, Czech Republic (1993), and Hluboka nad Vltavou, Czech Republic (1998). This meeting focused on issues associated with the corrosion of fuel cladding and the deposition of corrosion products from the primary circuit onto the fuel assembly, which can cause overheating and cladding failure or lead to unplanned power shifts due to boron deposition in the clad deposits. Crud deposition on other surfaces increases radiation fields and operator dose and the meeting considered ways to minimize the generation of crud to avoid

  15. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.; Girshik, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, laboratory experiments were performed on a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings by exposing them to fireside corrosion tests which simulated a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, RA253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, Ta-modified 310, NF 709, 690 clad, 671 clad, and 800HT for up to approximately 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy were exposed for 4,483, 11,348, and 15,883 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after the full 15,883 hours of exposure. A previous topical report has been issued for the 4,483 hours of exposure.

  16. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-01

    In Phase 1 a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347 RA-85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 Ta modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for approximately 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were assembled on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, the probe was installed in the reheater activity of the boiler and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. The results will be presented for the preliminary metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 16,000 hours of exposure. Continued metallurgical and interpretive analysis is still on going.

  17. Microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Hastelloy C22 coating produced by laser cladding

    Wang, Qin-Ying; Zhang, Yang-Fei; Bai, Shu-Lin; Liu, Zong-De

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hastelloy C22 coatings were prepared by diode laser cladding technique. ► Higher laser speed resulted in smaller grain size. ► Size-effect played the key role in the hardness measurements by different ways. ► Coating with higher laser scanning speed displayed higher nano-scratch resistance. ► Small grain size was beneficial for improvement of coating corrosion resistance. -- Abstract: The Hastelloy C22 coatings H1 and H2 were prepared by laser cladding technique with laser scanning speeds of 6 and 12 mm/s, respectively. Their microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance were investigated. The microstructures and phase compositions were studied by metallurgical microscope, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis. The hardness and scratch resistance were measured by micro-hardness and nanoindentation tests. The polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were tested by electrochemical workstation. Planar, cellular and dendritic solidifications were observed in the coating cross-sections. The coatings metallurgically well-bonded with the substrate are mainly composed of primary phase γ-nickel with solution of Fe, W, Cr and grain boundary precipitate of Mo 6 Ni 6 C. The hardness and corrosion resistance of steel substrate are significantly improved by laser cladding Hastelloy C22 coating. Coating H2 shows higher micro-hardness than that of H1 by 34% and it also exhibits better corrosion resistance. The results indicate that the increase of laser scanning speed improves the microstuctures, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Hastelloy C22 coating

  18. Corrosion of aluminum cladding under optimized water conditions

    Gibbs, A.

    1992-01-01

    Experience at SRS, ORNL, BNL, and Georgia Institute of Technology involving irradiated aluminum clad fuel and target elements, as well as studies of non-irradiated aluminum indicate that some types of aluminum assemblies can be kept in a continually well-deionized water atmosphere for up to 25 years without problems. SRS experience ranges from 2.75 years for the L-1.1 charge kept in deionized D 2 O 1 to greater than 10 years for assemblies stored in the Receiving Basin for Off-site Fuel (RBOF) 2 . Experience at Georgia Institute of Technology reactor in Atlanta yielded the longest value of 25 years without problems. The common denominators in all of the reports is that the water is continually deionized to approximately 2 MΩ (2 x 10 6 ohms) resistivity and the containers for the water are stainless steel or other non-porous material. This resistivity value is equivalent to a value of 0.5 micromhos or microSiemens conductivity and is reagent grade II quality water. 3 4 tabs, 26 refs

  19. Capabilities to improve corrosion resistance of fuel claddings by using powerful laser and plasma sources

    Borisov, V. M., E-mail: borisov@triniti.ru; Trofimov, V. N.; Sapozhkov, A. Yu.; Kuzmenko, V. A.; Mikhaylov, V. B.; Cherkovets, V. Ye.; Yakushkin, A. A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Yakushin, V. L.; Dzhumayev, P. S. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The treatment conditions of fuel claddings of the E110 alloy by using powerful UV or IR laser radiation, which lead to the increase in the corrosion resistance at the high-temperature (T = 1100°C) oxidation simulating a loss-of-coolant accident, are determined. The possibility of the complete suppression of corrosion under these conditions by using pulsed laser deposition of a Cr layer is demonstrated. The behavior of protective coatings of Al, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Cr planted on steel EP823 by pulsed laser deposition, which is planned to be used in the BREST-OD-300, is studied. The methods of the almost complete suppression of corrosion in liquid lead to the temperature of 720°C are shown.

  20. Corrosion surveillance programme for Latin American research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water

    Ramanathan, L.V.; Haddad, R.; Ritchie, I.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the IAEA sponsored Regional Technical Co-operation Project for Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru) are to provide the basic conditions to define a regional strategy for managing spent fuel and to provide solutions, taking into consideration the economic and technological realities of the countries involved. In particular, to determine the basic conditions for managing research reactor spent fuel during operation and interim storage as well as final disposal, and to establish forms of regional cooperation in the four main areas: spent fuel characterization, safety, regulation and public communication. This paper reports the corrosion surveillance activities of the Regional Project and these are based on the IAEA sponsored co-ordinated research project (CRP) on 'Corrosion of research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water'. The overall test consists of exposing corrosion coupon racks at different spent fuel basins followed by evaluation. (author)

  1. Feasibility of long-life and corrosion-resistant canister with titanium cladding

    Furuya, Masahiro; Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Saegusa, Toshiari

    2008-01-01

    In order to store nuclear spent fuels for a long term, we propose the concept of stainless steel canister with titanium cladding. The stainless canister is first brazed to titanium plates, and then the brazed joints are covered with other titanium plates. A MIG brazing for titanium and stainless steel was demonstrated with a brazing metal of Cu-1Mn-3Si alloy (MG960). JIS G 0601 shear strength, tensile shear stress and peel strength tests are conducted for the optimized MIG brazing conditions. These results showed the MIG brazing specimens possess adequate structural strength. After the salt spray test on the basis of JIS Z 2371, there were no pitting and general corrosions on a TIG welding specimen between titanium plates. The corrosion resistance is therefore, sufficiently high. Manufacturing cost estimation suggests that the titanium cladding concept is feasible thereby using 1-mm-thick titanium plates to reduce the material cost. In addition to this concept, we propose another concept of the canister by using titanium-stainless steel cladding plates to reduce a number of brazing joints. (author)

  2. Loop capabilities in Rez for water chemistry and corrosion control of cladding and in-core components

    Kysela, J.; Zmitko, M.; Srank, J.; Vsolak, R.

    1999-01-01

    Main characteristics of LVR-15 research reactor and its irradiation facilities are presented. For testing of cladding, internals and RPV materials specialised loop are used. There are now five high pressure loops modelling PWR, WWER or BWR water environment and chemistry. Loops can be connected with instrumented in-pile channels enable slow strain rate testing, 1CT or 2CT specimens loading and electrically heated rods exposition. Reactor dosimetry including neutronic parameters measurements and calculations and mock-up experiments are used. Water chemistry control involves gas (O 2 , H 2 ) dosing system, Orbisphere H 2 /O 2 measurement, electrochemical potential (ECP) measurements and specialised analytical chemistry laboratory. For cladding corrosion studies in-pile channels with four electrically heated rods with heat flux up to 100 W/cm 2 , void fraction 5 % at the outlet, inlet temperature 320 deg. C and flow velocity 3 m/s were development and tested. For corrosion layer investigation there is eddy current measurements and PIE techniques which use crud thickness measurement, chemical analyses of the crud, optical metallography, hydrogen analysis, SEM and TEM. (author)

  3. Alkaline corrosion properties of laser-clad aluminum/titanium coatings

    Aggerbeck, Martin; Herbreteau, Alexis; Rombouts, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to study the use of titanium as a protecting element for aluminum in alkaline conditions. Design/methodology/approach - Aluminum coatings containing up to 20 weight per cent Ti6Al4V were produced using laser cladding and were investigated using light optical...... microscope, scanning electron microscope - energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction, together with alkaline exposure tests and potentiodynamic measurements at pH 13.5. Findings - Cladding resulted in a heterogeneous solidification microstructure containing an aluminum matrix...... with supersaturated titanium ( (1 weight per cent), Al3Ti intermetallics and large partially undissolved Ti6Al4V particles. Heat treatment lowered the titanium concentration in the aluminum matrix, changed the shape of the Al3Ti precipitates and increased the degree of dissolution of the Ti6Al4V particles. Corrosion...

  4. Reactor fuel cladding tube with excellent corrosion resistance and method of manufacturing the same

    Okuda, Takanari; Kanehara, Mitsuo; Abe, Katsuhiro; Nishimura, Takashi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a fuel cladding tube having an excellent corrosion resistance and thus a long life, and a suitable manufacturing method therefor. Namely, in the fuel cladding tube, the outer circumference of an inner layer made of a zirconium base alloy is coated with an outer layer made of a metal more corrosion resistant than the zirconium base alloy. Ti or a titanium alloy is suitable for the corrosion resistant metal. In addition, the outer layer can be coated by a method such as vapor deposition or plating, not limited to joining of the inner layer material and the outer layer material. Specifically, a composite material having an inner layer made of a zirconium alloy coated by the outer material made of a titanium alloy is applied with hot fabrication at a temperature within a range of from 500 to 850degC and at a fabrication rate of not less than 5%. The fabrication method includes any of extrusion, rolling, drawing, and casting. As the titanium-base alloy, a Ti-Al alloy or a Ti-Nb alloy containing Al of not more than 20wt%, or Nb of not more than 20wt% is preferred. (I.S.)

  5. Corrosion of aluminium-clad spent fuel at RA research reactor

    Pesic, M.; Maksin, T.; Dobrijevic, R.; Idjakovic, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Almost 95% of all spent fuel elements of the RA research reactor in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro, are stored in 30 aluminium barrels and about 300 stainless steel channel-holders in the temporary spent fuel storage water pool. The first activities of sludge and water samples, taken from the pool, were measured in 1996-1997 and were followed by analysis of chemical composition of samples. Visual inspections of fuel elements in some stainless steel tubes and of the fuel channels stored in the reactor core have shown that some deposits cover aluminium cladding. Stains and surface discoloration are noted on many of the spent fuel elements that were examined visually during the core unloading and inspections carried out in 1979 - 1984. Some of water samples, taken from pool, about a 150 stainless steel tubes and 16 barrels have shown very high 137-Cs activity compared to low activity measured in pool water. It was concluded that aluminium cladding of the fuel elements was penetrated due to corrosion process. Study on influence of water corrosion processes in the RA reactor storage pool was started within the framework of the IAEA CRP 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel in Water' in 2002. The first test rack with various aluminium and stainless steel coupons, supplied by the IAEA, was immersed in the pool already in 1996. New racks were immersed in 2002 and 2003. The rack immersed in 1996 was taken out from the pool in 2002 and the rack immersed in 2002 was taken out in 2003. Results of the examination of these racks, carried out according to the strategy and the protocol, proposed by the IAEA, are described in this paper. (author)

  6. Corrosion of aluminum-clad alloys in wet spent fuel storage

    Howell, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    Large quantities of Defense related spent nuclear fuels are being stored in water basins around the United States. Under the non-proliferation policy, there has been no processing since the late 1980's and these fuels are caught in the pipeline awaiting processing or other disposition. At the Savannah River Site, over 200 metric tons of aluminum clad fuel are being stored in four water filled basins. Some of this fuel has experienced significant pitting corrosion. An intensive effort is underway at SRS to understand the corrosion problems and to improve the basin storage conditions for extended storage requirements. Significant improvements have been accomplished during 1993-1995, but the ultimate solution is to remove the fuel from the basins and to process it to a more stable form using existing and proven technology. This report presents a discussion of the fundamentals of aluminum alloy corrosion as it pertains to the wet storage of spent nuclear fuel. It examines the effects of variables on corrosion in the storage environment and presents the results of corrosion surveillance testing activities at SRS, as well as other fuel storage basins within the Department of Energy production sites

  7. The corrosion of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel in wet basin storage

    Howell, J.P.; Burke, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    Large quantities of Defense related spent nuclear fuels are being stored in water basins around the United States. Under the non-proliferation policy, there has been no processing since the late 1980's and these fuels are caught in the pipeline awaiting stabilization or other disposition. At the Savannah River Site, over 200 metric tons of aluminum clad fuel are being stored in four water filled basins. Some of this fuel has experienced visible pitting corrosion. An intensive effort is underway at SRS to understand the corrosion problems and to improve the basin storage conditions for extended storage requirements. Significant improvements have been accomplished during 1993-1996. This paper presents a discussion of the fundamentals of aluminum alloy corrosion as it pertains to the wet storage of spent nuclear fuel. It examines the effects of variables on corrosion in the storage environment and presents the results of corrosion surveillance testing activities at SRS, as well as discussions of fuel storage basins at other production sites of the Department of Energy

  8. The corrosion of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel in wet basin storage

    Howell, J.P.; Burke, S.D.

    1996-02-20

    Large quantities of Defense related spent nuclear fuels are being stored in water basins around the United States. Under the non-proliferation policy, there has been no processing since the late 1980`s and these fuels are caught in the pipeline awaiting stabilization or other disposition. At the Savannah River Site, over 200 metric tons of aluminum clad fuel are being stored in four water filled basins. Some of this fuel has experienced visible pitting corrosion. An intensive effort is underway at SRS to understand the corrosion problems and to improve the basin storage conditions for extended storage requirements. Significant improvements have been accomplished during 1993-1996. This paper presents a discussion of the fundamentals of aluminum alloy corrosion as it pertains to the wet storage of spent nuclear fuel. It examines the effects of variables on corrosion in the storage environment and presents the results of corrosion surveillance testing activities at SRS, as well as discussions of fuel storage basins at other production sites of the Department of Energy.

  9. The anti-corrosion behavior under multi-factor impingement of Hastelloy C22 coating prepared by multilayer laser cladding

    Chen, Lin; Bai, Shu-Lin

    2018-04-01

    Hastelloy C22 coating was prepared on substrate of Q235 steel by high power multilayer laser cladding. The microstructure, hardness and anti-corrosion properties of coating were investigated. The corrosion tests in 3.5% NaCl solution were carried out with variation of impingement angle and velocity, and vibration frequency of sample. The microstructure of coating changes from equiaxed grain at the top surface to dendrites oriented at an angle of 60° to the substrate inside the coating. The corrosion rate of coating increases with the increase of impingement angle and velocity, and vibrant frequency of sample. Corrosion mechanisms relate to repassivation and depassivation of coating according to electrochemical measurements. Above results show that multilayer laser cladding can endow Hastelloy C22 coating with fine microstructures, high hardness and good anti-corrosion performances.

  10. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure....

  11. Investigation of in-pile formed corrosion films on zircaloy fuel-rod claddings by impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic anodization

    Gebhardt, O.

    1993-01-01

    Hot-cell investigations have been executed to study the corrosion behaviour of irradiated Zircaloy fuel-rod claddings by impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic anodization. The thickness of the compact oxide at the metal/oxide interface and the thickness of the minimum barrier oxide have been determined at different positions along the claddings. As shown by analysis, both quantities first increase and then decrease with increasing thickness of the total oxide. (author) 6 figs., 33 refs

  12. Gallium-cladding compatibility testing plan. Phases 1 and 2: Test plan for gallium corrosion tests. Revision 2

    Wilson, D.F.; Morris, R.N.

    1998-05-01

    This test plan is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water-Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. The plan summarizes and updates the projected Phases 1 and 2 Gallium-Cladding compatibility corrosion testing and the following post-test examination. This work will characterize the reactions and changes, if any, in mechanical properties that occur between Zircaloy clad and gallium or gallium oxide in the temperature range 30--700 C

  13. Autoclave corrosion of zircaloy-4 cladding samples in LiOH solutions

    Hermann, A.

    2010-03-01

    In reactor operation, pH of the cooling water is adjusted by addition of alkaline hydroxides, and LiOH has been found to be the most suitable one. The addition of LiOH above a certain concentration level (depending on temperature) increases the corrosion rate of zirconium and its alloys. Hydrogen pick-up by the metal is also increased, and this effect is used to produce hydrided specimens for different investigations using the corrosion reaction. At the Paul Scherrer Institute several projects were accomplished to investigate the influence of hydrogen in Zircaloy cladding on its mechanical properties. In order to produce hydrided specimens for comparison and for adjusting new equipment, Zircaloy tubing samples were hydrogen charged by autoclave corrosion in lithiated water. Results of the corrosion experiments are outlined in this publication. Because of the great variety of possible experimental parameters these results are still of interest for the scientific community. Autoclave corrosion was accomplished in 0.2 M or 0.5 M LiOH solution at a constant temperature of 340 o C and a pressure of 160 bar. The corrosion rate increases from 84 mg/(dm 2 d) in 0.2 M LiOH to 153 mg/(dm 2 d) in 0.5 M LiOH. The hydrogen pick-up fraction in 0.5 M LiOH amounts to 80%. In 0.5 M LiOH, Zircaloy tubing samples can be charged with ∼ 500 ppm hydrogen in about 40 hours. In the corrosion experiments described in this report a homogeneous distribution of hydrides should be expected (except very high hydride concentrations) because no temperature gradient exists through the tubing wall. Hydrogen stringers are homogeneously distributed with circumferential orientation (stress-relieved tubing samples). (author)

  14. Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking of fixed deflection stressed slotted rings of Zircaloy fuel cladding

    Sejnoha, R.; Wood, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy fuel cladding by fission products is thought to be an important mechanism influencing power ramping defects of water-reactor fuels. We have used the fixed-deflection stressed slotted-ring technique to demonstrate cracking. The results show both the sensitivity and limitations of the stressed slotted-ring method in determining the responses of tubing to stress corrosion cracking. They are interpreted in terms of stress relaxation behavior, both on a microscopic scale for hydrogen-induced stress-relief and on a macroscopic scale for stress-time characteristics. Analysis also takes account of nonuniform plastic deformation during loading and residual stress buildup on unloading. 27 refs

  15. Study on Co-free amorphous material cladding using a laser beam to improve the resistance of primary system parts in NPPs to wear/erosion-corrosion

    Kim, J. S.; Woo, S. S.; Seo, J. H.

    2001-01-01

    A study on Co-free amorphous material, ARMACOR M, cladding using a laser beam has been performed to improve resistance of the primary system main parts on nuclear power plants to wear/erosion-corrosion. The wear/erosion-corrosion properties of ARMACRO M cladded speciemens were characterized in air at room temperature and 300 .deg. C and in air at room temperature, and compared to those of other hardfacing materials, such as Stellite 6, NOREM 02, Deloro 50, TIG-welde or laer cladded. According to the results, ARMACOR M laser-cladded specimen showed to have the highest resistance to wear/erosion-corrosion

  16. Multifrequency Eddy Current Inspection of Corrosion in Clad Aluminum Riveted Lap Joints and Its Effect on Fatigue Life

    Okafor, A. C.; Natarajan, S.

    2007-03-01

    Aging aircraft are prone to corrosion damage and fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints of fuselage skin panels. This can cause catastrophic failure if not detected and repaired. Hence detection of corrosion damage and monitoring its effect on structural integrity are essential. This paper presents multifrequency eddy current (EC) inspection of corrosion damage and machined material loss defect in clad A1 2024-T3 riveted lap joints and its effect on fatigue life. Results of eddy current inspection, corrosion product removal and fatigue testing are presented.

  17. Multifrequency Eddy Current Inspection of Corrosion in Clad Aluminum Riveted Lap Joints and Its Effect on Fatigue Life

    Okafor, A. C.; Natarajan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Aging aircraft are prone to corrosion damage and fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints of fuselage skin panels. This can cause catastrophic failure if not detected and repaired. Hence detection of corrosion damage and monitoring its effect on structural integrity are essential. This paper presents multifrequency eddy current (EC) inspection of corrosion damage and machined material loss defect in clad A1 2024-T3 riveted lap joints and its effect on fatigue life. Results of eddy current inspection, corrosion product removal and fatigue testing are presented

  18. In-reactor fuel cladding external corrosion measurement process and results

    Thomazet, J.; Musante, Y.; Pigelet, J.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the zirconium alloy cladding behaviour calls for an on-site corrosion measurement device. In the 80's, a FISCHER probe was used and allowed oxide layer measurements to be taken along the outer generating lines of the peripheral fuel rods. In order to allow measurements on inner rods, a thin Eddy current probe called SABRE was developed by FRAMATOME. The SABRE is a blade equipped with two E.C coils is moved through the assembly rows. A spring allows the measurement coil to be clamped on each of the generating lines of the scanned rods. By inserting this blade on all four assembly faces, measurements can also be performed along several generating lines of the same rod. Standard rings are fitted on the device and allow on-line calibration for each measured row. Signal acquisition and processing are performed by LAGOS, a dedicated software program developed by FRAMATOME. The measurements are generally taken at the cycle outage, in the spent fuel pool. On average, data acquisition calls for one shift per assembly (eight hours): this corresponds to more than 2500 measurement points. These measurements are processed statistically by the utility program SAN REMO. All the results are collected in a database for subsequent behaviour analysis: examples of investigated parameters are the thermal/hydraulic conditions of the reactors, the irradiation history, the cladding material, the water chemistry This analysis can be made easier by comparing the behaviour measurement and prediction by means of the COROS-2 corrosion code. (author)

  19. Advanced in-situ characterisation of corrosion properties of LWR fuel cladding materials

    Arilahti, E.; Bojinov, M.; Beverskog, B.

    1999-01-01

    The trend towards higher fuel burnups imposes a demand for better corrosion and hydriding resistance of cladding materials. Development of new and improved cladding materials is a long process. There is a lack of fast and reliable in-situ techniques to investigate zirconium alloys in simulated or in-core LWR coolant conditions. This paper describes a Thin Layer Electrode (TLE) arrangement suitable for in-situ characterization of oxide films formed on fuel cladding materials. This arrangement enables us to carry out: Versatile Thin Layer Electrochemical measurements, including: (i) Thin Layer Electrochemical impedance Spectroscopic (TLEIS) measurements to characterize the oxidation kinetics and mechanisms of metals and the properties of their oxide films in aqueous environments. These measurements can also be performed in low conductivity electrolytes. (ii) Thin-Layer Wall-Jet (TLWJ) measurements, which give the possibility to detect soluble reaction products and to evaluate the influence of novel water chemistry additions on their release. Solid Contact measurements: (i) Contact Electric Resistance (CER) measurements to investigate the electronic properties of surface films on the basis of d.c. resistance measurements. (i) Contact Electric impedance (CEI) measurements to study the electronic properties of surface films using a.c. perturbation. All the above listed measurements can be performed using one single measurement device developed at VTT. This device can be conveniently inserted into an autoclave. Its geometry is currently being optimized in cooperation with the OECD Halden Reactor Project. In addition, the applicability of the device for in-core measurements has been investigated in a joint feasibility study performed by VTT and JRC Petten. Results of some autoclave studies of the effect of LiOH concentration on the stability of fuel cladding oxide films are presented in this paper. (author)

  20. Modelling the waterside corrosion of PWR fuel rods

    Abram, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of zirconium alloy cladding corrosion in PWRs is briefly reviewed, and an engineering corrosion model is proposed. The basic model is intended to produce a best-estimate fit to circumferentially-average oxide thickness measurements obtained from inter-span positions, way from the effects of structural or flow mixing grids. The model comprises an initial pre-transition weight gain expression which follows cubic rate kinetics. On reaching a critical oxide thickness, a transition to linear rate kinetics occurs. The post-transition corrosion rate includes a term which is dependent on fast neutron flux, and an Arrhenius thermal corrosion rate which has been fitted to isothermal ex-reactor data. This thermal corrosion rate is enhanced by the presence of lithium in the coolant, and by the concentration of hydrogen in the cladding. Different cladding materials are accounted for in the selection of the model constants, and results for standard Zircaloy-4, low tin (or ''optimized'') Zircaloy-4, and the Westinghouse advanced alloy ZIRLO TM are presented. A method of accounting for the effects of grids is described, and the application of the model within the ENIGMA-B and ZROX codes is discussed. (author). 35 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  1. Modelling the waterside corrosion of PWR fuel rods

    Abram, T J [Fuel Engineering Dept., British Nuclear Fuels plc, Salwick, Preston (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    The mechanism of zirconium alloy cladding corrosion in PWRs is briefly reviewed, and an engineering corrosion model is proposed. The basic model is intended to produce a best-estimate fit to circumferentially-average oxide thickness measurements obtained from inter-span positions, way from the effects of structural or flow mixing grids. The model comprises an initial pre-transition weight gain expression which follows cubic rate kinetics. On reaching a critical oxide thickness, a transition to linear rate kinetics occurs. The post-transition corrosion rate includes a term which is dependent on fast neutron flux, and an Arrhenius thermal corrosion rate which has been fitted to isothermal ex-reactor data. This thermal corrosion rate is enhanced by the presence of lithium in the coolant, and by the concentration of hydrogen in the cladding. Different cladding materials are accounted for in the selection of the model constants, and results for standard Zircaloy-4, low tin (or ``optimized``) Zircaloy-4, and the Westinghouse advanced alloy ZIRLO{sup TM} are presented. A method of accounting for the effects of grids is described, and the application of the model within the ENIGMA-B and ZROX codes is discussed. (author). 35 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs.

  2. Structural, mechanical and corrosion studies of Cr-rich inclusions in 152 cladding of dissimilar metal weld joint

    Li, Yifeng; Wang, Jianqiu; Han, En-Hou; Yang, Chengdong

    2018-01-01

    Cr-rich inclusions were discovered in 152 cladding at the inner wall of domestic dissimilar metal weld joint, and their morphologies, microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors were systematically characterized by SEM, TEM, nanoindentation and FIB. The results indicate that the Cr-rich inclusions originate from large-size Cr particles in 152 welding electrode flux, and they are 50-150 μm in size in most cases, and there is a continuous transition zone of 2-5 μm in width between the Cr inclusion core and 152 cladding matrix, and the transition zone consists of Ni & Fe-rich dendritic austenite and Cr23C6 and Cr matrix. The transition zone has the highest nanoindentation hardness (7.66 GPa), which is much harder than the inclusion core (5.14 GPa) and 152 cladding (3.71 GPa). In-situ microscopic tensile tests show that cracks initialize preferentially in transition zone, and then propagate into the inclusion core, and creep further into 152 cladding after penetrating the core area. The inclusion core and its transition zone both share similar oxide film structure with nickel-base 152 cladding matrix in simulated primary water, while those two parts present better general corrosion resistance than 152 cladding matrix due to higher Cr concentration.

  3. A model for hydrogen pickup for BWR cladding materials

    Hede, G.; Kaiser, U.

    2001-01-01

    It has been observed that rod elongation is driven by the hydrogen pickup but not by corrosion as such. Based on this a non-destructive method to determine clad hydrogen concentration has been developed. The method is based on the observation that there are three different mechanisms behind the rod growth: the effect of neutron irradiation on the Zircaloy microstructure, the volume increase of the cladding as an effect of hydride precipitation and axial pellet-cladding-mechanical-interaction (PCMI). The derived correlation is based on the experience of older cladding materials, inspected at hot-cell laboratories, that obtained high hydrogen levels (above 500 ppm) at lower burnup (assembly burnup below 50 MWd/kgU). Now this experience can be applied, by interpolation, on more modern cladding materials with a burnup beyond 50 MWd/kgU by analysis of the rod growth database of the respective cladding materials. Hence, the method enables an interpolation rather than an extrapolation of present day hydrogen pickup database, which improves the reliability and accuracy. Further, one can get a good estimate of the hydrogen pickup during an ongoing outage based on a non-destructive method. Finally, rod growth measurements are normally performed for a large population of rods, hence giving a good statistics compared to examination of a few rods at a hot cell. (author)

  4. Corrosion of aluminium-clad spent fuel in LVR-15 research reactor storage facilities. Final report

    Splichal, K.; Berka, J.; Keilova, E.

    2006-03-01

    The corrosion of the research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water was investigated in two storage facilities. The standard racks were delivered by the IAEA and consisted of two aluminium alloys AA 6061 and Szav-1 coupons. Bimetallic couples create aluminium alloy and stainless steel 304 coupons. Rolled and extruded AA 6061 material was also tested. Single coupons, bimetallic and crevice couples were exposed in the at-reactor basin (ARB) and the high-level wastage pool (HLW). The water chemistry parameters were monitored and sedimentation of impurities was measured. The content of impurities of mainly Cl and SO 4 was in the range of 2 to 15 μg/l in the HLW pool; it was about one order higher in ARB. The Fe content was below 2 μg/l for both facilities. After two years of exposure the pitting was evaluated as local corrosion damage. The occurrence of pits was evaluated predominantly on the surfaces of single coupons and on the outer and inner surfaces of bimetallic and crevices coupons. No correlation was found between the pitting initiation and the type of aluminium alloys and rolled and extruded materials. In bimetallic couples the presence of stainless coupons did not have any effect on local corrosion. The depth of pits was lower than 50 μm for considerable areas of coupons and should be compared with the results of other participating institutes. (author)

  5. Modeling of Zircaloy cladding degradation under repository conditions

    Santanam, L.; Raghavan, S.; Chin, B.A.

    1989-07-01

    Two potential degradation mechanisms, creep and stress corrosion cracking, of Zircaloy cladding during repository storage of spent nuclear fuel have been investigated. The deformation and fracture map methodology has been used to predict maximum allowable initial storage temperatures to achieve a thousand year life without rupture as a function of spent-fuel history. A stress analysis of fuel rods has been performed. Stresses in the outer zirconium oxide layer and the inner Zircaloy tube have been predicted for typical internal pressurization, oxide layer thickness, volume expansion from formation of the oxide layer and thermal expansion coefficients of the cladding and oxide. Stress relaxation occurring in-reactor has also been taken into account. The calculations indicate that for the anticipated storage conditions investigated, the outer zirconium oxide layer is in a state of compression thus making it unlikely that stress corrosion cracking of the exterior surface will occur. 20 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs

  6. Aluminum alloy for cladding excellent in sacrificial anode property and erosion-corrosion resistance

    Imaizumi, S.; Mikami, K.; Yamada, K.

    1980-01-01

    An aluminum alloy for cladding excellent in sacrificial anode property and erosion-corrosion resistance, which consists essentially of, in weight percentage: zinc - 0.3 to 3.0%, magnesium - 0.2 to 4.0%, manganese - 0.3 to 2.0%, and, the balance aluminum and incidental impurities; said alloy including an aluminum alloy also containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of, in weight percentage: indium - 0.005 to 0.2%, tin - 0.01 to 0.3%, and, bismuth - 0.01 to 0.3%; provided that the total content of indium, tin and bismuth being up to 0.3%

  7. Cladding failure probability modeling for risk evaluations of fast reactors

    Mueller, C.J.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops the methodology to incorporate cladding failure data and associated modeling into risk evaluations of liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMRs). Current US innovative designs for metal-fueled pool-type LMRs take advantage of inherent reactivity feedback mechanisms to limit reactor temperature increases in response to classic anticipated-transient-without-scram (ATWS) initiators. Final shutdown without reliance on engineered safety features can then be accomplished if sufficient time is available for operator intervention to terminate fission power production and/or provide auxiliary cooling prior to significant core disruption. Coherent cladding failure under the sustained elevated temperatures of ATWS events serves as one indicator of core disruption. In this paper we combine uncertainties in cladding failure data with uncertainties in calculations of ATWS cladding temperature conditions to calculate probabilities of cladding failure as a function of the time for accident recovery

  8. Cladding failure probability modeling for risk evaluations of fast reactors

    Mueller, C.J.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops the methodology to incorporate cladding failure data and associated modeling into risk evaluations of liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMRs). Current U.S. innovative designs for metal-fueled pool-type LMRs take advantage of inherent reactivity feedback mechanisms to limit reactor temperature increases in response to classic anticipated-transient-without-scram (ATWS) initiators. Final shutdown without reliance on engineered safety features can then be accomplished if sufficient time is available for operator intervention to terminate fission power production and/or provide auxiliary cooling prior to significant core disruption. Coherent cladding failure under the sustained elevated temperatures of ATWS events serves as one indicator of core disruption. In this paper we combine uncertainties in cladding failure data with uncertainties in calculations of ATWS cladding temperature conditions to calculate probabilities of cladding failure as a function of the time for accident recovery. (orig.)

  9. Fuel compliance model for pellet-cladding mechanical interaction

    Shah, V.N.; Carlson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes two aspects of fuel pellet deformation that play significant roles in determining maximum cladding hoop strains during pellet-cladding mechanical interaction: compliance of fragmented fuel pellets and influence of the pellet end-face design on the transmission of axial compressive force in the fuel stack. The latter aspect affects cladding ridge formation and explains several related observations that cannot be explained by the hourglassing model. An empirical model, called the fuel compliance model and representing the above aspects of fuel deformation, has been developed using the results from two Halden experiments and incorporated into the FRAP-T6 fuel performance code

  10. Study of the uniform corrosion of an aluminium alloy used for the fuel cladding of the Jules Horowitz experimental reactor

    Wintergerst, M.

    2008-01-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material testing reactor, an aluminium base alloy, AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. Taking into account the thermal properties of the alloy and of its oxide, the corrosion of the fuel cans presents many problems. The aim of this thesis is to provide a growing kinetic of the oxide layer at the surface of the AlFeNi fuel can in order to predict the life time of fuel element. Thus the mechanism of degradation of the cladding will be describe in order to integrate the different parameters of the operating reactor. (A.L.B.)

  11. Cladding axial elongation models for FRAP-T6

    Shah, V.N.; Carlson, E.R.; Berna, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the cladding axial elongation models developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for use by the FRAP-T6 computer code in analyzing the response of fuel rods during reactor transients in light water reactors (LWR). The FRAP-T6 code contains models (FRACAS-II subcode) that analyze the structural response of a fuel rod including pellet-cladding-mechanical-interaction (PCMI). Recently, four models were incorporated into FRACAS-II to calculate cladding axial deformation: (a) axial PCMI, (b) trapped fuel stack, (c) fuel relocation, and (d) effective fuel thermal expansion. Comparisons of cladding axial elongation measurements from two experiments with the corresponding FRAP-T6 calculations are presented

  12. Corrosion by sulfate-reducing bacteria in a HP gas line under a detached weld cladding; Korrosion durch sulfatreduzierende Bakterien an einer Hochdruckgasleitung unter abgeloester Schweissnahtnachumhuellung

    Bette, Ulrich [Technische Akademie Wuppertal (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Intelligent pig measurements detected several points of corrosion in a HP gas pipeline in northern Germany. Corrosion occurred in a pipe section buried in clay soil, under detached weld claddings. It was not detected in regular measurements and additional intensive measurements. When the pipes were dug up, sulfate-reducing bacteria were found as the cause of corrosion. Due to the location of the corrosion processes, cathodic protection was impossible, and IFO measurements were ineffective in the low-ohmic soil.

  13. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steels: Part 1, medium-sulfur forging steel

    James, L.A.; Poskie, T.J.; Auten, T.A.; Cullen, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a medium- sulfur ASTM A508-2 forging steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 30.3--38.3 mm, and depths of 13.1--16.8 mm. The experiments were conducted in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O 2 < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243 degrees C, under loading conditions (ΔK, R, and cyclic frequency) conductive to environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) in higher-sulfur steels under quasi-stagnant conditions. Earlier experiments on unclad compact tension specimens of this heat of steel did not exhibit EAC, and the present experiments on semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating cladding also did not exhibit EAC

  14. Investigation on wear resistance and corrosion resistance of electron beam cladding co-alloy coating on Inconel617

    Liu, Hailang; Zhang, Guopei; Huang, Yiping; Qi, Zhengwei; Wang, Bo; Yu, Zhibiao; Wang, Dezhi

    2018-04-01

    To improve surface properties of Inconel 617 alloy (referred to as 617 alloy), co-alloy coating metallurgically bonded to substrate was prepared on the surface of 617 alloy by electron beam cladding. The microstructure, phase composition, microhardness, tribological properties and corrosion resistance of the coatings were investigated. The XRD results of the coatings reinforced by co-alloy (Co800) revealed the presence of γ-Co, CoCx and Cr23C6 phase as matrix and new metastable phases of Cr2Ni3 and Co3Mo2Si. These hypoeutectic structures contain primary dendrites and interdendritic eutectics. The metallurgical bonding forms well between the cladding layer and the matrix of 617 alloy. In most studied conditions, the co-alloy coating displays a better hardness, tribological performance, i.e., lower coefficient of frictions and wear rates, corrosion resistance in 1 mol L‑1 HCl solution, than the 617 alloy.

  15. Investigation of thermally sensitised stainless steels as analogues for spent AGR fuel cladding to test a corrosion inhibitor for intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    Whillock, Guy O. H.; Hands, Brian J.; Majchrowski, Tom P.; Hambley, David I.

    2018-01-01

    A small proportion of irradiated Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel cladding can be susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when stored in pond water containing low chloride concentrations, but corrosion is known to be prevented by an inhibitor at the storage temperatures that have applied so far. It may be necessary in the future to increase the storage temperature by up to ∼20 °C and to demonstrate the impact of higher temperatures for safety case purposes. Accordingly, corrosion testing is needed to establish the effect of temperature increases on the efficacy of the inhibitor. This paper presents the results of studies carried out on thermally sensitised 304 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steels, investigating their grain boundary compositions and their IGSCC behaviour over a range of test temperatures (30-60 °C) and chloride concentrations (0.3-10 mg/L). Monitoring of crack initiation and propagation is presented along with preliminary results as to the effect of the corrosion inhibitor. 304 stainless steel aged for 72 h at 600 °C provided a close match to the known pond storage corrosion behaviour of spent AGR fuel cladding.

  16. Corrosive sliding wear behavior of laser clad Mo2Ni3Si/NiSi intermetallic coating

    Lu, X.D.; Wang, H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Many ternary metal silicides such as W 2 Ni 3 Si, Ti 2 Ni 3 Si and Mo 2 Ni 3 Si with the topologically closed-packed (TCP) hP12 MgZn 2 type Laves phase crystal structure are expected to have outstanding wear and corrosion resistance due to their inherent high hardness and sluggish temperature dependence and strong atomic bonds. In this paper, Mo 2 Ni 3 Si/NiSi intermetallic coating was fabricated on substrate of an austenitic stainless steel AISI321 by laser cladding using Ni-Mo-Si elemental alloy powders. Microstructure of the coating was characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). Wear resistance of the coating is evaluated under corrosive sliding wear test condition. Influence of corrosion solutions on the wear resistance of the coating was studied and the wear mechanism was discussed based on observations of worn surface morphology. Results showed that the laser clad Mo 2 Ni 3 Si/NiSi composite coating have a fine microstructure of Mo 2 Ni 3 Si primary dendrites and the interdendritic Mo 2 Ni 3 Si/NiSi eutectics. The coating has excellent corrosive wear resistance compared with austenitic stainless steel AISI321 under acid, alkaline and saline corrosive environments

  17. Evaluation of steam corrosion and water quenching behavior of zirconium-silicide coated LWR fuel claddings

    Yeom, Hwasung; Lockhart, Cody; Mariani, Robert; Xu, Peng; Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates steam corrosion of bulk ZrSi2, pure Si, and zirconium-silicide coatings as well as water quenching behavior of ZrSi2 coatings to evaluate its feasibility as a potential accident-tolerant fuel cladding coating material in light water nuclear reactor. The ZrSi2 coating and Zr2Si-ZrSi2 coating were deposited on Zircaloy-4 flats, SiC flats, and cylindrical Zircaloy-4 rodlets using magnetron sputter deposition. Bulk ZrSi2 and pure Si samples showed weight loss after the corrosion test in pure steam at 400 °C and 10.3 MPa for 72 h. Silicon depletion on the ZrSi2 surface during the steam test was related to the surface recession observed in the silicon samples. ZrSi2 coating (∼3.9 μm) pre-oxidized in 700 °C air prevented substrate oxidation but thin porous ZrO2 formed on the coating. The only condition which achieved complete silicon immobilization in the oxide scale in aqueous environments was the formation of ZrSiO4 via ZrSi2 coating oxidation in 1400 °C air. In addition, ZrSi2 coatings were beneficial in enhancing quenching heat transfer - the minimum film boiling temperature increased by 6-8% in the three different environmental conditions tested. During repeated thermal cycles (water quenching from 700 °C to 85 °C for 20 s) performed as a part of quench tests, no spallation and cracking was observed and the coating prevented oxidation of the underlying Zircaloy-4 substrate.

  18. Comparison of models discribing cladding deformations during LOCA

    Chakraborty, A.K.; Zipper, R.

    1981-05-01

    This report compares the important models for the determination of cladding deformations during LOCA. In addition to the comparisons of underlying assumptions of different models the same is done for the coefficients applied for the models. In order to assess the predictive capability of the models the calculated results are compared with the experimental results of the individual claddings. It was found out that the results of temperature ramp tests could be calculated better than that of the pressure ramp tests. The calculations revealed that even with the simplified assumption of the model used in TESPA the agreement of the calculated results with those of model NORA was relatively good. (orig.) [de

  19. A model for predicting pellet-cladding interaction induced fuel rod failure, based on nonlinear fracture mechanics

    Jernkvist, L.O.

    1993-01-01

    A model for predicting pellet-cladding mechanical interaction induced fuel rod failure, suitable for implementation in finite element fuel-performance codes, is presented. Cladding failure is predicted by explicitly modelling the propagation of radial cracks under varying load conditions. Propagation is assumed to be due to either iodine induced stress corrosion cracking or ductile fracture. Nonlinear fracture mechanics concepts are utilized in modelling these two mechanisms of crack growth. The novelty of this approach is that the development of cracks, which may ultimately lead to fuel rod failure, can be treated as a dynamic and time-dependent process. The influence of cyclic loading, ramp rates and material creep on the failure mechanism can thereby be investigated. Results of numerical calculations, in which the failure model has been used to study the dependence of cladding creep rate on crack propagation velocity, are presented. (author)

  20. Modelling of stress corrosion cracking in zirconium alloys

    Fandeur, O.; Rouillon, L.; Pilvin, P.; Jacques, P.; Rebeyrolle, V.

    2001-01-01

    During normal and incidental operating conditions, PWR power plants must comply with the first safety requirement, which is to ensure that the cladding wall is sound. Indeed some severe power transients potentially induce Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) of the zirconium alloy clad, due to strong Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI). Since, at present, the prevention of this risk has some consequences on the French reactors manoeuvrability, a better understanding and forecast of the clad damage related to SCC/PCI is needed. With this aim, power ramp tests are performed in experimental reactors to assess the fuel rod behaviour and evaluate PCI failure risks. To study in detail SCC mechanisms, additional laboratory experiments are carried out on non-irradiated and irradiated cladding tubes. Numerical simulations of these tests have been developed aiming, on the one hand, to evaluate mechanical state variables and, on the other hand, to study consistent mechanical parameters for describing stress corrosion clad failure. The main result of this simulation is the determination of the validity ranges of the stress intensity factor, which is frequently used to model SCC. This parameter appears to be valid only at the onset of crack growth, when crack length remains short. In addition, the role of plastic strain rate and plastic strain as controlling parameters of the SCC process has been analysed in detail using the above mechanical description of the crack tip mechanical fields. Finally, the numerical determination of the first-order parameter(s) in the crack propagation rate law is completed by the development of laboratory tests focused on these parameters. These tests aim to support experimentally the results of the FE simulation. (author)

  1. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in PWR's

    Esteves, A.M.; Silva, A.T. e.

    1992-01-01

    The pellet-cladding interaction that can occur in a PWR fuel rod design is modelled with the computer codes FRAPCON-1 and ANSYS. The fuel performance code FRAPCON-1 analyses the fuel rod irradiation behavior and generates the initial conditions for the localized fuel rod thermal and mechanical modelling in two and three-dimensional finite elements with ANSYS. In the mechanical modelling, a pellet fragment is placed in the fuel rod gap. Two types of fuel rod cladding materials are considered: Zircaloy and austenitic stainless steel. (author)

  2. Absorptivity Measurements and Heat Source Modeling to Simulate Laser Cladding

    Wirth, Florian; Eisenbarth, Daniel; Wegener, Konrad

    The laser cladding process gains importance, as it does not only allow the application of surface coatings, but also additive manufacturing of three-dimensional parts. In both cases, process simulation can contribute to process optimization. Heat source modeling is one of the main issues for an accurate model and simulation of the laser cladding process. While the laser beam intensity distribution is readily known, the other two main effects on the process' heat input are non-trivial. Namely the measurement of the absorptivity of the applied materials as well as the powder attenuation. Therefore, calorimetry measurements were carried out. The measurement method and the measurement results for laser cladding of Stellite 6 on structural steel S 235 and for the processing of Inconel 625 are presented both using a CO2 laser as well as a high power diode laser (HPDL). Additionally, a heat source model is deduced.

  3. Development of high performance cladding materials

    Park, Jeong Yong; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.

    2010-04-01

    The irradiation test for HANA claddings conducted and a series of evaluation for next-HANA claddings as well as their in-pile and out-of pile performances tests were also carried out at Halden research reactor. The 6th irradiation test have been completed successfully in Halden research reactor. As a result, HANA claddings showed high performance, such as corrosion resistance increased by 40% compared to Zircaloy-4. The high performance of HANA claddings in Halden test has enabled lead test rod program as the first step of the commercialization of HANA claddings. DB has been established for thermal and LOCA-related properties. It was confirmed from the thermal shock test that the integrity of HANA claddings was maintained in more expanded region than the criteria regulated by NRC. The manufacturing process of strips was established in order to apply HANA alloys, which were originally developed for the claddings, to the spacer grids. 250 kinds of model alloys for the next-generation claddings were designed and manufactured over 4 times and used to select the preliminary candidate alloys for the next-generation claddings. The selected candidate alloys showed 50% better corrosion resistance and 20% improved high temperature oxidation resistance compared to the foreign advanced claddings. We established the manufacturing condition controlling the performance of the dual-cooled claddings by changing the reduction rate in the cold working steps

  4. Experiments for evaluation of corrosion to develop storage criteria for interim dry storage of aluminum-alloy clad spent nuclear fuel

    Peacock, H.B.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.; Murphy, T.H.

    1994-01-01

    The technical bases for specification of limits to environmental exposure conditions to avoid excessive degradation are being developed for storage criteria for dry storage of highly-enriched, aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuels owned by the US Department of Energy. Corrosion of the aluminum cladding is a limiting degradation mechanism (occurs at lowest temperature) for aluminum exposed to an environment containing water vapor. Attendant radiation fields of the fuels can lead to production of nitric acid in the presence of air and water vapor and would exacerbate the corrosion of aluminum by lowering the pH of the water solution. Laboratory-scale specimens are being exposed to various conditions inside an autoclave facility to measure the corrosion of the fuel matrix and cladding materials through weight change measurements and metallurgical analysis. In addition, electrochemical corrosion tests are being performed to supplement the autoclave testing by measuring differences in the general corrosion and pitting corrosion behavior of the aluminum cladding alloys and the aluminum-uranium fuel materials in water solutions

  5. A New Material Constitutive Model for Predicting Cladding Failure

    Rashid, Joe; Dunham, Robert [ANATECH Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Rashid, Mark [University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Machiels, Albert [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    An important issue in fuel performance and safety evaluations is the characterization of the effects of hydrides on cladding mechanical response and failure behavior. The hydride structure formed during power operation transforms the cladding into a complex multi-material composite, with through-thickness concentration profile that causes cladding ductility to vary by more than an order of magnitude between ID and OD. However, current practice of mechanical property testing treats the cladding as a homogeneous material characterized by a single stress-strain curve, regardless of its hydride morphology. Consequently, as irradiation conditions and hydrides evolution change, new material property testing is required, which results in a state of continuous need for valid material property data. A recently developed constitutive model, treats the cladding as a multi-material composite in which the metal and the hydride platelets are treated as separate material phases with their own elastic-plastic and fracture properties and interacting at their interfaces with appropriate constraint conditions between them to ensure strain and stress compatibility. An essential feature of the model is a multi-phase damage formulation that models the complex interaction between the hydride phases and the metal matrix and the coupled effect of radial and circumferential hydrides on cladding stress-strain response. This gives the model the capability of directly predicting cladding failure progression during the loading event and, as such, provides a unique tool for constructing failure criteria analytically where none could be developed by conventional material testing. Implementation of the model in a fuel behavior code provides the capability to predict in-reactor operational failures due to PCI or missing pellet surfaces (MPS) without having to rely on failure criteria. Even, a stronger motivation for use of the model is in the transportation accidents analysis of spent fuel

  6. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of TC2 Ti alloy by laser cladding with Ti/TiC/TiB_2 powders

    Diao, Yunhua; Zhang, Kemin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A TiC/TiB_2 composite coating was produced onto a TC2 Ti alloy by laser cladding with Ti/TiC/TiB_2 powders. • A maximum hardness of 1100 HV was achieved in the laser clad TiC/TiB_2 composite layer. • Corrosion resistance of the TC2 alloy in NaCl (3.5 wt%) aqueous solution can be improved after laser cladding. - Abstract: In the present work, a TiC/TiB_2 composite coating was produced onto a TC2 Ti alloy by laser cladding with Ti/TiC/TiB_2 powders. The surface microstructure, phase components and compositions were characterized with methods of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The cladding layer is consisted of Ti, TiC and TiB_2. And the surface microhardness was measured. After laser cladding, a maximum hardness of 1100 HV is achieved in the laser cladding surface layer, which is more three times higher than that of the TC2 substrate (∼300 HV). Due to the formation of TiC and TiB_2 intermetallic compounds in the alloyed region and grain refinement, the microhardness of coating is higher than TC2 Ti alloy. In this paper, the corrosion property of matrix material and treated samples were both measured in NaCl (3.5 wt%) aqueous solution. From the result we can see that the laser cladding specimens’ corrosion property is clearly becoming better than that of the substrate.

  7. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of TC2 Ti alloy by laser cladding with Ti/TiC/TiB{sub 2} powders

    Diao, Yunhua, E-mail: 990722012@qq.com; Zhang, Kemin, E-mail: zhangkm@sues.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A TiC/TiB{sub 2} composite coating was produced onto a TC2 Ti alloy by laser cladding with Ti/TiC/TiB{sub 2} powders. • A maximum hardness of 1100 HV was achieved in the laser clad TiC/TiB{sub 2} composite layer. • Corrosion resistance of the TC2 alloy in NaCl (3.5 wt%) aqueous solution can be improved after laser cladding. - Abstract: In the present work, a TiC/TiB{sub 2} composite coating was produced onto a TC2 Ti alloy by laser cladding with Ti/TiC/TiB{sub 2} powders. The surface microstructure, phase components and compositions were characterized with methods of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The cladding layer is consisted of Ti, TiC and TiB{sub 2}. And the surface microhardness was measured. After laser cladding, a maximum hardness of 1100 HV is achieved in the laser cladding surface layer, which is more three times higher than that of the TC2 substrate (∼300 HV). Due to the formation of TiC and TiB{sub 2} intermetallic compounds in the alloyed region and grain refinement, the microhardness of coating is higher than TC2 Ti alloy. In this paper, the corrosion property of matrix material and treated samples were both measured in NaCl (3.5 wt%) aqueous solution. From the result we can see that the laser cladding specimens’ corrosion property is clearly becoming better than that of the substrate.

  8. Microstructures and properties of low-chromium high corrosion-resistant TiC-VC reinforced Fe-based laser cladding layer

    Zhang, Hui; Zou, Yong; Zou, Zengda; Wu, Dongting

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The cladding layer with 3.0%Cr and 0.25%CeO 2 showed a good corrosion resistance. • Passive film formed on the cladding layer without Cr and CeO 2 was Fe 3 O 4 . • Fe 3 O 4 displayed p type semiconductivity. • Passive film formed on the cladding layer with Cr and CeO 2 was Fe(OH) 3 and Cr(OH) 3 . • Fe(OH) 3 displayed n type while Cr(OH) 3 displayed p type semiconductivity. - Abstract: Effects of 3.0 wt.%Cr and/or 0.25 wt.%CeO 2 on microstructures and properties of TiC-VC reinforced Fe-based cladding layer were investigated by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Passive films formed on cladding layers surface were investigated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Mott-Schottky analysis. Results showed that phases of cladding layers were α-Fe, γ-Fe, TiC, VC and TiVC 2 . There were no obvious effects of adding 3.0 wt.%Cr and/or 0.25 wt.%CeO 2 on cladding layers phases. The microstructure of the cladding layer with 3.0 wt.%Cr and 0.25 wt.%CeO 2 was lath martensite and retained austenite. Microhardness of the cladding layer with 0.25 wt.%CeO 2 decreased slightly. Microhardness and corrosion resistance of the cladding layer with 3.0 wt.%Cr and 0.25 wt.%CeO 2 both increased, the corrosion resistance increased 7.33 times while the EIS Nyquist spectrum transformed into a capacitive arc. The passive film formed on the cladding layer without Cr and CeO 2 was Fe 3 O 4 which displayed p type semiconductivity. The passive film formed on the cladding layer with 3.0 wt.%Cr and 0.25 wt.%CeO 2 was composed of Fe(OH) 3 and Cr(OH) 3 , which displayed n and p type semiconductivity respectively

  9. Microstructures and properties of low-chromium high corrosion-resistant TiC-VC reinforced Fe-based laser cladding layer

    Zhang, Hui; Zou, Yong, E-mail: yzou@sdu.edu.cn; Zou, Zengda; Wu, Dongting

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • The cladding layer with 3.0%Cr and 0.25%CeO{sub 2} showed a good corrosion resistance. • Passive film formed on the cladding layer without Cr and CeO{sub 2} was Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} displayed p type semiconductivity. • Passive film formed on the cladding layer with Cr and CeO{sub 2} was Fe(OH){sub 3} and Cr(OH){sub 3}. • Fe(OH){sub 3} displayed n type while Cr(OH){sub 3} displayed p type semiconductivity. - Abstract: Effects of 3.0 wt.%Cr and/or 0.25 wt.%CeO{sub 2} on microstructures and properties of TiC-VC reinforced Fe-based cladding layer were investigated by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Passive films formed on cladding layers surface were investigated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Mott-Schottky analysis. Results showed that phases of cladding layers were α-Fe, γ-Fe, TiC, VC and TiVC{sub 2}. There were no obvious effects of adding 3.0 wt.%Cr and/or 0.25 wt.%CeO{sub 2} on cladding layers phases. The microstructure of the cladding layer with 3.0 wt.%Cr and 0.25 wt.%CeO{sub 2} was lath martensite and retained austenite. Microhardness of the cladding layer with 0.25 wt.%CeO{sub 2} decreased slightly. Microhardness and corrosion resistance of the cladding layer with 3.0 wt.%Cr and 0.25 wt.%CeO{sub 2} both increased, the corrosion resistance increased 7.33 times while the EIS Nyquist spectrum transformed into a capacitive arc. The passive film formed on the cladding layer without Cr and CeO{sub 2} was Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} which displayed p type semiconductivity. The passive film formed on the cladding layer with 3.0 wt.%Cr and 0.25 wt.%CeO{sub 2} was composed of Fe(OH){sub 3} and Cr(OH){sub 3}, which displayed n and p type semiconductivity respectively.

  10. Studies of Corrosion of Cladding Materials in Simulated BWR-environment Using Impedance Measurements. Part I: Measurements in the Pre-transition Region

    Forsberg, Stefan; Ahlberg, Elisabet; Andersson, Ulf

    2004-09-01

    The corrosion of three Zircaloy 2 cladding materials, LK2, LK2+ and LK3, have been studied in-situ in an autoclave using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Measurements were performed in simulated BWR water at temperatures up to 288 deg C. The impedance spectra were successfully modelled using equivalent circuits. When the oxide grew thicker during the experiments, a change-over from one to two time constants was seen, showing that a layered structure was formed. Oxide thickness, oxide conductivity and effective donor density were evaluated from the impedance data. The calculated oxide thickness at the end of the experiments was consistent with the value obtained from SEM. It was shown that the difference in oxide growth rate between the investigated materials is small in the pre-transition region. The effective donor density, which is a measure of electronic conductivity, was found to be lower for the LK3 material compared to the other two materials

  11. A Novel Method of Modeling the Deformation Resistance for Clad Sheet

    Hu Jianliang; Yi Youping; Xie Mantang

    2011-01-01

    Because of the excellent thermal conductivity, the clad sheet (3003/4004/3003) of aluminum alloy is extensively used in various heat exchangers, such as radiator, motorcar air conditioning, evaporator, and so on. The deformation resistance model plays an important role in designing the process parameters of hot continuous rolling. However, the complex behaviors of the plastic deformation of the clad sheet make the modeling very difficult. In this work, a novel method for modeling the deformation resistance of clad sheet was proposed by combining the finite element analysis with experiments. The deformation resistance model of aluminum 3003 and 4004 was proposed through hot compression test on the Gleeble-1500 thermo-simulation machine. And the deformation resistance model of clad sheet was proposed through finite element analysis using DEFORM-2D software. The relationship between cladding ratio and the deformation resistance was discussed in detail. The results of hot compression simulation demonstrate that the cladding ratio has great effects on the resistance of the clad sheet. Taking the cladding ratio into consideration, the mathematical model of the deformation resistance for clad sheet has been proved to have perfect forecasting precision of different cladding ratio. Therefore, the presented model can be used to predict the rolling force of clad sheet during the hot continuous rolling process.

  12. Corrosion behavior of Zircaloy 4 cladding material. Evaluation of the hydriding effect

    Blat, M.

    1997-04-01

    In this work, particular attention has been paid to the hydriding effect in PIE and laboratory test to validate a detrimental hydrogen contribution on Zircaloy 4 corrosion behavior at high burnup. Laboratory corrosion tests results confirm that hydrides have a detrimental role on corrosion kinetics. This effect is particularly significant for cathodic charged samples with a massive hydride outer layer before corrosion test. PIE show that at high burnup a hydride layer is formed underneath the metal/oxide interface. The results of the metallurgical examinations are discussed with respect to the possible mechanisms involved in this detrimental effect of hydrogen. Therefore, according to the laboratory tests results and PIE, hydrogen could be a strong contributor to explain the increase in corrosion rate at high burnup. (author)

  13. Development of experimental apparatus for evaluating corrosion resistance of cladding materials applied for advanced power reactor. 1

    Inohara, Yasuto; Ioka, Ikuo; Fukaya, Kiyoshi; Tachibana, Katsumi; Suzuki, Tomio; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2001-03-01

    On the development of cladding materials for advanced power reactors, it is important to clarify long performance and to control the compatibility to high temperature water at heat conducting surfaces under heavy irradiation. On the present study, the high temperature water loop with an autoclave was made for examining the corrosion behavior up to the super critical water range and for developing the simulation testing technique under irradiation in the hot cell. The loop is applicable to immersion tests in the temperature and pressure ranges up to 450degC and 25 MPa that are covered the surface temperature range of fuel claddings. One of the characteristics of this apparatus is a pair of sapphire windows of autoclave for in-situ observations, and a phase transition from water to super critical water conditions was clearly verified through these windows. In this apparatus, it is possible to control the temperature, pressure and Dissolved Oxygen (DO) within a fluctuations of few % on three phases, namely, water, steam and super critical water. (author)

  14. Study of the aqueous corrosion mechanisms and kinetics of the AlFeNi aluminium based alloy used for the fuel cladding in the Jules Horowitz research reactor

    Wintergerst, M.

    2009-05-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material-testing reactor (JHR), an aluminium base alloy, called AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. This alloy (Al - 1% Fe - 1% Ni - 1 % Mg), which is already used as fuel cladding, was developed for its good corrosion resistance in water at high temperatures. However, few studies dealing with the alteration process in water and the relationships with irradiation effects have been performed on this alloy. The conception of the JHR fuel requires a better knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms. Corrosion tests were performed in autoclaves at 70 C, 165 C and 250 C on AlFeNi plates representative of the fuel cladding. Several techniques were used to characterize the corrosion scale: SEM, TEM, EPMA, XRD, Raman spectroscopy. Our observations show that the corrosion scale is made of two main layers: a dense amorphous scale close to the metal and a porous crystalline scale in contact with the water. More than the morphology, the chemical compositions of both layers are different. This duplex structure results from a mixed growth mechanism: an anionic growth to develop the inner oxide and a cationic diffusion followed by a dissolution-precipitation process to form the outer one. Dynamic experiments at 70 C and corrosion kinetics measurements have demonstrated that the oxide growth process is controlled by a diffusion step associated to a dissolution/precipitation process. A corrosion mechanism of the AlFeNi alloy in aqueous media has been proposed. Then post-irradiation exams performed on irradiated fuel plates were used to investigate the effects of the irradiation on the corrosion behaviour in the reactor core. (author)

  15. Influence of hydrazine primary water chemistry on corrosion of fuel cladding and primary circuit components

    Iourmanov, V.; Pashevich, V.; Bogancs, J.; Tilky, P.; Schunk, J.; Pinter, T.

    1999-01-01

    Earlier at Paks 1-4 NPP standard ammonia chemistry was in use. The following station performance indicators were improved when hydrazine primary water chemistry was introduced: occupational radiation exposures of personnel; gamma-radiation dose rates near primary system components during refuelling and maintenance outages. The reduction of radiation exposures and radiation fields were achieved without significant expenses. Recent results of experimental studies allowed to explain the mechanism of hydrazine dosing influence on: corrosion rate of structure materials in primary coolant; behaviour of soluble and insoluble corrosion products including long-life corrosion-induced radionuclides in primary system during steady-state and transient operation modes; radiolytic generation of oxidising radiolytic products in core and its corrosion activity in primary system; radiation situation during refuelling and maintenance outages; foreign material degradation and removal (including corrosion active oxidant species) from primary system during abnormal events. Operational experience and experimental data have shown that hydrazine primary water chemistry allows to reduce corrosion wear and thereby makes it possible to extend the life-time of plant components in primary system. (author)

  16. Hot Corrosion of Inconel 625 Overlay Weld Cladding in Smelting Off-Gas Environment

    Mohammadi Zahrani, E.; Alfantazi, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    Degradation mechanisms and hot corrosion behavior of weld overlay alloy 625 were studied. Phase structure, morphology, thermal behavior, and chemical composition of deposited salt mixture on the weld overlay were characterized utilizing XRD, SEM/EDX, DTA, and ICP/OES, respectively. Dilution level of Fe in the weldment, dendritic structure, and degradation mechanisms of the weld were investigated. A molten phase formed on the weld layer at the operating temperature range of the boiler, which led to the hot corrosion attack in the water wall and the ultimate failure. Open circuit potential and weight-loss measurements and potentiodynamic polarization were carried out to study the hot corrosion behavior of the weld in the simulated molten salt medium at 873 K, 973 K, and 1073 K (600 °C, 700 °C, and 800 °C). Internal oxidation and sulfidation plus pitting corrosion were identified as the main hot corrosion mechanisms in the weld and boiler tubes. The presence of a significant amount of Fe made the dendritic structure of the weld susceptible to preferential corrosion. Preferentially corroded (Mo, Nb)-depleted dendrite cores acted as potential sites for crack initiation from the surface layer. The penetration of the molten phase into the cracks accelerated the cracks' propagation mainly through the dendrite cores and further crack branching/widening.

  17. Mechanical modelling of transient- to- failure SFR fuel cladding

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L. E.

    2014-07-01

    The response of Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) fuel rods to transient accident conditions is an important safety concern. During transients the cladding strain caused by the stress due to pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) can lead to failure. Due to the fact that SFR fuel rods are commonly clad with strengthened material made of stainless steel (SS), cladding is usually treated as an elastic-perfectly-plastic material. However, viscoplastic behaviour can contribute to mechanical strain at high temperature (> 1000 K). (Author)

  18. A regression model for zircaloy cladding in-reactor creepdown: Database, development, and assessment

    Shah, V.N.; Tolli, J.E.; Lanning, D.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a cladding deformation model developed to analyze cladding creepdown during steady state operation in a PWR and a BWR. This model accounts for variation in the zircaloy cladding heat treatments - cold worked and stress relieved material typically used in a PWR and fully recrystallized material typically used in a BWR. This model calculates cladding creepdown as a function of hoop stress, fast neutron flux, exposure time, and temperature. The paper also presents a comparison between cladding creep calculations by the creepdown model and corresponding test results from the KWU/CE program. ORNL HOBBIE experiments, and EPRI/Westinghouse Engineering cooperative project. The comparisons show that the creepdown model calculates cladding creep strains reasonably well. (orig./HP)

  19. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium-clad spent fuel in water-chemical and microbiological influenced

    Maksin, T.N.; Dobrijevic, R.P.; Idjakovic, Z.E.; Pesic, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    Spent fuel resulting from 25 years of operating research reactor RA at the Vinca Institute is presently all stored in the temporary spent fuel storage pool. It has been left in the ambient temperature and humidity for more then fifteen years so intensive corrosion processes were notice. We have spent fuel pools under control, after first research coordination meeting (RCM), of the first CRP, by monitoring of physical and chemical parameters of water in the pools, including temperature, pH-factor, electrical conductivity, mass concentration of corrosion products in the water and mud, mass concentration of relevant ions etc. The rack of standard corrosion coupons, was given at that time, has been in poor quality water for six years. We pick up rack assembly from basin and analysed. The results of this investigation are present in this article. (author)

  20. Evaluation of aluminum-clad spent fuel corrosion in Argentine basins

    Haddad, R.; Loberse, A.N.; Semino, C.J.; Guasp, R.

    2001-01-01

    An IAEA sponsored Coordinated Research Program was extended to study corrosion effects in several sites. Racks containing Aluminum samples were placed in different positions of each basin and periodic sampling of all the waters was performed to conduct chemical analysis. Different forms of corrosion have been encountered during the programme. In general, the degree of degradation is inversely proportional to the purity of the water. Maximum pit depths after 2 years of exposure are in the range of 100-200 μm. However, sediments deposited on the coupon surfaces seem to be responsible for the developing of large pits (1-2 mm in diameter). In many cases, what appears to be iron oxide particles were found originated by the corrosion of carbon steel components present elsewhere in the basin. These results correlate with observations made on the fuel itself, during exhaustive visual inspection. (author)

  1. Advanced LMFBR fuel cladding susceptability to stress corrosion due to reprocessing impurities

    Henslee, S.P.

    1987-03-01

    The potential degradation of LMFBR fuel cladding alloys by chlorides, when used in metallic fuel systems, was evaluated. The alloys tested were D-9 and HT-9 stainless steels, austenitic and ferritic alloys respectively. These two alloys were tested in parallel with and their performance compared to the austenitic stainless steel Type 316. All alloys were tested for 7400 hours in a stress rupture environment with chloride exposure at either 550/degree/C 650/degree/C. None of the alloys tested were found to exhibit any degradation in time-to-rupture by the presence of chlorides under the conditions imposed during testing. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Steam oxidation of Zr 1% Nb clads of VVER fuels in high temperature

    Solyanyj, V.I.; Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Dranenko, V.V.; Levin, A.Ya.; Izrajlevskij, L.B.; Morozov, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    In a wide range of accident conditions processes of clad corrosion effected by steam are rather intensive and in many respects influence the safety of NPP and the after-accident dismantling of a reactor core. This paper discusses the results of comprehensive studies into corrosion behaviour of Zr 1%Nb clads of VVER-type fuels at high temperatures. These studies are a continuation of previous work and the base for the design modelling of corrosion processes

  3. Multiphysics modeling of two-phase film boiling within porous corrosion deposits

    Jin, Miaomiao, E-mail: mmjin@mit.edu; Short, Michael, E-mail: hereiam@mit.edu

    2016-07-01

    Porous corrosion deposits on nuclear fuel cladding, known as CRUD, can cause multiple operational problems in light water reactors (LWRs). CRUD can cause accelerated corrosion of the fuel cladding, increase radiation fields and hence greater exposure risk to plant workers once activated, and induce a downward axial power shift causing an imbalance in core power distribution. In order to facilitate a better understanding of CRUD's effects, such as localized high cladding surface temperatures related to accelerated corrosion rates, we describe an improved, fully-coupled, multiphysics model to simulate heat transfer, chemical reactions and transport, and two-phase fluid flow within these deposits. Our new model features a reformed assumption of 2D, two-phase film boiling within the CRUD, correcting earlier models' assumptions of single-phase coolant flow with wick boiling under high heat fluxes. This model helps to better explain observed experimental values of the effective CRUD thermal conductivity. Finally, we propose a more complete set of boiling regimes, or a more detailed mechanism, to explain recent CRUD deposition experiments by suggesting the new concept of double dryout specifically in thick porous media with boiling chimneys. - Highlights: • A two-phase model of CRUD's effects on fuel cladding is developed and improved. • This model eliminates the formerly erroneous assumption of wick boiling. • Higher fuel cladding temperatures are predicted when accounting for two-phase flow. • Double-peaks in thermal conductivity vs. heat flux in experiments are explained. • A “double dryout” mechanism in CRUD is proposed based on the model and experiments.

  4. A review on pipeline corrosion, in-line inspection (ILI), and corrosion growth rate models

    Vanaei, H.R.; Eslami, A.; Egbewande, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pipelines are the very important energy transmission systems. Over time, pipelines can corrode. While corrosion could be detected by in-line inspection (ILI) tools, corrosion growth rate prediction in pipelines is usually done through corrosion rate models. For pipeline integrity management and planning selecting the proper corrosion ILI tool and also corrosion growth rate model is important and can lead to significant savings and safer pipe operation. In this paper common forms of pipeline corrosion, state of the art ILI tools, and also corrosion growth rate models are reviewed. The common forms of pipeline corrosion introduced in this paper are Uniform/General Corrosion, Pitting Corrosion, Cavitation and Erosion Corrosion, Stray Current Corrosion, Micro-Bacterial Influenced Corrosion (MIC). The ILI corrosion detection tools assessed in this study are Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL), Circumferential MFL, Tri-axial MFL, and Ultrasonic Wall Measurement (UT). The corrosion growth rate models considered in this study are single-value corrosion rate model, linear corrosion growth rate model, non-linear corrosion growth rate model, Monte-Carlo method, Markov model, TD-GEVD, TI-GEVD model, Gamma Process, and BMWD model. Strengths and limitations of ILI detection tools, and also corrosion predictive models with some practical examples are discussed. This paper could be useful for those whom are supporting pipeline integrity management and planning. - Highlights: • Different forms of pipeline corrosion are explained. • Common In-Line Inspection (ILI) tools and corrosion growth rate models are introduced. • Strength and limitations of corrosion growth rate models/ILI tools are discussed. • For pipeline integrity management programs using more than one corrosion growth rate model/ILI tool is suggested.

  5. Solution to a fuel-and-cladding rewetting model

    Olek, S.

    1989-06-01

    A solution by the Wiener-Hopf technique is derived for a model for the rewetting of a nuclear fuel rod. The gap between the fuel and the cladding is modelled by an imperfect contact between the two. A constant heat transfer coefficient is assumed on the wet side, whereas the dry side is assumed to be adiabatic. The solution for the rewetting temperature is in the form of an integral whose integrand contains the model parameters, including the rewetting velocity. Numerical results are presented for a large number of these parameters. It is shown that there are such large values of the rewetting temperature and the gap resistance, or such low values of the initial wall temperature, for which the rewetting velocity is unaffected by the fuel properties. (author) l fig., 7 tabs., 17 refs

  6. Comparative Study of Cladding Corrosion with a Protective Film of Silicon Carbide

    Lee, Dong Hee; Park, Kwang Heon; Noh, Seon Ho

    2013-01-01

    After the Fukushima nuclear accident, development of accident-tolerant nuclear fuel is being required as a solution for suppression of reaction between nuclear fuel cladding tubes and vapor as well as prevention of hydrogen explosion. This research has been conducted to prove the oxidation resistivity of protective coats in the situation of a critical accident by producing SiC composites coated nuclear as per two types of coating methods; formula of composites using precursor under low temperature process and formula of composites using a transcritical CO 2 . To observe the changes of oxide layer thickness according to thickness of SiC fiber cover for both coating methods, specimens covered with 1 layer and 4 layers were prepared. Suppression rate of protective coating-oxidation As the suppression rate of protective coating -oxidation is low, it has better ability of suppression of oxidization

  7. Review of experimental data for modelling LWR fuel cladding behaviour under loss of coolant accident conditions

    Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    Extensive range of experiments has been conducted in the past to quantitatively identify and understand the behaviour of fuel rod under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors (LWRs). The obtained experimental data provide the basis for the current emergency core cooling system acceptance criteria under LOCA conditions for LWRs. The results of recent experiments indicate that the cladding alloy composition and high burnup effects influence LOCA acceptance criteria margins. In this report, we review some past important and recent experimental results. We first discuss the background to acceptance criteria for LOCA, namely, clad embrittlement phenomenology, clad embrittlement criteria (limitations on maximum clad oxidation and peak clad temperature) and the experimental bases for the criteria. Two broad kinds of test have been carried out under LOCA conditions: (i) Separate effect tests to study clad oxidation, clad deformation and rupture, and zirconium alloy allotropic phase transition during LOCA. (ii) Integral LOCA tests, in which the entire LOCA sequence is simulated on a single rod or a multi-rod array in a fuel bundle, in laboratory or in a tests and results are discussed and empirical correlations deduced from these tests and quantitative models are conferred. In particular, the impact of niobium in zirconium base clad and hydrogen content of the clad on allotropic phase transformation during LOCA and also the burst stress are discussed. We review some recent LOCA integral test results with emphasis on thermal shock tests. Finally, suggestions for modelling and further evaluation of certain experimental results are made.

  8. SUMMARY OF CHARACTERISATION DATA ON CLADDING MATERIALS USED IN THE CORROSION TEST IFA-638 AND IN THE CREEP TEST IFA-617

    Nakata, M.; Hauso, E.

    1998-10-01

    Modern PWR cladding materials are being tested in two joint programme tests; the cladding corrosion test IFA-638 and in the creep test IFA-617. The materials for the two tests, have been provided by four organisations: ABB-Atom, ENUSA, Framatome and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. This report gives an overview of the different materials being tested as fuelled test rods and unfuelled cladding coupons in IFA-638. For IFA-638, cladding has been used for fabrication of both fresh and pre-irradiated test rods. The coupon materials, all in the unirradiated condition, comprise a range of alloys of different chemical composition, heat treatment, pre-filming and /or pre-hydriding treatment. Four pre-irradiated cladding materials of the same type of those used in IFA-638, have also been used to prepare the four fuelled subsegments that are being studied in the creep rig IFA-617. All currently available information related to the IFA-638 and IFA-617 material characterisation and properties are summarised in this report. (author)

  9. Nuclear fuel cladding material

    Nakahigashi, Shigeo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To largely improve the durability and the safety of fuel cladding material. Constitution: Diffusion preventive layers, e.g., aluminum or the like are covered on both sides of a zirconium alloy base layer of thin material, and corrosion resistant layers, e.g., copper or the like are covered thereon. This thin plate material is intimately wound in a circularly tubular shape in a plurality of layers to form a fuel cladding tube. With such construction, corrosion of the tube due to fuel and impurity can be prevented by the corrosion resistant layers, and the diffusion of the corrosion resistant material to the zirconium alloy can be prevented by the diffusion preventive layers. Since a plurality of layers are cladded, even if the corrosion resistant layers are damaged or cracked due to stress corrosion, only one layer is damaged or cracked, but the other layers are not affected. (Sekiya, K.)

  10. Modeling of Corrosion-induced Concrete Damage

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non...... of corrosion products affects both the time-to cover cracking and the crack width at the concrete surface.......In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non......-uniform formation of corrosion products at the concrete/reinforcement interface, a deterministic approach is used. The model gives good estimates of both deformations in the con-crete/reinforcement interface and crack width when compared to experimental data. Further, it is shown that non-uniform deposition...

  11. Review and evaluation of cladding attack of LMFBR fuel

    Koizumi, M.; Nagai, S.; Furuya, H.; Muto, T.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of cladding inner wall corrosion during irradiation was evaluated in terms of fuel density, fuel form, O/M ratio, plutonium concentration, cladding composition, cladding pretreatment, cladding inner diameter, burnup and cladding inner wall temperature. Factors which influence the corrosion are O/M ratio (oxygen to metal ratio), burn up, cladding inner diameter and cladding inner wall temperature. Maximum cladding inner wall corrosion depth was formulated as a function of O/M ratio, burn up and cladding inner wall temperature

  12. Modeling the geometric formation and powder deposition mass in laser induction hybrid cladding

    Huang, Yong Jun; Yuan, Sheng Fa

    2012-01-01

    A new laser induction hybrid cladding technique on cylinder work piece is presented. Based on a series of laser induction hybrid experiments by off axial powder feeding, the predicting models of individual clad geometric formation and powder catchment were developed in terms of powder feeding rate, laser special energy and induction energy density using multiple regression analysis. In addition, confirmation tests were performed to make a comparison between the predicting results and measured ones. Via the experiments and analysis, the conclusions can be lead to that the process parameters have crucial influence on the clad geometric formation and powder catchment, and that the predicting model reflects well the relationship between the clad geometric formation and process parameters in laser induction hybrid cladding

  13. Modelling of pellet cladding interaction during power ramps in PWR rods by means of Transuranus fuel rod analysis code

    Di Marcello, V.; Luzzi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in PWR type rods subjected to power ramps was analysed by means of TRANSURANUS (TU) fuel rod performance code. PCI phenomena depend on the fuel power history - i.e. by several irradiation and thermal induced phenomena occurring in the fuel rod and mutually interacting during its life in reactor - and may become critical for cladding integrity under accidental conditions. Ten test fuel rods, whose power histories and post irradiation experiment (PIE) data were available from the OECD/NEA-IAEA International Fuel Performance Experiment (UTE) database through the Studsvik SUPER-RAMP Project, were simulated by TRANSURANUS. During a power ramp pellet gaseous swelling can be inhibited by cladding pressure and can be over-predicted by a normal operation swelling model. This phenomenon was simulated by a new formulation of a fuel swelling model already available in the code, in order to consider hot pressing of inter-granular -fuel porosity due to the high hydrostatic stress resulting from PCI: it was found that TRANSURANUS, as a result of the proposed swelling formulation as well as of the accurate modelling of the other phenomena occurring during irradiation, gives correct predictions on PCI induced fuel rod failures. In addition, PCI failure threshold identified by TRANSURANUS was compared with the technological limits known in literature: the possibility of relaxing these limits for low burn-up values and the preponderance of the European fuel rod design in front of PCI emerged from TU analyses. Finally, a good agreement was found between TU evaluations and PIE data, with regard to fission gas release, fuel grain growth, and creep, corrosion and elongation of the cladding. (authors)

  14. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. These models are expected to improve the calculations of several important aspects of fuel rod behavior. First, an improved mapping was established from a compilation of PIE results from severe fuel damage tests of the configuration of melted metallic cladding that is retained by an oxide layer. The improved mapping accounts for the relocation of melted cladding in the circumferential direction. Then, rules based on PIE results were established for calculating the effect of cladding that has relocated from above on the oxidation and integrity of the lower intact cladding upon which it solidifies. Next, three different methods were identified for calculating the extent of dissolution of the oxidic part of the cladding due to its contact with the metallic part. The extent of dissolution effects the stress and thus the integrity of the oxidic part of the cladding. Then, an empirical equation was presented for calculating the stress in the oxidic part of the cladding and evaluating its integrity based on this calculated stress. This empirical equation replaces the current criterion for loss of integrity which is based on temperature and extent of oxidation. Finally, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The implementation of these models is expected to eliminate the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled, Improvements in Modeling of Cladding Oxidation and Meltdown

  15. Corrosion and wear behavior of Ni60CuMoW coatings fabricated by combination of laser cladding and mechanical vibration processing

    Liu, Hongxi, E-mail: piiiliuhx@sina.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Xu, Qian [Faculty of Adult Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650051 (China); Wang, Chuanqi; Zhang, Xiaowei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2015-02-05

    Highlights: • Ni60CuMoW coatings were fabricated by mechanical vibration assisted laser cladding hybrid process. • The maximum micro-hardness of the coating with mechanical vibration increases by 16%. • The mass loss and friction coefficient of the coating decreases by 17% and 16%, respectively. • The E{sub corr} positive shifts 1134.9 mV and i{sub corr} decreases by nearly one order of magnitude. • The ideal vibration parameters is vibration frequency 200 Hz and vibration amplitude 140 μm. - Abstract: Ni60CuMoW composite coatings were fabricated on 45 medium carbon steel using mechanical vibration assisted laser cladding surface modification processing. The microstructure, element distribution, phase composition, microhardness, wear and corrosion resistance of cladding coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS), hardness tester, friction and wear apparatus and electrochemical workstation. The results indicate that the microstructure of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} or (Fe, Ni){sub 23}C{sub 6}) carbide dispersion strengthening phase is uniformly distributed in eutectic (Ni, Fe) phase. The in-situ BCr and MoC compounds distribute in lamellar structure Fe{sub 3}B and dendrite Fe{sub 3}Ni{sub 3}Si, and some new W{sub 2}C phases also generated in Ni60CuMoW coating. In addition, the coarse dendrite has been replaced by some fine grain structure at the bonding interface. The fine grain hard phase makes the average microhardness of cladding coating increase from 720 to 835 HV{sub 0.5}. Under the condition of 200 Hz mechanical vibration frequency, the wear mass loss and friction coefficient of Ni60CuMoW coating are 7.6 mg and 0.068, 17% and 16% lower than the coating without mechanical vibration, respectively. The corrosion potential of cladding coating with mechanical vibration increases by 1134.9 mV and the corrosion current density decreases by nearly one order of

  16. A Multi-Scale Modeling of Laser Cladding Process (Preprint)

    Cao, J; Choi, J

    2006-01-01

    Laser cladding is an additive manufacturing process that a laser generates a melt-pool on the substrate material while a second material, as a powder or a wire form, is injected into that melt-pool...

  17. Modelling the gas transport and chemical processes related to clad oxidation and hydriding

    Montgomery, R O; Rashid, Y R [ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Models are developed for the gas transport and chemical processes associated with the ingress of steam into a LWR fuel rod through a small defect. These models are used to determine the cladding regions in a defective fuel rod which are susceptible to massive hydriding and the creation of sunburst hydrides. The brittle nature of zirconium hydrides (ZrH{sub 2}) in these susceptible regions produces weak spots in the cladding which can act as initiation sites for cladding cracks under certain cladding stress conditions caused by fuel cladding mechanical interaction. The modeling of the axial gas transport is based on gaseous bimolar diffusion coupled with convective mass transport using the mass continuity equation. Hydrogen production is considered from steam reaction with cladding inner surface, fission products and internal components. Eventually, the production of hydrogen and its diffusion along the length results in high hydrogen concentration in locations remote from the primary defect. Under these conditions, the hydrogen can attack the cladding inner surface and breakdown the protective ZrO{sub 2} layer locally, initiating massive localized hydriding leading to sunburst hydride. The developed hydrogen evolution model is combined with a general purpose fuel behavior program to integrate the effects of power and burnup into the hydriding kinetics. Only in this manner can the behavior of a defected fuel rod be modeled to determine the conditions the result in fuel rod degradation. (author). 14 refs, 6 figs.

  18. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steels. Part 2: Water flow rate effects in high-sulfur plate steel

    James, L.A.; Lee, H.B.; Wire, G.L.; Novak, S.R.; Cullen, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a high-sulfur ASTM A302-B plate steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 22.8--27.3 mm, and depths of 10.5--14.1 mm. The experiments were initiated in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O 2 < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243 C, under loading conditions (ΔK, R, cyclic frequency) conducive to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) under quasi-stagnant conditions. Following fatigue testing under quasi-stagnant conditions where EAC was observed, the specimens were then fatigue tested under conditions where active water flow of either 1.7 m/s or 4.7 m/s was applied parallel to the crack. Earlier experiments on unclad surface-cracked specimens of the same steel exhibited EAC under quasi-stagnant conditions, but water flow rates at 1.7 m/s and 5.0 m/s parallel to the crack mitigated EAC. In the present experiments on clad specimens, water flow at approximately the same as the lower of these velocities did not mitigate EAC, and a free stream velocity approximately the same as the higher of these velocities resulted in sluggish mitigation of EAC. The lack of robust EAC mitigation was attributed to the greater crack surface roughness in the cladding interfering with flow induced within the crack cavity. An analysis employing the computational fluid dynamics code, FIDAP, confirmed that frictional forces associated with the cladding crack surface roughness reduced the interaction between the free stream and the crack cavity

  19. Laser performance and modeling of RE3+:YAG double-clad crystalline fiber waveguides

    Li, Da; Lee, Huai-Chuan; Meissner, Stephanie K.; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2018-02-01

    We report on laser performance of ceramic Yb:YAG and single crystal Tm:YAG double-clad crystalline fiber waveguide (CFW) lasers towards the goal of demonstrating the design and manufacturing strategy of scaling to high output power. The laser component is a double-clad CFW, with RE3+:YAG (RE = Yb, Tm respectively) core, un-doped YAG inner cladding, and ceramic spinel or sapphire outer cladding. Laser performance of the CFW has been demonstrated with 53.6% slope efficiency and 27.5-W stable output power at 1030-nm for Yb:YAG CFW, and 31.6% slope efficiency and 46.7-W stable output power at 2019-nm for Tm:YAG CFW, respectively. Adhesive-Free Bond (AFB®) technology enables a designable refractive index difference between core and inner cladding, and designable core and inner cladding sizes, which are essential for single transverse mode CFW propagation. To guide further development of CFW designs, we present thermal modeling, power scaling and design of single transverse mode operation of double-clad CFWs and redefine the single-mode operation criterion for the double-clad structure design. The power scaling modeling of double-clad CFW shows that in order to achieve the maximum possible output power limited by the physical properties, including diode brightness, thermal lens effect, and simulated Brillion scattering, the length of waveguide is in the range of 0.5 2 meters. The length of an individual CFW is limited by single crystal growth and doping uniformity to about 100 to 200 mm lengths, and also by availability of starting crystals and manufacturing complexity. To overcome the limitation of CFW lengths, end-to-end proximity-coupling of CFWs is introduced.

  20. Corrosion studies of carbon steel under impinging jets of simulated slurries of neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) and neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW)

    Smith, H.D.; Elmore, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Plans for the disposal of radioactive liquid and solid wastes presently stored in double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site call for retrieval and processing of the waste to create forms suitable for permanent disposal. Waste will be retrieved from a tank using a submerged slurry pump in conjunction with one or more rotating slurry jet mixer pumps. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted tests using simulated waste slurries to assess the effects of a impinging slurry jet on the corrosion rate of the tank wall and floor, an action that could potentially compromise the tank's structural integrity. Corrosion processes were investigated on a laboratory scale with a simulated neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) slurry and in a subsequent test with simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) slurry. The test slurries simulated the actual NCRW and NCAW both chemically and physically. The tests simulated those conditions expected to exist in the respective double-shell tanks during waste retrieval operations. Results of both tests indicate that, because of the action of the mixer pump slurry jets, the waste retrieval operations proposed for NCAW and NCRW will moderately accelerate corrosion of the tank wall and floor. Based on the corrosion of initially unoxidized test specimens, and the removal of corrosion products from those specimens, the maximum time-averaged corrosion rates of carbon steel in both waste simulants for the length of the test was ∼4 mil/yr. The protective oxide layer that exists in each storage tank is expected to inhibit corrosion of the carbon steel

  1. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in the Laser Multilayered Cladding Process

    Kong, Fanrong; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2010-12-01

    The current work examines the heat-and-mass transfer process in the laser multilayered cladding of H13 tool steel powder by numerical modeling and experimental validation. A multiphase transient model is developed to investigate the evolution of the temperature field and flow velocity of the liquid phase in the molten pool. The solid region of the substrate and solidified clad, the liquid region of the melted clad material, and the gas region of the surrounding air are included. In this model, a level-set method is used to track the free surface motion of the molten pool with the powder material feeding and scanning of the laser beam. An enthalpy-porosity approach is applied to deal with the solidification and melting that occurs in the cladding process. Moreover, the laser heat input and heat losses from the forced convection and heat radiation that occurs on the top surface of the deposited layer are incorporated into the source term of the governing equations. The effects of the laser power, scanning speed, and powder-feed rate on the dilution and height of the multilayered clad are investigated based on the numerical model and experimental measurements. The results show that an increase of the laser power and powder feed rate, or a reduction of the scanning speed, can increase the clad height and directly influence the remelted depth of each layer of deposition. The numerical results have a qualitative agreement with the experimental measurements.

  2. Irradiation and lithium presence influence on the crystallographic nature of zirconia in the framework of PWR zircaloy 4 fuel cladding corrosion study

    Gibert, C.

    1999-01-01

    The-increasing deterioration of the initially protective zirconia layer is one of the hypotheses which can explain the impairment with time of PWR fuel cladding corrosion. This deterioration could be worsened by irradiation or lithium presence in the oxidizing medium. The aim of this thesis was to underline the influence of those two parameters on zirconia crystallographic nature. We first studied the impact of ionic irradiation on pure, powdery, monoclinic zirconia and oxidation formed zirconia, mainly with X-ray diffraction and Raman microscopy. The high or low energy particles used (Kr n+- , Ar n+ ) respectively favored electronic or atomic defaults production. The crystallographic analyses showed that these irradiation have a significant effect on zirconia by inducing nucleation or growth of tetragonal phase. The extent depends on sample nature and particles energy. In all cases, phase transformation is correlated with crystalline parameters, grain size and especially micro-stress changes. The results are consistent with those obtained with 1 to 5 cycles PWR claddings. Therefore, the corrosion acceleration observed in reactor can partly be explained by the stress fields appearance under irradiation, which is particularly detrimental to zirconia layer cohesion. Last, we have underlined that the presence of considerable amounts of lithium in the oxidizing medium ((> 700 ppm) induces the disappearance of the tetragonal zirconia located at the metal/oxide interface and the appearance of a porosity of the dense under layer, which looses its protectiveness. (author)

  3. Corrosion properties of modified PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water as a fuel cladding candidate material for supercritical water reactor

    Nakazono, Yoshihisa; Iwai, Takeo; Abe, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) has been designed and investigated because of its high thermal efficiency and plant simplification. There are some advantages including the use of a single phase coolant with high enthalpy. Supercritical Water (SCW) has never been used in nuclear power applications. There are numerous potential problems, particularly with materials. As the operating temperature of SCWR will be between 553 K and 893 K with a pressure of 25 MPa, the selection of materials is difficult and important. The PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a nuclear fuel cladding material for a Na-cooled fast breeder reactor. Austenitic Fe-base steels were selected for possible use in supercritical water systems because of their corrosion resistance and radiation resistance. The PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel was selected for possible use in supercritical water systems. The corrosion data of PNC1520 in SCW is required but does not exist. The purpose of the present study is to research the corrosion properties for PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in SCW. The SCW corrosion test was performed for the standard PNC1520 (1520S) and the Ti-additional type of PNC1520 (1520T) by using a SCW autoclave. The 1520S and 1520T are the first trial production materials of SCWR cladding candidate material in our group. Corrosion and compatibility tests on the austenitic 1520S and 1520T steels in supercritical water were performed at 673, 773 and 600degC with exposures up to 1000 h. We have evaluated the amount of weight gain, weight loss and weight of scale after the corrosion test in SCW for 1520S and 1520T austenitic steels. After 1000 h corrosion test performed, the weight gains of both austenitic stainless steels were less than 2 g/m 2 at 400degC and 500degC. But 1520T weight increases more and weight loss than 1520S at 600degC. The SEM observation result of the surface after 1000 h corrosion of an test

  4. FUMAC-a new model for light water reactor fuel relocation and pellet-cladding interaction

    Walton, L.A.; Matheson, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved approach to the mechanical modeling of fuel rod performance is presented. Previous computer modeling has centered around a unified finite element approach with both fuel pellets and cladding being represented by ring elements. The fuel mechanical analysis code (FUMAC) departs from these approaches in two areas. The pellet model is an empirically based deterministic algorithm, while the cladding model uses both plane stress and plane strain finite elements. The work describes a semiempirical fuel cracking and fragment relocation model, which is burnup and power-level dependent. The interaction of the pellet with the cladding is treated classically. The resulting thick cylinder stresses are used in conjunction with an orthotropic creep model to predict cladding ridging. The resulting ridging compares well with experimental data for both steady-state and transient operating conditions. Future work planned includes the integration of the finite element cladding model with the pellet model and refinement of the pellet relocation and thermal models. Transient performance predictions will be emphasized

  5. A thermodynamic model for the attack behaviour in stainless steel clad oxide fuel pins

    Goetzmann, O.

    1979-01-01

    So far, post irradiation examination of burnt fuel pins has not revealed a clear cut picture of the cladding attack situation. For seemingly same conditions sometimes attack occurs, sometimes not. This model tries to depict the reaction possibilities along the inner cladding wall on the basis of thermodynamic facts in the fuel pin. It shows how the thermodynamic driving force for attack changes along the fuel column, and with different initial and operational conditions. Two criteria for attack are postulated: attack as a result of the direct reaction of reactive elements with cladding components; and attack as a result of the action of a special agent (CsOH). In defining a reaction potenial the oxygen potential, the temperature conditions (cladding temperature and fuel surface temperature), and the fission products are involved. For the determination of the oxygen potential at the cladding, three models for the redistribution of oxygen across the fuel/clad gap are offered. The effect of various parameters, like rod power, gap conductance, oxygen potential, inner wall temperature, on the thermodynamic potential for attack is analysed. (Auth.)

  6. Modelling anelastic contribution to nuclear fuel cladding creep and stress relaxation

    Tulkki, Ville, E-mail: ville.tulkki@vtt.fi; Ikonen, Timo

    2015-10-15

    In fuel behaviour modelling accurate description of the cladding mechanical response is important for both operational and safety considerations. While accuracy is desired, a certain level of simplicity is needed as both computational resources and detailed information on properties of particular cladding may be limited. Most models currently used in the integral codes divide the mechanical response into elastic and viscoplastic contributions. These have difficulties in describing both creep and stress relaxation, and often separate models for the two phenomena are used. In this paper we implement anelastic contribution to the cladding mechanical model, thus enabling consistent modelling of both creep and stress relaxation. We show that the model based on assumption of viscoelastic behaviour can be used to explain several experimental observations in transient situations and compare the model to published set of creep and stress relaxation experiments performed on similar samples. Based on the analysis presented we argue that the inclusion of anelastic contribution to the cladding mechanical models provides a way to improve the simulation of cladding behaviour during operational transients.

  7. Evaluation of the applicability of cladding deformation model in RELAP5/MOD3.2 code for VVER-1000 fuel

    Vorob'ev, Yu.; Zhabin, O.

    2015-01-01

    Applicability of cladding deformation model in RELAP5/MOD3.2 code is analyzed for VVER-1000 fuel cladding from Zr+1%Nb alloy. Experimental data and calculation model of fuel assembly channel of the core are used for this purpose. The model applicability is tested for the cladding temperature range from 600 to 1200 deg C and pressure range from 1 to 12 MPa. Evaluation results demonstrate limited applicability of built-in RELAP5/MOD3.2 cladding deformation model to the estimation of Zr+1%Nb cladding rupture conditions. The limitations found shall be considered in application of RELAP5/MOD3.2 cladding deformation model in the design-basis accident analysis of VVER reactors

  8. Characterization and modeling of the thermal hydraulic and chemical environment of fuel claddings of PWR reactors during boiling

    March, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    In pressurised water reactors (PWR), nucleate boiling can strongly influence the oxidation rate of the fuel cladding. To improve our understanding of the effect of the boiling phenomenon on corrosion kinetics, information about the chemical and thermal hydraulic boundary conditions at the heating rod surface is needed. Moreover, very few data are available in the range of thermal hydraulic parameters of PWR cores (15,5 MPa and 340 deg C) concerning the two-phase flow pattern close to the fuel cladding. A visualization device has been adapted on an out-of-pile loop Reggae to obtain both qualitative and quantitative data. These observations provide a direct access to the geometrical properties of the vapor inclusions, the onset of nucleate boiling and the gas velocity and trajectory. An image processing method has been validated to measure both void fraction and interfacial area concentration in a bubbly two-phase flow. Thus, the visualization device proves to be a suitable and accurate instrumentation to characterize nucleate boiling in PWR conditions. The experimental results analysis indicates that a local approach is needed for the modelling of the fuel rod chemical environment. To simulate the chemical additives enrichment, a new model is proposed where the vapor bubbles are now considered as physical obstacles for the liquid access to the rod surface. The influence of the two-phase flow pattern appears to be of major importance for the enrichment phenomenon. This study clearly demonstrates the existence of strong interactions between the two-phase flow pattern, the rod surface condition, the corrosion process and the water chemistry. (author)

  9. Finite element modeling of pellet-clad mechanical interaction with ABAQUS

    Cheon, C. S.; Lee, B. H.; Koo, Y. H.; Oh, J. Y.; Son, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI) was modelled by an axisymmetric finite element method. Thermomechanical models of pellet and clad materials and a contact model for their interaction have been implemented in addition to the application of appropriate boundary conditions so that the FE model was configured. Temperature and displacement were evaluated through a coupled analysis using a general purposed FE code, ABAQUS. Also, a batch program has been developed to efficiently deal with a series of jobs such as making an interface with a fuel performance code, the generation of an input deck for ABAQUS code and its execution, and an interpretation of the output. Under various conditions, results from the present FE model were analyzed. Preliminary verification was conducted by comparing the clad elongation measured during an in-pile PCMI experiment with that calculated by means of the developed FE model

  10. Pellet Cladding Mechanical Interaction Modeling Using the Extended Finite Element Method

    Spencer, Benjamin W.; Jiang, Wen; Dolbow, John E.; Peco, Christian

    2016-09-01

    As a brittle material, the ceramic UO2 used as light water reactor fuel experiences significant fracturing throughout its life, beginning with the first rise to power of fresh fuel. This has multiple effects on the thermal and mechanical response of the fuel/cladding system. One such effect that is particularly important is that when there is mechanical contact between the fuel and cladding, cracks that extending from the outer surface of the fuel into the volume of the fuel cause elevated stresses in the adjacent cladding, which can potentially lead to cladding failure. Modeling the thermal and mechanical response of the cladding in the vicinity of these surface-breaking cracks in the fuel can provide important insights into this behavior to help avoid operating conditions that could lead to cladding failure. Such modeling has traditionally been done in the context of finite-element-based fuel performance analysis by modifying the fuel mesh to introduce discrete cracks. While this approach is effective in capturing the important behavior at the fuel/cladding interface, there are multiple drawbacks to explicitly incorporating the cracks in the finite element mesh. Because the cracks are incorporated in the original mesh, the mesh must be modified for cracks of specified location and depth, so it is difficult to account for crack propagation and the formation of new cracks at other locations. The extended finite element method (XFEM) has emerged in recent years as a powerful method to represent arbitrary, evolving, discrete discontinuities within the context of the finite element method. Development work is underway by the authors to implement XFEM in the BISON fuel performance code, and this capability has previously been demonstrated in simulations of fracture propagation in ceramic nuclear fuel. These preliminary demonstrations have included only the fuel, and excluded the cladding for simplicity. This paper presents initial results of efforts to apply XFEM to

  11. Overview of cellular automaton models for corrosion

    Perez-Brokate, Cristian Felipe; De Lamare, Jacques; Dung di Caprio; Feron, Damien; Chausse, Annie

    2014-01-01

    A review of corrosion process modeling using cellular automata methods is presented. This relatively new and growing approach takes into account the stochastic nature of the phenomena and uses physico-chemical rules to make predictions at a mesoscopic scale. Milestone models are analyzed and perspectives are established. (authors)

  12. A nonlinear model for AC induced corrosion

    N. Ida

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of corrosion poses particular difficulties. The understanding of corrosion as an electrochemical process has led to simple capacitive-resistive models that take into account the resistance of the electrolytic cell and the capacitive effect of the surface potential at the interface between conductors and the electrolyte. In some models nonlinear conduction effects have been added to account for more complex observed behavior. While these models are sufficient to describe the behavior in systems with cathodic protection, the behavior in the presence of induced AC currents from power lines and from RF sources cannot be accounted for and are insufficient to describe the effects observed in the field. Field observations have shown that a rectifying effect exists that affects the cathodic protection potential and this effect is responsible for corrosion in the presence of AC currents. The rectifying effects of the metal-corrosion interface are totally missing from current models. This work proposes a nonlinear model based on finite element analysis that takes into account the nonlinear behavior of the metal-oxide interface and promises to improve modeling by including the rectification effects at the interface.

  13. Markov Chain Models for the Stochastic Modeling of Pitting Corrosion

    Valor, A.; Caleyo, F.; Alfonso, L.; Velázquez, J. C.; Hallen, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The stochastic nature of pitting corrosion of metallic structures has been widely recognized. It is assumed that this kind of deterioration retains no memory of the past, so only the current state of the damage influences its future development. This characteristic allows pitting corrosion to be categorized as a Markov process. In this paper, two different models of pitting corrosion, developed using Markov chains, are presented. Firstly, a continuous-time, nonhomogeneous linear growth (pure ...

  14. Pitting corrosion of copper. Further model studies

    Taxen, C.

    2002-08-01

    The work presented in this report is a continuation and expansion of a previous study. The aim of the work is to provide background information about pitting corrosion of copper for a safety analysis of copper canisters for final deposition of radioactive waste. A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits is used to estimate the conditions required for stationary propagation of a localised anodic corrosion process. The model uses equilibrium data for copper and its corrosion products and parameters for the aqueous mass transport of dissolved species. In the present work we have, in the model, used a more extensive set of aqueous and solid compounds and equilibrium data from a different source. The potential dependence of pitting in waters with different compositions is studied in greater detail. More waters have been studied and single parameter variations in the composition of the water have been studied over wider ranges of concentration. The conclusions drawn in the previous study are not contradicted by the present results. However, the combined effect of potential and water composition on the possibility of pitting corrosion is more complex than was realised. In the previous study we found what seemed to be a continuous aggravation of a pitting situation by increasing potentials. The present results indicate that pitting corrosion can take place only over a certain potential range and that there is an upper potential limit for pitting as well as a lower. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the model gives meaningful predictions of the minimum pitting potential also when relatively large errors in the input parameters are allowed for

  15. Corrosion of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods in high-temperature PWRs: Measurement of waterside corrosion in North Anna Unit 1

    Balfour, M.G.; Kilp, G.R.; Comstock, R.J.; McAtee, K.R.; Thornburg, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    Twenty-four peripheral rods and two interior rods from North Anna Unit 1, End-of-Cycle 7, were measured at poolside for waterside corrosion on four-cycle Region 6 assemblies F35 and F66, with rod average burnups of 60 GWD/MTU. Similar measurements were obtained on 24 two-cycle fuel rods from Region 8A assemblies H02 and H10 with average burnups of about 40 GWD/MTU. The Region 6 peripheral rods had been corrosion measured previously after three cycles, at 45 GWD/MTU average burnup. The four-cycle Region 6 fuel rods showed high corrosion, compared to only intermediate corrosion level after three cycles. The accelerated corrosion rate in the fourth cycle was accompanied by extensive laminar cracking and spalling of the oxide film in the thickest regions. The peak corrosion of the two-cycle region 8A rods was 32 μm to 53 μm, with some isolated incipient oxide spalling. In conjunction with the in-reactor corrosion measurements, extensive characterization tests plus long-term autoclave corrosion tests were performed on archive samples of the three major tubing lots represented in the North Anna measurements. The autoclave tests generally showed the same ordering of corrosion by tubing lot as in the reactor; the chief difference between the archive tubing samples was a lower tin content (1.38 percent) for the lot with the lowest corrosion rate compared with a higher tin content (1.58) for the lot with the highest corrosion rate. There was no indication in the autoclave tests of an accelerated rate of corrosion as observed in the reactor

  16. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction for PWRs reactors fuel rods

    Esteves, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The pellet-cladding interaction that can occur in a PWR fuel rod design is modelled with the computer codes FRAPCON-1 and ANSYS. The fuel performance code FRAPCON-1 analyzes the fuel rod irradiation behavior and generates the initial conditions for the localized fuel rod thermal and mechanical modelling in two and three-dimensional finite elements with ANSYS. In the mechanical modelling, a pellet fragment is placed in the fuel rod gap. Two types of fuel rod cladding materials are considered: Zircaloy and austenitic stainless steel. Linear and non-linear material behaviors are allowed. Elastic, plastic and creep behaviors are considered for the cladding materials. The modelling is applied to Angra-II fuel rod design. The results are analyzed and compared. (author)

  17. Magnesium microelectrode corrosion product transport modelling in relation to chloride induced pitting

    Burrows, R.; Cook, A.; Stevens, N.P.C.

    2012-09-01

    The high magnesium alloy Magnox is used as a fuel clad for the UK gas cooled, graphite moderated reactors of the same name. The fuel is metallic uranium (typically natural enrichment), so a low neutron absorption cross-section clad is required. Following discharge from reactor, spent fuel is stored in water, which acts as an effective heat transfer medium and biological shield. The chemistry of these ponds is carefully controlled to ensure that the Magnox clad remains in a passive state. This is primarily through the maintenance of a high pH and very low anion concentration. Of particular concern is the presence of chloride ions as even very low levels may allow localised corrosion to initiate. Although extensive work has been undertaken historically considering the behaviour of Magnox clad and the acceptable storage envelopes, the challenges of ageing plant and aspirations for accelerated decommissioning give value to further understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of this material. Recently, electrochemical techniques have been employed to characterise performance in a variety of chemistries and microelectrodes have been produced which have shown characteristics of salt film corrosion at moderate chloride concentrations under polarisation. A characteristic of the electrochemical response observed during the mass transport limited (potential independent) salt film regime has been periodic transients which correspond to emission of microscopic hydrogen bubbles from the microelectrode cavity. A simple finite element multi-physics model has been employed to assist in understanding the dominant processes of corrosion product transport away from a magnesium electrode surface which is dissolving under a salt film and this shows that characteristic transients observed in electrochemical tests may be simulated with reasonable agreement by consideration of convection from laminar flow around hydrogen micro-bubbles in the pit cavity combined with aqueous diffusion in the

  18. Stochastic modeling of pitting corrosion: A new model for initiation and growth of multiple corrosion pits

    Valor, A.; Caleyo, F.; Alfonso, L.; Rivas, D.; Hallen, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, a new stochastic model capable of simulating pitting corrosion is developed and validated. Pitting corrosion is modeled as the combination of two stochastic processes: pit initiation and pit growth. Pit generation is modeled as a nonhomogeneous Poisson process, in which induction time for pit initiation is simulated as the realization of a Weibull process. In this way, the exponential and Weibull distributions can be considered as the possible distributions for pit initiation time. Pit growth is simulated using a nonhomogeneous Markov process. Extreme value statistics is used to find the distribution of maximum pit depths resulting from the combination of the initiation and growth processes for multiple pits. The proposed model is validated using several published experiments on pitting corrosion. It is capable of reproducing the experimental observations with higher quality than the stochastic models available in the literature for pitting corrosion

  19. Stochastic modeling of pitting corrosion: A new model for initiation and growth of multiple corrosion pits

    Valor, A. [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de La Habana, San Lazaro y L, Vedado, 10400 Havana (Cuba); Caleyo, F. [Departamento de Ingenieria, Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)]. E-mail: fcaleyo@gmail.com; Alfonso, L. [Departamento de Ingenieria, Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico); Rivas, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria, Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico); Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria, Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)

    2007-02-15

    In this work, a new stochastic model capable of simulating pitting corrosion is developed and validated. Pitting corrosion is modeled as the combination of two stochastic processes: pit initiation and pit growth. Pit generation is modeled as a nonhomogeneous Poisson process, in which induction time for pit initiation is simulated as the realization of a Weibull process. In this way, the exponential and Weibull distributions can be considered as the possible distributions for pit initiation time. Pit growth is simulated using a nonhomogeneous Markov process. Extreme value statistics is used to find the distribution of maximum pit depths resulting from the combination of the initiation and growth processes for multiple pits. The proposed model is validated using several published experiments on pitting corrosion. It is capable of reproducing the experimental observations with higher quality than the stochastic models available in the literature for pitting corrosion.

  20. A Comparative Study of the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Ni- or Fe- Based Composite Coatings by Laser Cladding

    Wan, M. Q.; Shi, J.; Lei, L.; Cui, Z. Y.; Wang, H. L.; Wang, X.

    2018-04-01

    Ni- and Fe-based composite coatings were laser cladded on 40Cr steel to improve the surface mechanical property and corrosion resistance, respectively. The microstructure and phase composition were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The micro-hardness, tribological properties and electrochemical corrosion behavior of the coatings were evaluated. The results show that the thickness of both the coatings is around 0.7 mm, the Ni-based coating is mainly composed of γ-(Ni, Fe), FeNi3, Ni31Si12, Ni3B, CrB and Cr7C3, and the Fe-based coating is mainly composed of austenite and (Fe, Cr)7C3. Micro-hardness of the Ni-based composite coating is about 960 HV0.3, much higher than that of Fe-based coating (357.4 HV0.3) and the 40Cr substrate (251 HV0.3). Meanwhile, the Ni-based composite coating possesses better wear resistance than the Fe-based coating validated by the worn appearance and the wear loss. Electrochemical results suggested that Ni-based coating exhibited better corrosion resistance than the Fe-based coating. The 40Cr substrate could be well protected by the Ni-based coating.

  1. Model for incorporating fuel swelling and clad shrinkage effects in diffusion theory calculations (LWBR Development Program)

    Schick, W.C. Jr.; Milani, S.; Duncombe, E.

    1980-03-01

    A model has been devised for incorporating into the thermal feedback procedure of the PDQ few-group diffusion theory computer program the explicit calculation of depletion and temperature dependent fuel-rod shrinkage and swelling at each mesh point. The model determines the effect on reactivity of the change in hydrogen concentration caused by the variation in coolant channel area as the rods contract and expand. The calculation of fuel temperature, and hence of Doppler-broadened cross sections, is improved by correcting the heat transfer coefficient of the fuel-clad gap for the effects of clad creep, fuel densification and swelling, and release of fission-product gases into the gap. An approximate calculation of clad stress is also included in the model

  2. Cladding oxidation during air ingress. Part II: Synthesis of modelling results

    Beuzet, E.; Haurais, F.; Bals, C.; Coindreau, O.; Fernandez-Moguel, L.; Vasiliev, A.; Park, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A state-of-the-art for air oxidation modelling in the frame of severe accident is done. • Air oxidation models from main severe accident codes are detailed. • Simulations from main severe accident codes are compared against experimental results. • Perspectives in terms of need for further model development and experiments are given. - Abstract: Air ingress is a potential risk in some low probable situations of severe accidents in a nuclear power plant. Air is a highly oxidizing atmosphere that can lead to an enhanced Zr-based cladding oxidation and core degradation affecting the release of fission products. This is particularly true speaking about ruthenium release, due to its high radiotoxicity and its ability to form highly volatile oxides in a significant manner in presence of air. The oxygen affinity is decreasing from the Zircaloy cladding, fuel and ruthenium inclusions. It is consequently of great need to understand the phenomena governing cladding oxidation by air as a prerequisite for the source term issues in such scenarios. In the past years, many works have been done on cladding oxidation by air under severe accident conditions. This paper with in addition the paper “Cladding oxidation during air ingress – Part I: Synthesis of experimental results” of this journal issue aim at assessing the state of the art on this phenomenon. In this paper, the modelling of air ingress phenomena in the main severe accident codes (ASTEC, ATHLET-CD, MAAP, MELCOR, RELAP/SCDAPSIM, SOCRAT) is described in details, as well as the validation against the integral experiments QUENCH-10, QUENCH-16 and PARAMETER-SF4. A full review of cladding oxidation by air is thus established.

  3. Stochastic process corrosion growth models for pipeline reliability

    Bazán, Felipe Alexander Vargas; Beck, André Teófilo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Novel non-linear stochastic process corrosion growth model is proposed. •Corrosion rate modeled as random Poisson pulses. •Time to corrosion initiation and inherent time-variability properly represented. •Continuous corrosion growth histories obtained. •Model is shown to precisely fit actual corrosion data at two time points. -- Abstract: Linear random variable corrosion models are extensively employed in reliability analysis of pipelines. However, linear models grossly neglect well-known characteristics of the corrosion process. Herein, a non-linear model is proposed, where corrosion rate is represented as a Poisson square wave process. The resulting model represents inherent time-variability of corrosion growth, produces continuous growth and leads to mean growth at less-than-one power of time. Different corrosion models are adjusted to the same set of actual corrosion data for two inspections. The proposed non-linear random process corrosion growth model leads to the best fit to the data, while better representing problem physics

  4. An analytical model to predict and minimize the residual stress of laser cladding process

    Tamanna, N.; Crouch, R.; Kabir, I. R.; Naher, S.

    2018-02-01

    Laser cladding is one of the advanced thermal techniques used to repair or modify the surface properties of high-value components such as tools, military and aerospace parts. Unfortunately, tensile residual stresses generate in the thermally treated area of this process. This work focuses on to investigate the key factors for the formation of tensile residual stress and how to minimize it in the clad when using dissimilar substrate and clad materials. To predict the tensile residual stress, a one-dimensional analytical model has been adopted. Four cladding materials (Al2O3, TiC, TiO2, ZrO2) on the H13 tool steel substrate and a range of preheating temperatures of the substrate, from 300 to 1200 K, have been investigated. Thermal strain and Young's modulus are found to be the key factors of formation of tensile residual stresses. Additionally, it is found that using a preheating temperature of the substrate immediately before laser cladding showed the reduction of residual stress.

  5. Stress-corrosion cracking properties of candidate fuel cladding alloys for the Canadian SCWR: a summary of literature data and recent test results

    Zheng, W.; Zeng, Y., E-mail: Wenyue@NRcan.gc.ca [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Luo, J. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Novotny, R. [JRC-European Commission, Patten (Netherlands); Li, J.; Amirkhiz, B.S., E-mail: Jian.li@nrcan.gc.ca [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Guzonas, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Matchim, M.; Collier, J.; Yang, L., E-mail: lin.yang@nrcan.gc.ca [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Cracking of fuel claddings is a serious concern when selecting candidate alloys for the development of a next-generation reactor. Whether the cracking is due to an environment-metal interaction such as stress-corrosion, or a pure metallurgical process such as localized plastic deformation along grain boundaries, the final impact is the same: cracking of the cladding can lead to fuel failure. In the course of a review of potential candidate alloys in preparation for further assessment under conditions relevant to the Canadian SCWR concept, relevant cracking studies reported for five short-listed alloys (namely 310S, 347H, 800H, 625 and 214) in the open literature were examined, and the key findings are provided in this paper. Discussions are also made of the recent SCC data from capsule tests and slow-strain rate tests (SSRT) in supercritical water. The data suggest that there is a threshold strain level below which SCC is not developed during SSRT tests. The practical implication of this finding is also discussed. (author)

  6. Corrosion

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  7. Geometry characteristics modeling and process optimization in coaxial laser inside wire cladding

    Shi, Jianjun; Zhu, Ping; Fu, Geyan; Shi, Shihong

    2018-05-01

    Coaxial laser inside wire cladding method is very promising as it has a very high efficiency and a consistent interaction between the laser and wire. In this paper, the energy and mass conservation law, and the regression algorithm are used together for establishing the mathematical models to study the relationship between the layer geometry characteristics (width, height and cross section area) and process parameters (laser power, scanning velocity and wire feeding speed). At the selected parameter ranges, the predicted values from the models are compared with the experimental measured results, and there is minor error existing, but they reflect the same regularity. From the models, it is seen the width of the cladding layer is proportional to both the laser power and wire feeding speed, while it firstly increases and then decreases with the increasing of the scanning velocity. The height of the cladding layer is proportional to the scanning velocity and feeding speed and inversely proportional to the laser power. The cross section area increases with the increasing of feeding speed and decreasing of scanning velocity. By using the mathematical models, the geometry characteristics of the cladding layer can be predicted by the known process parameters. Conversely, the process parameters can be calculated by the targeted geometry characteristics. The models are also suitable for multi-layer forming process. By using the optimized process parameters calculated from the models, a 45 mm-high thin-wall part is formed with smooth side surfaces.

  8. Kinetic approach in numerical modeling of melting and crystallization at laser cladding with powder injection

    Mirzade, F. Kh., E-mail: fmirzade@rambler.ru [Institute on Laser and Information Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Svyatoozerskaya Street, Shatura, Moscow Region 140700 (Russian Federation); Niziev, V.G.; Panchenko, V. Ya.; Khomenko, M.D.; Grishaev, R.V. [Institute on Laser and Information Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1 Svyatoozerskaya Street, Shatura, Moscow Region 140700 (Russian Federation); Pityana, S.; Rooyen, Corney van [CSIR-National Laser Centre, Building 46A, Meiring Nauder Road, Brummeria, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2013-08-15

    The numerical model of laser cladding with coaxial powder injection includes the equations for heat transfer, melting and crystallization kinetics. It has been shown that the main parameters influencing the melt pool dynamics and medium maximum temperature are mass feed rate, laser power and scanning velocity. It has been observed that, due to the phase change occurring with superheating/undercooling, the melt zone has the boundary distinguished from melting isotherm. The calculated melt pool dimensions and dilution are in a good agreement with the experimental results for cladding of 431 martensitic stainless steel onto carbon steel substrate.

  9. Modeling flow-accelerated corrosion in CANDU

    Burrill, K.A.

    1995-11-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) of large areas of carbon steel in various circuits of CANDU plants generates significant quantities of corrosion products. As well, the relatively rapid corrosion rate can lead to operating difficulties with some components. Three areas in the plant are identified and a simple model of mass-transfer controlled corrosion of the carbon steel is derived and applied to these areas. The areas and the significant finding for each are given below: A number of lines in the feedwater system generate sludge by FAC, which causes steam generator fouling. Prediction of the steady-state iron concentration at the feedtrain outlet compares well with measured values. Carbon steel outlet feeders connect the reactor core with the steam generators. The feeder surface provides the dissolved iron through FAC, which fouls the primary side of the steam generator tubes, and can lead to derating of the plant and difficulty in tube inspection. Segmented carbon steel divider plates in the steam generator primary head leak at an increasing rate with time. The leakage rate is strongly dependent on the tightness of the overlapping joints. which undergo FAC at an increasing rate with time. (author) 7 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  10. A deformation and thermodynamic model for hydride precipitation kinetics in spent fuel cladding

    Stout, R.B.

    1989-10-01

    Hydrogen is contained in the Zircaloy cladding of spent fuel rods from nuclear reactors. All the spent fuel rods placed in a nuclear waste repository will have a temperature history that decreases toward ambient; and as a result, most all of the hydrogen in the Zircaloy will eventually precipitate as zirconium hydride platelets. A model for the density of hydride platelets is a necessary sub-part for predicting Zircaloy cladding failure rate in a nuclear waste repository. A model is developed to describe statistically the hydride platelet density, and the density function includes the orientation as a physical attribute. The model applies concepts from statistical mechanics to derive probable deformation and thermodynamic functionals for cladding material response that depend explicitly on the hydride platelet density function. From this model, hydride precipitation kinetics depend on a thermodynamic potential for hydride density change and on the inner product of a stress tensor and a tensor measure for the incremental volume change due to hydride platelets. The development of a failure response model for Zircaloy cladding exposed to the expected conditions in a nuclear waste repository is supported by the US DOE Yucca Mountain Project. 19 refs., 3 figs

  11. Optimization of the deposition process of corrosion resistant Stellite 6 coatings produced by laser cladding; Optimizacion del proceso de aporte de recubrimientos anticorrosion de Stellite 6 producidos mediante plaqueado laser

    Vicario, I.; Soriano, C.; Sanz, C.; Bayon, R.; Leunda, J.

    2009-07-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most efficient surface treatment technologies in the industry. It uses a laser heat source to deposit a thin layer of a desired material on a moving substrate, whose properties have to be improved, achieving a metallurgical bonding between them with low heat affected zone and low dilution, compared to other conventional technologies such as PTA, TIG welding or thermal Spraying. In this sense, it is remarkable that there are 3 main application fields for laser cladding technology: restoration of refurbishment of damaged parts, surface coating against corrosion or wear, and rapid proto typing. the present work described a study of the optimization of the laser cladding of Co based coatings (Diamalloy 4060NS) on medium carbon steel C45 (AISI 1945). After laser treatment, the surface of the substrate materials is improved in terms of resistance against corrosion; this confirmed in the analysis performed afterwards. it is also shown that the corrosion barrier properties have direct correlation with the laser cladding variables. (Author) 10 refs.

  12. Contribution to numerical and mechanical modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in nuclear reactor fuel rod

    Retel, V.

    2002-12-01

    Pressurised water reactor fuel rods (PWR) are the place of nuclear fission, resulting in unstable and radioactive elements. Today, the mechanical loading on the cladding is harder and harder and is partly due to the fuel pellet movement. Then, the mechanical behaviour of the cladding needs to be simulated with models allowing to assess realistic stress and strain fields for all the running conditions. Besides, the mechanical treatment of the fuel pellet needs to be improved. The study is part of a global way of improving the treatment of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in the 1D finite elements EDF code named CYRANO3. Non-axisymmetrical multidirectional effects have to be accounted for in a context of unidirectional axisymmetrical finite elements. The aim of this work is double. Firstly a model simulating the effect of stress concentration on the cladding, due to the opening of the radial cracks of fuel, had been added in the code. Then, the fragmented state of fuel material has been taken into account in the thermomechanical calculation, through a model which led the strain and stress relaxation in the pellet due to the fragmentation, be simulated. This model has been implemented in the code for two types of fuel behaviour: elastic and viscoplastic. (author)

  13. Humid-air and aqueous corrosion models for corrosion-allowance barrier material

    Lee, J.H.; Atkins, J.E.; Andrews, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Humid-air and aqueous general and pitting corrosion models (including their uncertainties) for the carbon steel outer containment barrier were developed using the corrosion data from literature for a suite of cast irons and carbon steels which have similar corrosion behaviors to the outer barrier material. The corrosion data include the potential effects of various chemical species present in the testing environments. The atmospheric corrosion data also embed any effects of cyclic wetting and drying and salts that may form on the corroding specimen surface. The humid-air and aqueous general corrosion models are consistent in that the predicted humid-air general corrosion rates at relative humidities between 85 and 100% RH are close to the predicted aqueous general corrosion rates. Using the expected values of the model parameters, the model predicts that aqueous pitting corrosion is the most likely failure mode for the carbon steel outer barrier, and an earliest failure (or initial pit penetration) of the 100-mm thick barrier may occur as early as about 500 years if it is exposed continuously to an aqueous condition at between 60 and 70 degrees C

  14. An overview of erosion corrosion models and reliability assessment for corrosion defects in piping system

    Srividya, A.; Suresh, H.N.; Verma, A.K.; Gopika, V.; Santosh

    2006-01-01

    Piping systems are part of passive structural elements in power plants. The analysis of the piping systems and their quantification in terms of failure probability is of utmost importance. The piping systems may fail due to various degradation mechanisms like thermal fatigue, erosion-corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and vibration fatigue. On examination of previous results, erosion corrosion was more prevalent and wall thinning is a time dependent phenomenon. The paper is intended to consolidate the work done by various investigators on erosion corrosion in estimating the erosion corrosion rate and reliability predictions. A comparison of various erosion corrosion models is made. The reliability predictions based on remaining strength of corroded pipelines by wall thinning is also attempted. Variables in the limit state functions are modelled using normal distributions and Reliability assessment is carried out using some of the existing failure pressure models. A steady state corrosion rate is assumed to estimate the corrosion defect and First Order Reliability Method (FORM) is used to find the probability of failure associated with corrosion defects over time using the software for Component Reliability evaluation (COMREL). (author)

  15. Modeling of nonuniform corrosion in salt brines: Salt Repository Project

    Reimus, P.W.

    1988-03-01

    A mechanistic approach to modeling nonuniform corrosion in brines is presented in this report. Equations are derived for completely describing the electrochemical environment within a localized corrosion cavity, and appropriate initial and boundary conditions are invoked to obtain a solvable system of equations. The initial and boundary conditions can be adjusted to simulate pitting, crevice corrosion, or stress corrosion cracking. Although no numerical results are presented, a numerical strategy for solving the equations is presented. The report focuses on the nonuniform corrosion behavior of mild steel; however, the modeling approach presented is expected to apply to a broad range of metallic materials. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Advanced modelling of concrete deterioration due to reinforcement corrosion

    Isgor, O.B.; Razaqpur, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive model is presented for predicting the rate of steel corrosion in concrete structures and the consequent formation and propagation of cracks around the steel reinforcement. The corrosion model considers both the initiation and the propagation stages of corrosion. Processes commencing in the initiation stage, such as the transport of chloride ions and oxygen within the concrete and variation in temperature and moisture, are assumed to continue in the propagation stage while active corrosion is occurring contemporaneously. This allows the model to include the effects of changes in exposure conditions on the corrosion rate and the effects of the corrosion reactions on the transport properties of concrete. The corrosion rates are calculated by applying the finite-element solution of the Laplace equation for electrochemical potential, with appropriate boundary conditions. Because these boundary conditions are nonlinear, a nonlinear solution algorithm is used. The results of the analysis are compared with available test data, and the comparison is found to be satisfactory. (author)

  17. A new high temperature deformation model for zircaloy clad ballooning under hypothetical LOCA conditions

    Brzoska, B.; Cheliotis, G.; Kunick, A.; Senski, G.

    1977-01-01

    Assuming Zircaloy clad ballooning occurs predominantly by thermal activated secondary creep, generally a power law is applied to describe the creep rate analytically. According to Norton the creep rate is taken as a power function of the cladding hoop stress multiplied by a numerical constant which is determined by the cladding structural properties and a Boltzmann factor including the creep activation energy, the gas constant and the cladding temperature respectively. As is well known, the stress exponent is not a constant value in the total range of LOCA stresses, but increases steadily with stress. This difficulty is avoided by introducing into the Norton law a plastic flow-factor including a limiting stress, which was derived by G. Senski using plastic crack models from Dugdale and Irwin. For LOCA applications the limiting stress is identified with the burst stress, which is experimentally determined. A total number of about 280 directly heated KWU burst tests including two types of experiments: (i) controlled temperature transient tests, (ii) creep rupture tests, are used to fit the burst stress of KWU zircaloy tubes simulating the whole range of LOCA temperatur

  18. Accident tolerant clad material modeling by MELCOR: Benchmark for SURRY Short Term Station Black Out

    Wang, Jun; Mccabe, Mckinleigh; Wu, Lei; Dong, Xiaomeng; Wang, Xianmao; Haskin, Troy Christopher; Corradini, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermo-physical and oxidation kinetics properties calculation and analysis of FeCrAl. • Properties modelling of FeCrAl in MELCOR. • Benchmark calculation of Surry nuclear power plant. - Abstract: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding materials are being investigated to provide a greater resistance to fuel degradation, oxidation and melting if long-term cooling is lost in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) following an accident such as a Station Blackout (SBO) or Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). Researchers at UW-Madison are analyzing an SBO sequence and examining the effect of a loss of auxiliary feedwater (AFW) with the MELCOR systems code. Our research work considers accident tolerant cladding materials (e.g., FeCrAl alloy) and their effect on the accident behavior. We first gathered the physical properties of this alternative cladding material via literature review and compared it to the usual zirconium alloys used in LWRs. We then developed a model for the Surry reactor for a Short-term SBO sequence and examined the effect of replacing FeCrAl for Zircaloy cladding. The analysis uses MELCOR, Version 1.8.6 YR, which is developed by Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with MELCOR developers at Sandia National Laboratories. This version allows the user to alter the cladding material considered, and our study examines the behavior of the FeCrAl alloy as a substitute for Zircaloy. Our benchmark comparisons with the Sandia National Laboratory’s analysis of Surry using MELCOR 1.8.6 and the more recent MELCOR 2.1 indicate good overall agreement through the early phases of the accident progression. When FeCrAl is substituted for Zircaloy to examine its performance, we confirmed that FeCrAl slows the accident progression and reduce the amount of hydrogen generated. Our analyses also show that this special version of MELCOR can be used to evaluate other potential ATF cladding materials, e.g., SiC as well as innovative coatings on zirconium cladding

  19. Accident tolerant clad material modeling by MELCOR: Benchmark for SURRY Short Term Station Black Out

    Wang, Jun, E-mail: jwang564@wisc.edu [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Mccabe, Mckinleigh [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Wu, Lei [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Dong, Xiaomeng [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Wang, Xianmao [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Haskin, Troy Christopher [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Corradini, Michael L., E-mail: corradini@engr.wisc.edu [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Thermo-physical and oxidation kinetics properties calculation and analysis of FeCrAl. • Properties modelling of FeCrAl in MELCOR. • Benchmark calculation of Surry nuclear power plant. - Abstract: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding materials are being investigated to provide a greater resistance to fuel degradation, oxidation and melting if long-term cooling is lost in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) following an accident such as a Station Blackout (SBO) or Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). Researchers at UW-Madison are analyzing an SBO sequence and examining the effect of a loss of auxiliary feedwater (AFW) with the MELCOR systems code. Our research work considers accident tolerant cladding materials (e.g., FeCrAl alloy) and their effect on the accident behavior. We first gathered the physical properties of this alternative cladding material via literature review and compared it to the usual zirconium alloys used in LWRs. We then developed a model for the Surry reactor for a Short-term SBO sequence and examined the effect of replacing FeCrAl for Zircaloy cladding. The analysis uses MELCOR, Version 1.8.6 YR, which is developed by Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with MELCOR developers at Sandia National Laboratories. This version allows the user to alter the cladding material considered, and our study examines the behavior of the FeCrAl alloy as a substitute for Zircaloy. Our benchmark comparisons with the Sandia National Laboratory’s analysis of Surry using MELCOR 1.8.6 and the more recent MELCOR 2.1 indicate good overall agreement through the early phases of the accident progression. When FeCrAl is substituted for Zircaloy to examine its performance, we confirmed that FeCrAl slows the accident progression and reduce the amount of hydrogen generated. Our analyses also show that this special version of MELCOR can be used to evaluate other potential ATF cladding materials, e.g., SiC as well as innovative coatings on zirconium cladding

  20. Model boiler studies on deposition and corrosion

    Balakrishnan, P.V.; McVey, E.G.

    1977-09-01

    Deposit formation was studied in a model boiler, with sea-water injections to simulate the in-leakage which could occur from sea-water cooled condensers. When All Volatile Treatment (AVT) was used for chemistry control the deposits consisted of the sea-water salts and corrosion products. With sodium phosphate added to the boiler water, the deposits also contained the phosphates derived from the sea-water salts. The deposits were formed in layers of differing compositions. There was no significant corrosion of the Fe-Ni-Cr alloy boiler tube under deposits, either on the open area of the tube or in crevices. However, carbon steel that formed a crevice around the tube was corroded severely when the boiler water did not contain phosphate. The observed corrosion of carbon steel was caused by the presence of acidic, highly concentrated chloride solution produced from the sea-water within the crevice. Results of theoretical calculations of the composition of the concentrated solution are presented. (author)

  1. Fuel element cladding state change mathematical model for a WWER-1000 plant operated in the mode of varying loading

    S. N. Pelykh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Main features of a fuel element cladding state change mathematical model for a WWER-1000 reactor plant operated in the mode of varying loading are listed. The integrated model is based on the energy creep theory, uses the finite element method for imultaneous solution of the fuel element heat conduction and mechanical deformation equa-tions. Proposed mathematical model allows us to determine the influence of the WWER-1000 regime parameters and fuel assembly design characteristics on the change of cladding properties under different loading conditions of normal operation, as well as the cladding limiting state at variable loading depending on the length, depth and number of cycles.

  2. Structural cladding /clad structures

    Beim, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure in the pr......Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure...... to analyze, compare, and discuss how these various construction solutions point out strategies for development based on fundamentally different mindsets. The research questions address the following issues: How to learn from traditional construction principles: When do we see limitations of tectonic maneuver......, to ask for more restrictive building codes. As an example, in Denmark there are series of increasing demands in the current building legislations that are focused at enhancing the energy performance of buildings, which consequently foster rigid insulation standards and ask for improvement of air...

  3. Atmospheric corrosion: statistical validation of models

    Diaz, V.; Martinez-Luaces, V.; Guineo-Cobs, G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two different methods for validation of regression models, applied to corrosion data. One of them is based on the correlation coefficient and the other one is the statistical test of lack of fit. Both methods are used here to analyse fitting of bi logarithmic model in order to predict corrosion for very low carbon steel substrates in rural and urban-industrial atmospheres in Uruguay. Results for parameters A and n of the bi logarithmic model are reported here. For this purpose, all repeated values were used instead of using average values as usual. Modelling is carried out using experimental data corresponding to steel substrates under the same initial meteorological conditions ( in fact, they are put in the rack at the same time). Results of correlation coefficient are compared with the lack of it tested at two different signification levels (α=0.01 and α=0.05). Unexpected differences between them are explained and finally, it is possible to conclude, at least in the studied atmospheres, that the bi logarithmic model does not fit properly the experimental data. (Author) 18 refs

  4. A Theoretical Model for Metal Corrosion Degradation

    David V. Svintradze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many aluminum and stainless steel alloys contain thin oxide layers on the metal surface which greatly reduce the corrosion rate. Pitting corrosion, a result of localized breakdown of such films, results in accelerated dissolution of the underlying metal through pits. Many researchers have studied pitting corrosion for several decades and the exact governing equation for corrosion pit degradation has not been obtained. In this study, the governing equation for corrosion degradation due to pitting corrosion behavior was derived from solid-state physics and some solutions and simulations are presented and discussed.

  5. Some observations on pitting corrosion in the zircaloy cladding of fuel pins irradiated in a PWR loop

    Linde, A. van der; Letsch, A.C.; Hornsveld, E.M.

    1978-11-01

    A three-pins, zircaloy-4 clad, sphere-pac bundle was irradiated in a 280 0 C PWR loop in the HFR at Petten during 131 effective full power days to a bundle average burnup of 0.84 % FIMA. The pins contained a mixture of 61.5 w/o of 1050 μm (U,Pu) 0 2 spheres, 18.5 w/o of 115 μm UO 2 spheres and 20.0 w/o of 2 spheres. The as-fabricated smear density of the vibratory compacted mixture was 81-85 % T.D. The pressure of the pin filling gas was 1 bar helium for pin 306 and 25 bar helium for the pins 308 and 309. The cladding was zircaloy-4 tubing, stress relieved for 4 hours at 540 0 C, with an inner diameter of 9.30 mm and a wall thickness of 0.73 mm. Exposure of the pins in the loop started in the as-pickled, degreased surface condition. The pins operated at an average heat rating of 335 W/cm and at a peak rating of 620 W/cm. The end-of -life peak rating was 425 W/cm. Unfavourable water chemistry conditions of the coolant during the last weeks of the irradition, in particular low NH 3 concentrations resulting in low pH values, caused the deposition of heavy crud layers on the pin surfaces. This crud layer caused a small cladding defect in pin 306 at the axial position of the peak heat rating. The zircaloy-4 wall failed by complete oxidation, which started at and progressed from the outer, coolant side, surface. Immediately after the detection of fission product activity in the loop water, the irradiation of the bundle was terminated. Microscopic investigations on cross sections of the pins 306 and 309 revealed the presence of oxide pits at the outer surface of the zircalloy-4 wall

  6. Irradiation effects on mechanical properties of fuel element cladding from thermal reactors

    Chatterjee, S.

    2005-01-01

    During reactor operation, UO 2 expands more than the cladding tube (Zirconium alloys for thermal reactors), is hotter, cracks and swells. The fuel therefore will interact with the cladding, resulting in straining of the later. To minimize the possibility of rupture of the cladding, ideally it should have good ductility as well as high strength. However, the ductility reduces with increase in fuel element burn-up. Increased burn-up also increases swelling of the fuel, leading to increased contact pressure between the fuel and the cladding tube. This would cause strains to be concentrated over localized regions of the cladding. For fuel elements burnup exceeding 40 GWd/T, the contribution of embrittlement due to hydriding, and the increased possibility of embrittlement due to stress corrosion cracking, also need to be considered. In addition to the tensile properties, the other mechanical properties of interest to the performance of cladding tube in an operating fuel element are creep rate and fatigue endurance. Irradiation is reported to have insignificant effect on high cycle endurance limit, and fatigue from fuel element vibration is most unlikely, to be life limiting. Even though creep rates due to irradiation are reported to increase by an order of magnitude, the cladding creep ductility would be so high that creep type failures in fuel element would be most improbable. Thus, the most important limiting aspect of mechanical performance of fuel element cladding has been recognized as the tensile ductility resulting from the stress conditions experienced by the cladding. Some specific fission products of threshold amount (if) deposited on the cladding, and hydride morphology (e.g. hydride lenses). The presentation will brief about irradiation damage in cladding materials and its significance, background of search for better Zirconium alloys as cladding materials, and elaborate on the types of mechanical tests need to be conducted for the evaluation of claddings

  7. Effects of corrosion and precipitates on mechanical properties in the ferritic/martensitic steel cladding under ultra-long cycle fast reactor environment at 650 .deg. C

    Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sang Hun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This changes chemical compositions of inter-surface and effects on behavior of precipitations. NaCrO{sub 2} which is ternary sodium compound occurs intergranular corrosion resulting in thickness reduction. This change can cause a degradation of mechanical strength of structure material of UCFR. Therefore, we should consider longterm compatibility with sodium and study about life prediction. The research about ferritic/martensitic steel on effects of long term exposure in liquid sodium at 650 .deg. C, 20ppm oxygen includes weight loss of test material (Gr. 92) by corrosion and mechanism about nucleation and growth of precipitates like Laves-phase in bulk. There are many changes such as segregation of component to nucleate precipitates, affecting into microstructural evolution of the steel. Therefore, the thermochemical reaction research to predict behavior about precipitates should be performed. In a specific procedure, the micro-structure and the surface phenomenon of ferritic/martensitic steels (Gr. 92) that are exposed to liquid sodium at 650 .deg. C, 20 ppm oxygen and aged in high pure Argon gas environment to express bulk have been investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). At 10 ppm oxygen designed oxygen value for UCFR, there is 107μm thickness reduction for 30 years. Thus, if there is no degradation of mechanical strength caused by aging effect, the tolerance of load of initial cladding should be higher than real load at least 23.6 %. Compared to specimens exposed to Ar-gas environment, Specimen which solutions are leaded into sodium has degradation of strength by reduction of solution hardening.

  8. Smeared crack modelling approach for corrosion-induced concrete damage

    Thybo, Anna Emilie Anusha; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a smeared crack modelling approach is used to simulate corrosion-induced damage in reinforced concrete. The presented modelling approach utilizes a thermal analogy to mimic the expansive nature of solid corrosion products, while taking into account the penetration of corrosion...... products into the surrounding concrete, non-uniform precipitation of corrosion products, and creep. To demonstrate the applicability of the presented modelling approach, numerical predictions in terms of corrosion-induced deformations as well as formation and propagation of micro- and macrocracks were......-induced damage phenomena in reinforced concrete. Moreover, good agreements were also found between experimental and numerical data for corrosion-induced deformations along the circumference of the reinforcement....

  9. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A. [Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, Michael I., E-mail: m.ojovan@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface. - Highlights: • The radionuclides yield is determined by the transport from the glass through the surface corrosion layer. • Formation of the surface layer is due to the dissolution of the glass network and the formation of insoluble compounds. • The model proposed accounts for glass dissolution, formation of corrosion layer, specie diffusion and chemical reactions. • Analytical solutions are found for corrosion layer growth rate and glass components component leaching rates.

  10. Study of the aqueous corrosion mechanisms and kinetics of the AlFeNi aluminium based alloy used for the fuel cladding in the Jules Horowitz research reactor; Etude des mecanismes et des cinetiques de corrosion aqueuse de l'alliage d'aluminium AlFeNi utilise comme gainage du combustible nucleaire de reacteurs experimentaux

    Wintergerst, M.

    2009-05-15

    For the Jules Horowitz new material-testing reactor (JHR), an aluminium base alloy, called AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. This alloy (Al - 1% Fe - 1% Ni - 1 % Mg), which is already used as fuel cladding, was developed for its good corrosion resistance in water at high temperatures. However, few studies dealing with the alteration process in water and the relationships with irradiation effects have been performed on this alloy. The conception of the JHR fuel requires a better knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms. Corrosion tests were performed in autoclaves at 70 C, 165 C and 250 C on AlFeNi plates representative of the fuel cladding. Several techniques were used to characterize the corrosion scale: SEM, TEM, EPMA, XRD, Raman spectroscopy. Our observations show that the corrosion scale is made of two main layers: a dense amorphous scale close to the metal and a porous crystalline scale in contact with the water. More than the morphology, the chemical compositions of both layers are different. This duplex structure results from a mixed growth mechanism: an anionic growth to develop the inner oxide and a cationic diffusion followed by a dissolution-precipitation process to form the outer one. Dynamic experiments at 70 C and corrosion kinetics measurements have demonstrated that the oxide growth process is controlled by a diffusion step associated to a dissolution/precipitation process. A corrosion mechanism of the AlFeNi alloy in aqueous media has been proposed. Then post-irradiation exams performed on irradiated fuel plates were used to investigate the effects of the irradiation on the corrosion behaviour in the reactor core. (author)

  11. A strain-mediated corrosion model for bioabsorbable metallic stents.

    Galvin, E; O'Brien, D; Cummins, C; Mac Donald, B J; Lally, C

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a strain-mediated phenomenological corrosion model, based on the discrete finite element modelling method which was developed for use with the ANSYS Implicit finite element code. The corrosion model was calibrated from experimental data and used to simulate the corrosion performance of a WE43 magnesium alloy stent. The model was found to be capable of predicting the experimentally observed plastic strain-mediated mass loss profile. The non-linear plastic strain model, extrapolated from the experimental data, was also found to adequately capture the corrosion-induced reduction in the radial stiffness of the stent over time. The model developed will help direct future design efforts towards the minimisation of plastic strain during device manufacture, deployment and in-service, in order to reduce corrosion rates and prolong the mechanical integrity of magnesium devices. The need for corrosion models that explore the interaction of strain with corrosion damage has been recognised as one of the current challenges in degradable material modelling (Gastaldi et al., 2011). A finite element based plastic strain-mediated phenomenological corrosion model was developed in this work and was calibrated based on the results of the corrosion experiments. It was found to be capable of predicting the experimentally observed plastic strain-mediated mass loss profile and the corrosion-induced reduction in the radial stiffness of the stent over time. To the author's knowledge, the results presented here represent the first experimental calibration of a plastic strain-mediated corrosion model of a corroding magnesium stent. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling the Influence of Process Parameters and Additional Heat Sources on Residual Stresses in Laser Cladding

    Brückner, F.; Lepski, D.; Beyer, E.

    2007-09-01

    In laser cladding thermal contraction of the initially liquid coating during cooling causes residual stresses and possibly cracks. Preweld or postweld heating using inductors can reduce the thermal strain difference between coating and substrate and thus reduce the resulting stress. The aim of this work is to better understand the influence of various thermometallurgical and mechanical phenomena on stress evolution and to optimize the induction-assisted laser cladding process to get crack-free coatings of hard materials at high feed rates. First, an analytical one-dimensional model is used to visualize the most important features of stress evolution for a Stellite coating on a steel substrate. For more accurate studies, laser cladding is simulated including the powder-beam interaction, the powder catchment by the melt pool, and the self-consistent calculation of temperature field and bead shape. A three-dimensional finite element model and the required equivalent heat sources are derived from the results and used for the transient thermomechanical analysis, taking into account phase transformations and the elastic-plastic material behavior with strain hardening. Results are presented for the influence of process parameters such as feed rate, heat input, and inductor size on the residual stresses at a single bead of Stellite coatings on steel.

  13. Geometry modeling of single track cladding deposited by high power diode laser with rectangular beam spot

    Liu, Huaming; Qin, Xunpeng; Huang, Song; Hu, Zeqi; Ni, Mao

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the relationship between the process parameters and geometrical characteristics of the sectional profile for the single track cladding (STC) deposited by High Power Diode Laser (HPDL) with rectangle beam spot (RBS). To obtain the geometry parameters, namely cladding width Wc and height Hc of the sectional profile, a full factorial design (FFD) of experiment was used to conduct the experiments with a total of 27. The pre-placed powder technique has been employed during laser cladding. The influence of the process parameters including laser power, powder thickness and scanning speed on the Wc and Hc was analyzed in detail. A nonlinear fitting model was used to fit the relationship between the process parameters and geometry parameters. And a circular arc was adopted to describe the geometry profile of the cross-section of STC. The above models were confirmed by all the experiments. The results indicated that the geometrical characteristics of the sectional profile of STC can be described as the circular arc, and the other geometry parameters of the sectional profile can be calculated only using Wc and Hc. Meanwhile, the Wc and Hc can be predicted through the process parameters.

  14. An example of coupling behaviour-damage-environment in polycrystals. Application to Pellet-Cladding Interaction

    Diard, Olivier

    2001-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 cladding is the first containment barrier for fission products, and its integrity must therefore be ensured in nominal and accidental situations. However, stress corrosion induced cracks may appear due to a strong pellet-cladding interaction. It is therefore important to model this interaction and crack growth and propagation to establish non-damage criteria. Thus, this research thesis aims at developing a modelling covering both issues (pellet-cladding interaction, and stress corrosion cracking) and allowing macroscopic and microscopic scales to be coupled. After a bibliographical synthesis on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking and similar phenomena, the author presents the model proposed for the pellet-cladding interaction: phenomena to be taken into account, phenomenological and macroscopic behaviour laws used respectively for pellet and cladding. An extended version of an existing cladding viscoplastic model is proposed. Stress and strain fields in the cladding are obtained, notably in the contact zone. In the next part, the author presents various numerical tools developed or used to model multi-crystalline aggregates, and the model of crystalline plasticity used to simulate cladding behaviour at the microstructure scale. Effects of mesh density, element types and anisotropic elasticity are also discussed. The next chapter addresses the mechanical-chemical coupling. Some coupling formulas are presented for simple cases in order to define the effective diffusion coefficient. The last part reports the modelling of intergranular damage: definition of a damage criterion at the granular scale, assessment of stresses at grain boundaries, and effect of crystallographic neighbouring. A model of grain boundary damage is also proposed. This model is assessed on Failure Mechanics test samples and on simple microstructures. The application of the whole numerical model is reported [fr

  15. Laser cladding with powder

    Schneider, M.F.; Schneider, Marcel Fredrik

    1998-01-01

    This thesis is directed to laser cladding with powder and a CO2 laser as heat source. The laser beam intensity profile turned out to be an important pa6 Summary rameter in laser cladding. A numerical model was developed that allows the prediction of the surface temperature distribution that is

  16. Study of the uniform corrosion of an aluminium alloy used for the fuel cladding of the Jules Horowitz experimental reactor; Etude de la corrosion uniforme d'un alliage d'aluminium utilise comme gainage du combustible nucleaire du reacteur experimental Jules Horowitz

    Wintergerst, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material testing reactor, an aluminium base alloy, AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. Taking into account the thermal properties of the alloy and of its oxide, the corrosion of the fuel cans presents many problems. The aim of this thesis is to provide a growing kinetic of the oxide layer at the surface of the AlFeNi fuel can in order to predict the life time of fuel element. Thus the mechanism of degradation of the cladding will be describe in order to integrate the different parameters of the operating reactor. (A.L.B.)

  17. Modeling of the PWR fuel mechanical behaviour and particularly study of the pellet-cladding interaction in a fuel rod

    Hourdequin, N.

    1995-05-01

    In Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power plants, fuel cladding constitutes the first containment barrier against radioactive contamination. Computer codes, developed with the help of a large experimental knowledge, try to predict cladding failures which must be limited in order to maintain a maximal safety level. Until now, fuel rod design calculus with unidimensional codes were adequate to prevent cladding failures in standard PWR's operating conditions. But now, the need of nuclear power plant availability increases. That leads to more constraining operating condition in which cladding failures are strongly influenced by the fuel rod mechanical behaviour, mainly at high power level. Then, the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) becomes important, and is characterized by local effects which description expects a multidimensional modelization. This is the aim of the TOUTATIS 2D-3D code, that this thesis contributes to develop. This code allows to predict non-axisymmetric behaviour too, as rod buckling which has been observed in some irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS. By another way, PCI is influenced by under irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS which includes a densification model and a swelling model. The latter can only be used in standard operating conditions. However, the processing structure of this modulus provides the possibility to include any type of model corresponding with other operating conditions. In last, we show the result of these fuel volume variations on the cladding mechanical conditions. (author). 25 refs., 89 figs., 2 tabs., 12 photos., 5 appends

  18. Impacts of transient heat transfer modeling on prediction of advanced cladding fracture during LWR LBLOCA

    Lee, Youho, E-mail: euo@kaist.ac.kr; Lee, Jeong Ik, E-mail: jeongiklee@kaist.ac.kr; NO, Hee Cheon, E-mail: hcno@kaist.ac.kr

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Use of constant heat transfer coefficient for fracture analysis is not sound. • On-time heat transfer coefficient should be used for thermal fracture prediction. • ∼90% of the actual fracture stresses were predicted with the on-time transient h. • Thermal-hydraulic codes can be used to better predict brittle cladding fracture. • Effects of surface oxides on thermal shock fracture should be accounted by h. - Abstract: This study presents the importance of coherency in modeling thermal-hydraulics and mechanical behavior of a solid for an advanced prediction of cladding thermal shock fracture. In water quenching, a solid experiences dynamic heat transfer rate evolutions with phase changes of the fluid over a short quenching period. Yet, such a dynamic change of heat transfer rates has been overlooked in the analysis of thermal shock fracture. In this study, we are presenting quantitative evidence against the prevailing use of a constant heat transfer coefficient for thermal shock fracture analysis in water. We conclude that no single constant heat transfer could suffice to depict the actual stress evolution subject to dynamic fluid phase changes. Use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient will remarkably increase predictability of thermal shock fracture of brittle materials. The presented results show a remarkable stress prediction improvement up to 80–90% of the actual stress with the use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient. For thermal shock fracture analysis of brittle fuel cladding such as oxidized zirconium-based alloy or silicon carbide during LWR reflood, transient subchannel heat transfer coefficients obtained from a thermal-hydraulics code should be used as input for stress analysis. Such efforts will lead to a fundamental improvement in thermal shock fracture predictability over the current experimental empiricism for cladding fracture analysis during reflood.

  19. Markov Chain Models for the Stochastic Modeling of Pitting Corrosion

    A. Valor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The stochastic nature of pitting corrosion of metallic structures has been widely recognized. It is assumed that this kind of deterioration retains no memory of the past, so only the current state of the damage influences its future development. This characteristic allows pitting corrosion to be categorized as a Markov process. In this paper, two different models of pitting corrosion, developed using Markov chains, are presented. Firstly, a continuous-time, nonhomogeneous linear growth (pure birth Markov process is used to model external pitting corrosion in underground pipelines. A closed-form solution of the system of Kolmogorov's forward equations is used to describe the transition probability function in a discrete pit depth space. The transition probability function is identified by correlating the stochastic pit depth mean with the empirical deterministic mean. In the second model, the distribution of maximum pit depths in a pitting experiment is successfully modeled after the combination of two stochastic processes: pit initiation and pit growth. Pit generation is modeled as a nonhomogeneous Poisson process, in which induction time is simulated as the realization of a Weibull process. Pit growth is simulated using a nonhomogeneous Markov process. An analytical solution of Kolmogorov's system of equations is also found for the transition probabilities from the first Markov state. Extreme value statistics is employed to find the distribution of maximum pit depths.

  20. Model of depositing layer on cylindrical surface produced by induction-assisted laser cladding process

    Kotlan Václav

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A model of hybrid cladding on a cylindrical surface is built and numerically solved. Heating of both substrate and the powder material to be deposited on its surface is realized by laser beam and preheating inductor. The task represents a hard-coupled electromagnetic-thermal problem with time-varying geometry. Two specific algorithms are developed to incorporate this effect into the model, driven by local distribution of temperature and its gradients. The algorithms are implemented into the COMSOL Multiphysics 5.2 code that is used for numerical computations of the task. The methodology is illustrated with a typical example whose results are discussed.

  1. Current status of studies on nodular corrosion

    Yasuda, Takayoshi; Kawasaki, Satoru; Echigoya, Hironori; Kinoshita, Yutaka; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Takao; Yamanaka, Tuneyasu.

    1993-01-01

    The studies on nodular corrosion formed on the outer surface of BWR fuel cladding tubes were reviewed. Main factors affecting the corrosion behavior were material and environmental conditions and combined effect. The effects of such material conditions as fabrication process, alloy elements, texture and surface treatment and environmental factors as neutron irradiation, thermo-hydrodynamic, water chemistry, purity of the coolant and contact with foreign metals on the corrosion phenomena were surveyed. Out-of-reactor corrosion test methods and models for the corrosion mechanism were also reviewed. Suppression of the accumulated annealing temperature during tube reduction process improved the nodular corrosion resistance of Zircaloys. Improved resistance for the nodular corrosion was reported for the unirradiated Zircaloys with some additives. Detailed irradiation test under the BWR conditions is needed to confirm the trend. Concerning the environmental factors, boiling on the cladding surface due to heat flux reduces the nodular corrosion susceptibility, while oxidizing radical generated from dissolved oxygen accelerates the corrosion. Concerning corrosion mechanisms, importance of such phenomena as the depleted zone of alloying elements in zirconium matrix, reduction of H + to H 2 in oxide layer, electrochemical property of precipitates, crystallographic anisotropy of oxidation rates were revealed. (author) 59 refs

  2. Corrosion monitoring along infrastructures using distributed fiber optic sensing

    Alhandawi, Khalil B.; Vahdati, Nader; Shiryayev, Oleg; Lawand, Lydia

    2016-04-01

    Pipeline Inspection Gauges (PIGs) are used for internal corrosion inspection of oil pipelines every 3-5 years. However, between inspection intervals, rapid corrosion may occur, potentially resulting in major accidents. The motivation behind this research project was to develop a safe distributed corrosion sensor placed inside oil pipelines continuously monitoring corrosion. The intrinsically safe nature of light provided motivation for researching fiber optic sensors as a solution. The sensing fiber's cladding features polymer plastic that is chemically sensitive to hydrocarbons within crude oil mixtures. A layer of metal, used in the oil pipeline's construction, is deposited on the polymer cladding, which upon corrosion, exposes the cladding to surrounding hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon's interaction with the cladding locally increases the cladding's refractive index in the radial direction. Light intensity of a traveling pulse is reduced due to local reduction in the modal capacity which is interrogated by Optical Time Domain Reflectometery. Backscattered light is captured in real-time while using time delay to resolve location, allowing real-time spatial monitoring of environmental internal corrosion within pipelines spanning large distances. Step index theoretical solutions were used to calculate the power loss due changes in the intensity profile. The power loss is translated into an attenuation coefficient characterizing the expected OTDR trace which was verified against similar experimental results from the literature. A laboratory scale experiment is being developed to assess the validity of the model and the practicality of the solution.

  3. Modeling of the propagation of crevice corrosion

    Mousson, Jean-Louis; Vuillemin, Bruno; Oltra, Roland; Crusset, Didier; Santarini, Gerard; Combrade, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Models of crevice corrosion can be divided into two categories: the first one is aimed to define the time necessary to reach a Critical Crevice Solution susceptible to initiate a stable crevice propagation whereas the second one is focused on the chemical composition and potential in the crevice during its steady propagation. In this second category the geometry of the crevice is kept constant which is a very rough approximation since a real crevice never reaches a steady state mainly because of its shape evolution. Such an approach necessitates the determination of the most important input parameters (external solution composition, applied potential, shape of the crevice, etc.) in the stabilization of a crevice providing a stability criterion is defined, taking into account the occurrence of precipitation or of gas evolution. The objective of this study was to determine under which conditions of pH and potential a crevice was susceptible to re-passivate. For doing this we used commercial code, since existing ones are mostly home-made, keeping in mind that it had to be as a modular as possible. This code was developed using the Chemical Engineering Module of FEMLAB, which is a MATLAB-based tool for finite element methods. In a first part of this study the ability of this software to be used for crevice corrosion on iron will be presented. As function of the environment (bulk composition and applied potential), calculations were performed in order to determine the occurrence of solid precipitation like FeCl 2 and Fe(OH) 2 or H 2 gas bubbles generation inside the occluded cavity. (authors)

  4. Diffusion in cladding materials

    Anand, M.S.; Pande, B.M.; Agarwala, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminium has been used as a cladding material in most research reactors because its low neutron absorption cross section and ease of fabrication. However, it is not suitable for cladding in power reactors and as such zircaloy-2 is normally used as a clad because it can withstand high temperature. It has low neutron absorption cross section, good oxidation, corrosion, creep properties and possesses good mechanical strength. With the passage of time, further development in this branch of science took place and designers started looking for better neutron economy and less hydrogen pickup in PHW reactors. The motion of fission products in the cladding material could pose a problem after long operation. In order to understand their behaviour under reactor environment, it is essential to study first the diffusion under normal conditions. These studies will throw light on the interaction of defects with impurities which would in turn help in understanding the mechanism of diffusion. In this article, it is intended to discuss the diffusion behaviour of impurities in cladding materials.(i.e. aluminium, zircaloy-2, zirconium-niobium alloy etc.). (author). 94 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Fuel clad chemical interactions in fast reactor MOX fuels

    Viswanathan, R., E-mail: rvis@igcar.gov.in

    2014-01-15

    Clad corrosion being one of the factors limiting the life of a mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel element pin at high burn-up, some aspects known about the key elements (oxygen, cesium, tellurium, iodine) in the clad-attack are discussed and many Fuel–Clad-Chemical-Interaction (FCCI) models available in the literature are also discussed. Based on its relatively superior predictive ability, the HEDL (Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory) relation is recommended: d/μm = ({0.507 ⋅ [B/(at.% fission)] ⋅ (T/K-705) ⋅ [(O/M)_i-1.935]} + 20.5) for (O/M){sub i} ⩽ 1.98. A new model is proposed for (O/M){sub i} ⩾ 1.98: d/μm = [B/(at.% fission)] ⋅ (T/K-800){sup 0.5} ⋅ [(O/M){sub i}-1.94] ⋅ [P/(W cm{sup −1})]{sup 0.5}. Here, d is the maximum depth of clad attack, B is the burn-up, T is the clad inner surface temperature, (O/M){sub i} is the initial oxygen-to-(uranium + plutonium) ratio, and P is the linear power rating. For fuels with [n(Pu)/n(M = U + Pu)] > 0.25, multiplication factors f are recommended to consider the potential increase in the depth of clad-attack.

  6. Modelling hydrodynamic parameters to predict flow assisted corrosion

    Poulson, B.; Greenwell, B.; Chexal, B.; Horowitz, J.

    1992-01-01

    During the past 15 years, flow assisted corrosion has been a worldwide problem in the power generating industry. The phenomena is complex and depends on environment, material composition, and hydrodynamic factors. Recently, modeling of flow assisted corrosion has become a subject of great importance. A key part of this effort is modeling the hydrodynamic aspects of this issue. This paper examines which hydrodynamic parameter should be used to correlate the occurrence and rate of flow assisted corrosion with physically meaningful parameters, discusses ways of measuring the relevant hydrodynamic parameter, and describes how the hydrodynamic data is incorporated into the predictive model

  7. WWER water chemistry related to fuel cladding behaviour

    Kysela, J; Zmitko, M [Nuclear Research Inst. plc., Rez (Czech Republic); Vrtilkova, V [Nuclear Fuel Inst., Prague (Czech Republic)

    1997-02-01

    Operational experience in WWER primary water chemistry and corrosion related to the fuel cladding is reviewed. Insignificant corrosion of fuel cladding was found which is caused by good corrosion resistance of Zr1Nb material and relatively low coolant temperature at WWER-440 reactor units. The differences in water chemistry control is outlined and an attention to the question of compatibility of Zircaloys with WWER water chemistry is given. Some results of research and development in field of zirconium alloy corrosion behaviour are discussed. Experimental facility for in-pile and out-of-pile cladding material corrosion testing is shown. (author). 14 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs.

  8. Stochastic Models for Chloride-Initiated Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete

    Engelund, Svend; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    Corrosion of the reinforcement in concrete structures can lead to a substantial decrease of the load-bearing capacity. One mode of corrosion initiation is when the chloride content around the reinforcement exceeds a threshold value. In the present paper a statistical model is developed by which...... the chloride content in a 1reinforced concrete structure can be predicted. The model parameters are estimated on the basis of measurements. The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by FORMISORM-analysis....

  9. Stochastic Models for Chloride-Initiated Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete

    Engelund, S.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion of the reinforcement in concrete structures can lead to a substantial decrease of the load-bearing capacity. One mode of corrosion initiation is when the chloride content around the reinforcement exceeds a threshold value. In the present paper a statistical model is developed by which...... the chloride content in a reinforced concrete structure can be predicted. The model parameters are estimated on the basis of measurements. The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by FORM/SORM-analysis....

  10. Static Recovery Modeling of Dislocation Density in a Cold Rolled Clad Aluminum Alloy

    Penlington, Alex

    Clad alloys feature one or more different alloys bonded to the outside of a core alloy, with non-equilibrium, interalloy interfaces. There is limited understanding of the recovery and recrystallization behaviour of cold rolled clad aluminum alloys. In order to optimize the properties of such alloys, new heat treatment processes may be required that differ from what is used for the monolithic alloys. This study examines the recovery behaviour of a cold rolled Novelis Fusion(TM) alloy containing an AA6XXX core with an AA3003 cladding on one side. The bond between alloys appears microscopically discrete and continuous, but has a 30 microm wide chemical gradient. The as-deformed structure at the interalloy region consists of pancaked sub-grains with dislocations at the misorientation boundaries and a lower density organized within the more open interiors. X-ray line broadening was used to extract the dislocation density from the interalloy region and an equivalently deformed AA6XXX following static annealing using a modified Williamson-Hall analysis. This analysis assumed that Gaussian broadening contributions in a pseudo-Voigt function corresponded only to strain from dislocations. The kinetics of the dislocation density evolution to recrystallization were studied isothermally at 2 minute intervals, and isochronally at 175 and 205°C. The data fit the Nes model, in which the interalloy region recovered faster than AA6XXX at 175°C, but was slower at 205°C. This was most likely caused by change in texture and chemistry within this region such as over-aging of AA6XXX . Simulation of a continuous annealing and self homogenization process both with and without pre-recovery indicates a detectable, though small change in the texture and grain size in the interalloy region.

  11. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  12. Influence of water chemistry on fuel cladding behaviour. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    1997-02-01

    For the purpose of the meeting water chemistry included the actual practice, the water chemistry monitoring and the on-going research. Corrosion included also hydriding, recent observations made in reactors, modelling and the recent research carried out. Fifty seven participants representing twenty countries attended the thirty formal presentations and the subsequent discussions. The thirty papers presented were split into five sessions covering, Reactor experience, Mechanism and Modelling, Oxidation and hydriding, On-line monitoring of water chemistry and the review of existing and advanced water chemistries. Four panel discussions including ''Corrosion mechanism and Modelling'', ''Corrosion and Hydriding'', ''Plant Experience and Loop Experiments'', Water Chemistry, Current Practice and Emerging Solutions'' and ''On-line Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion'' were organized. The main points of discussion focussed on the optimization of water chemistry, the compatibility of potassium water chemistry with the utilization of Zircaloy 4 or the utilization of zirconium niobium cladding with lithium water chemistry. The effect of the fabrication route and of the cladding composition (Sn content) on the corrosion kinetics, the state of the art and the correlative gaps in cladding corrosion modelling and the recent developments of on-line monitoring of water chemistry together with examination of suitable developments, were also discussed. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. Influence of water chemistry on fuel cladding behaviour. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    For the purpose of the meeting water chemistry included the actual practice, the water chemistry monitoring and the on-going research. Corrosion included also hydriding, recent observations made in reactors, modelling and the recent research carried out. Fifty seven participants representing twenty countries attended the thirty formal presentations and the subsequent discussions. The thirty papers presented were split into five sessions covering, Reactor experience, Mechanism and Modelling, Oxidation and hydriding, On-line monitoring of water chemistry and the review of existing and advanced water chemistries. Four panel discussions including ``Corrosion mechanism and Modelling``, ``Corrosion and Hydriding``, ``Plant Experience and Loop Experiments``, Water Chemistry, Current Practice and Emerging Solutions`` and ``On-line Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion`` were organized. The main points of discussion focussed on the optimization of water chemistry, the compatibility of potassium water chemistry with the utilization of Zircaloy 4 or the utilization of zirconium niobium cladding with lithium water chemistry. The effect of the fabrication route and of the cladding composition (Sn content) on the corrosion kinetics, the state of the art and the correlative gaps in cladding corrosion modelling and the recent developments of on-line monitoring of water chemistry together with examination of suitable developments, were also discussed. Refs, figs, tabs.

  14. The effect of hot spots upon swelling of Zircaloy cladding as modelled by the code CANSWEL-2

    Haste, T.J.; Gittus, J.H.

    1980-12-01

    The code CANSWEL-2 models cladding creep deformation under conditions relevant to a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurised-water reactor (PWR). It can treat azimuthal non-uniformities in cladding thickness and temperature, and model the mechanical restraint imposed by the nearest neighbouring rods, including situations where cladding is forced into non-circular shapes. The physical and mechanical models used in the code are presented. Applications of the code are described, both as a stand-alone version and as part of the PWR LOCA code MABEL-2. Comparison with a limited number of relevant out-of-reactor creep strain experiments has generally shown encouraging agreement with the data. (author)

  15. CANSWEL-2: a computer model of the creep deformation of Zircaloy cladding under loss-of-coolant accident conditions

    Haste, T.J.

    1982-07-01

    The CANSWEL-2 code models cladding creep deformation under conditions relevant to a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurised water reactor (PWR). It considers in detail the centre rod of a 3 x 3 nominally square array, taking into account azimuthal non-uniformities in cladding thickness and temperature, and the mechanical restraint imposed on contact with neighbouring rods. Any of the rods in the array may assume a non-circular shape. Models are included for primary and secondary creep, dynamic phase change and superplasticity when both alpha- and beta-phase Zircaloy are present. A simple treatment of oxidation strengthening is incorporated. Account is taken of the anisotropic creep behaviour of alpha-phase Zircaloy which leads to cladding bowing. The CANSWEL-2 model is used both as a stand-alone code and also as part of the LOCA analysis code MABEL-2. (author)

  16. Initiation model for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWR pipes

    Hishida, Mamoru; Kawakubo, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yuji; Arii, Mitsuru.

    1981-01-01

    Discussions were made on the keys of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature water in laboratories and stress corrosion cracking incidents in operating plants. Based on these discussions, a model was set up of intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation in BWR pipes. Regarding the model, it was presumed that the intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiates during start up periods whenever heat-affected zones in welded pipes are highly sensitized and suffer dynamic strain in transient water containing dissolved oxygen. A series of BWR start up simulation tests were made by using a flowing autoclave system with slow strain rate test equipment. Validity of the model was confirmed through the test results. (author)

  17. Nodal wear model: corrosion in carbon blast furnace hearths

    Verdeja, L. F.; Gonzalez, R.; Alfonso, A.; Barbes, M. F.

    2003-01-01

    Criteria developed for the Nodal Wear Model (NWM) were applied to estimate the shape of the corrosion profiles that a blast furnace hearth may acquire during its campaign. Taking into account design of the hearth, the boundary conditions, the characteristics of the refractory materials used and the operation conditions of the blast furnace, simulation of wear profiles with central well, mushroom and elephant foot shape were accomplished. The foundations of the NWM are constructed considering that the corrosion of the refractory is a function of the temperature present at each point (node) of the liquid metal-refractory interface and the corresponding physical and chemical characteristics of the corrosive fluid. (Author) 31 refs

  18. Dilution and Ferrite Number Prediction in Pulsed Current Cladding of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel Using RSM

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Raeissi, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels have an excellent combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance at relatively low temperatures and can be used as a coating to improve the corrosion and wear resistance of low carbon and low alloy steels. Such coatings can be produced using weld cladding. In this study, pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process was utilized to deposit super-duplex stainless steel on high strength low alloy steel substrates. In such claddings, it is essential to understand how the dilution affects the composition and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel layer in order to be able to estimate its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the current study, the effect of pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process parameters on the dilution and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel clad layer was investigated by applying response surface methodology. The validity of the proposed models was investigated by using quadratic regression models and analysis of variance. The results showed an inverse relationship between dilution and ferrite number. They also showed that increasing the heat input decreases the ferrite number. The proposed mathematical models are useful for predicting and controlling the ferrite number within an acceptable range for super-duplex stainless steel cladding.

  19. Clad-coolant chemical interaction

    Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.; Desgranges, C.; Toffolon, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the kinetics for zircaloy clad oxidation behaviour in steam and air during reactor accident conditions. The generation of chemical heat from metal/water reaction is considered. Low-temperature oxidation of zircaloy due to water-side corrosion is further described. (authors)

  20. A unified model to describe the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    Delobelle, P.; Robinet, P.; Bouffioux, P.; Geyer, P.; Pichon, I. Le

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the constitutive equations of a unified viscoplastic model and its validation with experimental data. The mechanical tests were carried out in a temperature range of 20 to 400 C on both cold-worked stress-relieved and fully annealed Zircaloy-4 tubes. Although their geometry (14.3 by 1.2 mm) is different, the crystallographic texture was close to that expected in the cladding tubes. To characterize the anisotropy, mechanical tests were performed under both monotonic and cyclic uni- and bi-directional loadings, i.e., tension-compression, tension-torsion, and tension-internal pressure tests. The results obtained at ambient temperatures and the independence of the ratio R p = var-epsilon θθ p /var-epsilon zz p , with respect to temperature would seem to indicate that the set of anisotropy coefficients does not depend on temperature. Zircaloy-4 material also has a slight supplementary hardening during out-of-phase cyclic loading. The authors propose to extend the formulation of a unified viscoplastic model, developed and identified elsewhere for other initially isotropic materials, to the case of Zircaloy-4. Generally speaking, anisotropy is introduced through fourth order tensors affecting the flow directions, the linear kinematical hardening components, as well as the dynamic and static recoveries of the forementioned hardening variables. The ability of the model to describe all the mechanical properties of the material is shown. The application of the model to simulate mechanical tests (tension, creep, and relaxation) performed on true CWSR Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes with low tin content is also presented

  1. Corrosion chemistry closing comments: opportunities in corrosion science facilitated by operando experimental characterization combined with multi-scale computational modelling.

    Scully, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in characterization tools, computational capabilities, and theories have created opportunities for advancement in understanding of solid-fluid interfaces at the nanoscale in corroding metallic systems. The Faraday Discussion on Corrosion Chemistry in 2015 highlighted some of the current needs, gaps and opportunities in corrosion science. Themes were organized into several hierarchical categories that provide an organizational framework for corrosion. Opportunities to develop fundamental physical and chemical data which will enable further progress in thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of corrosion were discussed. These will enable new and better understanding of unit processes that govern corrosion at the nanoscale. Additional topics discussed included scales, films and oxides, fluid-surface and molecular-surface interactions, selected topics in corrosion science and engineering as well as corrosion control. Corrosion science and engineering topics included complex alloy dissolution, local corrosion, and modelling of specific corrosion processes that are made up of collections of temporally and spatially varying unit processes such as oxidation, ion transport, and competitive adsorption. Corrosion control and mitigation topics covered some new insights on coatings and inhibitors. Further advances in operando or in situ experimental characterization strategies at the nanoscale combined with computational modelling will enhance progress in the field, especially if coupling across length and time scales can be achieved incorporating the various phenomena encountered in corrosion. Readers are encouraged to not only to use this ad hoc organizational scheme to guide their immersion into the current opportunities in corrosion chemistry, but also to find value in the information presented in their own ways.

  2. Cladding creepdown under compression

    Hobson, D.O.

    1977-01-01

    Light-water power reactors use Zircaloy tubing as cladding to contain the UO 2 fuel pellets. In-service operating conditions impose an external hydrostatic force on the cladding, causing it to creep down into eventual contact with the fuel. Knowledge of the rate of such creepdown is of great importance to modelers of fuel element performance. An experimental system was devised for studying creepdown that meets several severe requirements by providing (1) correct stress state, (2) multiple positions for measuring radial displacement of the cladding surface, (3) high-precision data, and (4) an experimental configuration compact enough to fit in-reactor. A microcomputer-controlled, eddy-current monitoring system was developed for this study and has proven highly successful in measuring cladding deformation with time at temperatures of 371 0 C (700 0 F) and higher, and at pressures as high as 21 MPa

  3. Numerical model of RC beam response to corrosion

    German, Magdalena; Pamin, Jerzy

    2018-01-01

    The chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcement used to be represented by Tuutti's model with initiation and propagation phases. During the initiation phase chlorides penetrate the concrete cover and accumulate around reinforcement bars. The chloride concentration in concrete increases until it reaches a chloride threshold value, causing deterioration of the passive layer of reinforcement. Then the propagation phase begins. During the propagation phase steel has no natural anti-corrosion protection, a corrosion current flows and this induces the production of rust. A growing volume of corrosion products generates stresses in concrete, which leads to cracking, splitting, delamination and loss of strength. The mechanical response of RC elements to reinforcement corrosion has mostly been examined on the basis of a 2D cross-section analysis. However, with this approach it is not possible to represent both corrosion and static loading. In the paper a 3D finite element model of an RC beam with the two actions applied is presented. Rust is represented as an interface between steel and concrete, considering the volumetric expansion of rust.

  4. RELAP5 model to simulate the thermal-hydraulic effects of grid spacers and cladding rupture during reflood

    Nithianandan, C.K.; Klingenfus, J.A.; Reilly, S.S. [B& W Nuclear Technologies, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Droplet breakup at spacer grids and a cladding swelled and ruptured locations plays an important role in the cooling of nuclear fuel rods during the reflooding period of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). During the reflood phase, a spacer grid affects the thermal-hydraulic system behavior through increased turbulence, droplet breakup due to impact on grid straps, grid rewetting, and liquid holdup due to grid form losses. Recently, models to simulate spacer grid effects and blockage and rupture effects on system thermal hydraulics were added to the B&W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) version of the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code. Several FLECHT-SEASET forced reflood tests, CCTF Tests C1-19 and C2-6, SCTF Test S3-15, and G2 Test 561 were simulated using RELAP5/MOD2-B&W to verify the applicability of the model at the cladding swelled and rupture locations. The results demonstrate the importance of modeling the thermal-hydraulic effects due to grids, and clad swelling and rupture to correctly predict the clad temperature response during the reflood phase of large break LOCA. The RELAP5 models and the test results are described in this paper.

  5. Modelling of Microbiological Influenced Corrosion – Limitations and Perspectives

    Skovhus, Torben Lund; Taylor, Christopher; Eckert, Rickard

    of corrosion relative to asset integrity, operators commonly use models to support decision-making. The models use qualitative, semi-quantitative or quantitative measures to help predict the rate of degradation caused by MIC and other threats. A new model that links MIC in topsides oil processing systems...... modeling tools to industry in the shortest development time. ICME development would couple our current understanding of MIC, as represented in models, with experimental data, to build a digital “twin” for optimizing performance of engineering systems, whether in the design phase or operations. Since...... functional groups of microorganisms on reaction kinetics or the significance of microbial growth kinetics on corrosion. The ability to accurately predict MIC initiation and growth is hampered by knowledge gaps regarding environmental conditions affect corrosion under biofilms. In order to manage the threat...

  6. A mathematical model of crevice and pitting corrosion

    Sharland, S.M.; Tasker, P.W.

    1985-09-01

    A predictive and self-consistent mathematical model incorporating the electrochemical, chemical and ionic migration processes characterising crevice and pitting corrosion is described. The model predicts full details of the steady-state solution chemistry and electrode kinetics (and hence metal penetration rates) within the corrosion cavities as functions of the many parameters on which these depend such as external electrode potential and crevice dimensions. The crevice is modelled as a parallel-sided slot filled with a dilute sodium chloride solution. Corrosion in both one and two directions is considered. The model includes a solid hydroxide precipitation reaction and assesses the effect on the corrosion rates of consequent changes in the chemical and physical environment within the crevice. A time stepping method is developed for the study of the progression of the corrosion with a precipitation reaction included and is applied to a restricted range of parameters. The applicability of this method is justified in relation to the physical and mathematical approximations made during the construction of the model. (author)

  7. Yucca Mountain engineered barrier system corrosion model (EBSCOM)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.; Kessler, J.H.; Apted, M.

    2008-01-01

    A revised engineered barrier system model has been developed by the Electric Power Research Institute to predict the time dependence of the failure of the drip shields and waste packages in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The revised model is based on new information on various corrosion processes developed by the US Department of Energy and others and for a 20-mm-thick waste package design with a double closure lid system. As with earlier versions of the corrosion model, the new EBSCOM code produces a best-estimate of the failure times of the various barriers. The model predicts that only 15% of waste packages will fail within a period of 1 million years. The times for the first corrosion failures are 40,000 years, 336,000 years, and 375,000 years for the drip shield, waste package, and combination of drip shield and the associated waste package, respectively

  8. In-cell facility for performing mechanical-property tests on irradiated cladding

    Yaggee, F.L.; Haglund, R.C.; Mattas, R.F.

    1978-11-01

    A new facility was developed for testing cladding sections of LWR fuel rods. This facility and the accompanying test procedures have improved the level of in-cell mechanical-testing capabilities, making them comparable to existing capabilities for unirradiated cladding. The new facility is currently being used to study the susceptibility of irradiated Zircaloy cladding from LWR fuel rods to iodine stress-corrosion cracking. Preliminary testing results indicate a systematic effect of temperature, stress and irradiation on the susceptibility of annealed and stress-relieved Zircaloy-2. Experimental data obtained to date are being used to develop a stress-corrosion cracking model for LWR fuel rod failure. SEM examination of the undisturbed fracture surface of specimens that failed by pinhole leakage provides useful information on crack propagation and morphology

  9. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Application

    Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Jung, Y. H.; Bang, B. G.

    2006-08-01

    The systematic study was performed to develop the advanced corrosion-resistant Zr alloys for high burnup and Gen IV application. The corrosion behavior was significantly changed with the alloy composition and the corrosion environment. In general, the model alloys with a higher alloying elements showed a higher corrosion resistance. Among the model alloys tested in this study, Zr-10Cr-0.2Fe showed the best corrosion resistance regardless of the corrosion condition. The oxide on the higher corrosion-resistant alloy such as Zr-1.0Cr-0.2Fe consisted of mainly columnar grains, and it have a higher tetragonal phase stability. In comparison with other alloys being considered for the SCWR, the Zr alloys showed a lower corrosion rate than ferritic-martensitic steels. The results of this study imply that, at least from a corrosion standpoint, Zr alloys deserve consideration as potential cladding or structural materials in supercritical water cooled reactors

  10. Markov chain modelling of pitting corrosion in underground pipelines

    Caleyo, F. [Departamento de Ingenieri' a Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico D. F. 07738 (Mexico)], E-mail: fcaleyo@gmail.com; Velazquez, J.C. [Departamento de Ingenieri' a Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico D. F. 07738 (Mexico); Valor, A. [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de La Habana, San Lazaro y L, Vedado, 10400 La Habana (Cuba); Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieri' a Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico D. F. 07738 (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    A continuous-time, non-homogenous linear growth (pure birth) Markov process has been used to model external pitting corrosion in underground pipelines. The closed form solution of Kolmogorov's forward equations for this type of Markov process is used to describe the transition probability function in a discrete pit depth space. The identification of the transition probability function can be achieved by correlating the stochastic pit depth mean with the deterministic mean obtained experimentally. Monte-Carlo simulations previously reported have been used to predict the time evolution of the mean value of the pit depth distribution for different soil textural classes. The simulated distributions have been used to create an empirical Markov chain-based stochastic model for predicting the evolution of pitting corrosion depth and rate distributions from the observed properties of the soil. The proposed model has also been applied to pitting corrosion data from pipeline repeated in-line inspections and laboratory immersion experiments.

  11. Markov chain modelling of pitting corrosion in underground pipelines

    Caleyo, F.; Velazquez, J.C.; Valor, A.; Hallen, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-time, non-homogenous linear growth (pure birth) Markov process has been used to model external pitting corrosion in underground pipelines. The closed form solution of Kolmogorov's forward equations for this type of Markov process is used to describe the transition probability function in a discrete pit depth space. The identification of the transition probability function can be achieved by correlating the stochastic pit depth mean with the deterministic mean obtained experimentally. Monte-Carlo simulations previously reported have been used to predict the time evolution of the mean value of the pit depth distribution for different soil textural classes. The simulated distributions have been used to create an empirical Markov chain-based stochastic model for predicting the evolution of pitting corrosion depth and rate distributions from the observed properties of the soil. The proposed model has also been applied to pitting corrosion data from pipeline repeated in-line inspections and laboratory immersion experiments.

  12. Early implementation of SiC cladding fuel performance models in BISON

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-18

    SiC-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) [5–8] are being developed and evaluated internationally as potential LWR cladding options. These development activities include interests within both the DOE-NE LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and the DOE-NE Advanced Fuels Campaign. The LWRS Program considers SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) as offering potentially revolutionary gains as a cladding material, with possible benefits including more efficient normal operating conditions and higher safety margins under accident conditions [9]. Within the Advanced Fuels Campaign, SiC-based composites are a candidate ATF cladding material that could achieve several goals, such as reducing the rates of heat and hydrogen generation due to lower cladding oxidation rates in HT steam [10]. This work focuses on the application of SiC cladding as an ATF cladding material in PWRs, but these work efforts also support the general development and assessment of SiC as an LWR cladding material in a much broader sense.

  13. Prediction of pipeline corrosion rate based on grey Markov models

    Chen Yonghong; Zhang Dafa; Peng Guichu; Wang Yuemin

    2009-01-01

    Based on the model that combined by grey model and Markov model, the prediction of corrosion rate of nuclear power pipeline was studied. Works were done to improve the grey model, and the optimization unbiased grey model was obtained. This new model was used to predict the tendency of corrosion rate, and the Markov model was used to predict the residual errors. In order to improve the prediction precision, rolling operation method was used in these prediction processes. The results indicate that the improvement to the grey model is effective and the prediction precision of the new model combined by the optimization unbiased grey model and Markov model is better, and the use of rolling operation method may improve the prediction precision further. (authors)

  14. Development of high performance cladding

    Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    The developments of superior next-generation light water reactor are requested on the basis of general view points, such as improvement of safety, economics, reduction of radiation waste and effective utilization of plutonium, until 2030 year in which conventional reactor plants should be renovate. Improvements of stainless steel cladding for conventional high burn-up reactor to more than 100 GWd/t, developments of manufacturing technology for reduced moderation-light water reactor (RMWR) of breeding ratio beyond 1.0 and researches of water-materials interaction on super critical pressure-water cooled reactor are carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Stable austenite stainless steel has been selected for fuel element cladding of advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR). The austenite stain less has the superiority for anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength. A hard spectrum of neutron energy up above 0.1 MeV takes place in core of the reduced moderation-light water reactor, as liquid metal-fast breeding reactor (LMFBR). High performance cladding for the RMWR fuel elements is required to get anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength also. Slow strain rate test (SSRT) of SUS 304 and SUS 316 are carried out for studying stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Irradiation tests in LMFBR are intended to obtain irradiation data for damaged quantity of the cladding materials. (M. Suetake)

  15. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended

    The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been discussed for decades. Here I propose a model of SCC reflecting the feature of fracture in brittle manner based on the variational principle under approximately supposed thermal equilibrium. In that model the functionals are expressed with extended forms of ...

  16. Prediction model for oxide thickness on aluminum alloy cladding during irradiation

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hofman, G.L.; Hanan, N.A.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    An empirical model predicting the oxide film thickness on aluminum alloy cladding during irradiation has been developed as a function of irradiation time, temperature, heat flux, pH, and coolant flow rate. The existing models in the literature are neither consistent among themselves nor fit the measured data very well. They also lack versatility for various reactor situations such as a pH other than 5, high coolant flow rates, and fuel life longer than ∼1200 hrs. Particularly, they were not intended for use in irradiation situations. The newly developed model is applicable to these in-reactor situations as well as ex-reactor tests, and has a more accurate prediction capability. The new model demonstrated with consistent predictions to the measured data of UMUS and SIMONE fuel tests performed in the HFR, Petten, tests results from the ORR, and IRIS tests from the OSIRIS and to the data from the out-of-pile tests available in the literature as well. (author)

  17. Clad Treatment in KARMA Code and Library

    Lee, Jeong-yeup; Lee, Hae-chan; Woo, Hae-seuk [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Zirconium is the main components in clad materials. The subgroup parameters of zirconium were generated with effective cross section which obtained by using flux distribution in clad region. It decreases absorption reaction rate differences with reference MCNP results. Use of composite nuclide is acceptable to increase efficiency but should be limited to specific target composition. Therefore, the use of the composite nuclide of Zircaloy-2 should be limited when HANA clad material is used for clad. Either using explicit components or generating composite nuclide for HANA is suggested. This paper investigates the clad analysis model for KARMA whether current method is applicable to HANA clad material.

  18. Uniform and localized corrosion modelling by means of probabilistic cellular automata

    Perez-Brokate, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Numerical modelling is complementary tool for corrosion prediction. The objective of this work is to develop a corrosion model by means of a probabilistic cellular automata approach at a mesoscopic scale. In this work, we study the morphological evolution and kinetics of corrosion. This model couples electrochemical oxidation and reduction reactions. Regarding kinetics, cellular automata models are able to describe current as a function of the applied potential for a redox reaction on an inert electrode. The inclusion of probabilities allows the description of the stochastic nature of anodic and cathodic reactions. Corrosion morphology has been studied in different context: generalised corrosion, pitting corrosion and corrosion in an occluded environment. a general tendency of two regimes is found. a first regime of uniform corrosion where the anodic and cathodic reactions occur homogeneously over the surface. a second regime of localized corrosion when there is a spatial separation of anodic and cathodic zones, with an increase of anodic reaction rate. (author) [fr

  19. Modelling the long-term corrosion behaviour of candidate alloys for Canadian SCWR

    Steeves, G.; Cook, W., E-mail: wcook@unb.ca, E-mail: graham.steeves@unb.ca [University of New Brunswick, Department of Chemical Engineering, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Corrosion behaviour of Inconel 625 and Incoloy 800H, two of the candidate fuel cladding materials for Canadian supercritical water (SCW) reactor designs, were evaluated by exposing the metals to SCW in UNB's SCW flow loop. Individual experiments were conducted over a range of 370{sup o}C and 600{sup o}C. Exposure times were typically intervals of 100, 250, and 500 hours. Experimental data was used to create an empirical kinetic equation for each material. Activation energies for the alloys were determined, and showed a distinct difference between low-temperature electrochemical corrosion mechanism and direct high-temperature chemical oxidation. (author)

  20. A state-of-the art report on the investigation of the various corrosion models for zirconium-based alloy

    Kim, S. J.; Kim, K. H.; Baek, J. H.; Choi, B. K.; Jeong, Y. H.

    1999-02-01

    The desire to increase uranium utilization and to minimize spent fuel storage requirements provides an incentive to extend the average fuel rod discharge burnup to about 70,000MWd/MTU. For these higher burnups data are needed to determine if waterside corrosion of the cladding may be a life-limiting feature of fuel rod design. It is apparent that many factors can influence waterside corrosion, and these need to be better understood in order to minimize corrosion at these higher target burnups. The objective of this report is to review published data relevant to the corrosion of Zircaloy under PWR operating conditions. (author). 100 refs., 4 tabs., 21 figs

  1. Fokker-Planck modeling of pitting corrosion in underground pipelines

    Camacho, Eliana Nogueira [Risco Ambiental Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Melo, Paulo F. Frutuoso e [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Saldanha, Pedro Luiz C. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CGRC/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao Geral de Reatores e Ciclo do Combustivel; Silva, Edson de Pinho da [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Physics

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The stochastic nature of pitting corrosion has been recognized since the 1930s. It has been learned that this damage retains no memory of its past. Instead, the future state is determined only by the knowledge of its present state. This Markovian property that underlies the stochastic process governing pitting corrosion has been explored as a discrete Markovian process by many authors since the beginning of the 1990s for underground pipelines of the oil and gas industries and nuclear power plants. Corrosion is a genuine continuous time and space state Markovian process, so to model it as a discrete time and/or state space is an approximation to the problem. Markovian chains approaches, with an increasing number of states, could involve a large number of parameters, the transition rates between states, to be experimentally determined. Besides, such an increase in the number of states produces matrices with huge dimensions leading to time-consuming computational solutions. Recent approaches involving Markovian discrete process have overcome those difficulties but, on the other hand, a large number of soil and pipe stochastic variables have to be known. In this work we propose a continuous time and space state approach to the evolution of pit corrosion depths in underground pipelines. In order to illustrate the application of the model for defect depth growth a combination of real life data and Monte Carlo simulation was used. The process is described by a Fokker-Planck equation. The Fokker-Planck equation is completely determined by the knowledge of two functions known as the drift and diffusion coefficients. In this work we also show that those functions can be estimated from corrosion depth data from in-line inspections. Some particular forms of drift and diffusion coefficients lead to particular Fokker-Planck equations for which analytical solutions are known, as is the case for the Wiener process, the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and the Brownian motion

  2. Electromagnetic modeling of stress corrosion cracks in Inconel welds

    Huang, Haoyu; Miya, Kenzo; Yusa, Noritaka; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Sera, Takehiko; Hirano, Shinro

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates suitable numerical modeling of stress corrosion cracks appearing in Inconel welds from the viewpoint of electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations. The stress corrosion cracks analyzed in this study are five artificial ones introduced into welded flat plate, and three natural ones found in a pressurized nuclear power plant. Numerical simulations model a crack as a planar region having a uniform conductivity inside and a constant width, and evaluate the width and conductivity that reproduce the maximum eddy current signals obtained by experiments. The results obtained validate the existence of the minimum value of the equivalent resistance, which is defined by the width divided by conductivity. In contrast, the values of the width and conductivity themselves vary across a wide range. The results also lead to a discussion about (1) the effect of probe utilized on the numerical model, (2) the difference between artificial and natural stress corrosion cracks, and (3) the difference between stress corrosion cracks in base metals and those in Inconel welds in their models. Electromagnetic characteristics of four different Inconel weld alloys are additionally evaluated using a resistance tester and a vibrating sample magnetometer to support the validity of the numerical modeling and the generality of results obtained. (author)

  3. Development of advanced zirconium fuel cladding

    Jeong, Young Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.

    2007-04-01

    This report includes the manufacturing technology developed for HANA TM claddings, a series of their characterization results as well as the results of their in-pile and out-of pile performances tests which were carried out to develop some fuel claddings for a high burn-up (70,000MWd/mtU) which are competitive in the world market. Some of the HANA TM claddings, which had been manufactured based on the results from the 1st and 2nd phases of the project, have been tested in a research reactor in Halden of Norway for an in-pile performance qualification. The results of the in-pile test showed that the performance of the HANA TM claddings for corrosion and creep was better than 50% compared to that of Zircaloy-4 or A cladding. It was also found that the out-of pile performance of the HANA TM claddings for such as LOCA and RIA in some accident conditions corrosion creep, tensile, burst and fatigue was superior or equivalent to that of the Zircaloy-4 or A cladding. The project also produced the other many data which were required to get a license for an in-pile test of HANA TM claddings in a commercial reactor. The data for the qualification or characterization were provided for KNFC to assist their activities to get the license for the in-pile test of HANA TM Lead Test Rods(LTR) in a commercial reactor

  4. Modeling of the cold work stress relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes mechanical behavior under PWR operating conditions

    Richard, F.; Delobelle, P.; Leclercq, S.; Bouffioux, P.; Rousselier, G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes a damaged viscoplastic model to simulate, for different isotherms (320, 350, 380, 400 and 420 degC), the out-of-flux anisotropic mechanical behavior of cold work stress relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes over the fluence range 0-85.1024 nm -2 (E > 1 MeV). The model, identified from uni and biaxial tests conducted at 350 and 400 degC, is validated from tests performed at 320, 380 and 420 degC. This model is able to simulate strain hardening under internal pressure followed by a stress relaxation period (thermal creep), which is representative of a pellet cladding mechanical interaction occurring during a power transient (class 2 incidental condition). Both the integration of a scalar state variable, characterizing the damage caused by a bombardment with neutrons, and the modification of the static recovery law allowed us to simulate the fast neutron flux effect (irradiation creep). (author)

  5. Initial Cladding Condition

    Siegmann, E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M andO 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in

  6. Development and application of preventive maintenance technique for pipes using laser cladding method

    Hatakenaka, Hiroaki; Yamadera, Masao; Shiraiwa, Takanori.

    1995-01-01

    A laser cladding method which produces a highly corrosion-resisting coating (cladding) on the surface of the material was developed for the purpose of preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the austenitic stainless steel (Type 304). In this method, metallic powder paste is applied on the inner surface of pipes, and then a YAG laser beam is irradiated to the paste, which melts and forms a clad with excellent corrosion resistance. Recently, the laser cladding method was practically and successfully applied to the actual nuclear power plant in Japan. This report describes this laser cladding technique, the equipment, and actual works in the field. (author)

  7. Integrated modelling of corrosion-induced deterioration in rein-forced concrete structures

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, M.R.; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    at the reinforcement surface, a FEM based me-chanical model was used to simulate corrosion-induced concrete damage. Both FEM models were fully coupled, i.e. information, such as corrosion current density, dam-age state of concrete cover, etc., were constantly exchanged between the models. To demonstrate the potential......An integrated finite element based modelling approach is presented, which allows for fully coupled simulation of reinforcement corrosion and corrosion-induced concrete damage. While a finite element method (FEM) based corrosion model was used to describe electrochemical processes...... use of the modelling approach, a numerical example is presented which illustrates full coupling of formation of corrosion cells, propagation of corrosion, and subsequent development of corrosion-induced concrete damage....

  8. Corrosion of fuel assembly materials

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Beslu, P.

    1985-08-01

    Corrosion of zircaloy-4 is reviewed in relation with previsions of improvement in PWRs performance: higher fuel burnup; increase coolant temperature, implying nucleate boiling on the hot clad surfaces; increase duration of the cycle due to load-follow operation. Actual knowledge on corrosion rates, based partly on laboratory tests, is insufficient to insure that external clad corrosion will not constitute a limitation to these improvements. Therefore, additional testing within representative conditions is felt necessary [fr

  9. Modeling of mechanical behavior of quenched zirconium-based nuclear fuel claddings after a high temperature oxidation

    Cabrera-Salcedo, A.

    2012-01-01

    During the second stage of Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) zirconium-based fuel claddings undergo a high temperature oxidation (up to 1200 C), then a water quench. After a single-side steam oxidation followed by a direct quench, the cladding is composed of three layers: an oxide (Zirconia) outer layer (formed at HT), always brittle at Room Temperature (RT), an intermediate oxygen stabilized alpha layer, always brittle at RT, called alpha(O), and an inner 'prior-beta' layer, which is the only layer able to keep some significant Post Quench (PQ) ductility at RT. However, hydrogen absorbed because of service exposure or during the LOCA transient, concentrates in this layer and may leads to its embrittlement. To estimate the PQ mechanical properties of these materials, Ring Compression Tests (RCT) are widely used because of their simplicity. Small sample size makes RCTs advantageous when a comparison with irradiated samples is required. Despite their good reproducibility, these tests are difficult to interpret as they often present two or more load drops on the engineering load-displacement curve. Laboratories disagree about their interpretation. This study proposes an original fracture scenario for a stratified PQ cladding tested by RCT, and its associated FE model. Strong oxygen content gradient effect on layers mechanical properties is taken into account in the model. PQ thermal stresses resulting from water quench of HT oxidized cladding are investigated, as well as progressive damage of three layers during an RCT. The proposed scenario is based on interrupted RCT analysis, post- RCT sample's outer layers observation for damage evaluation, RCTs of prior-beta single-layer rings, and mechanical behavior of especially chemically adjusted samples. The force displacement curves appearance is correctly reproduced using the obtained FE model. The proposed fracture scenario elucidates RCTs of quenched zirconium-based nuclear fuel

  10. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., generating defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, increasing shutdown radiation and increasing the volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behaviors are much affected by water qualities and differ according to the values of water qualities and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of key issues that determine corrosion related problems but it is not the only issue. Most phenomena for corrosion related problems, e.g., flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. In the paper, theoretical models based on electrochemistry to estimate wall thinning rate of carbon steel piping due to flow-accelerated corrosion and corrosive conditions determining IGSCC crack initiation and growth rate are introduced. (author)

  11. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    Gueneau, C.; Piron, J.P.; Dumas, J.C.; Bouineau, V.; Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    The chemistry of the nuclear fuel is very complex. Its chemical composition changes with time due to the formation of fission products and depends on the temperature level history within the fuel pellet and the clad during operation. Firstly, in thermal reactors, zircaloy oxidation from reaction with UO 2 fuel under high-temperature conditions will be addressed. Then other fuel-cladding interaction phenomena occurring in fast reactors will be described. Large thermal gradients existing between the centre and the periphery of the pellet induce the radial redistribution of the fuel constituents. The fuel pellet can react with the clad by different corrosion processes which can involve actinide and/or fission product transport via gas, liquid or/and solid phases. All these phenomena are briefly described in the case of different kinds of fuels (oxide, carbide, nitride, metallic) to be used in fast reactors. The way these phenomena are taken into account in fuel performance codes is presented. (authors)

  12. Experiments and models of general corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion of materials in nuclear reactor environments

    Cook, William Gordon

    Corrosion and material degradation issues are of concern to all industries. However, the nuclear power industry must conform to more stringent construction, fabrication and operational guidelines due to the perceived additional risk of operating with radioactive components. Thus corrosion and material integrity are of considerable concern for the operators of nuclear power plants and the bodies that govern their operations. In order to keep corrosion low and maintain adequate material integrity, knowledge of the processes that govern the material's breakdown and failure in a given environment are essential. The work presented here details the current understanding of the general corrosion of stainless steel and carbon steel in nuclear reactor primary heat transport systems (PHTS) and examines the mechanisms and possible mitigation techniques for flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) in CANDU outlet feeder pipes. Mechanistic models have been developed based on first principles and a 'solution-pores' mechanism of metal corrosion. The models predict corrosion rates and material transport in the PHTS of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and the influence of electrochemistry on the corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion of carbon steel in the CANDU outlet feeders. In-situ probes, based on an electrical resistance technique, were developed to measure the real-time corrosion rate of reactor materials in high-temperature water. The probes were used to evaluate the effects of coolant pH and flow on FAC of carbon steel as well as demonstrate of the use of titanium dioxide as a coolant additive to mitigated FAC in CANDU outlet feeder pipes.

  13. Modeling corrosion and constituent release from a metal waste form

    Bauer, T. H.; Fink, J. K.; Abraham, D. P.; Johnson, I.; Johnson, S. G.; Wigeland, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Several ANL ongoing experimental programs have measured metal waste form (MWF) corrosion and constituent release. Analysis of this data has initiated development of a consistent and quantitative phenomenology of uniform aqueous MWF corrosion. The effort so far has produced a preliminary fission product and actinide release model based on measured corrosion rates and calibrated by immersion test data for a 90 C J-13 and concentrated J-13 solution environment over 1-2 year exposure times. Ongoing immersion tests of irradiated and unirradiated MWF samples using more aggressive test conditions and improved tracking of actinides will serve to further validate, modify, and expand the application base of the preliminary model-including effects of other corrosion mechanisms. Sample examination using both mechanical and spectrographic techniques will better define both the nature and durability of the protective barrier layer. It is particularly important to assess whether the observations made with J-13 solution at 900 C persist under more aggressive conditions. For example, all the multiplicative factors in Table 1 implicitly assume the presence of protective barriers. Under sufficiently aggressive test conditions, such protective barriers may very well be altered or even eliminated

  14. Modelling the role of pellet crack motion in the (r-θ) plane upon pellet-clad interaction in advanced gas reactor fuel

    Haynes, T.A. [Centre for Nuclear Engineering & Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Rd., London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Ball, J.A. [EDF Energy, Barnett Way, Gloucester GL4 3RS (United Kingdom); Wenman, M.R., E-mail: m.wenman@imperial.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear Engineering & Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Rd., London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Finite element modelling of pellet relocation in the (r-θ) plane of nuclear fuel. • ‘Soft’ and ‘hard’ PCI have been predicted in a cracked nuclear fuel pellet. • Stress concentration in the cladding ahead of radial pellet cracks is predicted. • The model is very sensitive to the coefficient of friction and power ramp duration. • The model is less sensitive to the number of cracks assumed. - Abstract: A finite element model of pellet fragment relocation in the r-θ plane of advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) fuel is presented under conditions of both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ pellet-clad interaction. The model was able to predict the additional radial displacement of fuel fragments towards the cladding as well as the stress concentration on the inner surface resulting from the azimuthal motion of pellet fragments. The model was subjected to a severe ramp in power from both full power and after a period of reduced power operation; in the former, the maximum hoop stress in the cladding was found to be increased by a factor of 1.6 as a result of modelling the pellet fragment motion. The pellet-clad interaction was found to be relatively insensitive to the number of radial pellet crack. However, it was very sensitive to both the coefficient of friction used between the clad and pellet fragments and power ramp duration.

  15. Irradiation and lithium presence influence on the crystallographic nature of zirconia in the framework of PWR zircaloy 4 fuel cladding corrosion study; Influence de l'irradiation et de la presence du lithium sur la nature cristallographique de la zircone dans le cadre de l'etude de la corrosion du zircaloy 4 en milieu reacteur a eau pressurisee

    Gibert, C

    1999-07-01

    The-increasing deterioration of the initially protective zirconia layer is one of the hypotheses which can explain the impairment with time of PWR fuel cladding corrosion. This deterioration could be worsened by irradiation or lithium presence in the oxidizing medium. The aim of this thesis was to underline the influence of those two parameters on zirconia crystallographic nature. We first studied the impact of ionic irradiation on pure, powdery, monoclinic zirconia and oxidation formed zirconia, mainly with X-ray diffraction and Raman microscopy. The high or low energy particles used (Kr{sup n+-}, Ar{sup n+}) respectively favored electronic or atomic defaults production. The crystallographic analyses showed that these irradiation have a significant effect on zirconia by inducing nucleation or growth of tetragonal phase. The extent depends on sample nature and particles energy. In all cases, phase transformation is correlated with crystalline parameters, grain size and especially micro-stress changes. The results are consistent with those obtained with 1 to 5 cycles PWR claddings. Therefore, the corrosion acceleration observed in reactor can partly be explained by the stress fields appearance under irradiation, which is particularly detrimental to zirconia layer cohesion. Last, we have underlined that the presence of considerable amounts of lithium in the oxidizing medium ((> 700 ppm) induces the disappearance of the tetragonal zirconia located at the metal/oxide interface and the appearance of a porosity of the dense under layer, which looses its protectiveness. (author)

  16. Irradiation and lithium presence influence on the crystallographic nature of zirconia in the framework of PWR zircaloy 4 fuel cladding corrosion study; Influence de l'irradiation et de la presence du lithium sur la nature cristallographique de la zircone dans le cadre de l'etude de la corrosion du zircaloy 4 en milieu reacteur a eau pressurisee

    Gibert, C

    1999-07-01

    The-increasing deterioration of the initially protective zirconia layer is one of the hypotheses which can explain the impairment with time of PWR fuel cladding corrosion. This deterioration could be worsened by irradiation or lithium presence in the oxidizing medium. The aim of this thesis was to underline the influence of those two parameters on zirconia crystallographic nature. We first studied the impact of ionic irradiation on pure, powdery, monoclinic zirconia and oxidation formed zirconia, mainly with X-ray diffraction and Raman microscopy. The high or low energy particles used (Kr{sup n+-}, Ar{sup n+}) respectively favored electronic or atomic defaults production. The crystallographic analyses showed that these irradiation have a significant effect on zirconia by inducing nucleation or growth of tetragonal phase. The extent depends on sample nature and particles energy. In all cases, phase transformation is correlated with crystalline parameters, grain size and especially micro-stress changes. The results are consistent with those obtained with 1 to 5 cycles PWR claddings. Therefore, the corrosion acceleration observed in reactor can partly be explained by the stress fields appearance under irradiation, which is particularly detrimental to zirconia layer cohesion. Last, we have underlined that the presence of considerable amounts of lithium in the oxidizing medium ((> 700 ppm) induces the disappearance of the tetragonal zirconia located at the metal/oxide interface and the appearance of a porosity of the dense under layer, which looses its protectiveness. (author)

  17. 激光熔覆TiC-H13涂层的微结构及耐腐蚀性能的研究%Study on Microstructure and Electrochemical Corrosion Resistance of Laser Cladding TiC-H13 Steel Composite Coating

    杨倩; 黄宛真; 孔凡志

    2016-01-01

    TiC-H 13 cladding layer was produced by laser cladding on H 13 steel substrate.The effects of TiC on microstructure and electrochemical corrosion behavior of TiC-H13 layer were studied by SEM,EDS,TEM and anodic polarization curve.The results show that good metallurgical bonding is formed between the TiC-H 13 cladding layer and H 13 steel substrate.The new phase of TiC is formed in the laser cladding layer.Compared with H13 steel,the TiC-H13 cladding layer demonstrates much higher corrosion potential and the lower corrosion current,which exhibites significantly higher corrosion resistant.%以H13钢为基体,通过激光熔覆TiC-H13混合粉末获得熔覆层,考察TiC的加入对TiC-H13熔覆层的微观结构以及耐腐蚀性能的影响.采用SEM、EDS和TEM对熔覆层内的微观组成和物相进行表征,利用电化学阳极极化曲线研究熔覆层的耐腐蚀性能.结果表明:TiC-H13粉末和H13钢基体可以形成良好的熔覆层,熔覆层与基体紧密结合,熔覆层中形成新物相TiC.与H13钢相比,TiC-H 13熔覆层的腐蚀电位明显升高,腐蚀电流明显降低,耐腐蚀性能得到显著提高.

  18. Evaluation of the interfacial shear strength and residual stress of TiAlN coating on ZIRLO™ fuel cladding using a modified shear-lag model approach

    Liu, Y., E-mail: troy.liu@manchester.ac.uk [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bhamji, I., E-mail: imran.bhamji@manchester.ac.uk [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Withers, P.J., E-mail: p.j.withers@manchester.ac.uk [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Wolfe, D.E., E-mail: dew125@arl.psu.edu [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, PA 16801 (United States); Motta, A.T., E-mail: atmnuc@engr.psu.edu [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, PA 16801 (United States); Preuss, M., E-mail: michael.preuss@manchester.ac.uk [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    This paper investigates the residual stresses and interfacial shear strength of a TiAlN coating on Zr–Nb–Sn–Fe alloy (ZIRLO™) substrate designed to improve corrosion resistance of fuel cladding used in water-cooled nuclear reactors, both during normal and exceptional conditions, e.g. a loss of coolant event (LOCA). The distribution and maximum value of the interfacial shear strength has been estimated using a modified shear-lag model. The parameters critical to this analysis were determined experimentally. From these input parameters the interfacial shear strength between the TiAlN coating and ZIRLO™ substrate was inferred to be around 120 MPa. It is worth noting that the apparent strength of the coating is high (∼3.4 GPa). However, this is predominantly due to the large compressive residuals stress (3 GPa in compression), which must be overcome for the coating to fail in tension, which happens at a load just 150 MPa in excess of this.

  19. Laser cladding technology to small diameter pipes

    Fujimagari, H.; Hagiwara, M.; Kojima, T.

    2000-01-01

    A laser cladding method which produces a highly corrosion-resistant material coating layers (cladding) on the austenitic stainless steel (type 304 SS) pipe inner surface was developed to prevent SCC (stress corrosion cracking) occurrence. This technology is applicable to a narrow and long distance area from operators, because of the good accessibility of the YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser beam that can be transmitted through an optical fiber. In this method a mixed paste metallic powder and heating-resistive organic solvent are firstly placed on the inner surface of a small pipe, and then a YAG laser beam transmitted through an optical fiber irradiates to the pasted area. A mixed paste will be melted and form a cladding layer subsequently. A cladding layer shows as excellent corrosion resistance property. This laser cladding (LC) method had already applied to several domestic nuclear power plants and had obtained a good reputation. This report introduces the outline of laser cladding technology, the developed equipment for practical application in the field, and the circumstance in actual plant application. (orig.)

  20. A finite element modeling method for predicting long term corrosion rates

    Fu, J.W.; Chan, S.

    1984-01-01

    For the analyses of galvanic corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, which have been identified as possible corrosion processes for nuclear waste isolation, a finite element method has been developed for the prediction of corrosion rates. The method uses a finite element mesh to model the corrosive environment and the polarization curves of metals are assigned as the boundary conditions to calculate the corrosion cell current distribution. A subroutine is used to calculate the chemical change with time in the crevice or the pit environments. In this paper, the finite element method is described along with experimental confirmation

  1. Statistical mechanical analysis of LMFBR fuel cladding tubes

    Poncelet, J.-P.; Pay, A.

    1977-01-01

    The most important design requirement on fuel pin cladding for LMFBR's is its mechanical integrity. Disruptive factors include internal pressure from mixed oxide fuel fission gas release, thermal stresses and high temperature creep, neutron-induced differential void-swelling as a source of stress in the cladding and irradiation creep of stainless steel material, corrosion by fission products. Under irradiation these load-restraining mechanisms are accentuated by stainless steel embrittlement and strength alterations. To account for the numerous uncertainties involved in the analysis by theoretical models and computer codes statistical tools are unavoidably requested, i.e. Monte Carlo simulation methods. Thanks to these techniques, uncertainties in nominal characteristics, material properties and environmental conditions can be linked up in a correct way and used for a more accurate conceptual design. First, a thermal creep damage index is set up through a sufficiently sophisticated clad physical analysis including arbitrary time dependence of power and neutron flux as well as effects of sodium temperature, burnup and steel mechanical behavior. Although this strain limit approach implies a more general but time consuming model., on the counterpart the net output is improved and e.g. clad temperature, stress and strain maxima may be easily assessed. A full spectrum of variables are statistically treated to account for their probability distributions. Creep damage probability may be obtained and can contribute to a quantitative fuel probability estimation

  2. The fuel-cladding interfacial friction coefficient in water-cooled reactor fuel rods

    Smith, E.

    1979-01-01

    A central problem in the development of cladding failure criteria and of effective operational, design or material remedies is to know whether the cladding stress is enhanced significantly near cladding ridges, pellet chips or fuel pellet cracks; the latter may also be coincident with cladding ridges at pellet-pellet interfaces. As regards the fuel pellet crack source of cladding stress concentration, the magnitude of the uranium dioxide-Zircaloy interfacial friction coefficient μ governs the magnitude and distribution of the enhanced cladding stress. Considerable discussion, particularly at a Post-Conference Seminar associated with the SMIRT 4 Conference, has focussed on the value of μ, the author taking the view that it is unlikely to be large (< 0.5). The reasoning behind this view is as follows. A fuel pellet should fracture during a power ramp when the tensile hoop stress within the pellet exceeds the fuel's fracture stress. Since the preferred position for a fuel pellet crack to form is at the fuel-cladding interface midway between existing fuel cracks, where the interfacial shear stress changes sign, the pellet segment size after a power ramp provides a limit to the magnitude of the interfacial shear stresses and consequently to the value of μ. With this argument as a basis, the author's early work used the Gittus fuel rod model, in which there is a symmetric distribution of fuel pellet cracks and symmetric interfacial slippage, to show that μ < 0.5 if it is assumed that the average hoop stress within the cladding attains yield levels. It was therefore suggested that a high interfacial friction coefficient is unlikely to be operative during a power ramp; this result was used to support the view that interfacial friction effects do not play a dominant role in stress corrosion crack formation within the cladding. (orig.)

  3. Impact of reactor water chemistry on cladding performance

    Cox, B.

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistry may have a major impact on fuel cladding performance in PWRs. If the saturation temperature on the surface of fuel cladding is exceeded, either because of the thermal hydraulics of the system, or because of crud deposition, then LiOH concentration can occur within thick porous oxide films on the cladding. This can degrade the protective film and accelerate the corrosion rate of the cladding. If sufficient boric acid is also present in the coolant then these effects may be mitigated. This is normally the case through most of any reactor fuel cycle. Extensive surface boiling may disrupt this equilibrium because of the volatility of boric acid in steam. Under such conditions severe cladding corrosion can ensue. The potential for such effects on high burnup cladding in CANDU reactors, where bone acid is not present in the primary coolant, is discussed. (author)

  4. Impact of reactor water chemistry on cladding performance

    Cox, B. [University of Toronto, Centre for Nuclear Engineering, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    Water chemistry may have a major impact on fuel cladding performance in PWRs. If the saturation temperature on the surface of fuel cladding is exceeded, either because of the thermal hydraulics of the system, or because of crud deposition, then LiOH concentration can occur within thick porous oxide films on the cladding. This can degrade the protective film and accelerate the corrosion rate of the cladding. If sufficient boric acid is also present in the coolant then these effects may be mitigated. This is normally the case through most of any reactor fuel cycle. Extensive surface boiling may disrupt this equilibrium because of the volatility of boric acid in steam. Under such conditions severe cladding corrosion can ensue. The potential for such effects on high burnup cladding in CANDU reactors, where bone acid is not present in the primary coolant, is discussed. (author)

  5. Modeling Thermal and Stress Behavior of the Fuel-clad Interface in Monolithic Fuel Mini-plates

    Miller, Gregory K.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Burkes, Douglas E.; Wachs, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, a fuel development and qualification program is in process with the objective of qualifying very high density low enriched uranium fuel that will enable the conversion of high performance research reactors with operational requirements beyond those supported with currently available low enriched uranium fuels. The high density of the fuel is achieved by replacing the fuel meat with a single monolithic low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel foil. Doing so creates differences in the mechanical and structural characteristics of the fuel plate because of the planar interface created by the fuel foil and cladding. Furthermore, the monolithic fuel meat will dominate the structural properties of the fuel plate rather than the aluminum matrix, which is characteristic of dispersion fuel types. Understanding the integrity and behavior of the fuel-clad interface during irradiation is of great importance for qualification of the new fuel, but can be somewhat challenging to determine with a single technique. Efforts aimed at addressing this problem are underway within the fuel development and qualification program, comprised of modeling, as-fabricated plate characterization, and post-irradiation examination. An initial finite element analysis model has been developed to investigate worst-case scenarios for the basic monolithic fuel plate structure, using typical mini-plate irradiation conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor. Initial analysis shows that the stress normal to the fuel-clad interface dominates during irradiation, and that the presence of small, rounded delaminations at the interface is not of great concern. However, larger and/or fuel-clad delaminations with sharp corners can create areas of concern, as maximum principal cladding stress, strain, displacement, and peak fuel temperature are all significantly increased. Furthermore, stresses resulting from temperature gradients that cause the plate to bow or buckle in

  6. Numerical Modeling of Pump Absorption in Coiled and Twisted Double-Clad Fibers

    Koška, Pavel; Peterka, Pavel; Doya, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2016), s. 4401508 ISSN 1077-260X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-35256S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15122 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : double-clad optical fibers * beam propagation method * fiber amplifiers Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.971, year: 2016

  7. A copper container corrosion model for the in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel

    King, F.

    1996-11-01

    Copper containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault are expected to undergo uniform corrosion and, possibly, pitting. The corrosion behaviour of the containers will be dictated by the evolution of environmental conditions within the disposal vault. The environment will evolve from an early warm, oxidizing phase, during which fast uniform corrosion and pitting may occur, to an indefinite period of cool, anoxic conditions, during which the container will only be susceptible to slow uniform corrosion. The results of corrosion and electrochemical studies of the uniform corrosion of Cu in O 2 -containing Cl - solutions are discussed and a detailed reaction mechanism presented. The relevant literature on pitting corrosion is briefly reviewed and models for the prediction of pit depth discussed. The potential for microbially influenced corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking is discussed, as are vapour-phase corrosion and the effects of β-radiation. The use of natural analogues for justifying long-term corrosion predictions is also considered. Finally, a model for uniform corrosion and pitting is presented and container lifetimes predicted. Copper containers having a minimum wall thickness of 25.4 mm are not predicted to fail by corrosion in periods 6 a. Thus, despite the assumption of poor rock quality made here, the safety of the entire disposal concept can be assured by the use of a long-lived container. (author). 125 refs., 1 tab., 24 figs

  8. Simulation study on insoluble granular corrosion products deposited in PWR core

    Yang Xu; Zhou Tao; Ru Xiaolong; Lin Daping; Fang Xiaolu

    2014-01-01

    In the operation of reactor, such as fuel rods, reactor vessel internals etc. will be affected by corrosion erosion of high pressure coolant. It will produce many insoluble corrosion products. The FLUENT software is adopted to simulate insoluble granular corrosion products deposit distribution in the reactor core. The fluid phase uses the standard model to predict the flow field in the channel and forecast turbulence variation in the near-wall region. The insoluble granular corrosion products use DPM (Discrete Phase Model) to track the trajectory of the particles. The discrete phase model in FLUENT follows the Euler-Lagrange approach. The fluid phase is treated as a continuum by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, while the dispersed phase is solved by tracking a large number of particles through the calculated flow field. Through the study found, Corrosion products particles form high concentration area near the symmetry, and the entrance section of the corrosion products particles concentration is higher than export section. Corrosion products particles deposition attached on large area for the entrance of the cladding, this will change the core neutron flux distribution and the thermal conductivity of cladding material, and cause core axial offset anomaly (AOA). Corrosion products particles dot deposit in the outlet of cladding, which can lead to pitting phenomenon in a sheath. Pitting area will cause deterioration of heat transfer, destroy the cladding integrity. In view of the law of corrosion products deposition and corrosion characteristics of components in the reactor core. this paper proposes regular targeted local cleanup and other mitigation measures. (authors)

  9. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Baek, B. J.; Park, S. Y. and others

    1999-08-01

    The overview of corrosion and hydriding behaviors of Zr-based alloy under the conditions of the in-reactor service and in the absence of irradiation is introduced in this report. The metallurgical characteristics of Zr-based alloys and the thermo-mechanical treatments on the microstructures and the textures in the manufacturing process for fuel cladding are also introduced. The factors affecting the corrosion of Zr alloy in reactor are summarized. And the corrosion mechanism and hydrogen up-take are discussed based on the laboratory and in-reactor results. The phenomenological observations of zirconium alloy corrosion in reactors are summarized and the models of in-reactor corrosion are exclusively discussed. Finally, the effects of irradiation on the corrosion process in Zr alloy were investigated mainly based on the literature data. (author). 538 refs., 26 tabs., 105 figs

  10. Formation and Role of Gel Fractions in the Corrosion Layer of Zirconium Cladding as the First-stage Protection of the Nuclear Power Plant Fuel

    Weishauptová, Zuzana; Vrtílková, V.; Bláhová, O.; Maixner, J.

    -, č. 16 (2007), s. 29-38 ISSN 1214-9691 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/0043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : zirconium alloys * corrosion layer * hydrated ZrO2 Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  11. Critical cladding radius for hybrid cladding modes

    Guyard, Romain; Leduc, Dominique; Lupi, Cyril; Lecieux, Yann

    2018-05-01

    In this article we explore some properties of the cladding modes guided by a step-index optical fiber. We show that the hybrid modes can be grouped by pairs and that it exists a critical cladding radius for which the modes of a pair share the same electromagnetic structure. We propose a robust method to determine the critical cladding radius and use it to perform a statistical study on the influence of the characteristics of the fiber on the critical cladding radius. Finally we show the importance of the critical cladding radius with respect to the coupling coefficient between the core mode and the cladding modes inside a long period grating.

  12. Markov chain model helps predict pitting corrosion depth and rate in underground pipelines

    Caleyo, F.; Velazquez, J.C.; Hallen, J. M. [ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Esquivel-Amezcua, A. [PEMEX PEP Region Sur, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico); Valor, A. [Universidad de la Habana, Vedado, La Habana (Cuba)

    2010-07-01

    Recent reports place pipeline corrosion costs in North America at seven billion dollars per year. Pitting corrosion causes the higher percentage of failures among other corrosion mechanisms. This has motivated multiple modelling studies to be focused on corrosion pitting of underground pipelines. In this study, a continuous-time, non-homogenous pure birth Markov chain serves to model external pitting corrosion in buried pipelines. The analytical solution of Kolmogorov's forward equations for this type of Markov process gives the transition probability function in a discrete space of pit depths. The transition probability function can be completely identified by making a correlation between the stochastic pit depth mean and the deterministic mean obtained experimentally. The model proposed in this study can be applied to pitting corrosion data from repeated in-line pipeline inspections. Case studies presented in this work show how pipeline inspection and maintenance planning can be improved by using the proposed Markovian model for pitting corrosion.

  13. Study of laser cladding nuclear valve parts

    Shi Shihong; Wang Xinlin; Huang Guodong

    1998-12-01

    The mechanism of laser cladding is discussed by using heat transfer model of laser cladding, heat conduction model of laser cladding and convective transfer mass model of laser melt-pool. Subsequently the laser cladding speed limit and the influence of laser cladding parameters on cladding layer structure is analyzed. A 5 kW with CO 2 transverse flow is used in the research for cladding treatment of sealing surface of stop valve parts of nuclear power stations. The laser cladding layer is found to be 3.0 mm thick. The cladding surface is smooth and has no such defects as crack, gas pore, etc. A series of comparisons with plasma spurt welding and arc bead welding has been performed. The results show that there are higher grain grade and hardness, lower dilution and better performances of resistance to abrasion, wear and of anti-erosion in the laser cladding layer. The new technology of laser cladding can obviously improve the quality of nuclear valve parts. Consequently it is possible to lengthen the service life of nuclear valve and to raise the safety and reliability of the production system

  14. Statistical mechanical analysis of LMFBR fuel cladding tubes

    Poncelet, J.-P.; Pay, A.

    1977-01-01

    The most important design requirement on fuel pin cladding for LMFBR's is its mechanical integrity. Disruptive factors include internal pressure from mixed oxide fuel fission gas release, thermal stresses and high temperature creep, neutron-induced differential void-swelling as a source of stress in the cladding and irradiation creep of stainless steel material, corrosion by fission products. Under irradiation these load-restraining mechanisms are accentuated by stainless steel embrittlement and strength alterations. To account for the numerous uncertainties involved in the analysis by theoretical models and computer codes statistical tools are unavoidably requested, i.e. Monte Carlo simulation methods. Thanks to these techniques, uncertainties in nominal characteristics, material properties and environmental conditions can be linked up in a correct way and used for a more accurate conceptual design. (Auth.)

  15. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  16. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1993-11-01

    A chemical model of glass corrosion will be used to predict the rates of release of radionuclides from borosilicate glass waste forms in high-level waste repositories. The model will be used both to calculate the rate of degradation of the glass, and also to predict the effects of chemical interactions between the glass and repository materials such as spent fuel, canister and container materials, backfill, cements, grouts, and others. Coupling between the degradation processes affecting all these materials is expected. Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  17. Development of a simplified fuel-cladding gap conductance model for nuclear feedback calculation in 16x16 FA

    Yoo, Jong Sung; Park, Chan Oh; Park, Yong Soo

    1995-01-01

    The accurate determination of the fuel-cladding gap conductance as functions of rod burnup and power level may be a key to the design and safety analysis of a reactor. The incorporation of a sophisticated gap conductance model into nuclear design code for computing thermal hydraulic feedback effect has not been implemented mainly because of computational inefficiency due to complicated behavior of gap conductance. To avoid the time-consuming iteration scheme, simplification of the gap conductance model is done for the current design model. The simplified model considers only the heat conductance contribution to the gap conductance. The simplification is made possible by direct consideration of the gap conductivity depending on the composition of constituent gases in the gap and the fuel-cladding gap size from computer simulation of representative power histories. The simplified gap conductance model is applied to the various fuel power histories and the predicted gap conductances are found to agree well with the results of the design model

  18. A Corrosion Risk Assessment Model for Underground Piping

    Datta, Koushik; Fraser, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    The Pressure Systems Manager at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) has embarked on a project to collect data and develop risk assessment models to support risk-informed decision making regarding future inspections of underground pipes at ARC. This paper shows progress in one area of this project - a corrosion risk assessment model for the underground high-pressure air distribution piping system at ARC. It consists of a Corrosion Model of pipe-segments, a Pipe Wrap Protection Model; and a Pipe Stress Model for a pipe segment. A Monte Carlo simulation of the combined models provides a distribution of the failure probabilities. Sensitivity study results show that the model uncertainty, or lack of knowledge, is the dominant contributor to the calculated unreliability of the underground piping system. As a result, the Pressure Systems Manager may consider investing resources specifically focused on reducing these uncertainties. Future work includes completing the data collection effort for the existing ground based pressure systems and applying the risk models to risk-based inspection strategies of the underground pipes at ARC.

  19. Predicting corrosion product transport in nuclear power stations using a solubility-based model for flow-accelerated corrosion

    Burrill, K.A.; Cheluget, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    A general model of solubility-driven flow-accelerated corrosion of carbon steel was derived based on the assumption that the solubilities of ferric oxyhydroxide and magnetite control the rate of film dissolution. This process involves the dissolution of an oxide film due to fast-flowing coolant unsaturated in iron. The soluble iron is produced by (i) the corrosion of base metal under a porous oxide film and (ii) the dissolution of the oxide film at the fluid-oxide film interface. The iron released at the pipe wall is transferred into the bulk flow by turbulent mass transfer. The model is suitable for calculating concentrations of dissolved iron in feedtrain lines. These iron levels were used to calculate sludge transport rates around the feedtrain. The model was used to predict sludge transport rates due to flow accelerated corrosion of major feedtrain piping in a CANDU reactor. The predictions of the model compare well with plant measurements

  20. Exfoliation Corrosion and Pitting Corrosion and Their Role in Fatigue Predictive Modeling: State-of-the-Art Review

    David W. Hoeppner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intergranular attack (IG and exfoliation corrosion (EC have a detrimental impact on the structural integrity of aircraft structures of all types. Understanding the mechanisms and methods for dealing with these processes and with corrosion in general has been and is critical to the safety of critical components of aircraft. Discussion of cases where IG attack and exfoliation caused issues in structural integrity in aircraft in operational fleets is presented herein along with a much more detailed presentation of the issues involved in dealing with corrosion of aircraft. Issues of corrosion and fatigue related to the structural integrity of aging aircraft are introduced herein. Mechanisms of pitting nucleation are discussed which include adsorption-induced, ion migration-penetration, and chemicomechanical film breakdown theories. In addition, pitting corrosion (PC fatigue models are presented as well as a critical assessment of their application to aircraft structures and materials. Finally environmental effects on short crack behavior of materials are discussed, and a compilation of definitions related to corrosion and fatigue are presented.

  1. A contribution to the modelling of atmospheric corrosion of iron

    Hoerle, S.; Mazaudier, F.

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of predicting the long term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of iron, the characteristics of the rust layer formed during this process and the mechanisms occurring inside the rust layer during a wet-dry cycle are considered. A first step in modelling the behaviour is proposed, based on the description of the cathodic reactions associated with iron oxidation: reduction of a part of the rust layer (lepidocrocite) and reduction of dissolved oxygen on the rust layer. The modelling, by including some composition and morphological data of the rust layer as parameters, is able to account for the metal damage after one Wet-Dry cycle. (authors)

  2. Oxide thickness measurement technique for duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 cladding

    McClelland, R.G.; O'Leary, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP) is investigating the use of duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 tubing to improve the waterside corrosion resistance of cladding for high-burnup pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel designs. Standard SNP PWR cladding is typically 0.762-mm (0.030-in.)-thick Zircaloy-4. The SNP duplex cladding is nominally 0.660-mm (0.026-in.)-thick Zircalloy-4 with an ∼0.102-mm (0.004-in.) outer layer of another, more corrosion-resistant, zirconium-based alloy. It is common industry practice to monitor the in-reactor corrosion behavior of Zircaloy cladding by using an eddy-current 'lift-off' technique to measure the oxide thickness on the outer surface of the fuel cladding. The test program evaluated three different cladding samples, all with the same outer diameter and wall thickness: Zircaloy-4 and duplex clad types D2 and D4

  3. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  4. Water chemistry regimes for VVER-440 units: water chemistry influence on fuel cladding behaviour

    Zmitko, M.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture next problems of water chemistry influence on fuel cladding behaviour for VVER-440 units are presented: primary coolant technologies; water chemistry specification and control; fuel integrity considerations; zirconium alloys cladding corrosion (corrosion versus burn-up; water chemistry effect; crud deposition; hydrogen absorption; axial offset anomaly); alternatives for the primary coolant regimes

  5. Development of corrosion models to ensure reliable performance of nuclear power plants

    Kritzky, V.G.; Stjazhkin, P.S.

    1993-01-01

    The safety and reliability of the coolant circuits in nuclear power plants depend much on corrosion and corrosion products transfer processes. Various empirical models have been developed which are applicable to particular sets of operational conditions. In our laboratory a corrosion model has been worked out, which is based on the thermodynamic properties of the compounds, participating in corrosion process and on the assumption, that the corrosion process is controlled by the solubilities of the corrosion products forming the surface oxide layer. The validity of the model has been verified by use of retrospective experimental data, which have been obtained for a series of structural materials such as e.g., carbon and stainless steels, Cu-, Al-, and Zr alloys. With regard for hydriding the model satisfactorily describes stress corrosion cracking process in water-salt environments. This report describes a model based on the thermodynamic properties of the compounds participating in the corrosion process, and on the assumption that the corrosion process is controlled by the solubilities of the corrosion products forming the surface oxide layer

  6. Influence of fuel-cladding system deviations from the model of continuous cylinders on the parameters of WWER fuel element working ability

    Scheglov, A.

    1994-01-01

    In the programs of fuel rod computation, fuel and cladding are usually presented in the form of coaxial cylinders, which can change their sizes, mechanical and thermal-physical properties. The real fuel element has some typical deviations from this continuous coaxial cylinders (CCC) model as: axial asymmetry of fuel-cladding system (due to the oval form of the cladding, cracking and other type of fuel pallet damage, axial asymmetry of the volumetric heat release), gaps between the pallets (and heat release peaking in fuel near the gap), chambers in the pallets. As a result of these deviations actual fuel rod parameters of working ability - temperature, stresses, thermal fluxes relieved from the cladding, geometry changes - in some locations can greatly vary from the ones calculated according to CCC model. The influence of these deviations is extremely important while calculating the fuel rod, because they are a part of the mechanical excess coefficient. The author reviews the influence of these factors using specific examples. He applies his own two-dimensional codes based on the Finite Elements Method for calculations of temperature fields, stresses and deformation in the fuel rod elements. It is shown that consideration of these deviations, as a rule, leads to the increase of the maximum fuel temperature in the WWER pellets (characterized by a large central hole), temperature of the cladding, thermal flux, relieved by the coolant from the cladding, and stresses in the cladding. It is necessary to consider these factors for both validation of the fuel element working ability and interpretation of the experimental results. 4 tabs., 3 figs., 5 refs

  7. Influence of fuel-cladding system deviations from the model of continuous cylinders on the parameters of WWER fuel element working ability

    Scheglov, A [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    In the programs of fuel rod computation, fuel and cladding are usually presented in the form of coaxial cylinders, which can change their sizes, mechanical and thermal-physical properties. The real fuel element has some typical deviations from this continuous coaxial cylinders (CCC) model as: axial asymmetry of fuel-cladding system (due to the oval form of the cladding, cracking and other type of fuel pallet damage, axial asymmetry of the volumetric heat release), gaps between the pallets (and heat release peaking in fuel near the gap), chambers in the pallets. As a result of these deviations actual fuel rod parameters of working ability - temperature, stresses, thermal fluxes relieved from the cladding, geometry changes - in some locations can greatly vary from the ones calculated according to CCC model. The influence of these deviations is extremely important while calculating the fuel rod, because they are a part of the mechanical excess coefficient. The author reviews the influence of these factors using specific examples. He applies his own two-dimensional codes based on the Finite Elements Method for calculations of temperature fields, stresses and deformation in the fuel rod elements. It is shown that consideration of these deviations, as a rule, leads to the increase of the maximum fuel temperature in the WWER pellets (characterized by a large central hole), temperature of the cladding, thermal flux, relieved by the coolant from the cladding, and stresses in the cladding. It is necessary to consider these factors for both validation of the fuel element working ability and interpretation of the experimental results. 4 tabs., 3 figs., 5 refs.

  8. Modeling of cladding and fuel motion in a loss of flow situation for GCFR safety analysis. Technical progress report (annual), June 15, 1974--March 15, 1975

    Eggen, D.T.

    1975-01-01

    During the first nine months of the project, methods and apparatus were developed to study the freezeout of molten cladding in a cooler blanket region. Three tests were run in which a mass of molten material from a simulated core region of a GCFR flowed into a bundle of simulated blanket elements. In all cases plugging occurred in or before the first grid-spacer. Theories and preliminary models are in accord with these observations. These tests have been done with a 50/50-Pb/Sn alloy simulating the cladding and spacer grids and alumina simulating the fuel. Materials are being obtained for tests with stainless steel cladding and spacers. Development is progressing well on an electrically-heated fuel element which will be used to study the melting and motion of cladding in the core region for a loss of flow accident. Preliminary models is being developed to calculate the motion and freezeout of flowing cladding in the blanket region. The SAS-GAS and Argus codes are being adapted for uses in conjunction with model development on the project. A survey of fission gas effects in oxide during TOP cases was prepared and other codes (LIFE) were reviewed for possible value on the project. A set of reference physical parameters is being developed for the various materials used in the analysis and experiments. (U.S.)

  9. Super ODS steels R and D for fuel cladding of next generation nuclear systems. 7) Corrosion behavior and mechanism in LBE

    Sano, H.; Fujisawa, T.; Kimura, A.; Inoue, Masaki; Ukai, S.; Ohnuki, S.; Okuda, T.; Abe, F.

    2009-01-01

    Corrosion of structural materials is one of the serious problems when lead-bismuth eutectic alloy (LBE) is used as a coolant material in next generation nuclear systems. In this study, dissolution experiments of synthetic Fe-Cr-Al alloys and developed super ODS steel candidates into LBE under several partial pressures of oxygen were conducted. Dissolution behaviors of major components in such steels into LBE were investigated. Interfacial behavior between LBE and steels was also observed. In addition, partial potential diagrams of the Fe-Cr-Al-O system at several conditions were established as basic data. From the potential diagrams, the partial pressure range of oxygen was estimated for the stable protective oxide layer formation at the interface. At lower oxygen partial pressure than the pressure that is enough for the formation of the stable oxide layer, a rough oxide layer was formed at the interface in all samples, and the alloy elements dissolved into LBE through it. On the other hand, at the oxygen partial pressure to form stable oxide layer, a dense and very thin oxide layer was formed especially on the higher aluminum content steel, preventing the alloy dissolution into LBE. From the results, aluminum and chromium content in steel were very important for preventing the corrosion by LBE. (author)

  10. Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Modeling Metallic Waste Form Release Rates

    Poineau, Frederic; Tamalis, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The isotope 99 Tc is an important fission product generated from nuclear power production. Because of its long half-life (t 1/2 = 2.13 ∙ 105 years) and beta-radiotoxicity (β - = 292 keV), it is a major concern in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel. In the spent nuclear fuel, Tc is present as an alloy with Mo, Ru, Rh, and Pd called the epsilon-phase, the relative amount of which increases with fuel burn-up. In some separation schemes for spent nuclear fuel, Tc would be separated from the spent fuel and disposed of in a durable waste form. Technetium waste forms under consideration include metallic alloys, oxide ceramics and borosilicate glass. In the development of a metallic waste form, after separation from the spent fuel, Tc would be converted to the metal, incorporated into an alloy and the resulting waste form stored in a repository. Metallic alloys under consideration include Tc–Zr alloys, Tc–stainless steel alloys and Tc–Inconel alloys (Inconel is an alloy of Ni, Cr and iron which is resistant to corrosion). To predict the long-term behavior of the metallic Tc waste form, understanding the corrosion properties of Tc metal and Tc alloys in various chemical environments is needed, but efforts to model the behavior of Tc metallic alloys are limited. One parameter that should also be considered in predicting the long-term behavior of the Tc waste form is the ingrowth of stable Ru that occurs from the radioactive decay of 99 Tc ( 99 Tc → 99 Ru + β - ). After a geological period of time, significant amounts of Ru will be present in the Tc and may affect its corrosion properties. Studying the effect of Ru on the corrosion behavior of Tc is also of importance. In this context, we studied the electrochemical behavior of Tc metal, Tc-Ni alloys (to model Tc-Inconel alloy) and Tc-Ru alloys in acidic media. The study of Tc-U alloys has also been performed in order to better understand the nature of Tc in metallic spent fuel. Computational modeling

  11. Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Modeling Metallic Waste Form Release Rates

    Poineau, Frederic [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Tamalis, Dimitri [Florida Memorial Univ., Miami Gardens, FL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The isotope 99Tc is an important fission product generated from nuclear power production. Because of its long half-life (t1/2 = 2.13 ∙ 105 years) and beta-radiotoxicity (β⁻ = 292 keV), it is a major concern in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel. In the spent nuclear fuel, Tc is present as an alloy with Mo, Ru, Rh, and Pd called the epsilon-phase, the relative amount of which increases with fuel burn-up. In some separation schemes for spent nuclear fuel, Tc would be separated from the spent fuel and disposed of in a durable waste form. Technetium waste forms under consideration include metallic alloys, oxide ceramics and borosilicate glass. In the development of a metallic waste form, after separation from the spent fuel, Tc would be converted to the metal, incorporated into an alloy and the resulting waste form stored in a repository. Metallic alloys under consideration include Tc–Zr alloys, Tc–stainless steel alloys and Tc–Inconel alloys (Inconel is an alloy of Ni, Cr and iron which is resistant to corrosion). To predict the long-term behavior of the metallic Tc waste form, understanding the corrosion properties of Tc metal and Tc alloys in various chemical environments is needed, but efforts to model the behavior of Tc metallic alloys are limited. One parameter that should also be considered in predicting the long-term behavior of the Tc waste form is the ingrowth of stable Ru that occurs from the radioactive decay of 99Tc (99Tc → 99Ru + β⁻). After a geological period of time, significant amounts of Ru will be present in the Tc and may affect its corrosion properties. Studying the effect of Ru on the corrosion behavior of Tc is also of importance. In this context, we studied the electrochemical behavior of Tc metal, Tc-Ni alloys (to model Tc-Inconel alloy) and Tc-Ru alloys in acidic media. The study of Tc-U alloys has also been performed in order to better understand the

  12. Laser cladding of quasicrystalline alloys

    Audebert, F.; Sirkin, H.; Colaco, R.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Quasicrystals are a new class of ordinated structures with metastable characteristics room temperature. Quasicrystalline phases can be obtained by rapid quenching from the melt of some alloys. In general, quasicrystals present properties which make these alloys promising for wear and corrosion resistant coatings applications. During the last years, the development of quasicrystalline coatings by means of thermal spray techniques has been impulsed. However, no references have been found of their application by means of laser techniques. In this work four claddings of quasicrystalline compositions formed over aluminium substrate, produced by a continuous CO 2 laser using simultaneous powders mixture injection are presented. The claddings were characterized by X ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness. (Author) 18 refs

  13. Engineered zircaloy cladding modifications for improved accident tolerance of LWR fuel: US DOE NEUP Integrated Research Project

    Heuser, Brent

    2013-01-01

    An integrated research project (IRP) to fabricate and evaluate modified zircaloy LWR cladding under normal BWR/PWR operation and off-normal events has been funded by the US DOE. The IRP involves three US academic institutions, a US national laboratory, an intermediate stock industrial cladding supplier, and an international academic institution. A combination of computational and experimental protocols will be employed to design and test modified zircaloy cladding with respect to corrosion and accelerated oxide growth, the former associated with normal operation, the latter associated with steam exposure during loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) and low-pressure core re-floods. Efforts will be made to go beyond design-base accident (DBA) scenarios (cladding temperature equal to or less than 1204 deg. C) during the experimental phase of modified zircaloy performance characterisation. The project anticipates the use of the facilities at ORNL to achieve steam exposure beyond DBA scenarios. In addition, irradiation of down-selected modified cladding candidates in the ATR may be performed. Cladding performance evaluation will be incorporated into a reactor system modelling effort of fuel performance, neutronics, and thermal hydraulics, thereby providing a holistic approach to accident-tolerant nuclear fuel. The proposed IRP brings together personnel, facilities, and capabilities across a wide range of technical areas relevant to the study of modified nuclear fuel and LWR performance during normal operation and off-normal scenarios. Two pathways towards accident-tolerant LWR fuel are envisioned, both based on the modification of existing zircaloy cladding. The first is the modification of the cladding surface by the application of a coating layer designed to shift the M + O→MO reaction away from oxide growth during steam exposure at elevated temperatures. This pathway is referred to as the 'surface coating' solution. The second is the modification of the bulk

  14. Preliminary sensitivity analyses of corrosion models for BWIP [Basalt Waste Isolation Project] container materials

    Anantatmula, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary sensitivity analysis was performed for the corrosion models developed for Basalt Waste Isolation Project container materials. The models describe corrosion behavior of the candidate container materials (low carbon steel and Fe9Cr1Mo), in various environments that are expected in the vicinity of the waste package, by separate equations. The present sensitivity analysis yields an uncertainty in total uniform corrosion on the basis of assumed uncertainties in the parameters comprising the corrosion equations. Based on the sample scenario and the preliminary corrosion models, the uncertainty in total uniform corrosion of low carbon steel and Fe9Cr1Mo for the 1000 yr containment period are 20% and 15%, respectively. For containment periods ≥ 1000 yr, the uncertainty in corrosion during the post-closure aqueous periods controls the uncertainty in total uniform corrosion for both low carbon steel and Fe9Cr1Mo. The key parameters controlling the corrosion behavior of candidate container materials are temperature, radiation, groundwater species, etc. Tests are planned in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project containment materials test program to determine in detail the sensitivity of corrosion to these parameters. We also plan to expand the sensitivity analysis to include sensitivity coefficients and other parameters in future studies. 6 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Stochastic models for predicting pitting corrosion damage of HLRW containers

    Henshall, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Stochastic models for predicting aqueous pitting corrosion damage of high-level radioactive-waste containers are described. These models could be used to predict the time required for the first pit to penetrate a container and the increase in the number of breaches at later times, both of which would be useful in the repository system performance analysis. Monte Carlo implementations of the stochastic models are described, and predictions of induction time, survival probability and pit depth distributions are presented. These results suggest that the pit nucleation probability decreases with exposure time and that pit growth may be a stochastic process. The advantages and disadvantages of the stochastic approach, methods for modeling the effects of environment, and plans for future work are discussed

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Corrosion Rate Prediction Models Utilized for Reinforced Concrete Affected by Chloride

    Siamphukdee, Kanjana; Collins, Frank; Zou, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Chloride-induced reinforcement corrosion is one of the major causes of premature deterioration in reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Given the high maintenance and replacement costs, accurate modeling of RC deterioration is indispensable for ensuring the optimal allocation of limited economic resources. Since corrosion rate is one of the major factors influencing the rate of deterioration, many predictive models exist. However, because the existing models use very different sets of input parameters, the choice of model for RC deterioration is made difficult. Although the factors affecting corrosion rate are frequently reported in the literature, there is no published quantitative study on the sensitivity of predicted corrosion rate to the various input parameters. This paper presents the results of the sensitivity analysis of the input parameters for nine selected corrosion rate prediction models. Three different methods of analysis are used to determine and compare the sensitivity of corrosion rate to various input parameters: (i) univariate regression analysis, (ii) multivariate regression analysis, and (iii) sensitivity index. The results from the analysis have quantitatively verified that the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement bars in RC structures is highly sensitive to corrosion duration time, concrete resistivity, and concrete chloride content. These important findings establish that future empirical models for predicting corrosion rate of RC should carefully consider and incorporate these input parameters.

  17. Model-based inversion for the characterization of crack-like defects detected by ultrasound in a cladded component

    Haiat, G.

    2004-03-01

    This work deals with the inversion of ultrasonic data. The industrial context of the study in the non destructive evaluation of the internal walls of French reactor pressure vessels. Those inspections aim at detecting and characterizing cracks. Ultrasonic data correspond to echographic responses obtained with a transducer acting in pulse echo mode. Cracks are detected by crack tip diffraction effect. The analysis of measured data can become difficult because of the presence of a cladding, which surface is irregular. Moreover, its constituting material differs from the one of the reactor vessel. A model-based inverse method uses simulation of propagation and of diffraction of ultrasound taking into account the irregular properties of the cladding surface, as well as the heterogeneous nature of the component. The method developed was implemented and tested on a set of representative cases. Its performances were evaluated by the analysis of experimental results. The precision obtained in the laboratory on experimental cases treated is conform with industrial expectations motivating this study. (author)

  18. Nodal wear model: corrosion in carbon blast furnace hearths

    Verdeja, L. F.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Criterions developed for the Nodal Wear Model (NWM were applied to estimate the shape of the corrosion profiles that a blast furnace hearth may acquire during its campaign. Taking into account design of the hearth, the boundary conditions, the characteristics of the refractory materials used and the operation conditions of the blast furnace, simulation of wear profiles with central well, mushroom and elephant foot shape were accomplished. The foundations of the NWM are constructed considering that the corrosion of the refractory is a function of the temperature present at each point (node of the liquid metal-refractory interface and the corresponding physical and chemical characteristics of the corrosive fluid.

    Se aplican los criterios del Modelo de Desgaste Nodal (MDN para la estimación de los perfiles de corrosión que podría ir adquiriendo el crisol de un homo alto durante su campaña. Atendiendo al propio diseño del crisol, a las condiciones límites de contorno, a las características del material refractario utilizado y a las condiciones de operación del horno, se consiguen simular perfiles de desgaste con "pozo central", con "forma de seta" ó de "pie de elefante". Los fundamentos del MDN se apoyan en la idea de considerar que la corrosión del refractario es función de la temperatura que el sistema pueda presentar en cada punto (nodo de la intercara refractario-fundido y de las correspondientes características físico-químicas del fluido corrosivo.

  19. Experimental study and modeling of high-temperature oxidation and phase transformation of cladding-tubes made in zirconium alloy

    Mazeres, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    One of the hypothetical accident studied in the field of the safety studies of Pressurized light Water Reactor (PWR) is the Loss-Of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA). In this scenario, zirconium alloy fuel claddings could undergo an important oxidation at high temperature (T≅ 1200 C) in a steam environment. Cladding tubes constitute the first confinement barrier of radioelements and then it is essential that they keep a certain level of ductility after quenching to ensure their integrity. These properties are directly related to the growth kinetics of both the oxide and the αZr(O) phase and also to the oxygen diffusion profile in the cladding tube after the transient. In this context, this work was dedicated to the understanding and the modeling of the both oxidation phenomenon and oxygen diffusion in zirconium based alloys at high temperature. The numerical tool (EKINOX-Zr) used in this thesis is based on a numerical resolution of a diffusion/reaction problem with equilibrium-conditions on three moving boundaries: gas/oxide, oxide/αZr(O), αZr(O)/βZr. EKINOX-Zr kinetics model is coupled with ThermoCalc software and the Zircobase database to take into account the influence of the alloying elements (Sn, Fe, Cr, Nb) but also the influence of hydrogen on the solubility of oxygen. This study focused on two parts of the LOCA scenario: the influence of a pre-oxide layer (formed in-service) and the effects of hydrogen. Thanks to the link between EKINOX-Zr and the thermodynamic database Zircobase, the hydrogen effects on oxygen solubility limit could be considered in the numerical simulations. Thus, simulations could reproduce the oxygen diffusion profiles measured in pre-hydrided samples. The existence of a thick pre-oxide layer on cladding tubes can induce a reduction of this pre-oxide layer before the growth of a high-temperature one during the high temperature dwell under steam. The first simulations performed using the numerical tool EKINOX-Zr showed that this particular

  20. Monitoring and modeling stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue damage in nuclear reactors

    Andresen, P.L.; Ford, F.P.; Solomon, H.D.; Taylor, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue are significant problems in many industries, causing economic penalties from decreased plant availability and component repair or replacement. In nuclear power reactors, environmental cracking occurs in a wide variety of components, including reactor piping and steam generator tubing, bolting materials and pressure vessels. Life assessment for these components is complicated by the belief that cracking is quite irreproducible. Indeed, for conditions which were once viewed as nominally similar, orders of magnitude variability in crack growth rates are observed for stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue of stainless steels and low-alloy steels in 288 degrees C water. This paper shows that design and life prediction approaches are destined to be overly conservative or to risk environmental failure if life is predicted by quantifying only the effects of mechanical parameters and/or simply ignoring or aggregating environmental and material variabilities. Examples include the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) disposition line for stress-corrosion cracking of stainless steel in boiling water reactor (BWR) water and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Section XI lines for corrosion fatigue

  1. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO2 and/or H2S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  2. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO 2 and/or H 2 S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  3. A phenomenological model for iodine stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy

    Miller, A.K.; Tasooji, A.

    1981-01-01

    To predict the response of Zircaloy tubing in iodine environments under conditions where either crack initiation or crack propagation predominates, a unified model of the SCC process has been developed based on the local conditions (the local stress, local strain, and local iodine concentration) within a small volume of material at the cladding inner surface or the crack tip. The methodology used permits computation of these values from simple equations. A nonuniform distribution of local stress and strain results once a crack has initiated. The local stress can be increased due to plastic constraint and triaxiality at the crack tip. Iodine penetration is assumed to be a surface diffusion-controlled process. Experimental data are used to derive criteria for intergranular failure, transgranular failure, and ductile rupture in terms of the local conditions. The same failure criteria are used for both crack initiation and crack propagation. Irradiation effects are included in the model by changing the value of constants in the equation governing iodine penetration and by changing the values used to represent the mechanical properties of the Zircaloy. (orig./HP)

  4. Probabilistic models for steel corrosion loss and pitting of marine infrastructure

    Melchers, R.E.; Jeffrey, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing emphasis on attempting to retain in service ageing infrastructure models for the description and prediction of corrosion losses and for maximum pit depth are of increasing interest. In most cases assessment and prediction will be done in a probabilistic risk assessment framework and this then requires probabilistic corrosion models. Recently, novel models for corrosion loss and maximum pit depth under marine immersion conditions have been developed. The models show that both corrosion loss and pit depth progress in a non-linear fashion with increased exposure time and do so in a non-monotonic manner as a result of the controlling corrosion process changing from oxidation to being influenced by bacterial action. For engineers the importance of this lies in the fact that conventional 'corrosion rates' have no validity, particularly for the long-term corrosion effects as relevant to deteriorated infrastructure. The models are consistent with corrosion science principles as well as current understanding of the considerable influence of bacterial processes on corrosion loss and pitting. The considerable practical implications of this are described

  5. Zirconium-barrier cladding attributes

    Rosenbaum, H.S.; Rand, R.A.; Tucker, R.P.; Cheng, B.; Adamson, R.B.; Davies, J.H.; Armijo, J.S.; Wisner, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    This metallurgical study of Zr-barrier fuel cladding evaluates the importance of three salient attributes: (1) metallurgical bond between the zirconium liner and the Zircaloy substrate, (2) liner thickness (roughly 10% of the total cladding wall), and (3) softness (purity). The effect that each of these attributes has on the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) resistance of the Zr-barrier fuel was studied by a combination of analytical model calculations and laboratory experiments using an expanding mandrel technique. Each of the attributes is shown to contribute to PCI resistance. The effect of the zirconium liner on fuel behavior during off-normal events in which steam comes in contact with the zirconium surface was studied experimentally. Simulations of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) showed that the behavior of Zr-barrier cladding is virtually indistinguishable from that of conventional Zircaloy cladding. If steam contacts the zirconium liner surface through a cladding perforation and the fuel rod is operated under normal power conditions, the zirconium liner is oxidized more rapidly than is Zircaloy, but the oxidation rate returns to the rate of Zircaloy oxidation when the oxide phase reaches the zirconium-Zircaloy metallurgical bond

  6. Investigation of models to predict the corrosion of steels in flowing liquid lead alloys

    Balbaud-Celerier, F.; Barbier, F.

    2001-01-01

    Corrosion of steels exposed to flowing liquid lead alloys can be affected by hydrodynamic parameters. The rotating cylinder system is of interest for the practical evaluation of the fluid velocity effect on corrosion and for the prediction of the corrosion behavior in other geometries. Models developed in aqueous medium are tested in the case of liquid metal environments. It is shown that equations established for the rotating cylinder and the pipe flow geometry can be used effectively in liquid lead alloys (Pb-17Li) assuming the corrosion process is mass transfer controlled and the diffusion coefficient of dissolved species is known. The corrosion rate of martensitic steels in Pb-17Li is shown to be independent of the geometry when plotted as a function of the mass transfer coefficient. Predictions about the corrosion of steel in liquid Pb-Bi are performed but experiments are needed to validate the results obtained by modeling

  7. Mechanism of magnetite formation in high temperature corrosion by model naphthenic acids

    Jin, Peng; Robbins, Winston; Bota, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Magnetite scales were found in naphthenic acid (NAP) corrosion. • Magnetite scales were formed due to thermal decomposition of iron naphthenates. • Formation and protectiveness of magnetite scales depended on structure of NAP. • Carboxylic acids confirm corrosion observations for commercial NAP. - Abstract: Naphthenic acid (NAP) corrosion is a major concern for refineries. The complexity of NAP in crude oil and the sulfidation process hinder a fundamental knowledge of their corrosive behavior. Studies with model acids were performed to explore the corrosion mechanism and magnetite scales were found on carbon steel. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction methods detected differences in the quantity and quality of magnetite formed by model acids. These scales exhibited different resistance to higher severity NAP corrosion in a flow through apparatus. Magnetite is proposed to be formed by thermal decomposition of iron naphthenates.

  8. Use of empirically based corrosion model to aid steam generator life management

    Angell, P.; Balakrishnan, P.V.; Turner, C.W

    2000-07-01

    Alloy 800 (N08800) tubes used in CANDU 6 steam generators have shown a low incidence of corrosion damage because of the good corrosion resistance of N08800 and successful water chemistry control strategies. However, N08800 is not immune to corrosion, especially pitting, under plausible SG conditions. Electrochemical potentials are critical in determining both susceptibility and rates of corrosion and are known to be a function of water-chemistry. Using laboratory data an empirical model for pitting and crevice corrosion has been developed for N08800. Combination of such a model with chemistry monitoring and diagnostic software makes it possible to arm the impact of plant operating conditions on SG tube corrosion for plant life management (PLIM). Possible transient chemistry regimes that could significantly shorten expected tube lifetimes have been identified and predictions continue to support the position dud under normal, low dissolved oxygen conditions, pitting of N08800 will not initiate. (author)

  9. Use of empirically based corrosion model to aid steam generator life management

    Angell, P.; Balakrishnan, P.V.; Turner, C.W.

    2000-01-01

    Alloy 800 (N08800) tubes used in CANDU 6 steam generators have shown a low incidence of corrosion damage because of the good corrosion resistance of N08800 and successful water chemistry control strategies. However, N08800 is not immune to corrosion, especially pitting, under plausible SG conditions. Electrochemical potentials are critical in determining both susceptibility and rates of corrosion and are known to be a function of water-chemistry. Using laboratory data an empirical model for pitting and crevice corrosion has been developed for N08800. Combination of such a model with chemistry monitoring and diagnostic software makes it possible to arm the impact of plant operating conditions on SG tube corrosion for plant life management (PLIM). Possible transient chemistry regimes that could significantly shorten expected tube lifetimes have been identified and predictions continue to support the position dud under normal, low dissolved oxygen conditions, pitting of N08800 will not initiate. (author)

  10. Three-dimensional fuel pin model validation by prediction of hydrogen distribution in cladding and comparison with experiment

    Aly, A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Avramova, Maria [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Lacroix, E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Manera, Annalisa [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Walter, D. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Williamson, R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gamble, K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-10-29

    To correctly describe and predict this hydrogen distribution there is a need for multi-physics coupling to provide accurate three-dimensional azimuthal, radial, and axial temperature distributions in the cladding. Coupled high-fidelity reactor-physics codes with a sub-channel code as well as with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool have been used to calculate detailed temperature distributions. These high-fidelity coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics code systems are coupled further with the fuel-performance BISON code with a kernel (module) for hydrogen. Both hydrogen migration and precipitation/dissolution are included in the model. Results from this multi-physics analysis is validated utilizing calculations of hydrogen distribution using models informed by data from hydrogen experiments and PIE data.

  11. Thermomechanical behavior and modeling of zircaloy cladding tubes from an unirradiated state to high burn-up

    Schaeffler-Le Pichon, I.; Geyer, P.; Bouffioux, P.

    1997-01-01

    Creep laws are nowadays commonly used to simulate the fuel rod response to the solicitations it faces during its life. These laws are sufficient for describing the base operating conditions (where only creep appears), but they have to be improved for power ramp conditions (where hardening and relaxation appear). The modification due to a neutronic irradiation of the thermomechanical behavior of stress-relieved Zircaloy 4 fuel tubes that have been analysed for five different fluences ranging from a non-irradiated material to a material for which the combustion rate was very high is presented. In the second part, a viscoplastic model able to simulate, for different isotherms, out-of-flux anisotropic mechanical behavior of the cladding tubes irradiated until high burn-up is proposed. Finally, results of numerical simulations show the ability of the model to reproduce the totality of the thermomechanical experiments. (author)

  12. Modelling of zircaloy-4 corrosion in nitrogen and oxygen mixtures at high temperature

    Lasserre, M.; Peres, V.; Pijolat, M.; Coindreau, O.; Duriez, C.; Mardon, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of zircaloy-4 corrosion in air have shown accelerated corrosion in the 600-1000 Celsius degrees temperature range with Zr nitrides precipitating near the metal/oxide surface. The aim of this series of slides is to assess the influence of N 2 and O 2 partial pressures on the kinetic rate of growth of a new phase and to propose a kinetic modelling of zircaloy-4 corrosion

  13. General considerations on the oxide fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    Pascard, R.

    1977-01-01

    Since the very first experimental irradiations in thermal reactors, performed in view of the future Rapsodie fuel general study, corrosion cladding anomalies were observed. After 10 years of Rapsodie and more than two years of Phenix, performance brought definite confirmation of the chemical reactions between the irradiated fuel and cladding. That is the reason for which the fuel designers express an urgent need for determining the corrosion rates. Semi-empirical laws and mechanisms describing corrosion processes are proposed. Erratic conditions for appearance of the oxide-cladding corrosion are stressed upon. Obviously such a problem can be fully appreciated only by a statistical approach based on a large number of observations on the true LMFBR fuel pins

  14. Unirradiated cladding rip-propagation tests

    Hu, W.L.; Hunter, C.W.

    1981-04-01

    The size of cladding rips which develop when a fuel pin fails can affect the subassembly cooling and determine how rapidly fuel escapes from the pin. The object of the Cladding Rip Propagation Test (CRPT) was to quantify the failure development of cladding so that a more realistic fuel pin failure modeling may be performed. The test results for unirradiated 20% CS 316 stainless steel cladding show significantly different rip propagation behavior at different temperatures. At room temperature, the rip growth is stable as the rip extension increases monotonically with the applied deformation. At 500 0 C, the rip propagation becomes unstable after a short period of stable rip propagation. The rapid propagation rate is approximately 200 m/s, and the critical rip length is 9 mm. At test temperatures above 850 0 C, the cladding exhibits very high failure resistances, and failure occurs by multiple cracking at high cladding deformation. 13 figures

  15. Reactor water chemistry relevant to coolant-cladding interaction

    1987-09-01

    The report is a summary of the work performed in a frame of a Coordinated Research Program organized by the IAEA and carried out from 1981 till 1986. It consists of a survey on our knowledge on coolant-cladding interaction: the basic phenomena, the relevant parameters, their control and the modelling techniques implemented for their assessment. Based upon the results of this Coordinated Research Program, the following topics are reviewed on the report: role of water chemistry in reliable operation of nuclear power plants; water chemistry specifications and their control; behaviour of fuel cladding materials; corrosion product behaviour and crud build-up in reactor circuits; modelling of corrosion product behaviour. This report should be of interest to water chemistry supervisors at the power plants, to experts in utility engineering departments, to fuel designers, to R and D institutes active in the field and to the consultants of these organizations. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 3 papers included in the Annex of this document. Refs, figs, tabs

  16. Modeling the effects of evolving redox conditions on the corrosion of copper containers

    Kng, F.; LeNeveu, D.M.; Jobe, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosive environment around the containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault will change over time from open-quotes warm and oxidizingclose quotes to open-quotes cool and anoxic.close quotes As the conditions change, so too will the corrosion behaviour of the containers. For copper containers, uniform corrosion and, possibly, pitting will occur during the initial aggressive phase, to be replaced by slow uniform corrosion during the long-term anoxic period. The corrosion behaviour of copper has been studied over a range of conditions representing all phases in the evolution of the vault environment. The results of these studies are summarized and used to illustrate how a model can be developed to predict the corrosion behaviour and container lifetimes over long periods of time. Lifetimes in excess of 10 6 a are predicted for 25-mm-thick copper containers under Canadian disposal conditions

  17. A systematic multiscale modeling and experimental approach to protect grain boundaries in magnesium alloys from corrosion

    Horstemeyer, Mark R. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Chaudhuri, Santanu [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    A multiscale modeling Internal State Variable (ISV) constitutive model was developed that captures the fundamental structure-property relationships. The macroscale ISV model used lower length scale simulations (Butler-Volmer and Electronics Structures results) in order to inform the ISVs at the macroscale. The chemomechanical ISV model was calibrated and validated from experiments with magnesium (Mg) alloys that were investigated under corrosive environments coupled with experimental electrochemical studies. Because the ISV chemomechanical model is physically based, it can be used for other material systems to predict corrosion behavior. As such, others can use the chemomechanical model for analyzing corrosion effects on their designs.

  18. Inpile (in PWR) testing of cladding materials

    Hahn, R.; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. J.; Choi, B. K.; Kim, J. M.

    1999-04-01

    As an introduction, the reasons to perform inpile tests are depicted. An overview over general inpile test procedure is given, and test details which are necessary for the development of new alloys for high burnup claddings, like sample geometries and measuring techniques for inpile corrosion testing, are described in detail. Tests for the creep and length change behavior of cladding tubes are described briefly. Finally, conclusions are drawn and literature citations for further test details are given. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 17 figs

  19. Microstructure of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel

    Van Rooyen, C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available and martensite with 10% ferrite for Material B. Table 7 - Proposed martensitic stainless steel alloys for laser cladding Material C* Cr Ni Mn Si Mo Co Ms (ºC)* Cr eq Ni eq Material A 0.4 13 - 1 0.5 2.5 5.5 120 16.5 12.5 Material B 0.2 15 2 1 0.7 2.5 5.5 117... dilution, low heat input, less distortion, increased mechanical and corrosion properties excellent repeatability and control of process parameters. Solidification of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel is primarily austenitic. Microstructures...

  20. MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF IRON CORROSION PROBLEM BASED ON CONDENSATION CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

    Basuki Widodo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion process is a natural case that happened at the various metals, where the corrosion process in electrochemical can be explained by using galvanic cell. The iron corrosion process is based on the acidity degree (pH of a condensation, iron concentration and condensation temperature of electrolyte. Those are applied at electrochemistry cell. The iron corrosion process at this electrochemical cell also able to generate electrical potential and electric current during the process takes place. This paper considers how to build a mathematical model of iron corrosion, electrical potential and electric current. The mathematical model further is solved using the finite element method. This iron corrosion model is built based on the iron concentration, condensation temperature, and iteration time applied. In the electric current density model, the current based on electric current that is happened at cathode and anode pole and the iteration time applied. Whereas on the potential  electric model, it is based on the beginning of electric potential and the iteration time applied. The numerical results show that the part of iron metal, that is gristle caused by corrosion, is the part of metal that has function as anode and it has some influences, such as time depth difference, iron concentration and condensation temperature on the iron corrosion process and the sum of reduced mass during corrosion process. Moreover, difference influence of time and beginning electric potential has an effect on the electric potential, which emerges during corrosion process at the electrochemical cell. Whereas, at the electrical current is also influenced by difference of depth time and condensation temperature applied.Keywords: Iron Corrosion, Concentration of iron, Electrochemical Cell and Finite Element Method

  1. In-pile cladding tests at NRI Rez and PIE capabilities and experience

    Zmitko, M.

    2002-01-01

    In-pile cladding corrosion test facilities and relevant post-irradiation capabilities at NRI Rez plc are overviewed. Basic information about the research rector LVR-15 and in-pile water loops is given. An experience in the field of Zr-alloy cladding corrosion testing and investigation of cladding corrosion behaviour is demonstrated for two experimental programmes conducted at NRI Rez in the past period. The first example describes results obtained at studying of corrosion behaviour of advanced Zr-alloys under PWR conditions with a special concern to a high lithium content and subcooled surface boiling. The second example informs about completion of the experimental programme supported by the IAEA which is focused on investigation of Zircaloy-4 cladding behaviour under VVER water chemistry, thermal-hydraulic and irradiation conditions with the main to obtain experimental data for an assessment of the Zircaloy-4 cladding compatibility with VVER conditions. (author)

  2. Comparison of the corrosion of fasteners embedded in wood measured in outdoor exposure with the predictions from a combined hygrothermal-corrosion model

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Samuel V. Glass; Charles R. Boardman; Dominique Derome

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the accuracy of a recently developed hygrothermal-corrosion model which predictsthe corrosion of fasteners embedded in wood by comparing the results of the model to a one year fieldtest. Steel and galvanized steel fasteners were embedded into untreated and preservative treated woodand exposed outdoors while weather data were collected. Qualitatively...

  3. Heuristic modelling of laser written mid-infrared LiNbO3 stressed-cladding waveguides.

    Nguyen, Huu-Dat; Ródenas, Airán; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Martínez, Javier; Chen, Feng; Aguiló, Magdalena; Pujol, Maria Cinta; Díaz, Francesc

    2016-04-04

    Mid-infrared lithium niobate cladding waveguides have great potential in low-loss on-chip non-linear optical instruments such as mid-infrared spectrometers and frequency converters, but their three-dimensional femtosecond-laser fabrication is currently not well understood due to the complex interplay between achievable depressed index values and the stress-optic refractive index changes arising as a function of both laser fabrication parameters, and cladding arrangement. Moreover, both the stress-field anisotropy and the asymmetric shape of low-index tracks yield highly birefringent waveguides not useful for most applications where controlling and manipulating the polarization state of a light beam is crucial. To achieve true high performance devices a fundamental understanding on how these waveguides behave and how they can be ultimately optimized is required. In this work we employ a heuristic modelling approach based on the use of standard optical characterization data along with standard computational numerical methods to obtain a satisfactory approximate solution to the problem of designing realistic laser-written circuit building-blocks, such as straight waveguides, bends and evanescent splitters. We infer basic waveguide design parameters such as the complex index of refraction of laser-written tracks at 3.68 µm mid-infrared wavelengths, as well as the cross-sectional stress-optic index maps, obtaining an overall waveguide simulation that closely matches the measured mid-infrared waveguide properties in terms of anisotropy, mode field distributions and propagation losses. We then explore experimentally feasible waveguide designs in the search of a single-mode low-loss behaviour for both ordinary and extraordinary polarizations. We evaluate the overall losses of s-bend components unveiling the expected radiation bend losses of this type of waveguides, and finally showcase a prototype design of a low-loss evanescent splitter. Developing a realistic waveguide

  4. Towards modeling intergranular stress corrosion cracks on grain size scales

    Simonovski, Igor; Cizelj, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Simulating the onset and propagation of intergranular cracking. ► Model based on the as-measured geometry and crystallographic orientations. ► Feasibility, performance of the proposed computational approach demonstrated. - Abstract: Development of advanced models at the grain size scales has so far been mostly limited to simulated geometry structures such as for example 3D Voronoi tessellations. The difficulty came from a lack of non-destructive techniques for measuring the microstructures. In this work a novel grain-size scale approach for modelling intergranular stress corrosion cracking based on as-measured 3D grain structure of a 400 μm stainless steel wire is presented. Grain topologies and crystallographic orientations are obtained using a diffraction contrast tomography, reconstructed within a detailed finite element model and coupled with advanced constitutive models for grains and grain boundaries. The wire is composed of 362 grains and over 1600 grain boundaries. Grain boundary damage initialization and early development is then explored for a number of cases, ranging from isotropic elasticity up to crystal plasticity constitutive laws for the bulk grain material. In all cases the grain boundaries are modeled using the cohesive zone approach. The feasibility of the approach is explored.

  5. Parametric Evaluation of SiC/SiC Composite Cladding with UO2 Fuel for LWR Applications: Fuel Rod Interactions and Impact of Nonuniform Power Profile in Fuel Rod

    Singh, G.; Sweet, R.; Brown, N. R.; Wirth, B. D.; Katoh, Y.; Terrani, K.

    2018-02-01

    SiC/SiC composites are candidates for accident tolerant fuel cladding in light water reactors. In the extreme nuclear reactor environment, SiC-based fuel cladding will be exposed to neutron damage, significant heat flux, and a corrosive environment. To ensure reliable and safe operation of accident tolerant fuel cladding concepts such as SiC-based materials, it is important to assess thermo-mechanical performance under in-reactor conditions including irradiation and realistic temperature distributions. The effect of non-uniform dimensional changes caused by neutron irradiation with spatially varying temperatures, along with the closing of the fuel-cladding gap, on the stress development in the cladding over the course of irradiation were evaluated. The effect of non-uniform circumferential power profile in the fuel rod on the mechanical performance of the cladding is also evaluated. These analyses have been performed using the BISON fuel performance modeling code and the commercial finite element analysis code Abaqus. A constitutive model is constructed and solved numerically to predict the stress distribution in the cladding under normal operating conditions. The dependence of dimensions and thermophysical properties on irradiation dose and temperature has been incorporated into the models. Initial scoping results from parametric analyses provide time varying stress distributions in the cladding as well as the interaction of fuel rod with the cladding under different conditions of initial fuel rod-cladding gap and linear heat rate. It is found that a non-uniform circumferential power profile in the fuel rod may cause significant lateral bowing in the cladding, and motivates further analysis and evaluation.

  6. Atomistic Modeling of Corrosion Events at the Interface between a Metal and Its Environment

    Christopher D. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic simulation is a powerful tool for probing the structure and properties of materials and the nature of chemical reactions. Corrosion is a complex process that involves chemical reactions occurring at the interface between a material and its environment and is, therefore, highly suited to study by atomistic modeling techniques. In this paper, the complex nature of corrosion processes and mechanisms is briefly reviewed. Various atomistic methods for exploring corrosion mechanisms are then described, and recent applications in the literature surveyed. Several instances of the application of atomistic modeling to corrosion science are then reviewed in detail, including studies of the metal-water interface, the reaction of water on electrified metallic interfaces, the dissolution of metal atoms from metallic surfaces, and the role of competitive adsorption in controlling the chemical nature and structure of a metallic surface. Some perspectives are then given concerning the future of atomistic modeling in the field of corrosion science.

  7. A computation model for the corrosion resistance of nanocrystalline zirconium metal

    Zhang Xiyan; Shi Minghua; Liu Nianfu; Wei Yiming; Li Cong; Qiu Shaoyu; Zhang Qiang; Zhang Pengcheng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a computation model of corrosion rate-grain size of nanocrystalline and ultra-fine zirconium has been presented. The model is based on the Wagner's theory and the electron theory of solids. The conductivity, electronic mean free path and grain size of metal were considered. By this model, the corrosion rate of zirconium metal under different temperature was computed. The results show that the corrosion weight gain and rate constant of nanocrystalline zirconium is lower than that of zirconium with coarse grain size. And the corrosion rate constant and weight gain of nanocrystalline zirconium metal decrease with the decrease of grain size. So the refinement of grain size can remarkably improve the corrosion resistance of zirconium metal. (authors)

  8. Modeling of Metal Structure Corrosion Damage: A State of the Art Report

    Francesco Portioli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The durability of metal structures is strongly influenced by damage due to atmospheric corrosion, whose control is a key aspect for design and maintenance of both new constructions and historical buildings. Nevertheless, only general provisions are given in European codes to prevent the effects of corrosion during the lifetime of metal structures. In particular, design guidelines such as Eurocode 3 do not provide models for the evaluation of corrosion depth that are able to predict the rate of thickness loss as a function of different influencing parameters. In this paper, the modeling approaches of atmospheric corrosion damage of metal structures, which are available in both ISO standards and the literature, are presented. A comparison among selected degradation models is shown in order to evaluate the possibility of developing a general approach to the evaluation of thickness loss due to corrosion.

  9. ''Simulation of the testing of cladded steel pieces by focussed ultrasonic transducers''

    Nadal, J.

    1996-01-01

    The inner surface of vessels of pressurized water reactor is protected from corrosion by a stainless steel cladding hot-layer in many cuts. Therefore, the surface irregularities generate spurious echoes that can either mask or be misinterpreted for echoes from possible defects. Probes are calibrated on a specific reflector (side drilled holes in a steel block). The echo arising from it is used as a reference to quantify echoes measured during an examination. The study aims at simulating echographs of the vessel inspection so as to help the analysis of actual measurements. Three models are developed to compute echoes from cladding surface irregularities, echoes from planar defects and the reference echo, respectively. The radiated field is modelled using the Rayleigh integral, the integration of the incident beam with the cladded surface is treated under Kirchhoffs approximation and the reception of reflected waves involves reciprocity between radiation and reception. An extra physical hypothesis allows a fast algorithm to be developed for simulating the Bscan image obtained by transducer scan. The reference echo is also computed under Kirchhoffs approximation. The field refracted inside the material is modelled by an extension of the Rayleigh integral using the geometrical optics approximation. The model for computing diffracted echoes from crack tips is based upon the Geometric Theory of Diffraction. The model for predicting echoes from cladded surface irregularities has been validated by comparing theoretical predictions with experimental measurements. (author)

  10. Rupture behaviour of nuclear fuel cladding during loss-of-coolant accident

    Suman, Siddharth [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Patna 801 103 (India); Khan, Mohd Kaleem, E-mail: mkkhan@iitp.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Patna 801 103 (India); Pathak, Manabendra [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Patna 801 103 (India); Singh, R.N.; Chakravartty, J.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Modelling of nuclear fuel cladding during loss-of-coolant accident transient. • Phase transformation, corrosion, and creep combined to evaluate burst criterion. • Effect of oxygen concentration on burst stress and burst strain. • Effect of heating rate, internal pressure fluctuation, shear modulus incorporated. - Abstract: A burst criterion model accounting the simultaneous phenomena of corrosion, solute-strengthening effect of oxygen, oxygen concentration based non-isothermal phase transformation, and thermal creep has been developed to predict the rupture behaviour of zircaloy-4 nuclear fuel cladding during the loss-of-coolant accident transients. The present burst criterion model has been validated using experimental data obtained from single-rod transient burst tests performed in steam environment. The predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results. A detailed computational analysis has been performed to assess the role of different parameters in the rupture of zircaloy cladding during loss-of-coolant accidents. This model reveals that at low temperatures, lower heating rates produce higher burst strains as oxidation effect is nominal. For high temperatures, the lower heating rates produce less burst strains, whereas higher heating rates yield greater burst strains.

  11. Modeling of fast reactor cladding failure for hypothetical accident transient analysis

    Kramer, J.M.; DiMelfi, R.J.; Hughes, T.H.; Deitrich, L.W.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is made of burst experiments performed on neutron irradiated cladding tubes. This is done by employing a generalized Voce equation to describe the mechanical deformation of type 316 stainless steel, combined with an empirical creep crack growth law, each modified to account for the effects of irradiation matrix hardening, and irradiation induced grain boundary embrittlement, respectively. The results of this analysis indicate that for large initial hoop stress, failure occurs at relatively low temperature and is controlled by the onset of plastic instability. The increase in failure temperature of irradiated material, in this low temperature region, is due to irradiation strengthening. Failure in the case of relatively small initial hoop stress occurs at high temperature where the Voce equation reduces to a power law creep formula. The ductility of irradiated material, in this high temperature region, is adequately described through the use of an empirical intergranular crack growth law used in conjunction with the creep law. The effect of neutron irradiation is to reduce the activation energy for crack propagation from the value for creep to some lower value correlated to independent Dorn rupture parameter measurements. The result is a predicted reduced ductility which translates into a reduction in failure temperature at a given hoop stress value for irradiated material. (orig.)

  12. Modeling deformation and failure of fast reactor cladding during simulated accident transients

    Kramer, J.M.; Dimelfi, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is made of burst experiments performed on neutron irradiated cladding tubes. This is done by employing a generalized Voce equation to describe the mechanical deformation of type 316 stainless steel, combined with an empirical creep crack growth law, each modified to account for the effects of irradiation matrix hardening, and irradiation induced grain boundary embrittlement, respectively. The results of this analysis indicate that for large initial hoop stress, failure occurs at relatively low temperature and is controlled by the onset of plastic instability. The increase in failure temperature of irradiated material, in low temperature region, is due to irradiation strengthening. Failure in the case of relatively small initial hoop stress occurs at high temperature where the Voce equation reduces to a power law creep formula. The ductility of irradiated material, in this high temperature region, is adequately described through the use of an empirical intergranular crack growth law used in conjunction with the creep law. The effect of neutron irradiation is to reduce the activation energy for crack propagation from the value for creep to some lower value correlated to independent Dorn rupture parameter measurements. The result is a predicted reduced ductility which translates into a reduction in failure temperature at a given hoop stress value for irradiated material. (orig.)

  13. The corrosion potential of stainless steel in BWR environment comparison of data and modeling results

    Molander, Anders; Ullberg, Mats

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion potential measurements have been performed in Swedish BWRs during 25 years using commercially available monitoring equipment. Today, such measurements are performed on a routine basis in the BWRs on hydrogen water chemistry in Sweden. Measurements are usually performed at several monitoring locations in the plants. During the years, variations in the corrosion potential between different reactor cycles have been observed. Also, the corrosion potential can vary significantly during the reactor year. The changes have not always been easy to explain. Examples of in-plant data are given, demonstrating the need for a better understanding and for improved modeling tools. These examples were used as starting points for developing improved methods for corrosion potential modeling. A new tool recently developed, The Virtual ECP Laboratory, is described and applications to BWR conditions including some unexpected experimental corrosion potential responses are given. (author)

  14. Multi-physical and multi-scale deterioration modelling of re-inforced concrete: modelling corrosion-induced concrete damage

    Michel, Alexander; Lepech, Michael; Stang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    for the discretization of the concrete domain. To model the expansive nature of solid corrosion products, a thermal analogy is used. The modelling approach further accounts for the penetration of solid corrosion products into the available pore space of the surrounding cementitious materials and non-uniform distribution...

  15. SITE-94. CAMEO: A model of mass-transport limited general corrosion of copper canisters

    Worgan, K.J.; Apted, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the technical basis for the CAMEO code, which models the general, uniform corrosion of a copper canister either by transport of corrodants to the canister, or by transport of corrosion products away from the canister. According to the current Swedish concept for final disposal of spent nuclear fuels, extremely long containment times are achieved by thick (60-100 mm) copper canisters. Each canister is surrounded by a compacted bentonite buffer, located in a saturated, crystalline rock at a depth of around 500 m below ground level. Three diffusive transport-limited cases are identified for general, uniform corrosion of copper: General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of sulphide to the canister surface under reducing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of oxygen to the canister surface under mildly oxidizing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of copper chloride away from the canister surface under highly oxidizing conditions. The CAMEO code includes general corrosion models for each of the above three processes. CAMEO is based on the well-tested CALIBRE code previously developed as a finite-difference, mass-transfer analysis code for the SKI to evaluate long-term radionuclide release and transport in the near-field. A series of scoping calculations for the general, uniform corrosion of a reference copper canister are presented

  16. Analytical model for time to cover cracking in RC structures due to rebar corrosion

    Bhargava, Kapilesh; Ghosh, A.K.; Mori, Yasuhiro; Ramanujam, S.

    2006-01-01

    The structural degradation of concrete structures due to reinforcement corrosion is a major worldwide problem. Reinforcement corrosion causes a volume increase due to the oxidation of metallic iron, which is mainly responsible for exerting the expansive radial pressure at the steel-concrete interface and development of hoop tensile stresses in the surrounding concrete. Cracking occurs, once the maximum hoop tensile stress exceeds the tensile strength of the concrete. The cracking begins at the steel-concrete interface and propagates outwards and eventually results in the thorough cracking of the cover concrete and this would indicate the loss of service life for the corrosion affected structures. An analytical model is proposed to predict the time required for cover cracking and the weight loss of reinforcing bar in corrosion affected reinforced concrete structures. The modelling aspects of the residual strength of cracked concrete and the stiffness contribution from the combination of reinforcement and expansive corrosion products have also been incorporated in the model. The problem is modeled as a boundary value problem and the governing equations are expressed in terms of the radial displacement. The analytical solutions are presented considering a simple two-zone model for the cover concrete, viz. cracked or uncracked. Reasonable estimation of the various parameters in the model related to the composition and properties of expansive corrosion products based on the available published experimental data has also been discussed. The performance of the proposed corrosion cracking model is then investigated through its ability to reproduce available experimental trends. Reasonably good agreement between experimental results and the analytical predictions has been obtained. It has also been found that tensile strength and initial tangent modulus of cover concrete, annual mean corrosion rate and modulus of elasticity of reinforcement plus corrosion products combined

  17. Physical models of corrosion of iron and nickel in liquid sodium

    Skyrme, G.

    1975-11-01

    The possible physical models for the corrosion of iron and nickel in liquid sodium loops are considered. The models are assessed in the light of available experimental evidence, in particular the magnitude of the corrosion rate and the velocity, downstream, temperature and oxygen effects. Currently recommended solubility values are used throughout. It is shown that the simple model based on these recommended values, which assumes that the dissolved metals are in equilibrium throughout the loop, overestimates the corrosion rate by three orders of magnitude. (author)

  18. Corrosion models for predictions of performance of high-level radioactive-waste containers

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gdowski, G.E. [KMI Energy Services, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    The present plan for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the US is to seal it in containers before emplacement in a geologic repository. A proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated for its suitability as a geologic repository. The containers will probably be made of either an austenitic or a copper-based alloy. Models of alloy degradation are being used to predict the long-term performance of the containers under repository conditions. The models are of uniform oxidation and corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking, and are applicable to worst-case scenarios of container degradation. This paper reviews several of the models.

  19. Mechanical Property and Oxidation Behavior of ATF cladding developed in KAERI

    Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To realize the coating cladding, coating material (Cr-based alloy) as well as coating technology (3D laser coating and arc ion plating combined with vacuum annealing) can be developed to meet the fuel cladding criteria. The coated Zr cladding can be produced after the optimization of coating technologies. The coated cladding sample showed the good oxidation/corrosion and adhesion properties without the spalling and/or severe interaction with the Zr alloy cladding from the various tests. Thus, it is known that the mechanical property and oxidation behavior of coated cladding concept developed in KAERI is reasonable for applying the ATF cladding in LWRs. At the present time various ATF concepts have been proposed and developing in many countries. The ATF concepts with potentially improved accident performance can be summarized to the coating cladding, Mo-Zr cladding, FeCrAl cladding, and SiCf/SiC cladding. Regarding the cladding performance, ATF cladding concepts will be evaluated with respect to the accident scenarios and normal operations of LWRs as well as to the fuel cladding fabrication.

  20. Activity of corrosion products in pool type reactors with ascending flow in the core

    Andrade e Silva, Graciete S. de; Queiroz Bogado Leite, Sergio de

    1995-01-01

    A model for the activity of corrosion products in the water of a pool type reactor with ascending flow is presented. The problem is described by a set of coupled differential equations relating the radioisotope concentrations in the core and pool circuits and taking into account two types of radioactive sources: i) those from radioactive species formed in the fuel cladding, control elements, reflector, etc, and afterwards released to the primary stream by corrosion (named reactor sources) and ii) those formed from non radioactive isotopes entering the primary stream by corrosion of the circuit components and being activated when passing through the core (named circuit sources). (author). 6 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  1. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented

  2. Reactive-transport model for the prediction of the uniform corrosion behaviour of copper used fuel containers

    King, F.; Kolar, M.; Maak, P.

    2008-01-01

    Used fuel containers in a deep geological repository will be subject to various forms of corrosion. For containers made from oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper, the most likely corrosion processes are uniform corrosion, underdeposit corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. The environmental conditions within the repository are expected to evolve with time, changing from warm and oxidizing initially to cool and anoxic in the long-term. In response, the corrosion behaviour of the containers will also change with time as the repository environment evolve. A reactive-transport model has been developed to predict the time-dependent uniform corrosion behaviour of the container. The model is based on an experimentally-based reaction scheme that accounts for the various chemical, microbiological, electrochemical, precipitation/dissolution, adsorption/desorption, redox, and mass-transport processes at the container surface and in the compacted bentonite-based sealing materials within the repository. Coupling of the electrochemical interfacial reactions with processes in the bentonite buffer material allows the effect of the evolution of the repository environment on the corrosion behaviour of the container to be taken into account. The Copper Corrosion Model for Uniform Corrosion predicts the time-dependent corrosion rate and corrosion potential of the container, as well as the evolution of the near-field environment

  3. Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments

    E. Siegmann

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796])

  4. Nuclear-powered pacemaker fuel cladding study

    Shoup, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    The composite of metals and alloys used in the fabrication of 238 Pu cardiac pacemaker fuel capsules resists the effects of high temperatures, high mechanical forces, and chemical corrosives and provides more than adequate protection to the fuel pellet even from deliberate attempts to dissolve the cladding in inorganic acids. This does not imply that opening a pacemaker fuel capsule by inorganic acids is impossible but that it would not be a wise choice

  5. Modeling of corrosion product migration in the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with WWER-1200

    Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.; Motkova, E. A.; Zelenina, E. V.; Prokhorov, N. A.; Gorbatenko, S. P.; Tsitser, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Models of corrosion and mass transfer of corrosion products in the pipes of the condensate-feeding and steam paths of the secondary circuit of NPPs with WWER-1200 are presented. The mass transfer and distribution of corrosion products over the currents of the working medium of the secondary circuit were calculated using the physicochemical model of mass transfer of corrosion products in which the secondary circuit is regarded as a cyclic system consisting of a number of interrelated elements. The circuit was divided into calculated regions in which the change in the parameters (flow rate, temperature, and pressure) was traced and the rates of corrosion and corrosion products entrainment, high-temperature pH, and iron concentration were calculated. The models were verified according to the results of chemical analyses at Kalinin NPP and iron corrosion product concentrations in the feed water at different NPPs depending on pH at 25°C (pH25) for service times τ ≥ 5000 h. The calculated pH values at a coolant temperature t (pH t ) in the secondary circuit of NPPs with WWER-1200 were presented. The calculation of the distribution of pH t and ethanolamine and ammonia concentrations over the condensate feed (CFC) and steam circuits is given. The models are designed for developing the calculation codes. The project solutions of ATOMPROEKT satisfy the safety and reliability requirements for power plants with WWER-1200. The calculated corrosion and corrosion product mass transfer parameters showed that the model allows the designer to choose between the increase of the correcting reagent concentration, the use of steel with higher chromium contents, and intermittent washing of the steam generator from sediments as the best solution for definite regions of the circuit.

  6. YAG laser cladding to heat exchanger flange in actual plant

    Toshio, Kojima

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a sequel to ''Development of YAG Laser Cladding Technology to Heat Exchanger Flange'' presented in ICONE-8. A YAG Laser cladding technology is a permanent repairing and preventive maintenance method for heat exchanger's flange (channel side) seating surface which is degraded by the corrosion in long term operation. The material of this flange is carbon steel, and that of cladding wire is type 316 stainless steel so as to have high corrosion resistance. In former paper above, the soundness of cladding layers were presented to be verified. This channel side flange is bolted with tube sheet (shell side) through metal gasket. As the tube sheet side is already cladded a corrosion resistant material, it needs to apply the repairing and preventive maintenance method to only channel side. In 2000 this technology had been performed to the actual heat exchanger (Residual Heat Removal Heat Exchanger; RHR Hx) flange in domestic nuclear power plant. This paper described the outline, special equipment, and our total evaluation for this actual laser cladding work. And also several technical subjects which we should solve and/or improve for the next project was presented. (author)

  7. Corrosion in power industry

    Ventakeshwarlu, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    A brief account of the problem areas encountered as a result of corrosion in the electrical power industry including nuclear power industry is given and some of the measures contemplated and/or implemented to control corrosion are outlined. The corrosion problems in the steam generators and cladding tubes of the nuclear power plant have an added dimension of radioactivation which leads to contamination and radiation field. Importance of monitoring water quality and controlling water chemistry by addition of chemicals is emphasised. (M.G.B.)

  8. Mechanistic modelling of the corrosion behaviour of copper nuclear fuel waste containers

    King, F; Kolar, M

    1996-10-01

    A mechanistic model has been developed to predict the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a Canadian disposal vault. The model is based on a detailed description of the electrochemical, chemical, adsorption and mass-transport processes involved in the uniform corrosion of copper, developed from the results of an extensive experimental program. Predictions from the model are compared with the results of some of these experiments and with observations from a bronze cannon submerged in seawater saturated clay sediments. Quantitative comparisons are made between the observed and predicted corrosion potential, corrosion rate and copper concentration profiles adjacent to the corroding surface, as a way of validating the long-term model predictions. (author). 12 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear reactors: A model for irradiation induced enhancement by local radiolysis in the porous oxide

    Lemaignan, C; Salot, R [CEA/DRN/DTP, CENG-SECC, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    An analysis has been undertaken of the various cases of local enhancement of corrosion rate of zirconium alloys under irradiation. It is observed that in most cases a strong emission of energetic {beta}{sup -} is present leading to a local energy deposition rate higher than the core average. This suggests that the local transient radiolytic oxidizing species produced in the coolant by the {beta}{sup -} particles could contribute to corrosion enhancement, by increasing the local corrosion potential. This process is applicable to the local enhanced corrosion found in front of stainless steels structural parts, due to the contribution of Mn, and in front of Pt inserts or Cu-rich cruds. It explains also the irradiation corrosion enhancement of Cu-Zr alloys. Enhanced corrosion around neutron absorbing material is explained similarly by pair production from conversion of high energy capture photons in the cladding, leading to energetic electrons. The same process was found to be active with other highly ionizing species like {alpha} from Ni-rich alloys and fission products in homogeneous reactors. Due to the changes induced by the irradiation intensity on the concentration of the radiolytic species, the coolant chemistry, that controls the boundary conditions for oxide growth, has to be analyzed with respect to the local value of the energy deposition rate. An analysis has been undertaken which shows that, in a porous media, the water is exposed to a higher intensity than bulk water. This leads to a higher concentration of oxidizing radiolytic species at the root of the cracks of the porous oxide, and increases the corrosion rate under irradiation. This mechanism, deduced from the explanation proposed for localized irradiation enhanced corrosion, can be extended to the whole reactor core, where the general enhancement of Zr alloys corrosion under irradiation could be attributed to the general radiolysis in the porous zirconia. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs.

  10. Allowing for surface preparation in stress corrosion cracking modelling

    Berge, P.; Buisine, D.; Gelpi, A.

    1997-01-01

    When a 600 alloy component is significantly deformed during installation, by welding, rolling, bending, its stress corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor's primary coolant, is significantly changed by the initial surface treatment. Therefore, the crack initiated time may be reduced by several orders of magnitude for certain surfaces preparations. Allowing for cold working of the surface, for which modelling is proposed, depends less on the degree of cold work then on the depths of the hardened layers. Honing hardens the metal over depths of about one micron for vessel head penetrations, for example, and has little influence on subsequent behaviour after the part deforms. On the other hand, coarser turning treatment produces cold worked layers which can reach several tens of microns and can very significantly reduce the initiation time compared to fine honing. So evaluation after depths of hardening is vital on test pieces for interpreting laboratory results as well as on service components for estimating their service life. Suppression by mechanical or chemical treatment of these layers, after deformation, seems to be the most appropriate solution for reducing over-stressing connected with surface treatment carried out before deformation. (author)

  11. BWR fuel clad behaviour following LOCA

    Chaudhry, S.M.; Vyas, K.N.; Dinesh Babu, R.

    1996-01-01

    Flow and pressure through the fuel coolant channel reduce rapidly following a loss of coolant accident. Due to stored energy and decay heat, fuel and cladding temperatures rise rapidly. Increase in clad temperature causes deterioration of mechanical properties of clad material. This coupled with increase of pressure inside the cladding due to accumulation of fission gases and de-pressurization of coolant causes the cladding to balloon. This phenomenon is important as it can reduce or completely block the flow passages in a fuel assembly causing reduction of emergency coolant flow. Behaviour of a BWR clad is analyzed in a design basis LOCA. Fuel and clad temperatures following a LOCA are calculated. Fission gas release and pressure is estimated using well established models. An elasto-plastic analysis of clad tube is carried out to determine plastic strains and corresponding deformations using finite-element technique. Analysis of neighbouring pins gives an estimate of flow areas available for emergency coolant flow. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  12. Review and Study of Physics Driven Pitting Corrosion Modeling in 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys (Postprint)

    2015-05-01

    aluminum subjected to pitting corrosion under fatigue conditions ”, Journal of Aircraft, Vol. 46, No. 4, pp. 1253-1259 Wei, R.P. (2001) “A model for...and material microstructure applied to corrosion and fatigue of aluminum and steel alloys”, Engineering Fracture Mechanics , Vol. 76, pp. 695-708 Wei...Fatigue Behavior of Aluminum Alloy 7075 -T6: Modeling and Experimental Studies", Materials Science and Engineering: A, vol. 297, Issue: 1-2, 15, pp. 223

  13. A pellet-clad interaction failure criterion

    Howl, D.A.; Coucill, D.N.; Marechal, A.J.C.

    1983-01-01

    A Pellet-Clad Interaction (PCI) failure criterion, enabling the number of fuel rod failures in a reactor core to be determined for a variety of normal and fault conditions, is required for safety analysis. The criterion currently being used for the safety analysis of the Pressurized Water Reactor planned for Sizewell in the UK is defined and justified in this paper. The criterion is based upon a threshold clad stress which diminishes with increasing fast neutron dose. This concept is consistent with the mechanism of clad failure being stress corrosion cracking (SCC); providing excess corrodant is always present, the dominant parameter determining the propagation of SCC defects is stress. In applying the criterion, the SLEUTH-SEER 77 fuel performance computer code is used to calculate the peak clad stress, allowing for concentrations due to pellet hourglassing and the effect of radial cracks in the fuel. The method has been validated by analysis of PCI failures in various in-reactor experiments, particularly in the well-characterised power ramp tests in the Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor (SGHWR) at Winfrith. It is also in accord with out-of-reactor tests with iodine and irradiated Zircaloy clad, such as those carried out at Kjeller in Norway. (author)

  14. Microscopic Analysis and Electrochemical Behavior of Fe-Based Coating Produced by Laser Cladding

    Jinlin Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of laser cladding on the surface microstructure and corrosion properties of coated/uncoated specimens were investigated. Fe-based alloy coating was produced on 35CrMo steel by laser cladding. The phase composition, microstructure, interface element distribution, microhardness and corrosion resistance of the cladding coating were measured. The results show that the cladding layer is mainly composed of α-Fe phases, the microstructure presents a gradient distribution, and a good metallurgical bond is formed at the boundary with the substrate. Microhardness profiles show that the average microhardness of the cladding coating is about 2.1 times higher than that of the uncoated specimen. In addition, the electrochemical results show that the coated specimen exhibits far better corrosion resistance than to the uncoated specimen.

  15. Implementation of Localized Corrosion in the Performance Assessment Model for Yucca Mountain

    Vivek Jain, S.; David Sevougian; Patrick D. Mattie; Kevin G. Mon; Robert J. Mackinnon

    2006-01-01

    A total system performance assessment (TSPA) model has been developed to analyze the ability of the natural and engineered barriers of the Yucca Mountain repository to isolate nuclear waste over the 10,000-year period following repository closure. The principal features of the engineered barrier system (EBS) are emplacement tunnels (or ''drifts'') containing a two-layer waste package (WP) for waste containment and a titanium drip shield to protect the waste package from seeping water and falling rock, The 20-mm-thick outer shell of the WP is composed of Alloy 22, a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The barrier function of the EBS is to isolate the waste from migrating water. The water and its associated chemical conditions eventually lead to degradation of the waste packages and mobilization of the radionuclides within the packages. There are five possible waste package degradation modes of the Alloy 22: general corrosion, microbially influenced corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, early failure due to manufacturing defects, and localized corrosion. This paper specifically examines the incorporation of the Alloy-22 localized corrosion model into the Yucca Mountain TSPA model, particularly the abstraction and modeling methodology, as well as issues dealing with scaling, spatial variability, uncertainty, and coupling to other sub-models that are part of the total system model

  16. A new stress corrosion cracking model for Inconel 600 in PWR media

    Magnin, T.

    1993-01-01

    A model of cracking in corrosion under stress, based on corrosion-plasticity interactions at cracking points, is proposed to describe the generally intergranular breakage of Inconel 600 in PWR medium. It is shown by calculation, and verified experimentally by observations in SEM, that a pseudo-intergranular breakage connected to the formation of micro facets in zigzags along the joints is possible, as well as a completely intergranular breakage. This allows us to assume that a continuity of mechanisms exists between the trans- and intergranular cracking by corrosion under material stress. (author)

  17. Phase-field modeling of corrosion kinetics under dual-oxidants

    Wen, You-Hai; Chen, Long-Qing; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2012-04-01

    A phase-field model is proposed to simulate corrosion kinetics under a dual-oxidant atmosphere. It will be demonstrated that the model can be applied to simulate corrosion kinetics under oxidation, sulfidation and simultaneous oxidation/sulfidation processes. Phase-dependent diffusivities are incorporated in a natural manner and allow more realistic modeling as the diffusivities usually differ by many orders of magnitude in different phases. Simple free energy models are then used for testing the model while calibrated free energy models can be implemented for quantitative modeling.

  18. Future possibilities of SUSEN technologies for R&D of nuclear fuel cladding

    Mikloš, M.

    2015-01-01

    R&D possibilities with nuclear fuel cladding were discussed in this paper. The availability of 10 MWT reactor with BWR and PWR loops having chemistry control was described. Activity transport and fuel cladding corrosion can be investigated in this facility including PIE. The facility has hot cells and the laboratory is expected to start in 2017

  19. Chemical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction in light water reactor fuel elements

    Olander, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    In contrast to the extensive literature on the mechanical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in light water reactor fuel elements, the chemical features of this phenomenon are so poorly understood that there is still disagreement concerning the chemical agent responsible. Since the earliest work by Rosenbaum, Davies and Pon, laboratory and in-reactor experiments designed to elucidate the mechanism of PCI fuel rod failures have concentrated almost exclusively on iodine. The assumption that this is the reponsible chemical agent is contained in models of PCI which have been constructed for incorporation into fuel performance codes. The evidence implicating iodine is circumstantial, being based primarily upon the volatility and significant fission yield of this element and on the microstructural similarity of the failed Zircaloy specimens exposed to iodine in laboratory stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests to cladding failures by PCI

  20. Preliminary corrosion models for BWIP [Basalt Waste Isolation Project] canister materials

    Fish, R.L.; Anantatmula, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    Waste package development for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) requires the generation of materials degradation data under repository relevant conditions. These data are used to develop predictive models for the behavior of each component of waste package. The component models are exercised in performance analyses to optimize the waste package design. This document presents all repository relevant canister materials corrosion data that the BWIP and others have developed to date, describes the methodology used to develop preliminary corrosion models and provides the mathematical description of the models for both low carbon steel and Fe9Cr1Mo steel. Example environment/temperature history and model application calculations are presented to aid in understanding the models. The models are preliminary in nature and will be updated as additional corrosion data become available. 6 refs., 5 tabs

  1. Investigation of likely causes of white patch formation on irradiated WWER fuel rod claddings

    Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Velioukhanov, V.P.; Ioltoukhovski, A.Y.; Pogodin, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    The information concerning white patches observed on fuel cladding surfaces has been analytically treated. The analysis shows at least three kinds of the white patch appearance: bright white spots which appear to be loose corrosion product deposits disclosing corrosion pits upon spalling; indistinct streaks with separate pronounced spots 1-2 in dia. The spots seem to be thin superficial deposits; light-coloured dense uniform crud distributed over the surface of fuel claddings and fuel assembly jackets. (author)

  2. Modeling of liquid-metal corrosion/deposition in a fusion reactor blanket

    Malang, S.; Smith, D.L.

    1984-04-01

    A model has been developed for the investigation of the liquid-metal corrosion and the corrosion product transport in a liquid-metal-cooled fusion reactor blanket. The model describes the two-dimensional transport of wall material in the liquid-metal flow and is based on the following assumptions: (1) parallel flow in a straight circular tube; (2) transport of wall material perpendicular to the flow direction by diffusion and turbulent exchange; in flow direction by the flow motion only; (3) magnetic field causes uniform velocity profile with thin boundary layer and suppresses turbulent mass exchange; and (4) liquid metal at the interface is saturated with wall material. A computer code based on this model has been used to analyze the corrosion of ferritic steel by lithium lead and the deposition of wall material in the cooler part of a loop. Three cases have been investigated: (1) ANL forced convection corrosion experiment (without magnetic field); (2) corrosion in the MARS liquid-metal-cooled blanket (with magnetic field); and (3) deposition of wall material in the corrosion product cleanup system of the MARS blanket loop

  3. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended ...

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Abstract. In the previous paper (Pramana – J. Phys. 81(6), 1009 (2013)), the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) based on non-quadratic form of Dirichlet energy was proposed and its statistical features were discussed. Following those results, we discuss here how SCC propagates on pipe wall ...

  4. Laser Cladding of TiC for Better Titanium Components

    Sampedro, Jesús; Pérez, I; CÁRCEL GONZÁLEZ, BERNABÉ; Ramos, José Antonio; Amigó Borrás, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Pure commercial titanium is widely used because of its high corrosion resistance and lower cost compared with other titanium alloys, in particular when there is no high wear requirements. Nevertheless, the wear resistance is poor and surface damage usually occurs in areas under contact loadings. Laser cladding is a suitable technique for manufacturing precise and defect free coatings of a dissimilar material with higher wear and corrosion resistance. In this work a good understanding of laser...

  5. Development of laser surface cladding through energy transmission over optical fiber

    Hirano, Kenji; Morishige, Norio; Irisawa, Toshio

    1990-01-01

    Much attention has recently been paid to laser cladding techniques as an approach in controlling the composition and structure of the metal surface. If YAG laser is used as the cladding method, the flexibility of laser cladding process increases extremely because YAG laser beam is transmitted through an optical fiber, and enabling cladding on pipes installed in actual plants. So experiments on YAG laser cladding through energy transmission over an optical fiber were performed to prevent stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steel pipes. In order to build a cladding layer, mixed metal powder were pre-placed on the inner surface of the pipe using organic binder and the pre-placed powder beds were melted with YAG laser beam transmitted using an optical fiber. This paper introduces the method of building a cladding layer on pipes in actual nuclear plants. (author)

  6. Prediction of microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel welds by modelling

    Vilpas, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    1999-07-01

    The present study focuses on the ability of several computer models to accurately predict the solidification, microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel weld metals. Emphasis was given to modelling the effect of welding speed on solute redistribution and ultimately to the prediction of weld pitting corrosion resistance. Calculations were experimentally verified by applying autogenous GTA- and laser processes over the welding speed range of 0.1 to 5 m/min for several austenitic stainless steel grades. Analytical and computer aided models were applied and linked together for modelling the solidification behaviour of welds. The combined use of macroscopic and microscopic modelling is a unique feature of this work. This procedure made it possible to demonstrate the effect of weld pool shape and the resulting solidification parameters on microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance. Microscopic models were also used separately to study the role of welding speed and solidification mode in the development of microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance. These investigations demonstrate that the macroscopic model can be implemented to predict solidification parameters that agree well with experimentally measured values. The linked macro-micro modelling was also able to accurately predict segregation profiles and CPT-temperatures obtained from experiments. The macro-micro simulations clearly showed the major roles of weld composition and welding speed in determining segregation and pitting corrosion resistance while the effect of weld shape variations remained negligible. The microscopic dendrite tip and interdendritic models were applied to welds with good agreement with measured segregation profiles. Simulations predicted that weld inhomogeneity can be substantially decreased with increasing welding speed resulting in a corresponding improvement in the weld pitting corrosion resistance. In the case of primary austenitic

  7. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants

    1998-01-01

    Technically the study of corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power reactors is a very active field and both experimental work and understanding of the mechanisms involved are going through rapid changes. As a result, the lifetime of any publication in this area is short. Because of this it has been decided to revise IAEA-TECDOC-684 - Corrosion of Zirconium Alloys in Nuclear Power Plants - published in 1993. This updated, revised and enlarged version includes major changes to incorporate some of the comments received about the first version. Since this review deals exclusively with the corrosion of zirconium and zirconium based alloys in water, and another separate publication is planned to deal with the fuel-side corrosion of zirconium based fuel cladding alloys, i.e. stress corrosion cracking, it was decided to change the original title to Waterside Corrosion of Zirconium Alloys in Nuclear Power Plants. The rapid changes in the field have again necessitated a cut-off date for incorporating new data. This edition incorporates data up to the end of 1995; including results presented at the 11 International Symposium on Zirconium in the Nuclear Industry held in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, in September 1995. The revised format of the review now includes: Introductory chapters on basic zirconium metallurgy and oxidation theory; A revised chapter discussing the present extent of our knowledge of the corrosion mechanism based on laboratory experiments; a separate and revised chapter discussing hydrogen uptake; a completely reorganized chapter summarizing the phenomenological observations of zirconium alloy corrosion in reactors; a new chapter on modelling in-reactor corrosion; a revised chapter devoted exclusively to the manner in which irradiation might influence the corrosion process; finally, a summary of our present understanding of the corrosion mechanisms operating in reactor

  8. Development of zircaloy deformation model to describe the zircaloy-4 cladding tube during accidents

    Raff, S.

    1978-01-01

    The development of a high-temperature deformation model for Zircaloy-4 cans is primarily based on numerous well-parametrized tensile tests to get the material behaviour including statistical variance. It is shown that plastic deformation may be described by a power creep law, the coefficients of which show strong dependence on temperature in the relevant temperature region. These coefficients have been determined. A model based on these coefficients has been established which, apart from best estimate deformation, gives upper and lower bounds of possible deformation. The model derived from isothermal uniaxial tests is being verified against isothermal and transient tube burst tests. The influence of preoxidation and increased oxygen concentration during deformation is modeled on the basis of the pseudobinary Zircaloy-oxygen phase diagram. (author)

  9. Aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte-Carlo simulations

    Ledieu, A.

    2004-10-01

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  10. SiC/SiC Cladding Materials Properties Handbook

    Snead, Mary A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Singh, Gyanender P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    When a new class of material is considered for a nuclear core structure, the in-pile performance is usually assessed based on multi-physics modeling in coordination with experiments. This report aims to provide data for the mechanical and physical properties and environmental resistance of silicon carbide (SiC) fiber–reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites for use in modeling for their application as accidenttolerant fuel cladding for light water reactors (LWRs). The properties are specific for tube geometry, although many properties can be predicted from planar specimen data. This report presents various properties, including mechanical properties, thermal properties, chemical stability under normal and offnormal operation conditions, hermeticity, and irradiation resistance. Table S.1 summarizes those properties mainly for nuclear-grade SiC/SiC composites fabricated via chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). While most of the important properties are available, this work found that data for the in-pile hydrothermal corrosion resistance of SiC materials and for thermal properties of tube materials are lacking for evaluation of SiC-based cladding for LWR applications.

  11. Stochastic approach to pitting-corrosion-extreme modelling in low-carbon steel

    Valor, A. [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de La Habana, San Lazaro y L, Vedado 10400, La Habana (Cuba); Caleyo, F. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)], E-mail: fcaleyo@gmail.com; Rivas, D.; Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)

    2010-03-15

    A stochastic model previously developed by the authors using Markov chains has been improved in the light of new experimental evidence. The new model has been successfully applied to reproduce the time evolution of extreme pitting corrosion depths in low-carbon steel. The model is shown to provide a better physical understanding of the pitting process.

  12. Stochastic approach to pitting-corrosion-extreme modelling in low-carbon steel

    Valor, A.; Caleyo, F.; Rivas, D.; Hallen, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A stochastic model previously developed by the authors using Markov chains has been improved in the light of new experimental evidence. The new model has been successfully applied to reproduce the time evolution of extreme pitting corrosion depths in low-carbon steel. The model is shown to provide a better physical understanding of the pitting process.

  13. Improved Application of Local Models to Steel Corrosion in Lead-Bismuth Loops

    Zhang Jinsuo; Li Ning

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion of steels exposed to flowing liquid metals is influenced by local and global conditions of flow systems. The present study improves the previous local models when applied to closed loops by incorporating some global condition effects. In particular the bulk corrosion product concentration is calculated based on balancing the dissolution and precipitation in the entire closed loop. Mass transfer expressions developed in aqueous medium and an analytical expression are tested in the liquid-metal environments. The improved model is applied to a pure lead loop and produces results closer to the experimental data than the previous local models do. The model is also applied to a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) test loop. Systematic studies illustrate the effects of the flow rate, the oxygen concentration in LBE, and the temperature profile on the corrosion rate

  14. The negative binomial distribution as a model for external corrosion defect counts in buried pipelines

    Valor, Alma; Alfonso, Lester; Caleyo, Francisco; Vidal, Julio; Perez-Baruch, Eloy; Hallen, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Observed external-corrosion defects in underground pipelines revealed a tendency to cluster. • The Poisson distribution is unable to fit extensive count data for these type of defects. • In contrast, the negative binomial distribution provides a suitable count model for them. • Two spatial stochastic processes lead to the negative binomial distribution for defect counts. • They are the Gamma-Poisson mixed process and the compound Poisson process. • A Rogeŕs process also arises as a plausible temporal stochastic process leading to corrosion defect clustering and to negative binomially distributed defect counts. - Abstract: The spatial distribution of external corrosion defects in buried pipelines is usually described as a Poisson process, which leads to corrosion defects being randomly distributed along the pipeline. However, in real operating conditions, the spatial distribution of defects considerably departs from Poisson statistics due to the aggregation of defects in groups or clusters. In this work, the statistical analysis of real corrosion data from underground pipelines operating in southern Mexico leads to conclude that the negative binomial distribution provides a better description for defect counts. The origin of this distribution from several processes is discussed. The analysed processes are: mixed Gamma-Poisson, compound Poisson and Roger’s processes. The physical reasons behind them are discussed for the specific case of soil corrosion.

  15. Underwater laser cladding and seal welding for INCONEL 52

    Tamura, Masataka; Kouno, Wataru; Makino, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Shohei; Yoda, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    Recently, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed at aged components of nuclear power plants under water environment and high exposure of radiation. Toshiba has been developing both an underwater laser welding directly onto surface of the aged components as maintenance and repair techniques. This paper reports underwater laser cladding and seal welding for INCONEL 52. (author)

  16. Elimination of Start/Stop defects in laser cladding

    Ocelik, V.; Eekma, M.; Hemmati, I.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser cladding represents an advanced hard facing technology for the deposition of hard, corrosion and wear resistant layers of controlled thickness onto a selected area of metallic substrate. When a circular geometry is required, the beginning and the end of the laser track coincide in the same

  17. Production and quality control of fuel cladding tubes for LWRs

    Matsuda, Katsuhiko; Hagi, Shigeki; Anada, Hiroyuki; Abe, Hideaki; Hyodo, Shigetoshi

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent fabrication technology and corrosion resistance study of fuel cladding tubes for LWRs conducted by Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd. started the research on zircaloy in 1957. In 1980, the factory exclusively for the production of cladding tubes was founded, and the mass production system on full scale was established. Thereafter, the various improvement of the production technology, the development of new products, and the heightening of the performance mainly on the corrosion resistance have been tested and studied. Recently, the works in the production processes were almost automated, and the installation of the production lines advanced, and the stabilization of product quality and the rationalization of costs are promoted. Moreover, the development of the zircaloy cladding tubes having high corrosion resistance has been advanced to cope with the long term cycle operation of LWRs hereafter. The features of zircaloy cladding tubes, the manufacturing processes, the improvement of the manufacturing technology, the improvement of the corrosion resistance and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  18. Studies of corrosion morphologies by use of experiments and computer models

    Johnsen, Terje

    1997-12-31

    CO{sub 2} corrosion of carbon steel is frequently encountered in the oil industry. This thesis studies the morphology of corroded metals and the dynamical evolution of corrosion attacks, especially pits and general corroded fronts, experimentally and by computerized simulation. Two experimental systems of carbon steel in CO{sub 2} bearing waters and aluminium in chloride containing electrolytes were used. Fractal geometry was used in analysing the corrosion patterns and found to be a fruitful technique. The position of the corroding fronts was obtained by destructive methods as well as non-destructive ones. To study fragile corrosion product layers or the corrosion process in situ, a grazing angle lighting technique was developed and found superior to other techniques. A computer model was developed that uses Monte Carlo technique to simulate the generation of localized pits and more general corroded front morphologies. A three-dimensional model and two versions of a two-dimensional model were developed. The three-dimensional model was used to provide incremental data of corroded volume and depth as a function of the simulation time. 185 refs., 97 figs., 16 tabs.

  19. Method for decontaminating stainless cladding tubes

    Komatsu, Fumiaki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To form an oxide film over the surface of stainless cladding tubes and to efficiently remove radioactive materials from the steel surface together with the oxide layer by the use of an acid water solution. Method: After the removal of water from cladding tubes that have passed through the re-processing process, an oxide film is formed on the surface of the cladding tubes by heating over 400 deg C in an oxidizing atmosphere and thereafter washed again in an acid water solution. When the cladding tubes are thus oxidized once, the stainless base metal itself is oxidized, an oxide layer of several 10 μm or more being formed thereon. In consequence, since the oxide layer is far inferior in corrosion resistance to stainless metals, a pickling liquid easily penetrates into the stainless metal through the oxide layer, thereby remarkably promoting the peeling of the layer from the base metal surface and also improving the residual radioactive material removing efficiency together. (Takahashi, M.)

  20. Modelling and numerical simulation of the corrosion product transport in the pressurised water reactor primary circuit

    Marchetto, C.

    2002-05-01

    During operation of pressurised water reactor, corrosion of the primary circuit alloys leads to the release of metallic species such as iron, nickel and cobalt in the primary fluid. These corrosion products are implicated in different transport phenomena and are activated in the reactor core where they are submitted to neutron flux. The radioactive corrosion products are afterwards present in the out of flux parts of primary circuit where they generate a radiation field. The first part of this study deals with the modelling of the corrosion: product transport phenomena. In particular, considering the current state of the art, corrosion and release mechanisms are described empirically, which allows to take into account the material surface properties. New mass balance equations describing the corrosion product behaviour are thus obtained. The numerical resolution of these equations is implemented in the second part of this work. In order to obtain large time steps, we choose an implicit time scheme. The associated system is linearized from the Newton method and is solved by a preconditioned GMRES method. Moreover, a time step auto-adaptive management based on Newton iterations is performed. Consequently, an efficient resolution has been implemented, allowing to describe not only the quasi-steady evolutions but also the fast transients. In a last step, numerical simulations are carried out in order to validate the new corrosion product transport modelling and to illustrate the capabilities of this modelling. Notably, the numerical results obtained indicate that the code allows to restore the on-site observations underlining the influence of material surface properties on reactor contamination. (author)

  1. Modeling thermo-optic effect in large mode area double cladding photonic crystal fibers

    Coscelli, Enrico; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2014-02-01

    The impact of thermally-induced refractive index changes on the single-mode (SM) properties of large mode area (LMA) photonic crystal fibers are thoroughly investigated by means of a full-vector modal solver with integrated thermal model. Three photonic crystal fiber designs are taken into account, namely the 19-cell core fiber, the large-pitch fiber (LPF) and the distributed modal filtering (DMF) fiber, to assess the effects of the interplay between thermal effects and the high-order mode (HOM) suppression mechanisms exploited in order to obtain effectively SM guiding. The results have shown significant differences in the way the SM regime is changed by the increase of heat load, providing useful hints for the design of LMA fibers for high power lasers.

  2. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  3. The importance of the strain rate and creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is a nuclear, power, petrochemical, and other industries equipment and components (like pressure vessels, nozzles, tubes, accessories) life degradation mode, involving fragile fracture. The stress corrosion cracking failures can produce serious accidents, and incidents which can put on risk the safety, reliability, and efficiency of many plants. These failures are of very complex prediction. The stress corrosion cracking mechanisms are based on three kinds of factors: microstructural, mechanical and environmental. Concerning the mechanical factors, various authors prefer to consider the crack tip strain rate rather than stress, as a decisive factor which contributes to the process: this parameter is directly influenced by the creep strain rate of the material. Based on two KAPL-Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory experimental studies in SSRT (slow strain rate test) and CL (constant load) test, for prediction of primary water stress corrosion cracking in nickel based alloys, it has done a data compilation of the film rupture mechanism parameters, for modeling PWSCC of Alloy 600 and discussed the importance of the strain rate and the creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models. As derived from this study, a simple theoretical model is proposed, and it is showed that the crack growth rate estimated with Brazilian tests results with Alloy 600 in SSRT, are according with the KAPL ones and other published literature. (author)

  4. Coupling crevice chemistry with a corrosion model in laboratory: A first application to the analysis of secondary side corrosion in service

    Pavageau, E.M.; Vaillant, D.; Dimpre, S.; Bouchacourt, M.; Millet, L.

    2002-01-01

    Secondary side corrosion of tubes in Alloy 600 develops in flow-restricted areas between tubes and tubesheet or tube support plates since pollutants of the secondary water can concentrate under heat flux. So EDF has undertaken an important effort of modeling the degradation (intergranular attack IGA and intergranular stress corrosion cracking IGSCC). Three models of corrosion are available or under development depending on the type of crevice environment that could be deduced from the analysis of secondary water and from pulled tube examinations: the first one in strongly alkaline environments (sodium hydroxide environments), the second one in sulfate environments, sulfate being one of the main species analyzed in water after hideout return, the third one in complex environments that could duplicate the deposits, films and degradation observed on pulled tubes. The crevice chemistry during operation was first evaluated using analyses of secondary water after hideout return and the MULTEQ code. The local chemical conditions were introduced into the corrosion model generated in laboratory and gave results which were compared to field experience. Encouraging results were found with the sodium hydroxide model for some of the old French plant units in the early period of operation. A similar approach is under investigation with the sulfate corrosion model for the entire time of operation and for the other plant units. (authors)

  5. Clad Degradation- Summary and Abstraction for LA

    D. Stahl

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to develop the summary cladding degradation abstraction that will be used in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Most civilian commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. The model addressed in this report is intended to describe the postulated condition of commercial Zircaloy-clad fuel as a function of postclosure time after it is placed in the repository. Earlier total system performance assessments analyzed the waste form as exposed UO 2 , which was available for degradation at the intrinsic dissolution rate. Water in the waste package quickly became saturated with many of the radionuclides, limiting their release rate. In the total system performance assessments for the Viability Assessment and the Site Recommendation, cladding was analyzed as part of the waste form, limiting the amount of fuel available at any time for degradation. The current model is divided into two stages. The first considers predisposal rod failures (most of which occur during reactor operation and associated activities) and postdisposal mechanical failure (from static loading of rocks) as mechanisms for perforating the cladding. Other fuel failure mechanisms including those caused by handling or transportation have been screened out (excluded) or are treated elsewhere. All stainless-steel-clad fuel, which makes up a small percentage of the overall amount of fuel to be stored, is modeled as failed upon placement in the waste packages. The second stage of the degradation model is the splitting of the cladding from the reaction of water or moist air and UO 2 . The splitting has been observed to be rapid in comparison to the total system performance assessment time steps and is modeled to be instantaneous. After the cladding splits, the rind buildup inside the cladding widens the split, increasing the diffusion area from the fuel rind to the waste package interior. This model report summarizes the

  6. Indoor atmospheric corrosion of historical ferrous alloys. System characterisation, mechanisms and modelling discussion

    Monnier, J.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of indoor atmospheric corrosion in iron alloys is of primary importance in several fields, including for the conservation of Middle Ages monuments or the long term storage of nuclear waste. In this research, a double approach was developed, combining fine characterisation of corrosion systems and design of experiments to answers specific questions related to mechanisms understanding. Iron indoor atmospheric corrosion was investigated on samples coming from the reinforcing chain of the Amiens cathedral (15. century). In the first stage, the corrosion system has been extensively characterised from the macroscopic to the nano-metric scale. In particular, structural micro-analysis (μ-Raman, μ-XRD, μ-XAS) has been used to locate, identify and quantify the oxidised phases. Rust layers are composed of a matrix of nano-metric goethite, with low quantities of lepidocrocite and akaganeite mostly located in the extern part of the corrosion system. In addition, clear marblings are dispersed in the matrix, which are sometimes connected with the metal core. Although these may contain maghemite, these marblings are generally made of ferri-hydrite/feroxyhite phases. In the second stage, specific experiments have been carried out in an unsaturated marked medium to locate oxygen reduction sites in the rust layers. Several cases were evidenced, depending on the rust layer morphology. In addition, reduction processes of model phases have been studied in situ, using an electrochemical cell coupled with structural characterisation techniques. This combination highlighted the influence of reduction mode and pH on the type of reduced phase formed. From the obtained results, several mechanisms are proposed to explain the long term indoor atmospheric corrosion of iron, including rust layers morphology and phases properties. The different hypotheses have been integrated in a proposed method to diagnosis ancient ferrous systems stability. These hypotheses also

  7. Oxidation resistant chromium coating on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Eui-Jung; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The attributes of such a fuel are approved reaction kinetics with steam, a slower hydrogen generation rate, and good cladding thermo-mechanical properties. Many researchers have tried to modify zirconium alloys to improve their oxidation resistance in the early stages of the ATF development. Corrosion resistant coating on cladding is one of the candidate technologies to improve the oxidation resistance of zirconium cladding. By applying coating technology to zirconium cladding, it is easy to obtain corrosion resistance without a change in the base materials. Among the surface coating methods, arc ion plating (AIP) is a coating technology to improve the adhesion owing to good throwing power, and a dense deposit (Fig. 1). Owing to these advantages, AIP has been widely used to efficiently form protective coatings on cutting tools, dies, bearings, etc. In this study, The AIP technique for the protection of zirconium claddings from the oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment was studied. The homogeneous Cr film with a high adhesive ability to the cladding was deposited by AIP and acted as a protection layer to enhance the corrosion resistance of the zirconium cladding. It was concluded that the AIP technology is effective for coating a protective layer on claddings

  8. Oxidation resistant chromium coating on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Eui-Jung; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The attributes of such a fuel are approved reaction kinetics with steam, a slower hydrogen generation rate, and good cladding thermo-mechanical properties. Many researchers have tried to modify zirconium alloys to improve their oxidation resistance in the early stages of the ATF development. Corrosion resistant coating on cladding is one of the candidate technologies to improve the oxidation resistance of zirconium cladding. By applying coating technology to zirconium cladding, it is easy to obtain corrosion resistance without a change in the base materials. Among the surface coating methods, arc ion plating (AIP) is a coating technology to improve the adhesion owing to good throwing power, and a dense deposit (Fig. 1). Owing to these advantages, AIP has been widely used to efficiently form protective coatings on cutting tools, dies, bearings, etc. In this study, The AIP technique for the protection of zirconium claddings from the oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment was studied. The homogeneous Cr film with a high adhesive ability to the cladding was deposited by AIP and acted as a protection layer to enhance the corrosion resistance of the zirconium cladding. It was concluded that the AIP technology is effective for coating a protective layer on claddings.

  9. High performance fuel technology development : Development of high performance cladding materials

    Park, Jeongyong; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The superior in-pile performance of the HANA claddings have been verified by the successful irradiation test and in the Halden research reactor up to the high burn-up of 67GWD/MTU. The in-pile corrosion and creep resistances of HANA claddings were improved by 40% and 50%, respectively, over Zircaloy-4. HANA claddings have been also irradiated in the commercial reactor up to 2 reactor cycles, showing the corrosion resistance 40% better than that of ZIRLO in the same fuel assembly. Long-term out-of-pile performance tests for the candidates of the next generation cladding materials have produced the highly reliable test results. The final candidate alloys were selected and they showed the corrosion resistance 50% better than the foreign advanced claddings, which is beyond the original target. The LOCA-related properties were also improved by 20% over the foreign advanced claddings. In order to establish the optimal manufacturing process for the inner and outer claddings of the dual-cooled fuel, 18 different kinds of specimens were fabricated with various cold working and annealing conditions. Based on the performance tests and various out-of-pile test results obtained from the specimens, the optimal manufacturing process was established for the inner and outer cladding tubes of the dual-cooled fuel

  10. Overview of lower length scale model development for accident tolerant fuels regarding U3Si2 fuel and FeCrAl cladding

    Zhang, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    U3Si2 and FeCrAl have been proposed as fuel and cladding concepts, respectively, for accident tolerance fuels with higher tolerance to accident scenarios compared to UO2. However, a lot of key physics and material properties regarding their in-pile performance are yet to be explored. To accelerate the understanding and reduce the cost of experimental studies, multiscale modeling and simulation are used to develop physics-based materials models to assist engineering scale fuel performance modeling. In this report, the lower-length-scale efforts in method and material model development supported by the Accident Tolerance Fuel (ATF) high-impact-problem (HIP) under the NEAMS program are summarized. Significant progresses have been made regarding interatomic potential, phase field models for phase decomposition and gas bubble formation, and thermal conductivity for U3Si2 fuel, and precipitation in FeCrAl cladding. The accomplishments are very useful by providing atomistic and mesoscale tools, improving the current understanding, and delivering engineering scale models for these two ATF concepts.

  11. Overview of lower length scale model development for accident tolerant fuels regarding U3Si2 fuel and FeCrAl cladding

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-09-01

    U3Si2 and FeCrAl have been proposed as fuel and cladding concepts, respectively, for accident tolerance fuels with higher tolerance to accident scenarios compared to UO2. However, a lot of key physics and material properties regarding their in-pile performance are yet to be explored. To accelerate the understanding and reduce the cost of experimental studies, multiscale modeling and simulation are used to develop physics-based materials models to assist engineering scale fuel performance modeling. In this report, the lower-length-scale efforts in method and material model development supported by the Accident Tolerance Fuel (ATF) high-impact-problem (HIP) under the NEAMS program are summarized. Significant progresses have been made regarding interatomic potential, phase field models for phase decomposition and gas bubble formation, and thermal conductivity for U3Si2 fuel, and precipitation in FeCrAl cladding. The accomplishments are very useful by providing atomistic and mesoscale tools, improving the current understanding, and delivering engineering scale models for these two ATF concepts.

  12. Steel corrosion resistance in model solutions and reinforced mortar containing wastes

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on the corrosion resistance of steel in alkaline model solutions and in cement-based materials (mortar). The model solutions and the mortar specimens were Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) based. Further, hereby discussed is the implementation of an eco-friendly approach of waste

  13. Recent trend of titanium-clad steel plate/sheet (NKK)

    Kimura, Hideto

    1997-01-01

    The roll-bonding process for titanium-clad steel production enabled the on-line manufacturing and quality control of the products which are usually applied for the production of steel plate and sheet by the steel producers. The recent trend of roll-bonded titanium-clad steel which has an excellent corrosion resistance together with the advantage in cost-saving are mainly described in this article as to the demand, production technique and new application aspects. Though the predominant usage of titanium-clad steel plate has been in power-generating plants, enlargeing utilization in the chemical plants such as terephthalic acid production plants is leading the growth in the market of titanium-clad steel plate. Also, the application of titanium-clad steel plates and sheets for the lining the marine structures is expected as one of the best solution to long-term surface protection for their outstanding corrosion resistance against sea water. (author)

  14. Multiscale numerical modeling of Ce3+-inhibitor release from novel corrosion protection coatings

    Trenado, Carlos; Wittmar, Matthias; Veith, Michael; Strauss, Daniel J; Rosero-Navarro, Nataly C; Aparicio, Mario; Durán, Alicia; Castro, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    A novel hybrid sol–gel coating has recently been introduced as an alternative to high toxic chromate-based corrosion protection systems. In this paper, we propose a multiscale computational model to estimate the amount and time scale of inhibitor release of the active corrosion protection coating. Moreover, we study the release rate under the influence of parameters such as porosity and viscosity, which have recently been implicated in the stability of the coating. Numerical simulations obtained with the model predicted experimental release tests and recent findings on the compromise between inhibitor concentration and the stability of the coating

  15. Stone cladding engineering

    Camposinhos, Rui de Sousa

    2014-01-01

    .... Straightforward formulae are provided for computing action on cladding, with special emphasis on the effect of seismic forces, including an extensive general methodology applied to non-structural elements...

  16. Effects of porosity in a model of corrosion and passive layer growth

    F.D.A. Aarão Reis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a stochastic lattice model to investigate the effects of pore formation in a passive layer grown with products of metal corrosion. It considers that an anionic species diffuses across that layer and reacts at the corrosion front (metal-oxide interface, producing a random distribution of compact regions and large pores, respectively represented by O (oxide and P (pore sites. O sites are assumed to have very small pores, so that the fraction Φ of P sites is an estimate of the porosity, and the ratio between anion diffusion coefficients in those regions is D_r0 and D_r≪1, significant changes are observed in passive layer growth and corrosion front roughness. For small Φ, a slowdown of the growth rate is observed, which is interpreted as a consequence of the confinement of anions in isolated pores for long times. However, the presence of large pores near the corrosion front increases the frequency of reactions at those regions, which leads to an increase in the roughness of that front. This model may be a first step to represent defects in a passive layer which favor pitting corrosion.

  17. Development of a Predictive Corrosion Model Using Locality-Specific Corrosion Indices

    2017-09-12

    components, and method) were compiled into an executable program that uses mathematical models of materials degradation, and statistical calcula- tions...The primary metric used to validate the model was statistical analysis of its application to specific geospatial locations, comparing the severity...6 3.2.1 Statistical data analysis methods

  18. Electrochemical profiling of multi-clad aluminium sheets used in automotive heat exchangers

    Bordo, Kirill; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Peguet, Lionel

    2018-01-01

    potentiodynamic polarization, galvanic corrosion behaviour by ZRA, microstructure and composition by SEM and TEM were investigated and compared to those obtained for sheet without the interlayer. Inward diffusion of Si from clad, and outward diffusion of Cu from core are found to degrade the corrosion properties...

  19. Scientific basis for storage criteria for interim dry storage of aluminum-clad fuels

    Sindelar, R.L.; Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Lam, P.S.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Murphy, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    An engineered system for dry storage of aluminum-clad foreign and domestic research reactor spent fuel owned by the US Department of Energy is being considered to store the fuel up to a nominal period of 40 years prior to ultimate disposition. Scientifically-based criteria for environmental limits to drying and storing the fuels for this system are being developed to avoid excessive degradation in sealed and non-sealed (open to air) dry storage systems. These limits are based on consideration of degradation modes that can cause loss of net section of the cladding, embrittlement of the cladding, distortion of the fuel, or release of fuel and fission products from the fuel/clad system. Potential degradation mechanisms include corrosion mechanisms from exposure to air and/or sources of humidity, hydrogen blistering of the aluminum cladding, distortion of the fuel due to creep, and interdiffusion of the fuel and fission products with the cladding. The aluminum-clad research reactor fuels are predominantly highly-enriched aluminum uranium alloy fuel which is clad with aluminum alloys similar to 1100, 5052, and 6061 aluminum. In the absence of corrodant species, degradation due to creep and diffusion mechanisms limit the maximum fuel storage temperature to 200 C. The results of laboratory scale corrosion tests indicate that this fuel could be stored under air up to 200 C at low relative humidity levels (< 20%) to limit corrosion of the cladding and fuel (exposed to the storage environment through assumed pre-existing pits in the cladding). Excessive degradation of fuels with uranium metal up to 200 C can be avoided if the fuel is sufficiently dried and contained in a sealed system; open storage can be achieved if the temperature is controlled to avoid excessive corrosion even in dry air

  20. Preliminary study of mechanical behavior for Cr coated Zr-4 Fuel Cladding

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Kim, Hak-Sung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo-Chan; Yang, Yong-Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    To decrease the oxidation rate of Zr-based alloy components, many concepts of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) such as Mo-Zr cladding, SiC/SiCf cladding and iron-based alloy cladding are under development. One of the promised concept is the coated cladding which can remarkably increase the corrosion and wear resistance. Recently, KAERI is developing the Cr coated Zircaloy cladding as accident tolerance cladding. To coat the Cr powder on the Zircaloy, 3D laser coating technology has been employed because it is possible to make a coated layer on the tubular cladding surface by controlling the 3-diminational axis. Therefore, for this work, the mechanical integrity of Cr coated Zircaloy should be evaluated to predict the safety of fuel cladding during the operating or accident of nuclear reactor. In this work, the mechanical behavior of the Cr coated Zircaloy cladding has been studied by using finite element analysis (FEA). The ring compression test (RCT) of fuel cladding was simulated to evaluate the validity of mechanical properties of Zr-4 and Cr, which were referred from the literatures and experimental reports. In this work, the mechanical behavior of the Cr coated Zircaloy cladding has been studied by using finite element analysis (FEA). The ring compression test (RCT) of fuel cladding was simulated to evaluate the validity of mechanical properties of Zr-4 and Cr. The pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI) properties of Cr coated Zr-4 cladding were investigated by thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) simulation. The mechanical properties of Zr-4 and Cr was validated by simulation of ring compression test (RCT) of fuel cladding.

  1. Chemical interaction at the FBR cladding fuel interfaces

    Delbrassine, A.; Retels, J.; Dirven, P.

    1978-01-01

    Pins containing UO 2 -30 wt.%PuO 2 and/or Caesium and/or Telluriom as doping elements have been irradiated for about 40 days in the BR2 reactor. The effects of two Cs/Te ratios, namely 1.3 and 4 and a wide range of O/M ratios on the inner corrosion of the clad have been investigated. The influence of Tellurium on the attack of the cladding has been pointed out. It may be responsible for the Chromium NS Nickel depletion in the grain boundaries of the steel. It is necessary to measure the effective Ts/Te ratio associated with the local corrosion layers. This local Cs/Te ratio should be more useful than the initial mean Cs/Te ratio in a pin for understanding the corrosion phenomene. (author)

  2. SCC and Corrosion Fatigue characterization of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy in a corrosive environment – experiments and numerical models

    S. Baragetti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present article, a review of the complete characterization in different aggressive media of a Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy, performed by the Structural Mechanics Laboratory of the University of Bergamo, is presented. The light alloy has been investigated in terms of corrosion fatigue, by axial fatigue testing (R = 0.1 of smooth and notched flat dogbone specimens in laboratory air, 3.5% wt. NaCl–water mixture and methanol–water mixture at different concentrations. The first corrosive medium reproduced a marine environment, while the latter was used as a reference aggressive environment. Results showed that a certain corrosion fatigue resistance is found in a salt water medium, while the methanol environment caused a significant drop – from 23% to 55% in terms of limiting stress reduction – of the fatigue resistance of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, even for a solution containing 5% of methanol. A Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC experimental campaign at different methanol concentrations has been conducted over slightly notched dog-bone specimens (Kt = 1.18, to characterize the corrosion resistance of the alloy under quasi-static load conditions. Finally, crack propagation models have been implemented to predict the crack propagation rates for smooth specimens, by using Paris, Walker and Kato-Deng-Inoue-Takatsu propagation formulae. The different outcomes from the forecasting numerical models were compared with experimental results, proposing modeling procedures for the numerical simulation of fatigue behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  3. Protection of spent aluminum-clad research reactor fuels during extended wet storage

    Fernandes, Stela M.C.; Correa, Olandir V.; Souza, Jose A.; Ramanathan, Lalgudi V.; Antunes, Renato A.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from research reactors (RR) is stored in light water filled pools or basins worldwide. Many incidences of pitting corrosion of the fuel cladding has been reported and attributed to synergism in the effect of certain water parameters. Protection of spent Al-clad RR fuel with a conversion coating was proposed in 2008. Preliminary results revealed increased pitting corrosion resistance of cerium oxide coated aluminum alloys AA 1050 and AA 6061, used as RR fuel plate cladding. Further development of conversion coatings for Al alloys was carried out and this paper presents: (a) the preparation and characterization of hydrotalcite (HTC) coatings; (b) the results of laboratory tests in which the corrosion behavior of coated Al alloys in NaCl solutions was determined; (c) the results of field tests in which un-coated, boehmite coated, HTC coated and cerium modified boehmite / HTC coated AA 1050 and AA 6061 coupons were exposed to the IEA-R1 reactor spent fuel basin for extended periods. In these field tests the coupons coated with HTC from a high temperature (HT) bath and subsequently modified with Ce were the most resistant to pitting corrosion. In laboratory tests also, HT- hydrotalcite + Ce coated specimens were the most corrosion resistant in 0.01 M NaCl. The role of cerium in increasing the corrosion resistance imparted by the different conversion coatings of spent Al-clad RR fuel elements is presented. (author)

  4. Zircaloy-4 corrosion in PWR's

    Fyfitch, S.; Smalley, W.R.; Roberts, E.

    1985-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion has been studied extensively in the nuclear industry for a number of years. Following the early crud-related corrosion failures in the Saxton test reactor, Westinghouse undertook numerous programs to minimize crud deposition on fuel rods in power reactors through primary coolant chemistry control. Modern plants today are operating with improved coolant chemistry guidelines, and crud deposition levels are very low in proportion to earlier experience. Zircaloy-4 corrosion under a variety of coolant chemistry, heat flux and exposure conditions has been studied extensively. Experience to date, even in relatively high coolant temperature plants, has indicated that -for both fuel cladding and structural components- Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion performance has been excellent. Recognizing future industry trends, however, which will result in Zircaloy-4 being subjected to ever increasing corrosion duties, Westinghouse will continue accumulating Zircaloy-4 corrosion experience in large power plants. 13 refs.

  5. A point defect model for the general and pitting corrosion on iron-oxide-electrolyte interface deduced from current oscillations

    Pagitsas, M; Sazou, D

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of the passive-active oscillatory region of the Fe-0.75 M H sub 2 SO sub 4 system, perturbed by adding small amounts of halide species, allow the distinction between pitting and general corrosion. Complex periodic and aperiodic current oscillations characterize pitting corrosion whereas monoperiodic oscillations of a relaxation type indicate general corrosion. A point defect model (PDM) is considered for the microscopic description of the growth and breakdown of the iron oxide film. The physicochemical processes leading to different types of corrosion can be clarified in terms of the PDM. Occupation of an anion vacancy by a halide ion results in the localized attack of the passive oxide and pitting corrosion. On the other hand, the formation of surface soluble iron complexes is related to the uniform dissolution of the passive oxide and general corrosion.

  6. Corrosion mechanism and model of pulsed DC microarc oxidation treated AZ31 alloy in simulated body fluid

    Gu Yanhong, E-mail: ygu2@alaska.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Chen Chengfu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Bandopadhyay, Sukumar [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Ning Chengyun [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang Yongjun [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Guo Yuanjun [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2012-06-01

    This paper addresses the effect of pulse frequency on the corrosion behavior of microarc oxidation (MAO) coatings on AZ31 Mg alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF). The MAO coatings were deposited by a pulsed DC mode at four different pulse frequencies of 300 Hz, 500 Hz, 1000 Hz and 3000 Hz with a constant pulse ratio. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were used for corrosion rate and electrochemical impedance evaluation. The corroded surfaces were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and optical microscopy. All the results exhibited that the corrosion resistance of MAO coating produced at 3000 Hz is superior among the four frequencies used. The XRD spectra showed that the corrosion products contain hydroxyapatite, brucite and quintinite. A model for corrosion mechanism and corrosion process of the MAO coating on AZ31 Mg alloy in the SBF is proposed.

  7. Corrosion mechanism and model of pulsed DC microarc oxidation treated AZ31 alloy in simulated body fluid

    Gu Yanhong; Chen Chengfu; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Ning Chengyun; Zhang Yongjun; Guo Yuanjun

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the effect of pulse frequency on the corrosion behavior of microarc oxidation (MAO) coatings on AZ31 Mg alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF). The MAO coatings were deposited by a pulsed DC mode at four different pulse frequencies of 300 Hz, 500 Hz, 1000 Hz and 3000 Hz with a constant pulse ratio. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were used for corrosion rate and electrochemical impedance evaluation. The corroded surfaces were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and optical microscopy. All the results exhibited that the corrosion resistance of MAO coating produced at 3000 Hz is superior among the four frequencies used. The XRD spectra showed that the corrosion products contain hydroxyapatite, brucite and quintinite. A model for corrosion mechanism and corrosion process of the MAO coating on AZ31 Mg alloy in the SBF is proposed.

  8. Crevice corrosion ampersand pitting of high-level waste containers: integration of deterministic ampersand probabilistic models

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as carbon steel or Monel 400. An integrated predictive model is being developed to account for the effects of localized environmental conditions in the CRM-CAM crevice on the initiation and propagation of pits through the CRM

  9. First-Principles Approach to Model Electrochemical Reactions: Understanding the Fundamental Mechanisms behind Mg Corrosion

    Surendralal, Sudarsan; Todorova, Mira; Finnis, Michael W.; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2018-06-01

    Combining concepts of semiconductor physics and corrosion science, we develop a novel approach that allows us to perform ab initio calculations under controlled potentiostat conditions for electrochemical systems. The proposed approach can be straightforwardly applied in standard density functional theory codes. To demonstrate the performance and the opportunities opened by this approach, we study the chemical reactions that take place during initial corrosion at the water-Mg interface under anodic polarization. Based on this insight, we derive an atomistic model that explains the origin of the anodic hydrogen evolution.

  10. CREVICE CORROSION and PITTING OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE CONTAINERS: INTEGRATION OF DETERMINISTIC and PROBABILISTIC MODELS

    JOSEPH C. FARMER AND R. DANIEL MCCRIGHT

    1997-01-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as carbon steel or Monel 400. An integrated predictive model is being developed to account for the effects of localized environmental conditions in the CRM-CAM crevice on the initiation and propagation of pits through the CRM

  11. Laser cladding of turbine blades

    Shepeleva, L.; Medres, B.; Kaplan, W.D.; Bamberger, M.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative study of two different techniques for the application of wear-resistant coatings for contact surfaces of shroud shelves of gas turbine engine blades (GTE) has been conducted. Wear-resistant coatings were applied on In713 by laser cladding with direct injection of the cladding powder into the melt pool. Laser cladding was conducted with a TRUMPF-2500, CW-CO 2 laser. The laser cladding was compared with commercially available plasma cladding with wire. Both plasma and laser cladded zones were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the laser cladded zone has a higher microhardness value (650-820 HV) compared with that of the plasma treated material (420-440 HV). This is a result of the significant reduction in grain size in the case of laser cladding. Unlike the plasma cladded zones, the laser treated material is free of micropores and microcracks. (orig.)

  12. Pellet-clad interaction in water reactor fuels

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this seminar is was to draw up a comprehensive picture of the pellet clad interaction and its impact on the fuel rod. This document is a detailed abstract of the papers presented during the following five sessions: industrial goals, fuel material behaviour in PCI situation, cladding behaviour relevant to PCI, in pile rod behaviour and modelling of the mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding. (A.L.B.)

  13. Pellet-clad interaction in water reactor fuels

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this seminar is was to draw up a comprehensive picture of the pellet clad interaction and its impact on the fuel rod. This document is a detailed abstract of the papers presented during the following five sessions: industrial goals, fuel material behaviour in PCI situation, cladding behaviour relevant to PCI, in pile rod behaviour and modelling of the mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding. (A.L.B.)

  14. Modeling the corrosion of high-level waste containers: CAM-CRM interface

    Farmer, J.C.; Bedrossian, P.J.; McCright, R.D.

    1998-06-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological respository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 825, 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as A516 or Monel 400. At the present time, Alloy C-22 and A516 are favored. This publication addresses the development of models to account for corrosion of Alloy C-22 surfaces exposed directly to the Near Field Environmental (NFE), as well as to the exacerbated conditions in the CAM-CRM crevice

  15. Modelling the effects of porous and semi-permeable layers on corrosion processes

    King, F.; Kolar, M.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1996-09-01

    Porous and semi-permeable layers play a role in many corrosion processes. Porous layers may simply affect the rate of corrosion by affecting the rate of mass transport of reactants and products to and from the corroding surface. Semi-permeable layers can further affect the corrosion process by reacting with products and/or reactants. Reactions in semi-permeable layers include redox processes involving electron transfer, adsorption, ion-exchange and complexation reactions and precipitation/dissolution processes. Examples of porous and semi-permeable layers include non-reactive salt films, precipitate layers consisting of redox-active species in multiple oxidation states (e.g., Fe oxide films), clay and soil layers and biofilms. Examples of these various types of processes will be discussed and modelling techniques developed from studies for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste presented. (author). 48 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs

  16. Modelling the behaviour of corrosion products in the primary heat transfer circuits of pressurised water reactors

    Rodliffe, R.S.; Polley, M.V.; Thornton, E.W.

    1985-05-01

    The redistribution of corrosion products from the primary circuit surfaces of a water reactor can result in increased flow resistance, poorer heat transfer performance, fuel failure and radioactive contamination of circuit surfaces. The environment is generally sufficiently well controlled to ensure that the first three effects are not limiting. The last effect is of particular importance since radioactive corrosion products are major contributors to shutdown fields and since it is necessary to ensure that the radiation exposure of personnel is as low as reasonably achievable. This review focusses attention on the principles which must form the basis for any mechanistic model describing the formation, transport and deposition of radioactive corrosion products. It is relevant to all water reactors in which the primary heat transfer medium is predominantly single-phase water and in which steam is generated in a secondary circuit, i.e. including CANDU pressurised heavy water reactors, Sovient VVERs, etc. (author)

  17. CLAD DEGRADATION - FEPS SCREENING ARGUMENTS

    R. Schreiner

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the screening of the clad degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report also addresses the effect of certain FEPs on both the cladding and the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and defense high-level waste (DHLW) waste forms, as appropriate to address the effects on multiple materials and both components (FEPs 2.1.09.09.0A, 2.1.09.11.0A, 2.1.11.05.0A, 2.1.12.02.0A, and 2.1.12.03.0A). These FEPs are expected to affect the repository performance during the postclosure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. Table 1-1 provides the list of cladding FEPs, including their screening decisions (include or exclude). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analysis, screening decision, and TSPA-LA disposition (for included FEPs) or screening argument (for excluded FEPs) for these FEPs related to clad degradation. In some cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP reports, this report may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for shared FEPs is addressed collectively by the sharing FEP reports. The screening decisions and associated TSPA-LA dispositions or screening arguments from all of the FEP reports are cataloged in a project-specific FEPs database

  18. Mechanistic model of stress corrosion cracking (scc) of carbon steel in acidic solution with the presence of H2s

    Asmara, Y P; Juliawati, A; Sulaiman, A; Jamiluddin

    2013-01-01

    In oil and gas industrial environments, H 2 S gas is one of the corrosive species which should be a main concern in designing infrastructure made of carbon steel. Combination between the corrosive environment and stress condition will cause degradation of carbon steel increase unpredictably due to their simultaneous effects. This paper will design a model that involves electrochemical and mechanical theories to study crack growth rate under presence of H 2 S gas. Combination crack and corrosion propagation of carbon steel, with different hydrogen concentration has been investigated. The results indicated that high concentration of hydrogen ions showed a higher crack propagation rate. The comparison between corrosion prediction models and corrosion model developed by researchers used to verify the model accuracy showed a good agreement

  19. Summary of model to account for inhibition of CAM corrosion by porous ceramic coating

    Hopper, R., LLNL

    1998-03-31

    Corrosion occurs during five characteristic periods or regimes. These are summarized below. For more detailed discussion, see the attached Memorandum by Robert Hopper entitled `Ceramic Barrier Performance Model, Version 1.0, Description of Initial PA Input` and dated March 30, 1998.

  20. Ceramic Coatings for Clad (The C3 Project): Advanced Accident-Tolerant Ceramic Coatings for Zr-Alloy Cladding

    Sickafus, Kurt E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Miller, Larry [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Weber, Bill [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Patel, Maulik [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Wolfe, Doug [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Fratoni, Max [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Raj, Rishi [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Plunkett, Kenneth [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hollis, Kendall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Andy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Chris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Comstock, Robert [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Partezana, Jonna [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Whittle, Karl [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Preuss, Michael [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Withers, Philip [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Donnelly, Stephen [Univ. of Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Riley, Daniel [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Syndney (Australia)

    2017-02-14

    The goal of this NEUP-IRP project is to develop a fuel concept based on an advanced ceramic coating for Zr-alloy cladding. The coated cladding must exhibit demonstrably improved performance compared to conventional Zr-alloy clad in the following respects: During normal service, the ceramic coating should decrease cladding oxidation and hydrogen pickup (the latter leads to hydriding and embrittlement). During a reactor transient (e.g., a loss of coolant accident), the ceramic coating must minimize or at least significantly delay oxidation of the Zr-alloy cladding, thus reducing the amount of hydrogen generated and the oxygen ingress into the cladding. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: To produce durable ceramic coatings on Zr-alloy clad using two possible routes: (i) MAX phase ceramic coatings or similar nitride or carbide coatings; and (ii) graded interface architecture (multilayer) ceramic coatings, using, for instance, an oxide such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the outer protective layer. To characterize the structural and physical properties of the coated clad samples produced in 1. above, especially the corrosion properties under simulated normal and transient reactor operating conditions. To perform computational analyses to assess the effects of such coatings on fuel performance and reactor neutronics, and to perform fuel cycle analyses to assess the economic viability of modifying conventional Zr-alloy cladding with ceramic coatings. This project meets a number of the goals outlined in the NEUP-IRP call for proposals, including: Improve the fuel/cladding system through innovative designs (e.g. coatings/liners for zirconium-based cladding) Reduce or eliminate hydrogen generation Increase resistance to bulk steam oxidation Achievement of our goals and objectives, as defined above, will lead to safer light-water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel assemblies, due to improved cladding properties and built-in accident resistance, as well as

  1. Corrosion and pyrophoricity of ZPPR fuel plates: Implications for basin storage

    Totemeier, T.C.; Hayes, S.L.; Pahl, R.G.; Crawford, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of recent experimentation and analysis of the pyrophoric behavior of corroded Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) HEU fuel plates and the implications of these results for the handling, drying, and passivation of uranium metal fuels stored in water basins. The ZPPR plates were originally clad in 1980; crevice corrosion of the uranium metal in a dry storage environment has occurred due to the use of porous cladding end plugs. The extensive corrosion has resulted in bulging and, in some cases, breaching of the cladding over a 15 year storage period. Processing of the plates has been initiated to recover the highly enriched uranium metal and remove the storage vulnerability identified with the corroded plates, which have been shown to contain significant quantities of the pyrophoric compound uranium hydride (UH 3 ). Experiments were undertaken to determine effective passivation techniques for the corrosion product; analysis and modeling was performed to determine whether heat generated by rapid hydride re-oxidation could ignite the underlying metal plates. The results of the initial passivation experiment showed that simple exposure of the hydride-containing corrosion product to an Ar-3 vol.% O 2 environment was insufficient to fully passivate the hydride--flare-up of the product occurred during subsequent vigorous handling in air. A second experiment demonstrated that corrosion product was fully stable following grinding of the product to a fine powder in the Ar-3 vol.% O 2 atmosphere. Numerical modeling of a corroded plate indicated that ignition of the plate due to the heat from hydride re-oxidation was likely if hydride fractions in the corrosion product exceeded 30%

  2. Mathematical modeling for corrosion environment estimation based on concrete resistivity measurement directly above reinforcement

    Lim, Young-Chul; Lee, Han-Seung; Noguchi, Takafumi

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to formulate a resistivity model whereby the concrete resistivity expressing the environment of steel reinforcement can be directly estimated and evaluated based on measurement immediately above reinforcement as a method of evaluating corrosion deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. It also aims to provide a theoretical ground for the feasibility of durability evaluation by electric non-destructive techniques with no need for chipping of cover concrete. This Resistivity Estimation Model (REM), which is a mathematical model using the mirror method, combines conventional four-electrode measurement of resistivity with geometric parameters including cover depth, bar diameter, and electrode intervals. This model was verified by estimation using this model at areas directly above reinforcement and resistivity measurement at areas unaffected by reinforcement in regard to the assessment of the concrete resistivity. Both results strongly correlated, proving the validity of this model. It is expected to be applicable to laboratory study and field diagnosis regarding reinforcement corrosion. (author)

  3. Zirconium cladding - the long way towards a mechanistic understanding of processing and performance

    Preuss, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are the material of choice to encapsulate nuclear fuel in light and heavy water-cooled reactors due to their low neutron absorption, excellent corrosion resistance and sufficient mechanical properties. Despite these advantageous physical and mechanical properties a more physically based understanding of microstructure and texture evolution during processing is highly desirable in order to improve our understanding of formability during thermomechanical processing and performance variability of cladding material. In addition, the purely empirical understanding of aqueous zirconium corrosion, hydrogen pick up, hydride precipitation as well as irradiation growth and creep limits the accuracy of life predictions and therefore the level of burnup that is obtained from current fuel assemblies. The presentation aims at giving examples of new research strategies that will enable the development of a new physical understanding of processing and performance aspects in zirconium cladding material, which is required to develop new predictive models. Particular emphasis will be placed on using novel research tools and large-scale research facilities such as neutron spallation and synchrotron radiation sources to undertake very detailed and often in-situ studies of deformation mechanisms and microstructure evolution as well as determining stress states in grain families, oxides and hydrides. The results will be presented in the view of how they might help us to improve our understanding and enable the development of better predictive models

  4. Modelling fireside corrosion of heat exchangers in co-fired pulverised fuel power systems

    Simms, N.J. [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Centre; Fry, A.T. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    As a result of concerns about the effects of CO{sub 2} emissions on the global environment, there is increasing pressure to reduce such emissions from power generation systems. The use of biomass co-firing with coal in conventional pulverised fuel power stations has provided the most immediate route to introduce a class of fuel that is regarded as both sustainable and carbon neutral. In the future it is anticipated that increased levels of biomass will need to be used in such systems to achieve the desired CO{sub 2} emission targets. However there are concerns over the risk of fireside corrosion damage to the various heat exchangers and boiler walls used in such systems. Future pulverised fuel power systems will need to be designed to cope with the effects of using a wide range of coal-biomass mixes. However, such systems will also need to use much higher heat exchanger operating temperatures to increase their conversion efficiencies and counter the effects of the CO{sub 2} capture technologies that will need to be used in them. Higher operating temperatures will also increase the risk of fireside corrosion damage to the critical heat exchangers. This paper reports work that has been carried out to develop quantitative corrosion models for heat exchangers in pulverised fuel power systems. These developments have been particularly targeted at producing models that enable the evaluation of the effects of using different coal-biomass mixtures and of increasing heat exchanger operating conditions. Models have been produced that have been targeted at operating conditions and materials used in (a) superheaters/reheaters and (b) waterwalls. Data used in the development of these models has been produced from full scale and pilot scale plants in the UK using a wide range of coal and biomass mixtures, as well as from carefully targeted series of laboratory corrosion tests. Mechanistic and neural network based models have been investigated during this development process to

  5. Corrosion and deuterium ingress in CANDU pressure tubes: a literature review and new model

    Frankel, G.S.; Markworth, A.J.; Sehgal, A.

    1997-02-01

    This report addresses the problem of Zr corrosion and D uptake in two ways. The published literature and some proprietary reports are reviewed and critically assessed in the first section. A new model for Zr corrosion is then presented in the second section. The rate of corrosion is shown to be dependent on the rate of transformation of the protective inner oxide layer to a porous outer layer. The mechanism of this transformation is not known, and should be the subject of future investigations. It is assumed in the model that zirconia chemically dissolves into the solution at the pore bottom. The rate of this dissolution reaction depends on the local pH, which will increase if there is a build-up of deuteroxyl ions generated in the cathodic part of the Zr corrosion reaction. A mathematical description of this model containing several parameters with unknown values is presented. Assuming certain values of these parameters results in predictions of oxide formation (and thus D build-up) that are similar to observations. (author). 25 refs., 15 figs

  6. Technical committee meeting on fuel and cladding interaction. Summary report

    NONE

    1977-04-01

    Experiments and experiences concerning fuel-cladding interaction in thermal and fast neutron flux burnup are dealt with. A number of results from in-pile and out-of pile experiments with different fuel pins with cladding made of different stainless steels showed the importance of corrosion process, dependent on the burnup, core temperature, metal-oxide ratio, and other steady state parameters in the core of fast reactors (most frequently LMFBRs). This is of importance for fuel pins design and fabrication. Mixed oxide fuel is treated in many cases.

  7. Technical committee meeting on fuel and cladding interaction. Summary report

    1977-04-01

    Experiments and experiences concerning fuel-cladding interaction in thermal and fast neutron flux burnup are dealt with. A number of results from in-pile and out-of pile experiments with different fuel pins with cladding made of different stainless steels showed the importance of corrosion process, dependent on the burnup, core temperature, metal-oxide ratio, and other steady state parameters in the core of fast reactors (most frequently LMFBRs). This is of importance for fuel pins design and fabrication. Mixed oxide fuel is treated in many cases

  8. Electra-Clad

    NONE

    2006-05-04

    The study relates to the use of building-integrated photovoltaics. The Electra-Clad project sought to use steel-based cladding as a substrate for direct fabrication of a fully integrated solar panel of a design similar to the ICP standard glass-based panel. The five interrelated phases of the project are described. The study successfully demonstrated that the principles of the panel design are achievable and sound. But, despite intensive trials, a commercially realistic solar performance has not been achieved: the main failing was the poor solar conversion efficiency as the active area of the panel was increased in size. The problem lies with the coating used on the steel cladding substrates and it was concluded that a new type of coating will be required. ICP Solar Technologies UK carried out the work under contract to the DTI.

  9. Optimization of Ni-Based WC/Co/Cr Composite Coatings Produced by Multilayer Laser Cladding

    Andrea Angelastro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a surface coating technique, laser cladding (LC has been developed for improving wear, corrosion, and fatigue properties of mechanical components. The main advantage of this process is the capability of introducing hard particles such as SiC, TiC, and WC as reinforcements in the metallic matrix such as Ni-based alloy, Co-based alloy, and Fe-based alloy to form ceramic-metal composite coatings, which have very high hardness and good wear resistance. In this paper, Ni-based alloy (Colmonoy 227-F and Tungsten Carbides/Cobalt/Chromium (WC/Co/Cr composite coatings were fabricated by the multilayer laser cladding technique (MLC. An optimization procedure was implemented to obtain the combination of process parameters that minimizes the porosity and produces good adhesion to a stainless steel substrate. The optimization procedure was worked out with a mathematical model that was supported by an experimental analysis, which studied the shape of the clad track generated by melting coaxially fed powders with a laser. Microstructural and microhardness analysis completed the set of test performed on the coatings.

  10. A modelling of the mechanisms occurring during the atmospheric corrosion of iron

    Marechal, L.; Perrin, S.; Hoerle, S.; Mazaudier, F.; Dillmann, P.

    2004-01-01

    In order to predict the long-term corrosion of metallic containers in storage conditions, a modelling of atmospheric corrosion of iron is proposed. This modelling takes into account the mechanisms which occur during the three stages of a wet-dry cycle. During the wetting stage, the reduction of lepidocrocite (g-FeOOH), a constituent of the rust layer, is considered to be the rate-limiting step of the corrosion. During the second stage of the cycle, the wet period, the reduction of dissolved oxygen on the lepidocrocite, previously reduced, is controlling the mechanism. The amount of oxidized metal depends on the quantity of reduced lepidocrocite and also on the oxygen diffusion in the electrolyte and the rust layer. At the end of the cycle, the blocking of the anodic sites is considered to describe the extinction of electrochemical corrosion during the drying. It appears that each stage of the cycle depends mainly on the chemical and morphological properties of the rust layer. (authors)

  11. Mechanistic considerations used in the development of the probability of failure in transient increases in power (PROFIT) pellet-zircaloy cladding (thermo-mechanical-chemical) interactions (pci) fuel failure model

    Pankaskie, P.J.

    1980-05-01

    A fuel Pellet-Zircaloy Cladding (thermo-mechanical-chemical) interactions (PCI) failure model for estimating the Probability of Failure in Transient Increases in Power (PROFIT) was developed. PROFIT is based on (1) standard statistical methods applied to available PCI fuel failure data and (2) a mechanistic analysis of the environmental and strain-rate-dependent stress versus strain characteristics of Zircaloy cladding. The statistical analysis of fuel failures attributable to PCI suggested that parameters in addition to power, transient increase in power, and burnup are needed to define PCI fuel failures in terms of probability estimates with known confidence limits. The PROFIT model, therefore, introduces an environmental and strain-rate dependent Strain Energy Absorption to Failure (SEAF) concept to account for the stress versus strain anomalies attributable to interstitial-dislocation interaction effects in the Zircaloy cladding

  12. Corrosion-induced bond strength degradation in reinforced concrete-Analytical and empirical models

    Bhargava, Kapilesh; Ghosh, A.K.; Mori, Yasuhiro; Ramanujam, S.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper aims to investigate the relationship between the bond strength and the reinforcement corrosion in reinforced concrete (RC). Analytical and empirical models are proposed for the bond strength of corroded reinforcing bars. Analytical model proposed by Cairns.and Abdullah [Cairns, J., Abdullah, R.B., 1996. Bond strength of black and epoxy-coated reinforcement-a theoretical approach. ACI Mater. J. 93 (4), 362-369] for splitting bond failure and later modified by Coronelli [Coronelli, D. 2002. Corrosion cracking and bond strength modeling for corroded bars in reinforced concrete. ACI Struct. J. 99 (3), 267-276] to consider the corroded bars, has been adopted. Estimation of the various parameters in the earlier analytical model has been proposed by the present authors. These parameters include corrosion pressure due to expansive action of corrosion products, modeling of tensile behaviour of cracked concrete and adhesion and friction coefficient between the corroded bar and cracked concrete. Simple empirical models are also proposed to evaluate the reduction in bond strength as a function of reinforcement corrosion in RC specimens. These empirical models are proposed by considering a wide range of published experimental investigations related to the bond degradation in RC specimens due to reinforcement corrosion. It has been found that the proposed analytical and empirical bond models are capable of providing the estimates of predicted bond strength of corroded reinforcement that are in reasonably good agreement with the experimentally observed values and with those of the other reported published data on analytical and empirical predictions. An attempt has also been made to evaluate the flexural strength of RC beams with corroded reinforcement failing in bond. It has also been found that the analytical predictions for the flexural strength of RC beams based on the proposed bond degradation models are in agreement with those of the experimentally

  13. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  14. Optimization of pulsed TIG cladding process of stellite alloy on carbon steel using RSM

    Madadi, F., E-mail: f.madadi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafizadeh, F. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, M., E-mail: shamanian@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-05

    Highlights: > This study is useful to optimize the welding process variables in order to control the heat input and cooling rates such that the hardness and dilution of the clad could be estimated. > Central composite rotatable design technique with five-level, four-factor full-factorial design matrix and mathematical models was used to predict hardness and dilution of pulsed gas tungsten arc weld cladding of stellite6 on carbon steel with high accuracy. > The welding current is an effective parameter affecting heat input and melting. In this regard, it is the most important process parameter which influences the dilution. Increase welding current leads to increase in dilution percentage and vice versa. The effect of percentage on time is less important when compared to the other factors. > The results predicted by mathematical models were close to those obtained by experiments. The confirmation tests also indicated high correlation between the mentioned values. > All of the chosen pulse GTAW parameters were significant and showed a noticeable influence on clad dilution. - Abstract: Stellite 6 is a cobalt-base alloy which is resistant to wear and corrosion and retains these properties at high temperatures. The exceptional wear resistance of Stellite 6 is mainly due to the unique inherent characteristics of the hard carbides dispersed in a Co-Cr alloy matrix. In this study, pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) cladding process was carried out to deposit Stellite 6 on plain carbon steel plate. The beneficial effects of this cladding process are low heat input, low distortion, controlled weld bead volume, less hot cracking tendency, less absorption of gases by weld pool and better control of the fusion zone. The dilution effect is a key issue in the quality of cladded layers and, in this regard, the pulsed current tungsten inert gas (PCTIG) was performed to decrease excess heat input and melting of substrate. This paper deals with the investigation of the hardness and

  15. Development Status of Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding for LWRs

    Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jung-Hwan; Yang, Jae-Ho; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Hydrogen explosions and the release of radionuclides are caused by severe damage of current nuclear fuels, which are composed of fuel pellets and fuel cladding, during an accident. To reduce the damage to the public, the fuels have to enhance their integrity under an accident environment. Enhanced accident tolerance fuels (ATFs) can tolerate a loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period during design-basis and beyond design-basis events while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations as well as operational transients, in comparison with the current UO{sub 2}-Zr alloy system used in the LWR. Surface modified Zr cladding as a new concept was suggested to apply an enhanced ATF cladding. The aim of the partial ODS treatment is to increase the high-temperature strength to suppress the ballooning/rupture behavior of fuel cladding during an accident event. The target of the surface coating is to increase the corrosion resistance during normal operation and increase the oxidation resistance during an accident event. The partial ODS treatment of Zircaloy-4 cladding can be produced using a laser beam scanning method with Y2O3 powder, and the surface Cr-alloy and Cr/FeCrAl coating on Zircaloy-4 cladding can be obtained after the development of 3D laser coating and arc ion plating technologies.

  16. Metallography of pitted aluminum-clad, depleted uranium fuel

    Nelson, D.Z.; Howell, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The storage of aluminum-clad fuel and target materials in the L-Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site for more than 5 years has resulted in extensive pitting corrosion of these materials. In many cases the pitting corrosion of the aluminum clad has penetrated in the uranium metal core, resulting in the release of plutonium, uranium, cesium-137, and other fission product activity to the basin water. In an effort to characterize the extent of corrosion of the Mark 31A target slugs, two unirradiated slug assemblies were removed from basin storage and sent to the Savannah River Technology Center for evaluation. This paper presents the results of the metallography and photographic documentation of this evaluation. The metallography confirmed that pitting depths varied, with the deepest pit found to be about 0.12 inches (3.05 nun). Less than 2% of the aluminum cladding was found to be breached resulting in less than 5% of the uranium surface area being affected by corrosion. The overall integrity of the target slug remained intact

  17. Predictive models for deposit accumulation and corrosion on secondary side of steam generators

    Choi, Samuel; Moroney, Velvet; Marks, Chuck; Kreider, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Experience demonstrates that deposit accumulation in steam generators (SGs) can lead to corrosion of tubes. To minimize the probability of this corrosion, utilities employ a variety of deposit control strategies. However, these processes can involve significant costs and potentially affect outage critical paths. Since there has been no model that quantifies tube degradation as a function of deposit accumulation, utilities have had to make decisions regarding deposit control strategies without a reliable quantitative basis. The objective of this study is to develop methods that utilities can use to quantify benefits of SG deposit control strategies with regard to rates of secondary-side tube corrosion. Two different methodologies are employed in this work. The first methodology is empirical and is involved an attempt to correlate degradation rates with deposit accumulation as indicated by sludge pile height. Because there has been relatively little tube degradation in currently operating steam generators, this correlation is developed using data for Alloy 600MA SG tubes. To increase the number of units that could be used for defect/deposit correlations, a method to relate the sludge pile deposit mass and the number of tubes with non-zero sludge height is developed. The second methodology is theoretical and is based on the use of calculated differences in temperature and chemistry to predict the effect of deposits on corrosion rates. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are developed to simulate thermal-hydraulic conditions representative of conditions that are present within porous deposits formed at the top of tube sheet. This paper will discuss the development and application of the predictive models for deposit accumulation and corrosion on the secondary side of steam generators. (authors)

  18. Analytical model of cracking due to rebar corrosion expansion in concrete considering the structure internal force

    Lin, Xiangyue; Peng, Minli; Lei, Fengming; Tan, Jiangxian; Shi, Huacheng

    2017-12-01

    Based on the assumptions of uniform corrosion and linear elastic expansion, an analytical model of cracking due to rebar corrosion expansion in concrete was established, which is able to consider the structure internal force. And then, by means of the complex variable function theory and series expansion technology established by Muskhelishvili, the corresponding stress component functions of concrete around the reinforcement were obtained. Also, a comparative analysis was conducted between the numerical simulation model and present model in this paper. The results show that the calculation results of both methods were consistent with each other, and the numerical deviation was less than 10%, proving that the analytical model established in this paper is reliable.

  19. Corrosion problems in light water nuclear reactors

    Berry, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion problems encountered during the author's career are reviewed. Attention is given to the development of Zircaloys and attendant factors that affect corrosion; the caustic and chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel steam generator tubing; the qualification of Inconel Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing and the subsequent corrosion problem of secondary side wastage, caustic SCC, pitting, intergranular attack, denting, and primary side SCC; and SCC in weld and furnace sensitized stainless steel piping and internals in boiling water reactor primary coolants. Also mentioned are corrosion of metallic uranium alloy fuels; corrosion of aluminum and niobium candidate fuel element claddings; crevice corrosion and seizing of stainless steel journal-sleeve combinations; SCC of precipitation hardened and martensitic stainless steels; low temperature SCC of welded austenitic stainless steels by chloride, fluoride, and sulfur oxy-anions; and corrosion problems experienced by condensers

  20. A fracture mechanics model for iodine stress corrosion crack propagation in Zircaloy tubing

    Crescimanno, P.J.; Campbell, W.R.; Goldberg, I.

    1984-01-01

    A fracture mechanics model is presented for iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy tubing. The model utilizes a power law to relate crack extension velocity to stress intensity factor, a hyperbolic tangent function for the influence of iodine concentration, and an exponential function for the influence of temperature and material strength. Comparisons of predicted to measured failure times show that predicted times are within a factor of two of the measured times for a majority of the specimens considered

  1. Corrosion surveillance in spent fuel storage pools

    Howell, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    In mid-1991, corrosion of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel was observed in the light-water filled basins at the Savannah River site. A corrosion surveillance program was initiated in the P, K, L-Reactor basins and in the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF). This program verified the aggressive nature of the pitting corrosion and provided recommendations for changes in basin operations to permit extended longer term interim storage. The changes were implemented during 1994--1996 and have resulted in significantly improved basin water quality with conductivity in the 1--3 microS/cm range. Under these improved conditions, no new pitting has been observed over the last three years. This paper describes the corrosion surveillance program at SRS and what has been learned about the corrosion of aluminum-clad in spent fuel storage pools

  2. A mathematical model for localized corrosion in steam generator crevices under heat transfer conditions

    Engelhardt, G.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Sikora, J.; Macdonald, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    A predictive and self-consistent mathematical model has been developed to describe the localized corrosion in steam generators. The model recognizes that the internal and external environment are coupled by the need to conserve charge in the system. Thus, solution of Laplace's equation for the external environment (outside the crevice) provides the boundary condition for the electric potential at the crevice mouth, which is needed for solving the system of mass transfer equations for the internal environment (inside the crevice). Mass transfer by diffusion, ion migration, and convection was considered. Heat and momentum transfer equations are solved simultaneously, with the mass balance equation for each species and the condition of electroneutrality inside the cavity being considered. The model takes into account the porosity and tortuosity in the corrosion product deposit in the crevice. The homogeneous chemical reactions (hydrolysis of the products of the anodic reaction and the autoprotolysis of water) are included in the model. The model, in this preliminary form predicts the solution chemistry, potential drop, and temperature distribution inside the crevice. An order of magnitude estimate of the crevice corrosion rate also obtained. At this point, the model predicts only the steady state solution, but it is recognized that a steady state may not exist under normal conditions

  3. Corrosion mechanism of model zinc-magnesium alloys in atmospheric conditions

    Prosek, T.; Nazarov, A.; Bexell, U.; Thierry, D.; Serak, J.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, superior corrosion properties of zinc coatings alloyed with magnesium have been reported. Corrosion behaviour of model zinc-magnesium alloys was studied to understand better the protective mechanism of magnesium in zinc. Alloys containing from 1 to 32 wt.% magnesium, pure zinc, and pure magnesium were contaminated with sodium chloride and exposed to humid air for 28 days. Composition of corrosion products was analyzed using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ion chromatography (IC), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The exposure tests were completed with scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) and electrochemical measurements. Weight loss of ZnMg alloys with 1-16 wt.% magnesium was lower than that of pure zinc. Up to 10-fold drop in weight loss was found for materials with 4-8 wt.% Mg in the structure. The improved corrosion stability of ZnMg alloys was connected to the presence of an Mg-based film adjacent to the metal surface. It ensured stable passivity in chloride environment and limited the efficiency of oxygen reduction

  4. Using high throughput experimental data and in silico models to discover alternatives to toxic chromate corrosion inhibitors

    Winkler, D.A.; Breedon, M.; White, P.; Hughes, A.E.; Sapper, E.D.; Cole, I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We screened a large library of organic compounds as replacements for toxic chromates. • High throughput automated corrosion testing was used to assess inhibitor performance. • Robust, predictive machine learning models of corrosion inhibition were developed. • Models indicated molecular features contributing to performance of organic inhibitors. • We also showed that quantum chemistry descriptors do not correlate with performance. - Abstract: Restrictions on the use of toxic chromate-based corrosion inhibitors have created important issues for the aerospace and other industries. Benign alternatives that offer similar or superior performance are needed. We used high throughput experiments to assess 100 small organic molecules as potential inhibitors of corrosion in aerospace aluminium alloys AA2024 and AA7075. We generated robust, predictive, quantitative computational models of inhibitor efficiency at two pH values using these data. The models identified molecular features of inhibitor molecules that had the greatest impact on corrosion inhibition. Models can be used to discover better corrosion inhibitors by screening libraries of organic compounds for candidates with high corrosion inhibition.

  5. Partial corrosion casting to assess cochlear vasculature in mouse models of presbycusis and CMV infection.

    Carraro, Mattia; Park, Albert H; Harrison, Robert V

    2016-02-01

    Some forms of sensorineural hearing loss involve damage or degenerative changes to the stria vascularis and/or other vascular structures in the cochlea. In animal models, many methods for anatomical assessment of cochlear vasculature exist, each with advantages and limitations. One methodology, corrosion casting, has proved useful in some species, however in the mouse model this technique is difficult to achieve because digestion of non vascular tissue results in collapse of the delicate cast specimen. We have developed a partial corrosion cast method that allows visualization of vasculature along much of the cochlear length but maintains some structural integrity of the specimen. We provide a detailed step-by-step description of this novel technique. We give some illustrative examples of the use of the method in mouse models of presbycusis and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stochastic modeling of pitting corrosion in underground pipelines using Markov chains

    Velazquez, J.C.; Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J.M.; Araujo, J.E. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN), Mexico D.F. (Mexico). Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas (ESIQIE); Valor, A. [Universidad de La Habana, La Habana (Cuba)

    2009-07-01

    A non-homogenous, linear growth (pure birth) Markov process, with discrete states in continuous time, has been used to model external pitting corrosion in underground pipelines. The transition probability function for the pit depth is obtained from the analytical solution of the forward Kolmogorov equations for this process. The parameters of the transition probability function between depth states can be identified from the observed time evolution of the mean of the pit depth distribution. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict the time evolution of the mean value of the pit depth distribution in soils with different physicochemical characteristics. The simulated distributions have been used to create an empirical Markov-chain-based stochastic model for predicting the evolution of pitting corrosion from the observed properties of the soil in contact with the pipeline. Real- life case studies, involving simulated and measured pit depth distributions are presented to illustrate the application of the proposed Markov chains model. (author)

  7. Ray-Tracing-Based Modeling of Clad-Removed Step-Index Plastic Optical Fiber in Smart Textiles: Effect of Curvature in Plain Weave Fabric

    Sun Hee Moon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic optical fiber was chosen for information delivery media in smart textile. Cladding layer was peeled off by chemical and mechanical methods to find optimal peeling conditions. Both radial side illumination and longitudinal end-tip illumination were measured for visible light of 627 µm wavelength. A half-cone-shaped jig was manufactured using 3D printing to give various curvature conditions to fibers. Also POFs were embedded in plain weave textile structure to measure the light dissipation effect. The waveguide phenomenon was modeled using discrete ray tracing technique and ray-to-interface collision detection algorithm. Results from the proposed modeling technique showed linear relationship with those from experiment.

  8. Industry Application ECCS / LOCA Integrated Cladding/Emergency Core Cooling System Performance: Demonstration of LOTUS-Baseline Coupled Analysis of the South Texas Plant Model

    Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Szilard, Ronaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Epiney, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Parisi, Carlo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Vaghetto, Rodolfo [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Vanni, Alessandro [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Neptune, Kaleb [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Under the auspices of the DOE LWRS Program RISMC Industry Application ECCS/LOCA, INL has engaged staff from both South Texas Project (STP) and the Texas A&M University (TAMU) to produce a generic pressurized water reactor (PWR) model including reactor core, clad/fuel design and systems thermal hydraulics based on the South Texas Project (STP) nuclear power plant, a 4-Loop Westinghouse PWR. A RISMC toolkit, named LOCA Toolkit for the U.S. (LOTUS), has been developed for use in this generic PWR plant model to assess safety margins for the proposed NRC 10 CFR 50.46c rule, Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) performance during LOCA. This demonstration includes coupled analysis of core design, fuel design, thermalhydraulics and systems analysis, using advanced risk analysis tools and methods to investigate a wide range of results. Within this context, a multi-physics best estimate plus uncertainty (MPBEPU) methodology framework is proposed.

  9. Development of advanced LWR fuel cladding

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H. [and others

    2000-04-01

    This report describes the results from evaluating the preliminary Zr-based alloys to develop the advanced Zr-based alloys for the nuclear fuel claddings, which should have good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties at high burn-up over 70,000MWD/MTU. It also includes the results from the basic studies for optimizing the processes which are involved in the development of the advanced Zr-based alloys. Ten(10) kinds of candidates for the alloys of which performance is over that of the existing Zircaloy-4 or ZIRLO alloy were selected out of the preliminary alloys of 150 kinds which were newly designed and repeatedly manufactured and evaluated to find out the promising alloys. First of all, the corrosion tests on the preliminary alloys were carried out to evaluate their performance in both pure water and LiOH solution at 360 deg C and in steam at 400 deg C. The tensile tests were performed on the alloys which proved to be good in the corrosion resistance. The creep behaviors were tested at 400 deg C for 10 days with the application of constant load on the samples which showed good performance in the corrosion resistance and tensile properties. The effect of the final heat treatment and A-parameters as well as Sn or Nb on the corrosion resistance, tensile properties, hardness, microstructures of the alloys was evaluated for some alloys interested. The other basic researches on the oxides, electrochemical properties, corrosion mechanism, and the establishment of the phase diagrams of some alloys were also carried out.

  10. Development of advanced LWR fuel cladding

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.

    2000-04-01

    This report describes the results from evaluating the preliminary Zr-based alloys to develop the advanced Zr-based alloys for the nuclear fuel claddings, which should have good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties at high burn-up over 70,000MWD/MTU. It also includes the results from the basic studies for optimizing the processes which are involved in the development of the advanced Zr-based alloys. Ten(10) kinds of candidates for the alloys of which performance is over that of the existing Zircaloy-4 or ZIRLO alloy were selected out of the preliminary alloys of 150 kinds which were newly designed and repeatedly manufactured and evaluated to find out the promising alloys. First of all, the corrosion tests on the preliminary alloys were carried out to evaluate their performance in both pure water and LiOH solution at 360 deg C and in steam at 400 deg C. The tensile tests were performed on the alloys which proved to be good in the corrosion resistance. The creep behaviors were tested at 400 deg C for 10 days with the application of constant load on the samples which showed good performance in the corrosion resistance and tensile properties. The effect of the final heat treatment and A-parameters as well as Sn or Nb on the corrosion resistance, tensile properties, hardness, microstructures of the alloys was evaluated for some alloys interested. The other basic researches on the oxides, electrochemical properties, corrosion mechanism, and the establishment of the phase diagrams of some alloys were also carried out

  11. Corrosion and corrosion control

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  12. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Kinetic modelling of bentonite-canister interaction. Long-term predictions of copper canister corrosion under oxic and anoxic conditions

    Wersin, P.; Spahiu, K.; Bruno, J.

    1994-09-01

    A new modelling approach for canister corrosion which emphasises chemical processes and diffusion at the bentonite-canister interface is presented. From the geochemical boundary conditions corrosion rates for both an anoxic case and an oxic case are derived and uncertainties thereof are estimated via sensitivity analyses. Time scales of corrosion are assessed by including calculations of the evolution of redox potential in the near field and pitting corrosion. This indicates realistic corrosion depths in the range of 10 -7 and 4*10 -5 mm/yr, respectively for anoxic and oxic corrosion. Taking conservative estimates, depths are increased by a factor of about 200 for both cases. From these predictions it is suggested that copper canister corrosion does not constitute a problem for repository safety, although certain factors such as temperature and radiolysis have not been explicitly included. The possible effect of bacterial processes on corrosion should be further investigated as it might enhance locally the described redox process. 35 refs, 11 figs, 6 tabs

  14. Kinetic modelling of bentonite-canister interaction. Long-term predictions of copper canister corrosion under oxic and anoxic conditions

    Wersin, P; Spahiu, K; Bruno, J [MBT Tecnologia Ambiental, Cerdanyola (Spain)

    1994-09-01

    A new modelling approach for canister corrosion which emphasises chemical processes and diffusion at the bentonite-canister interface is presented. From the geochemical boundary conditions corrosion rates for both an anoxic case and an oxic case are derived and uncertainties thereof are estimated via sensitivity analyses. Time scales of corrosion are assessed by including calculations of the evolution of redox potential in the near field and pitting corrosion. This indicates realistic corrosion depths in the range of 10{sup -7} and 4*10{sup -5} mm/yr, respectively for anoxic and oxic corrosion. Taking conservative estimates, depths are increased by a factor of about 200 for both cases. From these predictions it is suggested that copper canister corrosion does not constitute a problem for repository safety, although certain factors such as temperature and radiolysis have not been explicitly included. The possible effect of bacterial processes on corrosion should be further investigated as it might enhance locally the described redox process. 35 refs, 11 figs, 6 tabs.

  15. Carbon dioxide corrosion: Modelling and experimental work applied to natural gas pipelines

    P, Loldrup Fosboel

    2007-10-15

    CO{sub 2} corrosion is a general problem in the industry and it is expensive. The focus of this study is an oil gas production related problem. CO{sub 2} corrosion is observed in offshore natural gas transportation pipelines. A general overview of the problem is presented in chapter 1. The chemical system consists mainly of CO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-NaHCO{sub 3}-MEG-H{sub 2}O. Sodium is injected in the pipelines as NaOH in order to pH-stabilize the pipeline to avoid corrosion and MEG is injected in order to prevent gas hydrates. There are a great number of models available in the literature which may predict CO{sub 2} corrosion. These models are not very accurate and assume ideality in the main part of the equation. This thesis deals with aspect of improving the models to account for the non-ideality. A general overview and extension of the theory behind electrochemical corrosion is presented in chapter 2 to 4. The theory deals with the basic thermodynamics of electrolytes in chapter 2, the extension and general description of electrolyte mass transport in chapter 3, and the electrochemical kinetics of corrosion in chapter 4. A literature overview of CO{sub 2} corrosion is shown in chapter 5 and possible extensions of the models are discussed. A list of literature cites is given in chapter 6. The literature review in chapter 5 shows how FeCO{sub 3} plays a main part in the protection of steel. Especially the solubility of FeCO{sub 3} is an important factor. Chapter 7 discusses and validates the thermodynamic properties of FeCO{sub 3}. The study shows that there is a discrepancy in the properties of FeCO{sub 3}. Sets of consistent thermodynamic properties of FeCO{sub 3} are given. A mixed solvent electrolyte model is regressed in chapter 8 for the CO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-NaHCO{sub 3}-MEG-H{sub 2}O system. Parameters of the extended UNIQUAC model is fitted to literature data of VLE, SLE, heat excess and validated against heat capacity data. The model is also

  16. Kinetics of corrosion products release from nickel-base alloys corroding in primary water conditions. A new modeling of release

    Carrette, F.; Guinard, L.; Pieraggi, B.

    2002-01-01

    The radioactivity in the primary circuit arises mainly from the activation of corrosion products in the core of pressurised water reactors; corrosion products dissolve from the oxide scales developed on steam generator tubes of alloy 690. The controlling and modelling of this process require a detailed knowledge of the microstructure and chemical composition of oxide scales as well as the kinetics of their corrosion and dissolution. Alloy 690 was studied as tubes and sheets, with three various surface states (as-received, cold-worked, electropolished). Corrosion tests were performed at 325 C and 155 bar in primary water conditions (B/Li - 1000/2 ppm, [H 2 ] 30 cm 3 .kg -1 TPN, [O 2 ] < 5 ppb); test durations ranged between 24 and 2160 hours. Corrosion tests in the TITANE loop provided mainly corrosion and oxidation kinetics, and tests in the BOREAL loop yielded release kinetics. This study revealed asymptotic type kinetics. Characterisation of the oxide scales grown in representative conditions of the primary circuit was performed by several techniques (SEM, TEM, SIMS, XPS, GIXRD). These analyses revealed the essential role of the fine grained cold-worked scale present on as-received and cold-worked materials. This scale controls the corrosion and release phenomena. The kinetic study and the characterisation of the oxide scales contributed to the modelling of the corrosion/release process. A growth/dissolution model was proposed for corrosion product scales grown in non-saturated dynamic fluid. This model provided the temporal evolution of oxide scales and release kinetics for different species (Fe, Ni, Cr). The model was validated for several surface states and several alloys. (authors)

  17. A new model for the in-reactor corrosion of zirconium alloys

    Cox, B [University of Toronto, ON (Canada). Centre for Nuclear Engineering

    1997-02-01

    Previous models for the in-reactor corrosion of zirconium alloys have assumed that the mechanism is a completely solid-state diffusion process, determined by the growth and breakdown of the protective oxide film. In-reactor kinetics have been related to out-reactor kinetics with the oxide-metal interface temperature calculated from effects of heat flux. Recent experimental results have suggested that oxide dissolution and reprecipitation may be a major process leading to the formation of thick porous oxide films in-reactor. The model described here is based on the dissolution of primary recoil tracks in the oxide as the primary process distinguishing in-reactor from out-reactor corrosion. The consequences of such a model would be a very different microscopic morphology of in-reactor and out-reactor thick films, a significant irradiation effect on non-heat transfer surfaces, and a change in the kinetics of the overall process. This model should be equally applicable to PWR and BWR water chemistries because of the amphoteric nature of ZrO{sub 2}, and the effects of LiOH should operate by an essentially identical mechanism. A reciprocal rate equation should fit these processes and with additive terms seems capable of accommodating all water chemistry effects, except for discontinuous processes such as nodular corrosion. (author). 60 refs, 6 figs.

  18. A new model for the in-reactor corrosion of zirconium alloys

    Cox, B.

    1997-01-01

    Previous models for the in-reactor corrosion of zirconium alloys have assumed that the mechanism is a completely solid-state diffusion process, determined by the growth and breakdown of the protective oxide film. In-reactor kinetics have been related to out-reactor kinetics with the oxide-metal interface temperature calculated from effects of heat flux. Recent experimental results have suggested that oxide dissolution and reprecipitation may be a major process leading to the formation of thick porous oxide films in-reactor. The model described here is based on the dissolution of primary recoil tracks in the oxide as the primary process distinguishing in-reactor from out-reactor corrosion. The consequences of such a model would be a very different microscopic morphology of in-reactor and out-reactor thick films, a significant irradiation effect on non-heat transfer surfaces, and a change in the kinetics of the overall process. This model should be equally applicable to PWR and BWR water chemistries because of the amphoteric nature of ZrO 2 , and the effects of LiOH should operate by an essentially identical mechanism. A reciprocal rate equation should fit these processes and with additive terms seems capable of accommodating all water chemistry effects, except for discontinuous processes such as nodular corrosion. (author). 60 refs, 6 figs

  19. Chemical Dissolution of Simulant FCA Cladding and Plates

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pierce, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has received some fast critical assembly (FCA) fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for disposition. Among the JAEA FCA fuel are approximately 7090 rectangular Stainless Steel clad fuel elements. Each element has an internal Pu-10.6Al alloy metal wafer. The thickness of each element is either 1/16 inch or 1/32 inch. The dimensions of each element ranges from 2 inches x 1 inch to 2 inches x 4 inches. This report discusses the potential chemical dissolution of the FCA clad material or stainless steel. This technology uses nitric acid-potassium fluoride (HNO3-KF) flowsheets of H-Canyon to dissolve the FCA elements from a rack of materials. Historically, dissolution flowsheets have aimed to maximize Pu dissolution rates while minimizing stainless steel dissolution (corrosion) rates. Because the FCA cladding is made of stainless steel, this work sought to accelerate stainless steel dissolution.

  20. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    Jinsong Liu [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2006-04-15

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 10{sup 5} years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 10{sup 5} years.

  1. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    Liu, Jinsong [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2006-04-15

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 10{sup 5} years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 10{sup 5} years.

  2. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    Jinsong Liu

    2006-04-01

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 10 5 years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 10 5 years

  3. An empirical-statistical model for laser cladding of Ti-6Al-4V powder on Ti-6Al-4V substrate

    Nabhani, Mohammad; Razavi, Reza Shoja; Barekat, Masoud

    2018-03-01

    In this article, Ti-6Al-4V powder alloy was directly deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrate using laser cladding process. In this process, some key parameters such as laser power (P), laser scanning rate (V) and powder feeding rate (F) play important roles. Using linear regression analysis, this paper develops the empirical-statistical relation between these key parameters and geometrical characteristics of single clad tracks (i.e. clad height, clad width, penetration depth, wetting angle, and dilution) as a combined parameter (PαVβFγ). The results indicated that the clad width linearly depended on PV-1/3 and powder feeding rate had no effect on it. The dilution controlled by a combined parameter as VF-1/2 and laser power was a dispensable factor. However, laser power was the dominant factor for the clad height, penetration depth, and wetting angle so that they were proportional to PV-1F1/4, PVF-1/8, and P3/4V-1F-1/4, respectively. Based on the results of correlation coefficient (R > 0.9) and analysis of residuals, it was confirmed that these empirical-statistical relations were in good agreement with the measured values of single clad tracks. Finally, these relations led to the design of a processing map that can predict the geometrical characteristics of the single clad tracks based on the key parameters.

  4. Fracture of Zircaloy cladding by interactions with uranium dioxide pellets in LWR fuel rods. Technical report 10

    Smith, E.; Ranjan, G.V.; Cipolla, R.C.

    1976-11-01

    Power reactor fuel rod failures can be caused by uranium dioxide fuel pellet-Zircaloy cladding interactions. The report summarizes the current position attained in a detailed theoretical study of Zircaloy cladding fracture caused by the growth of stress corrosion cracks which form near fuel pellet cracks as a consequence of a power increase after a sufficiently high burn-up. It is shown that stress corrosion crack growth in irradiated Zircaloy must be able to proceed at very low stress intensifications if uniform friction effects are operative at the fuel-cladding interface, when the interfacial friction coefficient is less than unity, when a symmetric distribution of fuel cracks exists, and when symmetric interfacial slippage occurs (i.e., ''uniform'' conditions). Otherwise, the observed fuel rod failures must be due to departures from ''uniform'' conditions, and a very high interfacial friction coefficient and particularly fuel-cladding bonding, are means of providing sufficient stess intensification at a cladding crack tip to explain the occurrence of cladding fractures. The results of the investigation focus attention on the necessity for reliable experimental data on the stress corrosion crack growth behavior of irradiated Zircaloy, and for further investigations on the correlation between local fuel-cladding bonding and stress corrosion cracking

  5. Study on the improvement of nuclear fuel cladding reliability

    Rheem, Karp Soon; Han, Jung Ho; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Lee, Deok Hyun

    1987-12-01

    In order to improve the nuclear fuel cladding reliability for high burn-up fuels, the corrosion resistance of laser beam surface treated and β-quenched zircaloys and the mechanical characteristics including fatigue, burst, and out-of-pile PCMI characteristics of heat treated zircaloys were investigated. In addition, the inadiation characteristics of Ko-Ri reactor fuel claddings was examined. It was found that the wasteside corrosion resistance of commercial zircaloys was improved remarkably by laser beam surface treatment. The out-of-pile transient cladding failures were investigated in terms of hoop stress versus time-to-failures by means of mandrel loading units at 25 deg C and 325 deg C. Fatigue characteristics of the β-quenched and as-received zircaloy cladding were investigated by using an internal oil pressurization method which can simulate the load-following operation cycle. The results were in good agreement with the existing data obtained by conventional methods for commercial zircaloys. Burst tests were performed with commercial and the β-quenched zircaloys in high pressure argon gas atmosphere as a function of burst temperature. The burst stress decreased linearly in the α phase region up to 600 deg C and hereafter the decrement of the burst stress decreased gradually with temperature in the β-phase region. For the first time, the burst characteristic of the irradiated zircaloy-4 cladding tubes released from Ko-Ri nuclear power unit 1 was investigated, and attempts were made to trace the cause of cladding failures by examining the failed structure and fret marks by debris. (Author)

  6. Corrosion modelling of iron based alloy in nuclear waste repository

    Bataillon, C., E-mail: christian.bataillon@cea.f [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Bouchon, F.; Chainais-Hillairet, C. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, Laboratoire de Mathematiques, BP10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6620, Laboratoire de Mathematiques, F-63177 Aubiere (France); Desgranges, C. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Hoarau, E. [ANDRA/DS, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Martin, F.; Perrin, S. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Tupin, M. [CEA, DEN, DMN, SEMI, LM2E, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Talandier, J. [ANDRA/DS, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2010-06-01

    The Diffusion Poisson Coupled Model (DPCM) is presented to modelling the oxidation of a metal covered by an oxide layer. This model is similar to the Point Defect Model and the Mixed Conduction Model except for the potential profile which is not assumed but calculated in solving the Poisson equation. This modelling considers the motions of two moving interfaces linked through the ratio of Pilling-Bedworth. Their locations are unknowns of the model. Application to the case of iron in neutral or slightly basic solution is discussed. Then, DPCM has been first tested in a simplified situation where the locations of interfaces were fixed. In such a situation, DPCM is in agreement with Mott-Schottky model when iron concentration profile is homogeneous. When it is not homogeneous, deviation from Mott-Schottky model has been observed and is discussed. The influence of the outer and inner interfacial structures on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions is illustrated and discussed. Finally, simulations for the oxide layer growth are presented. The expected trends have been obtained. The steady-state thickness is a linear function of the applied potential and the steady-state current density is potential independent.

  7. Deep surface rolling for fatigue life enhancement of laser clad aircraft aluminium alloy

    Zhuang, W., E-mail: wyman.zhuang@dsto.defence.gov.au [Aerospace Division, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, 506 Lorimer Street, Fishermans Bend, Victoria 3207 (Australia); Liu, Q.; Djugum, R.; Sharp, P.K. [Aerospace Division, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, 506 Lorimer Street, Fishermans Bend, Victoria 3207 (Australia); Paradowska, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Deep surface rolling as a post-repair enhancement technology was applied to the laser cladded 7075-T651 aluminium alloy specimens that simulated corrosion damage blend-out repair. • The residual stresses induced by the deep surface rolling process were measured. • The deep surface rolling process can introduce deep and high magnitude compressive residual stresses beyond the laser clad and substrate interface. • Spectrum fatigue test showed the fatigue life was significantly increased by deep surface rolling. - Abstract: Deep surface rolling can introduce deep compressive residual stresses into the surface of aircraft metallic structure to extend its fatigue life. To develop cost-effective aircraft structural repair technologies such as laser cladding, deep surface rolling was considered as an advanced post-repair surface enhancement technology. In this study, aluminium alloy 7075-T651 specimens with a blend-out region were first repaired using laser cladding technology. The surface of the laser cladding region was then treated by deep surface rolling. Fatigue testing was subsequently conducted for the laser clad, deep surface rolled and post-heat treated laser clad specimens. It was found that deep surface rolling can significantly improve the fatigue life in comparison with the laser clad baseline repair. In addition, three dimensional residual stresses were measured using neutron diffraction techniques. The results demonstrate that beneficial compressive residual stresses induced by deep surface rolling can reach considerable depths (more than 1.0 mm) below the laser clad surface.

  8. Deep surface rolling for fatigue life enhancement of laser clad aircraft aluminium alloy

    Zhuang, W.; Liu, Q.; Djugum, R.; Sharp, P.K.; Paradowska, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Deep surface rolling as a post-repair enhancement technology was applied to the laser cladded 7075-T651 aluminium alloy specimens that simulated corrosion damage blend-out repair. • The residual stresses induced by the deep surface rolling process were measured. • The deep surface rolling process can introduce deep and high magnitude compressive residual stresses beyond the laser clad and substrate interface. • Spectrum fatigue test showed the fatigue life was significantly increased by deep surface rolling. - Abstract: Deep surface rolling can introduce deep compressive residual stresses into the surface of aircraft metallic structure to extend its fatigue life. To develop cost-effective aircraft structural repair technologies such as laser cladding, deep surface rolling was considered as an advanced post-repair surface enhancement technology. In this study, aluminium alloy 7075-T651 specimens with a blend-out region were first repaired using laser cladding technology. The surface of the laser cladding region was then treated by deep surface rolling. Fatigue testing was subsequently conducted for the laser clad, deep surface rolled and post-heat treated laser clad specimens. It was found that deep surface rolling can significantly improve the fatigue life in comparison with the laser clad baseline repair. In addition, three dimensional residual stresses were measured using neutron diffraction techniques. The results demonstrate that beneficial compressive residual stresses induced by deep surface rolling can reach considerable depths (more than 1.0 mm) below the laser clad surface

  9. A mechanistic model for predicting flow-assisted and general corrosion of carbon steel in reactor primary coolants

    Lister, D. [University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Lang, L.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Lab., ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel in high-temperature lithiated water can be described with a model that invokes dissolution of the protective oxide film and erosion of oxide particles that are loosened as a result. General corrosion under coolant conditions where oxide is not dissolved is described as well. In the model, the electrochemistry of magnetite dissolution and precipitation and the effect of particle size on solubility move the dependence on film thickness of the diffusion processes (and therefore the corrosion rate) away from reciprocal. Particle erosion under dissolving conditions is treated stochastically and depends upon the fluid shear stress at the surface. The corrosion rate dependence on coolant flow under FAC conditions then becomes somewhat less than that arising purely from fluid shear (proportional to the velocity squared). Under non-dissolving conditions, particle erosion occurs infrequently and general corrosion is almost unaffected by flow For application to a CANDU primary circuit and its feeders, the model was bench-marked against the outlet feeder S08 removed from the Point Lepreau reactor, which furnished one value of film thickness and one of corrosion rate for a computed average coolant velocity. Several constants and parameters in the model had to be assumed or were optimised, since values for them were not available. These uncertainties are no doubt responsible for the rather high values of potential that evolved as steps in the computation. The model predicts film thickness development and corrosion rate for the whole range of coolant velocities in outlet feeders very well. In particular, the detailed modelling of FAC in the complex geometry of one outlet feeder (F11) is in good agreement with measurements. When the particle erosion computations are inserted in the balance equations for the circuit, realistic values of crud level are obtained. The model also predicts low corrosion rates and thick oxide films for inlet

  10. A mechanistic model for predicting flow-assisted and general corrosion of carbon steel in reactor primary coolants

    Lister, D.

    2002-01-01

    Flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel in high-temperature lithiated water can be described with a model that invokes dissolution of the protective oxide film and erosion of oxide particles that are loosened as a result. General corrosion under coolant conditions where oxide is not dissolved is described as well. In the model, the electrochemistry of magnetite dissolution and precipitation and the effect of particle size on solubility move the dependence on film thickness of the diffusion processes (and therefore the corrosion rate) away from reciprocal. Particle erosion under dissolving conditions is treated stochastically and depends upon the fluid shear stress at the surface. The corrosion rate dependence on coolant flow under FAC conditions then becomes somewhat less than that arising purely from fluid shear (proportional to the velocity squared). Under non-dissolving conditions, particle erosion occurs infrequently and general corrosion is almost unaffected by flow For application to a CANDU primary circuit and its feeders, the model was bench-marked against the outlet feeder S08 removed from the Point Lepreau reactor, which furnished one value of film thickness and one of corrosion rate for a computed average coolant velocity. Several constants and parameters in the model had to be assumed or were optimised, since values for them were not available. These uncertainties are no doubt responsible for the rather high values of potential that evolved as steps in the computation. The model predicts film thickness development and corrosion rate for the whole range of coolant velocities in outlet feeders very well. In particular, the detailed modelling of FAC in the complex geometry of one outlet feeder (F11) is in good agreement with measurements. When the particle erosion computations are inserted in the balance equations for the circuit, realistic values of crud level are obtained. The model also predicts low corrosion rates and thick oxide films for inlet

  11. Multi-physics corrosion modeling for sustainability assessment of steel reinforced high performance fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    Lepech, M.; Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette

    2016-01-01

    and widespread depassivation, are the mechanism behind experimental results of HPFRCC steel corrosion studies found in the literature. Such results provide an indication of the fundamental mechanisms by which steel reinforced HPFRCC materials may be more durable than traditional reinforced concrete and other......Using a newly developed multi-physics transport, corrosion, and cracking model, which models these phenomena as a coupled physiochemical processes, the role of HPFRCC crack control and formation in regulating steel reinforcement corrosion is investigated. This model describes transport of water...... and chemical species, the electric potential distribution in the HPFRCC, the electrochemical propagation of steel corrosion, and the role of microcracks in the HPFRCC material. Numerical results show that the reduction in anode and cathode size on the reinforcing steel surface, due to multiple crack formation...

  12. Surface improvement for inside surface of small diameter pipes by laser cladding technique

    Irisawa, Toshio; Morishige, Norio; Umemoto, Tadahiro; Ono, Kazumichi; Hamaoka, Tadashi; Tanaka, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    A laser cladding technique has been used for surface improvement in controlling the composition of a metal surface. Recent high power YAG laser development gives an opportunity to use this laser cladding technique for various applications. A YAG laser beam can be transmitted through an optical fiber for a long distance and through narrow spaces. YAG laser cladding was studied for developing alloy steel to prevent stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steel piping. In order to make a cladding layer, mixed metal powder was on the inside surface of the piping using an organic binder. Subsequently the powder beds were melted with a YAG laser beam transmitted through an optical fiber. This paper introduces the Laser cladding technique for surface improvement for the inside surface of a small diameter pipe. (author)

  13. Application of laser cladding method to small-diameter stainless steel pipes in actual nuclear plant

    Atago, Y.; Yamadera, M.; Tsuji, H.; Shiraiwa, T.; Kanno, M.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, to prevent stress corrosion cracking (SCC) the material of stainless steel (Type 304), a laser cladding method which produces a highly corrosion-resisting coating (cladding) to be formed on the surface of the material was developed. This is applicable to a long distance and narrow space, because of the good accessibility of the YAG (Yttrium-Aluminum Garnet) laser beam that can be transmitted through an optical fiber. In this method, a paste mixed metallic powder and heating resistive organic solvent is firstly placed on the inner surface of a small pipe and then a YAG laser beam transmitted through an optical fiber is irradiated to the paste, which will be melted and formed a clad subsequently, which is excellent in corrosion resistance. Finall