WorldWideScience

Sample records for clad fuel rods

  1. The effect of axial fuel rod power profile on fuel temperature and cladding strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyu-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The most limiting design criteria for nuclear reactor normal operating conditions (ANS Condition I are known to be rod internal pressure and cladding oxidation, while those for nuclear reactor transient operating conditions (ANS Conditon II to be fuel centerline temperature and transient cladding total tensile strain. However, the design margins against fuel temperature and transient cladding tensile strain become smaller since power uprating is being or will be utilized for the most of nuclear power reactors to enhance the economics of nuclear power. In order to secure sufficient design margins against fuel temperature and cladding total tensile strain even for power uprating, the current axial rod power profiles used in the reactor transient analysis were optimized to reduce over-conservatism, considering that 118% overpower of a steady-state peak rod average power was not exceeded during the reactor transients. The comparison of the current axial rod power profiles and the optimized ones indicates that the latter reduces the fuel centerline temperature and cladding total tensile strain by 26°C and 0.02%, respectively.

  2. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. These models are expected to improve the calculations of several important aspects of fuel rod behavior. First, an improved mapping was established from a compilation of PIE results from severe fuel damage tests of the configuration of melted metallic cladding that is retained by an oxide layer. The improved mapping accounts for the relocation of melted cladding in the circumferential direction. Then, rules based on PIE results were established for calculating the effect of cladding that has relocated from above on the oxidation and integrity of the lower intact cladding upon which it solidifies. Next, three different methods were identified for calculating the extent of dissolution of the oxidic part of the cladding due to its contact with the metallic part. The extent of dissolution effects the stress and thus the integrity of the oxidic part of the cladding. Then, an empirical equation was presented for calculating the stress in the oxidic part of the cladding and evaluating its integrity based on this calculated stress. This empirical equation replaces the current criterion for loss of integrity which is based on temperature and extent of oxidation. Finally, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The implementation of these models is expected to eliminate the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled, Improvements in Modeling of Cladding Oxidation and Meltdown.

  3. Investigation of stainless steel clad fuel rod failures and fuel performance in the Connecticut Yankee Reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R. W.

    1981-11-01

    Significant levels of fuel rod failures were observed in the batch 8 fuel assemblies of the Connecticut Yankee reactor. Failure of 304 stainless steel cladding in a PWR environment was not expected. Therefore a detailed poolside and hot cell examination program was conducted to determine the cause of failure and identify differences between batch 8 fuel and previous batches which had operated without failures. Hot cell work conducted consisted of detailed nondestructive and destructive examination of fuel rods from batches 7 and 8. The results indicate that the batch 8 failure mechanism was stress corrosion cracking initiating on the clad outer surface. The sources of cladding stresses are believed to be (a) fuel pellet chips wedged in the cladding gap, (b) swelling of highly nondensifying batch 8 fuel and (c) potentially harmful effects of a power change event that occurred near the end of the second cycle of irradiation for batch 8.

  4. Oxidation investigation of cladding specimens for regular and accident tolerant fuel rods under LOCA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyuk, S. S.; Deryabin, I. A.; Kiselev, D. S.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu A.; Mokrushin, A. A.; Parshin, N. Ya; Popov, E. B.; Soldatkin, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    The high-temperature oxidation tests were carried out for the regular fuel rod claddings specimens made of sponge-based zirconium alloy (E110G) and for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) ones – pure vacuum melted molybdenum (VCPM) and niobium alloy (Nb-1%Zr). The tests were carried out under the ambient pressure p ∼ 0.1 MPa in pure water steam. The experimental data on the oxidation characteristics were obtained for E110G specimens in the temperature range T = 1100 ‑ 1500 °C, that for VCPM and Nb-1%Zr are investigated under extended temperature-duration range (more than 1 hour). The thermal effects of molybdenum (QSMR) and niobium (QSNR) interactions with steam were defined and the derived oxidation rate constants for refractory metals were compared with the known ones. Based on the computations performed with PARAM-TG code the high-temperature oxidation characteristics of model fuel assemblies of large-scale facilities under LOCA conditions with regular and ATF claddings were compared. It was shown that Zr-steam interaction of fuel rod cladding (QSZR) is more intensive compared with VCPM and Nb-1%Zr ones under investigated conditions.

  5. Rod internal pressure of spent nuclear fuel and its effects on cladding degradation during dry storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Seong; Hong, Jong-Dae; Yang, Yong-Sik; Kook, Dong-Hak

    2017-08-01

    Temperature and hoop stress limits have been used to prevent the gross rupture of spent nuclear fuel during dry storage. The stress due to rod internal pressure can induce cladding degradation such as creep, hydride reorientation, and delayed hydride cracking. Creep is a self-limiting phenomenon in a dry storage system; in contrast, hydride reorientation and delayed hydride cracking are potential degradation mechanisms activated at low temperatures when the cladding material is brittle. In this work, a conservative rod internal pressure and corresponding hoop stress were calculated using FRAPCON-4.0 fuel performance code. Based on the hoop stresses during storage, a study on the onset of hydride reorientation and delayed hydride cracking in spent nuclear fuel was conducted under the current storage guidelines. Hydride reorientation is hard to occur in most of the low burn-up fuel while some high burn-up fuel can experience hydride reorientation, but their effect may not be significant. On the other hand, delayed hydride cracking will not occur in spent nuclear fuel from pressurized water reactor; however, there is a lack of confirmatory data on threshold intensity factor for delayed hydride cracking and crack size distribution in the fuel.

  6. A cone beam computed tomography inspection method for fuel rod cladding tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Tan, Renbo; Wang, Qianli; Deng, Jingshan; Liu, Ming

    2012-10-01

    Fuel rods in nuclear power plants consist of UO2 pellets enclosed in Zirconium alloy (Zircaloy) cladding tube, which is composed of a body and a plug. The body is manufactured separately from the plug and, before its use, the plug is welded with the body. It is vitally important for the welding zone to remain free from defects after the fuel pellets are loaded into the cladding tube to prevent the radioactive fission products from leaking. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is in principle a feasible inspection method for the welding zone, but it faces several challenges due to the high attenuation of Zircaloy. In this paper, a cone beam CT method is proposed to address these issues and perform the welding flaw inspection. A Zircaloy compensator is adopted to narrow the signal range, a structure-based background removal technique to reveal the defects, a linear extension technique to determine the reference X-ray intensity signal and FDK algorithm to reconstruct the slice images. A prototype system, based on X-ray tube source and flat panel detector, has been developed and the experiments in this system have demonstrated that the welding void and the incomplete joint penetrations could be detected by this method. This approach may find applications in the quality control of nuclear fuel rods.

  7. Multi-component gas transport in the fuel-to-clad gap of candu fuel rods during severe accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpunar, B.; Lewis, B. J.; Arimescu, V. I.; Dickson, R. S.; Dickson, L. W.

    2001-04-01

    The multi-component transport of steam, hydrogen and stable fission gas in the fuel-to-clad gap of defective CANDU fuel rods, during severe accident conditions, is investigated in the present work based on a general Stefan-Maxwell treatment. In this analysis, incoming steam must diffuse into a breached rod against a counter-current flow of non-condensable fission gases and out-flowing hydrogen that is produced from the internal reaction of steam with the Zircaloy cladding or urania. A solution of the transport equations yields the local molar distribution of hydrogen and steam so that the internal oxygen potential can be estimated along the length of the gap as a function of time. These equations are numerically solved using finite-difference and control-volume methods with a sparse matrix approach. The model has been used to interpret the fission product release and fuel-rod (i.e., Zircaloy and urania) oxidation behavior observed in high-temperature annealing experiments that were conducted at the Chalk River Laboratories with spent fuel samples with Zircaloy cladding.

  8. Modelling of the intergranular damage of fuel rod cladding under condition of fuel-cladding interactions; Modelisation de l'endommagement intergranulaire des gaines de combustibles en condition d'interaction pastille-gaine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diard, O.; Leclercq, S.; Rousselier, G.; Cailletaud, G. [Centre des Materiaux, ENSMP, Evry (France)

    2001-04-01

    The following topics were dealt with: intergranular damage modelling for Zircaloy-4 fuel rod cladding under fuel-cladding interaction conditions, stress corrosion due to fission products (esp. iodine), inhomogeneous mechanical and chemical damaging effects, microstructural simulations with respect to constraint analysis, intergranular microcavitation and brittle phase formation.

  9. Simulation with DIONISIO 1.0 of thermal and mechanical pellet-cladding interaction in nuclear fuel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soba, Alejandro; Denis, Alicia

    2008-02-01

    The code DIONISIO 1.0 describes most of the main phenomena occurring in a fuel rod throughout its life under normal operation conditions of a nuclear thermal reactor. Starting from the power history, DIONISIO predicts the temperature distribution in the domain, elastic and plastic stress and strain, creep, swelling and densification, release of fission gases, caesium and iodine to the rod free volume, gas mixing, pressure increase, restructuring and grain growth in the UO 2 pellet, irradiation growth of the Zircaloy cladding, oxide layer growth on its surface, hydrogen uptake and the effects of a corrosive atmosphere either internal or external. In particular, the models of thermal conductance of the gap and of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction incorporated to the code constitute two realistic tools. The possibility of gap closure (including partial contact between rough surfaces) and reopening during burnup is allowed. The non-linear differential equations are integrated by the finite element method in two-dimensions assuming cylindrical symmetry. Good results are obtained for the simulation of several irradiation tests.

  10. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W. (comp.)

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  11. EPRI fuel cladding integrity program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the EPRI fuel program is to supplement the fuel vendor research to assure that utility economic and operational interests are met. To accomplish such objectives, EPRI has conducted research and development efforts to (1) reduce fuel failure rates and mitigate the impact of fuel failures on plant operation, (2) provide technology to extend burnup and reduce fuel cycle cost. The scope of R&D includes fuel and cladding. In this paper, only R&D related to cladding integrity will be covered. Specific areas aimed at improving fuel cladding integrity include: (1) Fuel Reliability Data Base; (2) Operational Guidance for Defective Fuel; (3) Impact of Water Chemistry on Cladding Integrity; (4) Cladding Corrosion Data and Model; (5) Cladding Mechanical Properties; and (6) Transient Fuel Cladding Response.

  12. Evolutionary developments of advanced PWR nuclear fuels and cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae, E-mail: ktkim@dongguk.ac.kr

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are provided. • Evolution of PWR advanced fuel in U.S.A. and in Korea is described. • Cutting-edge design features against grid-to-rod fretting and debris are explained. • High performance data of advanced grids, debris filters and claddings are given. -- Abstract: The evolutionary developments of advanced PWR fuels and cladding materials are explained with outstanding design features of nuclear fuel assembly components and zirconium-base cladding materials. The advanced PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are also provided along with verification tests, which can be used as guidelines for newcomers planning to develop an advanced fuel for the first time. The up-to-date advanced fuels with the advanced cladding materials may provide a high level of economic utilization and reliable performance even under current and upcoming aggressive operating conditions. To be specific, nuclear fuel vendors may achieve high fuel burnup capability of between 45,000 and 65,000 MWD/MTU batch average, overpower thermal margin of as much as 15% and longer cycle length up to 24 months on the one hand and fuel failure rates of around 10{sup −6} on the other hand. However, there is still a need for better understanding of grid-to-rod fretting wear mechanisms leading to major PWR fuel defects in the world and subsequently a driving force for developing innovative spacer grid designs with zero fretting wear-induced fuel failure.

  13. Modeling of the PWR fuel mechanical behaviour and particularly study of the pellet-cladding interaction in a fuel rod; Contribution a la modelisation du comportement mecanique des combustibles REP sous irradiation, avec en particulier le traitement de l`interaction pastille-gaine dans un crayon combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourdequin, N.

    1995-05-01

    In Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power plants, fuel cladding constitutes the first containment barrier against radioactive contamination. Computer codes, developed with the help of a large experimental knowledge, try to predict cladding failures which must be limited in order to maintain a maximal safety level. Until now, fuel rod design calculus with unidimensional codes were adequate to prevent cladding failures in standard PWR`s operating conditions. But now, the need of nuclear power plant availability increases. That leads to more constraining operating condition in which cladding failures are strongly influenced by the fuel rod mechanical behaviour, mainly at high power level. Then, the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) becomes important, and is characterized by local effects which description expects a multidimensional modelization. This is the aim of the TOUTATIS 2D-3D code, that this thesis contributes to develop. This code allows to predict non-axisymmetric behaviour too, as rod buckling which has been observed in some irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS. By another way, PCI is influenced by under irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS which includes a densification model and a swelling model. The latter can only be used in standard operating conditions. However, the processing structure of this modulus provides the possibility to include any type of model corresponding with other operating conditions. In last, we show the result of these fuel volume variations on the cladding mechanical conditions. (author). 25 refs., 89 figs., 2 tabs., 12 photos., 5 appends.

  14. Reflood experiments in rod bundles with flow blockages due to clad ballooning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S.K.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, B.J.; Park, J.K.; Youn, Y.J.; Choi, H.S.; Song, C.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Clad ballooning and the resulting partial flow blockage are one of the major thermal-hydraulic concerns associated with the coolability of partially blocked cores during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Several in-pile tests have shown that fuel relocation causes a local power accumulation and a high thermal coupling between the clad and fuel debris in the ballooned regions. However, previous experiments in the 1980s did not take into account the fuel relocation phenomena and resulting local power increase in the ballooned regions. The present paper presents the results of systematic investigations on the coolability of rod bundles with flow blockages. The experiments were mainly performed in 5 x 5 rod bundles, 2 x 2 rod bundles and other test facilities. The experiments include a reflood heat transfer, single-phase convective heat transfer, flow redistributions phenomena, and droplet break-up behavior. The effects of the fuel relocation and resulting local power increase were investigated using a 5 x 5 rod bundle. The fuel relocation phenomena increase the peak cladding temperature.

  15. Technical basis for storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes the technical bases to establish safe conditions for dry storage of Zircaloy-clad fuel. Dry storage of fuel with zirconium alloy cladding has been licensed in Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, and Switzerland. In addition, dry storage demonstrations, hot cell tests, and modeling have been conducted using Zircaloy-clad fuel. The demonstrations have included irradiated boiling water reactor, pressurized heavy-water reactor, and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. Irradiated fuel has been emplaced in and retrieved from metal casks, dry wells, silos, and a vault. Dry storage tests and demonstrations have involved {similar_to}5,000 fuel rods, and {similar_to}600 rods have been monitored during dry storage in inert gases with maximum cladding temperatures ranging from 50 to 570{sup 0}C. Although some tests and demonstrations are still in progress, there is currently no evidence that any rods exposed to inert gases have failed (one PWR rod exposed to an air cover gas failed at {similar_to}70{sup 0}C). Based on this favorable experience, it is concluded that there is sufficient information on fuel rod behavior, storage conditions, and potential cladding failure mechanisms to support licensing of dry storage in the United States. This licensing position includes a requirement for inert cover gases and a maximum cladding temperature guideline of 380{sup 0}C for Zircaloy-clad fuel. Using an inert cover gas assures that even if fuel with cladding defects were placed in dry storage, or if defects develop during storage, the defects would not propagate. Tests and demonstrations involving Zircaloy-clad rods and assemblies with maximum cladding temperatures above 400{sup 0}C are in progress. When the results from these tests have been evaluated, the viability of higher temperature limits should be examined. Acceptable conditions for storage in air and dry storage of consolidated fuel are issues yet to be resolved.

  16. Advanced Fuels Campaign Cladding & Coatings Meeting Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not Listed

    2013-03-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) organized a Cladding and Coatings operational meeting February 12-13, 2013, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, industry, and universities attended the two-day meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss advanced cladding and cladding coating research and development (R&D); review experimental testing capabilities for assessing accident tolerant fuels; and review industry/university plans and experience in light water reactor (LWR) cladding and coating R&D.

  17. Fuel rod pressure in nuclear power reactors: Statistical evaluation of the fuel rod internal pressure in LWRs with application to lift-off probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelinek, Tomas

    2001-02-01

    In this thesis, a methodology for quantifying the risk of exceeding the Lift-off limit in nuclear light water power reactors is outlined. Due to fission gas release, the pressure in the gap between the fuel pellets and the cladding increases with burnup of the fuel. An increase in the fuel-clad gap due to clad creep would be expected to result in positive feedback, in the form of higher fuel temperatures, leading to more fission gas release, higher rod pressure, etc, until the cladding breaks. An increase in the fuel-clad gap that leads to this positive feedback is a phenomenon called Lift-off and is a limitation that must be considered in the fuel core management. Lift-off is a consequence of very high internal fuel rod pressure. The internal fuel rod pressure is therefore used as a Lift-off indicator. The internal fuel rod pressure is closely connected to the fission gas release into the fuel rod plenum and is thus used to increase the database. It is concluded that the dominating error source in the prediction of the pressure in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR), is the power history. There is a bias in the fuel pressure prediction that is dependent on the fuel rod position in the fuel assembly for BWRs. A methodology to quantify the risk of the fuel rod internal pressure exceeding a certain limit is developed; the risk is dependent of the pressure prediction and the fuel rod position. The methodology is based on statistical treatment of the discrepancies between predicted and measured fuel rod internal pressures. Finally, a methodology to estimate the Lift-off probability of the whole core is outlined.

  18. Examination of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel after extended pool storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E.R.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lowry, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results from metallurgical examinations of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods from two bundles (0551 and 0074) of Shippingport PWR Core 1 blanket fuel after extended water storage. Both bundles were exposed to water in the reactor from late 1957 until discharge. The estimated average burnups were 346 GJ/kgU (4000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0551 and 1550 GJ/kgU (18,000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0074. Fuel rods from bundle 0551 were stored in deionized water for nearly 21 yr prior to examination in 1980, representing the world's oldest pool-stored Zircaloy-clad fuel. Bundle 0074 has been stored in deionized water since reactor discharge in 1964. Data from the current metallurgical examinations enable a direct assessment of extended pool storage effects because the metallurgical condition of similar fuel rods was investigated and documented soon after reactor discharge. Data from current and past examinations were compared, and no significant degradation of the Zircaloy cladding was indicated after almost 21 yr in water storage. The cladding dimensions and mechanical properties, fission gas release, hydrogen contents of the cladding, and external oxide film thicknesses that were measured during the current examinations were all within the range of measurements made on fuel bundles soon after reactor discharge. The appearance of the external surfaces and the microstructures of the fuel and cladding were also similar to those reported previously. In addition, no evidence of accelerated corrosion or hydride redistribution in the cladding was observed.

  19. Review of CTF s Fuel Rod Modeling Using FRAPCON-4.0 s Centerline Temperature Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toptan, Aysenur [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Salko, Robert K [ORNL; Avramova, Maria [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh

    2017-01-01

    Coolant Boiling in Rod Arrays Two Fluid (COBRA-TF), or CTF1 [1], is a nuclear thermal hydraulic subchannel code used throughout academia and industry. CTF s fuel rod modeling is originally developed for VIPRE code [2]. Its methodology is based on GAPCON [3] and FRAP [4] fuel performance codes, and material properties are included from MATPRO handbook [5]. This work focuses on review of CTF s fuel rod modeling to address shortcomings in CTF s temperature predictions. CTF is compared to FRAPCON which is U.S. NRC s steady-state fuel performance code for light-water reactor fuel rods. FRAPCON calculates the changes in fuel rod variables and temperatures including the eects of cladding hoop strain, cladding oxidation, hydriding, fuel irradiation swelling, densification, fission gas release and rod internal gas pressure. It uses fuel, clad and gap material properties from MATPRO. Additionally, it has its own models for fission gas release, cladding corrosion and cladding hydrogen pickup. It allows finite dierence or finite element approaches for its mechanical model. In this study, FRAPCON-4.0 [6] is used as a reference fuel performance code. In comparison, Halden Reactor Data for IFA432 Rod 1 and Rod 3. CTF simulations are performed in two ways; informing CTF with gap conductance value from FRAPCON, and using CTF s dynamic gap conductance model. First case is chosen to show temperature is predicted correctly with CTF s models for thermal and cladding conductivities once gap conductance is provided. Latter is to review CTF s dynamic gap conductance model. These Halden test cases are selected to be representative of cases with and without any physical contact between fuel-pellet and clad while reviewing functionality of CTF s dynamic gap conductance model. Improving the CTF s dynamic gap conductance model will allow prediction of fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior under irradiation, and better temperature feedbacks from CTF in transient calculations.

  20. Review of experimental data for modelling LWR fuel cladding behaviour under loss of coolant accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    Extensive range of experiments has been conducted in the past to quantitatively identify and understand the behaviour of fuel rod under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors (LWRs). The obtained experimental data provide the basis for the current emergency core cooling system acceptance criteria under LOCA conditions for LWRs. The results of recent experiments indicate that the cladding alloy composition and high burnup effects influence LOCA acceptance criteria margins. In this report, we review some past important and recent experimental results. We first discuss the background to acceptance criteria for LOCA, namely, clad embrittlement phenomenology, clad embrittlement criteria (limitations on maximum clad oxidation and peak clad temperature) and the experimental bases for the criteria. Two broad kinds of test have been carried out under LOCA conditions: (i) Separate effect tests to study clad oxidation, clad deformation and rupture, and zirconium alloy allotropic phase transition during LOCA. (ii) Integral LOCA tests, in which the entire LOCA sequence is simulated on a single rod or a multi-rod array in a fuel bundle, in laboratory or in a tests and results are discussed and empirical correlations deduced from these tests and quantitative models are conferred. In particular, the impact of niobium in zirconium base clad and hydrogen content of the clad on allotropic phase transformation during LOCA and also the burst stress are discussed. We review some recent LOCA integral test results with emphasis on thermal shock tests. Finally, suggestions for modelling and further evaluation of certain experimental results are made.

  1. Novel Accident-Tolerant Fuel Meat and Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert D. Mariani; Pavel G Medvedev; Douglas L Porter; Steven L Hayes; James I. Cole; Xian-Ming Bai

    2013-09-01

    A novel accident-tolerant fuel meat and cladding are here proposed. The fuel meat design incorporates annular fuel with inserts and discs that are fabricated from a material having high thermal conductivity, for example niobium. The inserts are rods or tubes. Discs separate the fuel pellets. Using the BISON fuel performance code it was found that the peak fuel temperature can be lowered by more than 600 degrees C for one set of conditions with niobium metal as the thermal conductor. In addition to improved safety margin, several advantages are expected from the lower temperature such as decreased fission gas release and fuel cracking. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. An enrichment of only 7.5% fully compensates the lost reactivity of the displaced UO2. Slightly higher enrichments, such as 9%, allow uprates and increased burnups to offset the initial costs for retooling. The design has applications for fast reactors and transuranic burning, which may accelerate its development. A zirconium silicide coating is also described for accident tolerant applications. A self-limiting degradation behavior for this coating is expected to produce a glassy, self-healing layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature, with some similarities to MoSi2 and other silicides. Both the fuel and coating may benefit from the existing technology infrastructure and the associated wide expertise for a more rapid development in comparison to other, more novel fuels and cladding.

  2. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of FeCrAl cladding with updated properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-30

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, suitability for normal operation must also be demonstrated. This research is focused on modeling the integral thermo-mechanical performance of FeCrAl-cladded fuel during normal reactor operation. Preliminary analysis has been performed to assess FeCrAl alloys (namely Alkrothal 720 and APMT) as a suitable fuel cladding replacement for Zr-alloys, using the MOOSE-based, finite-element fuel performance code BISON and the best available thermal-mechanical and irradiation-induced constitutive properties. These simulations identify the effects of the mechanical-stress and irradiation response of FeCrAl, and provide a comparison with Zr-alloys. In comparing these clad materials, fuel rods have been simulated for normal reactor operation and simple steady-state operation. Normal reactor operating conditions target the cladding performance over the rod lifetime (~4 cycles) for the highest-power rod in the highest-power fuel assembly under reactor power maneuvering. The power histories and axial temperature profiles input into BISON were generated from a neutronics study on full-core reactivity equivalence for FeCrAl using the 3D full core simulator NESTLE. Evolution of the FeCrAl cladding behavior over time is evaluated by using steady-state operating conditions such as a simple axial power profile, a constant cladding surface temperature, and a constant fuel power history. The fuel rod designs and

  3. Experimental assessment of fuel-cladding interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Elizabeth Sooby [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-29

    A range of fuel concepts designed to better tolerate accident scenarios and reactor transients are currently undergoing fundamental development at national laboratories as well as university and industrial partners. Pellet-clad mechanical and chemical interaction can be expected to affect fuel failure rates experienced during steady state operation, as well as dramatically impact the response of the fuel form under loss of coolant and other accident scenarios. The importance of this aspect of fuel design prompted research initiated by AFC in FY14 to begin exploratory efforts to characterize this phenomenon for candidate fuelcladding systems of immediate interest. Continued efforts in FY15 and FY17 aimed to better understand and simulate initial pellet-clad interaction with little-to-no pressure on the pellet-clad interface. Reported here are the results from 1000 h heat treatments at 400, 500, and 600°C of diffusion couples pairing UN with a FeCrAl alloy, SiC, and Zr-based cladding candidate sealed in evacuated quartz ampoules. No gross reactions were observed, though trace elemental contaminants were identified.

  4. Assessment of stainless steel 348 fuel rod performance against literature available data using TRANSURANUS code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovedi Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early pressurized water reactors were originally designed to operate using stainless steel as cladding material, but during their lifetime this material was replaced by zirconium-based alloys. However, after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the problems related to the zirconium-based alloys due to the hydrogen production and explosion under severe accident brought the importance to assess different materials. In this sense, initiatives as ATF (Accident Tolerant Fuel program are considering different material as fuel cladding and, one candidate is iron-based alloy. In order to assess the fuel performance of fuel rods manufactured using iron-based alloy as cladding material, it was necessary to select a specific stainless steel (type 348 and modify properly conventional fuel performance codes developed in the last decades. Then, 348 stainless steel mechanical and physics properties were introduced in the TRANSURANUS code. The aim of this paper is to present the obtained results concerning the verification of the modified TRANSURANUS code version against data collected from the open literature, related to reactors which operated using stainless steel as cladding. Considering that some data were not available, some assumptions had to be made. Important differences related to the conventional fuel rods were taken into account. Obtained results regarding the cladding behavior are in agreement with available information. This constitutes an evidence of the modified TRANSURANUS code capabilities to perform fuel rod investigation of fuel rods manufactured using 348 stainless steel as cladding material.

  5. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of IFA-796 Rod 3 & 4 and Investigation of the Impact of Fuel Creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sweet, Ryan T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace the currently used zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromiumaluminum (FeCrAl) alloys because they exhibit slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and slow cladding consumption in the presence of high temperature steam. These alloys should also exhibit increased “coping time” in the event of an accident scenario by improving the mechanical performance at high temperatures, allowing greater flexibility to achieve core cooling. As a continuation of the development of these alloys, in-reactor irradiation testing of FeCrAl cladded fuel rods has started. In order to provide insight on the possible behavior of these fuel rods as they undergo irradiation in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor, engineering analysis has been performed using FeCrAl material models implemented into the BISON fuel performance code. This milestone report provides an update on the ongoing development of modeling capability to predict FeCrAl cladding fuel performance and to provide an early look at the possible behavior of planned in-reactor FeCrAl cladding experiments. In particular, this report consists of two separate analyses. The first analysis consists of fuel performance simulations of IFA-796 rod 4 and two segments of rod 3. These simulations utilize previously implemented material models for the C35M FeCrAl alloy and UO2 to provide a bounding behavior analysis corresponding to variation of the initial fuel cladding gap thickness within the fuel rod. The second analysis is an assessment of the fuel and cladding stress states after modification of the fuel creep model that is currently implemented in the BISON fuel performance code. Effects from modifying the fuel creep model were identified for the BISON simulations

  6. Fuel rod crud deposition: effects of heat load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Facundo

    1999-05-15

    Anomalous diameter changes have been observed on the fuel rods of the in-pile test assembly IFA-585. These diameter changes are described in the HWR-407 [1], where it is suggested that crud deposition is their cause. The present report continues the study of the causes of crud deposition on the fuel rods, by analysing its dependence with the heat load. It is observed that crud deposition is less favoured on the cladding at axial positions of pellet-pellet interfaces, and that this is directly correlated with the fact that heat flux is lower at pellet-pellet interfaces. A finite element model is built to analyse the heat flux on the cladding at the surroundings of pellet-pellet interfaces. Also, an empirical formula is derived for the dependence of crud deposition rate with heat loading, taking into account the differences in heat flux on the surroundings of pellet-pellet interfaces (author) (ml)

  7. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  8. Development of examination technique for oxide layer thickness measurement of irradiated fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, D. S.; Park, S. W.; Kim, J. H.; Seo, H. S.; Min, D. K.; Kim, E. K.; Chun, Y. B.; Bang, K. S

    1999-06-01

    Technique for oxide layer thickness measurement of irradiated fuel rods was developed to measure oxide layer thickness and study characteristic of fuel rods. Oxide layer thickness of irradiated fuels were measured, analyzed. Outer oxide layer thickness of 3 cycle-irradiated fuel rods were 20 - 30 {mu}m, inner oxide layer thickness 0 - 10 {mu}m and inner oxide layer thickness on cracked cladding about 30 {mu}m. Oxide layer thickness of 4 cycle-irradiated fuel rods were about 2 times as thick as those of 1 cycle-irradiated fuel rods. Oxide layer on lower region of irradiated fuel rods was thin and oxide layer from lower region to upper region indicated gradual increase in thickness. Oxide layer thickness from 2500 to 3000 mm showed maximum and oxide layer thickness from 3000 to top region of irradiated fuel rods showed decreasing trend. Inner oxide layer thicknesses of 4 cycle-irradiated fuel rod were about 8 {mu}m at 750 - 3500 mm from the bottom end of fuel rod. Outer oxide layer thickness were about 8 {mu}m at 750 - 1000 mm from the bottom end of fuel rod. These indicated gradual increase up to upper region from the bottom end of fuel rod. These indicated gradual increase up to upper region from the bottom end of fuel. Oxide layer thickness technique will apply safety evaluation and study of reactor fuels. (author). 6 refs., 14 figs.

  9. Models for fuel rod behaviour at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernkvist, Lars O.; Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    This report deals with release of fission product gases and irradiation-induced restructuring in uranium dioxide nuclear fuel. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloy clad tubes to light water reactor fuel rods is also discussed. Computational models, suitable for implementation in the FRAPCON-3.2 computer code, are proposed for these potentially life-limiting phenomena. Hence, an integrated model for the calculation or thermal fission gas release by intragranular diffusion, gas trapping in grain boundaries, irradiation-induced re-solution, grain boundary saturation, and grain boundary sweeping in UO{sub 2} fuel, under time varying temperature loads, is formulated. After a brief review of the status of thermal fission gas release modelling, we delineate the governing equations for the aforementioned processes. Grain growth kinetic modelling is briefly reviewed and pertinent data on grain growth of high burnup fuel obtained during power ramps in the Third Risoe Fission Gas Release Project are evaluated. Sample computations are performed, which clearly show the connection between fission gas release and gram growth as a function of time at different isotherms. Models are also proposed for the restructuring of uranium dioxide fuel at high burnup, the so-called rim formation, and its effect on fuel porosity build-up, fuel thermal conductivity and fission gas release. These models are assessed by use of recent experimental data from the High Burnup Rim Project, as well as from post irradiation examinations of high-burnup fuel, irradiated in power reactors. Moreover, models for clad oxide growth and hydrogen pickup in PWRs, applicable to Zircaloy-4, ZIRLO or M5 cladding, are formulated, based on recent in-reactor corrosion data for high-burnup fuel rods. Our evaluation of these data indicates that the oxidation rate of ZIRLO-type materials is about 20% lower than for standard Zircaloy-4 cladding under typical PWR conditions. Likewise, the oxidation rate of M5 seems to be

  10. MATPRO: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Thompson, L.B. (eds.)

    1976-02-01

    This handbook describes the materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Documentation and formulations that are generally semiempirical in nature are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium-plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, gas mixture, and LWR fuel rod material properties.

  11. FRAPCON-1: a computer code for the steady state analysis of oxide fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, G. A.; Bohn, M. P.; Coleman, D. R.; Lanning, D. D.

    1978-08-01

    FRAPCON is a FORTRAN IV computer code which predicts the steady state long-term burnup response of a light water reactor fuel rod. The coupled effects of fuel and cladding deformation, temperature, and internal gas pressure on the behavior of the fuel rod are considered in determining fuel rod response. The cladding deformation model includes multi-axial, elasto-plastic analysis and considers both primary and secondary creep. The fuel temperature model considers the effects of fuel cracking and relocation in determining the fuel temperature distribution. Burnup dependent fission gas generation and release is included in calculating fuel rod internal pressure. An integral fuel rod failure subcode determines failure and failure modes based on the operating conditions at each timestep. The material property subcode, MATPRO, provides gas, fuel and cladding properties to the computational subcodes in FRAPCON. No material properties need to be supplied by the code user. FRAPCON is a completely modular code with each major computational subcode isolated within the code and coupled to the main code by subroutine calls and data transfer through argument lists. FRAPCON is soft-coupled to the transient fuel rod code, FRAP-T, to provide initial conditions to initiate analysis of such off-normal transients as a loss-of-coolant accident. The code is presently programmed and running on a CDC 7600 computer.

  12. Structural analysis of fuel rod applied to pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Danilo P.; Pinheiro, Andre Ricardo M.; Lotto, André A., E-mail: danilo.pinheiro@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The design of fuel assemblies applied to Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has several requirements and acceptance criteria that must be attended for licensing. In the case of PWR fuel rods, an important mechanical structural requirement is to keep the radial stability when submitted to the coolant external pressure. In the framework of the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program new materials have been studied to replace zirconium based alloys as cladding, including iron-based alloys. In this sense, efforts have been made to evaluate the behavior of these materials under PWR conditions. The present work aims to evaluate the collapse cold pressure of a stainless steel thin-walled tube similar to that used as cladding material of fuel rods by means of the comparison of numeric data, and experimental results. As a result of the simulations, it was observed that the collapse pressure has a value intermediate value between those found by regulatory requirements and analytical calculations. The experiment was carried out for the validation of the computational model using test specimens of thin-walled tubes considering empty tube. The test specimens were sealed at both ends by means of welding. They were subjected to a high pressure device until the collapse of the tubes. Preliminary results obtained from experiments with the empty test specimens indicate that the computational model can be validated for stainless steel cladding, considering the difference between collapse pressure indicated in the regulatory document and the actual limit pressure concerning to radial instability of tubes with the studied characteristics. (author)

  13. Fuel Performance Calculations for FeCrAl Cladding in BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Sweet, Ryan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Maldonado, G. Ivan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study expands upon previous neutronics analyses of the reactivity impact of alternate cladding concepts in boiling water reactor (BWR) cores and directs focus toward contrasting fuel performance characteristics of FeCrAl cladding against those of traditional Zircaloy. Using neutronics results from a modern version of the 3D nodal simulator NESTLE, linear power histories were generated and supplied to the BISON-CASL code for fuel performance evaluations. BISON-CASL (formerly Peregrine) expands on material libraries implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and the MOOSE framework by providing proprietary material data. By creating material libraries for Zircaloy and FeCrAl cladding, the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod (e.g., strains, centerline fuel temperature, and time to gap closure) were investigated and contrasted.

  14. FRAPCON-2: A Computer Code for the Calculation of Steady State Thermal-Mechanical Behavior of Oxide Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, G. A; Bohn, M. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Williford, R. E.; Lanning, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    FRAPCON-2 is a FORTRAN IV computer code that calculates the steady state response of light Mater reactor fuel rods during long-term burnup. The code calculates the temperature, pressure, deformation, and tai lure histories of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include (a) heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, (b) cladding elastic and plastic deformation, (c) fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, (d) fission gas release, (e} fuel rod internal gas pressure, (f) heat transfer between fuel and cladding, (g) cladding oxidation, and (h) heat transfer from cladding to coolant. The code contains necessary material properties, water properties, and heat transfer correlations. FRAPCON-2 is programmed for use on the CDC Cyber 175 and 176 computers. The FRAPCON-2 code Is designed to generate initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by either the FRAP-T6 computer code or the thermal-hydraulic code, RELAP4/MOD7 Version 2.

  15. Surface Modification of Fuel Cladding Materials with Integral Fuel BUrnable Absorber Boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Todd Allen; Jesse Gudmundson; Benjamin Maier

    2008-11-03

    Integral fuel burnable absorgers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly to counteract excessive reactivity. These IFBA elements (usually boron or gadolinium) are presently incorporated in the U)2 pellets either by mixing in the pellets or as coatings on the pellet surface. In either case, the incorporation of ifba into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be costly and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. The goal of this NEER research project was to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of IFBA element boron at the surface of the fuel cladding material.

  16. Accident-tolerant oxide fuel and cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Robert D.

    2017-05-30

    Systems and methods for accident tolerant oxide fuel. One or more disks can be placed between fuel pellets comprising UO.sub.2, wherein such disks possess a higher thermal conductivity material than that of the UO.sub.2 to provide enhanced heat rejection thereof. Additionally, a cladding coating comprising zircaloy coated with a material that provides stability and high melting capability can be provided. The pellets can be configured as annular pellets having an annulus filled with the higher thermal conductivity material. The material coating the zircaloy can be, for example, Zr.sub.5Si.sub.4 or another silicide such as, for example, a Zr-Silicide that limits corrosion. The aforementioned higher thermal conductivity material can be, for example, Si, Zr.sub.xSi.sub.y, Zr, or Al.sub.2O.sub.3.

  17. Fuel/cladding compatibility of U-10Zr and U-5Fs fuels with advanced alloy cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, E. L.; Porter, D. L.

    1985-05-01

    This study was concerned with the fuel/cladding interaction observed in diffusion couples of U-10 wt % Zr, U-5 wt % Fs fuels with HT-9, T91, D9, and 316 cladding at 650{sup 0}C and U-10 wt % Zr fuel with the cladding materials at 750{sup 0}C (U-5Fs forms a eutectic with these cladding alloys at temperatures just over 700{sup 0}C). The results presented here represent complete qualitative and semiquantitative findings for diffusion couples exposed for 720 hrs along with preliminary results of 2880 h exposures. The most important result of technological importance to IFR feasibility was that U-10 wt % Zr fuel was found to not significantly interact chemically with the cladding alloys. Moreover, energy-dispersive x-ray analyses demonstrated that metallographically observed banding in the fuel near the fuel/cladding interface was not related to chemical interdiffusion, but was related to zirconium migration towards the fuel/cladding interface. The zirconium migration may be related to oxygen availability at this location. The 2880 h samples were consistent with 720 h findings, indicating that essentially no fuel/cladding interdiffusion occurred, but showing additional zirconium migration.

  18. Determination of the bias in LOFT fuel peak cladding temperature data from the blowdown phase of large-break LOCA experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berta, V.T.; Hanson, R.G.; Johnsen, G.W.; Schultz, R.R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Data from the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program help quantify the margin of safety inherent in pressurized water reactors during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). As early as 1979, questions arose concerning the accuracy of LOFT fuel rod cladding temperature data during several large-break LOCA experiments. This report analyzes how well externally-mounted fuel rod cladding thermocouples in LOFT accurately reflected actual cladding surface temperature during large-break LOCA experiments. In particular, the validity of the apparent core-wide fuel rod cladding quench exhibited during blowdown in LOFT Experiments L2-2 and L2-3 is studied. Also addressed is the question of whether the externally-mounted thermocouples might have influenced cladding temperature. The analysis makes use of data and information from several sources, including later, similar LOFT Experiments in which fuel centerline temperature measurements were made, experiments in other facilities, and results from a detailed FRAP-T6 model of the LOFT fuel rod. The analysis shows that there can be a significant difference (referred to as bias) between the surface-mounted thermocouple reading and the actual cladding temperature, and that the magnitude of this bias depends on the rate of heat transfer between the fuel rod cladding and coolant. The results of the analysis demonstrate clearly that a core-wide cladding quench did occur in Experiments L2-2 and L2-3. Further, it is shown that, in terms of peak cladding temperature recording during LOFT large-break LOCA experiments, the mean bias is 11.4 {plus_minus} 16.2K (20.5 {plus_minus} 29.2{degrees} F). The best-estimate value of peak cladding temperature for LOFT LP-02-6 is 1,104.8 K. The best-estimate peak cladding temperature for LOFT LP-LB-1 is 1284.0 K.

  19. MATPRO-Version 11: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D.L.; Reymann, G.A. (comps.)

    1979-02-01

    This handbook describes the materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO-Version 11) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Formulations of fuel rod material properties, which are generally semiempirical in nature, are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium--plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, and fill gas mixtures.

  20. Matpro--version 10: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reymann, G.A. (comp.)

    1978-02-01

    The materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO--Version 10) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. Formulations of fuel rod material properties, which are generally semiempirical in nature, are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium--plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, and fill gas mixtures.

  1. A Multi-Stage Wear Model for Grid-to-Rod Fretting of Nuclear Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The wear of fuel rod cladding against the supporting structures in the cores of pressurized water nuclear reactors (PWRs) is an important and potentially costly tribological issue. Grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF), as it is known, involves not only time-varying contact conditions, but also elevated temperatures, flowing hot water, aqueous tribo-corrosion, and the embrittling effects of neutron fluences. The multi-stage, closed-form analytical model described in this paper relies on published out-of-reactor wear and corrosion data and a set of simplifying assumptions to portray the conversion of frictional work into wear depth. The cladding material of interest is a zirconium-based alloy called Zircaloy-4, and the grid support is made of a harder and more wear-resistant material. Focus is on the wear of the cladding. The model involves an incubation stage, a surface oxide wear stage, and a base alloy wear stage. The wear coefficient, which is a measure of the efficiency of conversion of frictional work into wear damage, can change to reflect the evolving metallurgical condition of the alloy. Wear coefficients for Zircaloy-4 and for a polyphase zirconia layer were back-calculated for a range of times required to wear to a critical depth. Inputs for the model, like the friction coefficient, are taken from the tribology literature in lieu of in-reactor tribological data. Concepts of classical fretting were used as a basis, but are modified to enable the model to accommodate the complexities of the PWR environment. Factors like grid spring relaxation, pre-oxidation of the cladding, multiple oxide phases, gap formation, impact, and hydrogen embrittlement are part of the problem definition but uncertainties in their relative roles limits the ability to validate the model. Sample calculations of wear depth versus time in the cladding illustrate how GTRF wear might occur in a discontinuous fashion during months-long reactor operating cycles. A means to account for grid/rod gaps

  2. Fabrication of fuel rods containing /sup 233/U pelletized oxide fuels (LWBR Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankhouser, W.L.; Crain, H.H.; Fischer, R.L.; Suldan, J.H.; Eyler, J.H.; Speer, E.L.

    1967-02-01

    Approximately 13 kg of U-233 were fabricated into 1 wt % UO/sub 2/-ThO/sub 2/ and 26 wt % UO/sub 2/-ZrO/sub 2/ pellets and enclosed in Zircaloy-2 cladding tubes as 1299 blanket and 377 seed rods. The U-233 contained 38 ppM of U-232, and was purified as two batches of liquid UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ immediately prior to processing into powder form. All fuel rods were completed within 95 days of this initial solvent extraction of the nitrate. Overall U yield of nitrate to usable materials was over 90%, and only 14 rods were rejected in welding and all without loss of contained fuel. (NSA 21: 14872)

  3. FUEL PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Power-Ramp Testing and Postirradiation Examination of PCI- Resistant LWR Fuel Rod Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barner, J. O.; Guenther, R. J.

    1982-09-01

    This report describes the power-ramp testing results from 10 fuel rods irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), Halden, Norway. Tne work is part of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP), which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DUE) and is conducted through the joint efforts of Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, lnc., and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the FPlP is to identify and demonstrate fuel concepts with improved pellet-cladding interaction (PCl) behavior that will be capable of extended burnup. The postirradiation examination results obtained from one nonramped rod are also presented. The power-ramping behavior of three basic fuel rod types--rods with annular-pellet fuel, sphere-pac fuel, and dished-pellet (reference) fuel--are compared in terms of mechanisms known to promote PCl failures. The effects of graphite coating on the inside cladding surface and helium pressurization in rods witn annular fuel are also evaluated .

  4. Modeling and simulation of hydrogen behavior in Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason D. Hales; Various

    2014-09-01

    As a result of corrosion during normal operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium-alloy fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride platelets, which can severely degrade the cladding ductility. Under a heterogeneous temperature distribution, hydrides tend to accumulate in the colder areas, creating local spots of degraded cladding that can favor crack initiation. Therefore, an estimation of the local hydride distribution is necessary to help predict the risk of cladding failure. The hydride distribution is governed by three competing phenomena. Hydrogen in solid solution diffuses under a concentration gradient due to Fick’s law and under a temperature gradient due to the Soret effect. Precipitation of the hydride platelets occurs once the hydrogen solubility limit is reached. A model of these phenomena was implemented in the 3D fuel performance code BISON in order to calculate the hydrogen distribution for arbitrary geometries, such as a nuclear fuel rod, and is now available for BISON users. Simulations have been performed on simple geometries to validate the model and its implementation. The simulations predict that before precipitation occurs, hydrogen tends to accumulate in the colder spots due to the Soret effect. Once the solubility limit is reached, hydrogen precipitates and forms a rim close to the outer edge of the cladding. The simulations also predict that the reactor shut down has little effect on already precipitated hydrides but causes the remaining hydrogen to precipitate homogeneously into hydrides.

  5. Modeling and simulation of hydrogen behavior in Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courty, Olivier, E-mail: o.courty@gmail.com [Pennsylvania State University, 45 Bd Gouvion Saint Cyr, 75017 Paris (France); Motta, Arthur T., E-mail: atm2@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, 227 Reber Building, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hales, Jason D., E-mail: jason.hales@inl.gov [Fuels Modeling and Simulation Department, Idaho National Laboratory (United States)

    2014-09-15

    As a result of corrosion during normal operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium-alloy fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride platelets, which can severely degrade the cladding ductility. Under a heterogeneous temperature distribution, hydrides tend to accumulate in the colder areas, creating local spots of degraded cladding that can favor crack initiation. Therefore, an estimation of the local hydride distribution is necessary to help predict the risk of cladding failure. The hydride distribution is governed by three competing phenomena. Hydrogen in solid solution diffuses under a concentration gradient due to Fick’s law and under a temperature gradient due to the Soret effect. Precipitation of the hydride platelets occurs once the hydrogen solubility limit is reached. A model of these phenomena was implemented in the 3D fuel performance code BISON in order to calculate the hydrogen distribution for arbitrary geometries, such as a nuclear fuel rod, and is now available for BISON users. Simulations have been performed on simple geometries to validate the model and its implementation. The simulations predict that before precipitation occurs, hydrogen tends to accumulate in the colder spots due to the Soret effect. Once the solubility limit is reached, hydrogen precipitates and forms a rim close to the outer edge of the cladding. The simulations also predict that the reactor shut down has little effect on already precipitated hydrides but causes the remaining hydrogen to precipitate homogeneously into hydrides.

  6. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily.

  7. Uranium and cesium diffusion in fuel cladding of electrogenerating channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, I. V.; Ivanov, A. S.; Churin, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    The results of reactor tests of a carbonitride fuel in a single-crystal cladding from a molybdenum-based alloy can be used in substantiating the operational reliability of fuels in developing a project of a megawatt space nuclear power plant. The results of experimental studies of uranium and cesium penetration into the single-crystal cladding of fuel elements with a carbonitride fuel are interpreted. Those fuel elements passed nuclear power tests in the Ya-82 pilot plant for 8300 h at a temperature of about 1500°C. It is shown that the diffusion coefficients for uranium diffusion into the cladding are virtually coincident with the diffusion coefficients measured earlier for uranium diffusion into polycrystalline molybdenum. It is found that the penetration of uranium into the cladding is likely to occur only in the case of a direct contact between the cladding and fuel. The experimentally observed nonmonotonic uranium-concentration profiles are explained in terms of predominant uranium diffusion along grain boundaries. It is shown that a substantially nonmonotonic behavior observed in our experiment for the uranium-concentration profile may be explained by the presence of a polycrystalline structure of the cladding in the surface region from its inner side. The diffusion coefficient is estimated for the grain-boundary diffusion of uranium. The diffusion coefficients for cesium are estimated on the basis of experimental data obtained in the present study.

  8. Fuel rod under power oscillations; calculations with the ENIGMA code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranta-Puska, Kari

    1999-05-15

    Power oscillations in a BWR may result from a series of events starting from a re-circulation pump trip or can be initiated during start-up at low-flow conditions by other perturbations. Whole core and regional oscillations have been observed. Severe consequences may be anticipated if the instability diverges and the reactor protection system fails (no scram) in all phases of the incident (ATWS). Power peaks higher than ten times of the pre-transient power level have been speculated to appear. Low-magnitude oscillations have been observed at the TVO plant, Olkiluoto 1987, and at the Lasalle-2 plant, 1988, and in other BWRs world-wide. Typically, a boiling water reactor has an unstable operational point at low flow and high power conditions. The physical phenomenon behind the instability is density wave oscillations leading to boiling boundary oscillations and void fraction fluctuations across the heated channel. These in turn, make the fission power vary. The typical frequency of the oscillations seems to be of the order of 0.5 Hz, and thus the power peak for a fuel rod is considerably wider than a RIA-pulse, for instance. Large oscillations can result in elevated fuel temperatures, accelerated fission gas release and additional internal loads on the cladding. These effects may be more severe for a high burnup rod with a large fission gas inventory and a closed gap. Therefore, an experiment has been proposed to be conducted at Halden reactor for simulating the fuel rod response under power oscillations. As there is lack of knowledge also on the relevant boundary conditions, pre-calculations with various input options have been performed and are further suggested. Calculations with FRAPTRAN code have shown the importance of the cladding-coolant heat transfer to the fuel temperature. The applicability of the ENIGMA code to this kind of transients was confirmed. To support the planning of the proposed Halden test, estimates on fuel and cladding temperatures as well as

  9. Complex FEM based system of computer codes to model nuclear fuel rod thermomechanical behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valach, M.; Dostal, M.; Zymak, J. (Nuclear Reseach Institute, Rez-Husinec (Czech Republic)), e-mail: dostal@nri.cz

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents long-term effort to establish closed chain of computer codes, which allow computer modeling of the thermo-mechanical fuel rod behaviour from the 1D representation to the 3D detailed problem description. The whole complex uses the same FEM based mathematical approach. The principle of this modular approach is to handle boundary and initial conditions by the similar transfer independent on the complexity of solved problem. The goal of our modeling work was to develop model (FRA - Fuel Rod Analyser) capable of computing the spatial distribution of temperature and stress-strain in the fuel and cladding especially during power transients

  10. Effects of fuel relocation on reflood in a partially-blocked rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Jae [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongrok; Kim, Kihwan; Bae, Sung Won [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Division, 111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sang-Ki, E-mail: skmoon@kaeri.re.kr [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Division, 111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Ballooning of the fuel rods has been an important issue, since it can influence the coolability of the rod bundle in a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA). Numerous past studies have investigated the effect of blockage geometry on the heat transfer in a partially blocked rod bundle. However, they did not consider the occurrence of fuel relocation and the corresponding effect on two-phase heat transfer. Some fragmented fuel particles located above the ballooned region may drop into the enlarged volume of the balloon. Accordingly, the fuel relocation brings in a local power increase in the ballooned region. The present study’s objective is to investigate the effect of the fuel relocation on the reflood under a LBLOCA condition. Toward this end, experiments were performed in a 5 × 5 partially-blocked rod bundle. Two power profiles were tested: one is a typical cosine shape and the other is the modified shape considering the effect of the fuel relocation. For a typical power shape, the peak temperature in the ballooned rods was lower than that in the intact rods. On the other hand, for the modified power shape, the peak temperature in the ballooned rods was higher than that in the intact rods. Numerical simulations were also performed using the MARS code. The tendencies of the peak clad temperatures were well predicted.

  11. Fretting wear behavior of Cr-coated fuel rod for accident-tolerant fuel in flowing fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Gil; Koo, Yang Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Fretting wear test of the Cr-coated fuel clading candidate have been performed in the flowing fluid condition in order to verify the reliability of Cr-coated layer on zirconium-based fuel cladding. Rod wear volume at each grid spring and dimple is dramaically increased with GTR gap even though each wear scar is not evenly distributed within a 1x1 grid cell.

  12. Neutronic Analysis on Potential Accident Tolerant Fuel-Cladding Combination U3Si2-FeCrAl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengli Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutronic performance is investigated for a potential accident tolerant fuel (ATF, which consists of U3Si2 fuel and FeCrAl cladding. In comparison with current UO2-Zr system, FeCrAl has a better oxidation resistance but a larger thermal neutron absorption cross section. U3Si2 has a higher thermal conductivity and a higher uranium density, which can compensate the reactivity suppressed by FeCrAl. Based on neutronic investigations, a possible U3Si2-FeCrAl fuel-cladding system is taken into consideration. Fundamental properties of the suggested fuel-cladding combination are investigated in a fuel assembly. These properties include moderator and fuel temperature coefficients, control rods worth, radial power distribution (in a fuel rod, and different void reactivity coefficients. The present work proves that the new combination has less reactivity variation during its service lifetime. Although, compared with the current system, it has a little larger deviation on power distribution and a little less negative temperature coefficient and void reactivity coefficient and its control rods worth is less important, variations of these parameters are less important during the service lifetime of fuel. Hence, U3Si2-FeCrAl system is a potential ATF candidate from a neutronic view.

  13. Development of advanced LWR fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H. [and others

    2000-04-01

    This report describes the results from evaluating the preliminary Zr-based alloys to develop the advanced Zr-based alloys for the nuclear fuel claddings, which should have good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties at high burn-up over 70,000MWD/MTU. It also includes the results from the basic studies for optimizing the processes which are involved in the development of the advanced Zr-based alloys. Ten(10) kinds of candidates for the alloys of which performance is over that of the existing Zircaloy-4 or ZIRLO alloy were selected out of the preliminary alloys of 150 kinds which were newly designed and repeatedly manufactured and evaluated to find out the promising alloys. First of all, the corrosion tests on the preliminary alloys were carried out to evaluate their performance in both pure water and LiOH solution at 360 deg C and in steam at 400 deg C. The tensile tests were performed on the alloys which proved to be good in the corrosion resistance. The creep behaviors were tested at 400 deg C for 10 days with the application of constant load on the samples which showed good performance in the corrosion resistance and tensile properties. The effect of the final heat treatment and A-parameters as well as Sn or Nb on the corrosion resistance, tensile properties, hardness, microstructures of the alloys was evaluated for some alloys interested. The other basic researches on the oxides, electrochemical properties, corrosion mechanism, and the establishment of the phase diagrams of some alloys were also carried out.

  14. Interdiffusion between U-Zr fuel vs selected cladding steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, D. D.; Dayananda, M. A.

    1994-08-01

    To better understand fuel-cladding compatibility issues as affected by diffusion processes in Argonne National Laboratory’s Integral Fast Reactors, interdiffusion studies were carried out with solid-solid diffusion couples assembled with a U-23 at. pct Zr alloy and cladding steels, such as 316, D9, and HT9. All diffusion couples were annealed at 700 °C and examined metallographically and by scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis for diffusion structure development. The development of diffusion layers in the couples for various cladding steels is compared and discussed in light of the relative diffusion behavior of the individual elements, intermetallic formation, and experimental diffusion paths. In the context of fuel-cladding compatibility, HT9 is considered superior to 316 and D9, as it develops the smallest diffusion zone with the fewest number of phases.

  15. Experimental Study on Surrogate Nuclear Fuel Rods under Reversed Cyclic Bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) rods under reversed cyclic bending or bending fatigue must be understood to evaluate their vibration integrity in a transportation environment. This is especially important for high-burnup fuels (>45 GWd/MTU), which have the potential for increased structural damage. It has been demonstrated that the bending fatigue of SNF rods can be effectively studied using surrogate rods. In this investigation, surrogate rods made of stainless steel (SS) 304 cladding and aluminum oxide pellets were tested under load or moment control at a variety of amplitude levels at 5 Hz using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The behavior of the rods was further characterized using flexural rigidity and hysteresis data, and fractography was performed on the failed rods. The proposed surrogate rods captured many of the characteristics of deformation and failure mode observed in SNF, including the linear-to-nonlinear deformation transition and large residual curvature in static tests, PPI and PCMI failure mechanisms, and large variation in the initial structural condition. Rod degradation was measured and characterized by measuring the flexural rigidity; the degradation of the rigidity depended on both the moment amplitude applied and the initial structural condition of the rods. It was also shown that a cracking initiation site can be located on the internal surface or the external surface of cladding. Finally, fatigue damage to the bending rods can be described in terms of flexural rigidity, and the fatigue life of rods can be predicted once damage model parameters are properly evaluated. The developed experimental approach, test protocol, and analysis method can be used to study the vibration integrity of SNF rods in the future.

  16. Strategy for Fuel Rod Receipt, Characterization, Sample Allocation for the Demonstration Sister Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschman, Steven C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Warmann, Stephan A. [Portage, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rusch, Chris [NAC International, Inc., Norcross, GA (United States)

    2014-03-01

    , inert gas backfilling, and transfer to an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) for multi-year storage. To document the initial condition of the used fuel prior to emplacement in a storage system, “sister ” fuel rods will be harvested and sent to a national laboratory for characterization and archival purposes. This report supports the demonstration by describing how sister rods will be shipped and received at a national laboratory, and recommending basic nondestructive and destructive analyses to assure the fuel rods are adequately characterized for UFDC work. For this report, a hub-and-spoke model is proposed, with one location serving as the hub for fuel rod receipt and characterization. In this model, fuel and/or clad would be sent to other locations when capabilities at the hub were inadequate or nonexistent. This model has been proposed to reduce DOE-NE’s obligation for waste cleanup and decontamination of equipment.

  17. POST CRITICAL HEAT TRANSFER AND FUEL CLADDING OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Caha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of heat transfer coefficient in the post critical heat flux region in nuclear reactor safety is very important. Although the nuclear reactors normally operate at conditions where critical heat flux (CHF is not reached, accidents where dryout occur are possible. Most serious postulated accidents are a loss of coolant accident or reactivity initiated accident which can lead to CHF or post CHF conditions and possible disruption of core integrity. Moreover, this is also influenced by an oxide layer on the cladding surface. The paper deals with the study of mathematical models and correlations used for heat transfer calculation, especially in post dryout region, and fuel cladding oxidation kinetics of currently operated nuclear reactors. The study is focused on increasing of accuracy and reliability of safety limit calculations (e.g. DNBR or fuel cladding temperature. The paper presents coupled code which was developed for the solution of forced convection flow in heated channel and oxidation of fuel cladding. The code is capable of calculating temperature distribution in the coolant, cladding and fuel and also the thickness of an oxide layer.

  18. Characterization Of Cladding Hull Wastes From Used Nuclear Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang K.H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Used cladding hulls from pressurized water reactor (PWR are characterized to provide useful information for the treatment and disposal of cladding hull wastes. The radioactivity and the mass of gamma emitting nuclides increases with an increase in the fuel burn-up and their removal ratios are found to be more than 99 wt.% except Co-60 and Cs-137. In the result of measuring the concentrations of U and Pu included in the cladding hull wastes, most of the residues are remained on the surface and the removal ratio of U and Pu are revealed to be over 99.98 wt.% for the fuel burn-up of 35,000 MWd/tU. An electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA line scanning shows that radioactive fission products are penetrated into the Zr oxide layer, which is proportional to the fuel burn-up. The oxidative decladding process exhibits more efficient removal ratio of radionuclides.

  19. Transient thermo-mechanical analysis for metal fuel rod under transient operation condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Lee, Byoung Oon; Kim, Young Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-05-01

    Computational models for analyzing in-reactor behavior of metallic fuel pins in liquid-metal reactors under transient conditions are developed and implemented in the TRAnsient thermo-Mechanical Analysis Code for metal fuel rod under transient operation condition (TRAMAC). Not only the basic models for fuel rod performance under transient condition, but also some sub-models used for transient condition are installed in TRAMAC. Among the models, fission gas release model, which takes multibubble size distribution into account to characterize the lenticular bubble shape and the saturation condition on the grain boundary and cladding deformation model have been mainly developed based on the existing models in MACSIS code. Finally, cladding strains are calculated from the amount of thermal creep, irradiation creep, irradiation swelling. The cladding strain model in TRAMAC well predicts the absolute magnitudes and general trends of their predictions compared with those of experimental data. TRAMAC results for FM-1,2,6 pins are more conservative than experimental data and relatively reasonable than those of FPIN2. From the calculation results of TRAMAC, it is apparent that the code is capable of predicting fission gas release, and cladding deformation for LMR metal fuel. The results show that in general, the predictions of TRAMAC agree well with the available irradiation data. 13 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  20. Irradiation experience with HT9-clad metallic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.

    1991-12-31

    the safe and reliable performance of metallic fuel is currently under study and demonstration in the Integral Fast Reactor program. In-reactor tests of HT9-clad metallic fuel have now reached maturity and have all shown good performance characteristics to burnups exceeding 17.5 at. % in the lead assembly. Because this low-swelling tempered martensitic alloy is the cladding of choice for high fluence applications, the experimental observations and performance modelling efforts reported in this paper play an important role in demonstrating reliability.

  1. Critical Analysis of Dry Storage Temperature Limits for Zircaloy-Clad Spent Nuclear Fuel Based on Diffusion Controlled Cavity Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, T.A.; Rosen, R.S.; Kassner, M.E.

    1999-12-01

    Interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) rods is of critical concern because a shortage of existing SNF wet storage capacity combined with delays in the availability of a permanent disposal repository has led to an increasing number of SNF rods being placed into interim dry storage. Safe interim dry storage must be maintained for a minimum of twenty years according to the Standard Review Plan for Dry Cask Storage Systems [1] and the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR Part 72 [2]. Interim dry storage licensees must meet certain safety conditions when storing SNF rods to ensure that there is a ''very low probability (e.g. 0.5%) of cladding breach during long-term storage'' [1]. Commercial SNF typically consists of uranium oxide pellets surrounded by a thin cladding. The cladding is usually an {alpha}-zirconium based alloy know as ''Zircaloy''. In dry storage, the SNF rods are confined in one of several types of cask systems approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ''The cask system must be designed to prevent degradation of fuel cladding that results in a type of cladding breach, such as axial-splits or ductile fracture, where irradiated UO{sub 2} particles may be released. In addition, the fuel cladding should not degrade to the point where more than one percent of the fuel rods suffer pinhole or hairline crack type failure under normal storage conditions [1].'' The NRC has approved two models [3,4] for use by proposed dry storage licensees to determine the maximum initial temperature limit for nuclear fuel rods in dry storage that supposedly meet the above criteria and yield consistent temperature limits. Though these two models are based on the same fundamental failure theory, different assumptions have been made including the choice of values for material constants in the failure equation. This report will examine and compare the similarities and inconsistencies of these two models

  2. Measurement station for interim inspections of Lightbridge metallic fuel rods at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmann C.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightbridge Corporation has developed a new Uranium-Zirconium based metallic fuel. The fuel rods aremanufactured via a co-extrusion process, and are characterized by their multi-lobed (cruciform-shaped cross section. The fuel rods are also helically-twisted in the axial direction. Two experimental fuel assemblies, each containing four Lightbridge fuel rods, are scheduled to be irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR starting in 2018. In addition to on-line monitoring of fuel rod elongation and critical assembly conditions (e.g. power, flow rates, coolant temperatures, etc. during the irradiation, several key parameters of the fuel will be measured out-of-core during interim inspections. An inspection measurement station for use in the irradiated fuel handling compartment at the HBWR has therefore been developed for this purpose. The multi-lobed cladding cross section combined with the spiral shape of the Lightbridge metallic fuel rods requires a high-precision guiding system to ensure good position repeatability combined with low-friction guiding. The measurement station is equipped with a combination of instruments and equipment supplied from third-party vendors and instruments and equipment developed at Institute for Energy Technology (IFE. Two sets of floating linear voltage differential transformer (LVDT pairs are used to measure swelling and diameter changes between the lobes and the valleys over the length of the fuel rods. Eddy current probes are used to measure the thickness of oxide layers in the valleys and on the lobe tips and also to detect possible surface cracks/pores. The measurement station also accommodates gamma scans. Additionally, an eddy-current probe has been developed at IFE specifically to detect potential gaps or discontinuities in the bonding layer between the metallic fuel and the Zirconium alloy cladding. Potential gaps in the bonding layer will be hidden behind a 0.5-1.0 mm thick cladding wall. It has

  3. Measurement station for interim inspections of Lightbridge metallic fuel rods at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, C.; Totemeier, A.; Holcombe, S.; Liverud, J.; Limi, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Navestad, E. AB(; )

    2018-01-01

    Lightbridge Corporation has developed a new Uranium-Zirconium based metallic fuel. The fuel rods aremanufactured via a co-extrusion process, and are characterized by their multi-lobed (cruciform-shaped) cross section. The fuel rods are also helically-twisted in the axial direction. Two experimental fuel assemblies, each containing four Lightbridge fuel rods, are scheduled to be irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) starting in 2018. In addition to on-line monitoring of fuel rod elongation and critical assembly conditions (e.g. power, flow rates, coolant temperatures, etc.) during the irradiation, several key parameters of the fuel will be measured out-of-core during interim inspections. An inspection measurement station for use in the irradiated fuel handling compartment at the HBWR has therefore been developed for this purpose. The multi-lobed cladding cross section combined with the spiral shape of the Lightbridge metallic fuel rods requires a high-precision guiding system to ensure good position repeatability combined with low-friction guiding. The measurement station is equipped with a combination of instruments and equipment supplied from third-party vendors and instruments and equipment developed at Institute for Energy Technology (IFE). Two sets of floating linear voltage differential transformer (LVDT) pairs are used to measure swelling and diameter changes between the lobes and the valleys over the length of the fuel rods. Eddy current probes are used to measure the thickness of oxide layers in the valleys and on the lobe tips and also to detect possible surface cracks/pores. The measurement station also accommodates gamma scans. Additionally, an eddy-current probe has been developed at IFE specifically to detect potential gaps or discontinuities in the bonding layer between the metallic fuel and the Zirconium alloy cladding. Potential gaps in the bonding layer will be hidden behind a 0.5-1.0 mm thick cladding wall. It has therefore been

  4. High burnup fuel onset conditions in dry storage. Prediction of EOL rod internal pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L.E.

    2015-07-01

    During dry storage, cladding resistance to failure can be affected by several degrading mechanisms like creep or hydrides radial reorientation. The driving force of these effects is the stress at which the cladding is submitted. The maximum stress in the cladding is determined by the end-of-reactor-life (EOL) rod internal pressure, PEOL, at the maximum temperature attained during dry storage. Thus, PEOL sets the initial conditions of storage for potential time-dependent changes in the cladding. Based on FRAPCON-3.5 calculations, the aim of this work is to analyse the PEOL of a PWR fuel rod irradiated to burnups greater than 60 GWd/tU, where limited information is available. In order to be conservative, demanding irradiation histories have been used with a peak linear power of 44 kW/m. FRAPCON-3.5 results show an increasing exponential trend of PEOL with burnup, from which a simple correlation has been derived. The comparison with experimental data found in the literature confirms the enveloping nature of the predicted curve. Based on that, a conservative prediction of cladding stress in dry storage has been obtained. The comparison with a critical stress threshold related to hydrides embrittlement seems to point out that this issue should not be a concern at burnups below 65 GWd/tU. (Author)

  5. Improving Accident Tolerance of Nuclear Fuel with Coated Mo-alloy Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In severe loss of coolant accidents (LOCA, similar to those experienced at Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island Unit 1, the zirconium alloy fuel cladding materials are rapidly heated due to nuclear decay heating and rapid exothermic oxidation of zirconium with steam. This heating causes the cladding to rapidly react with steam, lose strength, burst or collapse, and generate large quantities of hydrogen gas. Although maintaining core cooling remains the highest priority in accident management, an accident tolerant fuel (ATF design may extend coping and recovery time for operators to restore emergency power, and cooling, and achieve safe shutdown. An ATF is required to possess high resistance to steam oxidation to reduce hydrogen generation and sufficient mechanical strength to maintain fuel rod integrity and core coolability. The initiative undertaken by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing an ATF cladding with capability to maintain its integrity in 1,200–1,500°C steam for at least 24 hours. This ATF cladding utilizes thin-walled Mo-alloys coated with oxidation-resistant surface layers. The basic design consists of a thin-walled Mo alloy structural tube with a metallurgically bonded, oxidation-resistant outer layer. Two options are being investigated: a commercially available iron, chromium, and aluminum alloy with excellent high temperature oxidation resistance, and a Zr alloy with demonstrated corrosion resistance. As these composite claddings will incorporate either no Zr, or thin Zr outer layers, hydrogen generation under severe LOCA conditions will be greatly reduced. Key technical challenges and uncertainties specific to Mo alloy fuel cladding include: economic core design, industrial scale fabricability, radiation embrittlement, and corrosion and oxidation resistance during normal operation, transients, and severe accidents. Progress in each aspect has been made and key results are

  6. Material Selection for Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Alternative cladding materials to Zr-based alloys are being investigated for accident tolerance, which can be defined as > 100X improvement (compared to Zr-based alloys) in oxidation resistance to steam or steam-H2 environments at ≥ 1200°C for short times. After reviewing a wide range of candidates, current steam oxidation testing is being conducted on Mo, MAX phases and FeCrAl alloys. Recently reported low mass losses for Mo in steam at 800°C could not be reproduced. Both FeCrAl and MAX phase Ti2AlC form a protective alumina scale in steam. However, commercial Ti2AlC that was not single phase, formed a much thicker oxide at 1200°C in steam and significant TiO2, and therefore Ti2AlC may be challenging to form as a cladding or a coating. Alloy development for FeCrAl is seeking to maintain its steam oxidation resistance to 1475°C, while reducing its Cr content to minimize susceptibility to irradiation-assisted α´ formation. The composition effects and critical limits to retaining protective scale formation at > 1400°C are still being evaluated.

  7. Clad thickness variation N-Reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.A.

    1966-05-12

    The current specifications for the cladding on {open_quotes}N{close_quotes} fuels were established early in the course of process development and were predicted on several basic considerations. Among these were: (a) a desire to provide an adequate safety factor in cladding thickness to insure against corrosion penetration and rupture from uranium swelling stresses; (b) an apprehension that the striations in the zircaloy cladding of the U/zircaloy interface and on the exterior surface might serve as stress-raisers, leading to untimely failures of the jacket; and (c) then existing process capability - the need to maintain a specified ratio between zircaloy and uranium in the billet assembly to effect satisfactory coextrusion. It now appears appropriate to review these specifications in an effort to determine whether some of them may be revised, with attendant gains in economy and/or operating smoothness.

  8. POST-IRRADIATION ANALYSES OF U-MO DISPERSION FUEL RODS OF KOMO TESTS AT HANARO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.J. RYU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2001, a series of five irradiation test campaigns for atomized U-Mo dispersion fuel rods, KOMO-1, -2, -3, -4, and -5, has been conducted at HANARO (Korea in order to develop high performance low enriched uranium dispersion fuel for research reactors. The KOMO irradiation tests provided valuable information on the irradiation behavior of U-Mo fuel that results from the distinct fuel design and irradiation conditions of the rod fuel for HANARO. Full size U-Mo dispersion fuel rods of 4–5 g-U/cm3 were irradiated at a maximum linear power of approximately 105 kW/m up to 85% of the initial U-235 depletion burnup without breakaway swelling or fuel cladding failure. Electron probe microanalyses of the irradiated samples showed localized distribution of the silicon that was added in the matrix during fuel fabrication and confirmed its beneficial effect on interaction layer growth during irradiation. The modifications of U-Mo fuel particles by the addition of a ternary alloying element (Ti or Zr, additional protective coatings (silicide or nitride, and the use of larger fuel particles resulted in significantly reduced interaction layers between fuel particles and Al.

  9. Final report on accident tolerant fuel performance analysis of APMT-Steel Clad/UO₂ fuel and APMT-Steel Clad/UN-U₃Si₅ fuel concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-12

    In FY2014 our group completed and documented analysis of new Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) concepts using BISON. We have modeled the viability of moving from Zircaloy to stainless steel cladding in traditional light water reactors (LWRs). We have explored the reactivity penalty of this change using the MCNP-based burnup code Monteburns, while attempting to minimize this penalty by increasing the fuel pellet radius and decreasing the cladding thickness. Fuel performance simulations using BISON have also been performed to quantify changes to structural integrity resulting from thinner stainless steel claddings. We account for thermal and irradiation creep, fission gas swelling, thermal swelling and fuel relocation in the models for both Zircaloy and stainless steel claddings. Additional models that account for the lower oxidation stainless steel APMT are also invoked where available. Irradiation data for HT9 is used as a fallback in the absence of appropriate models. In this study the isotopic vectors within each natural element are varied to assess potential reactivity gains if advanced enrichment capabilities were levied towards cladding technologies. Recommendations on cladding thicknesses for a robust cladding as well as the constitutive components of a less penalizing composition are provided. In the first section (section 1-3), we present results accepted for publication in the 2014 TOPFUEL conference regarding the APMT/UO₂ ATF concept (J. Galloway & C. Unal, Accident Tolerant and Neutronically Favorable LWR Cladding, Proceedings of WRFPM 2014, Sendai, Japan, Paper No.1000050). Next we discuss our preliminary findings from the thermo-mechanical analysis of UN-U₃Si₅ fuel with APMT clad. In this analysis we used models developed from limited data that need to be updated when the irradiation data from ATF-1 test is available. Initial results indicate a swelling rate less than 1.5% is needed to prevent excessive clad stress.

  10. Calculation of the linear heat generation rates which violate the thermomechanical limit of plastic deformation of the fuel cladding in function of the burn up of a BWR fuel rod type; Calculo de las razones de generacion de calor lineal que violen el limite termomecanico de deformacion plastica de la camisa en funcion del quemado de una barra combustible tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Hernandez L, H. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mal@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    The linear heat generation rates (LHGR) for a BWR type generic fuel rod, as function of the burnup that violate the thermomechanical limit of circumferential plastic deformation of the can (canning) in nominal operation in stationary state of the fuel rod are calculated. The evaluation of the LHGR in function of the burnt of the fuel, is carried out under the condition that the deformation values of the circumferential plastic deformation of the can exceeds in 0.1 the thermomechanical value operation limit of 1%. The results of the calculations are compared with the generation rates of linear operation heat in function of the burnt for this fuel rod type. The calculations are carried out with the FEMAXI-V and RODBURN codes. The results show that for exhibitions or burnt between 0 and 16,000 M Wd/tU a minimum margin of 160.8 W/cm exists among LHGR (439.6 W/cm) operation peak for the given fuel and maximum LHGR of the fuel (calculated) to reach 1.1% of circumferential plastic deformation of the can, for the peak factor of power of 1.40. For burnt of 20,000 MWd/tU and 60,000 MWd/tU exist a margin of 150.3 and 298.6 W/cm, respectively. (Author)

  11. Evaluation of corrosion on the fuel performance of stainless steel cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Gomes Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear reactors, the use of stainless steel (SS as the cladding material offers some advantages such as good mechanical and corrosion resistance. However, its main advantage is the reduction in the amount of the hydrogen released during loss-of-coolant accident, as observed in the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Hence, research aimed at developing accident tolerant fuels should consider SS as an important alternative to existing materials. However, the available computational tools used to analyze fuel rod performance under irradiation are not capable of assessing the effectiveness of SS as the cladding material. This paper addresses the SS corrosion behavior in a modified fuel performance code in order to evaluate its effect on the global fuel performance. Then, data from the literature concerning to SS corrosion are implemented in the specific code subroutines, and the results obtained are compared to those for Zircaloy-4 (Zy-4 under the same power history. The results show that the effects of corrosion on SS are considerably different from those on Zy-4. The thickness of the oxide layer formed on the SS surface is considerably lower than that formed on Zy-4. As a consequence of this, the global fuel performance of SS under irradiation should be less affected by the corrosion.

  12. Sensitivity analysis of FeCrAl cladding and U3Si2 fuel under accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this milestone report is to highlight the results of sensitivity analyses performed on two accident tol- erant fuel concepts: U3Si2 fuel and FeCrAl cladding. The BISON fuel performance code under development at Idaho National Laboratory was coupled to Sandia National Laboratories’ DAKOTA software to perform the sensitivity analyses. Both Loss of Coolant (LOCA) and Station blackout (SBO) scenarios were analyzed using main effects studies. The results indicate that for FeCrAl cladding the input parameters with greatest influence on the output metrics of interest (fuel centerline temperature and cladding hoop strain) during the LOCA were the isotropic swelling and fuel enrichment. For U3Si2 the important inputs were found to be the intergranular diffusion coefficient, specific heat, and fuel thermal conductivity. For the SBO scenario, Young’s modulus was found to be influential in FeCrAl in addition to the isotropic swelling and fuel enrichment. Contrarily to the LOCA case, the specific heat of U3Si2 was found to have no effect during the SBO. The intergranular diffusion coefficient and fuel thermal conductivity were still found to be of importance. The results of the sensitivity analyses have identified areas where further research is required including fission gas behavior in U3Si2 and irradiation swelling in FeCrAl. Moreover, the results highlight the need to perform the sensitivity analyses on full length fuel rods for SBO scenarios.

  13. Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongbing [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

    2014-01-09

    Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear

  14. High Temperature Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions Between TRIGA Fuels and 304 Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Emmanuel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keiser, Jr., Dennis D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Forsmann, Bryan [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Janney, Dawn E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Henley, Jody [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Woolstenhulme, Eric C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    High-temperature fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) fuel elements and the 304 stainless steel (304SS) are of interest to develop an understanding of the fuel behavior during transient reactor scenarios. TRIGA fuels are composed of uranium (U) particles dispersed in a zirconium-hydride (Zr-H) matrix. In reactor, the fuel is encased in 304-stainless-steel (304SS) or Incoloy 800 clad tubes. At high temperatures, the fuel can readily interact with the cladding, resulting in FCCI. A number of FCCI can take place in this system. Interactions can be expected between the cladding and the Zr-H matrix, and/or between the cladding and the U-particles. Other interactions may be expected between the Zr-H matrix and the U-particles. Furthermore, the fuel contains erbium-oxide (Er-O) additions. Interactions can also be expected between the Er-O, the cladding, the Zr-H and the U-particles. The overall result is that very complex interactions may take place as a result of fuel and cladding exposures to high temperatures. This report discusses the characterization of the baseline fuel microstructure in the as-received state (prior to exposure to high temperature), characterization of the fuel after annealing at 950C for 24 hours and the results from diffusion couple experiments carries out at 1000C for 5 and 24 hours. Characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with sample preparation via focused ion beam in situ-liftout-technique.

  15. A state of the Art report on Manufacturing technology of high burn-up fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Ho; Nam, Cheol; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Byung Kwon; Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Myung Ho; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    1999-09-01

    In order to manufacturing the prototype fuel cladding, overall manufacturing processes and technologies should be thoroughly understood on the manufacturing processes and technologies of foreign cladding tubes. Generally, the important technology related to fuel cladding tube manufacturing processes for PWRs/PHWRs is divided into three stages. The first stage is to produce the zirconium sponge from zirconium sand, the second stage is to produce the zircaloy shell or TREX from zirconium sponge ingot and finally, cladding is produced from TREX or zircaloy shell. Therefore, the manufacturing processes including the first and second stages are described in brief in this technology report in order to understand the whole fuel cladding manufacturing processes. (author)

  16. Analysis of transient heat conduction in a PWR fuel rod by an improved lumped parameter approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourado, Eneida Regina G. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cotta, Renato M. [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica; Jian, Su, E-mail: eneidadourado@gmail.com, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: cotta@mecanica.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to analyze transient heat conduction in a nuclear fuel rod by an improved lumped parameter approach. One-dimensional transient heat conduction is considered, with the circumferential symmetry assumed and the axial conduction neglected. The thermal conductivity and specific heat in the fuel pellet are considered temperature dependent, while the thermophysical properties of the cladding are considered constant. Hermite approximation for integration is used to obtain the average temperature and heat flux in the radial direction. Significant improvement over the classical lumped parameter formulation has been achieved. The proposed model can be also used in dynamic analysis of PWR and nuclear power plant simulators. (author)

  17. Analysis of Experimental Fuel Rod Parameters using 3D Modelling of PCMI with MPS Defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagranda, Albert [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-06-01

    An in-reactor experiment is being designed in order to validate the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) behavior of the BISON fuel performance code. The experimental parameters for the test rod being placed in the Halden Research Reactor are being determined using BISON simulations. The 3D model includes a missing pellet surface (MPS) defect to generate large local cladding deformations, which should be measureable after typical burnup times. The BISON fuel performance code is being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is built on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. BISON supports both 2D and 3D finite elements and solves the fully coupled equations for solid mechanics, heat conduction and species diffusion. A number of fuel performance effects are included using models for swelling, densification, creep, relocation and fission gas production & release. In addition, the mechanical and thermal contact between the fuel and cladding is explicitly modelled using a master-slave based contact algorithm. In order to accurately predict PCMI effects, the BISON code includes the relevant physics involved and provides a scalable and robust solution procedure. The depth of the proposed MPS defect is being varied in the BISON model to establish an optimum value for the experiment. The experiment will be interrupted approximately every 6 months to measure cladding radial deformation and provide data to validate BISON. The complete rodlet (~20 discrete pellets) is being simulated using a 180° half symmetry 3D model with MPS defects at two axial locations. In addition, annular pellets will be used at the top and bottom of the pellet stack to allow thermocouples within the rod to measure the fuel centerline temperature. Simulation results will be presented to illustrate the expected PCMI behavior and support the chosen experimental design parameters.

  18. Determination of Experimental Fuel Rod Parameters using 3D Modelling of PCMI with MPS Defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagranda, Albert [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    An in-reactor experiment is being designed in order to validate the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) behavior of the BISON fuel performance code. The experimental parameters for the test rod being placed in the Halden Research Reactor are being determined using BISON simulations. The 3D model includes a missing pellet surface (MPS) defect to generate large local cladding deformations, which should be measureable after typical burnup times. The BISON fuel performance code is being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is built on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. BISON supports both 2D and 3D finite elements and solves the fully coupled equations for solid mechanics, heat conduction and species diffusion. A number of fuel performance effects are included using models for swelling, densification, creep, relocation and fission gas production & release. In addition, the mechanical and thermal contact between the fuel and cladding is explicitly modelled using a master-slave based contact algorithm. In order to accurately predict PCMI effects, the BISON code includes the relevant physics involved and provides a scalable and robust solution procedure. The depth of the proposed MPS defect is being varied in the BISON model to establish an optimum value for the experiment. The experiment will be interrupted approximately every 6 months to measure cladding radial deformation and provide data to validate BISON. The complete rodlet (~20 discrete pellets) is being simulated using a 180° half symmetry 3D model with MPS defects at two axial locations. In addition, annular pellets will be used at the top and bottom of the pellet stack to allow thermocouples within the rod to measure the fuel centerline temperature. Simulation results will be presented to illustrate the expected PCMI behavior and support the chosen experimental design parameters.

  19. The R&D PERFROI Project on Thermal Mechanical and Thermal Hydraulics Behaviors of a Fuel Rod Assembly during a Loss of Coolant Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repetto, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Dominguez, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Durville, B. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Carnemolla, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France); Campello, D. [Institut National des Sciences Appliques, Lyon (France); Tardiff, N. [Institut National des Sciences Appliques, Lyon (France); Gradeck, M. [Univ. de Lorraine, Nancy, France. LEMTA

    2015-09-04

    The safety principle in case of a LOCA is to preserve the short and long term coolability of the core. The associated safety requirements are to ensure the resistance of the fuel rods upon quench and post-quench loads and to maintain a coolable geometry in the core. An R&D program has been launched by IRSN with the support of EDF, to perform both experimental and modeling activities in the frame of the LOCA transient, on technical issues such as: - flow blockage within a fuel rods bundle and its potential impact on coolability, - fuel fragment relocation in the ballooned areas: its potential impact on cladding PCT (Peak Cladding Temperature) and on the maximum oxidation rate, - potential loss of cladding integrity upon quench and post-quench loads. The PERFROI project (2014-2019) focusing on the first above issue, is structured in two axes: 1. axis 1: thermal mechanical behavior of deformation and rupture of cladding taking into account the contact between fuel rods; specific research at LaMCoS laboratory focus on the hydrogen behavior in cladding alloys and its impact on the mechanical behavior of the rod; and, 2. axis 2: thermal hydraulics study of a partially blocked region of the core (ballooned area taking into account the fuel relocation with local over power), during cooling phase by water injection; More detailed activities foreseen in collaboration with LEMTA laboratory will focus on the characterization of two phase flows with heat transfer in deformed structures.

  20. Data summary report for the destructive examination of Rods G7, G9, J8, I9, and H6 from Turkey Point Fuel Assembly B17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R B; Pasupathi, V

    1981-04-01

    Destructive examination results of five spent fuel rods from a Turkey Point Unit 3 pressurized water reactor are reported. Examinations included fission gas analysis, cladding hydrogen content analysis, fuel burnup analysis, metallographic examination, autoradiography and shielded electron microprobe analysis. All rods were found to be of sound integrity with an average burnup of 27 GWd/MTU and a 0.3% fission gas release.

  1. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Third semiannual report, January-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, H.S. (comp.)

    1980-09-01

    Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to avoid the harmful effects of localized stress and reactive fission products during reactor service. Within the work scope of this program one of these concepts is to be selected for demonstration in a commercial power reactor. It was decided to demonstrate Zr-liner in 132 bundles which have liners of either crystal-bar zirconium or of low-oxygen sponge zirconium in the reload for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6. Irradiation testing or barrier fuel was continued, and the superior PCI resistance of Zr-liner fuel was further substantiated in the current report period. Furthermore, an irradiation experiment in which Zr-liner fuel, having a deliberately fabricated cladding perforation, was operated at a linear heat generation rate of 35 kW/m to a burnup of approx. 3 MWd/kg U showed no unusual signs of degradation compared with a similarly defected reference fuel rod. Four lead test assemblies of barrier fuel (two of Zr-liner and two of Cu-barrier), presently under irradiation in Quad Cities Unit 1, have achieved a burnup of 11 MWd/kg U.

  2. Dependence of control rod worth on fuel burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savva, P., E-mail: savvapan@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Varvayanni, M., E-mail: melina@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Catsaros, N., E-mail: nicos@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: Diffusion and MC calculations for rod worth dependence on burnup and Xe in reactors. One-step rod withdrawal/insertion are used for rod worth estimation. The study showed that when Xe is present the rods worth is significantly reduced. Rod worth variation with burnup depends on rod position in core. Rod worth obtained with MC code is higher than that obtained from deterministic. - Abstract: One important parameter in the design and the analysis of a nuclear reactor core is the reactivity worth of the control rods, i.e. their efficiency to absorb excess reactivity. The control rod worth is affected by parameters such as the fuel burnup in the rod vicinity, the Xe concentration in the core, the operational time of the rod and its position in the core. In the present work, two different computational approaches, a deterministic and a stochastic one, were used for the determination of the rods worth dependence on the fuel burnup level and the Xe concentration level in a conceptual, symmetric reactor core, based on the MTR fuel assemblies used in the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1). For the deterministic approach the neutronics code system composed by the SCALE modules NITAWL and XSDRN and the diffusion code CITATION was used, while for the stochastic one the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI was applied. The study showed that when Xe is present in the core, the rods worth is significantly reduced, while the rod worth variation with increasing burnup depends on the rods position in the core grid. The rod worth obtained with the use of the Monte Carlo code is higher than the one obtained from the deterministic code.

  3. Development of End Plug Welding Technique for SFR Fuel Rod Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Won Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Korea, R&D on a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR was begun in 1997, as one of the national long-term nuclear R&D programs. As one fuel option for a prototype SFR, a metallic fuel, U-Zr alloy fuel, was selected and is currently being developed. For the fabrication of SFR metallic fuel rods, the end plug welding is a crucial process. The sealing of the end plug to the cladding tube should be hermetically perfect to prevent a leakage of fission gases and to maintain a good reactor performance. In this study, the welding technique, welding equipment, welding conditions, and parameters were developed for the end plug welding of SFR metallic fuel rods. A gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed. In addition, the optimal welding conditions and parameters were established. Based on the establishment of the welding conditions, the GTAW technique was qualified for the end plug welding of SFR metallic fuel rods.

  4. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign - Baseline Studies for Ring Compression Testing of High-Burnup Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Burtseva, T. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Liu, Y. Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-11-23

    Structural analyses of high-burnup fuel require cladding mechanical properties and failure limits to assess fuel behavior during long-term dry cask storage and transportation. Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage subject cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to in-reactor operation and pool storage. Under these conditions, radial hydrides may precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). On the basis of previous test results, susceptibility to radial-hydride precipitation depends on cladding material, microstructure, and pre-drying distribution of hydrides across the cladding wall, as well as peak hoop stresses and temperatures during drying operations and storage. Susceptibility to embrittlement depends on the extent of radial-hydride precipitation and the thickness of the outer-surface hydride rim. These results highlight the importance of determining the DBTT for high-burnup cladding as a function of peak drying-storage temperatures and stresses and including the relevant mechanical properties in cask structural analyses. Additional testing is needed at lower (and perhaps more realistic) peak drying-storage temperatures and stresses, for which the DBTT is expected to decrease.

  5. Design of the Capsule (13M-01K) for Irradiation of Fuel Cladding Materials in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Yang, Seong Woo; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Nuclear-grade zirconium alloys contain more than 95% Zr, and therefore most of their properties are similar to those of pure zirconium. ZIRLO material, used in fuel rod cladding, structural and flow mixing grids, instrumentation tubes, and guide thimbles, increases margin-to-fuel-rod-corrosion limits and enhances fuel assembly structural stability. The demonstrated corrosion resistance and enhanced structural stability of ZIRLO cladding enable longer cycle lengths at higher temperatures without reducing operating margins. An instrumented capsule (13M-01K) was designed and fabricated for evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of Zirlo material, which is commonly used for cladding of nuclear fuel. This capsule is now being irradiated for 2 cycles at CT test hole of HANARO, which was started at Jan 27 and will be ended at Mar 31, 2014. The structure of the capsule was based on the previous capsule (11M-22K capsule) which was successfully irradiated at the same hole of HANARO. In the capsule, 182 specimens such as tensile specimens of plate type and ring type specimens were placed. Most of them are made of Zirlo, but a few are HANA material that is developed in KAERI. The irradiation test was requested by 4 universities including Dong-Kook and Han-Yang etc. The capsule is composed of 5 layers, each of which had Al holder containing several specimens and an independent electric heater, thermocouples etc. During the irradiation test, temperatures of the specimens and fast neutron fluence were measured by 14 thermocouples and 5 sets of Ni-Ti-Fe neutron fluence monitors installed in the capsule. The capsule is irradiated for 2 cycles (28 days) at the CT test hole of HANARO of a 30MW thermal output at 350-390 .deg. C up to a fast neutron fluence of 9.6Χ10{sup 20} (n/cm{sup 2}) (E>1.0 Mev). In this capsule, the two kinds of irradiation tests are performed at quite different temperatures. At upper 3 layers of the capsule, specimens for irradiation at high

  6. Characteristics of copper-clad aluminum rods prepared by horizontal continuous casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yubo; Fu, Ying; Jie, Jinchuan; Wu, Li; Svynarenko, Kateryna; Guo, Qingtao; Li, Tingju; Wang, Tongmin

    2017-11-01

    An innovative horizontal continuous casting method was developed and successfully used to prepare copper-clad aluminum (CCA) rods with a diameter of 85 mm and a sheath thickness of 16 mm. The solidification structure and element distribution near the interface of the CCA ingots were investigated by means of a scanning electron microscope, an energy dispersive spectrometer, and an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. The results showed that the proposed process can lead to a good metallurgical bond between Cu and Al. The interface between Cu and Al was a multilayered structure with a thickness of 200 μm, consisting of Cu9Al4, CuAl2, α-Al/CuAl2 eutectic, and α-Al + α-Al/CuAl2 eutectic layers from the Cu side to the Al side. The mean tensile-shear strength of the CCA sample was 45 MPa, which fulfills the requirements for the further extrusion process. The bonding and diffusion mechanisms are also discussed in this paper.

  7. Structural analysis of the SNAP-8 developmental reactor fuel element cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalcher, A.W.

    1969-04-15

    Primary, secondary, and thermal stresses were calculated and evaluated for the SNAP-8 developmental reactor fuel element cladding. The effects of fabrication and assembly stresses, as well as test and operational stresses were included in the analysis. With the assumption that fuel-swelling-induced stresses are nil, the analytical results indicate that the cladding assembly is structurally adequate for the proposed operation.

  8. Development of nuclear fuel for the future -Development of performance improvement of the cladding by ion beam-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Hoh; Jung, Moon Kyoo; Jung, Kee Suk; Kim, Wan; Lee, Jae Hyung; Song, Tae Yung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jun Kun [Sung Kyoon Kwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyuk Sang [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    In this research we analyzed the state of art related to the surface treatment method of nuclear fuel cladding for the development of the surface treatment technique of nuclear fuel cladding by ion beam while investigating major causes of the leakage of fuel rods. Ion implantation simulation code called TRIM-95 was used to decide basic parameters of ion beams and setup an appropriate process for ion implantation. Performance of the ion beam extraction was measured after adding the needed vacuum and cooling system to the existing gas and metal ion implanters. Target system for the ion implantation of fuel cladding improved and a plasma accelerator was installed on the target chamber of the metal ion implanter. The plasma accelerator is used to produce low energy, high current ion beams. The mechanical and chemical properties of the implanted Zircaloy-4 such as micro hardness, wear resistance, fretting wear, friction coefficient and corrosion resistance was measured under the room temperature and atmosphere. A micro structure and composition analysis of Zircaloy-4 sample was performed before and after the implantation to study the cause of the improvement in the mechanical and chemical characteristics. 94 figs, 11 tabs, 51 refs. (Author).

  9. Apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Bobby R.; Tracy, Donald B.; Griffiths, Vernon

    1991-01-01

    Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is consumable with the fuel rod, and in another embodiment, part of the mold can be re-used. Several molds can be arranged together in a cascaded manner, if desired, or several long cavities can be integrated in a monolithic multiple cavity re-usable mold.

  10. Calibration of a fuel-to-cladding gap conductance model for fast reactor fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.B.

    1978-05-01

    The report presents refined methods for calculation of fuel temperatures in PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuel in Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) fuel pins. Of primary concern is the calculation of the temperature changes across the fuel-to-cladding gap of pins with fuel burnups that range from 60 to 10,900 MWd/MTM (0.006 to 1.12 at.%). Described in particular are: (1) a proposed set of heat transfer formulations and corresponding material properties for modeling radial heat transfer through the fuel and cladding; and (2) the calibration of a fuel-to-cladding gap conductance model, as part of a thermal performance computer code (SIEX-M1) which incorporates the proposed heat transfer expressions, using integral thermal performance data from two unique in-reactor experiments. The test data used are from the HEDL P-19 and P-20 experiments which were irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number Two (EBR-II), for the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL).

  11. Development of eutectic free cladding materials for metallic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Yuda, Ryoichi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan); Ohuchi, Atsushi [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co. Ltd., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Amaya, Masaki [Global Nuclear Fuel-Japan Co., Ltd, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Historically, it is well known that U base metallic fuel has a lower eutectic temperature with stainless steel cladding. In the phase diagram for the U-Fe binary system, the eutectic temperature is 998K. The eutectic reaction is a limiting factor for raising reactor operation temperature. For the purpose of development of eutectic-free cladding materials, three kinds of diffusion-couple tests with 10 mass%Zr alloy were conducted at a temperature of 1027K for 2250 hrs. We selected the following materials: (a) nitrogen charged zirconium foils, (b) vanadium foils of commercial grade, and (c) nitrogen charged ferritic stainless steel (HT-9). The results showed that typical Zr with layer was observed in all of these materials. Zr with layer appeared to act as a barrier against inter-diffusion of U, Fe. The barrier provided immunity to the eutectic reaction. Discussion was made on C-14 problems in relation to another desirable thermodynamic characteristics of Zr such as carbon-14 immobilization. EPMA analysis indicated relatively high nitrogen concentration at the barrier. The barrier is probably composed of ZrN. (author)

  12. On Cherenkov light production by irradiated nuclear fuel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branger, E.; Grape, S.; Jacobsson Svärd, S.; Jansson, P.; Andersson Sundén, E.

    2017-06-01

    Safeguards verification of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage is frequently done by measuring the Cherenkov light in the surrounding water produced due to radioactive decays of fission products in the fuel. This paper accounts for the physical processes behind the Cherenkov light production caused by a single fuel rod in wet storage, and simulations are presented that investigate to what extent various properties of the rod affect the Cherenkov light production. The results show that the fuel properties have a noticeable effect on the Cherenkov light production, and thus that the prediction models for Cherenkov light production which are used in the safeguards verifications could potentially be improved by considering these properties. It is concluded that the dominating source of the Cherenkov light is gamma-ray interactions with electrons in the surrounding water. Electrons created from beta decay may also exit the fuel and produce Cherenkov light, and e.g. Y-90 was identified as a possible contributor to significant levels of the measurable Cherenkov light in long-cooled fuel. The results also show that the cylindrical, elongated fuel rod geometry results in a non-isotropic Cherenkov light production, and the light component parallel to the rod's axis exhibits a dependence on gamma-ray energy that differs from the total intensity, which is of importance since the typical safeguards measurement situation observes the vertical light component. It is also concluded that the radial distributions of the radiation sources in a fuel rod will affect the Cherenkov light production.

  13. Fabrication and testing of U–7Mo monolithic plate fuel with Zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqualini, E.E. [Laboratorio de Nanotecnología Nuclear, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martín, Prov. Buenos Aires (Argentina); Robinson, A.B. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Porter, D.L., E-mail: Douglas.Porter@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Wachs, D.M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Finlay, M.R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear fuel designs are being developed to replace highly enriched fuel used in research and test reactors with fuels of low enrichment. In the most challenging cases, U–(7–10 wt%)Mo monolithic plate fuels are proposed. One of the considered designs includes aluminum-alloy cladding, which provides some challenges in fabrication and fuel/cladding interaction during service. Zircaloy cladding, specifically Zry–4, was investigated as an alternative cladding, and development of a fabrication method was performed by researchers with the Comisión Nacionalde Energia Atómica (CNEA) in Argentina, resulting in test fuel plates (Zry–4 clad U–7Mo) which were subsequently tested in the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Because Zry–4 and U–(7–10)Mo have similar high-temperature mechanical properties, fabrication was simplified in that the fuel foil and cladding could be co-rolled and bonded. The challenge was to prevent a thermal-expansion mismatch, which could destroy the fuel/cladding bond before complete bonding was achieved; the solution was to prevent the composites from cooling significantly during or between roll passes. The final product performed very well in-reactor, showing good bonding, very little fuel/cladding interaction—either from fabrication or in-reactor testing—and little swelling, especially no detectable heterogeneous bubble formation at the fuel/cladding interface tested to a fission density of up to 2.7E+21 (average) fissions/cm{sup 3}, 3.8E+21 (peak).

  14. An Innovative Accident Tolerant LWR Fuel Rod Design Based on Uranium-Molybdenum Metal Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Robert O.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Henager, Charles H.; Lavender, Curt A.; Smith, Mark T.; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2016-09-12

    The US Department of Energy is developing a uranium-molybdenum metal alloy Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel concept for Light Water Reactor applications that provides improved fuel performance during normal operation, anticipated operational occurrences, and postulated accidents. The high initial uranium atom density, the high thermal conductivity, and a low heat capacity permit a U-Mo-based fuel assembly to meet important design and safety requirements. These attributes also result in a fuel design that can satisfy increased fuel utilization demands and allow for improved accident tolerance in LWRs. This paper summarizes the results obtained from the on-going activities to; 1) evaluate the impact of the U-10wt%Mo thermal properties on operational and accident safety margins, 2) produce a triple extrusion of stainless steel cladding/niobium liner/U-10Mo fuel rod specimen and 3) test the high temperature water corrosion of rodlet samples containing a drilled hole in the cladding. Characterization of the cladding and liner thickness uniformity, microstructural features of the U-Mo gamma phase, and the metallurgical bond between the component materials will be presented. The results from corrosion testing will be discussed which yield insights into the resistance to attack by water ingress during high temperature water exposure for the triple extruded samples containing a drilled hole. These preliminary evaluations find that the U-10Mo fuel design concept has many beneficial features that can meet or improve conventional LWR fuel performance requirements under normal operation, AOOs, and postulated accidents. The viability of a deployable U-Mo fuel design hinges on demonstrating that fabrication processes and alloying additions can produce acceptable irradiation stability during normal operation and accident conditions and controlled metal-water reaction rates in the unlikely event of a cladding perforation. In the area of enhanced accident tolerance, a key objective

  15. Compatibility study between U-UO{sub 2} cermet fuel and T91 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Sudhir, E-mail: sudhir@barc.gov.in [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kaity, Santu; Khan, K.B. [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sengupta, Pranesh; Dey, G.K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-12-01

    Cermet is a new fuel concept for the fast reactor system and is ideally designed to combine beneficial properties of both ceramic and metal. In order to understand fuel clad chemical compatibility, diffusion couples were prepared with U-UO{sub 2} cermet fuel and T91 cladding material. These diffusion couples were annealed at 923–1073 K for 1000 h and 1223 K for 50 h, subsequently their microstructures were examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and electron probe microanalyser (EPMA). It was observed that the interaction between the fuel and constituents of T91 clad was limited to a very small region up to the temperature 993 K and discrete U{sub 6}(Fe,Cr) and U(Fe,Cr){sub 2} intermetallic phases developed. Eutectic microstructure was observed in the reaction zone at 1223 K. The activation energy for reaction at the fuel clad interface was determined.

  16. Finite element analysis of the contact between fuel rod and spacer grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Young Koon; Kang, Heung Seok; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Song, Kee Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    For the research on the fretting failure problem of nuclear fuel, the contact length and normal stress field are evaluated for the contact between fuel rod and spacer grid by using the Finite Element Method (FEM). An assumption of semi-infiniteness is necessary for applying the Contact Mechanics which is based on the classical theory of elasticity to the present problem. For the contact problem of fuel fretting, the contact mechanical solutions could be utilized well with sufficient accuracy if the contact bodies (i.e., the cladding tube and the spacer grid) can be assumed as semi-infinite bodies. To this end, the contact length evaluated by FEM is discussed together with the relevant research which concerned the effect of dimension for the validity of the assumption of semi-infiniteness. Normal stress profile on the contact is also studied through comparing the theoretical and the FE results. For the analysis of contact problem by FEM, ANSYS code (Version 5.3) is utilized and the geometry is chosen to be the Hertzian (cylinder-to-cylinder), the strip-to-cylinder and the fuel rod/spacer grid contact (strip-to-tube). Present research will be utilized for accessing the fuel fretting problem by FEM together with the theoretical (i.e., contact mechanical) analysis which has been published as KAERI/TR-1113/98. (author). 15 refs., 44 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

  18. EPRI/DOE High-Burnup Fuel Sister Rod Test Plan Simplification and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanson, B. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shimskey, R. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Klymyshyn, N. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webster, R. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, P. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); MacFarlan, P. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Billone, Mike [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Scaglione, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Rose [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The EPRI/DOE High-Burnup Confirmatory Data Project (herein called the “Demo”) is a multi-year, multi-entity test with the purpose of providing quantitative and qualitative data to show if high-burnup fuel mechanical properties change in dry storage over a ten-year period. The Demo involves obtaining 32 assemblies of high-burnup PWR fuel of common cladding alloys from the North Anna Nuclear Power Plant, loading them in an NRC-licensed TN-32B cask, drying them according to standard plant procedures, and then storing them on the North Anna dry storage pad for ten years. After the ten-year storage time, the cask will be opened and the mechanical properties of the rods will be tested and analyzed.

  19. Effective thermal conductivity method for predicting spent nuclear fuel cladding temperatures in a dry fill gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahney, Robert

    1997-12-19

    This paper summarizes the development of a reliable methodology for the prediction of peak spent nuclear fuel cladding temperature within the waste disposal package. The effective thermal conductivity method replaces other older methodologies.

  20. Mechanical behavior of fast reactor fuel pin cladding subjected to simulated overpower transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D.; Hunter, C.W.

    1978-06-01

    Cladding mechanical property data for analysis and prediction of fuel pin transient behavior were obtained under experimental conditions in which the temperature ramps of reactor transients were simulated. All cladding specimens were 20% CW Type 316 stainless steel and were cut from EBR-II irradiated fuel pins. It was determined that irradiation degraded the cladding ductility and failure strength. Specimens that had been adjacent to the fuel exhibited the poorest properties. Correlations were developed to describe the effect of neutron fluence on the mechanical behavior of the cladding. Metallographic examinations were conducted to characterize the failure mode and to establish the nature of internal and external surface corrosion. Various mechanisms for the fuel adjacency effect were examined and results for helium concentration profiles were presented. Results from the simulated transient tests were compared with TREAT test results.

  1. Development of a new bench for puncturing of irradiated fuel rods in STAR hot laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitprez, B.; Silvestre, P.; Valenza, P.; Boulore, A.; David, T.

    2018-01-01

    A new device for puncturing of irradiated fuel rods in commercial power plants has been designed by Fuel Research Department of CEA Cadarache in order to provide experimental data of high precision on fuel pins with various designs. It will replace the current set-up that has been used since 1998 in hot cell 2 of STAR facility with more than 200 rod puncturing experiments. Based on this consistent experimental feedback, the heavy-duty technique of rod perforation by clad punching has been preserved for the new bench. The method of double expansion of rod gases is also retained since it allows upgrading the confidence interval of volumetric results obtained from rod puncturing. Furthermore, many evolutions have been introduced in the new design in order to improve its reliability, to make the maintenance easier by remote handling and to reduce experimental uncertainties. Tightness components have been studied with Sealing Laboratory Maestral at Pierrelatte so as to make them able to work under mixed pressure conditions (from vacuum at 10-5 mbar up to pressure at 50 bars) and to lengthen their lifetime under permanent gamma irradiation in hot cell. Bench ergonomics has been optimized to make its operating by remote handling easier and to secure the critical phases of a puncturing experiment. A high pressure gas line equipped with high precision pressure sensors out of cell can be connected to the bench in cell for calibration purposes. Uncertainty analyses using Monte Carlo calculations have been performed in order to optimize capacity of the different volumes of the apparatus according to volumetric characteristics of the rod to be punctured. At last this device is composed of independent modules which allow puncturing fuel pins out of different geometries (PWR, BWR, VVER). After leak tests of the device and remote handling simulation in a mock-up cell, several punctures of calibrated specimens have been performed in 2016. The bench will be implemented soon in hot

  2. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  3. A Multi-Layered Ceramic Composite for Impermeable Fuel Cladding for COmmercial Wate Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinroth, Herbert

    2008-03-03

    A triplex nuclear fuel cladding is developed to further improve the passive safety of commercial nuclear plants, to increase the burnup and durablity of nuclear fuel, to improve the power density and economics of nuclear power, and to reduce the amount of spent fuel requiring disposal or recycle.

  4. Influence of operating and water-chemistry parameters on fuel cladding corrosion and deposition of corrosion products on cladding surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritsky, V.G.; Berezina, I.G.; Rodionov, Y.A., E-mail: kritsky@givnipiet.spb.ru, E-mail: alemaskina@givnipiet.ru [Leading Inst. ' VNIPIET' , Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    data available at an NPP and correct the water chemistry so that the pressure drop across the reactor is kept at a stable level by adjusting the concentrations of KOH, H{sub 2}, and NH{sub 3}. The parameters that have been included in the model are the following: operating parameters: reactor thermal power and concentration of boric acid; standards of water chemistry; parameters determining the system redox-potential: concentrations of hydrogen and ammonia; parameters of the physicochemical model of mass transfer; and parameters characterizing the composition of corrosion products in coolant. The deposits along fuel rod bring to sub-boiling and results in acceleration of corrosion products and boron precipitation on the fuel cladding surface increase of nuclide activation period and coolant radioactivity. Activity of Co-58 is the indicator of deposits growth acceleration. (author)

  5. Influence of the temperature in the measurement of the {sup 235}U content in fuel rods in the passive scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Carlos A. da S.; Junqueira, Fabio da S., E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br, E-mail: fabiojunqueira@ing.gov.br [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendência de Engenharia do Combustível

    2017-07-01

    The fuel rod, composed of a cladding responsible for storing UO{sub 2} pellets, is an indispensable component for the composition of the mentioned fuel assembly, a metallic structure that is installed inside nuclear reactors for the purpose of generating energy. With the change of the technology of fuel elements of the Angra-1 plant, it was necessary to install a new equipment in the Nuclear Fuel Plant of INB in Resende / RJ. This new equipment, called Rod Scanner, is responsible for inspecting, through non-destructive tests, the internal structure of the fuel rod. Such inspection is the measurement of enrichment of the pellets ({sup 235}U content) inside of the rod by detection of gamma radiation by bismuth germanate (BGO) detectors using the scintillation principle. However, throughout the operation of the equipment, it was found that this measurement was not happening on a regular basis. After an intense investigation, it was verified that one of the factors that affects such measurement is the temperature at which the BGO detectors are submitted. In this way, the objective of this paper is to show the experiments and tests performed to reach the conclusion described previously, as well as to show the relation obtained between the signals collected in the detectors versus the internal temperature of the block where they are located. (author)

  6. Vanadium as barrier to prevent inter diffusion between metallic fuel and clad material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Soo; Lee, Seok Hee; Kalita, Deep Jyoti; Woo, Sung Pil; Yoon, Young Soo [Yonsei Univ., Shinchondong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Hwan; Baek, Jong Hyuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) has been considered as next generation nuclear reactor because of its ability of recycling nuclear fuel. Specially, U Zr metal fuel in nuclear reactor has advantages such as ease of fabrication, high thermal conductivity, proliferation resistance and a good stability for sodium which have proven efficient in extending the fusion possibility. In spite of advantages, metal fuel can be inconvenient to use cladding. Actinide elements cause a FCCI (Fuel Clad Chemical Interaction) and eutectic reaction with Fe as nuclear cladding components at just above 650 .deg. C. Since nuclear cladding thickness is decreased during the combusting U Zr metal fuel, the interaction place in the cladding is brittle and less strength. It was reported that the eutectic melting between U Pu Zr and Fe occurs above 650 .deg. C. For such reasons, liner related materials and process have been studied by many research groups. In order to apply this nuclear cladding liner, Zr and V metals show better properties to preventing FCCI. Although liner materials prevent FCCI to an extent, it cannot block it perfectly. In this study, we attempt a combination of vanadium (V) and vanadium foil double layer in between a 420J2(Fe based 12Cr steel) and misch metal. The V thin film was deposited with various RF power. The results of diffusion couple tests at 660 .deg. C for 25 hours showed that a combination of the V thin films and foil exhibited a better shielding for FCCI.

  7. Fuel behavior in severe accidents and Mo-alloy based cladding designs to improve accident tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Bo [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States). Nucler Power Sector

    2013-03-15

    The severe accidents at TMI-2 and Fukushima-Daiichi led to core meltdown and hydrogen explosions. The main source of energy causing core melting is the decay heat from {beta}-, {beta}+, and {gamma} decays of short-lived isotopes following a power scram. The exothermic reaction of Zr-alloy cladding can further increase the cladding temperature leading to rapid cladding corrosion and hydrogen production. The most effective mitigation to minimize core damage in a severe accident is to extend the duration of heat removal capacity via battery-supported passive cooling for as long as practically possible. Replacing the Zr-alloy cladding with a higher heat resistant cladding with lower enthalpy release rate may also provide additional coping time for accident management. Such a heat resistant cladding may also overcome the current licensing concerns about Zr-alloy hydriding and post quench ductility issues in a design base loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Zr-alloy cladding, while has been optimized for normal operation in high pressure water and steam of light water reactors, will rapidly lose its corrosion resistance and tensile and creep strength in high pressure steam. Evaluation of alternate cladding materials and designs have been performed to search for a new fuel cladding design which will substantially improve the safety margins at elevated temperatures during a severe accident, while maintaining the excellent fuel performance attributes of the current Zr-alloy cladding. The screening criteria for the evaluation include neutronic properties, material availability, adaptability and operability in current LWRs, resistance to melting. The new designs also need to be fabricable, maintain sufficient strength and resist to attack by high pressure steam. Engineering metals, alloys and ceramics which can meet some or most of these requirements are limited. Following review of the properties of potential candidates, it is concluded that molybdenum alloys may potentially

  8. Estimation and control in HTGR fuel rod fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, D J; Bailey, M J

    1980-01-01

    A control algorithm has been derived for a HTGR Fuel Rod Fabrication Process utilizing the method of Box and Jenkins. The estimator is a Kalman filter and is compared with a Least Square estimator and a standard control chart. The effects of system delays are presented.

  9. Thermal-Hydraulic Effect of Pattern of Wire-wrap Spacer in 19-pin Rod Bundle for SFR Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Dae [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) has been considered the most promising reactor type for future and prototype gen-IV SFR has been developed actively in Korea, thermal-hydraulic aspects of the SFR fuel assembly have the important role for the reactor safety analysis. In PGSFR fuel assembly, 271 pins of fuel rods are tightly packed in triangular array inside hexagonal duct, and wire is wound helically per each fuel rod with regular pattern to assure the gap between rods and prevent the collision, which is called wire-wrapped spacer. Due to helical shape of the wire-wrapped spacer, flow inside duct can have stronger turbulent characteristics and thermal mixing effect. However, many studies showed the possible wake from swirl flow inside subchannel, which cause local hot spot. To prevent the wake flow and improve thermal mixing, new pattern of wire wrap spacer was suggested. To evaluate the effect of wire wrap spacer pattern, CFD analysis was performed for 19-pin rod bundle with comparison of conventional and U-pattern wire wrap spacer. To prevent the wake due to same direction of swirl flow, 7-rod unit pattern of wire spacer, which are arranged to have different rotational direction of wire with adjacent rods and center rod without wire wrap was proposed. From simulation results, swirl flow across gap conflicts its rotation direction causing wake flow from the regular pattern of the conventional one, which generates local hot spot near cladding. With U-pattern of wire wrap spacer, heat transfer in subchannel can be enhanced with evenly distributed cross flow without compensating pressure loss. From the results, the pattern of wire wrap spacer can influence the both heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop, with flow structures generated by wire wrap spacer.

  10. Carbon 14 distribution in irradiated BWR fuel cladding and released carbon 14 after aqueous immersion of 6.5 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuragi, T. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tsukishima 1-15-7, Chuo City, Tokyo, 104-0052 (Japan); Yamashita, Y.; Akagi, M.; Takahashi, R. [TOSHIBA Corporation, Ukishima Cho 4-1, Kawasaki Ward, Kawasaki, 210-0862 (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Spent fuel cladding which is highly activated and strongly contaminated is expected to be disposed of in an underground repository. A typical activation product in the activated metal waste is carbon 14 ({sup 14}C), which is mainly generated by the {sup 14}N(n,p){sup 14}C reaction and produces a significant exposure dose due to the large inventory, long half-life (5730 years), rapid release rate, and the speciation and consequent migration parameters. In the preliminary Japanese safety case, the release of radionuclides from the metal matrix is regarded as the corrosion-related congruent release, and the cladding oxide layer is regarded as a source of instant release fraction (IRF). In the present work, specific activity of {sup 14}C was measured using an irradiated BWR fuel cladding (Zircaloy-2, average rod burnup of 41.6 GWd/tU) which has an external oxide film having a thickness of 25.3 μm. The {sup 14}C specific activity of the base metal was 1.49*10{sup 4} Bq/g, which in the corresponding burnup is comparable to values in the existing literature, which were obtained from various irradiated claddings. Although the specific activity in oxide was 2.8 times the base metal activity due to the additive generation by the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction, the {sup 14}C abundance in oxide was less than 10% of total inventory. A static leaching test using the cladding tube was carried out in an air-tight vessel filled with a deoxygenated dilute NaOH solution (pH of 12.5) at room temperature. After 6.5 years, {sup 14}C was found in each leachate fraction of gas phase and dissolved organics and inorganics, the total of which was less than 0.01% of the {sup 14}C inventory of the immersed cladding tube. A simple calculation based on the congruent release with Zircaloy corrosion has suggested that the 96.7% of released {sup 14}C was from the external oxide layer and 3.3% was from the base Zircaloy metal. However, both the {sup 14}C abundance and the low leaching rate

  11. Preliminary Content Evaluation of the North Anna High Burn-Up Sister Fuel Rod Segments for Transportation in the 10-160B and NAC-LWT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) Program has transported high-burnup nuclear sister fuel rods from a commercial nuclear power plant for purposes of evaluation and testing. The evaluation and testing of high-burnup used nuclear fuel is integral to DOE initiatives to collect information useful in determining the integrity of fuel cladding for future safe transportation of the fuel, and for determining the effects of aging, on the integrity of UNF subjected to extended storage and subsequent transportation. The UFDC Program, in collaboration with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the commercial nuclear industry, has obtained individual used nuclear fuel rods for testing. The rods have been received at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for both separate effects testing (SET) and small-scale testing (SST). To meet the research objectives, testing on multiple 6 inch fuel rod pins cut from the rods at ORNL will be performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Up to 10 rod equivalents will be shipped. Options were evaluated for multiple shipments using the 10-160B (based on 4.5 rod equivalents) and a single shipment using the NAC-LWT. Based on the original INL/Virginia Power transfer agreement, the rods are assumed to 152 inches in length with a 0.374-inch diameter. This report provides a preliminary content evaluation for use of the 10-160B and NAC-LWT for transporting those fuel rod pins from ORNL to PNNL. This report documents the acceptability of using these packagings to transport the fuel segments from ORNL to PNNL based on the following evaluations: enrichment, A2 evaluation, Pu-239 FGE evaluation, heat load, shielding (both gamma and neutron), and content weight/structural evaluation.

  12. Early implementation of SiC cladding fuel performance models in BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-18

    SiC-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) [5–8] are being developed and evaluated internationally as potential LWR cladding options. These development activities include interests within both the DOE-NE LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and the DOE-NE Advanced Fuels Campaign. The LWRS Program considers SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) as offering potentially revolutionary gains as a cladding material, with possible benefits including more efficient normal operating conditions and higher safety margins under accident conditions [9]. Within the Advanced Fuels Campaign, SiC-based composites are a candidate ATF cladding material that could achieve several goals, such as reducing the rates of heat and hydrogen generation due to lower cladding oxidation rates in HT steam [10]. This work focuses on the application of SiC cladding as an ATF cladding material in PWRs, but these work efforts also support the general development and assessment of SiC as an LWR cladding material in a much broader sense.

  13. A Procedure to Address the Fuel Rod Failures during LB-LOCA Transient in Atucha-2 NPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Adorni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the specific event scenario and on the purpose of the analysis, the availability of calculation methods that are not implemented in the standard system thermal hydraulic codes might be required. This may imply the use of a dedicated fuel rod thermomechanical computer code. This paper provides an outline of the methodology for the analysis of the 2A LB-LOCA accident in Atucha-2 NPP and describes the procedure adopted for the use of the fuel rod thermomechanical code. The methodology implies the application of best estimate thermalhydraulics, neutron physics, and fuel pin performance computer codes, with the objective to verify the compliance with the specific acceptance criteria. The fuel pin performance code is applied with the main objective to evaluate the extent of cladding failures during the transient. The procedure consists of a deterministic calculation by the fuel performance code of each individual fuel rod during its lifetime and in the subsequent LB-LOCA transient calculations. The boundary and initial conditions are provided by core physics and three-dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic system codes calculations. The procedure is completed by the sensitivity calculations and the application of the probabilistic method, which are outside the scope of the current paper.

  14. Study on the Standard Establishment for the Integrity Assessment of Nuclear Fuel Cladding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S-S; Kim, S-H; Jung, Y-K; Yang, C-Y; Kim, I-G; Choi, Y-H; Kim, H-J; Kim, M-W; Rho, B-H [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    Fuel cladding material plays important role as a primary structure under the high temperature, high pressure and neutron environment of nuclear power plant. According to this environment, cladding material can be experienced several type aging phenomena including the neutron irradiation embrittlement. On the other hand, although the early nuclear power plant was designed to fitting into the 40MWd/KgU burn-up, the currently power plant intends to go to the high burn-up range. In this case, the safety criteria which was established at low burn-up needs to conform the applicability at the high burn-up. In this study, the safety criteria of fuel cladding material was reviewed to assess the cladding material integrity, and the material characteristics of cladding were reviewed. The current LOCA criterial was also reviewed, and the basic study for re-establishment of LOCA criteria was performed. The time concept safety criteria was also discussed to prevent the breakaway oxidation. Through the this study, safety issues will be produced and be helpful for integrity insurance of nuclear fuel cladding material. This report is the final report.

  15. Study on the standard establishment for the integrity assessment of nuclear fuel cladding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S. S.; Kim, S. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Yang, C. Y.; Kim, I. G.; Choi, Y. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, M. W.; Rho, B. H. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    Fuel cladding material plays important role as a primary structure under the high temperature, high pressure and neutron environment of nuclear power plant. According to this environment, cladding material can be experienced several type aging phenomena including the neutron irradiation embrittlement. On the other hand, although the early nuclear power plant was designed to fitting into the 40MWd/KgU burn-up, the currently power plant intends to go to the high burn-up range. In this case, the safety criteria which was established at low burn-up needs to conform the applicability at the high burn-up. In this study, the safety criteria of fuel cladding material was reviewed to assess the cladding material integrity, and the material characteristics of cladding were reviewed. The current LOCA criterial was also reviewed, and the basic study for re-establishment of LOCA criteria was performed. The time concept safety criteria was also discussed to prevent the breakaway oxidation. Through the this study, safety issues will be produced and be helpful for integrity insurance of nuclear fuel cladding material. This report is 2nd term report.

  16. Allowable peak heat-up cladding temperature for spent fuel integrity during interim-dry storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Nam Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate allowable peak cladding temperature and hoop stress for maintenance of cladding integrity during interim-dry storage and subsequent transport, zirconium alloy cladding tubes were hydrogen-charged to generate 250 ppm and 500 ppm hydrogen contents, simulating spent nuclear fuel degradation. The hydrogen-charged specimens were heated to four peak temperatures of 250°C, 300°C, 350°C, and 400°C, and then cooled to room temperature at cooling rates of 0.3 °C/min under three tensile hoop stresses of 80 MPa, 100 MPa, and 120 MPa. The cool-down specimens showed that high peak heat-up temperature led to lower hydrogen content and that larger tensile hoop stress generated larger radial hydride fraction and consequently lower plastic elongation. Based on these out-of-pile cladding tube test results only, it may be said that peak cladding temperature should be limited to a level < 250°C, regardless of the cladding hoop stress, to ensure cladding integrity during interim-dry storage and subsequent transport.

  17. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world’s highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding and Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 oC). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed.

  18. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world's highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate an appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding and Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 °C). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed.

  19. Control rod system useable for fuel handling in a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1976-11-30

    A control rod and its associated drive are used to elevate a complete stack of fuel blocks to a position above the core of a gas-cooled nuclear reactor. A fuel-handling machine grasps the control rod and the drive is unlatched from the rod. The stack and rod are transferred out of the reactor, or to a new location in the reactor, by the fuel-handling machine.

  20. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction in thermal reactor fuel pins using the Sleuth computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatham, N.; Hughes, H.; Ellis, W.E.; Shaw, T.L. (AEA Technology, Windscale (UK))

    1990-04-01

    This Paper describes the modelling of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCI) in thermal reactor fuel pins using the Sleuth Computer code. The code is based on the fundamental physical mechanisms causing PCI (differential thermal expansion, fuel swelling, cladding creep-down, etc.) coupled with an estimate of strain concentrations over fuel cracks. It uses the classical 1 1/2 dimensional method which subdivides the fuel both axially and radially. While Sleuth was originally developed to predict PCI failure/survival, it has evolved into a general fuel performance code. The latest version, Sleuth 86, which is a modular form with mnemonic variable names, has proved to be an ideal vehicle for testing new sub-models which have been required as the experimental data base has been expanded. (author).

  1. Thermal effects in Yb-doped double-cladding Distributed Modal Filtering rod-type fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Poli, Federica; Jørgensen, Mette Marie

    2012-01-01

    element method. A DMF fiber design, which is single-mode in the 1030 nm–1064 nm region, is considered, and the effects of thermal load on the transmission characteristics are evaluated. Results show a blue-shift of the single-mode window and the single-mode bandwidth narrowing as the absorbed pump power......The effects of thermally-induced refractive index change in Yb-doped Distributed Modal Filtering (DMF) photonic crystal fibers are investigated, where high-order mode suppression is obtained by resonant coupling with high index elements in the cladding. The temperature distribution on the fiber...... cross-section is calculated with an analytical model, for different pump power values. The consequent refractive index change, due to the thermo-optical effect, is applied to the cross-section of the DMF fiber, whose guiding properties are studied with a full-vector modal solver based on the finite...

  2. Hydrides reorientation investigation of high burn-up PWR fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valance, Stéphane; Bertsch, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    The direction of formation of hydride in fuel cladding tube is a major issue for the assessment of the cladding remaining ductility after service. This behavior is quite well known for fresh material, but few results exist for irradiated material. The reorientation behavior of a Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding (AREVA duplex DX-D4) at a burn-up of around 72 GWd t-1 is investigated here. The increase of the fraction of reoriented hydrides through repeated thermo-mechanical loading is inspected; as well, the possibility to recover a state with a minimized quantity of reoriented hydrides is tested using pure thermal loading cycles. The study is completed by a qualitative assessment of the hydrogen density in the duplex layer, where a dependence of the hydrides density on the hoop stress state is observed.

  3. Low temperature chemical processing of graphite-clad nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-10-17

    A reduced-temperature method for treatment of a fuel element is described. The method includes molten salt treatment of a fuel element with a nitrate salt. The nitrate salt can oxidize the outer graphite matrix of a fuel element. The method can also include reduced temperature degradation of the carbide layer of a fuel element and low temperature solubilization of the fuel in a kernel of a fuel element.

  4. BISON Investigation of the Effect of the Fuel- Cladding Contact Irregularities on the Peak Cladding Temperature and FCCI Observed in AFC-3A Rodlet 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedev, Pavel G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The primary objective of this report is to document results of BISON analyses supporting Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) activities. Specifically, the present report seeks to provide explanation for the microstructural features observed during post irradiation examination of the helium-bonded annular U-10Zr fuel irradiated during the AFC-3A experiment. Post irradiation examination of the AFC-3A rodlet revealed microstructural features indicative of the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) at the fuel-cladding interface. Presence of large voids was also observed in the same locations. BISON analyses were performed to examine stress and temperature profiles and to investigate possible correlation between the voids and FCCI. It was found that presence of the large voids lead to a formation of circumferential temperature gradients in the fuel that may have redirected migrating lanthanides to the locations where fuel and cladding are in contact. Resulting localized increase of lanthanide concentration is expected to accelerate FCCI. The results of this work provide important guidance to the post irradiation examination studies. Specifically, the hypothesis of lanthanides being redirected from the voids to the locations where the fuel and the cladding are in contact should be verified by conducting quantitative electron microscopy or Electron Probe Micro-Analyzer (EPMA). The results also highlight the need for computer models capable of simulating lanthanide diffusion in metallic fuel and establish a basis for validation of such models.

  5. Two-dimensional thermal analysis of a fuel rod by finite volume method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Rhayanne Y.N.; Silva, Mario A.B. da; Lira, Carlos A.B. de O., E-mail: ryncosta@gmail.com, E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamaento de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    In a nuclear reactor, the amount of power generation is limited by thermal and physic limitations rather than by nuclear parameters. The operation of a reactor core, considering the best heat removal system, must take into account the fact that the temperatures of fuel and cladding shall not exceed safety limits anywhere in the core. If such considerations are not considered, damages in the fuel element may release huge quantities of radioactive materials in the coolant or even core meltdown. Thermal analyses for fuel rods are often accomplished by considering one-dimensional heat diffusion equation. The aim of this study is to develop the first paper to verify the temperature distribution for a two-dimensional heat transfer problem in an advanced reactor. The methodology is based on the Finite Volume Method (FVM), which considers a balance for the property of interest. The validation for such methodology is made by comparing numerical and analytical solutions. For the two-dimensional analysis, the results indicate that the temperature profile agree with expected physical considerations, providing quantitative information for the development of advanced reactors. (author)

  6. A procedure for addressing the fuel rod failures during LB-LOCA transient in Atucha-2 NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorni, Martina; Del Nevo, Alessandro; Parisi, Carlo; D' Auria, Francesco [University of Pisa, San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), Via Diotisalvi 2, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Mazzantini, Oscar [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., UGCNAII, 2806 Lima (Argentina)

    2009-06-15

    Overview of CNA-2 NPP: Atucha-2 is a pressurized heavy water cooled and moderated reactor (PHWR) designed by Siemens under construction in the Republic of Argentina. The nominal electric power is 745 MWe. The reactor is equipped with a PWR-type Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). The operating pressure for the moderator and the coolant is equal (11.5 MPa) since the same fluid is simultaneously passing through the core and the moderator tank. The moderator and coolant circuits are connected through the bypass in the lower plenum and the upper plenum of the RPV. The former is constituted by two loops with a U-Tubes SGs. The latter is a four loops moderator system connecting upstream and downstream the moderator tank. Four horizontal U-Tubes exchangers remove the heat from the moderator system and preheat the feed water. The reactor power is generated in the core, composed by 451 fuel bundles placed in vertical fuel channels, each one containing a fuel assembly (FA) composed by 37 fuel rods. The reactor power is removed via the above mentioned 2 hydraulic loops equipped with U-Tubes Steam Generators (SG). The fuel rod consists of a stack of natural UO{sub 2} pellets, of compensation pellets in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the supporting tube, and the compression spring. Everything is placed into a Zircaloy-4 cladding tube. Although most fission products are retained within the UO{sub 2}, a fraction of the gaseous fission products is released from the pellets and accumulated in the plenum of the rod. The fuel rod cladding thickness is adequate to be 'free-standing', i.e., capable of withstanding external reactor pressure without collapsing onto the pellets. All fuel rods are internally pre-pressurized in order to reduce compressive clad stresses and creep down due to the high coolant pressure. Helium is used as pressurizing gas to get good heat transfer from fuel to cladding. The plant is operated with a on-power re-fueling that is performed by a refueling machine. After

  7. FY15 Status Report: CIRFT Testing of Spent Nuclear Fuel Rods from Boiler Water Reactor Limerick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of used nuclear fuel (UNF, also known as spent nuclear fuel [SNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. The additional CIRFT was conducted on three HBR rods (R3, R4, and R5) in which two specimens failed and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 10⁷ cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR UNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the UNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum of tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, ten SNF rod segments from BWR Limerick were tested using ORNL CIRFT, with one under static and nine dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at maximum curvature 4.0 m⁻¹. The specimen did not show any sign of failure in three repeated loading cycles to almost same maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitude varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of the tested rod specimens. The cycles to failure were

  8. Construction of in-situ creep strain test facility for the SFR fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Heo, Hyeong Min; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Sung Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, in-situ laser inspection creep test machine was developed for the measuring the creep strain of SFR fuel cladding materials. Ferritic-martensitic steels are being considered as an attractive candidate material for a fuel cladding of a SFR due to their low expansion coefficients, high thermal conductivities and excellent irradiation resistances to a void swelling. HT9 steel (12CrMoVW) is initially developed as a material for power plants in Europe in the 1960. This steel has experienced to expose up to 200dpa in FFTE and EBR-II. Ferritic-Martensitic steel's maximum creep strength in existence is 180Mpa for 106 hour 600 .deg., but HT9 steel is 60Mpa. Because SFR is difficult to secure in developing and applying materials, HT9 steel has accumulated validated data and is suitable for SFR component. And also, because of its superior dimensional stability against fast neutron irradiation, Ferritic-martensitic steel of 9Cr and 12Cr steels, such as HT9 and FC92(12Cr-2W) are preferable to utilize in the fuel cladding of an SFR in KAERI. The pressurized thermal creep test of HT9 and FC92 claddings are being conducted in KAERI, but the change of creep strain in cladding is not easy to measure during the creep test due to its pressurized and closed conditions. In this paper, in-situ laser inspection pressurized creep test machine developed for SFR fuel cladding specimens is described. Moreover, the creep strain rate of HT9 at 650 .deg. C was examined from the in-situ laser inspection pressurized creep test machine.

  9. Status Report on the Fabrication of Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction Test Articles for ATR Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-28

    FeCrAl alloys are a promising new class of alloys for light water reactor (LWR) applications due to their superior oxidation and corrosion resistance in high temperature environments. The current R&D efforts have focused on the alloy composition and processing routes to generate nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys with optimized properties for enhanced accident tolerance while maintaining properties needed for normal operation conditions. Therefore, the composition and processing routes must be optimized to maintain the high temperature steam oxidation (typically achieved by increasing the Cr and Al content) while still exhibiting properties conducive to normal operation in a LWR (such as radiation tolerance where reducing Cr content is favorable). Within this balancing act is the addition of understanding the influence on composition and processing routes on the FeCrAl alloys for fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI). Currently, limited knowledge exists on FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system. To overcome the knowledge gaps on the FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system a series of fueled irradiation tests have been developed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) housed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The first series of tests has already been reported. These tests used miniaturized 17x17 PWR fuel geometry rodlets of second-generation FeCrAl alloys fueled with industrial Westinghouse UO2 fuel. These rodlets were encapsulated within a stainless steel housing.To provide high fidelity experiments and more robust testing, a new series of rodlets have been developed deemed the Accident Tolerant Fuel Experiment #1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory FCCI test (ATF-1 ORNL FCCI). The main driving factor, which is discussed in detail, was to provide a radiation environment where prototypical fuel-clad interface temperatures are met while still maintaining constant contact between industrial fuel and the candidate cladding alloys

  10. Effect of fission fragment on thermal conductivity via electrons with an energy about 0.5 MeV in fuel rod gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Golian

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer process from pellet to coolant is one of the important issues in nuclear reactor. In this regard, the fuel to clad gap and its physical and chemical properties are effective factors on heat transfer in nuclear fuel rod discussion. So, the energy distribution function of electrons with an energy about 0.5 MeV in fuel rod gap in Busherhr’s VVER-1000 nuclear reactor was investigated in this paper. Also, the effect of fission fragments such as Krypton, Bromine, Xenon, Rubidium and Cesium on the electron energy distribution function as well as the heat conduction via electrons in the fuel rod gap have been studied. For this purpose, the Fokker- Planck equation governing the stochastic behavior of electrons in absorbing gap element has been applied in order to obtain the energy distribution function of electrons. This equation was solved via Runge-Kutta numerical method. On the other hand, the electron energy distribution function was determined by using Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. It was concluded that these fission fragments have virtually insignificant effect on energy distribution of electrons and therefore, on thermal conductivity via electrons in the fuel to clad gap. It is worth noting that this result is consistent with the results of other experiments. Also, it is shown that electron relaxation in gap leads to decrease in thermal conductivity via electrons

  11. Characterization of LWRS Hybrid SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Fuel Cladding after Gamma Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella J van Rooyen

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the gamma irradiation tests conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was to obtain a better understanding of chemical interactions and potential changes in microstructural properties of a mock-up hybrid nuclear fuel cladding rodlet design (unfueled) in a simulated PWR water environment under irradiation conditions. The hybrid fuel rodlet design is being investigated under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program for further development and testing of one of the possible advanced LWR nuclear fuel cladding designs. The gamma irradiation tests were performed in preparation for neutron irradiation tests planned for a silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic matrix composite (CMC) zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) hybrid fuel rodlet that may be tested in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) if the design is selected for further development and testing

  12. SCADOP: Phenomenological modeling of dryout in nuclear fuel rod bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Arnab, E-mail: arnie@barc.gov.in; Chandraker, D.K., E-mail: dineshkc@barc.gov.in; Vijayan, P.K., E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Phenomenological model for annular flow dryout is presented. • The model evaluates initial entrained fraction using a new methodology. • The history effect in annular flow is predicted and validated. • Rod bundle dryout is predicted using subchannel methodology. • Model is validated against experimental dryout data in tubes and rod bundles. - Abstract: Analysis and prediction of dryout is of important consequence to safety of nuclear fuel clusters of boiling water type of reactors. Traditionally, experimental correlations are used for dryout predictions. Since these correlations are based on operating parameters and do not aim to model the underlying phenomena, there has been a proliferation of the correlations, each catering to some specific bundle geometry under a specific set of operating conditions. Moreover, such experiments are extremely costly. In general, changes in tested bundle geometry for improvement in thermal-hydraulic performance would require re-experimentation. Understanding and modeling the basic processes leading to dryout in flow boiling thus has great incentive. Such a model has the ability to predict dryout in any rod bundle geometry, unlike the operating parameter based correlation approach. Thus more informed experiments can be carried out. A good model can, reduce the number of experiments required during the iterations in bundle design. In this paper, a phenomenological model as indicated above is presented. The model incorporates a new methodology to estimate the Initial Entrained Fraction (IEF), i.e., entrained fraction at the onset of annular flow. The incorporation of this new methodology is important since IEF is often assumed ad-hoc and sometimes also used as a parameter to tune the model predictions to experimental data. It is highlighted that IEF may be low under certain conditions against the general perception of a high IEF due to influence of churn flow. It is shown that the same phenomenological model is

  13. Surface modification techniques for increased corrosion tolerance of zirconium fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, James Patrick, IV

    Corrosion is a major issue in applications involving materials in normal and severe environments, especially when it involves corrosive fluids, high temperatures, and radiation. Left unaddressed, corrosion can lead to catastrophic failures, resulting in economic and environmental liabilities. In nuclear applications, where metals and alloys, such as steel and zirconium, are extensively employed inside and outside of the nuclear reactor, corrosion accelerated by high temperatures, neutron radiation, and corrosive atmospheres, corrosion becomes even more concerning. The objectives of this research are to study and develop surface modification techniques to protect zirconium cladding by the incorporation of a specific barrier coating, and to understand the issues related to the compatibility of the coatings examined in this work. The final goal of this study is to recommend a coating and process that can be scaled-up for the consideration of manufacturing and economic limits. This dissertation study builds on previous accident tolerant fuel cladding research, but is unique in that advanced corrosion methods are tested and considerations for implementation by industry are practiced and discussed. This work will introduce unique studies involving the materials and methods for accident tolerant fuel cladding research by developing, demonstrating, and considering materials and processes for modifying the surface of zircaloy fuel cladding. This innovative research suggests that improvements in the technique to modify the surface of zirconium fuel cladding are likely. Three elements selected for the investigation of their compatibility on zircaloy fuel cladding are aluminum, silicon, and chromium. These materials are also currently being investigated at other labs as alternate alloys and coatings for accident tolerant fuel cladding. This dissertation also investigates the compatibility of these three elements as surface modifiers, by comparing their microstructural and

  14. Transient heat transfer analysis up to dryout in 3D fuel rods under unideal conditions through the development of a computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Rodolfo I.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes; Sampaio, Paulo A. B. de, E-mail: rodolfoienny@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we analyze a conjugated transient heat transfer problem consisting of a nuclear reactor's fuel rod and its intrinsic coolant channel. Our analysis is made possible through a computer code being developed at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN). This code is meant to study the temperature behavior in fuel rods which exhibit deviation from their ideal conditions, that is, rods in which the cladding is deformed or the fuel is dislocated. It is also designed to avoid the use of the computationally expensive Navier-Stokes equations. For these reasons, its physical model has as basis a three-dimensional fuel rod coupled to a one-dimensional coolant channel, which are discretized using the finite element method. Intending to study accidental conditions in which the coolant (light water) transcends its saturation temperature, turning into vapor, a homogeneous mixture is used to represent the two-phase flow, and so the coolant channel's energy equation is described using enthalpy. Owing to the fact that temperature and enthalpy are used in the physical model, it became impractical to generate a fully coupled method for solving the pertinent equations. Thus, the conjugated heat transfer problem is solved in a segregated manner through the implementation of an iterative method. Finally, as study cases for this paper we present analyses concerning the behavior of the hottest fuel rod in a Pressurized Water Reactor during a shutdown wherein the residual heat removal system is lost (loss of the reactor's coolant pumps). These studies contemplate cases in which the fuel rod's geometry is ideal or curved. Analyses are also performed for two circumstances of positioning of the fuel inside the rod: concentric and eccentric. (author)

  15. Innovative coating of nanostructured vanadium carbide on the F/M cladding tube inner surface for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Phillpot, Simon [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-11-29

    Fuel cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) have been acknowledged as a critical issue in a metallic fuel/steel cladding system due to the formation of low melting intermetallic eutectic compounds between the fuel and cladding steel, resulting in reduction in cladding wall thickness as well as a formation of eutectic compounds that can initiate melting in the fuel at lower temperature. In order to mitigate FCCI, diffusion barrier coatings on the cladding inner surface have been considered. In order to generate the required coating techniques, pack cementation, electroplating, and electrophoretic deposition have been investigated. However, these methods require a high processing temperature of above 700 oC, resulting in decarburization and decomposition of the martensites in a ferritic/martensitic (F/M) cladding steel. Alternatively, organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) can be a promising process due to its low processing temperature of below 600 oC. The aim of the project is to conduct applied and fundamental research towards the development of diffusion barrier coatings on the inner surface of F/M fuel cladding tubes. Advanced cladding steels such as T91, HT9 and NF616 have been developed and extensively studied as advanced cladding materials due to their excellent irradiation and corrosion resistance. However, the FCCI accelerated by the elevated temperature and high neutron exposure anticipated in fast reactors, can have severe detrimental effects on the cladding steels through the diffusion of Fe into fuel and lanthanides towards into the claddings. To test the functionality of developed coating layer, the diffusion couple experiments were focused on using T91 as cladding and Ce as a surrogate lanthanum fission product. By using the customized OMCVD coating equipment, thin and compact layers with a few micron between 1.5 µm and 8 µm thick and average grain size of 200 nm and 5 µm were successfully obtained at the specimen coated between 300oC and

  16. FABRICATION AND MATERIAL ISSUES FOR THE APPLICATION OF SiC COMPOSITES TO LWR FUEL CLADDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEON-JU KIM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication methods and requirements of the fiber, interphase, and matrix of nuclear grade SiCf/SiC composites are briefly reviewed. A CVI-processed SiCf/SiC composite with a PyC or (PyC-SiCn interphase utilizing Hi-Nicalon Type S or Tyranno SA3 fiber is currently the best combination in terms of the irradiation performance. We also describe important material issues for the application of SiC composites to LWR fuel cladding. The kinetics of the SiC corrosion under LWR conditions needs to be clarified to confirm the possibility of a burn-up extension and the cost-benefit effect of the SiC composite cladding. In addition, the development of end-plug joining technology and fission products retention capability of the ceramic composite tube would be key challenges for the successful application of SiC composite cladding.

  17. Fuel-rod temperature transients during LWR degraded-core accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briscoe, F; Rivard, J B; Young, M F

    1982-01-01

    Heat transfer models of fuel rods and coolant have been developed in support of LWR damaged fuel studies underway at Sandia National Laboratories for the NRC. A one-dimensional, full-length model simulates a PWR fuel rod; a two-dimensional, 0.5 m model simulates 9-rod bundle experiments to be performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor. The models include zircaloy oxidation, heat transfer by convecting steam/hydrogen flow, and radiation between surfaces through an absorbing/emitting gas. Characteristics of the one-dimensional reactor fuel rod model for two types of accident sequence are reported, as well as comparisons with MARCH code results.

  18. Current status of materials development of nuclear fuel cladding tubes for light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Zhengang, E-mail: duan_zg@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Yang, Huilong [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Satoh, Yuhki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Murakami, Kenta; Kano, Sho; Zhao, Zishou; Shen, Jingjie [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki, E-mail: abe.hiroaki@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Zirconium-based (Zr-based) alloys have been widely used as materials for the key components in light water reactors (LWRs), such as fuel claddings which suffer from waterside corrosion, hydrogen uptakes and strength loss at elevated temperature, especially during accident scenarios like the lost-of-coolant accident (LOCA). For the purpose of providing a safer, nuclear leakage resistant and economically viable LWRs, three general approaches have been proposed so far to develop the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) claddings: optimization of metallurgical composition and processing of Zr-based alloys, coatings on existing Zr-based alloys and replacement of current Zr-based alloys. In this manuscript, an attempt has been made to systematically present the historic development of Zr-based cladding, including the impacts of alloying elements on the material properties. Subsequently, the research investigations on coating layer on the surface of Zr-based claddings, mainly referring coating materials and fabrication methods, have been broadly reviewed. The last section of this review provides the introduction to alternative materials (Non-Zr) to Zr-based alloys for LWRs, such as advanced steels, Mo-based, and SiC-based materials.

  19. Investigation and basic evaluation for ultra-high burnup fuel cladding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Nagase, Fumihisa; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Suga, Masataka [Kokan Keisoku Co., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    In ultra-high burnup of the power reactor, it is an essential problem to develop the cladding with excellent durability. First, development history and approach of the safety assessment of Zircaloy for the high burnup fuel were summarized in the report. Second, the basic evaluation and investigation were carried out on the material with high practicability in order to select the candidate materials for the ultra-high burnup fuel. In addition, the basic research on modification technology of the cladding surface was carried out from the viewpoint of the addition of safety margin as a cladding. From the development history of the zirconium alloy including the Zircaloy, it is hard to estimate the results of in-pile test from those of the conventional corrosion test (out-pile test). Therefore, the development of the new testing technology that can simulate the actual environment and the elucidation of the corrosion-controlling factor of the cladding are desired. In cases of RIA (Reactivity Initiated Accident) and LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident), it seems that the loss of ductility in zirconium alloys under heavy irradiation and boiling of high temperature water restricts the extension of fuel burnup. From preliminary evaluation on the high corrosion-resistance materials (austenitic stainless steel, iron or nickel base superalloys, titanium alloy, niobium alloy, vanadium alloy and ferritic stainless steel), stabilized austenitic stainless steels with a capability of future improvement and high-purity niobium alloys with a expectation of the good corrosion resistance were selected as candidate materials of ultra-high burnup cladding. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanical performance of fuel rods of a BWR during a power ramp using the FUELSIM code; Evaluacion del desempeno termomecanico de barras de combustible de un reactor BWR durante una rampa de potencia utilizando el codigo FUELSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R.

    2010-07-01

    To avoid the risk to environment due to release of radioactive material, because of occurrence of an accident, it is the priority of the design and performance of the diverse systems of safety of a commercial nuclear power plant. The safety of nuclear power plants requires, therefore, monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behavior under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. The main application of the thermal-mechanical analysis codes is the prediction of occurrence of conditions and/or phenomena that could lead to the deterioration or even mechanical failure of the fuel rod cladding, as, for example, the pellet-cladding interaction. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, fuel preconditioning operations refer to the operational procedures employed to reduce the fuel rod failure probability due to fuel-cladding interaction, specially during reactor startup. Preconditioning simulations are therefore necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR 5/6, as those two nuclear reactors in Laguna Verde, Veracruz, is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with an array 8 x 8

  1. SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for “accident tolerant” nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designs being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between loading points

  2. Modeling of laser cladding with application to fuel cell manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells have many advantages such as compactness, : lightweight, high power density, low temperature operation and near zero emissions. Although : many research organizations have intensified their efforts toward...

  3. Delayed hydride cracking in zircaloy fuel cladding-an IAEA coordinated research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C. [AECL, Chalk River (Canada); Grigoriev, V. [Studsvik, Nykoeping (Sweden); Inozemtsev, V. [IAEA, Vienna (Austria); Markelov, V. [VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation); Roth, M. [INR, Saclay (France); Makarevicius, V. [LEI, Kaunas (Lithuania); Kim, Y. S. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ali, Kanwar Liagat [PINS, TU Wien (Austria); Chakravartty, J. K. [BARC, Mumbai (India); Mizrahi, R. [CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lalgudi, R. [IPEN, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2008-10-15

    The rate of delayed hydride cracking (DHC), V, has been measured in cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy 4 fuel cladding using the Pin Loading Tension technique. At 250 .deg. C the mean value of V from 69 specimens was 3.3({+-}0.8)x10-8 m/s while the temperature dependence up to 275 .deg. C was described by Aexp(-Q/RT), where Q is 48.3 kJ/mol. No cracking or cracking at very low rates was observed at higher temperatures. The fracture surface consisted of flat fracture with no striations. The results are compared with previous results on fuel cladding and pressure tubes.

  4. Measurement of nuclear fuel rod deformation using an image processing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jung Cheol [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, a deformation measurement technology for nuclear fuel rods is proposed. The deformation measurement system includes a high-definition CMOS image sensor, a lens, a semiconductor laser line beam marker, and optical and mechanical accessories. The basic idea of the proposed deformation measurement system is to illuminate the outer surface of a fuel rod with a collimated laser line beam at an angle of 45 degrees or higher. For this method, it is assumed that a nuclear fuel rod and the optical axis of the image sensor for observing the rod are vertically composed. The relative motion of the fuel rod in the horizontal direction causes the illuminated laser line beam to move vertically along the surface of the fuel rod. The resulting change of the laser line beam position on the surface of the fuel rod is imaged as a parabolic beam in the high definition CMOS image sensor. An ellipse model is then extracted from the parabolic beam pattern. The center coordinates of the ellipse model are taken as the feature of the deformed fuel rod. The vertical offset of the feature point of the nuclear fuel rod is derived based on the displacement of the offset in the horizontal direction. Based on the experimental results for a nuclear fuel rod sample with a formation of surface crud, an inspection resolution of 50 is achieved using the proposed method. In terms of the degree of precision, this inspection resolution is an improvement of more than 300% from a 150 {mu}m resolution, which is the conventional measurement criteria required for the deformation of neutron irradiated fuel rods

  5. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    The purpose of this research was to develop a burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model within Pennsylvania State University, Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group (RDFMG) version of the subchannel thermal-hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF). The model takes into account first, the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with high burnup; and second, the fuel thermal conductivity dependence on the Gadolinium content for both UO2 and MOX fuel rods. The modified Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) model for UO2 fuel rods and Duriez/Modified NFI Model for MOX fuel rods were incorporated into CTF and fuel centerline predictions were compared against Halden experimental test data and FRAPCON-3.4 predictions to validate the burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF. Experimental test cases from Halden reactor fuel rods for UO2 fuel rods at Beginning of Life (BOL), through lifetime without Gd2O3 and through lifetime with Gd 2O3 and a MOX fuel rod were simulated with CTF. Since test fuel rod and FRAPCON-3.4 results were based on single rod measurements, CTF was run for a single fuel rod surrounded with a single channel configuration. Input decks for CTF were developed for one fuel rod located at the center of a subchannel (rod-centered subchannel approach). Fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF were compared against the measurements from Halden experimental test data and the predictions from FRAPCON-3.4. After implementing the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF and validating the model with experimental data, CTF model was applied to steady state and transient calculations. 4x4 PWR fuel bundle configuration from Purdue MOX benchmark was used to apply the new model for steady state and transient calculations. First, one of each high burnup UO2 and MOX fuel rods from 4x4 matrix were selected to carry out single fuel rod calculations and fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD were compared against CTF /TORT-TD /FRAPTRAN

  6. Nanocrystalline diamond protects Zr cladding surface against oxygen and hydrogen uptake: Nuclear fuel durability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škarohlíd, Jan; Ashcheulov, Petr; Škoda, Radek; Taylor, Andrew; Čtvrtlík, Radim; Tomáštík, Jan; Fendrych, František; Kopeček, Jaromír; Cháb, Vladimír; Cichoň, Stanislav; Sajdl, Petr; Macák, Jan; Xu, Peng; Partezana, Jonna M; Lorinčík, Jan; Prehradná, Jana; Steinbrück, Martin; Kratochvílová, Irena

    2017-07-25

    In this work, we demonstrate and describe an effective method of protecting zirconium fuel cladding against oxygen and hydrogen uptake at both accident and working temperatures in water-cooled nuclear reactor environments. Zr alloy samples were coated with nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers of different thicknesses, grown in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition apparatus. In addition to showing that such an NCD layer prevents the Zr alloy from directly interacting with water, we show that carbon released from the NCD film enters the underlying Zr material and changes its properties, such that uptake of oxygen and hydrogen is significantly decreased. After 100-170 days of exposure to hot water at 360 °C, the oxidation of the NCD-coated Zr plates was typically decreased by 40%. Protective NCD layers may prolong the lifetime of nuclear cladding and consequently enhance nuclear fuel burnup. NCD may also serve as a passive element for nuclear safety. NCD-coated ZIRLO claddings have been selected as a candidate for Accident Tolerant Fuel in commercially operated reactors in 2020.

  7. Synthesis of the Novel MAX Phases for the Future Nuclear Fuel Cladding and Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Hyeok [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taehee; Lee, Taegyu; Ryu, H. J. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    With these properties, the MAX phases are expected to be used for the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) cladding and oxidation/corrosion resistance materials. Especially, the MAX phase can be used for the Gen-IV, SFR and HTGR, component materials which have to possess the thermal and corrosion resistance. The zirconium has been used to the nuclear industry for fuel cladding because of the small thermal neutron cross-section. Zr-based MAX phase was discovered by group Lapauw et al. They observed the Zr{sub 2}AlC and Zr{sub 3}AlC{sub 2} with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and backscattered electron detector. Fabrication of the Zr-containing MAX phase was investigated for nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials applications. A MAX phase with the Zr{sub 3}AlC{sub 2} structure was synthesized by spark plasma sintering of a powder mixture targeting (Zr{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}){sub 4}AlC{sub 3}. The formation of MAX phases was confirmed by XRD and EDS of sintered samples. In the future work, the electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are required to certain analyze the elements composition and formation of the MAX phase.

  8. Scratch Behaviors of Cr-Coated Zr-Based Fuel Claddings for Accident-Tolerant Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Il-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As the progression of Fukushima accident is worsened by the runaway reaction at a high temperature above 1200 .deg. C, it is essential to ensure the stabilities of coating layers on conventional Zr-based alloys during normal operations as well as severe accident conditions. This is because the failures of coating layer result in galvanic corrosion phenomenon by potential difference between coating layer and Zr alloy. Also, it is possible to damage the coating layer during handling and manufacturing process by contacting structural components of a fuel assembly. So, adhesion strength is one of the key factors determining the reliability of the coating layer on conventional Zr-based alloy. In this study, two kinds of Cr-coated Zr-based claddings were prepared using arc ion plating (AIP) and direct laser (DL) coating methods. The objective is to evaluate the scratch deformation behaviors of each coating layers on Zr alloys. Large area spallation below normal load of about 15 N appeared to be the predominant mode of failure in the AIP coating during scratch test. However, no tensile crack were found in entire stroke length. In DL coating, small plastic deformation and grooving behavior are more dominant scratching results. It was observed that the change of the slope of the COF curve did not coincide with the failure of coating layer.

  9. Reactor Physics Assessment of Thick Silicon Carbide Clad PWR Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Be was modeled in SERPENT ; the depletion of Be at 60 MWd/kg in 5.5% 235 U enriched fuel was negligible as the difference between the SERPENT predicted...SIMULATE in the evaluation of core physics performance. 77 Comparison of ENDF-VI based CASMO results with ENDF-VII based SERPENT results for PuO2

  10. Results of the Gallium-Clad Phase 3 and Phase 4 tasks (canceled prior to completion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R.N.

    1998-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Gallium-Clad interactions Phase 3 and 4 tasks. Both tasks were to involve examining the out-of-pile stability of residual gallium in short fuel rods with an imposed thermal gradient. The thermal environment was to be created by an electrical heater in the center of the fuel rod and coolant flow on the rod outer cladding. Both tasks were canceled due to difficulties with fuel pellet fabrication, delays in the preparation of the test apparatus, and changes in the Fissile Materials Disposition program budget.

  11. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF FeCrAl CLADDING AND U-Si FUEL FOR ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUEL CONCEPTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, J. D.; Gamble, K. A.

    2015-09-01

    Since the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, enhancing the accident tolerance of light water reactors (LWRs) has become an important research topic. In particular, the community is actively developing enhanced fuels and cladding for LWRs to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools. Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period during design-basis and beyond design-basis events while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations and operational transients. This paper presents early work in developing thermal and mechanical models for two materials that may have promise: U-Si for fuel, and FeCrAl for cladding. These materials would not necessarily be used together in the same fuel system, but individually have promising characteristics. BISON, the finite element-based fuel performance code in development at Idaho National Laboratory, was used to compare results from normal operation conditions with Zr-4/UO2 behavior. In addition, sensitivity studies are presented for evaluating the relative importance of material parameters such as ductility and thermal conductivity in FeCrAl and U-Si in order to provide guidance on future experiments for these materials.

  12. ROD INTERNAL PRESSURE QUANTIFICATION AND DISTRIBUTION ANALYSIS USING FRAPCON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Jessee, Matthew Anderson [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The discharge rod internal pressure (RIP) and cladding hoop stress (CHS) distributions are quantified forWatts BarNuclearUnit 1 (WBN1) fuel rods by modeling core cycle design data, intercycle assembly movements, operation data (including modeling significant trips and downpowers), and as-built fuel enrichments and densities of each fuel rod in FRAPCON-3.5. An alternate model for the amount of helium released from zirconium diboride (ZrB2) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) layers is derived and applied to FRAPCON output data to quantify the RIP and CHS for these fuel rods. SCALE/Polaris is used to quantify fuel rod-specific spectral quantities and the amount of gaseous fission products produced in the fuel for use in FRAPCON inputs. Fuel rods with ZrB2 IFBA layers (i.e., IFBA rods) are determined to have RIP predictions that are elevated when compared to fuel rod without IFBA layers (i.e., standard rods) despite the fact that IFBA rods often have reduced fill pressures and annular fuel blankets. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) are prepared from the distribution of RIP predictions for all standard and IFBA rods. The provided CDFs allow for the determination of the portion of WBN1 fuel rods that exceed a specified RIP limit. Lastly, improvements to the computational methodology of FRAPCON are proposed.

  13. Development of Cold Spray Coatings for Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Light Weight Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Benjamin; Yeom, Hwasung; Johnson, Greg; Dabney, Tyler; Walters, Jorie; Romero, Javier; Shah, Hemant; Xu, Peng; Sridharan, Kumar

    2017-11-01

    The cold spray coating process has been developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for the deposition of oxidation-resistant coatings on zirconium alloy light water reactor fuel cladding with the goal of improving accident tolerance during loss of coolant scenarios. Coatings of metallic (Cr), alloy (FeCrAl), and ceramic (Ti2AlC) materials were successfully deposited on zirconium alloy flats and cladding tube sections by optimizing the powder size, gas preheat temperature, pressure and composition, and other process parameters. The coatings were dense and exhibited excellent adhesion to the substrate. Evaluation of the samples after high-temperature oxidation tests at temperatures up to 1300°C showed that the cold spray coatings significantly mitigate oxidation kinetics because of the formation of thin passive oxide layers on the surface. The results of the study indicate that the cold spray coating process is a viable near-term option for developing accident-tolerant zirconium alloy fuel cladding.

  14. Development of Cold Spray Coatings for Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Benjamin; Yeom, Hwasung; Johnson, Greg; Dabney, Tyler; Walters, Jorie; Romero, Javier; Shah, Hemant; Xu, Peng; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    The cold spray coating process has been developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for the deposition of oxidation-resistant coatings on zirconium alloy light water reactor fuel cladding with the goal of improving accident tolerance during loss of coolant scenarios. Coatings of metallic (Cr), alloy (FeCrAl), and ceramic (Ti2AlC) materials were successfully deposited on zirconium alloy flats and cladding tube sections by optimizing the powder size, gas preheat temperature, pressure and composition, and other process parameters. The coatings were dense and exhibited excellent adhesion to the substrate. Evaluation of the samples after high-temperature oxidation tests at temperatures up to 1300°C showed that the cold spray coatings significantly mitigate oxidation kinetics because of the formation of thin passive oxide layers on the surface. The results of the study indicate that the cold spray coating process is a viable near-term option for developing accident-tolerant zirconium alloy fuel cladding.

  15. Development of Mechanical Loading Device for testing the zirconium cladding under the pellet-cladding interaction conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Solonin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is a tendency of transition to the long-term cycles of operation with fuel and to the new transitional modes. This fact requires extra experimental validation for design of fuel rods. New operating conditions are expanding operability requirements of claddings.To implement the experimental techniques the Mechanical Loading Device (MLD was developed, capable of providing the conditions of stress-strain state similar to the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI during operation of the reactor.Complex strain state of a fuel rod cladding is simulated by the impacting force on the plunger and then on the simulator of the fuel pellet. The simulator is made of interposer of zirconium and the inset made of ceramic - aluminum oxide. Mechanical properties of the aluminum oxide are similar to the material of the fuel pellet - uranium dioxide. Experiments conducted on the layout and the MLD as such have shown that a stress-strain state matches with that of under operating conditions of the fuel rod in the reactor.The developed device and test method allows us to simulate a wide range of reactor transient modes. Claddings can be used both in the delivered state, and with the further preparation, including the exposure in nuclear reactor. MLD design enables us to carry out experiments with the presence of an aggressive environment inside the cladding, simulating the presence of gaseous fission products in the fuel rod.For further the development of this research it is necessary to design the laboratory complex for MLD. Extra computational verification experiment is needed as well. In particular, stresses in the cladding achieved during the experiment ought to be calculated. Calculated stresses are required to make project justification on the performance capability of fuel rods.

  16. Assessment of precision gamma scanning for inspecting LWR fuel rods. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.R.; Barnes, B.K.; Barnes, M.L.; Hamlin, D.K.; Medina-Ortega, E.G.

    1981-07-01

    Reconstruction of the radial two-dimensional distributions of fission products using projections obtained by nondestructive gamma scanning was evaluated. The filtered backprojection algorithm provided the best reconstruction for simulated gamma-ray sources, as well as for actual irradiated fuel material. Both a low-burnup (11.5 GWd/tU) light-water reactor fuel rod and a high-burnup (179.1 GWd/tU) fast breeder reactor fuel rod were examined using this technique.

  17. Characterization of control rod worths and fuel rod power peaking factors in the university of Utah TRIGA Mark I reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alroumi Fawaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Control rod reactivity (worths for the three control rods and fuel rod power peaking factors in the University of Utah research reactor (100 kW TRIGA Mark I are characterized using the AGENT code system and the results described in this paper. These values are compared to the MCNP6 and existing experimental measurements. In addition, the eigenvalue, neutron spatial flux distributions and reaction rates are analyzed and discussed. The AGENT code system is widely benchmarked for various reactor types and complexities in their geometric arrangements of the assemblies and reactor core material distributions. Thus, it is used as a base methodology to evaluate neutronics variables of the research reactor at the University of Utah. With its much shorter computation time than MCNP6, AGENT provides agreement with the MCNP6 within a 0.5 % difference for the eigenvalue and a maximum difference of 10% in the power peaking factor values. Differential and integral control rod worths obtained by AGENT show well agreement with MCNP6 and the theoretical model. However, regulating the control rod worth is somewhat overestimated by both MCNP6 and AGENT models when compared to the experimental/theoretical values. In comparison to MCNP6, the total control rod worths and shutdown margin obtained with AGENT show better agreement to the experimental values.

  18. Internal corrosion of EK164 and CHS68 fuel pin cladding steels of uranium dioxide fast power reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Kinev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic chromium-nickel steel EK-164 is the promising material for manufacturing claddings of fuel pins of fast nuclear reactors. Physical and chemical compatibility with typical nuclear fuel compositions on the basis of uranium dioxide pellets is an important aspect of ensuring fuel cladding operability. Post-irradiation examination of irradiated combined fuel assembly with maximum burnup 9.1% FIMA and damaging dose of 77.3dpa equipped with fuel pins with claddings made of CHS-68 and EK-164 steels in cold-worked state was performed. Gamma-scanning, electric potential resistometry and optical metallography methods were applied in the examination. According to the gamma-scanning and resistometry data high-temperature sections of fuel pins are the potential centers of development of fuel pin cladding corrosion. Comparative analysis of internal corrosion of fuel pin claddings made of EK-164 and CHS-68 steels along the reactor core height was performed. In the section with maximum power density at operational temperatures below 540°С depth of corrosion of CHS-68 steel from the side of fuel did not exceed 15µm. On similar sections of fuel pin cladding made of EK-164 steel depth of internal corrosion amounted to 10µm. Maximum of corrosion damage for both steel types was registered at temperatures in the range from 600°С to 650°С. In this case depth of corrosion damages in the form of intercrystalline and general corrosion did not exceed 20µm. No significant differences in the corrosion mechanism between the steels were found. Local exacerbation of corrosion at the junctions between fuel pellets and in places of concentration of cesium fission fragments was detected. And contrariwise in place of narrowing residual gap between fuel and cladding, where cesium is not present, corrosion of EK-164 steel is minimal. Maximum thinning of cladding of the investigated fuel pins with maximum burnup of 9% FIMA amounted to not more than 5% of the

  19. CONTAINMENT ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY FOR TRANSPORT OF BREACHED CLAD ALUMINUM SPENT FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-07-11

    Aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al-SNF) from foreign and domestic research reactors (FRR/DRR) is being shipped to the Savannah River Site and placed in interim storage in a water basin. To enter the United States, a cask with loaded fuel must be certified to comply with the requirements in the Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The requirements include demonstration of containment of the cask with its contents under normal and accident conditions. Many Al-SNF assemblies have suffered corrosion degradation in storage in poor quality water, and many of the fuel assemblies are 'failed' or have through-clad damage. A methodology was developed to evaluate containment of Al-SNF even with severe cladding breaches for transport in standard casks. The containment analysis methodology for Al-SNF is in accordance with the methodology provided in ANSI N14.5 and adopted by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in NUREG/CR-6487 to meet the requirements of 10CFR71. The technical bases for the inputs and assumptions are specific to the attributes and characteristics of Al-SNF received from basin and dry storage systems and its subsequent performance under normal and postulated accident shipping conditions. The results of the calculations for a specific case of a cask loaded with breached fuel show that the fuel can be transported in standard shipping casks and maintained within the allowable release rates under normal and accident conditions. A sensitivity analysis has been conducted to evaluate the effects of modifying assumptions and to assess options for fuel at conditions that are not bounded by the present analysis. These options would include one or more of the following: reduce the fuel loading; increase fuel cooling time; reduce the degree of conservatism in the bounding assumptions; or measure the actual leak rate of the cask system. That is, containment analysis for alternative inputs at fuel-specific conditions and

  20. Results of Post Irradiation Examinations of VVER Leaky Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markov, D.; Perepelkin, S.; Polenok, V.; Zhitelev, V.; Mayorshina, G. [Head of Fuel Research Department, JSC ' SSC RIAR' , 433510, Dimitrovgrad-10, Ulyanovsk region (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    The most important requirement imposed on fuel elements is to maintain integrity of fuel rod claddings under operation, storage and transportation, since it is directly related to the operational safety. However, failed rod claddings are sometimes observed under reactor operation. Identification and unloading of fuel assemblies with leaky rods from VVER is available only at the time of planned preventive maintenance. An unscheduled reactor shutdown due to the excess of coolant activity limit as well as a preterm unloading of the fuel assembly cause economic damage to nuclear plant. Therefore, models and calculation codes were developed to forecast coolant contamination and failed fuel rod behavior. Criteria based on calculations were set to determine the admissible number of the failed rods in core and the opportunity to continue the reactor operation or pre-term unloading of the fuel assembly with the failed rods. Nevertheless, to prevent the fuel rod failure (for unfailing operation) it is necessary to reveal disadvantages of the design, fabrication method and fuel operation conditions, and to eliminate defects. The most complete and significant information about spent fuel assemblies may be received following the post irradiation material examinations. In order to reveal failure origins and mechanism of changes in VVER fuel and failed rod cladding condition depending on the operation, the examinations of 12 VVER-1000 fuel assemblies and 3 VVER-440 fuel assemblies, operated under normal conditions up to the fuel burnup 13..47 MWd/kgU were carried out. To evaluate the rod cladding condition, reveal defects and determine their parameters, the ultrasonic control of cladding integrity, surface visual inspection, eddy current defectoscopy, measurement of geometrical parameters were applied. In separate cases we used the metallography, measured the hydrogen percentage and carried out the mechanical tests of o-ring samples. The pellet condition was evaluated in

  1. Evaluations of Mo-alloy for light water reactor fuel cladding to enhance accident tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Bo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum based alloy is selected as a candidate to enhance tolerance of fuel to severe loss of coolant accidents due to its high melting temperature of ∼2600 °C and ability to maintain sufficient mechanical strength at temperatures exceeding 1200 °C. An outer layer of either a Zr-alloy or Al-containing stainless steel is designed to provide corrosion resistance under normal operation and oxidation resistance in steam exceeding 1000 °C for 24 hours under severe loss of coolant accidents. Due to its higher neutron absorption cross-sections, the Mo-alloy cladding is designed to be less than half the thickness of the current Zr-alloy cladding. A feasibility study has been undertaken to demonstrate (1 fabricability of long, thin wall Mo-alloy tubes, (2 formability of a protective outer coating, (3 weldability of Mo tube to endcaps, (4 corrosion resistance in autoclaves with simulated LWR coolant, (5 oxidation resistance to steam at 1000–1500 °C, and (6 sufficient axial and diametral strength and ductility. High purity Mo as well as Mo + La2O3 ODS alloy have been successfully fabricated into ∼2-meter long tubes for the feasibility study. Preliminary results are encouraging, and hence rodlets with Mo-alloy cladding containing fuel pellets have been under preparation for irradiation at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR in Idaho National Laboratory. Additional efforts are underway to enhance the Mo cladding mechanical properties via process optimization. Oxidation tests to temperatures up to 1500 °C, and burst and creep tests up to 1000 °C are also underway. In addition, some Mo disks in close contact with UO2 from a previous irradiation program (to >100 GWd/MTU at the Halden Reactor have been subjected to post-irradiation examination to evaluate the chemical compatibility of Mo with irradiated UO2 and fission products. This paper will provide an update on results from the feasibility study and discuss the attributes of the

  2. Final Report: Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowsell, David Leon [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report documents the Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation. The review followed the approved Plan of Action (POA) and Implementation Plan (IP) using the identified core requirements. The activity was limited scope focusing on the control rod drives functional isolation and fuel element movement. The purpose of this review is to ensure the facility's readiness to move fuel elements thus supporting inspection and functionally isolate the control rod drives to maintain the required shutdown margin.

  3. Computer simulation of the behaviour and performance of a CANDU fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, A.C. [Comison Nacional de Energia Atomica (Argentina)

    1997-07-01

    At the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, CNEA) the BACO code (for 'BArra COmbustible', fuel rod) was developed. It allows the simulation of the thermo-mechanical performance of a cylindrical fuel rod in a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The standard present version of the code (2.30), is a powerful tool for a relatively easy and complete evaluation of fuel behaviour predictions. Input parameters and, therefore, output ones may include statistical dispersion. As a demonstration of BACO capabilities we include a review of CANDU fuel applications, and the calculation and a parametric analysis of a characteristic CANDU fuel. (author)

  4. EVALUATION METRICS APPLIED TO ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUEL CLADDING CONCEPTS FOR VVER REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sevecek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of high interest in many countries after the accidents at Fukushima-Daiichi. Fuel systems that can tolerate a severe accident for a longer time period are referred as Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF. Development of a new ATF fuel system requires evaluation, characterization and prioritization since many concepts have been investigated during the first development phase. For that reason, evaluation metrics have to be defined, constraints and attributes of each ATF concept have to be studied and finally rating of concepts presented. This paper summarizes evaluation metrics for ATF cladding with a focus on VVER reactor types. Fundamental attributes and evaluation baseline was defined together with illustrative scenarios of severe accidents for modeling purposes and differences between PWR design and VVER design.

  5. FABRICATION AND MATERIAL ISSUES FOR THE APPLICATION OF SiC COMPOSITES TO LWR FUEL CLADDING

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Weon-Ju; Kim, Daejong; Park, Ji Yeon

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication methods and requirements of the fiber, interphase, and matrix of nuclear grade SiCf/SiC composites are briefly reviewed. A CVI-processed SiCf/SiC composite with a PyC or (PyC-SiC)n interphase utilizing Hi-Nicalon Type S or Tyranno SA3 fiber is currently the best combination in terms of the irradiation performance. We also describe important material issues for the application of SiC composites to LWR fuel cladding. The kinetics of the SiC corrosion under LWR conditions needs t...

  6. ODS Ferritic/martensitic alloys for Sodium Fast Reactor fuel pin cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuisson, Philippe; Carlan, Yann de; Garat, Véronique; Blat, Martine

    2012-09-01

    The development of ODS materials for the cladding for Sodium Fast Reactors is a key issue to achieve the objectives required for the GEN IV reactors. CEA, AREVA and EDF have launched in 2007 an important program to determine the optimal fabrication parameters, and to measure and understand the microstructure and properties before, under and after irradiation of such cladding materials. The aim of this paper is to present the French program and the major results obtained recently at CEA on Fe-9/14/18Cr1WTiY2O3 ferritic/martensitic ODS materials. The first step of the program was to consolidate Fe-9/14/18Cr ODS materials as plates and bars to study the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the new alloys. The second step consists in producing tubes at a geometry representative of the cladding of new Sodium Fast Reactors. The optimization of the fabrication route at the laboratory scale is conducted and different tubes were produced. Their microstructure depends on the martensitic (Fe-9Cr) or ferritic (Fe-14Cr) structure. To join the plug to the tube, the reference process is the welding resistance. A specific approach is developed to model the process and support the development of the welds performed within the "SOPRANO" facility. The development at CEA of Fe-9/14/18Cr new ODS materials for the cladding for GENIV Sodium Fast Reactors is in progress. The first microstructural and mechanical characterizations are very encouraging and the full assessment and qualification of this new alloys and products will pass through the irradiation of specimens, tubes, fuel pins and subassemblies up to high doses.

  7. Literature search on Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel and absorber rod fabrication, 1960--1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, C R [comp.

    1977-02-01

    A literature search was conducted to provide information supporting the design of a conceptual Light Water Reactor (LWR) Fuel Fabrication plant. Emphasis was placed on fuel processing and pin bundle fabrication, effects of fuel impurities and microstructure on performance and densification, quality assurance, absorber and poison rod fabrication, and fuel pin welding. All data have been taken from publicly available documents, journals, and books. This work was sponsored by the Finishing Processes-Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Studies program at HEDL.

  8. CFD analysis of blockage length on a partially blocked fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scuro, Nikolas Lymberis; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear; Angelo, Gabriel [Centro Universitário FEI (UNIFEI), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecânica; Angelo, Edvaldo, E-mail: nikolas.scuro@gmail.com, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br, E-mail: gangelo@fei.edu.br, E-mail: eangelo@mackenzie.br [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola da Engenharia. Grupo de Simulação Numérica

    2017-07-01

    In LOCA accidents, fuel rods may balloon by the increasing of pressure difference between fuel rod and core vessel. With the balloon effect, the swelling can partially block the flow channel, affecting the coolability during reflood phase. In order to analyze the influence of blockage length after LOCA events, many numerical simulations using Ansys-CFX code have been done in steady state condition, characterizing the final phase of reflood. Peaks of temperature are observed in the middle of the fuel rod, followed by a temperature drop. This effect is justified by the increasing of heat transfer coefficient, originated from the high turbulence effects. Therefore, this paper considers a radial blockage of 90%, varying just the blockage length. This study observed that, for the same boundary conditions, the longer the blockage length originated after LOCA events, the higher are the central temperatures in the fuel rod. (author)

  9. Xe-133 Activity Evaluation of a Defective Fuel Rod Depending on Loading Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Young; Yang, Sung Tae; Jung, Ji Eun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Reliable performance of LWR fuels not only allows power plants to operate economically but also minimizes personnel radiation exposure, which may in turn contribute to convince the public of the viability of clean nuclear energy. Although KHNP's fuel failure rate has been remarkably decreased and it is excellent worldwide, one or two fuel rods have been damaged annually. Whenever fuel failure is occurred, KHNP engineers have to evaluate which FA(fuel assembly) is damaged by analyzing reactor coolant activity. It is important because they decide whether the FA with a damaged rod is the reload FA in the next cycle or not. Recently, based on our operational experience and technical expertise, we analyzed the reactor coolant activity in order to identify FA's loading cycle with a damaged fuel rod. This paper suggests the knowledge about Xe{sup 133} activity level analysis

  10. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric Global Research, Schnectady, NY (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding materials both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to

  11. Metallography and fuel cladding chemical interaction in fast flux test facility irradiated metallic U-10Zr MFF-3 and MFF-5 fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W. J.; Chichester, H. M.; Porter, D. L.; Wootan, D. W.

    2016-05-01

    Abstract The Mechanistic Fuel Failure (MFF) series of metal fuel irradiations conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) provides an important potential comparison between data generated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) and that expected in a larger-scale fast reactor. The irradiations were the beginning tests to qualify U-10wt%Zr as a driver fuel for FFTF. The FFTF core, with a 91.4 cm tall fuel column and a chopped cosine neutron flux profile, operated with a peak cladding temperature at the top of the fuel column, but developed peak burnup at the centerline of the core. This places the peak fuel temperature midway between the core center and the top of fuel, lower in the fuel column than in previous EBR-II experiments that had a 32-cm height core. The MFF-3 and MFF-5 qualification assemblies operated in FFTF to >10 at% burnup, and performed very well with no cladding breaches. The MFF-3 assembly operated to 13.8 at% burnup with a peak inner cladding temperature of 643°C, and the MFF-5 assembly operated to 10.1 at% burnup with a peak inner cladding temperature of 651°C. Because of the very high operating temperatures for both the fuel and the cladding, data from the MFF assemblies are most comparable to the data obtained from the EBR-II X447 experiment, which experienced two pin breaches. The X447 breaches were strongly influenced by a large amount of fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). The MFF pins benefitted from different axial locations of high burnup and peak cladding temperature, which helped to reduce interdiffusion between rare earth fission products and stainless steel cladding. Post-irradiation examination evidence illustrates this advantage. Comparing other performance data of the long MFF pins to prior EBR-II test data, the MFF fuel inside the cladding grew less axially, and the gas release data did not reveal a definitive difference.

  12. Metallography and fuel cladding chemical interaction in fast flux test facility irradiated metallic U-10Zr MFF-3 and MFF-5 fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W.J., E-mail: jon.carmack@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Chichester, H.M., E-mail: heather.chichester@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Porter, D.L., E-mail: douglas.porter@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Wootan, D.W., E-mail: david.wootan@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The Mechanistic Fuel Failure (MFF) series of metal fuel irradiations conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) provides an important comparison between data generated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) and that expected in a larger-scale fast reactor. The MFF fuel operated with a peak cladding temperature at the top of the fuel column, but developed peak burnup at the centerline of the core. This places the peak fuel temperature midway between the core center and the top of fuel, lower in the fuel column than in EBR-II experiments. Data from the MFF-3 and MFF-5 assemblies are most comparable to the data obtained from the EBR-II X447 experiment. The two X447 pin breaches were strongly influenced by fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) at the top of the fuel column. Post irradiation examination data from MFF-3 and MFF-5 are presented and compared to historical EBR-II data. - Highlights: • Irradiation and post irradiation examination of full-length metallic fast reactor fuel. • Fuel cladding chemical interaction formation in full-length metallic fast reactor fuel. • Correlation of FCCI with temperature and burnup. • Comparison of full-length reactor fuel performance with test reactor fuel performance.

  13. Development of Modified Ring Tensile Test Technique for Fuel Cladding in Hot Cell (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Sik; Ahn, S. B.; Oh, W. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Choo, Y. S

    2005-12-15

    The modified ring tensile test technique was proposed in order to evaluate mechanical properties of fuel cladding under hoop loading condition in hot cell. The hoop loading grip for the modified ring tensile test is designed such that a constant specimen curvature is maintained during deformation, and the gage section of ring specimen is located at the top of the half-cylinder({phi}8.08 mm). The interface between the outer surface of the half-cylinder and the inner surface of the ring specimen was lubricated by graphite lubricant(Molykote P37) in order to minimize the friction between this contact surface. The ring specimen design for ring tensile test is conducted to limit deformation within the gauge section and to maximize uniformity of strain distribution. The dimensions of the ring specimen are 5 mm in ring width, 3 mm in gage length, 2 mm in width of the gage section and 1 mm in radius of the shoulder part. The specially designed precision grinding machine was developed to machine the gage section at the ring segment with 5 mm in length, and the optimum machining conditions are determined. From the comparisons between the test results in this study and the other researcher's test results, we ensure that the proposed ring tensile test technique is suitable to evaluate the mechanical properties of fuel cladding in hoop direction quantitatively.

  14. 2nd Gen FeCrAl ODS Alloy Development For Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Massey, Caleb P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Edmondson, Philip D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Extensive research at ORNL aims at developing advanced low-Cr high strength FeCrAl alloys for accident tolerant fuel cladding. One task focuses on the fabrication of new low Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys. The first Fe-12Cr-5Al+Y2O3 (+ ZrO2 or TiO2) ODS alloys exhibited excellent tensile strength up to 800 C and good oxidation resistance in steam up to 1400 C, but very limited plastic deformation at temperature ranging from room to 800 C. To improve alloy ductility, several fabrication parameters were considered. New Fe-10-12Cr-6Al gas-atomized powders containing 0.15 to 0.5wt% Zr were procured and ball milled for 10h, 20h or 40h with Y2O3. The resulting powder was then extruded at temperature ranging from 900 to 1050 C. Decreasing the ball milling time or increasing the extrusion temperature changed the alloy grain size leading to lower strength but enhanced ductility. Small variations of the Cr, Zr, O and N content did not seem to significantly impact the alloy tensile properties, and, overall, the 2nd gen ODS FeCrAl alloys showed significantly better ductility than the 1st gen alloys. Tube fabrication needed for fuel cladding will require cold or warm working associated with softening heat treatments, work was therefore initiated to assess the effect of these fabrications steps on the alloy microstructure and properties. This report has been submitted as fulfillment of milestone M3FT 16OR020202091 titled, Report on 2nd Gen FeCrAl ODS Alloy Development for the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Advanced Fuel Campaign of the Fuel Cycle R&D program.

  15. Patent Analysis of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for the Fuel Cladding in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Woo Gon; Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Dae Whan; Han, Chang Hee; Lee, Chan Bock

    2007-09-15

    The Korean, Japanese, U.S. and European patents related to the ferritic/martensitic steels were systematically surveyed to evaluate their patent status, which would be applicable to the fuel cladding materials for the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). From the surveys, totally 38 patents were finally selected for the quantitative and qualitative analysis. Among them, 28 patents (74%) were processed by Japanese companies and Sumitomo Metal industries Ltd. was top-ranked in the number (9) of priority patents. On the basis of these surveys, most patents could be applicable to the fuel cladding materials for SFR and, especially, some useful patents as the cladding were registered by the Russian and the Korean.

  16. Evaluation of tantalum-alloy-clad uranium mononitride fuel specimens from 7500-hour, 1040 C pumped-lithium-loop test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, G. K.

    1974-01-01

    Simulated nuclear fuel element specimens, consisting of uranium mononitride (UN) fuel cylinders clad with tungsten-lined T-111, were exposed for up to 7500 hr at 1040 C (1900 F) in a pumped-lithium loop. The lithium flow velocity was 1.5 m/sec (5 ft/sec) in the specimen test section. No evidence of any compatibility problems between the specimens and the flowing lithium was found based on appearance, weight change, chemistry, and metallography. Direct exposure of the UN to the lithium through a simulated cladding crack resulted in some erosion of the UN in the area of the defect. The T-111 cladding was ductile after lithium exposure, but it was sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement during post-test handling.

  17. Non-destructive evaluation of the cladding thickness in LEU fuel plates by accurate ultrasonic scanning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borring, J.; Gundtoft, H.E.; Borum, K.K.; Toft, P. [Riso National Lab. (Denmark)

    1997-08-01

    In an effort to improve their ultrasonic scanning technique for accurate determination of the cladding thickness in LEU fuel plates, new equipment and modifications to the existing hardware and software have been tested and evaluated. The authors are now able to measure an aluminium thickness down to 0.25 mm instead of the previous 0.35 mm. Furthermore, they have shown how the measuring sensitivity can be improved from 0.03 mm to 0.01 mm. It has now become possible to check their standard fuel plates for DR3 against the minimum cladding thickness requirements non-destructively. Such measurements open the possibility for the acceptance of a thinner nominal cladding than normally used today.

  18. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico, A., E-mail: alvaro.rico@urjc.es [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Martin-Rengel, M.A., E-mail: mamartin@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J., E-mail: jesus.ruiz@upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J. [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Sanchez, F.J., E-mail: javier.gomez@amsimulation.com [Advanced Material Simulation, S.L, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  19. Capabilities to improve corrosion resistance of fuel claddings by using powerful laser and plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, V. M.; Trofimov, V. N.; Sapozhkov, A. Yu.; Kuzmenko, V. A.; Mikhaylov, V. B.; Cherkovets, V. Ye.; Yakushkin, A. A.; Yakushin, V. L.; Dzhumayev, P. S.

    2016-12-01

    The treatment conditions of fuel claddings of the E110 alloy by using powerful UV or IR laser radiation, which lead to the increase in the corrosion resistance at the high-temperature ( T = 1100°C) oxidation simulating a loss-of-coolant accident, are determined. The possibility of the complete suppression of corrosion under these conditions by using pulsed laser deposition of a Cr layer is demonstrated. The behavior of protective coatings of Al, Al2O3, and Cr planted on steel EP823 by pulsed laser deposition, which is planned to be used in the BREST-OD-300, is studied. The methods of the almost complete suppression of corrosion in liquid lead to the temperature of 720°C are shown.

  20. Capabilities to improve corrosion resistance of fuel claddings by using powerful laser and plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, V. M., E-mail: borisov@triniti.ru; Trofimov, V. N.; Sapozhkov, A. Yu.; Kuzmenko, V. A.; Mikhaylov, V. B.; Cherkovets, V. Ye.; Yakushkin, A. A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Yakushin, V. L.; Dzhumayev, P. S. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The treatment conditions of fuel claddings of the E110 alloy by using powerful UV or IR laser radiation, which lead to the increase in the corrosion resistance at the high-temperature (T = 1100°C) oxidation simulating a loss-of-coolant accident, are determined. The possibility of the complete suppression of corrosion under these conditions by using pulsed laser deposition of a Cr layer is demonstrated. The behavior of protective coatings of Al, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Cr planted on steel EP823 by pulsed laser deposition, which is planned to be used in the BREST-OD-300, is studied. The methods of the almost complete suppression of corrosion in liquid lead to the temperature of 720°C are shown.

  1. Report on Reactor Physics Assessment of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Maldonado, G. Ivan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-28

    This work focuses on ATF concepts being researched at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), expanding on previous studies of using alternate cladding materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The neutronic performance of two leading alternate cladding materials were assessed in boiling water reactors (BWRs): iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based composite cladding. This report fulfills ORNL Milestone M3FT-15OR0202332 within the fiscal year 2015 (FY15)

  2. Isotopic Details of the Spent Catawba-1 MOX Fuel Rods at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy funded Shaw/AREVA MOX Services LLC to fabricate four MOX Lead Test Assemblies (LTA) from weapons-grade plutonium. A total of four MOX LTAs (including MX03) were irradiated in the Catawba Nuclear Station (Unit 1) Catawba-1 PWR which operated at a total thermal power of 3411 MWt and had a core with 193 total fuel assemblies. The MOX LTAs were irradiated along with Duke Energy s irradiation of eight Westinghouse Next Generation Fuel (NGF) LEU LTAs (ref.1) and the remaining 181 LEU fuel assemblies. The MX03 LTA was irradiated in the Catawba-1 PWR core (refs.2,3) during cycles C-16 and C-17. C-16 began on June 5, 2005, and ended on November 11, 2006, after 499 effective full power days (EFPDs). C-17 started on December 29, 2006, (after a shutdown of 48 days) and continued for 485 EFPDs. The MX03 and three other MOX LTAs (and other fuel assemblies) were discharged at the end of C-17 on May 3, 2008. The design of the MOX LTAs was based on the (Framatome ANP, Inc.) Mark-BW/MOX1 17 17 fuel assembly design (refs. 4,5,6) for use in Westinghouse PWRs, but with MOX fuel rods with three Pu loading ranges: the nominal Pu loadings are 4.94 wt%, 3.30 wt%, and 2.40 wt%, respectively, for high, medium, and low Pu content. The Mark-BW/MOX1 (MOX LTA) fuel assembly design is the same as the Advanced Mark-BW fuel assembly design but with the LEU fuel rods replaced by MOX fuel rods (ref. 5). The fabrication of the fuel pellets and fuel rods for the MOX LTAs was performed at the Cadarache facility in France, with the fabrication of the LTAs performed at the MELOX facility, also in France.

  3. Effect of ultra high temperature ceramics as fuel cladding materials on the nuclear reactor performance by SERPENT Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkut, Turgay; Kara, Ayhan; Korkut, Hatun [Sinop Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Energy Engineering

    2016-12-15

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) have low density and high melting point. So they are useful materials in the nuclear industry especially reactor core design. Three UHTCs (silicon carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide) were evaluated as the nuclear fuel cladding materials. The SERPENT Monte Carlo code was used to model CANDU, PWR, and VVER type reactor core and to calculate burnup parameters. Some changes were observed at the same burnup and neutronic parameters (keff, neutron flux, absorption rate, and fission rate, depletion of U-238, U-238, Xe-135, Sm-149) with the use of these UHTCs. Results were compared to conventional cladding material zircalloy.

  4. Radial power density distribution of MOX fuel rods in the IFA-651

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun; Joo, Hyung Kook; Cheon, Jin Sik; Oh, Je Yong; Sohn, Dong Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Two MOX fuel rods, which were fabricated in the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland in cooperation with Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, have been irradiated in the HBWR from June, 2000 in the framework of OECD-HRP together with a reference MOX fuel rod supplied by the BNFL. Since fuel temperature, which is influenced by radial power distribution, is basic in analyzing fuel behavior, it is required to consider radial power distribution in the HBWR. A subroutine FACTOR{sub H}BWR that calculates radial power density distribution for three MOX fuel rods has been developed based on neutron physics results and DEPRESS program. The developed subroutine FACTOR{sub H}BWR gives good agreement with the physics calculation except slight under-prediction at the outer part of the pellet above the burnup of 20 MWd/kgHM. The subroutine will be incorporated into a computer code COSMOS and used to analyze the in-reactor behavior of the three MOX fuel rods during the Halden irradiation test. 24 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  5. Studies of electrochemical oxidation of Zircaloy nuclear reactor fuel cladding using time-of-flight-energy elastic recoil detection analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, H. J.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Winzell, T.; Simic, N.; Ahlberg, E.; Limbäck, M.; Wikmark, G.

    2000-03-01

    The trend towards increased fuel burn-up and higher operating temperatures in order to achieve more economic operation of nuclear power plants places demands on a better understanding of oxidative corrosion of Zircaloy (Zry) fuel rod cladding. As part of a programme to study these processes we have applied time-of-flight-energy elastic recoil detection (ToF-E ERD), electrochemical impedance measurements and scanning electron microscopy to quantitatively characterise thin-oxide films corresponding to the pre-transition oxidation regime. Oxide films of different nominal thickness in the 9-300 nm range were grown on a series of rolled Zr and Zry-2 plates by anodisation in dilute H 2SO 4 with applied voltages. The dielectric thickness of the oxide layer was determined from the electrochemical impedance measurements and the surface topography characterised by scanning electron microscopy. ToF-E ERD with a 60 MeV 127I 11+ ion beam was used to determine the oxygen content and chemical composition of the oxide layer. In the Zr samples, the oxygen content (O atom cm -2) that was determined by ERD was closely similar to the O content derived from impedance measurements from the dielectric film. The absolute agreement was well within the uncertainty associated with the stopping powers. Moreover, the measured composition of the thick oxide layers corresponded to ZrO 2 for the films thicker than 65 nm where the oxide layer was resolved in the ERD depth profile. Zry-2 samples exhibited a similar behaviour for small thickness ( ⩽130 nm) but had an enhanced O content at larger thicknesses that could be associated either with enhanced rough surface topography or porous oxide formation that was correlated with the presence of Second Phase Particles (SPP) in Zry-2. The concentration of SPP elements (Fe, Cr, Ni) in relation to Zr was the same in the outer 9×10 17 atom cm -2 of oxide as in the same thickness of metal. The results also revealed the presence of about 1 at.% 32S in the

  6. Gap transport of fission products in defective fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, H.W.; Lewis, B.J.

    1994-12-31

    The diffusive and convective transport of fission products released into the fuel-to-sheath gap of defective fuel has been modeled analytically and numerically for normal reactor operation and for accident conditions. The model is based on the results of in-reactor and out-of-pile annealing tests performed at the Chalk River Laboratories.

  7. Behavior of an improved Zr fuel cladding with oxidation resistant coating under loss-of-coolant accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Jun, E-mail: pdj@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Hyun Gil; Jung, Yang Il; Park, Jung Hwan; Yang, Jae Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2016-12-15

    This study investigates protective coatings for improving the high temperature oxidation resistance of Zr fuel claddings for light water nuclear reactors. FeCrAl alloy and Cr layers were deposited onto Zr plates and tubes using cold spraying. For the FeCrAl/Zr system, a Mo layer was introduced between the FeCrAl coating and the Zr matrix to prevent inter-diffusion at high temperatures. Both the FeCrAl and Cr coatings improved the oxidation resistance compared to that of the uncoated Zr alloy when exposed to a steam environment at 1200 °C. The ballooning behavior and mechanical properties of the coated cladding samples were studied under simulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The coated samples showed higher burst temperatures, lower circumferential strain, and smaller rupture openings compared to the uncoated Zr. Although 4-point bend tests of the coated samples showed a small increase in the maximum load, ring compression tests of a sectioned sample showed increased ductility. - Highlights: • Cr and FeCrAl were coated onto Zr fuel cladding for light water nuclear reactors. • Mo layer between FeCrAl and Zr prevented inter-diffusion at high temperatures. • Coated claddings were tested under loss-of-cooling accident conditions. • Coating improved high-temperature oxidation resistance and mechanical properties.

  8. Consistent neutron-physical and thermal-physical calculations of fuel rods of VVER type reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikhomirov Georgy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For modeling the isotopic composition of fuel, and maximum temperatures at different moments of time, one can use different algorithms and codes. In connection with the development of new types of fuel assemblies and progress in computer technology, the task makes important to increase accuracy in modeling of the above characteristics of fuel assemblies during the operation. Calculations of neutronphysical characteristics of fuel rods are mainly based on models using averaged temperature, thermal conductivity factors, and heat power density. In this paper, complex approach is presented, based on modern algorithms, methods and codes to solve separate tasks of thermal conductivity, neutron transport, and nuclide transformation kinetics. It allows to perform neutron-physical and thermal-physical calculation of the reactor with detailed temperature distribution, with account of temperature-depending thermal conductivity and other characteristics. It was applied to studies of fuel cell of the VVER-1000 reactor. When developing new algorithms and programs, which should improve the accuracy of modeling the isotopic composition and maximum temperature in the fuel rod, it is necessary to have a set of test tasks for verification. The proposed approach can be used for development of such verification base for testing calculation of fuel rods of VVER type reactors

  9. Results of High-Temperature Heating Test for Irradiated U-10Zr(-5Ce with T92 Cladding Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June-Hyung Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A microstructure observation using an optical microscope, SEM and EPMA was performed for the irradiated U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5Ce fuel slugs with a T92 cladding specimen after a high-temperature heating test. Also, the measured eutectic penetration rate was compared with the value predicted by the existing eutectic penetration correlation being used for design and modeling purposes. The heating temperature and duration time for the U-10Zr/T92 specimen were 750 °C and 1 h, and those for the U-10Zr-5Ce/T92 specimen were 800 °C and 1 h. In the case of the U-10Zr/T92 specimen, the migration phenomena of U, Zr, Fe, and Cr as well as the Nd lanthanide fission product were observed at the eutectic melting region. The measured penetration rate was similar to the value predicted by the existing eutectic penetration rate correlation. In addition, when comparing with measured eutectic penetration rates for the unirradiated U-10Zr fuel slug with FMS (ferritic martensitic steel, HT9 or Gr.91 cladding specimens which had been reported in the literature, the measured eutectic penetration rate for the irradiated fuel specimen was higher than that for the unirradiated U-10Zr specimen. In the case of the U-10Zr-5Ce/T92 specimen in which there had been a gap between the fuel slug and cladding after the irradiation test, the eutectic melting region was not found because contact between the fuel slug and cladding did not take place during the heating test.

  10. Development and Experimental Benchmark of Simulations to Predict Used Nuclear Fuel Cladding Temperatures during Drying and Transfer Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, Miles [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2017-03-31

    Radial hydride formation in high-burnup used fuel cladding has the potential to radically reduce its ductility and suitability for long-term storage and eventual transport. To avoid this formation, the maximum post-reactor temperature must remain sufficiently low to limit the cladding hoop stress, and so that hydrogen from the existing circumferential hydrides will not dissolve and become available to re-precipitate into radial hydrides under the slow cooling conditions during drying, transfer and early dry-cask storage. The objective of this research is to develop and experimentallybenchmark computational fluid dynamics simulations of heat transfer in post-pool-storage drying operations, when high-burnup fuel cladding is likely to experience its highest temperature. These benchmarked tools can play a key role in evaluating dry cask storage systems for extended storage of high-burnup fuels and post-storage transportation, including fuel retrievability. The benchmarked tools will be used to aid the design of efficient drying processes, as well as estimate variations of surface temperatures as a means of inferring helium integrity inside the canister or cask. This work will be conducted effectively because the principal investigator has experience developing these types of simulations, and has constructed a test facility that can be used to benchmark them.

  11. Experience with incomplete control rod insertion in fuel with burnup exceeding approximately 40 GWD/MTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, E. [Houston Lighting & Power Co., Wadworth, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Analysis and measurement experience with fuel assemblies having incomplete control rod insertion at burnups of approximately 40 GWD/MTU is presented. Control rod motion dynamics and simplified structural analyses are presented and compared to measurement data. Fuel assembly growth measurements taken with the plant Refueling Machine Z-Tape are described and presented. Bow measurements (including plug gauging) are described and potential improvements are suggested. The measurements described and analysis performed show that sufficient guide tube bow (either from creep or yield buckling) is present in some high burnup assemblies to stop the control rods before they reach their full limit of travel. Recommendations are made that, if implemented, could improve cost performance related to testing and analysis activities.

  12. CFD analysis of rewetting vertical nuclear fuel rod by dispersed fluid jet impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajoy Debbarma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical analysis of cooling assessment in hot vertical fuel rod is carryout using ANSYS 14.0 – CFX Solver. Rewetting is the process of re-establishment of coolants with hot surfaces. Numerical validation exercise carried out with number of turbulence and shear stress turbulence model fairly predict the experimental data and used for further investigation. In the present paper, dispersed fluid is simulating with CFX solver to investigate the flow boiling process in emergency cooling of vertical fuel rod. When coolants come in contact on the hot surface this may not initiated the wetting patch. However, this paper introduces the unique jet impingement direction to remove the heat from the hot surface. In this report, the rewetting temperature and wetting delay also described during in progress of wetting front movement in hot vertical rod.

  13. Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuser, Brent [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Stubbins, James [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Kozlowski, Tomasz [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Uddin, Rizwan [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Trinkle, Dallas [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Downar, Thoms [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); ang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Phillpot, Simon [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sabharwall, piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-25

    The DOE NEUP sponsored IRP on accident tolerant fuel (ATF) entitled Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel involved three academic institutions, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and ATI Materials (ATI). Detailed descriptions of the work at the University of Illinois (UIUC, prime), the University of Florida (UF), the University of Michigan (UMich), and INL are included in this document as separate sections. This summary provides a synopsis of the work performed across the IRP team. Two ATF solution pathways were initially proposed, coatings on monolithic Zr-based LWR cladding material and selfhealing modifications of Zr-based alloys. The coating pathway was extensively investigated, both experimentally and in computations. Experimental activities related to ATF coatings were centered at UIUC, UF, and UMich and involved coating development and testing, and ion irradiation. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic aspects of ATF coatings were the focus of computational work at UIUC and UMich, while materials science aspects were the focus of computational work at UF and INL. ATI provided monolithic Zircaloy 2 and 4 material and a binary Zr-Y alloy material. The selfhealing pathway was investigated with advanced computations only. Beryllium was identified as a valid self-healing additive early in this work. However, all attempts to fabricate a Zr-Be alloy failed. Several avenues of fabrication were explored. ATI ultimately declined our fabrication request over health concerns associated with Be (we note that Be was not part of the original work scope and the ATI SOW). Likewise, Ames Laboratory declined our fabrication request, citing known litigation dating to the 1980s and 1990s involving the U.S. Federal government and U.S. National Laboratory employees involving the use of Be. Materion (formerly, Brush Wellman) also declined our fabrication request, citing the difficulty in working with a highly reactive Zr and Be

  14. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  15. Partially-reflected water-moderated square-piteched U(6.90)O2 fuel rod lattices with 0.67 fuel to water volume ratio (0.800 CM Pitch)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Gary A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative funded the design and construction of the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at Sandia National Laboratories. The start-up of the experiment facility and the execution of the experiments described here were funded by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. The 7uPCX is designed to investigate critical systems with fuel for light water reactors in the enrichment range above 5% 235U. The 7uPCX assembly is a water-moderated and -reflected array of aluminum-clad square-pitched U(6.90%)O2 fuel rods.

  16. Anisotropic Azimuthal Power and Temperature distribution on FuelRod. Impact on Hydride Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Arramova, Maria [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Hales, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-29

    The degradation of the zirconium cladding may limit nuclear fuel performance. In the high temperature environment of a reactor, the zirconium in the cladding corrodes, releasing hydrogen in the process. Some of this hydrogen is absorbed by the cladding in a highly inhomogeneous manner. The distribution of the absorbed hydrogen is extremely sensitive to temperature and stress concentration gradients. The absorbed hydrogen tends to concentrate near lower temperatures. This hydrogen absorption and hydride formation can cause cladding failure. This project set out to improve the hydrogen distribution prediction capabilities of the BISON fuel performance code. The project was split into two primary sections, first was the use of a high fidelity multi-physics coupling to accurately predict temperature gradients as a function of r, θ , and z, and the second was to use experimental data to create an analytical hydrogen precipitation model. The Penn State version of thermal hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF) was successfully coupled to the DeCART neutronics code. This coupled system was verified by testing and validated by comparison to FRAPCON data. The hydrogen diffusion and precipitation experiments successfully calculated the heat of transport and precipitation rate constant values to be used within the hydrogen model in BISON. These values can only be determined experimentally. These values were successfully implemented in precipitation, diffusion and dissolution kernels that were implemented in the BISON code. The coupled output was fed into BISON models and the hydrogen and hydride distributions behaved as expected. Simulations were conducted in the radial, axial and azimuthal directions to showcase the full capabilities of the hydrogen model.

  17. High Temperature Steam Oxidation Testing of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nelson, Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parkison, Adam [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-12-23

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign has initiated a multifold effort aimed at facilitating development of accident tolerant fuels in order to overcome the inherent shortcomings of light water reactor (LWR) fuels when exposed to beyond design basis accident conditions. The campaign has invested in development of experimental infrastructure within the Department of Energy complex capable of chronicling the performance of a wide range of concepts under prototypic accident conditions. This report summarizes progress made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in FY13 toward these goals. Alternative fuel cladding materials to Zircaloy for accident tolerance and a significantly extended safety margin requires oxidation resistance to steam or steam-H2 environments at ≥1200°C for short times. At ORNL, prior work focused attention on SiC, FeCr and FeCrAl as the most promising candidates for further development. Also, it was observed that elevated pressure and H2 additions had minor effects on alloy steam oxidation resistance, thus, 1 bar steam was adequate for screening potential candidates. Commercial Fe-20Cr-5Al alloys remain protective up to 1475°C in steam and CVD SiC up to 1700°C in steam. Alloy development has focused on Fe-Cr-Mn-Si-Y and Fe-Cr-Al-Y alloys with the aluminaforming alloys showing more promise. At 1200°C, ferritic binary Fe-Cr alloys required ≥25% Cr to be protective for this application. With minor alloy additions to Fe-Cr, more than 20%Cr was still required, which makes the alloy susceptible to α’ embrittlement. Based on current results, a Fe-15Cr-5Al-Y composition was selected for initial tube fabrication and welding for irradiation experiments in FY14. Evaluations of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were conducted up to 1700°C in steam. The reaction of H2O with the alumina reaction tube at 1700°C resulted in Al(OH)3

  18. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33% was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  19. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-31

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  20. CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  1. Characterization of Zircaloy-4 tubing procured for fuel cladding research programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, R.H. (comp.)

    1976-06-14

    A quantity of Zircaloy-4 tubing (10.92 mm outside diameter by 0.635 mm wall thickness) was purchased specifically for use in a number of related fuel cladding research programs sponsored by the Division of Reactor Safety Research, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC/RSR). Identical tubing (produced simultaneously and from the same ingot) was purchased concurrently by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for use in similar research programs sponsored by that organization. In this way, source variability and prior fabrication history were eliminated as parameters, thus permitting direct comparison (as far as as-received material properties are concerned) of experimental results from the different programs. The tubing is representative of current reactor technology. Consecutive serial numbers assigned to each tube identify the sequence of the individual tubes through the final tube wall reduction operation. The report presented documents the procurement activities, provides a convenient reference source of manufacturer's data and tubing distribution to the various users, and presents some preliminary characterization data. The latter have been obtained routinely in various research programs and are not complete. Although the number of analyses, tests, and/or examinations performed to date are insufficient to draw statistically valid conclusions with regard to material characterization, the data are expected to be representative of the as-received tubing. It is anticipated that additional characterizations will be performed and reported routinely by the various research programs that use the tubing.

  2. The post irradiation examinations of twenty-years stored spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasahara, A.; Matsumura, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The post irradiation examinations (PIE) on the twenty years stored spent fuels were carried out to evaluate fuel integrity during storage. The spent BWR-MOX fuel rods and PWR-UO{sub 2} fuel rod irradiated in commercial LWR were used. The burnup of the BWR-MOX fuels (five fuel rods) are about 20 GWd/t and that of the PWR-UO{sub 2} fuel is 58 GWd/t. PIE items in this study are, a) visual inspection of the cladding surface, b) puncture test or gas analysis in capsule, c) ceramographic examination to observe oxide layer thickness on outside/inside cladding and pellet microstructure such as grain size, d) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) on pellet, e) hydrogen content in cladding. The preliminary result shows that twenty years stored fuel rods were not different from that before storage. (authors)

  3. Casting technology for manufacturing metal rods from simulated metallic spent fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeand, Y. S.; Lee, D. B.; Kim, C. K.; Shin, Y. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2000-09-01

    A uranium metal rod 13.5 mm in diameter and 1,150 mm long was produced from simulated metallic spent fuels with advanced casting equipment using the directional-solidification method. A vacuum casting furnace equipped with a four-zone heater to prevent surface oxidation and the formation of surface shrinkage holes was designed. By controlling the axial temperature gradient of the casting furnace, deformation by the surface shrinkage phenomena was diminished, and a sound rod was manufactured. The cooling behavior of the molten uranium was analyzed using the computer software package MAGMAsoft.

  4. Development of the vibration analysis technique of fuel rod and research on the methodology of fuel fretting wear analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Heung Seok; Kim, Kyung Kyu; Yoon, Hyung Hoo; Song, Ki Nam

    1998-12-01

    The FEM program has been developed to predict the natural frequencies, the FEM program has been developed to predict the natural frequencies, and mode shapes of fuel rod subjected to axial force and continuously supported by a rotational and vent spring system, and to calculate the minimum reaction forces of the spacer grid spring when the maximum vibration amplitude of fuel rod is known. This program has been verified by commercial ANSYS program and the vibration test of dummy rods in air. The test equipment were set to get the fifth modes of test rods. Partial slip problem has been studied for the analysis of fuel fretting problem. Firstly, the assumption of semi-infiniteness of the contact bodies were validated by finite element (FE) analysis. From FE results, a classical bodies were validated by finite element (FE) analysis. From FE results, aclassical theory of elasticity was utilized with regarding the problem as a plane problem. Secondly, the Mindlin-Cattaneo problem was re-evaluated, which gave the fundamental idea for developing the numerical tool for the shear traction on the contact. Shear force of sequentially-changing directions was considered and the corresponding shear traction was evaluated by extending the numerical tool for the Mindlin-Cattaneo problem.

  5. Thermochemistry of metal-rich manganese telluride and its role in fuel-clad interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, M. Sai; Narasimhan, T. S. Lakshmi; Balasubramanian, R.; Mathews, C. K.

    Vaporisation of Mn-Te alloys was studied by Knudsen-effusion mass spectrometry. The partial pressures of Te(g) over the two-phase field, Mn-MnTe, were determined in the temperature range 1120-1250 K. Two samples of initial composition of 29.1 and 40.1 at% Te were used in the experiments. The vapour phase consists of Mn(g) and Te(g). Partial pressure-temperature relations for Te(g) were found to follow the equation log( {(p)}/{Pa}) = - {(16099±285)}/{T(K)}+(10.525±0.240) . Mn-rich phase boundary of MnTe was determined from continuous vaporisation experiments starting with a sample from two-phase field Mn + MnTe. The boundary composition was found to be 44.3 ± 0.5 at% Te in the temperature range 1205-1280 K. Enthalpy of the following reactions was obtained: MnTe0.8( s) / aiMn( s) + 0.8 Te( g), MnTe0.8( s) / aiMn( g) + 0.8 Te( g) and Mn( s) / aiMn( g). The standard molar enthalpy and Gibbs energy of formation of MnTe 0.8 were arrived at. The tellurium potential which would be required for the formation of MnTe 0.8 in AISI 316 stainless steel was calculated and the possibility of such a telluride formation in the fuel-cladding gap of a mixed-oxide fuel pin is discussed.

  6. Thermochemistry of metal-rich chromium telluride and its role in fuel-clad chemical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, R.; Sai Baba, M.; Albert Raj, D. Darwin; Balasubramanian, R.; Saha, B.; Mathews, C. K.

    1989-09-01

    Vaporisation of Cr-Te alloys was studied by Knudsen-effusion mass spectrometry. The partial pressures of Te 2(g) and Te(g) over the two-phase field, Cr + CrTex, were determined in the temperature ranges 1015 to 1138 K and 1180 to 1285 K, respectively. The temperature dependencies of the partial pressures have indicated that nearly equimolar proportions of Te and Te 2 are present in the vapor phase and that there is a phase transformation in CrTe x at 1160 ± 20 K. The Cr-rich phase boundaries of the nonstoichiometric CrTe x were delineated at 1075 K (50.72 ± 0.7 at% Te) as well as at 1235 K (48.25 ± 0.9 at% Te) by a continuous monitoring of the intensities of Te + and Te +2 as a function of time, starting with samples having 55.63 and 57.22 at% Te. Enthalpies and Gibbs energy changes were derived for the equilibria. CrTe x(s) ai Cr(s) + ( {x}/{i})Te i(g) [ x = 1.029 and 0.932; i = 1 and 2] and Te2( g) ai 2 Te( g). Enthalpies and Gibbs energies of formation of CrTe 1.0.29 and CrTe 0.932 were arrived at. The tellurium potentials which would be required for the formation of MTe x ( M = Fe, Cr, andNi) in Type 316 stainless steel and those likely to exist in the fuel-cladding gap of a mixed-oxide fuel pin were computed.

  7. Development of oxygen sensing technology in an irradiated fuel rod. Characteristic test of oxygen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Junichi; Hoshiya, Taiji; Sakurai, Fumio; Sakai, Haruyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1996-03-01

    At the Department of JMTR (Japan Materials Test Reactor), the re-instrumentation technologies to a high burnup fuel rod irradiated in an LWR have been developed to study irradiation behavior of the fuel during power transient. It has been progressed developing a chemical sensor as one of the re-instrumentation technologies. This report summarizes the results of characteristic tests of an oxygen sensor made of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) as a solid electrolyte. Several kinds of experiments were carried out to evaluate the electromotive force (emf) performance, stability and lifetime of the oxygen sensor with Ni/NiO, Cr/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe/FeO, respectively as a reference electrode. From the experimental data, it is suggested that the reference electrode of Ni/NiO reveals the most appropriate characteristic of the sensor to measure the partial oxygen pressure in a fuel rod. It is the final goal of this development to clarify the change of oxygen chemical potential in a fuel rod during power transient. (author).

  8. Modelling the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod; Etude de l'impact de la fissuration des combustibles nucleaires oxyde sur le comportement normal et incidentel des crayons combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfer, Th

    2006-03-15

    This thesis aims to model the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod. Fuel cracking has two main consequences. It relieves the stress in the pellet, upon which the majority of the mechanical and physico-chemical phenomena are dependent. It also leads to pellet fragmentation. Taking fuel cracking into account is therefore necessary to adequately predict the mechanical loading of the cladding during the course of an irradiation. The local approach to fracture was chosen to describe fuel pellet cracking. Practical considerations brought us to favour a quasi-static description of fuel cracking by means of a local damage models. These models describe the appearance of cracks by a local loss of rigidity of the material. Such a description leads to numerical difficulties, such as mesh dependency of the results and abrupt changes in the equilibrium state of the mechanical structure during unstable crack propagations. A particular attention was paid to these difficulties because they condition the use of such models in engineering studies. This work was performed within the framework of the ALCYONE fuel performance package developed at CEA/DEC/SESC which relies on the PLEIADES software platform. ALCYONE provides users with various approaches for modelling nuclear fuel behaviour, which differ in terms of the type geometry considered for the fuel rod. A specific model was developed and implemented to describe fuel cracking for each of these approaches. The 2D axisymmetric fuel rod model is the most innovative and was particularly studied. We show that it is able to assess, thanks to an appropriate description of fuel cracking, the main geometrical changes of the fuel rod occurring under normal and off-normal operating conditions. (author)

  9. Modelling the role of pellet crack motion in the (r-θ) plane upon pellet-clad interaction in advanced gas reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, T.A. [Centre for Nuclear Engineering & Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Rd., London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Ball, J.A. [EDF Energy, Barnett Way, Gloucester GL4 3RS (United Kingdom); Wenman, M.R., E-mail: m.wenman@imperial.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear Engineering & Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Rd., London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Finite element modelling of pellet relocation in the (r-θ) plane of nuclear fuel. • ‘Soft’ and ‘hard’ PCI have been predicted in a cracked nuclear fuel pellet. • Stress concentration in the cladding ahead of radial pellet cracks is predicted. • The model is very sensitive to the coefficient of friction and power ramp duration. • The model is less sensitive to the number of cracks assumed. - Abstract: A finite element model of pellet fragment relocation in the r-θ plane of advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) fuel is presented under conditions of both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ pellet-clad interaction. The model was able to predict the additional radial displacement of fuel fragments towards the cladding as well as the stress concentration on the inner surface resulting from the azimuthal motion of pellet fragments. The model was subjected to a severe ramp in power from both full power and after a period of reduced power operation; in the former, the maximum hoop stress in the cladding was found to be increased by a factor of 1.6 as a result of modelling the pellet fragment motion. The pellet-clad interaction was found to be relatively insensitive to the number of radial pellet crack. However, it was very sensitive to both the coefficient of friction used between the clad and pellet fragments and power ramp duration.

  10. Thermal behavior analysis of PWR fuel during RIA at various fuel burnups using modified theatre code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaz Amjad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fuel irradiation and burnup causes geometrical and dimensional changes in the fuel rod which affects its thermal resistance and ultimately affects the fuel rod behavior during steady-state and transient conditions. The consistent analysis of fuel rod thermal performance is essential for precise evaluation of reactor safety in operational transients and accidents. In this work, analysis of PWR fuel rod thermal performance is carried out under steady-state and transient conditions at different fuel burnups. The analysis is performed by using thermal hydraulic code, THEATRe. The code is modified by adding burnup dependent fuel rod behavior models. The original code uses as-fabricated fuel rod dimensions during steady-state and transient conditions which can be modified to perform more consistent reactor safety analysis. AP1000 reactor is considered as a reference reactor for this analysis. The effect of burnup on steady-state fuel rod parameters has been investigated. For transient analysis, hypothetical reactivity initiated accident was simulated by considering a triangular power pulse of variable pulse height (relative to the full power reactor operating conditions and pulse width at different fuel burnups which corresponds to fresh fuel, low and medium burnup fuels. The effect of power pulse height, pulse width and fuel burnup on fuel rod temperatures has been investigated. The results of reactivity initiated accident analysis show that the fuel failure mechanisms are different for fresh fuel and fuel at different burnup levels. The fuel failure in fresh fuel is expected due to fuel melting as fuel temperature increases with increase in pulse energy (pulse height. However, at relatively higher burnups, the fuel failure is expected due to cladding failure caused by strong pellet clad mechanical interaction, where, the contact pressure increases beyond the cladding yield strength.

  11. Licensing of spent fuel dry storage and consolidated rod storage: A Review of Issues and Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1990-02-01

    The results of this study, performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), respond to the nuclear industry's recommendation that a report be prepared that collects and describes the licensing issues (and their resolutions) that confront a new applicant requesting approval from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for dry storage of spent fuel or for large-scale storage of consolidated spent fuel rods in pools. The issues are identified in comments, questions, and requests from the NRC during its review of applicants' submittals. Included in the report are discussions of (1) the 18 topical reports on cask and module designs for dry storage fuel that have been submitted to the NRC, (2) the three license applications for dry storage of spent fuel at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) that have been submitted to the NRC, and (3) the three applications (one of which was later withdrawn) for large-scale storage of consolidated fuel rods in existing spent fuel storage pools at reactors that were submitted tot he NRC. For each of the applications submitted, examples of some of the issues (and suggestions for their resolutions) are described. The issues and their resolutions are also covered in detail in an example in each of the three subject areas: (1) the application for the CASTOR V/21 dry spent fuel storage cask, (2) the application for the ISFSI for dry storage of spent fuel at Surry, and (3) the application for full-scale wet storage of consolidated spent fuel at Millstone-2. The conclusions in the report include examples of major issues that applicants have encountered. Recommendations for future applicants to follow are listed. 401 refs., 26 tabs.

  12. Thermal performance of nuclear fuel rod with a Jacobian elliptic cross sectional form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Joao B. de; Tu, Carlos C.C.; Abe, Luciano [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Sistemas Mecanicos], e-mail: jbaguiar@usp.br, e-mail: carlcctu@usp.br, e-mail: Luciano.abe@poli.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    Boiling water reactors, BWR, commercially use fuel rods with a circular cross section. Set the operational conditions as well as the distribution of these rods, a specific power is established. Changing this form while conserving the cross sectional area may deliver a better performance. This fact is investigated here for a family of elliptic forms, in a thermal sense, using the finite element method. Two limiting values are considered: the melting temperature of the fuel and the critical flux rate. For 2 d models, gains of the order of twenty percent in performance are estimated. It is also perceived the advantage of this alteration in other form of reactor, and discussed means of addressing other aspects of the problem. (author)

  13. Probabilistic analysis of PWR and BWR fuel rod performance using the code CASINO-SLEUTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bull, A.J.

    1987-05-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the Monte Carlo and response surface techniques used in the code, and a probabilistic analysis of fuel rod performance in PWR and BWR applications. The analysis shows that fission gas release predictions are very sensitive to changes in certain of the code's inputs, identifies the most dominant input parameters and compares their effects in the two cases.

  14. Comparison study of the thermal mechanical performance of fuel rods during BWR fuel preconditioning operations using the computer codes FUELSIM and FEMAXI-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R., E-mail: rafael.pantoja10@yahoo.com.m [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The safety of nuclear power plants requires monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behaviour under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, pre-conditioning simulations are necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod during any power ramp, and mainly during reactor startup, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with array 8 x 8, and the other one from a 10 x 10 fuel assembly design, and a comparison of the thermal-mechanical performance between the two different rod designs is performed. The performance simulations were performed by the code FUELSIM, and compared against results previously obtained from similar simulation with the code FEMAXI-V. (Author)

  15. Influence of texture on fracture toughness of zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, V. [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Andersson, Stefan [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-06-01

    The correlation between texture and fracture toughness of Zircaloy 2 cladding has been investigated in connection with axial cracks in fuel rods. The texture of the cladding determines the anisotropy of plasticity of the cladding which, in turn, should influence the strain conditions at the crack-tip. Plastic strains in the cladding under uniaxial tension were characterised by means of the anisotropy constants F, G and H calculated according to Hill`s theory. Test temperatures between 20 and 300 deg C do not influence the F, G and H values. Any significant effect of hydrogen (about 500 wtppm) on the anisotropy constants F, G and H has not been revealed at a test temperature of 300 deg C. The results, obtained for stress-relieved and recrystallized cladding with different texture, show an obvious influence of texture on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy cladding. A higher fracture toughness has been found for cladding with more radial texture. With a 2 page summary in Swedish. 32 refs, 18 figs.

  16. Oxidation of Zircaloy Fuel Cladding in Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, Digby; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Chen, Yingzi; Ai, Jiahe; Park, Pilyeon; Kim, Han-Sang

    2006-12-12

    Our work involved the continued development of the theory of passivity and passivity breakdown, in the form of the Point Defect Model, with emphasis on zirconium and zirconium alloys in reactor coolant environments, the measurement of critically-important parameters, and the development of a code that can be used by reactor operators to actively manage the accumulation of corrosion damage to the fuel cladding and other components in the heat transport circuits in both BWRs and PWRs. In addition, the modified boiling crevice model has been further developed to describe the accumulation of solutes in porous deposits (CRUD) on fuel under boiling (BWRs) and nucleate boiling (PWRs) conditions, in order to accurately describe the environment that is contact with the Zircaloy cladding. In the current report, we have derived expressions for the total steady-state current density and the partial anodic and cathodic current densities to establish a deterministic basis for describing Zircaloy oxidation. The models are “deterministic” because the relevant natural laws are satisfied explicitly, most importantly the conversation of mass and charge and the equivalence of mass and charge (Faraday’s law). Cathodic reactions (oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution) are also included in the models, because there is evidence that they control the rate of the overall passive film formation process. Under open circuit conditions, the cathodic reactions, which must occur at the same rate as the zirconium oxidation reaction, are instrumental in determining the corrosion potential and hence the thickness of the barrier and outer layers of the passive film. Controlled hydrodynamic methods have been used to measure important parameters in the modified Point Defect Model (PDM), which is now being used to describe the growth and breakdown of the passive film on zirconium and on Zircaloy fuel sheathing in BWRs and PWRs coolant environments. The modified PDMs recognize the existence of a

  17. A new cladding embrittlement criterion derived from ring compression tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herb, Joachim, E-mail: Joachim.Herb@grs.de; Sievers, Jürgen, E-mail: Juergen.Sievers@grs.de; Sonnenburg, Heinz-Günther, E-mail: Heinz-Guenther.Sonnenburg@grs.de

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Using FEM it was possible to simulate measured ring compression test data. • The FEM provides burst stresses from Zry-4, M5 and ZIRLO cladding. • The ratio of burst stresses to yield stresses was correlated. • The ratio depends linearly on the state of oxidation and hydriding. • The ratio of stresses at unity can be applied as embrittlement criterion. - Abstract: It is of regulatory interest to prevent the breaking of fuel rods in LOCA transients. In current regulations this is accomplished by limiting the oxidation during LOCA to such an extent that still some residual ductility is preserved in the fuel rod cladding. The current oxidation limit in German as well as in US regulations is set to 17% ECR (Equivalent Cladding Reacted) which aims at maintaining a residual ductility for oxidized claddings. Recent ANL tests have shown that the combination of both oxidation and additionally hydrogen up-take affects the transition to zero-ductility. Furthermore, the oxidation during LOCA transient is accompanied by a significant up-take of hydrogen (secondary hydriding) if the fuel rod bursts during this transient. This secondary hydriding affects the cladding in the vicinity of the burst opening. These findings necessitate a new criterion for preserving cladding's strength. This paper describes a method how to derive a criterion which assures the required residual mechanical strength of the cladding for LOCA transients. This method utilizes the experimental results of 102 ring compression tests (RCT) conducted at ANL and KIT. RCTs of various cladding materials, oxidation levels and hydrogen content were considered. The basic approach was to compare the RCT test data with finite element analyses using the code ADINA. Starting with the cladding oxidation model of Leistikov, both the layer structure of the cladding and the distribution of the oxygen among these layers were determined. The mechanical properties of these layers were taken from

  18. Overview of lower length scale model development for accident tolerant fuels regarding U3Si2 fuel and FeCrAl cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-09-01

    U3Si2 and FeCrAl have been proposed as fuel and cladding concepts, respectively, for accident tolerance fuels with higher tolerance to accident scenarios compared to UO2. However, a lot of key physics and material properties regarding their in-pile performance are yet to be explored. To accelerate the understanding and reduce the cost of experimental studies, multiscale modeling and simulation are used to develop physics-based materials models to assist engineering scale fuel performance modeling. In this report, the lower-length-scale efforts in method and material model development supported by the Accident Tolerance Fuel (ATF) high-impact-problem (HIP) under the NEAMS program are summarized. Significant progresses have been made regarding interatomic potential, phase field models for phase decomposition and gas bubble formation, and thermal conductivity for U3Si2 fuel, and precipitation in FeCrAl cladding. The accomplishments are very useful by providing atomistic and mesoscale tools, improving the current understanding, and delivering engineering scale models for these two ATF concepts.

  19. Using Finite Model Analysis and Out of Hot Cell Surrogate Rod Testing to Analyze High Burnup Used Nuclear Fuel Mechanical Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL

    2014-07-01

    Based on a series of FEA simulations, the discussions and the conclusions concerning the impact of the interface bonding efficiency to SNF vibration integrity are provided in this report; this includes the moment carrying capacity distribution between pellets and clad, and the impact of cohesion bonding on the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod system. As progressive de-bonding occurs at the pellet-pellet interfaces and at the pellet-clad interface, the load ratio of the bending moment carrying capacity gradually shifts from the pellets to the clad; the clad starts to carry a significant portion of the bending moment resistance until reaching the full de-bonding state at the pellet-pellet interface regions. This results in localized plastic deformation of the clad at the pellet-pellet-clad interface region; the associated plastic deformations of SS clad leads to a significant degradation in the stiffness of the surrogate rod. For instance, the flexural rigidity was reduced by 39% from the perfect bond state to the de-bonded state at the pellet-pellet interfaces.

  20. Evaluation of missing pellet surface geometry on cladding stress distribution and magnitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Nathan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Montgomery, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sunderland, Dion [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); ANATECH Corp, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Pytel, Martin [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Stress concentrations are related to pellet defect geometries. • The presence of radial cracks cause increases in stress concentration. • Increasing the size of MPS causes an increase hoop stress concentrations. - Abstract: Missing pellet surface (MPS) defects are local geometric defects in nuclear fuel pellets that result from pellet mishandling or manufacturing. The presence of MPS defects can cause significant clad stress concentrations that can lead to through-wall cladding failure for certain combinations of fuel burnup, and reactor power level or power change. Consequently, the impact of MPS defects has limited the rate of power increase, or ramp rate, in both pressurized and boiling water reactors (PWRs and BWRs, respectively). Improved three-dimensional (3-D) fuel performance models of MPS defect geometry can provide better understanding of the probability for pellet clad mechanical interaction (PCMI), and correspondingly the available margin against cladding failure by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The Consortium of Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) has been developing the Bison-CASL fuel performance code to consider the inherently multi-physics and multi-dimensional mechanisms that control fuel behavior, including cladding stress concentrations resulting from MPS defects. This paper evaluates the cladding hoop stress distributions as a function of MPS defect geometry with discrete pellet radial cracks for a set of typical operating conditions in a PWR fuel rod. The results provide a first step toward a probabilistic approach to assess cladding failure during power maneuvers. This analysis provides insight into how varying pellet defect geometries affect the distribution of the cladding stress, as well as the temperature distributions within the fuel and clad; and are used to develop stress concentration factors for comparing 2-D and 3-D models.

  1. Impact of UO{sub 2} Enrichment of Fuel Zoning Rods in Long Cycle Operation of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ho Cheol; Lee, Deokjung [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Eun; Choe, Jiwon [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Extending the cycle length can not only increase the energy production, but also bring down outage costs by reducing the number of refueling outages during the lifetime of a nuclear power plant. It is reasonable that more fresh fuels are loaded for long cycle operation. However, minimizing the number of fresh fuels is essential in aspect of fuel economics. This can cause high power peaking near the water holes, due to increased thermalization of neutrons in those regions. To prevent this, special fuel zoning rods are used and surround the water holes. These rods use lower-enriched uranium (they have an enrichment rate lower than the other fuel rods). If we adjust the enrichment rate of fuel zoning rods, we can reduce power peaking and moreover increase cycle length. In this paper, we designed a core suitable for long cycle operation and we conducted sensitivity tests of fuel cycle length on UO2 enrichment rate in fuel zoning region in order to extend the cycle length while using the same number of fresh fuels. The correlations between the fuel zoning enrichment and cycle length, peaking factor, CBC and shutdown margin were analyzed. The more the enrichment rate in fuel zoning region increases, the more the fuel cycle length increases. At the same time, CBC, Fq and shutdown margin do not change significantly. Increasing the fuel zoning enrichment rate presents the right property of increasing the fuel cycle length without causing a large change to CBC, Fq and shutdown margin. In conclusion, by increasing the uranium enrichment rate in fuel zoning region, fuel cycle length can be increased and the safety margins can be maintained for long cycle operation of cores.

  2. Initial report on stress-corrosion-cracking experiments using Zircaloy-4 spent fuel cladding C-rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.D.

    1988-09-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is sponsoring C-ring stress corrosion cracking scoping experiments as a first step in evaluating the potential for stress corrosion cracking of spent fuel cladding in a potential tuff repository environment. The objective is to scope the approximate behavior so that more precise pressurized tube testing can be performed over an appropriate range of stress, without expanding the long-term effort needlessly. The experiment consists of stressing, by compression with a dead weight load, C-rings fabricated from spent fuel cladding exposed to an environment of Well J-13 water held at 90{degree}C. The results indicate that stress corrosion cracking occurs at the high stress levels employed in the experiments. The cladding C-rings, tested at 90% of the stress at which elastic behavior is obtained in these specimens, broke in 25 to 64 d when tested in water. This was about one third of the time required for control tests to break in air. This is apparently the first observation of stress corrosion under the test conditions of relatively low temperature, benign environment but very high stress. The 150 ksi test stress could be applied as a result of the particular specimen geometry. By comparison, the uniaxial tensile yield stress is about 100 to 120 ksi and the ultimate stress is about 150 ksi. When a general model that fits the high stress results is extrapolated to lower stress levels, it indicates that the C-rings in experiments now running at {approximately}80% of the yield strength should take 200 to 225 d to break. 21 refs., 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Criticality experiments with low enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierman, S.R.; Murphy, E.S.; Clayton, E.D.; Keay, R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The results obtained in a criticality experiments program performed for British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. (BNFL) under contract with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved low enriched UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium, and are in direct support of BNFL plans to use soluble compounds of the neutron poison gadolinium as a primary criticality safeguard in the reprocessing of low enriched nuclear fuels. The experiments were designed primarily to provide data for validating a calculation method being developed for BNFL design and safety assessments, and to obtain data for the use of gadolinium as a neutron poison in nuclear chemical plant operations - particularly fuel dissolution. The experiments program covers a wide range of neutron moderation (near optimum to very under-moderated) and a wide range of gadolinium concentration (zero to about 2.5 g Gd/l). The measurements provide critical and subcritical k/sub eff/ data (1 greater than or equal to k/sub eff/ greater than or equal to 0.87) on fuel-water assemblies of UO/sub 2/ rods at two enrichments (2.35 wt % and 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U) and on mixed fuel-water assemblies of UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ rods containing 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U and 2 wt % PuO/sub 2/ in natural UO/sub 2/ respectively. Critical size of the lattices was determined with water containing no gadolinium and with water containing dissolved gadolinium nitrate. Pulsed neutron source measurements were performed to determine subcritical k/sub eff/ values as additional amounts of gadolinium were successively dissolved in the water of each critical assembly. Fission rate measurements in /sup 235/U using solid state track recorders were made in each of the three unpoisoned critical assemblies, and in the near-optimum moderated and the close-packed poisoned assemblies of this fuel.

  4. The Development of Expansion Plug Wedge Test for Clad Tubing Structure Mechanical Property Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [ORNL

    2016-01-12

    To determine the tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding in a hot cell, a simple test was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is described fully in US Patent Application 20060070455, “Expanded plug method for developing circumferential mechanical properties of tubular materials.” This method is designed for testing fuel rod cladding ductility in a hot cell using an expandable plug to stretch a small ring of irradiated cladding material. The specimen strain is determined using the measured diametrical expansion of the ring. This method removes many complexities associated with specimen preparation and testing. The advantages are the simplicity of measuring the test component assembly in the hot cell and the direct measurement of the specimen’s strain. It was also found that cladding strength could be determined from the test results.

  5. An electrical simulator of a nuclear fuel rod cooled by nucleate boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Antonio Carlos Lopes da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: aclc@cdtn.br; Machado, Luiz; Koury, Ricardo Nicolau Nassar [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], e-mail: luizm@demec.ufmg.br; Bonjour, Jocelyn [CETHIL, UMR5008, CNRS, INSA-Lyon (France)], e-mail: jocelyn.bonjour@insa-lyon.fr; Passos, Julio Cesar [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. LEPTEN/Boiling], e-mail: jpassos@emc.ufsc.br

    2009-07-01

    This study investigates an electrical heated test section designed to simulate a nuclear fuel rod. This simulator comprises a stainless steel vertical tube, with length and outside diameter of 600 mm and 10 mm, respectively, inside which there is a high power electrical resistor. The heat generated is removed by means of enhanced confined subcooled nucleate boiling of water in an annular space containing 153 small metal inclined discs. The tests were performed under electrical power and pressure up to 48 kW and 40 bar, respectively. The results show that the experimental boiling heat transfer coefficients are in good agreement with those calculated using the Jens-Lottes correlation. (author)

  6. Eddy current examination of the nuclear fuel elements with aluminum 1100-F cladding of IPR-R1 research reactor: An initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Roger F. da; Silva Júnior, Silvério F. da; Frade, Rangel T. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rodrigues, Juliano S., E-mail: rfs@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br, E-mail: rtf@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Tubes of aluminum 1100-F as well as tubes of AISI 304 stainless steel are used as cladding of the fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 nuclear research reactor. Usually, these tubes are inspected by means of visual test and sipping test. The visual test allows the detection of changes occurred at the external fuel elements surface, such as those promoted by corrosion processes. However, this test method cannot be used for detection of internal discontinuities at the tube walls. Sipping test allows the detection of fuel elements whose cladding has failed, but it is not able to determine the place where the discontinuity is located. On the other hand, eddy current testing, an electromagnetic nondestructive test method, allows the detection of discontinuities and monitoring their growth. In previous works, the application of eddy current testing to evaluate the AISI 304 cladding fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 was studied. In this paper, it is proposed an initial study about the use of eddy current testing for detection and characterization of discontinuities in the aluminum 1100-F fuel elements cladding. The study includes the development of probes and the design and manufacture of reference standards. (author)

  7. Structural Analysis of Surface-Modified Oxidation-Resistant Zirconium Alloy Cladding for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho; No, Hee Cheon; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    While the current zirconium-based alloy cladding (Zircaloy, here after) has served well for fission-product barrier and heat transfer medium for the nuclear fuel of light water reactors (LWRs) in steady-states, concerns surrounding its mechanical behavior during accidents have drawn serious attentions. In accidents, strength degradation of the current-zirconium based alloy cladding manifests at temperature around ∼800 .deg. C, which results in fuel ballooning. Above 1000 .deg. C, zircaloy undergoes rapid oxidation with steam. Formation of brittle oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) and underlying oxygen-saturated α-zircaloy as a consequence of steam oxidation leads to loss of cladding ductility. Indeed, the loss of zircaloy ductility upon the steam oxidation has been taken as a measure of fuel failure criteria as stated in 10 CFR 50.46. In addition, zircaloy steam oxidation is an exothermic reaction, which is an energy source that sharply accelerates temperature increase under loss of coolant accidents, decreasing allowable coping time for loss of coolant accidents, decreasing allowable coping time for loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) before significant fuel/core melting starts. Hydrogen generated as a result of zircaloy oxidation could cause an explosion if certain conditions are met. In steady-state operation, zircaloy embrittlement limits the burnup of the fuel rod to assure remaining cladding ductility to cope with accidents. As a way to suppress hydrogen generation and cladding embrittlement by oxidation, ideas of cladding coating with an oxidation-preventive layer have emerged. Indeed, among a numbers of 'accident-tolerant-fuel (ATF)' concepts, the concept of coating the current fuel rod. Some signs of success on the lab-scale oxidation-prevention have been confirmed with a few coating candidates. Yet, relatively less attention has been given to structural integrity of coated zirconium-based alloy cladding. It is important to note that oxidation

  8. Zircaloy cladding performance under spent fuel disposal conditions; Progress report, May 1--October 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pescatore, C.; Cowgill, M.G.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1990-04-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Waste Materials and Environment Modeling (WMEM) Program has been assigned the task of helping the DOE formulate and certify analytical tools needed to support and/or strengthen the Waste Package Licensing Strategy. One objective of the WMEM program is to perform qualitative and quantitative analyses of irradiated Zircaloy cladding. This progress report presents the early findings of an on-going literature evaluation and the results of the numerical implementation of two models of Zircaloy creep. The report only addresses cladding degradation modes within intact, dry waste containers. Additional degradation modes will be considered when the study is expanded to include moist environments and partly failed containers. Further updates of the present analyses will also be provided.

  9. Synthesis and Analysis of Alpha Silicon Carbide Components for Encapsulation of Fuel Rods and Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin M. McHugh; John E. Garnier; George W. Griffith

    2011-09-01

    The chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of silicon carbide (SiC) along with its low neutron activation and stability in a radiation field make it an attractive material for encapsulating fuel rods and fuel pellets. The alpha phase (6H) is particularly stable. Unfortunately, it requires very high temperature processing and is not readily available in fibers or near-net shapes. This paper describes an investigation to fabricate a-SiC as thin films, fibers and near-net-shape products by direct conversion of carbon using silicon monoxide vapor at temperatures less than 1700 C. In addition, experiments to nucleate the alpha phase during pyrolysis of polysilazane, are also described. Structure and composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Preliminary tensile property analysis of fibers was also performed.

  10. Prevention of significant deterioration permit application for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    This New Source Review'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (PO Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 173-403-050 and in compliance with the Department of Ecology Guide to Processing A Prevention Of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit'' for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS), the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF), and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA), will be located in one facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post-irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies for use in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, these systems will be dealt with separately to the extent possible. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

  11. Hydride reorientation and its impact on ambient temperature mechanical properties of high burn-up irradiated and unirradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 nuclear fuel cladding with an inner liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzoux, Q.; Bouffioux, P.; Machiels, A.; Yagnik, S.; Bourdiliau, B.; Mallet, C.; Mozzani, N.; Colas, K.

    2017-10-01

    Precipitation of radial hydrides in zirconium-based alloy cladding concomitant with the cooling of spent nuclear fuel during dry storage can potentially compromise cladding integrity during its subsequent handling and transportation. This paper investigates hydride reorientation and its impact on ductility in unirradiated and irradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 cladding with an inner liner (cladding for boiling water reactors) subjected to hydride reorientation treatments. Cooling from 400 °C, hydride reorientation occurs in recrystallized Zircaloy-2 with liner at a lower effective stress in irradiated samples (below 40 MPa) than in unirradiated specimens (between 40 and 80 MPa). Despite significant hydride reorientation, unirradiated recrystallized Zircaloy-2 with liner cladding containing ∼200 wppm hydrogen shows a high diametral strain at fracture (>15%) during burst tests at ambient temperature. This ductile behavior is due to (1) the lower yield stress of the recrystallized cladding materials in comparison to hydride fracture strength (corrected by the compression stress arising from the precipitation) and (2) the hydride or hydrogen-depleted zone as a result of segregation of hydrogen into the liner layer. In irradiated Zircaloy-2 with liner cladding containing ∼340 wppm hydrogen, the conservation of some ductility during ring tensile tests at ambient temperature after reorientation treatment at 400 °C with cooling rates of ∼60 °C/h is also attributed to the existence of a hydride-depleted zone. Treatments at lower cooling rates (∼6 °C/h and 0.6 °C/h) promote greater levels of hydrogen segregation into the liner and allow for increased irradiation defect annealing, both of which result in a significant increase in ductility. Based on this investigation, given the very low cooling rates typical of dry storage systems, it can be concluded that the thermal transients associated with dry storage should not degrade, and more likely should actually

  12. Process Management Development for Quality Monitoring on Resistance Weldment of Nuclear Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Tae Hyung; Yang, Kyung Hwan; Kim, In Kyu [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The current, welding force, and displacement are displayed on the indicator during welding. However, real-time quality control is not performed. Due to the importance of fuel rod weldment, many studies on welding procedures have been conducted. However, there are not enough studies regarding weldment quality evaluation. On the other hand, there are continuous studies on the monitoring and control of welding phenomena. In resistance welding, which is performed in a very short time, it is important to find the process parameters that well represent the weld zone formation and the welding process. In his study, Gould attempted to analyze melt zone formation using the finite difference method. Using the artificial neural network, Javed and Sanders, Messler Jr et al., Cho and Rhee, Li and Gong et al. estimated the size of the melt zone by mapping a nonlinear functional relation between the weldment and the electrode head movement, which is a typical welding process parameter. Applications of the artificial intelligence method include fuzzy control using electrode displacement, fuzzy control using the optimal power curve, neural network control using the dynamic resistance curve, fuzzy adaptive control using the optimal electrode curve, etc. Therefore, this study induced quality factors for the real-time quality control of nuclear fuel rod end plug weldment using instantaneous dynamic resistance (IDR), which incorporates the instantaneous value of secondary current and voltage of the transformer, and using instantaneous dynamic force (IDF), obtained real-time during welding.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy examination of a Fast Flux Test Facility irradiated U-10Zr fuel cross section clad with HT-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Jason M.; Porter, Douglas L.; Miller, Brandon D.; Trowbridge, Tammy L.; Carmack, William J.

    2017-10-01

    Observations from a scanning electron microscopy examination of irradiated U-10Zr fuel are presented. The sample studied had a local burnup of 5.7 atom percent and a local inner cladding temperature of 615 °C. This examination by electron microscopy has concentrated on producing data relevant to facilitating a better understanding of Zr redistribution in irradiated U-10Zr fuel and on a better understanding of the complex microstructure present in fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) layers. The presented zirconium redistribution data supplements the existing literature by providing a data set at these particular local conditions. In addition to FCCI layers that are readily visible in optical microscopy, this examination has revealed lanthanide degradation of the cladding by what appears to be a grain boundary facilitated pathway. Precipitates of fission produced Pd-lanthanide compounds were observed in the fuel. Precipitated regions with elevated Mo and elevated W content were also observed in the HT-9 cladding of this sample.

  14. Experiments for evaluation of corrosion to develop storage criteria for interim dry storage of aluminum-alloy clad spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peacock, H.B.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.; Murphy, T.H.

    1994-11-01

    The technical bases for specification of limits to environmental exposure conditions to avoid excessive degradation are being developed for storage criteria for dry storage of highly-enriched, aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuels owned by the US Department of Energy. Corrosion of the aluminum cladding is a limiting degradation mechanism (occurs at lowest temperature) for aluminum exposed to an environment containing water vapor. Attendant radiation fields of the fuels can lead to production of nitric acid in the presence of air and water vapor and would exacerbate the corrosion of aluminum by lowering the pH of the water solution. Laboratory-scale specimens are being exposed to various conditions inside an autoclave facility to measure the corrosion of the fuel matrix and cladding materials through weight change measurements and metallurgical analysis. In addition, electrochemical corrosion tests are being performed to supplement the autoclave testing by measuring differences in the general corrosion and pitting corrosion behavior of the aluminum cladding alloys and the aluminum-uranium fuel materials in water solutions.

  15. Determination of the rod-wise fission gas release fraction in a complete fuel assembly using non-destructive gamma emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcombe, Scott, E-mail: scott.holcombe@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology – OECD Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); Andersson, Peter; Svärd, Staffan Jacobsson [Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Hallstadius, Lars [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 22, 72163 Västerås (Sweden)

    2016-11-21

    A gamma tomography instrument has been developed at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) in cooperation between the Institute for Energy Technology, Westinghouse (Sweden) and Uppsala University. The instrument is used to record the gamma radiation field surrounding complete fuel assemblies and consists of a shielded enclosure with fixtures to accurately position the fuel and detector relative to each other. A High Purity Germanium detector is used for acquiring high-resolution spectroscopic data, allowing for analysis of multiple gamma-ray peaks. Using the data extracted from the selected peaks, tomographic reconstruction algorithms are used to reproduce the corresponding spatial gamma-ray source distributions within the fuel assembly. With this method, rod-wise data can be can be deduced without the need to dismantle the fuel. In this work, the tomographic device has been experimentally benchmarked for non-destructive rod-wise determination of the Fission Gas Release (FGR) fraction. Measurements were performed on the fuel-stack and gas-plenum regions of a complete fuel assembly, and quantitative tomographic reconstructions of the measurement data were performed in order to determine the rod-wise ratio of {sup 85}Kr in the gas plenum to {sup 137}Cs in the fuel stack. The rod-wise ratio of {sup 85}Kr/{sup 137}Cs was, in turn, used to calculate the rod-wise FGR fraction. In connection to the tomographic measurements, the fuel rods were also measured individually using gamma scanning in order to provide an experimental benchmark for the tomographic method. Fuel rods from two donor driver fuel assemblies were placed into a nine-rod HBWR driver fuel assembly configuration. In order to provide a challenging measurement object and thus an appropriate benchmark for the tomographic method, five rods were taken from an assembly with a burnup of 51 MWd/kgUO{sub 2}, and four rods were from an assembly with a burnup of 26 MWd/kgUO{sub 2}. At the time of the measurements, the

  16. Evidence of tellurium iodide compounds in a power-ramped irradiated UO{sub 2} fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desgranges, L., E-mail: lionel.desgranges@cea.fr [CEA/DEN/DEC CE Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Riglet-Martial, Ch.; Aubrun, I.; Pasquet, B.; Roure, I.; Lamontagne, J.; Blay, T. [CEA/DEN/DEC CE Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-06-15

    The existence of tellurium iodide compounds was evidenced in power-ramped UO{sub 2} irradiated fuel by means of post-test SIMS analysis that showed both volatile fission product releases from the pellet centre and precipitates composed of these volatile fission products on the fuel periphery. Thermodynamic calculations confirmed the stability of TeI{sub x} gaseous phases in equilibrium with irradiated UO{sub 2}. Both the experimental and theoretical results offer a strong incentive to consider TeI{sub x} compounds for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the cladding during a power ramp instead of CsI since TeI{sub x} compounds are more corrosive to Zircaloy cladding than CsI.

  17. Computerized operating procedures for shearing and dissolution of segments from LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osudar, J.; Deeken, P.G.; Graczyk, D.G.; Fagan, J.E.; Martino, F.J.; Parks, J.E.; Levitz, N.M.; Kessie, R.W.; Leddin, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    This report presents two detailed computerized operating procedures developed to assist and control the shearing and dissolution of irradiated fuel rods. The procedures were employed in the destructive analysis of end-of-life fuel rods from the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) that was designed by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. Seventeen entire fuel rods from the end-of-life core of the LWBR were sheared into 169 precisely characterized segments, and more than 150 of these segments were dissolved during execution of the LWBR Proof-of-Breeding (LWBR-POB) Analytical Support Project at Argonne National Laboratory. The procedures illustrate our approaches to process monitoring, data reduction, and quality assurance during the LWBR-POB work.

  18. Three-dimensional fuel pin model validation by prediction of hydrogen distribution in cladding and comparison with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Avramova, Maria [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Lacroix, E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Manera, Annalisa [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Walter, D. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Williamson, R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gamble, K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-10-29

    To correctly describe and predict this hydrogen distribution there is a need for multi-physics coupling to provide accurate three-dimensional azimuthal, radial, and axial temperature distributions in the cladding. Coupled high-fidelity reactor-physics codes with a sub-channel code as well as with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool have been used to calculate detailed temperature distributions. These high-fidelity coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics code systems are coupled further with the fuel-performance BISON code with a kernel (module) for hydrogen. Both hydrogen migration and precipitation/dissolution are included in the model. Results from this multi-physics analysis is validated utilizing calculations of hydrogen distribution using models informed by data from hydrogen experiments and PIE data.

  19. NSRR experiment with un-irradiated uranium-zirconium hydride fuel. Design, fabrication process and inspection data of test fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasajima, Hideo; Fuketa, Toyoshi; Ishijima, Kiyomi; Kuroha, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Yoshikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Aizawa, Keiichi

    1998-08-01

    An experiment plan is progressing in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to perform pulse-irradiation with uranium-zirconium hydride (U-ZrH{sub x}) fuel. This fuel is widely used in the training research and isotope production reactor of GA (TRIGA). The objectives of the experiment are to determine the fuel rod failure threshold and to investigate fuel behavior under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. This report summarizes design, fabrication process and inspection data of the test fuel rods before pulse-irradiation. The experiment with U-ZrH{sub x} fuel will realize precise safety evaluation, and improve the TRIGA reactor performance. The data to be obtained in this program will also contribute development of next-generation TRIGA reactor and its safety evaluation. (author)

  20. Structural cladding /clad structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure...... of materials, the structural features and the construction details of building systems in selected architectural works. With a particular focus at heavy constructions made of solid wood and masonry, and light weight constructions made of wooden frame structures and steel profiles, it is the intention...... tightness in constructions. At the same time a need for longevity and effortless maintenance have lead to contemporary architectural structures, where the exterior walls and the building envelope most often are made of several layers of advanced materials and separate building elements. In most contemporary...

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation on Hydrided LWR Fuel Cladding by Small Angle Incoherent Neutron Scattering of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yong [ORNL; Qian, Shuo [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Plummer, Lee K [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A non-destructive neutron scattering method was developed to precisely measure the uptake of total hydrogen in nuclear grade Ziraloy-4 cladding. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and H gas. By controlling the initial H gas pressure in the vessel and the temperature profile, target H concentrations from tens of ppm to a few thousands of wppm have been successfully achieved. Following H charging, the H content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method (VHE), by which the samples with desired H concentration were selected for the neutron study. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering (SANIS) were performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge national Laboratory (ORNL). Our study indicates that a very small amount ( 20 ppm) H in commercial Zr cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes for a wide range of H concentration by a nondestructive method. The H distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor, which is determined by calibration process with direct chemical analysis method on the specimen. This scale factor can be used for future test with unknown H concentration, thus provide a nondestructive method for absolute H concentration determination.

  2. Improving 6061-Al Grain Growth and Penetration across HIP-Bonded Clad Interfaces in Monolithic Fuel Plates: Initial Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackenberg, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McCabe, Rodney J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Montalvo, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clarke, Kester D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dvornak, Matthew J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Edwards, Randall L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trujillo, R. Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aikin, Beverly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vargas, Victor D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hollis, Kendall J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lienert, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Forsyth, Robert T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harada, Kiichi L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-05-06

    Grain penetration across aluminum-aluminum cladding interfaces in research reactor fuel plates is desirable and was obtained by a legacy roll-bonding process, which attained 20-80% grain penetration. Significant grain penetration in monolithic fuel plates produced by Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) fabrication processing is equally desirable but has yet to be attained. The goal of this study was to modify the 6061-Al in such a way as to promote a much greater extent of crossinterface grain penetration in monolithic fuel plates fabricated by the HIP process. This study documents the outcomes of several strategies attempted to attain this goal. The grain response was characterized using light optical microscopy (LOM) electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) as a function of these prospective process modifications done to the aluminum prior to the HIP cycle. The strategies included (1) adding macroscopic gaps in the sandwiches to enhance Al flow, (2) adding engineering asperities to enhance Al flow, (3) adding stored energy (cold work), and (4) alternative cleaning and coating. Additionally, two aqueous cleaning methods were compared as baseline control conditions. The results of the preliminary scoping studies in all the categories are presented. In general, none of these approaches were able to obtain >10% grain penetration. Recommended future work includes further development of macroscopic grooving, transferred-arc cleaning, and combinations of these with one another and with other processes.

  3. Eddy current NDT: a suitable tool to measure oxide layer thickness in PWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Donizete A.; Silva Junior, Silverio F. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: daa@cdtn.br, e-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br; Vieira, Andre L.P.S. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB S.A.), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Fabrica de Combustivel Nuclear], e-mail: andre@inb.gov.br; Soares, Adolpho [Technotest Consultoria e Acessoria Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: adolpho@technotest.com.br

    2009-07-01

    Eddy current is a nondestructive test (NDT) widely used in industry to support integrity analysis of components and equipment. In the nuclear area it is frequently applied to inspect tubes installed in tube exchangers, such as steam generators and condensers in PWR plants, as well as turbine blades. Adequately assisted by means of robotic devices, that inspection method has been pointed as a suitable tool to perform accurate oxide layer thickness measurements in PWR fuel rods. This paper shows some theoretical aspects and physical operating principles of the inspection method, as well as test probes construction details, and the calibration reference standards fabrication processes. Furthermore, some data, experimentally obtained at INB laboratories and other technical information obtained from TECNATOM S.A. are presented, showing the accuracy and efficacy of such NDT method. (author)

  4. Structure Optimization Design of the Electronically Controlled Fuel Control Rod System in a Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor ride comfort and shorter clutch life span are the key factors restricting the commercialization of automated manual transmission (AMT. For nonelectrically controlled engines or AMT where cooperative control between the engine and the transmission is not realizable, applying electronically controlled fuel control rod systems (ECFCRS is an effective way to solve these problems. By applying design software such as CATIA, Matlab and Simulink, and MSC Adams, a suite of optimization design methods for ECFCRS drive mechanisms are developed here. Based on these new methods, design requirements can be analyzed comprehensively and the design scheme can be modified easily, thus greatly shortening the design cycle. The bench tests and real vehicle tests indicate that the system developed achieves preferable engine speed following-up performance and engine speed regulating performance. The method developed has significance as a reference for developing other vehicle systems.

  5. Compact Hybrid Laser Rod and Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, George E. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor); Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid fiber rod includes a fiber core and inner and outer cladding layers. The core is doped with an active element. The inner cladding layer surrounds the core, and has a refractive index substantially equal to that of the core. The outer cladding layer surrounds the inner cladding layer, and has a refractive index less than that of the core and inner cladding layer. The core length is about 30 to 2000 times the core diameter. A hybrid fiber rod laser system includes an oscillator laser, modulating device, the rod, and pump laser diode(s) energizing the rod from opposite ends. The rod acts as a waveguide for pump radiation but allows for free-space propagation of laser radiation. The rod may be used in a laser resonator. The core length is less than about twice the Rayleigh range. Degradation from single-mode to multi-mode beam propagation is thus avoided.

  6. Starting Point, Keys and Milestones of a Computer Code for the Simulation of the Behaviour of a Nuclear Fuel Rod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando C. Marino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The BaCo code (“Barra Combustible” was developed at the Atomic Energy National Commission of Argentina (CNEA for the simulation of nuclear fuel rod behaviour under irradiation conditions. We present in this paper a brief description of the code and the strategy used for the development, improvement, enhancement, and validation of a BaCo during the last 30 years. “Extreme case analysis”, parametric (or sensitivity, probabilistic (or statistic analysis plus the analysis of the fuel performance (full core analysis are the tools developed in the structure of BaCo in order to improve the understanding of the burnup extension in the Atucha I NPP, and the design of advanced fuel elements as CARA and CAREM. The 3D additional tools of BaCo can enhance the understanding of the fuel rod behaviour, the fuel design, and the safety margins. The modular structure of the BaCo code and its detailed coupling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation-induced phenomena make it a powerful tool for the prediction of the influence of material properties on the fuel rod performance and integrity.

  7. Analysis and Experimental Qualification of an Irradiation Capsule Design for Testing Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cladding in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kurt R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is currently investigating a number of advanced nuclear fuel cladding concepts to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactors. Alumina-forming ferritic alloys (e.g., FeCrAl) are some of the leading candidates to replace traditional zirconium alloys due to their superior oxidation resistance, provided no prohibitive irradiation-induced embrittlement occurs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed experimental designs to irradiate thin-walled cladding tubes with representative pressurized water reactor geometry in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) under relevant temperatures. These designs allow for post-irradiation examination (PIE) of cladding that closely resembles expected commercially viable geometries and microstructures. The experiments were designed using relatively inexpensive rabbit capsules for the irradiation vehicle. The simplistic designs combined with the extremely high neutron flux in the HFIR allow for rapid testing of a large test matrix, thus reducing the time and cost needed to advanced cladding materials closer to commercialization. The designs are flexible in that they allow for testing FeCrAl alloys, stainless steels, Inconel alloys, and zirconium alloys (as a reference material) both with and without hydrides. This will allow a direct comparison of the irradiation performance of advanced cladding materials with traditional zirconium alloys. PIE will include studies of dimensional change, microstructure variation, mechanical performance, etc. This work describes the capsule design, neutronic and thermal analyses, and flow testing that were performed to support the qualification of this new irradiation vehicle.

  8. Technical Development of Gamma Scanning for Irradiated Fuel Rod after Upgrade of System in Hot-cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, Hee Moon; Baik, Seung Je; Yoo, Byung Ok; Choo, Yong Sun

    2007-06-15

    Non-destructive test system was installed at hot-cell(M1) in IMEF(Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) more than 10 years ago for the diametric measurement and gamma scanning of fuel rod. But this system must be needed to be remodeled for the effective operations. In 2006, the system was upgraded for 3 months. The collimator bench can be movable with horizontal direction(x-direction) by motorized system for sectional gamma scanning and 3-dimensional tomography of fuel rod. So, gamma scanning for fuel rod can be detectable by x, y and rotation directions. It may be possible to obtain the radioactivities with radial and axial directions of pellet. This system is good for the series experiments with several positions. Operation of fuel bench and gamma detection program were linked each other by new program tools. It can control detection and bench moving automatically when gamma inspection of fuel rod is carried out with axial or radial positions. Some of electronic parts were added in PLC panel, and operating panel was re-designed for the remote control. To operate the fuel bench by computer, AD converter and some I/O cards were installed in computer. All of software were developed in Windows-XP system instead of DOS system. Control programs were made by visual-C language. After upgrade of system, DUPIC fuel which was irradiated in HANARO research reactor was detected by gamma scanning. The results were good and operation of gamma scanning showed reduced inspection time and easy control of data on series of detection with axial positions. With consideration of ECT(Eddy Current Test) installation, the computer program and hardware were set up as well. But ECT is not installed yet, so we have to check abnormal situation of program and hardware system. It is planned to install ECT in 2007.

  9. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    Fuel is one of the essential components in a reactor. It is within that fuel that nuclear reactions take place, i.e. fission of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium. Fuel is at the core of the reactor, but equally at the core of the nuclear system as a whole. Fuel design and properties influence reactor behavior, performance, and safety. Even though it only accounts for a small part of the cost per kilowatt-hour of power provided by current nuclear power plants, good utilization of fuel is a major economic issue. Major advances have yet to be achieved, to ensure longer in-reactor dwell-time, thus enabling fuel to yield more energy; and improve ruggedness. Aside from economics, and safety, such strategic issues as use of plutonium, conservation of resources, and nuclear waste management have to be addressed, and true technological challenges arise. This Monograph surveys current knowledge regarding in-reactor behavior, operating limits, and avenues for R and D. It also provides illustrations of ongoing research work, setting out a few noteworthy results recently achieved. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - Water reactor fuel: What are the features of water reactor fuel? 9 (What is the purpose of a nuclear fuel?, Ceramic fuel, Fuel rods, PWR fuel assemblies, BWR fuel assemblies); Fabrication of water reactor fuels (Fabrication of UO{sub 2} pellets, Fabrication of MOX (mixed uranium-plutonium oxide) pellets, Fabrication of claddings); In-reactor behavior of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels (Irradiation conditions during nominal operation, Heat generation, and removal, The processes involved at the start of irradiation, Fission gas behavior, Microstructural changes); Water reactor fuel behavior in loss of tightness conditions (Cladding, the first containment barrier, Causes of failure, Consequences of a failure); Microscopic morphology of fuel ceramic and its evolution under irradiation; Migration and localization of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices (The ceramic under

  10. Effects of Lower Drying-Storage Temperature on the Ductility of High-Burnup PWR Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Burtseva, T. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-08-30

    The purpose of this research effort is to determine the effects of canister and/or cask drying and storage on radial hydride precipitation in, and potential embrittlement of, high-burnup (HBU) pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding alloys during cooling for a range of peak drying-storage temperatures (PCT) and hoop stresses. Extensive precipitation of radial hydrides could lower the failure hoop stresses and strains, relative to limits established for as-irradiated cladding from discharged fuel rods stored in pools, at temperatures below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  11. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK•CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 °C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2, TiO2, ZrSiO4) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 °C, solution annealing at 1050 °C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 °C, final annealing at 1050 °C, straightening and final aging at 800 °C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO2 were loaded in the Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial and final reduction rates, temperature, duration, atmosphere and furnace). Specific non

  12. Thermal-hydraulics analysis of a PWR reactor using zircaloy and carbide silicon reinforced with type S fibers as fuel claddings: Simulation of a channel blockage transient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuck, Vinicius; Ramos, Mario C.; Faria, Rochkhudson B.; Reis, Patricia A.L.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: rochkdefaria@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: matuck747@gmail.com, E-mail: patricialire@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    A detailed thermal-hydraulic reactor model using as reference data from the Angra 2 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) has been developed and SiC reinforced with Hi-Nicalon type S fibers (SiC HNS) was used as fuel cladding. The goal is to compare its behavior from the thermal viewpoint with the Zircaloy, at the steady- state and transient conditions. The RELAP-3D was used to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis and a blockage transient has been investigated at full power operation. The transient considered is related to total obstruction of a core cooling channel of one fuel assembly. The calculations were performed using a point kinetic model. The reactor behavior after this transient was analyzed and the time evolution of cladding and coolant temperatures mass flow and void fraction are presented. (author)

  13. Obtention and physical and microstructural characterization of monolhitic U-2.5Zr-7.5Zr alloy fuel plate cladded in zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Geraldo Correa; Torres, Felipe Silva; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos; Paula, Joao Bosco de; Brina, Jose Giovanni Mascarenhas; Lameiras, Fernando Soares; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A major advantage of monolithic metallic nuclear fuel is due to the higher density of uranium achieved when compared with the usual dispersion fuel. The benefit of utilizing a fuel with a higher density of uranium is that it provides a higher neutron flux which, in turn, allows the replacement of high enrichment uranium by low enriched one in order to obtain the maximum fuel enrichment of 20% U-235, as established under international agreements. Some transition metals such as Zr, Mo, Nb have been used in developing uranium alloys for apply in nuclear reactors in order to retain the gamma phase of high structural stability. The ternary alloy elements uranium, zirconium and niobium have the advantage of combining a greater mechanical resistance due to zirconium with high corrosion resistance afforded by niobium, allowing of a high performance fuel. Added to this, the use of zircaloy cladding, replacing the aluminum alloys, allows the development of a higher burn-up fuel throughout reactor operation. This may be explained due to increased chemical stability of the zircaloy when in contact with uranium alloys, instead of cladding with aluminum alloys. The fuel plate cladded with aluminum alloys favors the formation of deleterious chemical reactions products between aluminum and uranium alloys with serious consequences to the fuel performance. In this work, the development of monolithic fuel plate is done using a technique called 'picture-frame'. In this way, it is obtained a sandwich comprising of a U-2.5Zr-7.5NB monolithic alloy, instead of the usual dispersion of the alloy in a metal matrix, coupled to a frame and cladded by zircaloy plates. The sandwich thus obtained was then hot and cold rolled. Samples cut from the fuel plate were prepared by the usual metallography techniques, and then analyzed by physical and microstructural techniques of X-ray diffraction, optical and electron microscopy, microanalysis of energy dispersive (EDS), Vickers microhardness

  14. Sipping test update device for fuel elements cladding inspections in IPR-r1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.R.; Mesquita, A.Z.; Andrade, E.P.D.; Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: rrr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br, E-mail: edson@cdtn.br, E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    It is in progress at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN (Nuclear Technology Development Center), a research project that aims to investigate possible leaks in the fuel elements of the TRIGA reactor, located in this research center. This paper presents the final form of sipping test device for TRIGA reactor, and results of the first experiments setup. Mechanical support strength tests were made by knotting device on the crane, charged with water from the conventional water supply, and tests outside the reactor pool with the use of new non-irradiated fuel elements encapsulated in stainless steel, and available safe stored in this unit. It is expected that tests with graphite elements from reactor pool are done soon after and also the test experiment with the first fuel elements in service positioned in the B ring (central ring) of the reactor core in the coming months. (author)

  15. A study on the instrumentation technology for the irradiation of the DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Yong; Bae, K. K.; Moon, J. S.; Park, H. S.; Song, K. C.; Jung, I. H.; Kang, K. H.; Yang, M. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Cho, Y. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    The advanced countries have a great experience for the irradiation test of material and nuclear fuel from 1960's. Especially, instruments and instrument attachment technology and irradiation equipment have been developed for this purpose. The techniques described in this report are temperature measurement of fuel rod cladding surface and fuel centerline, cladding elongation, fuel stack elongation, fuel rod pressure by fission gas release. As a result of analysis we define the instrumentation techniques for the DUPIC fuel irradiation test at HANARO. The development of high temperature thermocouple, the method of attachment to fuel cladding and inside the fuel, the method of fuel rod elongation and fuel rod pressure measurement (by LVDT) are essential techniques. In addition to the instrumentation technique, re-instrumentation technique have been developed for high burn-up fuel in commercial reactor. The re-instrumentation is a technique of re-fabrication and instrumentation of irradiated fuel rod. It technology can be utilized as a reference for us to develop instrumented test rig with a remote manner. 19 refs., 38 figs. (Author)

  16. Investigations of Aluminum-Doped Self-Healing Zircaloy Surfaces in Context of Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, James; Vasudevamurthy, Gokul; Snead, Lance; Hinderliter, Brian; Massey, Caleb

    2016-06-01

    We present here some important results investigating aluminum as an effective surface dopant for increased oxidation resistance of zircaloy nuclear fuel cladding. At first, the transport behavior of aluminum into reactor grade zircaloy was studied using simple diffusion couples at temperatures greater than 770 K. The experiments revealed the formation of tens of microns thick graded Zr-Al layers. The activation energy of aluminum in zircaloy was found to be ~175 kJ/mol (~1.8 eV), indicating the high mobility of aluminum in zircaloy. Subsequently, aluminum sputter-coated zircaloy coupons were heat-treated to achieve surface doping and form compositionally graded layers. These coupons were then tested in steam environments at 1073 and 1273 K. The microstructure of the as-fabricated and steam-corroded specimens was compared to those of pure zircaloy control specimens. Analysis of data revealed that aluminum effectively competed with zircaloy for oxygen up until 1073 K blocking oxygen penetration, with no traces of large scale spalling, indicating mechanically stable interfaces and surfaces. At the highest steam test temperatures, aluminum was observed to segregate from the Zr-Al alloy under layers and migrate to the surface forming discrete clusters. Although this is perceived as an extremely desirable phenomenon, in the current experiments, oxygen was observed to penetrate into the zirconium-rich under layers, which could be attributed to formation of surface defects such as cracks in the surface alumina layers.

  17. Study of corrosion and deposit on fuel cladding under heat flux. Adjustment of an original experimental device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foucault, M.; Albinet, B.; Lucotte, J.P.; Thomazet, J. [Framatome ANP (France)

    2002-07-01

    I INTRODUCTION The cycle extension imposes an increase of the boric acid concentration of the primary environment at the beginning of the cycles. This evolution modifies the chemical and electrochemical conditions in the primary system. The main effect is to reduce the pH of the environment. The solubility of metal cations is dependent on the temperature and the pH of the solution. The solubility limit of iron is decreasing with the temperature in the range 300 - 360 C if the pH is lowered than a critical value which is near 5.8 [1]. The figure 1 gives for instance the evolution for iron solubility limit with temperature in this pH condition. Thus the metal release of the primary system can be the source of deposit on fuel cladding during cycles. In parallel, in the modern PWR's, the surface power density is increased, leading to higher surface temperature with risk of boiling. (authors)

  18. Chemical compatibility between UO2 fuel and SiC cladding for LWRs. Application to ATF (Accident-Tolerant Fuels)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, James; Guéneau, Christine; Alpettaz, Thierry; Sauder, Cédric; Brackx, Emmanuelle; Domenger, Renaud; Gossé, Stéphane; Balbaud-Célérier, Fanny

    2017-04-01

    Silicon carbide-silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) composites are considered to replace the current zirconium-based cladding materials thanks to their good behavior under irradiation and their resistance under oxidative environments at high temperature. In the present work, a thermodynamic analysis of the UO2±x/SiC system is performed. Moreover, using two different experimental methods, the chemical compatibility of SiC towards uranium dioxide, with various oxygen contents (UO2±x) is investigated in the 1500-1970 K temperature range. The reaction leads to the formation of mainly uranium silicides and carbides phases along with CO and SiO gas release. Knudsen Cell Mass Spectrometry is used to measure the gas release occurring during the reaction between UO2+x and SiC powders as function of time and temperature. These experimental conditions are representative of an open system. Diffusion couple experiments with pellets are also performed to study the reaction kinetics in closed system conditions. In both cases, a limited chemical reaction is observed below 1700 K, whereas the reaction is enhanced at higher temperature due to the decomposition of SiC leading to Si vaporization. The temperature of formation of the liquid phase is found to lie between 1850 < T < 1950 K.

  19. Power Burst Facility: U(18)O2-CaO-ZrO2 Fuel Rods in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose Ignacio Marquez Damian; Alexis Weir; Valeria L. Putnam; John D. Bess

    2009-09-01

    The Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactor operated from 1972 to 1985 on the SPERT Area I of the Idaho National Laboratory, then known as Nuclear Reactor Test Station. PBF was designed to provide experimental data to aid in defining thresholds for and modes of failure under postulated accident conditions. PBF reactor startup testing began in 1972. This evaluation focuses on two operational loading tests, chronologically numbered 1 and 2, published in a startup-test report in 1974 [1]. Data for these tests was used by one of the authors to validate a MCNP model for criticality safety purposes [2]. Although specific references to original documents are kept in the text, all the reactor parameters and test specific data presented here was adapted from that report. The tests were performed with operational fuel loadings, a stainless steel in-pile tube (IPT) mockup, a neutron source, four pulse chambers, two fission chambers, and one ion chamber. The reactor's four transition rods (TRs) and control rods (CRs) were present but TR boron was completely withdrawn below the core and CR boron was partially withdrawn above the core. Test configurations differ primarily in the number of shim rods, and consequently the number of fuel rods included in the core. The critical condition was approached by incrementally and uniformly withdrawing CR boron from the core. Based on the analysis of the experimental data and numerical calculations, both experiments are considered acceptable as criticality safety benchmarks.

  20. CFD modelling of supercritical water flow and heat transfer in a 2 × 2 fuel rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podila, Krishna, E-mail: krishna.podila@cnl.ca; Rao, Yanfei, E-mail: yanfei.rao@cnl.ca

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Bare and wire wrapped 2 × 2 fuel rod bundles were modelled with CFD. • Sensitivity of predictions to SST k–ω, v{sup 2}–f and turbulent Prandtl number was tested. • CFD predictions were assessed with experimentally reported fuel wall temperatures. - Abstract: In the present assessment of the CFD code, two heat transfer experiments using water at supercritical pressures were selected: a 2 × 2 rod bare bundle; and a 2 × 2 rod wire-wrapped bundle. A systematic 3D CFD study of the fluid flow and heat transfer at supercritical pressures for the rod bundle geometries was performed with the key parameter being the fuel rod wall temperature. The sensitivity of the prediction to the steady RANS turbulence models of SST k–ω, v{sup 2}–f and turbulent Prandtl number (Pr{sub t}) was tested to ensure the reliability of the predicted wall temperature obtained for the current analysis. Using the appropriate turbulence model based on the sensitivity analysis, the mesh refinement, or the grid convergence, was performed for the two geometries. Following the above sensitivity analyses and mesh refinements, the recommended CFD model was then assessed against the measurements from the two experiments. It was found that the CFD model adopted in the current work was able to qualitatively capture the trends reported by the experiments but the degree of temperature rise along the heated length was underpredicted. Moreover, the applicability of turbulence models varied case-by-case and the performance evaluation of the turbulence models was primarily based on its ability to predict the experimentally reported fuel wall temperatures. Of the two turbulence models tested, the SST k–ω was found to be better at capturing the measurements at pseudo-critical and supercritical test conditions, whereas the v{sup 2}–f performed better at sub-critical test conditions. Along with the appropriate turbulence model, CFD results were found to be particularly sensitive to

  1. Preliminary developments of miniplate-type fuel of U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb alloy dispersed and cladded in zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantagalli, Natalia Mattar; Faeda, Kelly Cristina Martins; Braga, Daniel Martins; Paula, Joao Bosco de; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa, E-mail: natalia.cantagalli@prof.una.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear fuel based on uranium metal alloys is utilized in research and test reactors. For the purpose of the reduction of fuel enrichment, high densities of uranium-235 in this kind of fuel are needed. This can be achieved when uranium alloys are used containing elements such as Zr, Mo and Nb. The construction of fuel element with high-uranium density requires materials with low cross sections for neutron absorption, stability under irradiation and thermal cycling, as also absence of the chemical interactions between the fuel and cladding elements. In case of U-Zr-Nb alloys, zircaloy (Zry) cladding is a better option due to the fact that they have a higher chemical compatibility with zirconium alloys when compared with the use of aluminum alloys. This study aims to develop plate type nuclear fuel using the U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb alloy dispersed in Zry. Powders of the U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb alloy were obtained by hydriding-dehydriding process. Uranium alloy and Zry powders were homogenized, compacted in pellets, placed between two Zry plates as a sandwich. This assembly was hot rolled forming the dispersion fuel plate which was characterized by density and microhardness measurements, phases evaluation, grain sizes, pores and precipitates presences. It was observed by visual inspection that the fuel plate showed no failures and a perfect metallurgical bonding. Results obtained by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) show that there is no interaction between the U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb alloy and Zry matrix revealing a fuel with properties of high stability. (author)

  2. Fission gas release during power change. Re-irradiation test of LWR fuel rod at JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Jinichi; Furuta, Teruo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Endo, Yasuichi; Ishii, Tadahiko; Shimizu, Michio

    1995-11-01

    A full length rod irradiated at Tsuruga unit 1 was refablicated to short length rods, and rod inner pressure gauges were re-instrumented to the rods. Re-irradiation tests to study the fission gas release during power change were carried out by means of BOCA/OSF-1 facility at JMTR. In the tests, steady state operation at 40kW/m, power cycling and daily load follow operations between 20 and 40kW/m were conducted for the same high power holding time, and the rod inner pressure change during the tests was measured. The rod inner pressure increase was observed during power change, especially during power reduction. The rod inner pressure increase during a power cycling depended on the length of the high power operation just before the power cycling. The width of the rod inner pressure increase during a power cycling decreased gradually as the power cycling was repeated continuously. When steady state operation and power cycling were repeated at the power levels of 30, 35 and 40kW/m, the power cycling accelerated the fission gas release compared with the steady state operation. The fission gas release during power reduction is estimated to be the release from FP gas bubbles on the grain boundary caused by the thermal stress in the pellet during power reduction. (author).

  3. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN U-MO DISPERSED FUEL OF FULL-SIZE FUEL ELEMENTS AND MINI-RODS IRRADIATED IN THE MIR REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSEY. L. IZHUTOV

    2013-12-01

    The full-size fuel rods were irradiated up to an average burnup of ∼ 60%235U; the mini-rods were irradiated to an average burnup of ∼ 85%235U. The presented data show a significant increase of the void fraction in the U-Mo alloy as the U-235 burnup rises from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%. The effect of irradiation test conditions and U-235 burnup were analyzed with regard to the formation of an interaction layer between the matrix and fuel particles as well as generation of porosity in the U-Mo alloy. Shown here are changes in distribution of U fission products as the U-235 burnup increases from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%.

  4. Modeling of Complex Wear Behavior Associated with Grid-to-Rod Fretting in Light Water Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, P. J.; Qu, J.; Lu, R.

    2016-11-01

    Fretting wear damage to fuel cladding from flow-induced vibrations can be a significant concern in the operation of light water nuclear reactors. For years, research on the grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) phenomena has been underway in countries where nuclear power production is a significant industry. Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, an effort has been underway to develop and test an engineering wear model for zirconium alloy fuel rod cladding against a supporting grid. The multi-stage model accounts for oxide layers and wear rate transitions. This paper describes the basis for a GTRF engineering wear model, the physical significance of the wear factor it contains, and recent progress toward model validation based on a fretting wear testing apparatus that accounts for coolant temperature, pressure, and the presence of periodic impacts (gaps) in grid/rod contact.

  5. Effect of bundle size on cladding deformation in LOCA simulation tests. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, R.H.; Crowley, J.L.; Longest, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    Two LOCA simulation tests were conducted to investigate the effects of temperature uniformity and radial restraint boundary conditions on Zircaloy cladding deformation. In one of the tests (B-5), boundary conditions typical of a large array were imposed on an inner 4 x 4 square array by two concentric rings of interacting guard fuel pin simulators. In the other test (B-3), the boundary conditions were imposed on a 4 x 4 square array by a non-interacting heated shroud. Test parameters conducive to large deformation were selected in order to favor rod-to-rod interactions. The tests showed that rod-to-rod interactions play an important role in the deformation process.

  6. Rod internal pressure quantification and distribution analysis using Frapcon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessee, Matthew Anderson [ORNL; Wieselquist, William A [ORNL; Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State University, University Park

    2015-09-01

    This report documents work performed supporting the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) under work breakdown structure element 1.02.08.10, ST Analysis. In particular, this report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT- 15OR0810036, Quantify effects of power uncertainty on fuel assembly characteristics, within work package FT-15OR081003 ST Analysis-ORNL. This research was also supported by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (http://www.casl.gov), an Energy Innovation Hub (http://www.energy.gov/hubs) for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. The discharge rod internal pressure (RIP) and cladding hoop stress (CHS) distributions are quantified for Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) fuel rods by modeling core cycle design data, operation data (including modeling significant trips and downpowers), and as-built fuel enrichments and densities of each fuel rod in FRAPCON-3.5. A methodology is developed which tracks inter-cycle assembly movements and assembly batch fabrication information to build individual FRAPCON inputs for each evaluated WBN1 fuel rod. An alternate model for the amount of helium released from the zirconium diboride (ZrB2) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) layer is derived and applied to FRAPCON output data to quantify the RIP and CHS for these types of fuel rods. SCALE/Polaris is used to quantify fuel rodspecific spectral quantities and the amount of gaseous fission products produced in the fuel for use in FRAPCON inputs. Fuel rods with ZrB2 IFBA layers (i.e., IFBA rods) are determined to have RIP predictions that are elevated when compared to fuel rod without IFBA layers (i.e., standard rods) despite the fact that IFBA rods often have reduced fill pressures and annular fuel pellets. The primary contributor to elevated RIP predictions at burnups less than and greater than 30 GWd

  7. Effects of heat transfer coefficient treatments on thermal shock fracture prediction for LWR fuel claddings in water quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho; Lee, Jeong Ik; Cheon, Hee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Accurate modeling of thermal shock induced stresses has become ever most important to emerging accident-tolerant ceramic cladding concepts, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and SiC coated zircaloy. Since fractures of ceramic (entirely ceramic or coated) occur by excessive tensile stresses with linear elasticity, modeling transient stress distribution in the material provides a direct indication of the structural integrity. Indeed, even for the current zircaloy cladding material, the oxide layer formed on the surface - where cracks starts to develop upon water quenching - essentially behaves as a brittle ceramic. Hence, enhanced understanding of thermal shock fracture of a brittle material would fundamentally contribute to safety of nuclear reactors for both the current fuel design and that of the coming future. Understanding thermal shock fracture of a brittle material requires heat transfer rate between the solid and the fluid for transient temperature fields of the solid, and structural response of the solid under the obtained transient temperature fields. In water quenching, a solid experiences dynamic time-varying heat transfer rates with phase changes of the fluid over a short quenching period. Yet, such a dynamic change of heat transfer rates during the water quenching transience has been overlooked in assessments of mechanisms, predictability, and uncertainties for thermal shock fracture. Rather, a time-constant heat transfer coefficient, named 'effective heat transfer coefficient' has become a conventional input to thermal shock fracture analysis. No single constant heat transfer could suffice to depict the actual stress evolution subject to dynamic heat transfer coefficient changes with fluid phase changes. Use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient will remarkably increase predictability of thermal shock fracture of brittle materials and complete the picture of stress evolution in the quenched solid. The presented result

  8. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - integrated multi-scale multi-physics hierarchical modeling and simulation framework Part III: cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tome, Carlos N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, J A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lebensohn, R A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arsenlis, A [LLNL; Marian, J [LLNL; Pasamehmetoglu, K [INL

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Reactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems to develop predictive tools is critical. Not only are fabrication and performance models needed to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. In this paper we review the current status of the advanced modeling and simulation of nuclear reactor cladding, with emphasis on what is available and what is to be developed in each scale of the project, how we propose to pass information from one scale to the next, and what experimental information is required for benchmarking and advancing the modeling at each scale level.

  9. Light water reactor fuel response during reactivity initiated accident experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, P. E.; McCardell, R. K.; Martinson, Z. R.; Seiffert, S. L.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results from six recent Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactivity initiated accident (RIA) tests are compared with data from previous Special Power Excursion Reactor Test (SPERT), and Japanese Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) tests. The RIA fuel behavior experimental program recently started in the PBF is being conducted with coolant conditions typical of hot-startup conditions in a commercial boiling water reactor. The SPERT and NSRR test programs investigated the behavior of single or small clusters of light water reactor (LWR) type fuel rods under approximate room temperature and atmospheric pressure conditions in capsules containing stagnant water. As observed in the SPERT and NSRR tests, energy deposition, and consequent enthalpy increase in the PBF test fuel, appears to be the single most important variable. However, the consequences of failure at boiling water hot-startup system conditions appear to be more severe than previously observed in either the stagnant capsule SPERT or NSRR tests. Metallographic examination of both previously unirradiated and irradiated PBF fuel rod cross sections revealed extensive variation in cladding wall thicknesses (involving considerable plastic flow) and fuel shattering along grain boundaries in both restructured and unrestructured fuel regions. Oxidation of the cladding resulted in fracture at the location of cladding thinning and disintegration of the rods during quench. In addition,swelling of the gaseous and potentially volatile fission products in previously irradiated fuel resulted in volume increases of up to 180% and blockage of the coolant channels within the flow shrouds surrounding the fuel rods.

  10. Modelling of LOCA Tests with the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based, multidimensional nuclear fuel performance code that is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (USA). Recent advances of BISON include the extension of the code to the analysis of LWR fuel rod behaviour during loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). In this work, BISON models for the phenomena relevant to LWR cladding behaviour during LOCAs are described, followed by presentation of code results for the simulation of LOCA tests. Analysed experiments include separate effects tests of cladding ballooning and burst, as well as the Halden IFA-650.2 fuel rod test. Two-dimensional modelling of the experiments is performed, and calculations are compared to available experimental data. Comparisons include cladding burst pressure and temperature in separate effects tests, as well as the evolution of fuel rod inner pressure during ballooning and time to cladding burst. Furthermore, BISON three-dimensional simulations of separate effects tests are performed, which demonstrate the capability to reproduce the effect of azimuthal temperature variations in the cladding. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project, and the IAEA Coordinated Research Project FUMAC.

  11. On the effect of temperature on the threshold stress intensity factor of delayed hydride cracking in light water reactor fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holston, Anna-MariaAlvarez; Stjarnsater, Johan [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoping (Sweden)

    2017-06-15

    Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) was first observed in pressure tubes in Canadian CANDU reactors. In light water reactors, DHC was not observed until the late 1990s in high-burnup boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel cladding. In recent years, the focus on DHC has resurfaced in light of the increased interest in the cladding integrity during interim conditions. In principle, all spent fuel in the wet pools has sufficient hydrogen content for DHC to operate below 300°C. It is therefore of importance to establish the critical parameters for DHC to operate. This work studies the threshold stress intensity factor (K{sub IH}) to initiate DHC as a function of temperature in Zry-4 for temperatures between 227°C and 315°C. The experimental technique used in this study was the pin-loading testing technique. To determine the K{sub IH}, an unloading method was used where the load was successively reduced in a stepwise manner until no cracking was observed during 24 hours. The results showed that there was moderate temperature behavior at lower temperatures. Around 300°C, there was a sharp increase in K{sub IH} indicating the upper temperature limit for DHC. The value for K{sub IH} at 227°C was determined to be 2.6 ± 0.3 MPa √m.

  12. Results from Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Series 3 spent fuel dissolution tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1990-06-01

    The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), formerly the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Specimens prepared from pressurized water reactor fuel rod segments were tested in sealed stainless steel vessels in Nevada Test Site J-13 well water at 85{degree}C and 25{degree}C. The test matrix included three specimens of bare-fuel particles plus cladding hulls, two fuel rod segments with artificially defected cladding and water-tight end fittings, and an undefected fuel rod section with watertight end fittings. Periodic solution samples were taken during test cycles with the sample volumes replenished with fresh J-13 water. Test cycles were periodically terminated and the specimens restarted in fresh J-13 water. The specimens were run for three cycles for a total test duration of 15 months. 22 refs., 32 figs., 26 tabs.

  13. Fuel performance evaluation for the CAFE experimental device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Hirota, Leandro T., E-mail: claudia.giovedi@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP/CEA), Ipero, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares; Gomes, Daniel S.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Fuel rod cladding material is the second barrier to prevent the release of radioactive inventories in a PWR reactor. In this sense, an important safety aspect is to assess the fuel behavior under operational conditions. This can be made by means of fuel performance codes and confirmed by experimental measurements. In order to evaluate the fuel behavior of fuel rods in steady-state conditions, it was designed an experimental irradiation device, the Nuclear Fuel Irradiation Circuit (CAFE-Mod1). This device will allow controlling the surface rod temperature, to measure the power associated to the rod and the evolution of fission gas release for a typical PWR fuel pin. However, to support the experimental irradiation program, it is extremely important to simulate the experimental conditions using a fuel performance code. The aim of this paper is to evaluate some parameters and aspects related to the fuel rod behavior during the irradiation program. This evaluation was carried out by means of an adapted fuel performance code. Obtained results have shown that besides of the variation observed for parameters, such as, fuel temperature and fission gas release as a function of fuel enrichment level, the fuel rod integrity was preserved in all studied conditions. (author)

  14. A new fast neutron collar for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low enriched uranium fuel assemblies containing burnable poison rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Louise G., E-mail: evanslg@ornl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Schwalbach, Peter; Baere, Paul De [European Commission, Euratom Safeguards Office (Luxembourg); Browne, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-11-21

    Safeguards inspection measurements must be performed in a timely manner in order to detect the diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. A shorter measurement time can increase the number of items that a nuclear safeguards inspector can reliably measure during a period of access to a nuclear facility. In turn, this improves the reliability of the acquired statistical sample, which is used to inform decisions regarding compliance. Safeguards inspection measurements should also maintain independence from facility operator declarations. Existing neutron collars employ thermal neutron interrogation for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh fuel assemblies. A new fast neutron collar has been developed for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies containing gadolinia (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) burnable poison rods. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC) was designed with high neutron detection efficiency to make a fast (Cd) mode measurement viable whilst meeting the high counting precision and short assay time requirements of the Euratom safeguards inspectorate. A fast mode measurement reduces the instrument sensitivity to burnable poison rod content and therefore reduces the applied poison correction, consequently reducing the dependence on the operator declaration of the poison content within an assembly. The EFC non-destructive assay (NDA) of typical modern European pressurized water reactor (PWR) fresh fuel assembly designs have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-particle extended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. Simulations predict that the EFC can achieve 2% relative statistical uncertainty on the doubles neutron counting rate for a fast mode measurement in an assay time of 600 s (10 min) with the available {sup 241}AmLi (α,n) interrogation source strength of 5.7×10{sup 4} s{sup −1}. Furthermore, the calibration range of the new collar has been extended to verify {sup 235}U content in variable PWR fuel

  15. A new fast neutron collar for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low enriched uranium fuel assemblies containing burnable poison rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Louise G.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Schwalbach, Peter; Baere, Paul De; Browne, Michael C.

    2013-11-01

    Safeguards inspection measurements must be performed in a timely manner in order to detect the diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. A shorter measurement time can increase the number of items that a nuclear safeguards inspector can reliably measure during a period of access to a nuclear facility. In turn, this improves the reliability of the acquired statistical sample, which is used to inform decisions regarding compliance. Safeguards inspection measurements should also maintain independence from facility operator declarations. Existing neutron collars employ thermal neutron interrogation for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh fuel assemblies. A new fast neutron collar has been developed for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies containing gadolinia (Gd2O3) burnable poison rods. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC) was designed with high neutron detection efficiency to make a fast (Cd) mode measurement viable whilst meeting the high counting precision and short assay time requirements of the Euratom safeguards inspectorate. A fast mode measurement reduces the instrument sensitivity to burnable poison rod content and therefore reduces the applied poison correction, consequently reducing the dependence on the operator declaration of the poison content within an assembly. The EFC non-destructive assay (NDA) of typical modern European pressurized water reactor (PWR) fresh fuel assembly designs have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-particle extended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. Simulations predict that the EFC can achieve 2% relative statistical uncertainty on the doubles neutron counting rate for a fast mode measurement in an assay time of 600 s (10 min) with the available 241AmLi (α,n) interrogation source strength of 5.7×104 s-1. Furthermore, the calibration range of the new collar has been extended to verify 235U content in variable PWR fuel designs in the presence of up to 32

  16. An investigation of FeCrAl cladding behavior under normal operating and loss of coolant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, K. A.; Barani, T.; Pizzocri, D.; Hales, J. D.; Terrani, K. A.; Pastore, G.

    2017-08-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are candidates to be used as nuclear fuel cladding for increased accident tolerance. An analysis of the response of FeCrAl under normal operating and loss of coolant conditions has been performed using fuel performance modeling. In particular, recent information on FeCrAl material properties and phenomena from separate effects tests has been implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and analyses of integral fuel rod behavior with FeCrAl cladding have been performed. BISON simulations included both light water reactor normal operation and loss-of-coolant accidental transients. In order to model fuel rod behavior during accidents, a cladding failure criterion is desirable. For FeCrAl alloys, a failure criterion is developed using recent burst experiments under loss of coolant like conditions. The added material models are utilized to perform comparative studies with Zircaloy-4 under normal operating conditions and oxidizing and non-oxidizing out-of-pile loss of coolant conditions. The results indicate that for all conditions studied, FeCrAl behaves similarly to Zircaloy-4 with the exception of improved oxidation performance. Further experiments are required to confirm these observations.

  17. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material--ATM-104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material 104 (ATM-104), which is spent fuel from Assembly DO47 of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Unit 1), a pressurized-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-104 consists of 128 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 42 MWd/kgM and expected fission gas release of about 1%. A variety of analyses were performed to investigate cladding characteristics, radionuclide inventory, and redistribution of fission products. Characterization data include (1) fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling history; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) and electron probe microanalyses (EPMA); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding.

  18. Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel rods in HFIR experiments HRB-11 and -12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, F.J.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kania, M.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Thoms, K.R.; Robbins, J.M.; Wagner, P.

    1980-06-01

    Capsules HRB-11 and -12 were irradiated in support of development of weak-acid-resin-derived recycle fuel for the high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel cycle for the HTGR. Fissil fuel particles with initial oxygen-to-metal ratios between 1.0 and 1.7 performed acceptably to full burnup for HEU fuel. Particles with ratios below 1.0 showed excessive chemical interaction between rare earth fission products and the SiC layer.

  19. Hot Isostatic Press Can Optimization for Aluminum Cladding of U-10Mo Reactor Fuel Plates: FY12 Final Report and FY13 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Kester D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scott, Jeffrey E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aikin, Beverly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vargas, Victor D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dvornak, Matthew J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Duffield, Andrew N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weinberg, Richard Y. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alexander, David J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Montalvo, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hudson, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mihaila, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Liu, Cheng [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lovato, Manuel L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dombrowski, David E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-08-26

    Currently, the proposed processing path for low enriched uranium – 10 wt. pct. molybdenum alloy (LEU-10Mo) monolithic fuel plates for high power research and test reactors includes hot isostatic pressing (HIP) to bond the aluminum cladding that encapsulates the fuel foil. Initial HIP experiments were performed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on approximately ¼ scale “mini” fuel plate samples using a HIP can design intended for these smaller experimental trials. These experiments showed that, with the addition of a co-rolled zirconium diffusion barrier on the LEU-10Mo alloy fuel foil, the HIP bonding process is a viable method for producing monolithic fuel plates. Further experimental trials at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) effectively scaled-up the “mini” can design to produce full-size fuel prototypic plates. This report summarizes current efforts at LANL to produce a HIP can design that is further optimized for higher volume production runs. The production-optimized HIP can design goals were determined by LANL and Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) to include maintaining or improving the quality of the fuel plates produced with the baseline scaled-up mini can design, while minimizing material usage, improving dimensional stability, easing assembly and disassembly, eliminating machining, and significantly reducing welding. The initial small-scale experiments described in this report show that a formed-can approach can achieve the goals described above. Future work includes scaling the formed-can approach to full-size fuel plates, and current progress toward this goal is also summarized here.

  20. SCORE-EVET: a computer code for the multidimensional transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear fuel rod arrays. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, R. L.; Lords, L. V.; Kiser, D. M.

    1978-02-01

    The SCORE-EVET code was developed to study multidimensional transient fluid flow in nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays. The conservation equations used were derived by volume averaging the transient compressible three-dimensional local continuum equations in Cartesian coordinates. No assumptions associated with subchannel flow have been incorporated into the derivation of the conservation equations. In addition to the three-dimensional fluid flow equations, the SCORE-EVET code ocntains: (a) a one-dimensional steady state solution scheme to initialize the flow field, (b) steady state and transient fuel rod conduction models, and (c) comprehensive correlation packages to describe fluid-to-fuel rod interfacial energy and momentum exchange. Velocity and pressure boundary conditions can be specified as a function of time and space to model reactor transient conditions such as a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or flow blockage.

  1. Processing of the GALILEOTM fuel rod code model uncertainties within the AREVA LWR realistic thermal-mechanical analysis methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailhe, P.; Barbier, B.; Garnier, Ch.; Landskron, H.; Sedlacek, R.; Arimescu, I.; Smith, M.; Bellanger, Ph.

    2014-06-01

    The availability of reliable tools and associated methodology able to accurately predict the LWR fuel behavior in all conditions is of great importance for safe and economic fuel usage. For that purpose, AREVA has developed its new global fuel rod performance code GALILEOTM along with its associated realistic thermal-mechanical analysis methodology. This realistic methodology is based on a Monte Carlo type random sampling of all relevant input variables. After having outlined the AREVA realistic methodology, this paper will be focused on the GALILEOTM code benchmarking process on its extended experimental database and the GALILEOTM model uncertainties assessment. The propagation of these model uncertainties through the AREVA realistic methodology is also presented. This GALILEOTM model uncertainties processing is of the utmost importance for accurate fuel design margin evaluation as illustrated on some application examples. With the submittal of Topical Report for GALILEOTM to the U.S. NRC in 2013, GALILEOTM and its methodology are on the way to be industrially used in a wide range of irradiation conditions.

  2. French investigations of high burnup effect on LOCA thermomecanical behavior. Part two. Oxidation and quenching experiments under simulated LOCA conditions with high burnup clad material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GrandJean, C. [IPSN, Cadarache (France); Cauvin, R.; Lebuffe, C. [EDF/SCMI, Chinon (France)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    In the frame of the high burnup fuel studies to support a possible extension of the current discharge burnup limit, experimental programs have been undertaken, jointly by EDF and IPSN in order to study the thermal-shock behavior of high burnup fuel claddings under typical LOCA conditions. The TAGUS program used unirradiated cladding samples, bare or bearing a pre-corrosion state simulating the end-of-life state of high burnup fuel claddings: the TAGCIR program used actually irradiated cladding samples taken from high burnup rods irradiated over 5 cycles in a commercial EDF PWR and having reached a rod burnup close to 60 GWd/tU. The thermal-shock failure tests consisted in oxidizing the cladding samples under steam flow, on both inner and outer faces or on the outer face alone, and subjecting them to a final water quench. The heating was provided by an inductive furnace the power of which being regulated through monitoring of the sample surface temperature with use of a single-wave optical pyrometer. Analysis of the irradiated tests (TAGCIR series) evidenced an increased oxidation rate as compared to similar tests on unirradiated samples. Results of the quenching tests series on unirradiated and irradiated samples are plotted under the usual presentation of failure maps relative to the oxidation parameters ECR (equivalent cladding reacted) or e{sub {beta}} (thickness of the remaining beta phase layer) as a function of the oxidation temperature. Comparison of the failure limits for irradiated specimens to those for unirradiated specimens indicates a lower brittleness under two side oxidation and possibly the opposite under one-side oxidation. The tentative analysis of the oxidation and quenching tests results on irradiated samples reveals the important role played by the hydrogen charged during in-reactor corrosion on the oxidation kinetics and the failure bearing capability of the cladding under LOCA transient conditions.

  3. Thermoacoustic enhancements for nuclear fuel rods and other high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Steven L.; Smith, James A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    2017-05-09

    A nuclear thermoacoustic device includes a housing defining an interior chamber and a portion of nuclear fuel disposed in the interior chamber. A stack is disposed in the interior chamber and has a hot end and a cold end. The stack is spaced from the portion of nuclear fuel with the hot end directed toward the portion of nuclear fuel. The stack and portion of nuclear fuel are positioned such that an acoustic standing wave is produced in the interior chamber. A frequency of the acoustic standing wave depends on a temperature in the interior chamber.

  4. Validation of the Monte Carlo model developed to estimate doses around the irradiated fuel pool produced by activated control rods discharged from a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abarca, Agustin; Gallardo, Sergio; Rodenas, Jose [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear], e-mail: ergalbe@iqn.upv.es

    2009-07-01

    BWR control rods are irradiated into the reactor by the neutron flux and consequently materials composing the rod become activated. When the control rods are withdrawn from the reactor, they must be stored into the spent fuel storage pool of the plant at a certain depth under water. Doses potentially received by plant workers in the area surrounding the pool edges as well as in a platform moving over the water surface should be calculated to assure the adequate protection. Irradiated fuel elements are stored at the bottom of the pool while controls rods are nearer the surface. Therefore, doses out of the pool are mainly produced by activated control rods. The MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method has been applied to model the pool containing hanger devices with irradiated control rods and to estimate dose rates at points of interest. To obtain dose rates on the pool and around it an F4MESH tally has been used. Furthermore, the SSW/SSR technique has been applied in order to strongly reduce the computer time. Results have been compared with measurements in plant in order to validate the model. An interesting application of the validated model is the assessment of doses when some variation is introduced in the distribution of activated material. (author)

  5. Automatic system of welding for nuclear fuel rods; Sistema automatico de soldadura para barras de combustible nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero G, M; Romero C, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The welding process of nuclear fuel must be realized in an inert gas environment (He) and constant flow of this. In order to reach these conditions it is necessary to do vacuum at the chamber and after it is pressurized with the noble gas (purge) twice in the welding chamber. The purge eliminates impurities that can provoke oxidation in the weld. Once the conditions for initiating the welding are gotten, it is necessary to draw a graph of the flow parameters, pressure, voltage and arc current and to analyse those conditions in which have been carried out the weld. The rod weld must be free of possible pores or cracks which could provoke rod leaks, so reducing the probability of these failures should intervene mechanical and metallurgical factors. Automatizing the process it allows to do reliable welding assuring that conditions have been performed, reaching a high quality welding. Visually it can be observed the welding process by means of a mimic which represents the welding system. There are the parameters acquired such as voltage, current, pressure and flow during the welding arc to be analysed later. (Author)

  6. Breakdown voltage at the electric terminals of GCFR-core flow test loop fuel rod simulators in helium and air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, W.R.; Conley, T.B.

    1979-12-01

    Tests were performed to determine the ac and dc breakdown voltage at the terminal ends of a fuel rod simulator (FRS) in helium and air atmospheres. The tests were performed at low pressures (1 to 2 atm) and at temperatures from 20 to 350/sup 0/C (68 to 660/sup 0/F). The area of concern was the 0.64-mm (0.025-in.) gap between the coaxial conductor of the FRS and the sheaths of the four internal thermocouples as they exit the FRS. The tests were prformed to ensure a sufficient safety margin during Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) operations that require potentials up to 350 V ac at the FRS terminals. The primary conclusion from the test results is that the CFTL cannot be operated safely if the terminal ends of the FRSs are surrounded by a helium atmosphere but can be operated safely in air.

  7. Industry Application Emergency Core Cooling System Cladding Acceptance Criteria Early Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Youngblood, Robert W. [FPoliSolutions LLC, Murrysville, PA (United States); Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhao, Haihua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frepoli, Cesare [FPoliSolutions LLC, Murrysville, PA (United States); Yurko, Joseph P. [FPoliSolutions LLC, Murrysville, PA (United States); Swindlehurst, Gregg [GS Nuclear Consulting, Charlotte, NC (United States); Zoino, Angelo [Univ. of Rome Tor Vergata (Italy)

    2015-09-01

    The U. S. NRC is currently proposing rulemaking designated as “10 CFR 50.46c” to revise the loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA)/emergency core cooling system (ECCS) acceptance criteria to include the effects of higher burnup on cladding performance as well as to address other technical issues. The NRC is also currently resolving the public comments with the final rule expected to be issued in April 2016. The impact of the final 50.46c rule on the industry may involve updating of fuel vendor LOCA evaluation models, NRC review and approval, and licensee submittal of new LOCA evaluations or re-analyses and associated technical specification revisions for NRC review and approval. The rule implementation process, both industry and NRC activities, is expected to take 4-6 years following the rule effective date. As motivated by the new rule, the need to use advanced cladding designs may be a result. A loss of operational margin may result due to the more restrictive cladding embrittlement criteria. Initial and future compliance with the rule may significantly increase vendor workload and licensee cost as a spectrum of fuel rod initial burnup states may need to be analyzed to demonstrate compliance. Consequently, there will be an increased focus on licensee decision making related to LOCA analysis to minimize cost and impact, and to manage margin. The proposed rule would apply to a light water reactor and to all cladding types.

  8. Instant release of fission products in leaching experiments with high burn-up nuclear fuels in the framework of the Euratom project FIRST- Nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, K.; González-Robles, E.; Kienzler, B.; Curti, E.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Sureda, R.; Martínez-Torrents, A.; Roth, O.; Slonszki, E.; Mennecart, T.; Günther-Leopold, I.; Hózer, Z.

    2017-02-01

    The instant release of fission products from high burn-up UO2 fuels and one MOX fuel was investigated by means of leach tests. The samples covered PWR and BWR fuels at average rod burn-up in the range of 45-63 GWd/tHM and included clad fuel segments, fuel segments with opened cladding, fuel fragments and fuel powder. The tests were performed with sodium chloride - bicarbonate solutions under oxidizing conditions and, for one test, in reducing Ar/H2 atmosphere. The iodine and cesium release could be partially explained by the differences in sample preparation, leading to different sizes and properties of the exposed surface areas. Iodine and cesium releases tend to correlate with FGR and linear power rating, but the scatter of the data is significant. Although the gap between the fuel and the cladding was closed in some high burn-up samples, fissures still provide possible preferential transport pathways.

  9. Control of the neutronic and thermohydraulic conditions of power ramps in an irradiation loop for PWR fuel rod; Controle des conditions neutroniques et thermohydrauliques des rampes de puissance dans une boucle d`irradiation de combustibles de reacteur a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, D.J.F.

    1993-09-10

    In order to study the power transients effects on PWR fuel rod clad, ramp tests in a pressurized water loop, are carried out at OSIRIS reactor. The present thesis deals with the on-line control of the device, during power ramp and conditioning irradiation. Based on a convolution-type resolution of the kinetics equations, a dynamic compensation of the Silver self-powered neutron detector was developed. With this method, the uncertainty of the ramp end-point is lower than 1%, thus it is very suited for monitoring both transient, as well as steady state conditions. Furthermore, a thermohydraulic model of the irradiation device is described: heat transfer equations, including gamma heating in materials, are solved to obtain temperatures and thermal fluxes of steady states. Results from the model and temperature measurements of the coolant are used together for fuel power determination, in real time. The clad external temperature profile is also calculated and displayed, to improve the irradiation monitoring. (author), 51 refs., 12 annexes, 66 figs.

  10. Frictional Behavior of Fe-based Cladding Candidates for PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Thak Sang [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge (United States)

    2014-10-15

    After the recent nuclear disaster at Fukushima Daiichi reactors, there is a growing consensus on the development of new fuel systems (i.e., accident-tolerant fuel, ATF) that have high safety margins under design-basis accident (DBA) and beyond design-basis accident (BDBA). A common objective of various developing candidates is to archive the outstanding corrosion-resistance under severe accidents such as DBA and DBDA conditions for decreasing hydrogen production and increasing coping time to respond to severe accidents. ATF could be defined as new fuel/cladding system with enhanced accident tolerant to loss of active cooling in the core for a considerably longer time period under severe accidents while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations. This means that, in normal operating conditions, new fuel systems should be applicable to current operating PWRs for suppressing various degradation mechanisms of current fuel assembly without excessive design changes. When considering that one of the major degradation mechanisms of PWR fuel assemblies is a grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF), it is necessary to examine the tribological behavior of various ATF candidates at initial development stage. In this study, friction and reciprocating wear behavior of two kinds of Fe-based ATF candidates were examined with a reciprocating wear tests at room temperature (RT) air and water. The objective is to examine the compatibilities of these Fe-based alloys against current Zr-based alloy properties, which is used as major structural materials of PWR fuel assemblies. The reciprocating wear behaviors of Fe-based accident-tolerant fuel cladding candidates against current Zr-based alloy has been studied using a reciprocating sliding wear tester in room temperature air and water. Frictional behavior and wear depth were used for evaluating the applicability and compatibilities of Fe-based candidates without significant design changes of PWR fuel assemblies

  11. Post-irradiation examination of prototype Al-64 wt% U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel rods from NRU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, D.F.; Primeau, M.F.; Buchanan, C.; Rose, D. [Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)

    1997-08-01

    Three prototype fuel rods containing Al-64 wt% U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} (3.15 gU/cm{sup 3}) have been irradiated to their design burnup in the NRU reactor without incident. The fuel was fabricated using production-scale equipment and processes previously developed for Al-U{sub 3}Si fuel fabrication at Chalk River Laboratories, and special equipment developed for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} powder production and handling. The rods were irradiated in NRU up to 87 at% U-235 burnup under typical driver fuel conditions; i.e., nominal coolant inlet temperature 37{degrees}C, inlet pressure 654 kPa, mass flow 12.4 L/s, and element linear power ratings up to 73 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations showed that the fuel elements survived the irradiation without defects. Fuel core diametral increases and volumetric swelling were significantly lower than that of Al-61 wt% U{sub 3}Si fuel irradiated under similar conditions. This irradiation demonstrated that the fabrication techniques are adequate for full-scale fuel manufacture, and qualified the fuel for use in AECL`s research reactors.

  12. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly/annual progress report, October 1977--September 1978. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouthamel, C.E. (comp.)

    1978-10-01

    This quarterly/annual report reviews and summarizes the activities performed in support of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP) during Fiscal Year 1978 with emphasis on those activities that transpired during the quarter ending September 30, 1978. Significant progress has been made in achieving the primary objectives of the program, i.e., to demonstrate commercially viable fuel concepts with improved fuel - cladding interaction (FCI) behavior. This includes out-of-reactor experiments to support the fuel concepts being evaluated, initiation of instrumented test rod experiments in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), and fabrication of the first series of demonstration rods for irradiation in the Big Rock Point Reactor (BRPR).

  13. Design requirement on HYPER blanket fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, B. O.; Nam, C.; Ryu, W. S.; Lee, B. S.; Park, W. S

    2000-07-01

    This document describes design requirements which are needed for designing the blanket assembly of the HYPER as design guidance. The blanket assembly of the HYPER consists of blanket fuel rods, mounting rail, spacer, upper nozzle with handling socket, bottom nozzle with mounting rail and skeleton structure. The blanket fuel rod consists of top end plug, bottom end plug with key way, blanket fuel slug, and cladding. In the assembly, the rods are in a triangular pitch array. This report contains functional requirements, performance and operational requirements, interfacing systems requirements, core restraint and interface requirements, design limits and strength requirements, system configuration and essential feature requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements for the blanket fuel assembly of the HYPER.

  14. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

  15. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction investigations on strains in the oxide layer of an irradiated Zircaloy fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, Mélanie; Valance, Stéphane; Abolhassani, Sousan; Stein, Gene; Grolimund, Daniel; Martin, Matthias; Bertsch, Johannes

    2017-05-01

    For the first time the microstructure of the oxide layer of a Zircaloy-2 cladding after 9 cycles of irradiation in a boiling water reactor has been analyzed with synchrotron micro-X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic strains of the monoclinic and to some extent of the tetragonal ZrO2 are depicted through the thick oxide layer. Thin layers of sub-oxide at the oxide-metal interface as found for autoclave-tested samples and described in the literature, have not been observed in this material maybe resulting from irradiation damage. Shifts of selected diffraction peaks of the monoclinic oxide show that the uniform strain produced during oxidation is orientated in the lattice and displays variations along the oxide layer. Diffraction peaks and their shifts from families of diffracting planes could be translated into a virtual tensor. This virtual tensor exhibits changes through the oxide layer passing by tensile or compressive components.

  16. Behavior of U3Si2 Fuel and FeCrAl Cladding under Normal Operating and Accident Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Barani, Tommaso [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pizzocri, Davide [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation program, an Accident Tolerant Fuel High Impact Problem was initiated at the beginning of fiscal year 2015 to investigate the behavior of \\usi~fuel and iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) claddings under normal operating and accident reactor conditions. The High Impact Problem was created in response to the United States Department of Energy's renewed interest in accident tolerant materials after the events that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011. The High Impact Problem is a multinational laboratory and university collaborative research effort between Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. This report primarily focuses on the engineering scale research in fiscal year 2016 with brief summaries of the lower length scale developments in the areas of density functional theory, cluster dynamics, rate theory, and phase field being presented.

  17. Sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly design with graphite-moderating rods to reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Hyuck; Cho, Nam Zin, E-mail: nzcho@kaist.ac.kr; Park, Hae Min; Jeong, Yong Hoon, E-mail: jeongyh@kaist.ac.kr

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The graphite rod-inserted SFR fuel assembly is proposed to achieve low sodium void reactivity. • The neutronics/thermal-hydraulics analyses are performed for the proposed SFR cores. • The sodium void reactivity is improved about 960–1030 pcm compared to reference design. - Abstract: The concept of a graphite-moderating rod-inserted sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly is proposed in this study to achieve a low sodium void reactivity coefficient. Using this concept, two types of SFR cores are analyzed; the proposed SFR type 1 core has new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions while the proposed SFR type 2 core has a B{sub 4}C absorber sandwich in the middle of the active core region as well as new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions. For the proposed SFR core designs, neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analyses are performed using the DIF3D, REBUS3, and the MATRA-LMR codes. In the neutronics analysis, the sodium void reactivity coefficient is obtained in various void situations. The two types of proposed core designs reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient by about 960–1030 pcm compared to the reference design. However, the TRU enrichment for the proposed SFR core designs is increased. In the thermal hydraulic analysis, the temperature distributions are calculated for the two types of proposed core designs and the mass flow rate is optimized to satisfy the design constraints for the highest power generating assembly. The results of this study indicate that the proposed SFR assembly design concept, which adopts graphite-moderating rods which are inserted into the fuel assembly, can feasibly minimize the sodium void reactivity coefficient. Single TRU enrichment and an identical fuel slug diameter throughout the SFR core are also achieved because the radial power peak can be flattened by varying the number of moderating rods in each core region.

  18. Evaluation of alternative treatments for spent fuel rod consolidation wastes and other miscellaneous commercial transuranic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, W.A.; Schneider, K.J.; Oma, K.H.; Smith, R.I.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1986-05-01

    Eight alternative treatments (and four subalternatives) are considered for both existing commercial transuranic wastes and future wastes from spent fuel consolidation. Waste treatment is assumed to occur at a hypothetical central treatment facility (a Monitored Retrieval Storage facility was used as a reference). Disposal in a geologic repository is also assumed. The cost, process characteristics, and waste form characteristics are evaluated for each waste treatment alternative. The evaluation indicates that selection of a high-volume-reduction alternative can save almost $1 billion in life-cycle costs for the management of transuranic and high-activity wastes from 70,000 MTU of spent fuel compared to the reference MRS process. The supercompaction, arc pyrolysis and melting, and maximum volume reduction alternatives are recommended for further consideration; the latter two are recommended for further testing and demonstration.

  19. Integrity assessment of research reactor fuel cladding and material testing using eddy current inspection; Avaliacao de integridade de revestimentos de combustiveis de reatores de pesquisa e teste de materiais utilizando o ensaio de correntes parasitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Donizete Anderson de

    2004-07-01

    A methodology to perform the integrity assessment of research reactors nuclear fuels cladding, such as those installed in IPR-Rl (TRIGA) and IEA-R1 (MTR), using nondestructive electromagnetic inspection (eddy current) is presented. This methodology is constituted by: the development of calibration reference standards, specific for each type of fuel; the development of special test probes; the recommendations for the inspection equipment calibration; the construction of voltage based evaluation curves and the inspection procedures developed for the characterization of detected flaws. The test probes development, specially those designed for the inspection of MTR fuels cladding, which present access difficulties due to the narrow gap between fuel plates (2,89 mm for IEAR-R1), constituted a challenge that demanded the introduction of unusual materials and constructive techniques. The operational performance of the developed resources, as well as the special operative characteristics of the test probes, such as their immunity to adjacent fuel plates interference and electrical resistivity changes of the fuels meat are experimentally demonstrated. The practical applicability of the developed methodology is verified in non radioactive environment, using a dummy MTR fuel element model, similar to an IEA-R1 reactor fuel element, produced and installed in IPEN, Sao Paulo. The efficacy of the proposed methodology was verified by the achieved results. (author)

  20. Development of proto-type advanced leaked fuel rod detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyung Chul; Cho, Seong Won; Jeon, Jae Hyuk; Jeong, Jae Cheon; Kim, Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-02-01

    The fuel inspection equipment using ultrasonic signal has been developed its design and configuration in order to get inspection results more accurate and easier than the previous ones. In this task, the system functions are advanced by adopting of state of the art technologies in the field of digital servo control and signal processing. By the above endeavors, the total performance are improved and made to handle easily. 61 tabs., 31 figs., 3 ills., 9 refs. (Author).

  1. A comparison of crud phases appearing on some Swedish BWR fuel rods using Laser Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H.P. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)]|[Lulea Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    Previous investigations showed that laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) can be used as a phase specific analytical tool for radioactive fuel crud samples and also for details in the underlying layer of zirconium dioxide. It is relatively easy to record Raman spectra that discriminate between chemical phases for all crud oxides of interest. The method has therefore been recommended for crud investigations within the Swedish program. At ideal conditions the resolution is about 1 {mu}m, permitting detailed position determination of crud phases in the sample. Therefore LRS is a very good complement to X-ray diffraction (XRD). The methods for sample preparation and handling of radioactive crud samples for LRS turn out to be relatively simple. A detailed LRS study on fuel crud samples from Barsebaeck 2, Forsmark 2, Forsmark 3 and Ringhals 1 was performed in this work. All of those Swedish BWRs were operated at different conditions at the time of sampling. The chemistry regimes covered NWC, HWC and other variable conditions. Also different types of fuel, exposure times and sampling positions were selected. (authors)

  2. Transactions of the second technical exchange meeting on fuel- and clad-motion diagnostics for LMFBR safety test facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVolpi, A. (comp.)

    1976-01-01

    Papers are presented which deal with diagnostic requirements and fuel motion monitoring capabilities of hodoscopes, coded aperture systems, x-ray radiography, and in-core detectors. Separate abstracts and indexing were prepared for each paper. (DG)

  3. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK-CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bremaecker, Anne, E-mail: adbremae@sckcen.be [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie-Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), NMS, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-09-15

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK-CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 Degree-Sign C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, ZrSiO{sub 4}) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 Degree-Sign C, solution annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 Degree-Sign C, final annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C, straightening and final aging at 800 Degree-Sign C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO{sub 2} were loaded in Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial

  4. Lithium and boron analysis by LA-ICP-MS results from a bowed PWR rod with contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puranen Anders

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A previously published investigation of an irradiated fuel rod from the Ringhals 2 PWR, which was bowed to contact with an adjacent rod, identified a significant but highly localised thinning of the clad wall and increased corrosion. Rod fretting was deemed unlikely due to the adhering oxide covering the surfaces. Local overheating in itself was also deemed insufficient to account for the accelerated corrosion. Instead, an enhanced concentration of lithium due to conditions of local boiling was hypothesised to explain the accelerated corrosion. Studsvik has developed a hot cell coupled LA-ICP-MS (Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer equipment that enables a flexible means of isotopic analysis of irradiated fuel and other highly active surfaces. In this work, the equipment was used to investigate the distribution of lithium (7Li and boron (11B in the outer oxide at the bow contact area. Depth profiling in the clad oxide at the opposite side of the rod to the point of contact, which is considered to have experienced normal operating conditions and which has a typical oxide thickness, evidenced levels of ∼10–20 ppm 7Li and a 11B content reaching hundreds of ppm in the outer parts of the oxide, largely in agreement with the expected range of Li and B clad oxide concentrations from previous studies. In the contact area, the 11B content was similar to the reference condition at the opposite side. The 7Li content in the outermost oxide closest to the contact was, however, found to be strongly elevated, reaching several hundred ppm. The considerable and highly localised increase in lithium content at the area of enhanced corrosion thus offers strong evidence for a case of lithium induced breakaway corrosion during power operation, when rod-to-rod contact and high enough surface heat flux results in a very local increase in lithium concentration.

  5. Fission gas induced deformation model for FRAP-T6 and NSRR irradiated fuel test simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Sasajima, Hideo; Fuketa, Toyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hosoyamada, Ryuji; Mori, Yukihide

    1996-11-01

    Pulse irradiation tests of irradiated fuels under simulated reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) have been carried out at the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR). Larger cladding diameter increase was observed in the irradiated fuel tests than in the previous fresh fuel tests. A fission gas induced cladding deformation model was developed and installed in a fuel behavior analysis code, FRAP-T6. The irradiated fuel tests were analyzed with the model in combination with modified material properties and fuel cracking models. In Test JM-4, where the cladding temperature rose to higher temperatures and grain boundary separation by the pulse irradiation was significant, the fission gas model described the cladding deformation reasonably well. The fuel had relatively flat radial power distribution and the grain boundary gas from the whole radius was calculated to contribute to the deformation. On the other hand, the power density in the irradiated LWR fuel rods in the pulse irradiation tests was remarkably higher at the fuel periphery than the center. A fuel thermal expansion model, GAPCON, which took account of the effect of fuel cracking by the temperature profile, was found to reproduce well the LWR fuel behavior with the fission gas deformation model. This report present details of the models and their NSRR test simulations. (author)

  6. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this

  7. Preliminary results for the Co-Rolling process fabrication of plate-type nuclear fuel based in U-10Mo monolithic meat and zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, Tercio A.; Brina, Jose Giovanni M.; Paula, Joao Bosco de; Lameiras, Fernando S.; Ferraz, Wilmar B., E-mail: tap@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The fabrication process of plate-type nuclear fuel with monolithic meat is under development at CDTN. The U-10Mo alloy was chosen as the meat material due to its high density, corrosion resistance and the higher dimensional stability proportioned by the metastable gamma phase, which presents a lesser extension of the breakaway swelling phenomena occurrence during irradiation tests. The monolithic meat was cut from an U-10Mo ingot, that was induction melted at CDTN. The co-rolling process was adopted due to the higher mechanical properties and melting point of the Zircalloy-4 cladding material, which presents a lesser discrepancy in relation to the meat material properties, when compared to the aluminum 6061 alloy. Preliminary plates were obtained by means of the co-rolling process, performed at 650, 800, 950 deg C with total thickness reduction of 80%, followed by a pickling step and cold co-rolling passes. The plates were characterized through bending tests, optical microscopy and radiography. The co-rolling temperature of 800 deg C presented the best results, with a homogeneous distribution of the total thickness reduction between the cover plates and the meat, and the absence of delamination in the bending test samples. It was observed the occurrence of meat thickening in its ends, according to its longitudinal axle, parallel to the rolling direction, that is known as the {sup d}og bone{sup ,} for the three co-rolling temperatures. (author)

  8. IN-PILE PERFORMANCE OF HANA CLADDING TESTED IN HALDEN REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HYUN-GIL KIM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An in-pile performance test of HANA claddings was conducted at up to 67 GWD/MTU in the Halden research reactor in Norway over a 6.5 year period. Four types of HANA claddings (HANA-3, HANA-4, HANA-5, and HANA-6 and a reference Zircaloy-4 cladding were used for the in-pile test. The evaluation parameters of the HANA claddings were the corrosion behavior, dimensional changes, hydrogen uptake, and tensile strength after the claddings were tested under the simulated operation conditions of a Korean commercial reactor. The oxide thickness ranged from 15 to 37 mm at a high flux region in the test rods, and all HANA claddings showed corrosion resistance superior to the Zircaloy-4 cladding. The creep-down rate of all HANA claddings was lower than that of the Zircaloy-4 cladding. In addition, the hydrogen content of the HANA claddings ranged from 54 to 96 wppm at the high heat flux region of the test rods, whereas the hydrogen content of the Zircaloy-4 cladding was 119 wppm. The tensile strength of the HANA and Zircaloy-4 claddings was similarly increased when compared to the un-irradiated claddings owing to the radiation-induced hardening.

  9. PWR core design with Metal Matrix Micro-encapsulated (M3) fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Fratoni, M; Terrani, KA

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 Elsevier Ltd Metal Matrix Micro-encapsulated (M3) fuel consists of TRISO coated fuel particles directly dispersed in a matrix of zirconium metal to form a solid rod. In this integral fuel concept the cladding tube and the failure mechanisms associated with it have been eliminated; therefore, M3 fuel, compared to existing fuel designs, is expected to provide greatly improved operational performance. The main challenge to the deployment of M3 fuels is the low heavy metal load. This needs...

  10. Fuel failures in the Connecticut Yankee reactor (Haddam Neck). Addendum to NP-2119

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, L.F.A.; Howl, D.; Naylor, J.; Pitek, M.T.; Clink, L.J.

    1984-05-01

    Significant levels of fuel rod failures were observed in the batch 8 fuel assemblies of the Connecticut Yankee reactor. Results of detailed poolside and hot cell examinations, reported earlier in NP-2119, indicated the failure mechanism was stress corrosion cracking initiating on the clad outer surface. The sources of cladding stresses were believed to be (a) fuel pellet chips wedged in the cladding gap, (b) swelling of highly nondensifying batch 8 fuel, and (c) potentially harmful effects of a power change event that occurred near the end of the second cycle of irradiation for batch 8. This report reviews the 1977-78 experience and conclusions of the earlier investigations against the background of the total operational experience of the reactor from initial startup to the present time. It provides more details on operating conditions and uses the results of SLEUTH-SEER analyses to interpret the effects of operational maneuvers. The investigation adds more evidence for the importance of the ramp effects.

  11. Crack resistance curve determination of zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, J.; Alam, A.; Zubler, R

    2009-03-15

    Fracture mechanics properties of fuel claddings are of relevance with respect to fuel rod integrity. The integrity of a fuel rod, in turn, is important for the fuel performance, for the safe handling of fuel rods, for the prevention of leakages and subsequent dissemination of fuel, for the avoidance of unnecessary dose rates, and for safe operation. Different factors can strongly deteriorate the mechanical fuel rod properties: irradiation damage, thermo-mechanical impact, corrosion or hydrogen uptake. To investigate the mechanical properties of fuel rod claddings which are used in Swiss nuclear power plants, PSI has initiated a program for mechanical testing. A major issue was the interaction between specific loading devices and the tested cladding tube, e.g. in the form of bending or friction. Particular for Zircaloy is the hexagonal closed packed structure of the zirconium crystallographic lattice. This structure implies plastic deformation mechanisms with specific, preferred orientations. Further, the manufacturing procedure of Zircaloy claddings induces a specific texture which plays a salient role with respect to the embrittlement by irradiation or integration of hydrogen in the form of hydrides. Both, the induced microstructure as well as the plastic deformation behaviour play a role for the mechanical properties. At PSI, in a first step inactive thin walled Zircaloy tubes and, for comparison reasons, plates were tested. The validity of the mechanical testing of the non standard tube and plate geometries had to be verified. The used Zircaloy-4 cladding tube sections and small plates of the same wall thickness have been notched, fatigue pre-cracked and tensile tested to evaluate the fracture toughness properties at room temperature, 300 {sup o}C and 350 {sup o}C. The crack propagation has been determined optically. The test results of the plates have been further used to validate FEM calculations. For each sample a complete crack resistance (J-R) curve could

  12. Study of the uniform corrosion of an aluminium alloy used for the fuel cladding of the Jules Horowitz experimental reactor; Etude de la corrosion uniforme d'un alliage d'aluminium utilise comme gainage du combustible nucleaire du reacteur experimental Jules Horowitz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintergerst, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material testing reactor, an aluminium base alloy, AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. Taking into account the thermal properties of the alloy and of its oxide, the corrosion of the fuel cans presents many problems. The aim of this thesis is to provide a growing kinetic of the oxide layer at the surface of the AlFeNi fuel can in order to predict the life time of fuel element. Thus the mechanism of degradation of the cladding will be describe in order to integrate the different parameters of the operating reactor. (A.L.B.)

  13. Thermomechanical analysis of a fuel rod in a BWR reactor using the FUELSIM code; Analisis termomecanico de una barra de combustible de un reactor BWR utilizando el codigo FUELSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, IPN, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Ortiz V, J.; Araiza M, E. [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: rapaca78@yahoo.com.mx

    2009-10-15

    The thermomechanical behaviour of a fuel rod exposed to irradiation is a complex process in which are coupled great quantity of interrelated physical-chemical phenomena, for that analysis of rod performance in the core of a nuclear power reactor is realized generally with computation codes that integrate several phenomena expected during the time life of fuel rod in the core. An application of this type of thermomechanical codes is to predict, inside certain reliability margin, the design parameters that would be required to adjust, in order to get a better economy or rod performance, for a systematic approach to the fuel design optimization. FUELSIM is a thermomechanical code based on the models of FRAPCON code, which was developed under auspice of Nuclear Regulatory Commission of USA. FUELSIM allows iterative calculations like part of its programming structure, allowing search of extreme cases of behaviour, probabilistic analysis (or statistical), parametric analysis (or sensibility) and also can include as entrance data to the uncertainties associated with production data, code parameters and associated models. In this work is reported a first analysis of thermomechanical performance of a typical fuel rod used in a BWR 5/6. Results of maximum temperatures are presented in the fuel center and of axial deformation, for the 10 axial nodes in that the active longitude of fuel rod was divided. (Author)

  14. Proceedings of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting - WRFPM / Top Fuel 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    SFEN, ENS, SNR, ANS, AESJ, CNS KNS, IAEA and NEA are jointly organizing the 2009 International Water Reactor Fuel Performance / TopFuel 2009 Meeting following the 2008 KNS Water Reactor Performance Meeting held during October 19-23, 2008 in Seoul, Korea. This meeting is held annually on a tri-annual rotational basis in Europe, USA and Asia. In 2009, this meeting will be held in Paris, September 6-10, 2009 in coordination with the Global 2009 Conference at the same date and place. That would lead to a common opening session, some common technical presentations, a common exhibition and common social events. The technical scope of the meeting includes all aspects of nuclear fuel from fuel rod to core design as well as manufacturing, performance in commercial and test reactors or on-going and future developments and trends. Emphasis will be placed on fuel reliability in the general context of nuclear 'Renaissance' and recycling perspective. The meeting includes selectively front and/or back end issues that impact fuel designs and performance. In this frame, the conference track devoted to 'Concepts for transportation and interim storage of spent fuels and conditioned waste' will be shared with 'GLOBAL' conference. Technical Tracks: - 1. Fuel Performance, Reliability and Operational Experience: Fuel operating experience and performance; experience with high burn-up fuels; water side corrosion; stress corrosion cracking; MOX fuel performance; post irradiation data on lead fuel assemblies; radiation effects; water chemistry and corrosion counter-measures. - 2. Transient Fuel Behaviour and Safety Related Issues: Transient fuel behavior and criteria (RIA, LOCA, ATWS, Ramp tests..). Fuel safety-related issues such as PCI (pellet cladding interaction), transient fission gas releases and cladding bursting/ballooning during transient events - Advances in fuel performance modeling and core reload methodology, small and large-scale fuel testing

  15. BISON Theory Manual The Equations behind Nuclear Fuel Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, J. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williamson, R. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Novascone, S. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pastore, G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, B. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stafford, D. S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gamble, K. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Perez, D. M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Liu, W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    BISON is a finite element-based nuclear fuel performance code applicable to a variety of fuel forms including light water reactor fuel rods, TRISO particle fuel, and metallic rod and plate fuel. It solves the fully-coupled equations of thermomechanics and species diffusion, for either 2D axisymmetric or 3D geometries. Fuel models are included to describe temperature and burnup dependent thermal properties, fission product swelling, densification, thermal and irradiation creep, fracture, and fission gas production and release. Plasticity, irradiation growth, and thermal and irradiation creep models are implemented for clad materials. Models are also available to simulate gap heat transfer, mechanical contact, and the evolution of the gap/plenum pressure with plenum volume, gas temperature, and fission gas addition. BISON is based on the MOOSE framework and can therefore efficiently solve problems using standard workstations or very large high-performance computers. This document describes the theoretical and numerical foundations of BISON.

  16. In-situ Monitoring of Sub-cooled Nucleate Boiling on Fuel Cladding Surface in Water at 1 bar and 130 bars using Acoustic Emission Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Heon; Wu, Kaige; Shim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Crud deposition increases through a sufficient corrosion product supply around the steam-liquid interface of a boiling bubble. Therefore, the understanding of this SNB phenomenon is important for effective and safe operation of nuclear plants. The experimental SNB studies have been performed in visible conditions at a low pressure using a high speed video camera. Meanwhile, an acoustic emission (AE) method is an on-line non-destructive evaluation method to sense transient elastic wave resulting from a rapid release of energy within a dynamic process. Some researchers have investigated boiling phenomena using the AE method. However, their works were performed at atmospheric pressure conditions. Therefore, the objective of this work is for the first time to detect and monitor SNB on fuel cladding surface in simulated PWR primary water at 325 .deg. C and 130 bars using an AE technique. We successfully observed the boiling AE signals in primary water at 1 bar and 130 bars using AE technique. Visualization test was performed effectively to identify a correlation between water boiling phenomenon and AE signals in a transparent glass cell at 1 bar, and the boiling AE signals were in good agreement with the boiling behavior. Based on the obtained correlations at 1 bar, the AE signals obtained at 130 bars were analyzed. The boiling density and size of the AE signals at 130 bars were decreased by the flow parameters. However, overall AE signals showed characteristics and a trend similar to the AE signals at 1 bar. This indicates that boiling AE signals are detected successfully at 130 bars, and the AE technique can be effectively implemented in non-visualized condition at high pressures.

  17. Determination of internal pressure and the backfill gas composition of nuclear fuel rods; Determinacion de la presion interna y la composicion del gas de llenado de barras de combustible nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia C, M.A.; Cota S, G.; Merlo S, L.; Fernandez T, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    An important consideration in the nuclear fuel manufacturing is the measurement of the helium atmosphere pressure and its composition analysis inside the nuclear fuel rod. In this work it is presented a system used to measure the internal pressure and to determine the backfill gas composition of fuel rods. The system is composed of an expansion chamber provided of a seals system to assure that when rod is drilled, the gas stays contained inside the expansion chamber. The system is connected to a pressure measurement digital system: Baratron MKS 310-AHS-1000. Range 1000 mm Hg from which the pressure readings are taken when this is stabilized in all the system. After a gas sample is sent toward a Perkin Elmer gas chromatograph, model 8410 with thermal conductivity detector to get the corresponding chromatogram and doing the necessary calculations for obtaining the backfill gas composition of the rod in matter. (Author)

  18. Simulation of a control rod ejection in a VVER-1000 reactor with the program Relap5-3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajo, J.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Yoder, G.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ivanov, V.K. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The RELAP5-3D code has been employed to simulate the ejection of a control rod at the Balakovo-4 plant, a VVER-1000 V320 plant located in Russia. The reactor core contains 163 assemblies, three of them Lead Test Assemblies (LTAs) with mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and the remaining 160 assemblies with UO{sub 2} fuel. The worth of the ejected control rod was $ 0,225 or 142 pcm. Results from point and three-dimensional (3-D) or nodal kinetics calculations are presented. The results from both models are similar with no significant differences. All calculated results are within safety limits, with no fuel melting or cladding failures predicted to occur. (author)

  19. PLUTON: Three-group neutronic code for burnup analysis of isotope generation and depletion in highly irradiated LWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemehov, Sergei E; Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    PLUTON is a three-group neutronic code analyzing, as functions of time and burnup, the change of radial profiles, together with average values, of power density, burnup, concentration of trans-uranium elements, plutonium buildup, depletion of fissile elements, and fission product generation in water reactor fuel rod with standard UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, inhomogeneous MOX, and UO{sub 2}-ThO{sub 2}. The PLUTON code, which has been designed to be run on Windows PC, has adopted a theoretical shape function of neutron attenuation in pellet, which enables users to perform a very fast and accurate calculation easily. The present code includes the irradiation conditions of the Halden Reactor which gives verification data for the code. The total list of trans-uranium elements included in the calculations consists of {sub 92}U{sup 233-239}, {sub 93}Np{sup 237-239}, {sub 94}Pu{sup 238-243}, {sub 95}Am{sup 241-244} (including isomers), and {sub 96}Cm{sup 242-245}. Poisoning fission products are represented by {sub 54}Xe{sup 131,133,135}, {sub 48}Cd{sup 113}, {sub 62}Sm{sup 149,151,152}, {sub 64}Gd{sup 154-160}, {sub 63}Eu{sup 153,155}, {sub 36}Kr{sup 83,85}, {sub 42}Mo{sup 95}, {sub 43}Tc{sup 99}, {sub 45}Rh{sup 103}, {sub 47}Ag{sup 109}, {sub 53}I{sup 127,129,131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133}, {sub 57}La{sup 139}, {sub 59}Pr{sup 141}, {sub 60}Nd{sup 143-150}, {sub 61}Pm{sup 147}. Fission gases and volatiles included in the code are {sub 36}Kr{sup 83-86}, {sub 54}Xe{sup 129-136}, {sub 52}Te{sup 125-130}, {sub 53}I{sup 127-131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133-137}, and {sub 56}Ba{sup 135-140}. Verification has been performed up to 83 GWd/tU, and a satisfactory agreement has been obtained. (author)

  20. Study of heat transfer in a eccentric fuel rods in a non stop planned shutdown of a PWR type reactor; Estudo da transferencia de calor em uma vareta combustivel excentrica, num desligamento nao planejado de um reator do tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Lava, Deise Diana; Borges, Diogo da Silva; Sampaio, Paulo Augusto Berquo de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: deisedy@gmail.com, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: sampaio@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to conduct a case study in which the fuel pellets are displaced related to the center coating. Therefore, it will be addressed, first, the verification of computer code, comparing the results obtained with analytical solutions. This check is important so that, at a time later, you can use the program to know the fuel rod behavior and coolant channel.

  1. Radiochemical analyses of several spent fuel Approved Testing Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Wildung, N.J.

    1994-09-01

    Radiochemical characterization data are described for UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} plus 3 wt% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} commercial spent nuclear fuel taken from a series of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs). These full-length nuclear fuel rods include MLA091 of ATM-103, MKP070 of ATM-104, NBD095 and NBD131 of ATM-106, and ADN0206 of ATM-108. ATMs 103, 104, and 106 were all irradiated in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Reactor No.1), a pressurized-water reactor that used fuel fabricated by Combustion Engineering. ATM-108 was part of the same fuel bundle designed as ATM-105 and came from boiling-water reactor fuel fabricated by General Electric and irradiated in the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant. Rod average burnups and expected fission gas releases ranged from 2,400 to 3,700 GJ/kgM. (25 to 40 Mwd/kgM) and from less than 1% to greater than 10%, respectively, depending on the specific ATM. The radiochemical analyses included uranium and plutonium isotopes in the fuel, selected fission products in the fuel, fuel burnup, cesium and iodine on the inner surfaces of the cladding, {sup 14}C in the fuel and cladding, and analyses of the gases released to the rod plenum. Supporting examinations such as fuel rod design and material descriptions, power histories, and gamma scans used for sectioning diagrams are also included. These ATMs were examined as part of the Materials Characterization Center Program conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program.

  2. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly/annual progress report, April--September 1977. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouthamel, C.E. (comp.)

    1977-11-01

    The Fuel Performance Improvement Program has as its objective the identification and demonstration of fuel concepts with improved power ramp performance. The program contains a combination of out-of-reactor studies, in-reactor experiments and in-reactor demonstrations. Fuel concepts initially being considered include annular pellets, cladding internally coated with graphite and packed-particle fuels. The performance capability of each concept will be compared to a reference fuel of contemporary pellet design by irradiations in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor. Fuel design and process development is being completed and fuel rod fabrication will begin for the Halden test rods and for the first series of in-reactor demonstrations. The in-reactor demonstrations are being performed in the Big Rock Point reactor to show that the concepts pose no undue risk to commercial operation.

  3. Study of heat transfer in 3D fuel rods of the EPRI-9R reactor modified; Estudo da transferencia de calor em varetas combustiveis 3D do reator EPRI-9R 3D modificado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Lava, Deise Diana; Borges, Diogo da Silva; Sampaio, Paulo Augusto Berquo de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: deisedy@gmail.com, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: sampaio@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to conduct a case study of the fuel rods that have the highest and the lowest average power of the EPRI-9R 3D reactor modified , for various positions of the control rods banks. For this, will be addressed the verification of computer code, comparing the results obtained with analytical solutions. This check is important so that, subsequently, it is possible use the program to understand the behavior of the fuel rods and the coolant channel of the EPRI-9R 3D reactor modified. Thus, in view of the scope of this paper, first a brief introducing on the heat transfer is done, including the rod equations and the equation of energy in the channel to allow the analysis of the results.

  4. Copper, clay and granite - the ''seal of eternity'' for nuclear fuel rods. Final disposal of nuclear fuel rods; Kupfer, Lehm und Granit: Das 'Siegel der Ewigkeit' fuer Kernbrennstaebe. Endlagerung von Nuklearbrennstaeben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollrath, K.

    2007-07-01

    After more than 35 years of electricity production from nuclear fuel, the CLAB interim store harbours more than 10,000 spent fuel rods. After a long search for a suitable final disposal concept a solution was found which is based on multiple barriers. Its key feature are hermetically tight welded copper vessels which are encased in betonite clay and deposited at 500 m depth in native granite rock. The moulding and drawing technique used at the Duesseldorf-Reisholz site of Vallourec and Mannesmann Tubes proved suitable for the manufacture of the vessels.

  5. Metallurgical and mechanical behaviours of PWR fuel cladding tube oxidised at high temperature; Comportements metallurqigue et mecanique des materiaux de gainage du combustible REP oxydes a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, A

    2007-12-15

    Zirconium alloys are used as cladding materials in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). As they are submitted to very extreme conditions, it is necessary to check their behaviour and especially to make sure they meet the safety criteria. They are therefore studied under typical in service-loadings but also under accidental loadings. In one of these accidental scenarios, called Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) the cladding temperature may increase above 800 C, in a steam environment, and decrease before a final quench of the cladding. During this temperature transient, the cladding is heavily oxidised, and the metallurgical changes lead to a decrease of the post quench mechanical properties. It is then necessary to correlate this drop in residual ductility to the metallurgical evolutions. This is the problem we want to address in this study: the oxidation of PWR cladding materials at high temperature in a steam environment and its consequences on post quench mechanical properties. As oxygen goes massively into the metallic part - a zirconia layer grows at the same time - during the high temperature oxidation, the claddings tubes microstructure shows three different phases that are the outer oxide layer (zirconia) and the inner metallic phases ({alpha}(O) and 'ex {beta}') - with various mechanical properties. In order to reproduce the behaviour of this multilayered material, the first part of this study consisted in creating samples with different - but homogeneous in thickness - oxygen contents, similar to those observed in the different phases of the real cladding. The study was especially focused on the {beta}-->{alpha} phase transformation upon cooling and on the resulting microstructures. A mechanism was proposed to describe this phase transformation. For instance, we conclude that for our oxygen enriched samples, the phase transformation kinetics upon cooling are ruled by the oxygen partitioning between the two allotropic phases. Then, these materials

  6. Development for analysis system of rods enrichment of nuclear fuels; Desarrollo de un sistema de analisis de enriquecimiento de barras de combustible nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E.L

    1998-11-01

    Nuclear industry is strongly regulated all over the world and quality assurance is important in every nuclear installation or process related with it. Nuclear fuel manufacture is not the exception. ININ was committed to manufacture four nuclear fuel bundles for the CFE nucleo electric station at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, under General Electric specifications and fulfilling all the requirements of this industry. One of the quality control requisites in nuclear fuel manufacture deals with the enrichment of the pellets inside the fuel bundle rods. To achieve the quality demanded in this aspect, the system described in this work was developed. With this system, developed at ININ it is possible to detect enrichment spikes since 0.4 % in a column of pellets with a 95 % confidence interval and to identify enrichment differences greater than 0.2 % e between homogeneous segments, also with a 95 % confidence interval. ININ delivered the four nuclear fuel bundles to CFE and these were introduced in the core of the nuclear reactor of Unit 1 in the fifth cycle. Nowadays they are producing energy and have shown a correct mechanical performance and neutronic behavior. (Author)

  7. The impact of interface bonding efficiency on high-burnup spent nuclear fuel dynamic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hao, E-mail: jiangh@ornl.gov; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • To investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on its dynamic performance. • Flexural rigidity, EI = M/κ, estimated from FEA results were benchmarked with SNF dynamic experimental results, and used to evaluate interface bonding efficiency. • Interface bonding efficiency can significantly dictate the SNF system rigidity and the associated dynamic performance. • With consideration of interface bonding efficiency and fuel cracking, HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with SNF static and dynamic experimental data. - Abstract: Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on system dynamic performance. Bending moments M were applied to FEA model to evaluate the system responses. From bending curvature, κ, flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI = M/κ. The FEA simulation results were benchmarked with experimental results from cyclic integrated reversal bending fatigue test (CIRFT) of HBR fuel rods. The consequence of interface debonding between fuel pellets and cladding is a redistribution of the loads carried by the fuel pellets to the clad, which results in a reduction in composite rod system flexural rigidity. Therefore, the interface bonding efficiency at the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces can significantly dictate the SNF system dynamic performance. With the consideration of interface bonding efficiency, the HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with CIRFT test data.

  8. Guideline for design requirement on KALIMER driver fuel assembly duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Kang, H. Y.; Nam, C.; Kim, J. O.; Lim, J. S.; Ryu, W. S.; Min, B. T.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, Y. J.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes design requirements which are needs for designing the driver fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER as design guidance. The driver fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER consists of fuel rods, mounting rail, nosepiece, duct with pad, handling socket with pad. Fuel rod consists of top end plug, bottom end plug with solid ferritic-martensitic steel rod and key way, fuel slug, cladding, and wire wrap. In the assembly, the rods are in a triangular pitch array, and the rod bundle attaches to the nosepiece with mounting rails. The bottom end of the assembly duct is formed by a long nosepiece which provides the lower restraint function and the coolant inlet. It contains functional requirements, performance and operational requirements, interfacing systems requirements, core restraint and interface requirements, design limits and strength requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements. The design requirements are intended to be used for the design of the driver fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER. (author). 16 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Steady-state fuel behavior modeling of nitride fuels in FRAPCON-EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bo; Karahan, Aydın; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2012-08-01

    Fuel material properties and mechanistic fission gas models in FRAPCON-EP were updated to model the steady-state behavior of high-porosity nitride fuel operating at temperatures below half of the melting point. The fuel thermal conductivity and fuel thermal expansion models were updated with correlations for UN and (U,Pu)N fuels. Hot-pressing of the as-fabricated porosity was modeled as a function of the hydrostatic pressure and creep rate. The solid fission product swelling was assumed to increase linearly with burnup. Fission gas swelling constitutive models were updated to appropriately capture the intragranular gas bubble evolution in nitride fuel. Intergranular gas swelling was neglected due to the assumed high porosity of the fuel. The fission gas release behavior was modeled by fitting the fission gas diffusion coefficient in UN to FRAPCON's default fission gas release model. This fitted gas diffusion coefficient reflects the effects of porosity, burnup, operating temperature, fission rate, and bubble sink strength. Fission gas release and fuel swelling benchmarks against irradiation data were performed. The updated code was applied to UN fuel in typical PWR geometry and operating conditions, with an extended cycle length of 24 months. The results show that swelling of the nitride fuel up to 60 MWd/kg burnup did not lead to excessive straining of the cladding. Furthermore, this study showed that a porous (>15% porosity) nitride fuel pellet could achieve a much higher margin to failure from the cladding collapse and grid-to-rod fretting.

  10. MCTP, a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of a fuel rod of BWR type reactors (Neutron part); MCTP, un codigo para el analisis termo-mecanico de una barra combustible de reactores tipo BWR (Parte Neutronica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H.; Ortiz V, J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: hhl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of the fuel rods of the BWR type reactors of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde is developed. The code solves the diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates with several energy groups. The code, likewise, calculates the temperature distribution and power distribution in those fuel rods. The code is denominated Multi groups With Temperatures and Power (MCTP). In the code, the energy with which the fission neutrons are emitted it is divided in six groups. They are also considered the produced perturbations by the changes in the temperatures of the materials that constitute the fuel rods, the content of fission products, the uranium consumption and in its case the gadolinium, as well as the plutonium production. In this work there are present preliminary results obtained with the code, using data of operation of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  11. Risk-Informed Margin Management (RIMM) Industry Applications IA1 - Integrated Cladding ECCS/LOCA Performance Analysis - Problem Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Youngblood, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frepoli, Cesare [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yurko, Joseph P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swindlehurst, Gregg [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhao, Haihua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The U. S. NRC is currently proposing rulemaking designated as “10 CFR 50.46c” to revise the LOCA/ECCS acceptance criteria to include the effects of higher burnup on cladding performance as well as to address some other issues. The NRC is also currently resolving the public comments with the final rule expected to be issued in the summer of 2016. The impact of the final 50.46c rule on the industry will involve updating of fuel vendor LOCA evaluation models, NRC review and approval, and licensee submittal of new LOCA evaluations or reanalyses and associated technical specification revisions for NRC review and approval. The rule implementation process, both industry and NRC activities, is expected to take 5-10 years following the rule effective date. The need to use advanced cladding designs is expected. A loss of operational margin will result due to the more restrictive cladding embrittlement criteria. Initial and future compliance with the rule may significantly increase vendor workload and licensee cost as a spectrum of fuel rod initial burnup states may need to be analyzed to demonstrate compliance. Consequently there will be an increased focus on licensee decision making related to LOCA analysis to minimize cost and impact, and to manage margin.

  12. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanic performance of fuel rods MOX in fuel assemblies 10 x 10; Evaluacion del desempeno termo-mecanico barras combustibles MOX en ensambles combustible 10 x 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H., E-mail: hector.hernandez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico) , we have been working in proposals of fuel assemblies that bear to the reduction of the plutonium inventories that exist a global level, plutonium coming from the dismantlement of the nuclear weapons as of the one used as fuel inside the reactors in operation at the present time. For this reason besides carrying out the evaluation of the neutron performance is necessary to realize the evaluation of the thermal-mechanic behavior of the rods that compose a fuel assembly with the purpose of determining if under the operation conditions to those that are subjected the fuel does not surpass the limit established and this causes a failure in the fuel element. In this sense when carrying out the analysis of an fuel element of mixed oxides in an arrangement 10 x 10 is observed that under the established operation conditions for the proposed cycle values that surpass the limit established for fuel failure are not presented, therefore the proposed assembly can be used as reload element in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  13. Ceramic Coatings for Clad (The C3 Project): Advanced Accident-Tolerant Ceramic Coatings for Zr-Alloy Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickafus, Kurt E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Miller, Larry [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Weber, Bill [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Patel, Maulik [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Wolfe, Doug [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Fratoni, Max [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Raj, Rishi [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Plunkett, Kenneth [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hollis, Kendall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Andy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Chris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Comstock, Robert [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Partezana, Jonna [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Whittle, Karl [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Preuss, Michael [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Withers, Philip [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Donnelly, Stephen [Univ. of Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Riley, Daniel [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Syndney (Australia)

    2017-02-14

    The goal of this NEUP-IRP project is to develop a fuel concept based on an advanced ceramic coating for Zr-alloy cladding. The coated cladding must exhibit demonstrably improved performance compared to conventional Zr-alloy clad in the following respects: During normal service, the ceramic coating should decrease cladding oxidation and hydrogen pickup (the latter leads to hydriding and embrittlement). During a reactor transient (e.g., a loss of coolant accident), the ceramic coating must minimize or at least significantly delay oxidation of the Zr-alloy cladding, thus reducing the amount of hydrogen generated and the oxygen ingress into the cladding. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: To produce durable ceramic coatings on Zr-alloy clad using two possible routes: (i) MAX phase ceramic coatings or similar nitride or carbide coatings; and (ii) graded interface architecture (multilayer) ceramic coatings, using, for instance, an oxide such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the outer protective layer. To characterize the structural and physical properties of the coated clad samples produced in 1. above, especially the corrosion properties under simulated normal and transient reactor operating conditions. To perform computational analyses to assess the effects of such coatings on fuel performance and reactor neutronics, and to perform fuel cycle analyses to assess the economic viability of modifying conventional Zr-alloy cladding with ceramic coatings. This project meets a number of the goals outlined in the NEUP-IRP call for proposals, including: Improve the fuel/cladding system through innovative designs (e.g. coatings/liners for zirconium-based cladding) Reduce or eliminate hydrogen generation Increase resistance to bulk steam oxidation Achievement of our goals and objectives, as defined above, will lead to safer light-water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel assemblies, due to improved cladding properties and built-in accident resistance, as well as

  14. Multi-Dimensional Simulation of LWR Fuel Behavior in the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, R. L.; Capps, N. A.; Liu, W.; Rashid, Y. R.; Wirth, B. D.

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear fuel operates in an extreme environment that induces complex multiphysics phenomena occurring over distances ranging from inter-atomic spacing to meters, and times scales ranging from microseconds to years. To simulate this behavior requires a wide variety of material models that are often complex and nonlinear. The recently developed BISON code represents a powerful fuel performance simulation tool based on its material and physical behavior capabilities, finite-element versatility of spatial representation, and use of parallel computing. The code can operate in full three dimensional (3D) mode, as well as in reduced two dimensional (2D) modes, e.g., axisymmetric radial-axial ( R- Z) or plane radial-circumferential ( R- θ), to suit the application and to allow treatment of global and local effects. A BISON case study was used to illustrate analysis of Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction failures from manufacturing defects using combined 2D and 3D analyses. The analysis involved commercial fuel rods and demonstrated successful computation of metrics of interest to fuel failures, including cladding peak hoop stress and strain energy density. In comparison with a failure threshold derived from power ramp tests, results corroborate industry analyses of the root cause of the pellet-clad interaction failures and illustrate the importance of modeling 3D local effects around fuel pellet defects, which can produce complex effects including cold spots in the cladding, stress concentrations, and hot spots in the fuel that can lead to enhanced cladding degradation such as hydriding, oxidation, CRUD formation, and stress corrosion cracking.

  15. CFD analysis of localized crud effects on the flow of coolant in nuclear rod bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinosi, N., E-mail: n.cinosi@imperial.ac.uk; Walker, S.P.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • CDF simulation of PWR sub-channels with crudded rods. • Evaluation of coolant flow variations induced by crud rough surfaces. • Evaluation of coolant temperatures in presence of crudded rods. • Evaluation of crud effects on critical heat flux and DNBR margins. - Abstract: It has been suggested that crud deposits on a number of adjacent fuel rods might reduce coolant flow rates in associated sub-channels. Such reduced flow rates could then worsen thermal-hydraulic conditions, such as margin to saturated boiling, fuel surface temperature, and the DNB ratio. We report the results of a detailed computational fluid dynamics study of the flow pattern in a partially crudded rod bundle. Values obviously depend on, for example, the thickness of crud assumed, but sub-channel flow rate reductions of ∼10% were predicted by this analysis. However, this mass flow rate reduction was found to be more than offset by improved heat transfer induced by the relatively rough surface of the crud. Cladding temperatures were predicted to be essentially unchanged, and the DNBR was similarly little altered. We conclude that such flow reduction and diversion is not likely to be of concern.

  16. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Idaho National Laboratory Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor Rods and Pellets Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-08-31

    The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Rods and Pellets waste stream (INEL103597TR2, Revision 2) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream consists of 24 containers with unirradiated fabricated rods and pellets composed of uranium oxide (UO2) and thorium oxide (ThO2) fuel in zirconium cladding. The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream requires an SA because the 229Th, 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U activity concentrations exceed the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

  17. Design requirement on KALIMER blanket fuel assembly duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Kang, H. Y.; Nam, C.; Kim, J. O

    1998-03-01

    This document describes design requirements which are needed for designing the blanket fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER as design guidance. The blanket fuel assembly duct of the KALIMER consists of fuel rods, mounting rail, nosepiece, duct with pad, handling socket with pad. Blanket fuel rod consists of top end plug, bottom end plug with solid ferritic-martensitic steel rod and key way blanket fuel slug, cladding, and wire wrap. In the assembly, the rods are in a triangular pitch array, and the rod bundle is attached to the nosepiece with mounting rails. The bottom end of the assembly duct is formed by a long nosepiece which provides the lower restraint function and the paths for coolant inlet. This report contains functional requirements, performance and operational requirements, interfacing systems requirements, core restraint and interface requirements, design limits and strength requirements, system configuration and essential feature requirements, seismic requirements, structural requirements, environmental requirements, reliability and safety requirements, standard and codes, QA programs, and other requirements. (author). 20 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Comparison of ring compression testing to three point bend testing for unirradiated ZIRLO cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-04-01

    Safe shipment and storage of nuclear reactor discharged fuel requires an understanding of how the fuel may perform under the various conditions that can be encountered. One specific focus of concern is performance during a shipment drop accident. Tests at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are being performed to characterize the properties of fuel clad relative to a mechanical accident condition such as a container drop. Unirradiated ZIRLO tubing samples have been charged with a range of hydride levels to simulate actual fuel rod levels. Samples of the hydrogen charged tubes were exposed to a radial hydride growth treatment (RHGT) consisting of heating to 400°C, applying initial hoop stresses of 90 to 170 MPa with controlled cooling and producing hydride precipitates. Initial samples have been tested using both a) ring compression test (RCT) which is shown to be sensitive to radial hydride and b) three-point bend tests which are less sensitive to radial hydride effects. Hydrides are generated in Zirconium based fuel cladding as a result of coolant (water) oxidation of the clad, hydrogen release, and a portion of the released (nascent) hydrogen absorbed into the clad and eventually exceeding the hydrogen solubility limit. The orientation of the hydrides relative to the subsequent normal and accident strains has a significant impact on the failure susceptability. In this study the impacts of stress, temperature and hydrogen levels are evaluated in reference to the propensity for hydride reorientation from the circumferential to the radial orientation. In addition the effects of radial hydrides on the Quasi Ductile Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT) were measured. The results suggest that a) the severity of the radial hydride impact is related to the hydrogen level-peak temperature combination (for example at a peak drying temperature of 400°C; 800 PPM hydrogen has less of an impact/ less radial hydride fraction than 200 PPM hydrogen for the same thermal

  19. Effect of heat transfer correlations on the fuel temperature prediction of SCWRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinosa-Martínez Erick-Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a numerical analysis of the effect of different heat transfer correlations on the prediction of the cladding wall temperature in a supercritical water reactor at nominal operating conditions. The neutronics process with temperature feedback effects, the heat transfer in the fuel rod, and the thermal-hydraulics in the core were simulated with a three-pass core design.

  20. Rodding Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... above-the-knee splint or lightweight plaster or fiberglass splint instead. Bracing may be used after the ... level. Potential Complications Complications from rodding surgery include risks related to:  General anesthesia,  Fractures during the procedure,  ...

  1. On the application of electrochemical techniques for the preparation of {sup 57}Co source core, encapsulation and quality evaluation for radiometric assay of nuclear fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, A.; Kumar, M.; Udhayakumar, J.; Gandhi, S.S.; Venkatesh, M. [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radiopharmaceuticals Div.; Satpati, A.K. [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Analytical Chemistry Div.; Nuwad, J.; Shukla, R.; Pillai, C.G.S. [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Chemistry Div.; Venugopal, V. [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry and Isotope Group

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes an electrochemical method for the preparation of {sup 57}Co source to be used in quality evaluation of nuclear fuel rods. The electrolytic cell, the experimental set up used and the process of deposition are described. The effect of various parameters such as pH of the electrolyte, bath temperature, current density, content of cobalt in the bath, electrolyte volume in the cell and deposition time were investigated and optimized for maximum deposition. The texture and morphology of the electrodeposited samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM and EDS analyses. Sources containing {proportional_to} 370 MBq (10 mCi) {sup 57}Co on a circular copper foil of 4 mm diameter could be prepared and encapsulated in an aluminum capsule. Quality assurance tests performed to ensure non-leachability, uniform distribution of activity and stability of the sources gave satisfactory results. (orig.)

  2. A contribution to the analysis of the thermal behaviour of Fast Breeder fuel rods with UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} fuel; Contribucion al analisis del comportamiento termico de las barras combustibles de UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} de los reactores rapidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Elbel, H.

    1977-07-01

    The fuel of Fast Breeder Reactors which consists of Uranium and Plutonium dioxide is mainly characterized by the amount and distribution of void volume and Plutonium and the amount of oxygen. Irradiation experiments carried out with this fuel have shown that initial structure of the fuel pellet is subjected to large changes during operation. These are consequences of the radial and axial temperature gradients within the fuel rods. (Author) 54 refs.

  3. Quantification of hydrogen distribution with the nuclear microprobe of the Pierre Sue Laboratory in the thickness of the PWR fuel cladding in zirconium alloy; Quantification de la repartition de l'hydrogene a la microsonde nucleaire du Laboratoire Pierre Sue dans l'epaisseur du tube de gainage du combustible des REP en alliage de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raepsaet, C. [Laboratoire Pierre Sue (DSM/DRECAM/LPS) - CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bossis, Ph. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI/LM2E), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Hamon, D.; Bechade, J.L.; Brachet, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA/LA2M), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    In a first part of this study, are detailed the general principles of the specific technique ERDA (Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis) used in the Pierre Sue Laboratory. Then, the contribution of this technique is illustrated with two studies examples on the behaviour of PWR nuclear fuel cladding. (O.M.)

  4. Evaluation of the fuel rod integrity in PWR reactors from the spectrometric analysis of the primary coolant; Avaliacao da integridade de varetas combustiveis em reatores PWR a partir da analise espectrometrica da agua do primario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Iara Arraes

    1999-02-15

    The main objective of this thesis is to provide a better comprehension of the phenomena involved in the transport of fission products, from the fuel rod to the coolant of a PWR reactor. To achieve this purpose, several steps were followed. Firstly, it was presented a description of the fuel elements and the main mechanisms of fuel rod failure, indicating the most important nuclides and their transport mechanisms. Secondly, taking both the kinetic and diffusion models for the transport of fission products as a basis, a simple analytical and semi-empirical model was developed. This model was also based on theoretical considerations and measurements of coolant's activity, according to internationally adopted methodologies. Several factors are considered in the modelling procedures: intrinsic factors to the reactor itself, factors which depend on the reactor's operational mode, isotope characteristic factors, and factors which depend on the type of rod failure. The model was applied for different reactor's operational parameters in the presence of failed rods. The main conclusions drawn from the analysis of the model's output are relative to the variation on the coolant's water activity with the fuel burnup, the linear operation power and the primary purification rate and to the different behaviour of iodine and noble gases. The model was saturated from a certain failure size and showed to be unable to distinguish between a single big fail and many small ones. (author)

  5. Morphological analysis of zirconium nuclear fuel retaining rods braided with SiC: Quality assurance and defect identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazoff, Michael V., E-mail: Michael.Glazoff@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3710 (United States); Hiromoto, Robert; Tokuhiro, Akira [University of Idaho, CAES, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • The stability of materials under extreme conditions is an important issue for the safety of nuclear reactors. • To improve zircaloys’ thermal stability in off-normal conditions, coating of SiC filaments is considered because silicon carbide possesses remarkable inertness at high temperatures. • Mathematical morphology was used for automatic defect identification in Zircaloy-4 rods braided with the layer of SiC filament. • The original mathematical morphology algorithms allowing solving the problem of quality assurance were developed. • In nuclear industry, such algorithms are used for the first time. - Abstract: In the after-Fukushima world, the stability of materials under extreme conditions is an important issue for the safety of nuclear reactors. Among the methods explored currently to improve zircaloys’ thermal stability in off-normal conditions, using a protective coat of the SiC filaments is considered because silicon carbide is well known for its remarkable chemical inertness at high temperatures. A typical SiC fiber contains ∼50,000 individual filaments of 5–10 μm in diameter. In this paper, an effort was made to develop and apply mathematical morphology to the process of automatic defect identification in Zircaloy-4 rods braided with the protective layer of the silicon carbide filament. However, the issues of the braiding quality have to be addressed to ensure its full protective potential. We present the original mathematical morphology algorithms that allow solving this problem of quality assurance successfully. In nuclear industry, such algorithms are used for the first time, and could be easily generalized to the case of automated continuous monitoring for defect identification in the future.

  6. Verification and Validation of the BISON Fuel Performance Code for PCMI Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Gardner, Russell James [Idaho National Laboratory; Perez, Danielle Marie [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-06-01

    BISON is a modern finite element-based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior and has been used to analyze a variety of fuel forms in 1D spherical, 2D axisymmetric, or 3D geometries. A brief overview of BISON’s computational framework, governing equations, and general material and behavioral models is provided. BISON code and solution verification procedures are described. Validation for application to light water reactor (LWR) PCMI problems is assessed by comparing predicted and measured rod diameter following base irradiation and power ramps. Results indicate a tendency to overpredict clad diameter reduction early in life, when clad creepdown dominates, and more significantly overpredict the diameter increase late in life, when fuel expansion controls the mechanical response. Initial rod diameter comparisons have led to consideration of additional separate effects experiments to better understand and predict clad and fuel mechanical behavior. Results from this study are being used to define priorities for ongoing code development and validation activities.

  7. Modeling of PWR fuel at extended burnup; Estudo de modelos para o comportamento a altas queimas de varetas combustiveis de reatores a agua leve pressurizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Raphael Mejias

    2016-11-01

    This work studies the modifications implemented over successive versions in the empirical models of the computer program FRAPCON used to simulate the steady state irradiation performance of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods under high burnup condition. In the study, the empirical models present in FRAPCON official documentation were analyzed. A literature study was conducted on the effects of high burnup in nuclear fuels and to improve the understanding of the models used by FRAPCON program in these conditions. A steady state fuel performance analysis was conducted for a typical PWR fuel rod using FRAPCON program versions 3.3, 3.4, and 3.5. The results presented by the different versions of the program were compared in order to verify the impact of model changes in the output parameters of the program. It was observed that the changes brought significant differences in the results of the fuel rod thermal and mechanical parameters, especially when they evolved from FRAPCON-3.3 version to FRAPCON-3.5 version. Lower temperatures, lower cladding stress and strain, lower cladding oxide layer thickness were obtained in the fuel rod analyzed with the FRAPCON-3.5 version. (author)

  8. Development and verification of NRC`s single-rod fuel performance codes FRAPCON-3 AND FRAPTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, C.E.; Cunningham, M.E.; Lanning, D.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The FRAPCON and FRAP-T code series, developed in the 1970s and early 1980s, are used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to predict fuel performance during steady-state and transient power conditions, respectively. Both code series are now being updated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to improve their predictive capabilities at high burnup levels. The newest versions of the codes are called FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN. The updates to fuel property and behavior models are focusing on providing best estimate predictions under steady-state and fast transient power conditions up to extended fuel burnups (> 55 GWd/MTU). Both codes will be assessed against a data base independent of the data base used for code benchmarking and an estimate of code predictive uncertainties will be made based on comparisons to the benchmark and independent data bases.

  9. Monopolar fuel cell stack coupled together without use of top or bottom cover plates or tie rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A monopolar fuel cell stack comprises a plurality of sealed unit cells coupled together. Each unit cell comprises two outer cathodes adjacent to corresponding membrane electrode assemblies and a center anode plate. An inlet and outlet manifold are coupled to the anode plate and communicate with a channel therein. Fuel flows from the inlet manifold through the channel in contact with the anode plate and flows out through the outlet manifold. The inlet and outlet manifolds are arranged to couple to the inlet and outlet manifolds respectively of an adjacent one of the plurality of unit cells to permit fuel flow in common into all of the inlet manifolds of the plurality of the unit cells when coupled together in a stack and out of all of the outlet manifolds of the plurality of unit cells when coupled together in a stack.

  10. Simulation of Thermopower Influence on Fuel Core of Power Rod in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP Active Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Kulikov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems of modern methods for  calculation of designs and materials of nuclear power. A model of numerical analysis for stress-strain state of fuel pins in the NPP active zone is proposed in the paper. The paper contains simulation concerning a fuel core section of a nuclear reactor heat-generating element with subsequent solution of a temperature and thermoelastic problem in computer program complex FEA ANSYS Workbench 11.0. All the obtained results have passed through checking procedure.

  11. Development of fuel performance and thermal hydraulic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Youn Ho; Song, K. N.; Kim, H. K. and others

    2000-03-01

    Space grid in LWR fuel assembly is a key structural component to support fuel rods and to enhance heat transfer from fuel rod to the coolant. Therefore, the original spacer grid has been developed. In addition, new phenomena in fuel behavior occurs at the high burnup, so that models to analyze those new phenomena were developed. Results of this project can be summarized as follows. - Seven different spacer grid candidates have been invented and submitted for domestic and US patents. Spacer grid test specimen(3x3 array and 5x5 array) were fabricated for each candidate and the mechanical tests were performed. - Basic technologies in the mechanical and thermal hydraulic behavior in the spacer grid development are studied and relevant test facilities were established - Fuel performance analysis models and programs were developed for the high burnup pellet and cladding, and fuel performance data base were compiled - Procedures of fuel characterization and in-/out of-pile tests were prepared - Conceptual design of fuel rod for integral PWR was carried out. (author)

  12. Morphological Analysis of Zirconium Nuclear Fuel Retaining Rods Braided with SiC: Quality Assurance and Defect Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael V Glazoff; Robert Hiromoto; Akira Tokuhiro

    2014-08-01

    In the after-Fukushima world, the stability of materials under extreme conditions is an important issue for the safety of nuclear reactors. Among the methods explored currently to improve zircaloys’ thermal stability in off-normal conditions, using a protective coat of the SiC filaments is considered because silicon carbide is well known for its remarkable chemical inertness at high temperatures. A typical SiC fiber contains ~50,000 individual filaments of 5 – 10 µm in diameter. In this paper, an effort was made to develop and apply mathematical morphology to the process of automatic defect identification in Zircaloy-4 rods braided with the protective layer of the silicon carbide filament. However, the issues of the braiding quality have to be addressed to ensure its full protective potential. We present the original mathematical morphology algorithms that allow solving this problem of quality assurance successfully. In nuclear industry, such algorithms are used for the first time, and could be easily generalized to the case of automated continuous monitoring for defect identification in the future.

  13. Application of a genetic algorithm for the optimization of enrichment zoning and Gadolinia fuel (UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) rod designs in OPR1000s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae Je; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    A new effective methodology for optimizing the enrichment of low-enriched zones as well as gadolinia fuel (UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) rod designs in PLUS7 fuel assemblies was developed to minimize the maximum peak power in the core and to maximize the cycle lifetime. An automated link code was developed to integrate the genetic algorithm (GA) and the core design code package of ALPHA/PHOENIX-P/ANC and to generate and evaluate the candidates to be optimized efficiently through the integrated code package. This study introduces an optimization technique for the optimization of gadolinia fuel rod designs in order to effectively reduce the peak powers for a few hot assemblies simultaneously during the cycle. Coupled with the gadolinia optimization, the optimum enrichments were determined using the same automated code package. Applying this technique to the reference core of Ulchin Unit 4 Cycle 11, the gadolinia fuel rods in each hot assembly were optimized to different numbers and positions from their original designs, and the maximum peak power was decreased by 2.5%, while the independent optimization technique showed a decrease of 1.6% for the same fuel assembly. The lower enrichments at the fuel rods adjacent to the corner gap (CG), guide tube (GT), and instrumentation tube (IT) were optimized from the current 4.1, 4.1, 4.1 w/o to 4.65, 4.2, 4.2 w/o. The increase in the cycle lifetime achieved through this methodology was 5 effective full-power days (EFPD) on an ideal equilibrium cycle basis while keeping the peak power as low as 2.3% compared with the original design.

  14. Development of TRIGA Fuel Fabrication by Powder Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Suwarno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The prospect of operation of the Indonesian TRIGA reactors may be jeopardizes in the future due to the lack of fuel and control rods. Both fuel and control rods may not longer be imported and should be developed domestically. The most specific technology to fabricate TRIGA fuel rod is the production of UZrH1.6 pellet. The steps include converting the massive U metal into powder in by hydriding-dehydriding technique and mixing the U and Zr powders. A research has been planned to conducted by the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN in Indonesia. Fixed amount of U-Zr mixed powders at the ratio of U/Zr = 10 wt% was pressed into a pellet with a diameter of 1.41 in and a thickness of 1 or 1.5 in, sintered at a temperature of 1200oC, followed by hydriding at 800oC to obtained UZrH1.6. The pellets, cladding, and other components were then fabricated into a fuel rod. A detailed discussion of the TRIGA fuel fabrication is presented in the paper.

  15. Handling of damaged spent fuel at Ignalina NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziehm, Ronny [NUKEM Technologies GmbH (Germany); Bechtel, Sascha [Hoefer und Bechtel GmbH (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) is situated in the north-eastern part of Lithuania close to the borders with Latvia and Belarus and on the shore of Lake Druksiai. It is approximately 120 km from the capital city Vilnius. The power plant has two RMBK type water cooled graphite moderated pressure tube reactors each of design capacity 1500MW(e). The start of operation of the Unit 1 was in 1983 and of the Unit 2 in 1987. In the period 1987 - 1991 (i.e. Soviet period) a small proportion of the existing spent nuclear fuel suffered minor to major damages. In the frame of decommissioning of INPP it is necessary that this damaged fuel is retrieved from the storage pools and stored in an interim spent fuel store. NUKEM Technologies GmbH (Germany) as part of a consortium with GNS mbH (Germany) was awarded the contract for an Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility (B1- ISFSF). This contract includes the design, procurement, manufacturing, supply and installation of a damaged fuel handling system (DFHS). Objective of this DFHS is the safe handling of spent nuclear fuel with major damages, which result in rupture of the cladding and potential loss of fuel pellets from within the cladding. Typical damages are bent fuel bundle skeletons, broken fuel rods, missing or damaged end plugs, very small gaps between fuel bundles, bent central rods between fuel bundles. The presented concept is designed for Ignalina NPP. However, the design is developed more generally to solve these problems with damaged fuel at other nuclear power plants applying these proven techniques. (orig.)

  16. The improvement of control rod in experimental fast reactor JOYO. The development of a sodium bonded type control rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soga, T.; Miyakawa, S.; Mitsugi, T. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai Engineering Center, Irradiation Center, Irradiation and Administration Section, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Currently, the lifetime of control rods in JOYO is limited by Absorber-Cladding Mechanical Interaction (ACMI) due to swelling of B{sub 4}C(boron carbide) pellets accelerated by relocation of pellet fragments. A sodium bonded type control rod was developed which improves the thermal conductivity by means of charging sodium into the gap between B{sub 4}C and cladding and by utilizing a shroud which wraps the pellet fragments in a thin tube. This new design will be able to enlarge the gap between B{sub 4}C and cladding, without heating B{sub 4}C or fragment relocation, thus extending the life of the control rod. The sodium bonded type will be fabricated as the ninth reload control rods in JOYO. (1) The specification of a sodium bonded type control rod was determined with the wide gap between B{sub 4}C and cladding. In the design simulation, main component temperature were below the maximum limit. And the local heating by helium bubble generated from B{sub 4}C in the sodium gap, was not a serious problem in the analysis which was considered. (2) A structural design for the sodium entrance into the pin was determined. A formula was developed which the limit for sodium charging given physical dimension of the structure and sodium property. Result from sodium out-pile experiments validated the theoretical formula. (3) The analysis of ACMI indicated a lifetime extension of the sodium bonded type by 4.6% in comparison with lifetime of the helium bonded type of 1.6%. This is due to the boron10 burn-up rate being three times higher in the sodium bonded type than in the helium bonded type. To achieve a target burn-up 10% in the future, it will be necessary to modify design based on irradiation data which will be obtained by practical use of the sodium bonded control rods in JOYO. (4) The effects due to Absorber-Cladding Chemical Interaction (ACCI) were reduced by controlling the cladding temperature and chromium coating to the cladding's inner surface. It was confirmed

  17. Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-03-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed from 1962–1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967.a The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, relative fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector” (see Reference 1). The experiment studied in this evaluation was the second of the series and had the fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular pitch. One critical configuration was found (see Reference 3). Once the critical configuration had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U,bc and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configuration are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4, and 1.7, respectively.

  18. Systematic technology evaluation program for SiC/SiC composite-based accident-tolerant LWR fuel cladding and core structures: Revision 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Fuels and core structures in current light water reactors (LWR’s) are vulnerable to catastrophic failure in severe accidents as unfortunately evidenced by the March 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident. This vulnerability is attributed primarily to the rapid oxidation kinetics of zirconium alloys in a water vapor environment at very high temperatures. Zr alloys are the primary material in LWR cores except for the fuel itself. Therefore, alternative materials with reduced oxidation kinetics as compared to zirconium alloys are sought to enable enhanced accident-tolerant fuels and cores.

  19. Crud formation evaluation at the advanced fuel operating in Angra-1 NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Diego; Palheiros, Franklin; Gomes, Sydney, E-mail: franklin@inb.gov.br, E-mail: diegogomez@inb.gov.br, E-mail: sydney@inb.gov.br [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendência de Engenharia do Combustível

    2017-07-01

    In nuclear engineering, 'crud' is a technical term. It stands for Chalk River Unidentified Deposit, originally found on the cladding surface of some fuel rods in the referred canadian reactor, for which it was named. The deposit can be flaky, porous, or hard depending on its chemical composition. In most cases, it reduces the power output of nuclear reactors - the deposits absorb boron and the neutrons that keep the fission reaction going, as well lead to a more corrosion scenario by increasing the oxide/metal interface surface temperature. This issue might been a concern at Angra 1 where many design alterations have been performed in the new Fuel assembly design. The so called 16NGF has a smaller fuel rod diameter, different burnable absorber - gadolinium instead of pyrex borosilicate glass, hydraulic mismatch compared to 16STD fuel, new IFM grids, higher FDeltaH and several other characteristics. All those features lead to a increase in the subcooled boiling rates, which might favour particles depositions in fuel cladding forming the undesired Crud deposits. In order to evaluate how those implementations could impact negatively the new fuel performance at Angra 1, a study has ben carried out using Thermal Hydraulic calculations. With that, an existing methodology was used to assess the associated risks and what could be the done to mitigate further development of crud in 16NGF Fuel in Angra 1. (author)

  20. Mechanical and fracture behavior of nuclear fuel cladding in terms of transport and temporary dry storage; Comportamiento mecanio y en fractura de vainas de combustible nuclear en condiciones de transporte y almacenamiento temporal en seco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Hervias, J.; Martin Rengel, M. A.; Gomez, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the most relevant results of a research project on the mechanical and fracture behavior of cladding in transport and dry storage conditions are summarized. the project is being carried out at Universidad Politecnica de Madrid in collaboration with ENUSA, ENRESA and CSN. Non-irradiated cladding is investigated. The main objective is to determine a failure criterion of cladding as a function of hydrogen content, temperature and strain rate. (Author)

  1. Chemical Dissolution of Simulant FCA Cladding and Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pierce, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has received some fast critical assembly (FCA) fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for disposition. Among the JAEA FCA fuel are approximately 7090 rectangular Stainless Steel clad fuel elements. Each element has an internal Pu-10.6Al alloy metal wafer. The thickness of each element is either 1/16 inch or 1/32 inch. The dimensions of each element ranges from 2 inches x 1 inch to 2 inches x 4 inches. This report discusses the potential chemical dissolution of the FCA clad material or stainless steel. This technology uses nitric acid-potassium fluoride (HNO3-KF) flowsheets of H-Canyon to dissolve the FCA elements from a rack of materials. Historically, dissolution flowsheets have aimed to maximize Pu dissolution rates while minimizing stainless steel dissolution (corrosion) rates. Because the FCA cladding is made of stainless steel, this work sought to accelerate stainless steel dissolution.

  2. An Analysis of the Thermal and Structure Behaviour of the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}-Fuel in the Irradiation Experiment of the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}-Fuel in the Irradiation Experiment FR2 Capsule Test Series 5a; Analisis termico y estructural del combustible UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} irradiado en el reactor FR2 dentro del experimento KVE-Vg.5a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Helmut, E.

    1981-07-01

    In the Karlsruhe research reactor FR2 nine fuel pins were irradiated within three irradiation capsules in the course of the test series 5a. The pins contained UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} fuel pellets. They reached bump values of about 6, 17 and 47 Mwd/Kg Me with linear rod powers of 400 to 600 W/cm and clad surface temperature between 500 and 700 degree centigree. A detailed analysis of the fuel structuration data (columnar-grain and equiaxed- -grain growth regions) have allowed to determine, with the help of physic-mathematical models, the radii of these regions and the heat transfer through the contact zone between fuel and clad depending on the bump. The results of the analysis showed that the fuel surface temperature rose with increasing burnup. (Author) 16 refs.

  3. Separate-effect tests on zirconium cladding degradation in air ingress situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duriez, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, Direction de Prevention des Accidents Majeurs, Centre de Cadarache, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: christian.duriez@irsn.fr; Steinbrueck, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, FZK, Institut fuer Materialforschung, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ohai, D.; Meleg, T. [Institute for Nuclear Research, INR, Nuclear Material and Corrosion Department, Pitesti, 115400 Mioveni Arges (Romania); Birchley, J.; Haste, T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2009-02-15

    In the event of air ingress during a reactor or spent fuel pond low probability accident, the fuel rods will be exposed to air-containing atmospheres at high temperatures. In comparison with steam, the presence of air is expected to result in a more rapid escalation of the accident. A state-of-the-art review performed before SARNET started showed that the existing data on zirconium alloy oxidation in air were scarce. Moreover, the exact role of zirconium nitride on the cladding degradation process was poorly understood. Regarding the cladding behaviour in air + steam or nitrogen-enriched atmospheres (encountered in oxygen-starved conditions), almost no data were available. New experimental programmes comprising small-scale tests have therefore been launched at FZK, IRSN (MOZART programme in the frame of the International Source Term Program-ISTP) and INR. Zircaloy-4 cladding in PWR (FZK, IRSN) and in CANDU (INR) geometry are investigated. On-line kinetic data are obtained on centimetre size tube segments, by thermogravimetry (FZK, IRSN and INR) or by mass spectrometry (FZK). Plugged tubes 15 cm long (FZK) are also investigated. The samples are air-oxidised either in the 'as-received' state, or after pre-oxidation in steam. 'Analytical' tests at constant temperature and gas composition provide basic kinetic data, while more prototypical temperature transients and sequential gas compositions are also investigated. The temperature domains extend from 600 deg. C up to 1500 deg. C. Systematic post-test metallographic inspections are performed. The paper gives a synthesis of the results obtained, comparing them in terms of kinetics and oxide scale structure and composition. A comparative analysis is performed with results of the QUENCH-10 (Q-10) bundle test, which included an air ingress phase. It is shown how the data contribute to a better understanding of the cladding degradation process, especially regarding the role of nitrogen. For modelling of

  4. R&D Plan for RISMC Industry Application #1: ECCS/LOCA Cladding Acceptance Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Epiney, Aaron Simon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tu, Lei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is finalizing a rulemaking change that would revise the requirements in 10 CFR 50.46. In the proposed new rulemaking, designated as 10 CFR 50.46c, the NRC proposes a fuel performance-based equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) criterion as a function of cladding hydrogen content before the accident (pre-transient) in order to include the effects of higher burnup on cladding performance as well as to address other technical issues. A loss of operational margin may result due to the more restrictive cladding embrittlement criteria. Initial and future compliance with the rule may significantly increase vendor workload and licensee costs as a spectrum of fuel rod initial burnup states may need to be analyzed to demonstrate compliance. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a project, as part of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), to develop analytical capabilities to support the industry in the transition to the new rule. This project is called the Industry Application 1 (IA1) within the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of LWRS. The general idea behind the initiative is the development of an Integrated Evaluation Model (IEM). The motivation is to develop a multiphysics framework to analyze how uncertainties are propagated across the stream of physical disciplines and data involved, as well as how risks are evaluated in a LOCA safety analysis as regulated under 10 CFR 50.46c. This IEM is called LOTUS which stands for LOCA Toolkit for US, and it represents the LWRS Program’s response to the proposed new rule making. The focus of this report is to complete an R&D plan to describe the demonstration of the LOCA/ECCS RISMC Industry Application # 1 using the advanced RISMC Toolkit and methodologies. This report includes the description and development plan for a RISMC LOCA tool that fully couples advanced MOOSE tools already in development in order to characterize and optimize

  5. Optimization of gap sizes for the high performance of annular nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Doo; Kwon, Soon Bum; Cho, Hui Jeong; Kim, Seong Su [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Solid-type nuclear fuels have been used for nuclear reactors for a long time. Many countries are currently developing annular fuels to improve the efficiency of nuclear fuels. The thermoelastic-plastic-creep analyses of solid- and annular-type rods were conducted under the same conditions. The temperature and stress of the solid- and annular-type rods were compared on the basis of gap size. In this study, we examined the advantages and disadvantages of annular-type fuel regarding the temperature and stress of the pellet and cladding. The inner and outer gaps between the pellet and cladding play important roles in the temperature and stress distributions of fuel systems. Therefore, the optimization of gaps in fuel systems was conducted for a low temperature under certain stress conditions. hermoelasticplastic-creep analyses were conducted by using an in-house thermoelastic-plastic-creep finite element analysis program in Visual FORTRAN with the effective stress function algorithm. Nonlinear iterative stress analyses were conducted by nonlinear iterative temperature analyses; that is, a quasi-fully coupled algorithm was applied to this procedure. In this study, the thermoelastic-plastic-creep analysis of pressurized water reactor annular fuels was conducted to determine the contacting tendency of the inner-outer gaps between the annular fuel pellets and cladding, as well as to optimize the gap sizes by using the commercial package PIAnO for efficient heat transfer at certain stress levels. Most analyses were conducted until the gaps disappeared. However, certain analyses lasted for 1582 days, after which the fuels were replaced.

  6. Quantification of the distribution of hydrogen by nuclear microprobe at the Laboratory Pierre Sue in the width of zirconium alloy fuel clad of PWR reactors; Quantification de la repartition de l'hydrogene a la microsonde nucleaire du Laboratoire Pierre Sue dans l'epaisseur de tubes de gainage du combustible des REP en alliage de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raepsaet, C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules (DSM/DRECAM/LPS-CNRS) UMR9956, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Bossis, Ph. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMULM2E), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hamon, D.; Bechade, J.L.; Brachet, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMALA2M), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    Among the analysis techniques by ions beams, the micro ERDA (Elastic Detection Analysis) is an interesting technique which allows the quantitative distribution of the hydrogen in materials. In particular, this analysis has been used for hydride zirconium alloys, with the nuclear microprobe of the Laboratory Pierre Sue. This probe allows the characterization of radioactive materials. The technique principles are recalled and then two examples are provided to illustrate the fuel clad behavior in PWR reactors. (A.L.B.)

  7. A thermodynamic model for noble metal alloy inclusions in nuclear fuel rods and application to the study of loss-of-coolant accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Matthew Haigh

    Metal alloy inclusions comprised of Mo, Pd, Rh, Ru, and Tc (the so-called "noble" metals) develop in CANDU fuel pellets as a result of fission. The thermochemical behaviour of this alloy system during severe accident conditions is of interest in connection with computations of loss of volatile compounds of these elements by reaction with steam-hydrogen gas mixtures that develop in the system as a result of water reacting with the Zircalloy cladding. This treatment focuses on the development of thermodynamic models for the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc quinary system. A reasonable prediction was made by modelling the ten binary phase diagrams, five of these evaluations being original to this work. This process provides a complete treatment for the five solution phases (vapour, liquid, bcc-solid, fcc-solid, and cph-solid) in this alloy system, as well as self-consistent Gibbs energies of formation for the Mo 5Ru3 intermetallic phase, and two intermediate phases in the Mo-Tc system. The resulting collection of properties, when treated by Gibbs energy minimization, permits phase equilibria to be computed for specified temperatures and compositions. Experimental work in support of this treatment has been performed. Measurements of the solidus and liquidus temperatures for Pd-Rh alloys were made using differential thermal analysis. These measurements confirm that the liquid solution exhibits positive deviation from Raoult's law. Experimental work as a visiting research engineer at AECL (Chalk River) was performed using a custom developed Knudsen cell/mass spectrometer. The Pd partial pressure was measured above multi-component alloys of known composition over a range of temperatures. These are correlated to predicted activities of Pd from the developed thermodynamic model in the multi-component alloy. The thermodynamic treatment developed for the noble metal alloy inclusions has been combined with considerable other data and applied to selected loss-of-coolant-accident scenarios to

  8. Alloy development for high burnup cladding (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    An overview on current alloy development for high burnup PWR fuel cladding is given. It is mainly based on literature data. First, the reasons for an increase of the current mean discharge burnup from 35 MWd / kg(U) to 70 MWd / kg(U) are outlined. From the material data, it is shown that a batch average burnup of 60-70 MWd / kg(U), as aimed by many fuel vendors, can not be achieved with stand (=ASTM-) Zry-4 cladding tubes without violating accepted design criteria. Specifically criteria which limit maximum oxide scale thickness and maximum hydrogen content, and to a less degree, maximum creep and growth rate, can not be achieved. The development potential of standard Zry-4 is shown. Even when taking advantage of this potential, it is shown that an 'improved' Zry-4 is reaching its limits when it achieves the target burnup. The behavior of some Zr alloys outside the ASTM range is shown, and the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 alloy groups (ZrSn+transition metals, ZrNb, ZrSnNb+transition metals) which are currently considered to have the development potential for high burnup cladding materials are depicted. Finally, conclusions are drawn. (author). 14 refs., 11 tabs., 82 figs.

  9. Non-destructive Residual Stress Analysis Around The Weld-Joint of Fuel Cladding Materials of ZrNbMoGe Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikin

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The residual stress measurements around weld-joint of ZrNbMoGe alloy have been carried out by using X-ray diffraction technique in PTBIN-BATAN. The research was performed to investigate the structure of a cladding material with high temperature corrosion resistance and good weldability. The equivalent composition of the specimens (in %wt. was 97.5%Zr1%Nb1%Mo½%Ge. Welding was carried out by using TIG (tungsten inert gas technique that completed butt-joint with a current 20 amperes. Three region tests were taken in specimen while diffraction scanning, While diffraction scanning, tests were performed on three regions, i.e., the weldcore, the heat-affected zone (HAZ and the base metal. The reference region was determined at the base metal to be compared with other regions of the specimen, in obtaining refinement structure parameters. Base metal, HAZ and weldcore were diffracted by X-ray, and lattice strain changes were calculated by using Rietveld analysis program. The results show that while the quantity of minor phases tend to increase in the direction from the base metal to the HAZ and to the weldcore, the quantity of the ZrGe phase in the HAZ is less than the quantity of the ZrMo2 phase due to tGe element evaporation. The residual stress behavior in the material shows that minor phases, i.e., Zr3Ge and ZrMo2, are more dominant than the Zr matrix. The Zr3Ge and ZrMo2 experienced sharp straining, while the Zr phase was weak-lined from HAZ to weldcore. The hydrostatic residual stress ( in around weld-joint of ZrNbMoGe alloy is compressive stress which has minimum value at about -2.73 GPa in weldcore region

  10. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  11. Gel-sphere-pac reactor fuel fabrication and its application to a variety of fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, A.R.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

    1979-12-01

    The gel-sphere-pac fuel fabrication option was evaluated for its possible application to commercial scale fuel fabrication for 19 fuel element designs that use oxide fuel in metal clad rods. The dry gel spheres are prepared at the reprocessing plant and are then calcined, sintered, inspected, and loaded into fuel rods and packed by low-energy vibration. A fuel smear density of 83 to 88% theoretical can be obtained. All fuel fabrication process steps were defined and evaluated from fuel receiving to finished fuel element shipping. The evaluation also covers the feasibility of the process, the current status of technology, estimates of the required time and cost to develop the technology to commercial status, and the safety and licensability of commercial scale plants. The primary evaluation was for a Light-Water Reactor fuel element containing (U,Pu)O/sub 2/ fuel. The other 18 fuel element types - 3 for Light-Water Reactors, 1 for a Heavy-Water Reactor, 1 for a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor, 7 for Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors, and 3 pairs for Light-Water Prebreeder and Breeder Reactors - were compared with the Light-Water Reactor. The gel-sphere-pac option was found applicable to 17 of the 19 element types; the characteristics of a commercial scale plant were defined for these for making cost estimates for such plants. The evaluation clearly shows the gel-sphere-pac process to be a viable fuel fabrication option. Estimates indicate a significant potential fabrication cost advantage for the gel-sphere-pac process if a remotely operated and remotely maintained fuel fabrication plant is required.

  12. Review of construction criteria for nuclear fuels under normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences - a literature study; Oeversyn av konstruktionskriterier foer kaernbraensle under normaldrift och foervaentade driftsstoerningar - en litteraturstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudling, P. [Advanced Nuclear Technology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1999-06-01

    General Design Criteria 10, GDC 10, in the Code of Federal Regulation Part 50 of Nuclear Regulatory Commission specifies that the fuel assembly including the fuel rod may not be damaged during normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences. No damaged, means that the fuel rods do not fail, that fuel rod and assembly dimensions remain within operational tolerances, and that functional capabilities are not reduced below those assumed in the safety analysis. This objective is given by GDC 10, and the design limits that are required to accomplish this objective are called Specified Acceptable Fuel Design Limits, SAFDLs. The SAFDLs are specified in Standard Review Plan, SRP, chapter 4.2. This report summarises and analyses published open data that are relevant for the below-specified SAFDLs. It also summarises the current view of NRC on the discussed SAFDLs as well as the margin towards fuel failure of the SAFDLs. The following SAFDLs are discussed herein: Avoidance of fuel centre melting; Avoidance of liftoff; Maximum cladding creep deformation; Avoidance of cladding collapse; Maximum fretting; Maximum dimensional changes; Maximum stresses; Maximum fatigue stresses; Maximum oxide thickness; Maximum hydrogen content; Avoidance of PCI - failures.

  13. Thermal hydraulic-Mechanic Integrated Simulation for Advanced Cladding Thermal Shock Fracture Analysis during Reflood Phase in LBLOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Seong Min; Lee, You Ho; Cho, Jae Wan; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This study suggested thermal hydraulic-mechanical integrated stress based methodology for analyzing the behavior of ATF type claddings by SiC-Duplex cladding LBLOCA simulation. Also, this paper showed that this methodology could predict real experimental result well. That concept for enhanced safety of LWR called Advanced Accident-Tolerance Fuel Cladding (ATF cladding, ATF) is researched actively. However, current nuclear fuel cladding design criteria for zircaloy cannot be apply to ATF directly because those criteria are mainly based on limiting their oxidation. So, the new methodology for ATF design criteria is necessary. In this study, stress based analysis methodology for ATF cladding design criteria is suggested. By simulating LBLOCA scenario of SiC cladding which is the one of the most promising candidate of ATF. Also we'll confirm our result briefly through comparing some facts from other experiments. This result is validating now. Some of results show good performance with 1-D failure analysis code for SiC fuel cladding that already developed and validated by Lee et al,. It will present in meeting. Furthermore, this simulation presented the possibility of understanding the behavior of cladding deeper. If designer can predict the dangerous region and the time precisely, it may be helpful for designing nuclear fuel cladding geometry and set safety criteria.

  14. A MULTIDIMENSIONAL AND MULTIPHYSICS APPROACH TO NUCLEAR FUEL BEHAVIOR SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; S. R. Novascone; M. R. Tonks; D. R. Gaston; C. J. Permann; D. Andrs; R. C. Martineau

    2012-04-01

    Important aspects of fuel rod behavior, for example pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI), fuel fracture, oxide formation, non-axisymmetric cooling, and response to fuel manufacturing defects, are inherently multidimensional in addition to being complicated multiphysics problems. Many current modeling tools are strictly 2D axisymmetric or even 1.5D. This paper outlines the capabilities of a new fuel modeling tool able to analyze either 2D axisymmetric or fully 3D models. These capabilities include temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of fuel; swelling and densification; fuel creep; pellet fracture; fission gas release; cladding creep; irradiation growth; and gap mechanics (contact and gap heat transfer). The need for multiphysics, multidimensional modeling is then demonstrated through a discussion of results for a set of example problems. The first, a 10-pellet rodlet, demonstrates the viability of the solution method employed. This example highlights the effect of our smeared cracking model and also shows the multidimensional nature of discrete fuel pellet modeling. The second example relies on our the multidimensional, multiphysics approach to analyze a missing pellet surface problem. As a final example, we show a lower-length-scale simulation coupled to a continuum-scale simulation.

  15. Transition from HEU to LEU fuel in Romania`s 14-MW TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1991-12-31

    The 14-MW TRIGA steady state reactor (SSR) located in Pitesti, Romania, first went critical in the fall of 1979. Initially, the core configuration for full power operation used 29 fuel clusters each containing a 5 {times} 5 square array of HEU (10 wt%) -- ZrH -- Er (2.8 wt%) fuel-moderator rods (1.295 cm o.d.) clad in Incology. With a total inventory of 35 HEU fuel clusters, burnup considerations required a gradual expansion of the core from 29 to 32 and finally to 35 clusters before the reactor was shut down because of insufficient excess reactivity. At this time each of the original 29 fuel clusters had an overage {sup 235}U burnup in the range from 50 to 62%. Because of the US policy regarding the export of highly enriched uranium, fresh HEU TRIGA replacement fuel is not available. After a number of safety-related measurements, the SSR is expected to resume full power operation in the near future using a mixed core containing five LEU TRIGA clusters of the same geometry as the original fuel but with fuel-moderator rods containing 45 wt% U (19.7% {sup 235}U enrichment) and 1.1 wt% Er. Rods for 14 additional LEU fuel clusters will be fabricated by General Atomics. In support of the SSR mixed core operation numerous neutronic calculations have been performed. This paper presents some of the results of those calculations.

  16. Development of data base with mechanical properties of un- and pre-irradiated VVER cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmolov, V.; Yegorova, L.; Kaplar, E.; Lioutov, K. [Nuclear Safety Inst. of Russian Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation). Kurchatov Inst.; Smirnov, V.; Prokhorov, V.; Goryachev, A. [State Research Centre, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation). Research Inst. of Atomic Reactors

    1998-03-01

    Analysis of recent RIA test with PWR and VVER high burnup fuel, performed at CABRI, NSRR, IGR reactors has shown that the data base with mechanical properties of the preirradiated cladding is necessary to interpret the obtained results. During 1997 the corresponding cycle of investigations for VVER clad material was performed by specialists of NSI RRC KI and RIAR in cooperation with NRC (USA), IPSN (France) in two directions: measurements of mechanical properties of Zr-1%Nb preirradiated cladding versus temperature and strain rate; measurements of failure parameters for gas pressurized cladding tubes. Preliminary results of these investigations are presented in this paper.

  17. Gel-sphere-pac fuel for thermal reactors: assessment of fabrication technology and irradiation performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, R.L. Norman, R.E.; Notz, K.J. (comps.)

    1979-11-01

    Recent interest in proliferation-resistant fuel cycles for light-water reactors has focused attention on spiked plutonium and /sup 233/U-Th fuels, requiring remote refabrication. The gel-sphere-pac process for fabricating metal-clad fuel elements has drawn special attention because it involves fewer steps. Gel-sphere-pac fabrication technology involves two major areas: the preparation of fuel spheres of high density and loading these spheres into rods in an efficiently packed geometry. Gel sphere preparation involves three major steps: preparation of a sol or of a special solution (broth), gelation of droplets of sol or broth to give semirigid spheres of controlled size, and drying and sintering these spheres to a high density. Gelation may be accomplished by water extraction (suitable only for sols) or ammonia gelation (suitable for both sols and broths but used almost exclusively with broths). Ammonia gelation can be accomplished either externally, via ammonia gas and ammonium hydroxide, or internally via an added ammonia generator such as hexamethylenetetramine. Sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication involves controlled blending and metering of three sizes of spheres into the rod and packing by low- to medium-energy vibration to achieve about 88% smear density; these sizes have diametral ratios of about 40:10:1 and are blended in size fraction amounts of about 60% coarse, 18% medium, and 22% fine. Irradiation test results indicate that sphere-pac fuel performs at least as well as pellet fuel, and may in fact offer an advantage in significantly reducing mechanical and chemical interaction between the fuel and cladding. The normal feed for gel sphere preparation, heavy metal nitrate solution, is the usual product of fuel reprocessing, so that fabrication of gel spheres performs all the functions performed by both conversion and pellet fabrication in the case of pellet technology.

  18. Study of a criticality accident involving fuel rods and water outside a power reactor; Etude d'un accident de criticite mettant en presence des crayons combustibles et de l'eau hors reacteur de puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beloeil, L

    2000-05-30

    It is possible to imagine highly unlikely but numerous accidental situations where fuel rods come into contact with water under conditions close to atmospheric values. This work is devoted to modelling and simulation of first instants of the power excursion that may result from such configurations. We show that void effect is a preponderant feedback for most severe accidents. The formation of a vapour film around the rods is put forward and confirmed with the help of experimental transients using electrical heating. We propose then a vapour/liquid flow model able to reproduce void fraction evolution. The vapour film is treated as a compressible medium. Conservation balance equations are solved on a moving mesh with a two-dimensional scheme and boundary conditions taking notice of interfacial phenomena and axial escape possibility. Movements of the liquid phase are modelled through a non-stationary integral equation and a dissipative term suited to the particular geometry of this flow. The penetration of energy into the liquid is also calculated. Thus, the coupling of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic modules gives results in excellent agreement with experiments. Next, neutronic phenomena into the fuel pellet, their feedback effects and the distribution of power through the rod are numerically translated. For each developed module, validation tests are provided. Then, it is possible to simulate the first seconds of the whole criticality accident. Even if this calculation tool is only a way of study as a first approach, performed simulations are proving coherent with reported data on recorded accidents. (author)

  19. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The hot and cold cracking tendencies of some early iron aluminide alloy compositions have limited their use in applications where good weldability is required. Using hot crack testing techniques invented at ORNL, and experimental determinations of preheat and postweld heat treatment needed to avoid cold cracking, we have developed iron aluminide filler metal compositions which can be successfully used to weld overlay clad various substrate materials, including 9Cr-1Mo steel, 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel, and 300-series austenitic stainless steels. Dilution must be carefully controlled to avoid crack-sensitive deposit compositions. The technique used to produce the current filler metal compositions is aspiration-casting, i.e. drawing the liquid from the melt into glass rods. Future development efforts will involve fabrication of composite wires of similar compositions to permit mechanized gas tungsten arc (GTA) and/or gas metal arc (GMA) welding.

  20. Results of irradiated cladding tests and clad plate experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Two aspects critical to the fracture behavior of three-wire stainless steel cladding were investigated by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program: (1) radiation effects on cladding strength and toughness, and (2) the response of mechanically loaded, flawed structures in the presence of cladding (clad plate experiments). Postirradiation testing results show that, in the test temperature range from /minus/125 to 288/degree/C, the yield strength increased, and ductility insignificantly increased, while there was almost no change in ultimate tensile strength. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during Charpy impact testing. Radiation damage decreased the Charpy upper-shelf energy by 15 to 20% and resulted in up to 28/degree/C shifts of the Charpy impact transition temperature. Results of irradiated 12.5-mm-thick compact specimens (0.5TCS) show consistent decreases in the ductile fracture toughness, J/sub Ic/, and the tearing modulus. Results from clad plate tests have shown that (1) a tough surface layer composed of cladding and/or heat-affected zone has arrested running flaws under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured, and (2) the residual load-bearing capacity of clad plates with large subclad flaws significantly exceeded that of an unclad plate. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Prediction of CRUD deposition on PWR fuel using a state-of-the-art CFD-based multi-physics computational tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Victor [Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulv, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kendrick, Brian K. [Theoretical Division (T-1, MS B221), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Walter, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulv, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Manera, Annalisa, E-mail: manera@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulv, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Secker, Jeffrey [Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Fuel Division, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper we report about the first attempt to demonstrate and assess the ability of state-of-the-art high-fidelity computational tools to reproduce the complex patterns of CRUD deposits found on the surface of operating Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) fuel rods. A fuel assembly of the Seabrook Unit 1 PWR was selected as the test problem. During Seabrook Cycle 5, CRUD induced power shift (CIPS) and CRUD induced localized corrosion (CILC) failures were observed. Measurements of the clad oxide thickness on both failed and non-failed rods are available, together with visual observations and the results from CRUD scrapes of peripheral rods. Blind simulations were performed using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code STAR-CCM+ coupled to an advanced chemistry code, MAMBA, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The blind simulations were then compared to plant data, which were released after completion of the simulations.

  2. Modelling of the Gadolinium Fuel Test IFA-681 using the BISON Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    In this work, application of Idaho National Laboratory’s fuel performance code BISON to modelling of fuel rods from the Halden IFA-681 gadolinium fuel test is presented. First, an overview is given of BISON models, focusing on UO2/UO2-Gd2O3 fuel and Zircaloy cladding. Then, BISON analyses of selected fuel rods from the IFA-681 test are performed. For the first time in a BISON application to integral fuel rod simulations, the analysis is informed by detailed neutronics calculations in order to accurately capture the radial power profile throughout the fuel, which is strongly affected by the complex evolution of absorber Gd isotopes. In particular, radial power profiles calculated at IFE–Halden Reactor Project with the HELIOS code are used. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project. Some slide have been added as an Appendix to present the newly developed PolyPole-1 algorithm for modeling of intra-granular fission gas release.

  3. Nuclear Fuels: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Olander

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The important new developments in nuclear fuels and their problems are reviewed and compared with the status of present light-water reactor fuels. The limitations of these fuels and the reactors they power are reviewed with respect to important recent concerns, namely provision of outlet coolant temperatures high enough for use in H2 production, destruction of plutonium to eliminate proliferation concerns, and burning of the minor actinides to reduce the waste repository heat load and long-term radiation hazard. In addition to current oxide-based fuel-rod designs, the hydride fuel with liquid metal thermal bonding of the fuel-cladding gap is covered. Finally, two of the most promising Generation IV reactor concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor and the Sodium Fast Reactor, and the accompanying reprocessing technologies, aqueous-based UREX and pyrometallurgical, are summarized. In all of the topics covered, the thermodynamics involved in the material's behavior under irradiation and in the reprocessing schemes are emphasized.

  4. Feasibility Test of Commercial CFD Code for Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Wire-wrapped Fuel Pin Bundle in SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chiwoong; Ha, Kwiseok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Haeyong, Jeong [Sejong Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    One of the major difficulties in the numerical approach is a grid generation of the interface between a wire and rod, because the point connectivity and higher scale deviation of a wire and rod can easily increase the number of meshes. The general way to handle this problem is a simplification of the wire-rod interface. In this study, the wire configuration effect is also studied with a no-wire case and simplified wire geometries. The materials of coolant and cladding are sodium and HT9. Fuel part is not modeled. The detailed design parameters are described in Table 1. In addition, Fig. 2 shows a detailed schematic of the fuel rod and wire. The wire contact distance, Sw, is the length penetrating the clad. Basically, the wire will be firmly contacted with the clad surface. As shown in Table 1, the wire diameter is the same as the gap between two fuel rods. However, it is unavoidable in the modeling of the wire to ignore a singular contact point between the wire and cladding. Therefore, an intersected wire and rod are arbitrarily generated. The boundary conditions for the conjugated heat transfer analysis are described in Table 2. The inlet region is defined with a uniform velocity and constant temperature of 650 K. The outlet is defined with a constant ambient pressure, i. e., zero static pressure. Since only the cladding part was modeled, a uniform heat flux condition is applied on the inner cladding wall surface. All solid surfaces are considered as no slip adiabatic boundaries. The numerical analyses of wire-wrapped 7 pins are conducted using ANSYS-CFX to check the feasibility of the CFD tool in thermal-hydraulic phenomena in a wire-wrapped fuel pin bundle. Typical turbulent models are applied to check the dependency of model selection on the pressure drop and heat transfer on the wire-wrapped fuel rod. In short, the omega-based model shows the highest pressure drop and heat transfer. Comparing the existing correlations, the pressure drop results represent

  5. COMPARISON OF CLADDING CREEP RUPTURE MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Macheret

    2000-06-12

    The objective of this calculation is to compare several creep rupture correlations for use in calculating creep strain accrued by the Zircaloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel when it has been emplaced in the repository. These correlations are used to calculate creep strain values that are then compared to a large set of experimentally measured creep strain data, taken from four different research articles, making it possible to determine the best fitting correlation. The scope of the calculation extends to six different creep rupture correlations.

  6. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  7. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, B.J.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report 'Alloy Development for High Burnup Cladding.' Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs.

  8. Neutron Flux Depression in the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}(15 to 30%) Fuel Rods from IVO-FR2-Vg7-Irradiation Experiment; Depresion de flujo neutronico en las barras combustibles de UO2-PuO2(15 al 30%) del experimento de irradiacion IVO-FR2-Vg7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J.; Fernandez, J. L.

    1983-07-01

    The thermal-neutron flux depression within a fuel rod has a great influence in the radial temperature profile of the rod, especially for high enrichment fuel. For this reason, a study was made about the UO{sub 2}-PUO{sub 2} (15 to 30% PUO{sub 2}) fuel pins for the KfK-JEN joint irradiation program IVO, in the FR2 reactor. Different methods (diffusion, Bonalumi, successive generations) were compared and a new approach (parabolic approximation) was developed. (Author) 22 refs.

  9. Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was {sup 108m}Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well ({+-}10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste.

  10. Comparison of thermal compatibility between atomized and comminuted U{sub 3}Si dispersion fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo-Seog; Park, Jong-Man; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kuk, II-Hyun [Korea Atomic Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    Thermal compatibility of atomized U{sub 3}Si dispersion fuels were evaluated up to 2600 hours in the temperature range from 250 to 500{degrees}C, and compared with that of comminuted U{sub 3}Si. Atomized U{sub 3}Si showed better performance in terms of volume expansion of fuel meats. The reaction zone of U{sub 3}Si and Al occurred along the grain boundaries and deformation bands in U{sub 3}Si particles. Pores around fuel particles appeared at high temperature or after long-term annealing tests to remain diffusion paths over the trench of the pores. The constraint effects of cladding on fuel rod suppressed the fuel meat, and reduced the volume expansion.

  11. Cladding material, tube including such cladding material and methods of forming the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    A multi-layered cladding material including a ceramic matrix composite and a metallic material, and a tube formed from the cladding material. The metallic material forms an inner liner of the tube and enables hermetic sealing of thereof. The metallic material at ends of the tube may be exposed and have an increased thickness enabling end cap welding. The metallic material may, optionally, be formed to infiltrate voids in the ceramic matrix composite, the ceramic matrix composite encapsulated by the metallic material. The ceramic matrix composite includes a fiber reinforcement and provides increased mechanical strength, stiffness, thermal shock resistance and high temperature load capacity to the metallic material of the inner liner. The tube may be used as a containment vessel for nuclear fuel used in a nuclear power plant or other reactor. Methods for forming the tube comprising the ceramic matrix composite and the metallic material are also disclosed.

  12. Stone cladding engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa Camposinhos, Rui de

    2014-01-01

    This volume presents new methodologies for the design of dimension stone based on the concepts of structural design while preserving the excellence of stonemasonry practice in façade engineering. Straightforward formulae are provided for computing action on cladding, with special emphasis on the effect of seismic forces, including an extensive general methodology applied to non-structural elements. Based on the Load and Resistance Factor Design Format (LRDF), minimum slab thickness formulae are presented that take into consideration stress concentrations analysis based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) for the most commonly used modern anchorage systems. Calculation examples allow designers to solve several anchorage engineering problems in a detailed and objective manner, underlining the key parameters. The design of the anchorage metal parts, either in stainless steel or aluminum, is also presented.

  13. Ice-clad volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitt, Richard B.; Edwards, B.R.; Fountain, Andrew G.; Huggel, C.; Carey, Mark; Clague, John J.; Kääb, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An icy volcano even if called extinct or dormant may be active at depth. Magma creeps up, crystallizes, releases gas. After decades or millennia the pressure from magmatic gas exceeds the resistance of overlying rock and the volcano erupts. Repeated eruptions build a cone that pokes one or two kilometers or more above its surroundings - a point of cool climate supporting glaciers. Ice-clad volcanic peaks ring the northern Pacific and reach south to Chile, New Zealand, and Antarctica. Others punctuate Iceland and Africa (Fig 4.1). To climb is irresistible - if only “because it’s there” in George Mallory’s words. Among the intrepid ascents of icy volcanoes we count Alexander von Humboldt’s attempt on 6270-meter Chimborazo in 1802 and Edward Whymper’s success there 78 years later. By then Cotopaxi steamed to the north.

  14. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Accident Tolerant Fuels High Impact Problem: Coordinate Multiscale FeCrAl Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, K. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hales, J. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andersson, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Capolungo, L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wirth, B. D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-07-26

    Since the events at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 significant research has unfolded at national laboratories, universities and other institutions into alternative materials that have potential enhanced ac- cident tolerance when compared to traditional UO2 fuel zircaloy clad fuel rods. One of the potential replacement claddings are iron-chromium-alunimum (FeCrAl) alloys due to their increased oxidation resistance [1–4] and higher strength [1, 2]. While the oxidation characteristics of FeCrAl are a benefit for accident tolerance, the thermal neu- tron absorption cross section of FeCrAl is about ten times that of Zircaloy. This neutronic penalty necessitates thinner cladding. This allows for slightly larger pellets to give the same cold gap width in the rod. However, the slight increase in pellet diameter is not sufficient to compensate for the neutronic penalty and enriching the fuel beyond the current 5% limit appears to be necessary [5]. Current estimates indicate that this neutronic penalty will impose an increase in fuel cost of 15-35% [1, 2]. In addition to the neutronic disadvantage, it is anticipated that tritium release to the coolant will be larger because the permeability of hydrogen in FeCrAl is about 100 times higher than in Zircaloy [6]. Also, radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement of FeCrAl need to be fully characterized experimentally [7]. Due to the aggressive development schedule for inserting some of the potential materials into lead test assemblies or rods by 2022 [8] multiscale multiphysics modeling approaches have been used to provide insight into these the use of FeCrAl as a cladding material. The purpose of this letter report is to highlight the multiscale modeling effort for iron-chromium-alunimum (FeCrAl) cladding alloys as part of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program through its Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) High Impact Problem (HIP). The approach taken throughout the HIP is to

  15. Friction surface cladding: development of a solid state cladding process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stelt, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Many industries including automotive, aerospace, electronics, shipbuilding, offshore, railway and heavy equipment employ surface modification technologies to change the surface properties of a manufactured product. Often, the surface is covered (coated) with a dissimilar clad layer for this purpose

  16. Complete Non-Radioactive Operability Tests for Cladding Hull Chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Emory D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Jared A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hylton, Tom D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brunson, Ronald Ray [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunt, Rodney Dale [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bradley, Eric Craig [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Non-radioactive operability tests were made to test the metal chlorination reactor and condenser and their accessories using batch chlorinations of non-radioactive cladding samples and to identify optimum operating practices and components that need further modifications prior to installation of the equipment into the hot cell for tests on actual used nuclear fuel (UNF) cladding. The operability tests included (1) modifications to provide the desired heating and reactor temperature profile; and (2) three batch chlorination tests using, respectively, 100, 250, and 500 g of cladding. During the batch chlorinations, metal corrosion of the equipment was assessed, pressurization of the gas inlet was examined and the best method for maintaining solid salt product transfer through the condenser was determined. Also, additional accessing equipment for collection of residual ash and positioning of the unit within the hot cell were identified, designed, and are being fabricated.

  17. Power Burst Facility (PBF) severe fuel damage test 1-4 test results report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, D.A.; Martinson, Z.R.; Hobbins, R.R.; Allison, C.M.; Carlson, E.R.; Hagrman, D.L.; Cheng, T.C.; Hartwell, J.K.; Vinjamuri, K.; Seifken, L.J.

    1989-04-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1-4 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1-4 was the fourth and final test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel and control rod behavior, aerosol and hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (36,000 MWd/MtU) pressurized water-reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 silver-indium-cadmium control rods, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1.3-h transient at a coolant pressure of 6.95 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy and control rod absorber alloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 2100-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of on-line instrumentation, analysis of fission product and aerosol data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 40 refs., 160 figs., 31 tabs.

  18. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Guoping [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  19. Models for MOX fuel behaviour. A selective review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    This report reviews the basic physical properties of light water reactor mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel comprising nuclear characteristics, thermal properties such as melting temperature, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, and heat capacity, and compares these with properties of conventional UO{sub 2} fuel. These properties are generally well understood for MOX fuel and are well described by appropriate models developed for engineering analysis. Moreover, certain modelling approaches of MOX fuel in-reactor behaviour, regarding densification, swelling, fission product gas release, helium release, fuel creep and grain growth, are evaluated and compared with the models for UO{sub 2}. In MOX fuel the presence of plutonium rich agglomerates adds to the complexity of fuel behaviour on the micro scale. In addition, we survey the recent fuel performance experience and post irradiation examinations on several types of MOX fuel types. We discuss the data from these examinations, regarding densification, swelling, fission product gas release and the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation. The results of our review indicate that in general MOX fuel has a higher fission gas release and helium release than UO{sub 2} fuel. Part of this increase is due to the higher operating temperatures of MOX fuel relative to UO{sub 2} fuel due to the lower thermal conductivity of MOX material. But this effect by itself seems to be insufficient to make for the difference in the observed fission gas release of UO{sub 2} vs. MOX fuel. Furthermore, the irradiation induced creep rate of MOX fuel is higher than that of UO{sub 2}. This effect can reduce the pellet-clad interaction intensity in fuel rods. Finally, we suggest that certain physical based approaches discussed in the report are implemented in the fuel performance code to account for the behaviour of MOX fuel during irradiation.

  20. Learning from corrosion. What are the demands of the operation, what is feasible weldingly at the corrosion protection by cladding?; Von Korrosion lernen. Welche Herausforderungen stellt der Betrieb, was ist schweisstechnisch beim Korrosionsschutz durch Cladding machbar?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Thomas; Trotha, Ghita von; Molitor, Dominik [CheMin GmbH, Augsburg (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    The weld cladding of pipe walls and single tubes with nickel-base alloys is a precautionary measure for the new construction of evaporators or super-heaters in incinerators with difficult fuels. Under this aspect, the authors of this contribution report on some aspects of corrosion of claddings in order to learn about the corrosion protection. Welding optimizations are presented.

  1. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Accident Tolerant Fuels High Impact Problem: Coordinate Multiscale U3Si2 Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, K. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hales, J. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miao, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Andersson, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zhang, Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-26

    Since the events at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 significant research has unfolded at national laboratories, universities and other institutions into alternative materials that have potential enhanced accident tolerance when compared to traditional \\uo~fuel zircaloy clad fuel rods. One of the potential replacement fuels is uranium silicide (\\usi) for its higher thermal conductivity and uranium density. The lower melting temperature is of potential concern during postulated accident conditions. Another disadvantage for \\usi~ is the lack of experimental data under power reactor conditions. Due to the aggressive development schedule for inserting some of the potential materials into lead test assemblies or rods by 2022~\\cite{bragg-sitton_2014} multiscale multiphysics modeling approaches have been used to provide insight into these materials. \\\\ \

  2. Examination of cadmium safety rod thermal test specimens and failure mechanism evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.K.; Peacock, H.B.; Iyer, N.C.

    1992-01-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental cadmium safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. Companion reports describe the experiments and a structural evaluation (finite element analysis) of the safety rod. This report deals primarily with the examination of the test specimens, evaluation of possible failure mechanisms, and confirmatory separate effects experiments. It is concluded that the failures observed in the cadmium safety rod thermal tests which occurred at low temperature (T < 600{degrees}C) with slow thermal ramp rates (slow cladding strain rates) resulted from localized dissolution of the stainless steel cladding by the cadmium/aluminum solution and subsequent ductility exhaustion and rupture. The slow thermal ramp rate is believed to be the root cause for the failures; specifically, the slow ramp rate led to localized cladding shear deformation which ruptured the protective oxide film on the cladding inner surface and allowed dissolution to initiate. The test results and proposed failure mechanism support the conclusion that the rods would not fail below 500{degrees}C even at slow ramp rates. The safety rod thermal test specimen failures which occurred at high temperature (T > 800{degrees}C) with fast thermal ramp rates are concluded to be mechanical in nature without significant environmental degradation. Based on these tests, tasks were initiated to design and manufacture B{sub 4}C safety rods to replace the cadmium safety rods. The B{sub 4}C safety rods have been manufactured at this time and it is currently planned to charge them to the reactor in the near future. 60 refs.

  3. Shippingport LWBR (Th/U Oxide) Fuel Characteristics for Disposal Criticality Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. L. Taylor; H. H. Loo

    1999-09-01

    Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuels encompass many fuel types. In an effort to facilitate criticality analysis for these various fuel types, they were categorized into eight characteristic fuel groups with emphasis on fuel matrix composition. Out of each fuel group, a representative fuel type was chosen for analysis as a bounding case within that fuel group. Generally, burnup data, fissile enrichments, and total fuel and fissile mass govern the selection of the representative or candidate fuel within that group. The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) fuels incorporate more of the conventional materials (zirconium cladding/heavy metal oxides) and fabrication details (rods and spacers) that make them comparable to a typical commercial fuel assembly. The LWBR seed/blanket configuration tested a light-water breeder concept with Th-232/U-233 binary fuel matrix. Reactor design used several assembly configurations at different locations within the same core . The seed assemblies contain the greatest fissile mass per (displaced) unit volume, but the blanket assemblies actually contain more fissile mass in a larger volume; the atom-densities are comparable.

  4. Nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.; Williford, R.E.; Christensen, J.A.

    1982-03-03

    A nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer between fuel material and cladding is described. The element consists of an outer cladding tube divided into an upper fuel section containing a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material, slightly smaller in diameter than the inner surface of the cladding tube and a small lower accumulator section, the cladding tube being which is filled with a low molecular weight gas to transfer heat from fuel material to cladding during irradiation. A plurality of essentially vertical grooves in the fuel section extend downward and communicate with the accumulator section. The radial depth of the grooves is sufficient to provide a thermal gradient between the hot fuel surface and the relatively cooler cladding surface to allow thermal segregation to take place between the low molecular weight heat transfer gas and high molecular weight fission product gases produced by the fuel material during irradiation.

  5. Transient dry out in Forsmark 2 during a fast pump runback - course of events, fuel investigations and measures taken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramenblad, Eric; Schrire, David [Vattenfall Nuclear Fuel, Jaemtlandsgatan 99, 162 87 Stockholm (Sweden); Schroeder, Bjoern [Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB, 172 03 Oesthammar (Sweden)

    2009-06-15

    Swedish BWRs operate under the condition that dry out is not accepted for anticipated transients. To guarantee this, extensive work has been done regarding plant models, methodology development and full scope SAR analyses. In addition to this, every cycle is analyzed in detail to determine an operating limit for the minimum critical power ratio (OLMCPR). A course of events on June 13 led about 84 fuel assemblies of Forsmark 2 to exceed the safety limit minimum CPR and 18 of these experienced dry out. This had not been anticipated beforehand, hence, the OLMCPR was too low and did not protect the fuel against the transient dryout. The calculations are made up out of two separate cases. First the plant response was analyzed with the Westinghouse code BISON. Global variables like total core flow, the neutron flux (APRM) and steam dome pressure were determined. After this, boundary conditions regarding inlet temperature, core pressure drop, core power and axial power profile are used on a specific hot channel. The calculations were also compared to those that were available from the plant log, showing good agreement. Vattenfall and the fuel vendors did independent best estimate hot channel analyses to calculate what impact the transient might have had on the fuel. The agreement between different codes (GE: TRACG, Areva: HECHAN and Vattenfall: BISON/SLAVE) was very good showing that the maximum outside cladding temperature was around 450 deg. C. Since the transient leads to a decrease in power and the dry out was of such short duration, it was only the cladding and the outer part of the pellet that experienced a higher temperature than during normal full power operation. The impact on the cladding temperature when rewetting is not credited was also studied, and assuming uncertainties regarding rod power, channel flow and gap size. Rewetting had only a slight impact on the maximum temperature but, of course, a major impact on the duration. The other uncertainties added up

  6. Multispectral pyrometry for surface temperature measurement of oxidized Zircaloy claddings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvry, B.; Cheymol, G.; Ramiandrisoa, L.; Javaudin, B.; Gallou, C.; Maskrot, H.; Horny, N.; Duvaut, T.; Destouches, C.; Ferry, L.; Gonnier, C.

    2017-06-01

    Non-contact temperature measurement in a nuclear reactor is still a huge challenge because of the numerous constraints to consider, such as the high temperature, the steam atmosphere, and irradiation. A device is currently developed at CEA to study the nuclear fuel claddings behavior during a Loss-of-Coolant Accident. As a first step of development, we designed and tested an optical pyrometry procedure to measure the surface temperature of nuclear fuel claddings without any contact, under air, in the temperature range 700-850 °C. The temperature of Zircaloy-4 cladding samples was retrieved at various temperature levels. We used Multispectral Radiation Thermometry with the hypothesis of a constant emissivity profile in the spectral ranges 1-1.3 μm and 1.45-1.6 μm. To allow for comparisons, a reference temperature was provided by a thermocouple welded on the cladding surface. Because of thermal losses induced by the presence of the thermocouple, a heat transfer simulation was also performed to estimate the bias. We found a good agreement between the pyrometry measurement and the temperature reference, validating the constant emissivity profile hypothesis used in the MRT estimation. The expanded measurement uncertainty (k = 2) of the temperature obtained by the pyrometry method was ±4 °C, for temperatures between 700 and 850 °C. Emissivity values, between 0.86 and 0.91 were obtained.

  7. Tie rod insertion test

    CERN Multimedia

    B. LEVESY

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting coil is inserted in the outer vaccum tank and supported by a set of tie rods. These tie rods are made of titanium alloy. This test reproduce the final insertion of the tie rods inside the outer vacuum tank.

  8. Development of a suitable weld geometry for pressure resistance welding of the leader test assembly (LTA's) 16NGF fuel assembly fuel rod at Angra-1 Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Fabio da Silva; Silva, Josue Ribeiro, E-mail: fabiojunqueira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: josueribeiro@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (GEPRDN/INB), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia do Produto

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop suitable weld geometry for pressure resistance welding of the zircaloy-4 end plug to the special zirconium alloy cladding tube, Ø 9,14mm, for demonstration at Angra-1 Nuclear Plant. Weld geometry development was carried out in two steps: at the first one, the influence caused by the variation of the welding process key parameters, the axial compression strength of the end plug against the cladding tube, projection of the cladding tube into the welding chamber and the welding current have been evaluated; at the second step, the influence of the variation of end-plug weld geometry area was checked. For the combination of welding parameters, the technique of factorial design was used. Results from mechanical and metallographic tests have indicated a strong and direct influence of weld geometry dimensional variation on the weld mechanical resistance, and a modest influence in relation to the range of key parameters used to carry out tests. (author)

  9. EPRI/DOE High Burnup Fuel Sister Pin Test Plan Simplification and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saltzstein, Sylvia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanson, Brady [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Billone, Mike [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Scaglione, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Rose [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The EPRI/DOE High Burnup Confirmatory Data Project (herein called the "Demo") is a multi-year, multi-entity confirmation demonstration test with the purpose of providing quantitative and qualitative data to show how high-burnup fuel ages in dry storage over a ten-year period. The Demo involves obtaining 32 assemblies of high-burnup PWR fuel of four common cladding alloys from the North Anna Nuclear Power Plant, drying them according to standard plant procedures, and then storing them in an NRC-licensed TN-3 2B cask on the North Anna dry storage pad for ten years. After the ten-year storage time, the cask will be opened and the rods will be examined for signs of aging. Twenty-five rods from assemblies of similar claddings, in-reactor placement, and burnup histories (herein called "sister rods") have been shipped from the North Anna Nuclear Power Plant and are currently being nondestructively tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After the non-destructive testing has been completed for each of the twenty-five rods, destructive analysis will be performed at ORNL, PNNL, and ANL to obtain mechanical data. Opinions gathered from the expert interviews, ORNL and PNNL Sister Rod Test Plans, and numerous meetings has resulted in the Simplified Test Plan described in this document. Some of the opinions and discussions leading to the simplified test plan are included here. Detailed descriptions and background are in the ORNL and PNNL plans in the appendices . After the testing described in this simplified test plan h as been completed , the community will review all the collected data and determine if additional testing is needed.

  10. 1D and 3D analyses of the Zy2 SCIP BWR ramp tests with the fuel codes METEOR and ALCYONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sercombe, J.; Agard, M.; Stuzik, C.; Michel, B.; Thouvenin, G.; Poussard, C.; Kallstrom, K. R. [CEA, Saint-Paul-lez Durance (France)

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, three power ramp tests performed on high burn-up Recrystallized Zircaloy2 - UO{sub 2} BWR fuel rods (56 to 63 MWd/kgU) within the SCIP project have been simulated with METEOR and ALCYONE 3D. Two of the ramp tests are of staircase type up to Linear Heat Rates of 420 and 520 W/cm and with long holding periods. Failure of the 420 W/cm fuel rod was observed after 40 minutes. The third ramp test consists in a more standard ramp test with a constant power rate of 80 W/cm/min till 410 W/cm and a short holding time. The tests were first simulated with the METEOR 1D fuel rod code leading accurate results in terms of profilometry and fission gas releases. The behaviour of a fuel pellet fragment and of the cladding piece on top of it was then investigated with ALCYONE 3D. The size and the main characteristics of the ridges after base irradiation and power ramp testing were recovered. Finally, the failure criteria validated for PWR conditions and fuel rods with low to medium burn ups were used to analyze the failure probability of the KKL rodlets during ramp testing.

  11. Prognosis and comparison of performances of composite CERCER and CERMET fuels dedicated to transmutation of TRU in an EFIT ADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, V.; Uyttenhove, W.; Thetford, R.; Maschek, W.

    2011-07-01

    The neutronic and thermomechanical performances of two composite fuel systems: CERCER with (Pu,Np,Am,Cm)O 2-x fuel particles in ceramic MgO matrix and CERMET with metallic Mo matrix, selected for transmutation of minor actinides in the European Facility for Industrial Transmutation (EFIT), were analysed aiming at their optimisation. The ALEPH burnup code system, based on MNCPX and ORIGEN codes and JEFF3.1 nuclear data library, and the modern version of the fuel rod performance code TRAFIC were used for this analysis. Because experimental data on the properties of the mixed minor-actinide oxides are scarce, and the in-reactor behaviour of the T91 steel chosen as cladding, as well as of the corrosion protective layer, is still not well-known, a set of "best estimates" provided the properties used in the code. The obtained results indicate that both fuel candidates, CERCER and CERMET, can satisfy the fuel design and safety criteria of EFIT. The residence time for both types of fuel elements can reach about 5 years with the reactivity swing within ±1000 pcm, and about 22% of the loaded MA is transmuted during this period. However, the fuel centreline temperature in the hottest CERCER fuel rod is close to the temperature above which MgO matrix becomes chemically instable. Moreover, a weak PCMI can appear in about 3 years of operation. The CERMET fuel can provide larger safety margins: the fuel temperature is more than 1000 K below the permitted level of 2380 K and the pellet-cladding gap remains open until the end of operation.

  12. A Critical Heat Generation for Safe Nuclear Fuels after a LOCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yong Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study applies a thermo-elasto-plastic-creep finite element procedure to the analysis of an accidental behavior of nuclear fuel as well as normal behavior. The result will be used as basic data for the robust design of nuclear power plant and fuels. We extended the range of mechanical strain from small or medium to large adopting the Hencky logarithmic strain measure in addition to the Green-Lagrange strain and Almansi strain measures, for the possible large strain situation in accidental environments. We found that there is a critical heat generation after LOCA without ECCS (event category 5, under which the cladding of fuel sustains the internal pressure and temperature for the time being for the rescue of the power plant. With the heat generation above the critical value caused by malfunctioning of the control rods, the stiffness of cladding becomes zero due to the softening by high temperature. The weak position of cladding along the length continuously bulges radially to burst and to discharge radioactive substances. This kind of cases should be avoid by any means.

  13. Development and Validation of Accident Models for FeCrAl Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this milestone report is to present the work completed in regards to material model development for FeCrAl cladding and highlight the results of applying these models to Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) and Station Blackouts (SBO). With the limited experimental data available (essentially only the data used to create the models) true validation is not possible. In the absence of another alternative, qualitative comparisons during postulated accident scenarios between FeCrAl and Zircaloy-4 cladded rods have been completed demonstrating the superior performance of FeCrAl.

  14. Clad Treatment in KARMA Code and Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-yeup; Lee, Hae-chan; Woo, Hae-seuk [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Zirconium is the main components in clad materials. The subgroup parameters of zirconium were generated with effective cross section which obtained by using flux distribution in clad region. It decreases absorption reaction rate differences with reference MCNP results. Use of composite nuclide is acceptable to increase efficiency but should be limited to specific target composition. Therefore, the use of the composite nuclide of Zircaloy-2 should be limited when HANA clad material is used for clad. Either using explicit components or generating composite nuclide for HANA is suggested. This paper investigates the clad analysis model for KARMA whether current method is applicable to HANA clad material.

  15. COBRA-IV-I: an interim version of COBRA for thermal-hydraulic analysis of rod bundle nuclear fuel elements and cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, C.L.; Stewart, C.W.; Cena, R.J.; Rowe, D.S.; Sutey, A.M.

    1976-03-01

    The COBRA-IV-I computer code uses the subchannel analysis approach to determine the enthalpy and flow distribution in rod bundles for both steady-state and transient conditions. The steady-state and transient solution schemes used in COBRA-IIIC are still available in COBRA-IV-I as the implicit solution scheme option. In addition to these techniques, a new explicit solution scheme is now available which allows the calculation of severe transients involving flow reversals, recirculations, expulsion and reentry flows, with a pressure or flow boundary condition specified. Significant storage compaction and reduced running times have been achieved to allow the calculation of problems involving hundreds of subchannels.

  16. Synergistic Smart Fuel For Microstructure Mediated Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2013-07-01

    Advancing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants requires enhancing our basic understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The two most significant issues limiting the effectiveness and lifespan of the fuel are the loss of thermal conductivity of the fuel and the mechanical strength of both fuel and cladding. The core of a nuclear reactor presents an extremely harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to elevated temperatures and large fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles from radioactive decay processes. The majority of measurements are made in reactors using “radiation hardened” sensors and materials. A different approach has been pursued in this research that exploits high temperatures and materials that are robust with respect to ionizing radiation. This synergistically designed thermoacoustic sensor will be self-powered, wireless, and provide telemetry. The novel sensor will be able to provide reactor process information even if external electrical power and communication are unavailable. In addition, the form-factor for the sensor is identical to the existing fuel rods within reactors and contains no moving parts. Results from initial proof of concept experiments designed to characterize porosity, surface properties and monitor gas composition will be discussed.

  17. Synergistic smart fuel for microstructure mediated measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James A.; Kotter, Dale K. [Idaho National Laboratory, Fuel Performance and Design, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho, 83415-6188 (United States); Ali, Randall A. [Graduate Program in Acoustics and Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State University, P. . Box 30, M/S 3520D, State College, PA 16804-0030 (United States); Garrett, Steven L. [Graduate Program in Acoustics and Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State University, P.O. Box 30, M/S 3520D, State College, PA 16804-0030 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Advancing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants requires enhancing our basic understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The two most significant issues limiting the effectiveness and lifespan of the fuel are the loss of thermal conductivity of the fuel and the mechanical strength of both fuel and cladding. The core of a nuclear reactor presents an extremely harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to elevated temperatures and large fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles from radioactive decay processes. The majority of measurements are made in reactors using 'radiation hardened' sensors and materials. A different approach has been pursued in this research that exploits high temperatures and materials that are robust with respect to ionizing radiation. This synergistically designed thermoacoustic sensor will be self-powered, wireless, and provide telemetry. The novel sensor will be able to provide reactor process information even if external electrical power and communication are unavailable. In addition, the form-factor for the sensor is identical to the existing fuel rods within reactors and contains no moving parts. Results from initial proof of concept experiments designed to characterize porosity, surface properties and monitor gas composition will be discussed.

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Mono-uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J; Ebbinghaus, B; Meiers, T; Ahn, J

    2006-02-09

    The US National Energy Policy of 2001 advocated the development of advanced fuel and fuel cycle technologies that are cleaner, more efficient, less waste-intensive, and more proliferation resistant. The need for advanced fuel development is emphasized in on-going DOE-supported programs, e.g., Global Nuclear Energy Initiative (GNEI), Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and GEN-IV Technology Development. The Directorates of Energy & Environment (E&E) and Chemistry & Material Sciences (C&MS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are interested in advanced fuel research and manufacturing using its multi-disciplinary capability and facilities to support a design concept of a small, secure, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR). The E&E and C&MS Directorates co-sponsored this Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) Project on Mono-Uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications. In fact, three out of the six GEN-IV reactor concepts consider using the nitride-based fuel, as shown in Table 1. SSTAR is a liquid-metal cooled, fast reactor. It uses nitride fuel in a sealed reactor vessel that could be shipped to the user and returned to the supplier having never been opened in its long operating lifetime. This sealed reactor concept envisions no fuel refueling nor on-site storage of spent fuel, and as a result, can greatly enhance proliferation resistance. However, the requirement for a sealed, long-life core imposes great challenges to research and development of the nitride fuel and its cladding. Cladding is an important interface between the fuel and coolant and a barrier to prevent fission gas release during normal and accidental conditions. In fabricating the nitride fuel rods and assemblies, the cladding material should be selected based on its the coolant-side corrosion properties, the chemical/physical interaction with the nitride fuel, as well as their thermal and neutronic properties. The US NASA space reactor, the

  19. THE APPLICATION OF MAMMOTH FOR A DETAILED TIGHTLY COUPLED FUEL PIN SIMULATION WITH A STATION BLACKOUT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleicher, Frederick; Ortensi, Javier; DeHart, Mark; Wang, Yaqi; Schunert, Sebastian; Novascone, Stephen; Hales, Jason; Williamson, Rich; Slaughter, Andrew; Permann, Cody; Andrs, David; Martineau, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Accurate calculation of desired quantities to predict fuel behavior requires the solution of interlinked equations representing different physics. Traditional fuels performance codes often rely on internal empirical models for the pin power density and a simplified boundary condition on the cladding edge. These simplifications are performed because of the difficulty of coupling applications or codes on differing domains and mapping the required data. To demonstrate an approach closer to first principles, the neutronics application Rattlesnake and the thermal hydraulics application RELAP-7 were coupled to the fuels performance application BISON under the master application MAMMOTH. A single fuel pin was modeled based on the dimensions of a Westinghouse 17x17 fuel rod. The simulation consisted of a depletion period of 1343 days, roughly equal to three full operating cycles, followed by a station blackout (SBO) event. The fuel rod was depleted for 1343 days for a near constant total power loading of 65.81 kW. After 1343 days the fission power was reduced to zero (simulating a reactor shut-down). Decay heat calculations provided the time-varying energy source after this time. For this problem, Rattlesnake, BISON, and RELAP-7 are coupled under MAMMOTH in a split operator approach. Each system solves its physics on a separate mesh and, for RELAP-7 and BISON, on only a subset of the full problem domain. Rattlesnake solves the neutronics over the whole domain that includes the fuel, cladding, gaps, water, and top and bottom rod holders. Here BISON is applied to the fuel and cladding with a 2D axi-symmetric domain, and RELAP-7 is applied to the flow of the circular outer water channel with a set of 1D flow equations. The mesh on the Rattlesnake side can either be 3D (for low order transport) or 2D (for diffusion). BISON has a matching ring structure mesh for the fuel so both the power density and local burn up are copied accurately from Rattlesnake. At each depletion time

  20. Modal properties of the flexural vibrating package of rods linked by spacer grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeman V.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the modelling and modal analysis of the large package of identical parallel rods linked by transverse springs (spacer grids placed on several level spacings. The rod discretization by finite element method is based on Rayleigh beam theory. For the cyclic and central symmetric package of rods (such as fuel rods in nuclear fuel assembly the system decomposition on the identical revolved rod segments was applied. A modal synthesis method with condensation is used for modelling of the whole system. The presented method is the first step for modelling the nuclear fuel assembly vibration caused by excitation determined by the support plate motion of the reactor core.

  1. Possible effects of UO/sub 2/ oxidation on light water reactor spent fuel performance in long-term geologic disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almassy, M.Y.; Woodley, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    Disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a conventionally mined geologic formation is the nearest-term option for permanently isolating radionuclides from the biosphere. Because irradiated uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) fuel pellets retain 95 to 99% of the radionuclides generated during normal light water reactor operation, they may represent a significant barrier to radionuclide release. This document presents a technical assessment of published literature representing the current level of understanding of spent fuel characteristics and conditions that may degrade pellet integrity during a geologic disposal sequence. A significant deterioration mechanism is spent UO/sub 2/ oxidation with possible consequences identified as fission gas release, rod diameter increases, cladding breach extension, and release of solid fuel particles containing radionuclides. Areas requiring further study to support development of a comprehensive spent fuel performance prediction model are highlighted. A program and preliminary schedule to obtain the information needed to develop model correlations are also presented.

  2. CLADDING DEGRADATION COMPONENT IN WASTE FORM DEGRADATION MODEL IN TSPA-SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Siegmann; R.P. Rechard

    2001-01-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a total system performance assessment for a site recommendation (TSPA-SR), if suitable, on Yucca Mountain for disposal of radioactive waste. Discussed here is the Cladding Degradation Component of the Waste Form Degradation Model (WF Model), of the TSPA-SR. The Cladding Degradation Component determines the degradation rate of the Zircaloy cladding on commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) and, thereby, the CSNF matrix exposed and radioisotopes available for dissolution in any water present. Since the 1950s, most CSNF has been clad with less than 1 mm (usually between 600 and 900 {micro}m) of Zircaloy, a zirconium alloy. Zircaloy cladding is not a designed engineered barrier of the Yucca Mountain disposal system, but rather is an existing characteristic of the CSNF that is important to determining the release rate of radioisotopes once the waste package (WP) has breached. Although studies of cladding degradation from fluoride [F] began at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as early as 1984, cladding as a characteristic of the waste was not considered in TSPAs, conducted in the early 1990s. However, enough information on cladding performance has accumulated in the literature such that cladding was considered in 1993 when examining the performance of DOE spent nuclear (DSNF) and most recently in TSPA for the viability assessment (TSPA-VA). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently uses cladding data as the basis for extending the period of wet storage, for licensing dry storage facilities, and for licensing shipping casks for CNSF.

  3. Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff`s understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required.

  4. Photonic crystal rod fibers: Understanding a new class of active optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko

    In this PhD thesis an experimental study of modal characterization methods on large mode area photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) is performed and the development of a new ytterbium-doped photonic bandgap PCF rod fiber is presented. The first focus of this work is to use modal characterization methods...... core modes and the cladding band as the underlying mechanics to ensure SM operation of the new rod fiber design (85 μm core diameter), which was developed during this thesis work. The second focus of this work is the study of the new ytterbiumdoped rod fiber design under active operation. Performance...... of the rod fiber is evaluated in high power laser and laser amplifier configurations. The high power rod amplifier setup including the seed source is developed and characterized. Results obtained from the rod fiber showed simultaneously SM, near diffraction limited output beam quality with high average power...

  5. Comparison of the Characteristics of Solid Type and Annular Type Nuclear Fuels Using Thermoelastic-Plastic-Creep FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Doo Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare the characteristics of two types of nuclear fuel using the finite element program of thermoelastic-plastic-creep analysis. The analyzed fuel rods are of two types, solid and annular ones, and their thermomechanical characteristics are compared. Thermoelastic-plastic-creep analyses were made using an in-house finite element analysis program that adopts the “effective-stress-function” algorithm. The temperature-dependent material properties, which were obtained from the experiments for actual nuclear reactors, are adopted. The effects of type of fuel systems are revealed in both stresses and temperature distributions. The maximum tensile and compressive hoop stress of pellet and cladding are monitored to evaluate the mechanical behavior, and the maximum temperature is used to evaluate the thermal behavior. Although the annular type of fuel has certain disadvantage, it would be used very effectively or safely in future nuclear power plants.

  6. Cladding single crystal YAG fibers grown by laser heated pedestal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Subhabrata; Nie, Craig D.; Harrington, James A.; Chick, Theresa; Chakrabarty, Ayan; Trembath-Reichert, Stephen; Chapman, James; Rand, Stephen C.

    2016-03-01

    Rare-earth doped single-crystal (SC) Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) fibers are excellent candidates for high power lasers. These SC fiber optics combine the favorable low Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) gain coefficient and excellent thermal properties to make them an attractive alternative to glass fiber lasers and amplifiers. Various rare-earth doped SC fibers have been grown using the laser heated pedestal growth (LHPG) technique. Several cladding methods, including in-situ and post-growth cladding techniques, are discussed in this paper. A rod-in-tube approach has been used by to grow a fiber with an Erbium doped SC YAG fiber core inserted in a SC YAG tube. The result is a radial gradient in the distribution of rare-earth ions. Post cladding methods include sol-gel deposited polycrystalline.

  7. Commissioning of a passive rod scanner at INB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Fabio da Silva; Oliveira, Carlos A.; Palheiros, Franklin, E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br, E-mail: franklin@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendencia de Engenharia do Combustivel; Fernandez, Pablo Jesus Piñer, E-mail: pineiro@tecnatom.es [Tecnatom, San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    For the 21st reload for Angra 1, a shift from Standard to Advanced fuel design will be introduced, where the fuel assemblies under the new design will contain fuel rods with axial blanket, in line with ELETRONUCLEAR's requirement for a higher energy efficient reactor fuel. Additionally, fuel rods for Angra 2 and 3, using gadolinium type burnable poison, have to be submitted to inspections due to the demand for the same type of inspection, which cannot be certified at INB currently. In keeping with CNEN regulations, every fuel-assembly component must be inspected and certified by a qualified method. Nevertheless, INB lacks the means to perform the certification-required inspection aimed at determining the uranium enrichment and presence of gadolinium pellets inside the closed rods. Hence, the use is necessary of a scanner capable of inspecting differently enriched fuel rods and/or gadolinium pellets (axial blanket). This work aims to present the recent Passive Rod Scanner installed at INB with most advance technology in the area, making possible to completely fulfill Angra 1, 2 and 3 rods inspection at INB Resende site. (author)

  8. Irradiation and lithium presence influence on the crystallographic nature of zirconia in the framework of PWR zircaloy 4 fuel cladding corrosion study; Influence de l'irradiation et de la presence du lithium sur la nature cristallographique de la zircone dans le cadre de l'etude de la corrosion du zircaloy 4 en milieu reacteur a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibert, C

    1999-07-01

    The-increasing deterioration of the initially protective zirconia layer is one of the hypotheses which can explain the impairment with time of PWR fuel cladding corrosion. This deterioration could be worsened by irradiation or lithium presence in the oxidizing medium. The aim of this thesis was to underline the influence of those two parameters on zirconia crystallographic nature. We first studied the impact of ionic irradiation on pure, powdery, monoclinic zirconia and oxidation formed zirconia, mainly with X-ray diffraction and Raman microscopy. The high or low energy particles used (Kr{sup n+-}, Ar{sup n+}) respectively favored electronic or atomic defaults production. The crystallographic analyses showed that these irradiation have a significant effect on zirconia by inducing nucleation or growth of tetragonal phase. The extent depends on sample nature and particles energy. In all cases, phase transformation is correlated with crystalline parameters, grain size and especially micro-stress changes. The results are consistent with those obtained with 1 to 5 cycles PWR claddings. Therefore, the corrosion acceleration observed in reactor can partly be explained by the stress fields appearance under irradiation, which is particularly detrimental to zirconia layer cohesion. Last, we have underlined that the presence of considerable amounts of lithium in the oxidizing medium ((> 700 ppm) induces the disappearance of the tetragonal zirconia located at the metal/oxide interface and the appearance of a porosity of the dense under layer, which looses its protectiveness. (author)

  9. Estimation of Hydrogen Gas Production from Oxidation Process of Zirconium Cladding with Water Vapor in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit One at Japan after Earthquake and Tsunami in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Lestari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been an explosion at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP caused by the fusion reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen is believed to be generated one of which comes from the oxidation reaction between the fuel cladding and water vapor in the reactor core due to the failure of coolant (LOCA=Loos of Coolant Accident. This study aims to estimate the amount of hydrogen gas that accumulates in the reactor core theoretically by using a model based on equilibrium mole of a chemical reaction. The zirconium cladding material is set as a limiting reagent that limits the formation of hydrogen in the reactor core. The estimation results show that the amount of hydrogen accumulated in the reactor is directly proportional to the mass of the oxidized zirconium with water vapor. The amount of hydrogen that accumulates for one fuel rod reaches 0.018 kg, for one assembly is 1.10 kg and for overall at Unit One reaches 441 kg, which these results have been enough to blow up the reactor.

  10. TREAT Neutronics Analysis of Water-Loop Concept Accommodating LWR 9-rod Bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Connie M.; Woolstenhulme, Nicolas E.; Parry, James R.; Bess, John D.; Housley, Gregory K.

    2016-09-01

    TREAT fuel elements to facilitate the experiment will not inhibit the ability to successfully simulate a RIA for the 2-pin or 3-pin bundle. This new water loop design leaves room for accommodating a larger fuel pin bundle than previously analyzed. The 7-pin fuel bundle in a hexagonal array with similar spacing of fuel pins in a SFR fuel assembly was considered the minimum needed for one central fuel pin to encounter the most correct thermal conditions. The 9-rod fuel bundle in a square array similar in spacing to pins in a LWR fuel assembly would be considered the LWR equivalent. MCNP analysis conducted on a preliminary LWR 9-rod bundle design shows that sufficient energy deposition into the central pin can be achieved well within range to investigate fuel and cladding performance in a simulated RIA. This is achieved by surrounding the flow channel with an additional annulus of water. Findings also show that a highly significant increase in TREAT to specimen power coupling factor (PCF) within the central pin can be achieved by surrounding the experiment with one to two rings of TREAT upgrade fuel assemblies. The experiment design holds promise for the performance evaluation of PWR fuel at extremely high burnup under similar reactor environment conditions.

  11. Why Rods and Cocci

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bacteria exhibit a wide variety of shapes but the commonly studied species of bacteria are generally either spherical in shape which are called cocci (singular coccus) or have a cylindrical shape and are called rods or bacilli (singular bacillus). In reality rods and cocci are the ends of a continuum. Sonle of the cocci are.

  12. Coupon Surveillance For Corrosion Monitoring In Nuclear Fuel Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I.; Murphy, T. R.; Deible, R.

    2012-10-01

    Aluminum and stainless steel coupons were put into a nuclear fuel basin to monitor the effect of water chemistry on the corrosion of fuel cladding. These coupons have been monitored for over ten years. The corrosion and pitting data is being used to model the kinetics and estimate the damage that is occurring to the fuel cladding.

  13. ENUSA-TECNATOM collaboration project: improvements to the system of inspection by UT's circular fresh fuel rod welding; Proyecto colaboraci0n ENUSA-TECNATOM: Mejoras en el sistema de inspeccion por UT de la soldadura circular de la barra combustible fresca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.; Toral, M.; Moraleda, J.; Quinones, D.

    2014-07-01

    Enusa and Tecnatom have embarked on a road of technological and commercial collaboration that aims to firstly, the continuous improvement of the means of production of fuel from the factory in Juzbado, but uses the joint technological capital to diversify their business global opportunities. This collaboration has emerged a new line for control by UT of welding circular fresh fuel rod and the development of an equipment for sale to the CINF in Yibin fuel factory. The characteristics of these projects are presented in this paper. (Author)

  14. Evaluation of the internal pressure in UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} rods of fuel assemblies 10 x 10 with the FEMAXI-Vi code; Evaluacion de la presion interna en barras de UO{sub 2} y UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} de ensambles combustibles 10 x 10 con el codigo FEMAXI-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H.; Lucatero, M. A., E-mail: hector.hernandez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    Inside the acceptable criterions of fuel licensing are some that should be fulfilled in relation to the internal pressure of the fuel rods. These criterions are related with the loss of mechanical integrity due to the load excess in the pressure inside the jacket, as well as by the pressure that exercises the pellet on the jacket at the time of suffering the swelling by irradiation. This work shows the calculation of the increment of the internal pressure of the fuel rods caused by the swelling contribution of the pellets and by the accumulation of the fission gases inside the hole, pellet-jacket, in function of the burned for values of the lineal heat generation reason (LHGR) mean of fuel rods in arrangements 10 x 10. (author)

  15. Evaluation of the elastic constants of the high burnup nuclear fuel (U{sub 1-y},Gd{sub y})O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Luciana T.; Dias, Marcio S., E-mail: ltl@cdtn.b, E-mail: marciod@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear fuels with burnable poisons are applications in the scope of the nuclear energy for electricity generation. The discharge burnups of this type of fuel are higher than the discharge burnups of pure UO{sub 2} fuels with same enrichment of the fissile element. In conditions of high burnups and moderate transients, the fuel rods can be subject to the pellet/cladding mechanical interactions (PCMI). Elastic constants of the fuel and cladding are used in the thermo-mechanical evaluation of the PCMI. The fuel elastic constants are usually expressed as a function of temperature, composition and porosity. Data survey and modeling of elastic constants for the (U{sub 1-y},Gd{sub y})O{sub 2} fuel are developed in this paper. Due to small amount of the available measurements for the (U{sub 1-y},Gd{sub y})O{sub 2}, the modeling taken into account the data from UO{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} measurements. Available measurements of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were also used in the model validation. The elastic constants of these mat