WorldWideScience

Sample records for cl upper limits

  1. Upper limit for J/psi→γ+ axion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.; Partridge, R.; Peck, C.; Porter, F.C.; Antreasyan, D.; Gu, Y.F.; Kollmann, W.; Richardson, M.; Strauch, K.; Weinstein, A.; Aschman, D.; Burnett, T.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyne, D.; Newman, C.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Gelphman, D.; Hofstadter, R.; Horisberger, R.; Kirkbride, I.; Kolanoski, H.; Koenigsmann, K.; Lee, R.; Liberman, A.; O'Reilly, J.; Osterheld, A.; Pollock, B.; Tompkins, J.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Chestnut, R.; Gaiser, J.; Godfrey, G.; Kiesling, C.; Lockman, W.; Oreglia, M.; Scharre, D.L.; Wacker, K.

    1982-01-01

    The authors have searched with the crystal ball detector for axionlike particles in radiative J/psi decays. An upper limit on the branching ratio B(J/psi→γ+a) -5 (90% C.L.) is obtained. This result holds for long-lived, noninteracting pseudoscalar or vector particles of mass less than 1 GeV. Thus, this experiment also places stringent limits on the existence of other possible light bosons such as those arising in supersymmetric theories

  2. A new upper limit for the branching ratio for the decay eta→π0e+e-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, M.R.; Grannis, P.; Jones, B.D.; Lipman, N.H.; Owen, D.P.; Peterson, V.Z.; Toner, W.T.

    1975-01-01

    A search has been made for the decay eta→π 0 e + e - in an optical spark chamber experiment at the Rutherford Laboratory. The observations are consistent with no events being seen and give an upper limit. Rate (eta→π 0 e + e - )/Rate (eta→ALL) -5 (90%C.L.). (author)

  3. Experimental upper limits for hadronic and axion decays of the T(1S)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niczyporuk, B.; Jakubowski, Z.; Zeludziewicz, T.; Folger, G.; Lurz, B.; Vogel, H.; Volland, U.; Wegener, H.; Coles, M.; Engler, A.; Kraemer, R.W.; Marlow, D.; Messing, F.; Rippich, C.; Youssef, S.; Fridman, A.; Alexander, G.; Av-Shalom, A.; Bella, G.; Grunhaus, J.; Langguth, W.; Scheer, M.; Bienlein, J.K.; Graumann, R.; Trost, H.J.; Schmitz, M.

    1982-10-01

    A search for the decays Y->rhoπ, Y->J/psiX and Y->γa (where X is undetermined and a is an axion) has been completed using the LENA detector at the DORIS storage ring. No evidence for any of these processes was found. For these decay modes we set branching fraction upper limits (90% C.L.) of 2.1 x 10 -3 , 2.0 x 10 -2 and 9.1 x 10 -4 , respectively. (orig.)

  4. A Revised Experimental Upper Limit on the Electric Dipole Moment of the Neutron

    CERN Document Server

    Pendlebury, J  M; Ayres, N J; Baker, C A; Ban, G; Bison, G; Bodek, K; Burghoff, M; Geltenbort, P; Green, K; Griffith, W C; van der Grinten, M; Grujic, Z D; Harris, P G; Helaine, V; Iaydjiev, P; Ivanov, S N; Kasprzak, M; Kermaidic, Y; Kirch, K; Koch, H-C; Komposch, S; Kozela, A; Krempel, J; Lauss, B; Lefort, T; Lemiere, Y; May, D J R; Musgrave, M; Musgrave, M; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Piegsa, F M; Pignol, G; Prashanth, P N; Quéméner, G; Rawlik, M; Rebreyend, D; Richardson, J D; Ries, D; Roccia, S; Rozpedzik, D; Schnabel, A; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Severijns, N; Shiers, D; Thorne, J A; Weis, A; Winston, O  J; Wursten, E; Zejma, J; Zsigmond, G

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the experimental results that set the current world sensitivity limit on the magnitude of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron. We have extended and enhanced our earlier analysis to include recent developments in the understanding of the effects of gravity in depolarizing ultracold neutrons (UCN); an improved calculation of the spectrum of the neutrons; and conservative estimates of other possible systematic errors, which are also shown to be consistent with more recent measurements undertaken with the apparatus. We obtain a net result of $d_\\mathrm{n} = -0.21 \\pm 1.82 \\times10^{-26}$ $e$cm, which may be interpreted as a slightly revised upper limit on the magnitude of the EDM of $3.0 \\times10^{-26}$ $e$cm (90% CL) or $ 3.6 \\times10^{-26}$ $e$cm (95% CL). This paper is dedicated by the remaining authors to the memory of Prof. J. Michael Pendlebury.

  5. ACA Federal Upper Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Affordable Care Act Federal Upper Limits (FUL) based on the weighted average of the most recently reported monthly average manufacturer price (AMP) for...

  6. An upper limit to the photon fraction in cosmic rays above 10**19-eV from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET /La Plata U. /Pierre Auger Observ. /CNEA, San Martin /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Sao Paulo U. /Campinas State U. /UEFS, Feira de Santana

    2006-06-01

    An upper limit of 16% (at 95% c.l.) is derived for the photon fraction in cosmic rays with energies above 10{sup 19} eV, based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This is the first such limit on photons obtained by observing the fluorescence light profile of air showers. This upper limit confirms and improves on previous results from the Haverah Park and AGASA surface arrays. Additional data recorded with the Auger surface detectors for a subset of the event sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favored.

  7. ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin; Connors, Alanna; Freeman, Peter E.; Zezas, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper

  8. Upper Limit for Regional Sea Level Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Jackson, Luke; Riva, Riccardo; Grinsted, Aslak; Moore, John

    2016-04-01

    With more than 150 million people living within 1 m of high tide future sea level rise is one of the most damaging aspects of warming climate. The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report (AR5 IPCC) noted that a 0.5 m rise in mean sea level will result in a dramatic increase the frequency of high water extremes - by an order of magnitude, or more in some regions. Thus the flood threat to the rapidly growing urban populations and associated infrastructure in coastal areas are major concerns for society. Hence, impact assessment, risk management, adaptation strategy and long-term decision making in coastal areas depend on projections of mean sea level and crucially its low probability, high impact, upper range. With probabilistic approach we produce regional sea level projections taking into account large uncertainties associated with Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets contribution. We calculate the upper limit (as 95%) for regional sea level projections by 2100 with RCP8.5 scenario, suggesting that for the most coastlines upper limit will exceed the global upper limit of 1.8 m.

  9. Upper limits on the total cosmic-ray luminosity of individual sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, R.C.; De Souza, V. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Supanitsky, A.D., E-mail: rita@ifsc.usp.br, E-mail: vitor@ifsc.usp.br, E-mail: supanitsky@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), CONICET-UBA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, upper limits on the total luminosity of ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays (UHECR) E > 10{sup 18} eV) are determined for five individual sources. The upper limit on the integral flux of GeV--TeV gamma-rays is used to extract the upper limit on the total UHECR luminosity of individual sources. The correlation between upper limit on the integral GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux and upper limit on the UHECR luminosity is established through the cascading process that takes place during propagation of the cosmic rays in the background radiation fields, as explained in reference [1]. Twenty-eight sources measured by FERMI-LAT, VERITAS and MAGIC observatories have been studied. The measured upper limit on the GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux is restrictive enough to allow the calculation of an upper limit on the total UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of five sources. The upper limit on the UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of these sources is shown for several assumptions on the emission mechanism. For all studied sources an upper limit on the ultra-high-energy proton luminosity is also set.

  10. Upper limits on the total cosmic-ray luminosity of individual sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, R.C.; De Souza, V.; Supanitsky, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, upper limits on the total luminosity of ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays (UHECR) E > 10 18 eV) are determined for five individual sources. The upper limit on the integral flux of GeV--TeV gamma-rays is used to extract the upper limit on the total UHECR luminosity of individual sources. The correlation between upper limit on the integral GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux and upper limit on the UHECR luminosity is established through the cascading process that takes place during propagation of the cosmic rays in the background radiation fields, as explained in reference [1]. Twenty-eight sources measured by FERMI-LAT, VERITAS and MAGIC observatories have been studied. The measured upper limit on the GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux is restrictive enough to allow the calculation of an upper limit on the total UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of five sources. The upper limit on the UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of these sources is shown for several assumptions on the emission mechanism. For all studied sources an upper limit on the ultra-high-energy proton luminosity is also set

  11. Upper limits from counting experiments with multiple pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

  12. Upper limit on the diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy tau neutrinos from the Pierre Auger Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Armengaud, E; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Atulugama, B S; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barbosa, A F; Barnhill, D; Barroso, S L C; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bergmann, T; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Blasi, P; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Bohácová, M; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Boratav, M; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Cai, B; Camin, D V; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chye, J; Clark, P D J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; de Mello Junior, W J M; de Mello Neto, J R T; DeMitri, I; de Souza, V; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Delle Fratte, C; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dornic, D; Dorofeev, A; dos Anjos, J C; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; DuVernois, M A; Engel, R; Epele, L; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Facal San Luis, P; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferry, S; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipcic, A; Fleck, I; Fonte, R; Fracchiolla, C E; Fulgione, W; García, B; García Gámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Geenen, H; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giller, M; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Gomez Albarracin, F; Gómez Berisso, M; Gómez Herrero, R; Gonçalves, P; Gonçalves do Amaral, M; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; González, M; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grassi, V; Grillo, A F; Grunfeld, C; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Hamilton, J C; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hauschildt, T; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J; Horneffer, A; Horvat, M; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D-H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kuempel, D; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; Leigui de Oliveira, M A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Lopez Agüera, A; Lozano Bahilo, J; Luna García, R; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mancarella, G; Manceñido, M E; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Marquez Falcon, H R; Martello, D; Martínez, J; Martínez Bravo, O; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McCauley, T; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina, M C; Medina-Tanco, G; Meli, A; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menschikov, A; Meurer, Chr; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier Ragaigne, D; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nguyen Thi, T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nozka, L; Oehlschläger, J; Ohnuki, T; Olinto, A; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Ortolani, F; Ostapchenko, S; Otero, L; Pacheco, N; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pekala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrov, Y; Pham Ngoc, Diep; Pham Ngoc, Dong; Pham Thi, T N; Pichel, A; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Redondo, A; Reucroft, S; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Roberts, M; Robledo, C; Rodriguez, G; Rodríguez Frías, D; Rodriguez Martino, J; Rodriguez Rojo, J; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schovánek, P; Schüssler, F; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Smetniansky De Grande, N; Smiałkowski, A; Smída, R; Smith, A G K; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sokolsky, P; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Takahashi, J; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Taşcău, O; Tcaciuc, R; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Todero Peixoto, C J; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Torresi, D; Travnicek, P; Tripathi, A; Tristram, G; Tscherniakhovski, D; Tueros, M; Tunnicliffe, V; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valdés Galicia, J F; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van den Berg, A M; van Elewyck, V; Vázquez, R A; Veberic, D; Veiga, A; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walker, P; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zech, A; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2008-05-30

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to Earth-skimming tau neutrinos that interact in Earth's crust. Tau leptons from nu(tau) charged-current interactions can emerge and decay in the atmosphere to produce a nearly horizontal shower with a significant electromagnetic component. The data collected between 1 January 2004 and 31 August 2007 are used to place an upper limit on the diffuse flux of nu(tau) at EeV energies. Assuming an E(nu)(-2) differential energy spectrum the limit set at 90% C.L. is E(nu)(2)dN(nu)(tau)/dE(nu)<1.3 x 10(-7) GeV cm(-2) s(-1) sr(-1) in the energy range 2 x 10(17) eV< E(nu)< 2 x 10(19) eV.

  13. Upper limit of peak area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helene, O.A.M.

    1982-08-01

    The determination of the upper limit of peak area in a multi-channel spectra, with a known significance level is discussed. This problem is specially important when the peak area is masked by the background statistical fluctuations. The problem is exactly solved and, thus, the results are valid in experiments with small number of events. The results are submitted to a Monte Carlo test and applied to the 92 Nb beta decay. (Author) [pt

  14. Upper limit on the transition temperature for non-ideal Bose gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Wusheng; Xie Mi

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we show that for a non-ideal Bose gas there exists an upper limit on the transition temperature above which Bose-Einstein condensation cannot occur regardless of the pressure applied. Such upper limits for some realistic Bose gases are estimated

  15. Upper limit of the muon-neutrino mass and charged-pion mass from the momentum analysis of a surface muon beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettle, P R [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    Using a surface muon beam and a magnetic spectrometer equipped with a position-sensitive detector, we have measured the muon momentum from pion decay at rest {pi}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}, to be p{sub {mu}{sup +}}=(29.79200{+-}0.00011)MeV/c. This value together with the muon mass and the favoured pion mass leads to an upper limit of 0.17 MeV (90%CL) for the muon-neutrino mass. (author) 4 figs., 5 refs.

  16. Upper limit for Poisson variable incorporating systematic uncertainties by Bayesian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yongsheng

    2007-01-01

    To calculate the upper limit for the Poisson observable at given confidence level with inclusion of systematic uncertainties in background expectation and signal efficiency, formulations have been established along the line of Bayesian approach. A FORTRAN program, BPULE, has been developed to implement the upper limit calculation

  17. Upper limits for air humidity based on human comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Fanger, Povl Ole; Jørgensen, Anette S.

    1998-01-01

    respiratory cooling. Human subjects perceived the condition of their skin to be less acceptable with increasing skin humidity. Inhaled air was rated warmer, more stuffy and less acceptable with increasing air humidity and temperature. Based on the subjects' comfort responses, new upper limits for air humidity......The purpose of this study was to verify the hypothesis that insufficient respiratory cooling and a high level of skin humidity are two reasons for thermal discomfort at high air humidities, and to prescribe upper limits for humidity based on discomfort due to elevated skin humidity and insufficient...

  18. New upper limits on the local metagalactic ionizing radiation density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Stuart N.; Weymann, Ray; Rauch, Michael; Hamilton, Tom

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained H-alpha observations with the Maryland-Caltech Fabry-Perot Spectrometer attached to the Cassegrain focus of the 1.5 m telescope at Palomer Observatory in order to set limits on the number of ionizing photons from the local metagalactic radiation field. We have observed the SW component of the Haynes-Giovanelli cloud H I 1225+01, an intergalactic cloud which should be optimum for measuring the metagalactic flux because it is nearly opaque to ionizing photons, it does not appear to be significantly shielded from the metagalactic radiation field, and the limits on embedded or nearby ionizing sources are unusually low. For the area of the cloud with an H I column density greater than 10(exp 19)/sq cm we set a 2 sigma limit of 1.1 x 10(exp -19) ergs/sq cm/s/sq arcsec (20 mR) for the surface brightness of diffuse H-alpha. This implies a 2 sigma upper limit on the incident one-sided ionizing flux of Phi(sub ex) is less than 3 x 10(exp 4)/sq cm/s. For a radiation field of the form J(sub nu) is approximately nu(exp -1.4), this yields a firm 2 sigma upper limit on the local metagalactic photoionization rate of Gamma is less than 2 x 10(exp -13)/s, and an upper limit for the radiation field J(sub nu) at the Lyman limit of J(sub nu0) is less than 8 x 10(exp -23) ergs/sq cm/Hz/sr. We discuss previous efforts to constrain the metagalactic ionizing flux using H-alpha surface brightness observations and also other methods, and conclude that our result places the firmest upper limit on this flux. We also observed the 7 min diameter region centered on 3C 273 in which H-alpha emission at a velocity of approximately 1700 km/s was initially reported by Williams and Schommer. In agreement with T. B. Williams (private communication) we find the initial detection was spurious. We obtain a 2 sigma upper limit of 1.8 x 10(exp -19) ergs/sq cm/s/sq arcsec (32 mR) for the mean surface brightness of diffuse H-alpha, about a factor of 6 below the published value.

  19. Upper temperature limits of tropical marine ectotherms: global warming implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh Dung T Nguyen

    Full Text Available Animal physiology, ecology and evolution are affected by temperature and it is expected that community structure will be strongly influenced by global warming. This is particularly relevant in the tropics, where organisms are already living close to their upper temperature limits and hence are highly vulnerable to rising temperature. Here we present data on upper temperature limits of 34 tropical marine ectotherm species from seven phyla living in intertidal and subtidal habitats. Short term thermal tolerances and vertical distributions were correlated, i.e., upper shore animals have higher thermal tolerance than lower shore and subtidal animals; however, animals, despite their respective tidal height, were susceptible to the same temperature in the long term. When temperatures were raised by 1°C hour(-1, the upper lethal temperature range of intertidal ectotherms was 41-52°C, but this range was narrower and reduced to 37-41°C in subtidal animals. The rate of temperature change, however, affected intertidal and subtidal animals differently. In chronic heating experiments when temperature was raised weekly or monthly instead of every hour, upper temperature limits of subtidal species decreased from 40°C to 35.4°C, while the decrease was more than 10°C in high shore organisms. Hence in the long term, activity and survival of tropical marine organisms could be compromised just 2-3°C above present seawater temperatures. Differences between animals from environments that experience different levels of temperature variability suggest that the physiological mechanisms underlying thermal sensitivity may vary at different rates of warming.

  20. New upper limits for atmospheric constituents on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, U.; Larson, H. P.; Gautier, T. N., III

    1976-01-01

    A spectrum of Io from 0.86 to 2.7 microns with a resolution of 3.36 per cm and a signal to rms noise ratio of 120 is presented. No absorptions due to any atmospheric constituents on Io could be found in the spectrum. Upper limits of 0.12 cm-atm for NH3, 0.12 cm-atm for CH4, 0.4 cm-atm for N2O, and 24 cm-atm for H2S were determined. Laboratory spectra of ammonia frosts as a function of temperature were compared with the spectrum of Io and showed this frost not to be present at the surface of Io. A search for possible resonance lines of carbon, silicon, and sulfur, as well as the 1.08-micron line of helium, proved negative. Upper emission limits of 60, 18, 27, and 60 kilorayleighs, respectively, were established for these lines.

  1. Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Selesnick, RS; Baker, DN; Jaynes, AN; Kanekal, SG; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Fennell, J; Blake, JB

    2015-01-01

    No instruments in the inner radiation belt are immune from the unforgiving penetration of the highly energetic protons (tens of MeV to GeV). The inner belt proton flux level, however, is relatively stable; thus, for any given instrument, the proton contamination often leads to a certain background noise. Measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment on board Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment CubeSat, in a low Earth orbit, clearly demonstrate that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt because their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background, while higher-energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Detailed analysis of high-quality measurements from the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope on board Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, provides, for the first time, quantified upper limits on MeV electron fluxes in various energy ranges in the inner belt. These upper limits are rather different from flux levels in the AE8 and AE9 models, which were developed based on older data sources. For 1.7, 2.5, and 3.3 MeV electrons, the upper limits are about 1 order of magnitude lower than predicted model fluxes. The implication of this difference is profound in that unless there are extreme solar wind conditions, which have not happened yet since the launch of Van Allen Probes, significant enhancements of MeV electrons do not occur in the inner belt even though such enhancements are commonly seen in the outer belt. Key Points Quantified upper limit of MeV electrons in the inner belt Actual MeV electron intensity likely much lower than the upper limit More detailed understanding of relativistic electrons in the magnetosphere PMID:26167446

  2. Cl-36 in polar ice, rainwater and seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, R. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Elmore, D.; Ferraro, R. D.; Gove, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrations of the cosmogenic radioisotope Cl-36 in Antarctic ice, rain, and an upper limit of the seawater value are determined using van de Graaff accelerator high energy mass spectrometry. Cl-36 concentrations in Antarctic ice range between 2.5 to 8.7 x 10 to the 6th atoms Cl-36/kg, while those concentrations in samples collected at the Alan Hills ice field locations where meteorites have been brought to the surface by glacial flow and ablation are found to vary by more than a factor of three. This variation is attributed either to the effects of atmospheric mixing and scavenging or to radioactive decay in old ice. The Cl-36 concentration found in a present sample of rainwater is much lower than that reported in samples collected in the early 1960's, suggesting the occurrence of a decrease in the concentration of atmospheric Cl-36 derived from nuclear weapons tests over this time period.

  3. Determination of the upper limit of a peak area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helene, O.

    1990-03-01

    This paper reports the procedure to extract an upper limit of a peak area in a multichannel spectrum. This procedure takes into account the finite shape of the peak and the uncertanties in the background and in the expected position of the peak. (author) [pt

  4. Determination of the upper limit of a peak area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helene, O.

    1991-01-01

    This article reports the procedure to extract an upper limit of a peak area in a multichannel spectrum. This procedure takes into account the finite shape of the peak and the uncertainties both in the background and in the expected position of the peak. (orig.)

  5. New experimental upper limit of the electron–proton spin-flip cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oellers, D.; Weidemann, C.; Lenisa, P.; Meyer, H.O.; Rathmann, F.; Trusov, S.; Augustyniak, W.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Barion, L.; Barsov, S.

    2014-01-01

    In a previous publication, measurements of the depolarization of a stored proton beam by interaction with a co-propagating unpolarized electron beam at low relative energy have been presented and an upper limit of about 3 ×10 7 b for the electron–proton spin-flip cross-section was determined. A refined analysis presented in this paper reduces the previous upper limit by a factor of three by the introduction of a new procedure that also makes use of non-identified particles

  6. Improved upper limits on B(KL0 → μe) and B(KL0 → ee) and a new value for B(KL0 → μμ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molzon, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    The author gives recent results from E791 at BNL with improved upper limits on the branching fractions B(K L 0 → μe) and B(K L 0 → ee) of 8.5 x 10 -11 and 11.6 x 10 -11 at 90% C.L. He also gives a preliminary result of a new measurement B(K L 0 → μμ) = 7.6 ± 0.5(stat) ± 0.4(syst) x 10 -9

  7. Reduction behavior of UO22+ in molten LiCl-RbCl and LiCl-KCl eutectics by using tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takayuki; Uehara, Akihiro; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Yamana, Hajimu

    2013-08-01

    The reduction of uranium from UO22+ to UO2+ or U4+ in molten LiCl-RbCl and LiCl-KCl eutectics was examined by using tungsten and chlorine gas. Spectrophotometric technique was adopted to determine the concentration of uranium species. When tungsten was immersed into the LiCl-RbCl eutectic melt at 400 °C without supplying chlorine gas, 36% of the total weight of the hexavalent of UO22+ was reduced to the pentavalent of UO2+. Under purging chlorine gas into the melt, 96% of UO22+ was reduced to the tetravalent of U4+. Tungsten oxy-chloride of WOCl4 was produced via the reductions of UO22+, which was volatized from the melt and adsorbed on the upper part of experimental cell. On the other hand, 84% of UO22+ in the LiCl-KCl eutectic melt at 500 °C was reduced to U4+ by using tungsten and chlorine gas.

  8. Upper limits on the luminosity of the progenitor of type Ia supernova SN2014J

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. T. B.; Gilfanov, M.; Bogdan, A.

    2014-01-01

    We analysed archival data of Chandra pre-explosion observations of the position of SN2014J in M82. No X-ray source at this position was detected in the data, and we calculated upper limits on the luminosities of the progenitor. These upper limits allow us to firmly rule out an unobscured supersof...

  9. A hydrochemical investigation using 36Cl/Cl in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, Richard

    2003-03-01

    This report describes 36 Cl studies which were undertaken during the H14 financial year. The results of this study suggest that, if 36 Cl data can be obtained for groundwaters at spatial scales comparable with, or smaller than, the spatial scales of the variability in in-situ 36 Cl production in the host rock, the data could potentially be useful for interpreting groundwater origins and flow paths. Four groundwater samples and one onsen water sample from the Tono area were collected for 36 Cl analysis. The groundwater samples came from boreholes MSB-2 and MSB-4 in the MIU Construction Site, whereas the onsen water was taken from Oniiwa Onsen (Komatsuya). In addition, a single sample from borehole HDB-1 at Horonobe was also sent for analysis. Supporting rock chemical data and wireline geophysical data have also been evaluated, to provide a basis for interpreting the 36 Cl data. Rock analyses and spectral gamma wireline data were used to estimate theoretical limiting equilibrium 36 Cl/Cl ratios in the rock. These have been compared with the compositions measured for groundwater samples, enabling a judgement to be made as to: whether the waters have resided for long enough in the rock to approach equilibrium (> c. 1.5 Ma); the spatial scales of mixing of the dissolved Cl in the groundwater. The estimates of in-situ 36 Cl/Cl production made with the newly available rock chemical data and wireline geophysical data have enabled 36 Cl data obtained previously from MIU-4, KNA-6 and DH-12 during H12 and H13 to be interpreted more confidently. In particular it seems that 36 Cl/Cl ratios measured previously in groundwater samples from MIU-4 are not in equilibrium with in-situ production in the granite. Furthermore, they imply that the Cl is homogenised, at least on the scale of the upper half of borehole. In contrast, the data from DH-12 imply that the Cl could be in equilibrium with in-situ 36 Cl production in the granite, which would be consistent with a relatively long

  10. Upper limits to trace constituents in Jupiter's atmosphere from an analysis of its 5 micrometer spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffers, R. R.; Larson, H. P.; Fink, U.; Gautier, T. N.

    1978-01-01

    A high-resolution spectrum of Jupiter at 5 micrometers recorded at the Kuiper Airborne Observatory is used to determine upper limits to the column density of 19 molecules. The upper limits to the mixing ratios of SiH4, H2S, HCN, and simple hydrocarbons are discussed with respect to current models of Jupiter's atmosphere. These upper limits are compared to expectations based upon the solar abundance of the elements. This analysis permits upper limit measurements (SiH4), or actual detections (GeH4) of molecules with mixing ratios with hydrogen as low as 10 to the minus 9th power. In future observations at 5 micrometers the sensitivity of remote spectroscopic analyses should permit the study of constituents with mixing ratios as low as 10 to the minus 10th power, which would include the hydrides of such elements as Sn and As as well as numerous organic molecules.

  11. Low Upper Limit to Methane Abundance on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Flesch, Gregory J.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Kemppinen, Osku; Bridges, Nathan; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Minitti, Michelle; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Weigle, Gerald; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Grotzinger, John; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Elvira, Javier Gómez; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Soler, Javier Martín; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; DeMarines, Julia; Grinspoon, David; Reitz, Günther; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Posner, Arik; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Brinza, David; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Cucinotta, Francis; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Bullock, Mark; Ehresmann, Bent; Hamilton, Victoria; Hassler, Donald; Peterson, Joseph; Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Kim, Myung-Hee; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; Boehm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2013-10-01

    By analogy with Earth, methane in the Martian atmosphere is a potential signature of ongoing or past biological activity. During the past decade, Earth-based telescopic observations reported “plumes” of methane of tens of parts per billion by volume (ppbv), and those from Mars orbit showed localized patches, prompting speculation of sources from subsurface bacteria or nonbiological sources. From in situ measurements made with the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) on Curiosity using a distinctive spectral pattern specific to methane, we report no detection of atmospheric methane with a measured value of 0.18 ± 0.67 ppbv corresponding to an upper limit of only 1.3 ppbv (95% confidence level), which reduces the probability of current methanogenic microbial activity on Mars and limits the recent contribution from extraplanetary and geologic sources.

  12. Global robust stability of delayed neural networks: Estimating upper limit of norm of delayed connection weight matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vimal

    2007-01-01

    The question of estimating the upper limit of -parallel B -parallel 2 , which is a key step in some recently reported global robust stability criteria for delayed neural networks, is revisited ( B denotes the delayed connection weight matrix). Recently, Cao, Huang, and Qu have given an estimate of the upper limit of -parallel B -parallel 2 . In the present paper, an alternative estimate of the upper limit of -parallel B -parallel 2 is highlighted. It is shown that the alternative estimate may yield some new global robust stability results

  13. Studies towards the data acquisition of the PANDA experiment and measurement of a new upper limit of the production cross section of p anti p→hc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Milan Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The PANDA experiment will be one of the main future FAIR experiments located at Darmstadt, Germany. It has a challenging concept of a new type of Data Acquisition (DAQ) including the full online reconstruction and filtering as well as a high precision synchronization mechanism. The new concept is needed due to a high data rate of 200 GB/s, which has to be reduced by three orders of magnitude before storing. In this thesis the prototype trigger-less DAQ, a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based system is presented. As a scalable system, it includes first parts of the final DAQ. Thus it is the first system allowing studies of the full DAQ-chain, including the synchronization mechanism. Furthermore, the functionalities during an in-beam environment test of the prototype of the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter were investigated. This test showed that the PTDAQ can be used as a DAQ in prototype tests. In addition to hardware and firmware development, simulations of benchmark channels are crucial to extract filtering possibilities. Therefore the knowledge of the production cross section is necessary. In the framework of this thesis a new upper limit of the production cross section σ(p anti p→h c ) was extracted. h c is one of the most unknown charmonium states, and it is not possible to produce pure h c in one of the other ''charm factories'' directly. For this purpose, the branching ratio of the decay B(h c →p anti p)<5.6.10 -5 rate at 90% C.L. was determined. For this, data from the BES III experiment located at the BEPCII accelerator in Beijing, China was used. h c was produced in the decay of the ψ(2S) charmonium resonance, which itself was produced in e + e - collisions. A data set of (447.9±2.8).10 6 ψ(2S)-events was used for this analysis. The new upper limit of the cross section σ(p anti p→h c )<32 nb rate at 90% C.L. was calculated by using the method of detailed balance. Furthermore, the lower limit of the integrated

  14. NaCl - Changes stem morphology, anatomy and phloem structure in Lucerne (Medicago sativa cv. Gabès): Comparison of upper and lower internodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nja, Riheb Ben; Merceron, Bruno; Faucher, Mireille; Fleurat-Lessard, Pierrette; Béré, Emile

    2018-02-01

    In M. sativa cv. Gabès plants treated with 150mM NaCl, the height of the stem is decreased and the internode number, length and diameter are reduced. This depressive effect on growth, but also on photosynthetic activity and water balance, is accompanied by structural changes. In the upper internodes, NaCl treatment increases cambium development, so that the vascular ring is initiated earlier than in controls. In the lower internodes, the number of lignified phloem fibers is increased by NaCl, and their wall thickness is augmented, compared to controls; in the phloem complex, the nacreous layer is enlarged, the number of internal wall ingrowths is increased, but companion cells are damaged. In the treated lower internodes, few vessels occur in the secondary xylem, which is by contrast rich in lignified fibers and in wide vessels grouped in the metaxylem area; protoxylem parenchyma and adjacent pith are also lignified. In addition, in treated lower internodes, starch grains are less abundant than in controls, and this variation might be related to the decrease of photosynthesis. When taken together, qualitative and quantitative results indicate that the saline stress has a marked morpho-anatomical impact on the M. sativa Gabès stem. In particular, variations of secondary derivative distribution, increased wall thickening, lignification of phloem and xylem fibers and damage in the phloem complex are NaCl-induced responses, and are more expressed in the lower than in the upper internodes. The reinforcement of the stem lignified vasculature is thus a positive response to stress, but it has a negative impact on the quality of the forage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Acoustic observation of living organisms reveals the upper limit of the oxygen minimum zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Bertrand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs are expanding in the World Ocean as a result of climate change and direct anthropogenic influence. OMZ expansion greatly affects biogeochemical processes and marine life, especially by constraining the vertical habitat of most marine organisms. Currently, monitoring the variability of the upper limit of the OMZs relies on time intensive sampling protocols, causing poor spatial resolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using routine underwater acoustic observations of the vertical distribution of marine organisms, we propose a new method that allows determination of the upper limit of the OMZ with a high precision. Applied in the eastern South-Pacific, this original sampling technique provides high-resolution information on the depth of the upper OMZ allowing documentation of mesoscale and submesoscale features (e.g., eddies and filaments that structure the upper ocean and the marine ecosystems. We also use this information to estimate the habitable volume for the world's most exploited fish, the Peruvian anchovy (Engraulis ringens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This opportunistic method could be implemented on any vessel geared with multi-frequency echosounders to perform comprehensive high-resolution monitoring of the upper limit of the OMZ. Our approach is a novel way of studying the impact of physical processes on marine life and extracting valid information about the pelagic habitat and its spatial structure, a crucial aspect of Ecosystem-based Fisheries Management in the current context of climate change.

  16. CALET UPPER LIMITS ON X-RAY AND GAMMA-RAY COUNTERPARTS OF GW151226

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G. [University of Florence, Via Sansone, 1, I-50019 Sesto, Fiorentino (Italy); Akaike, Y. [Universities Space Research Association, 7178 Columbia Gateway Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States); Asano, K. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Asaoka, Y. [JEM Mission Operations and Integration Center, Human Spaceflight Technology Directorate, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Bonechi, S.; Brogi, P.; Felice, V. Di [National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Piazza dei Caprettari, 70, I-00186 Rome (Italy); Binns, W. R.; Buckley, J. H. [Department of Physics, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130-4899 (United States); Cannady, N.; Cherry, M. L.; Guzik, T. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Checchia, C.; Collazuol, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Via Marzolo, 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Ebisawa, K.; Fuke, H., E-mail: nakahira@crab.riken.jp, E-mail: yoichi.asaoka@aoni.waseda.jp, E-mail: tsakamoto@phys.aoyama.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); and others

    2016-09-20

    We present upper limits in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands at the time of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) gravitational-wave event GW151226 derived from the CALorimetric Electron Telescope ( CALET ) observation. The main instrument of CALET , CALorimeter (CAL), observes gamma-rays from ∼1 GeV up to 10 TeV with a field of view of ∼2 sr. The CALET gamma-ray burst monitor (CGBM) views ∼3 sr and ∼2 π sr of the sky in the 7 keV–1 MeV and the 40 keV–20 MeV bands, respectively, by using two different scintillator-based instruments. The CGBM covered 32.5% and 49.1% of the GW151226 sky localization probability in the 7 keV–1 MeV and 40 keV–20 MeV bands respectively. We place a 90% upper limit of 2 × 10{sup −7} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} in the 1–100 GeV band where CAL reaches 15% of the integrated LIGO probability (∼1.1 sr). The CGBM 7 σ upper limits are 1.0 × 10{sup −6} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} (7–500 keV) and 1.8 × 10{sup −6} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} (50–1000 keV) for a 1 s exposure. Those upper limits correspond to the luminosity of 3–5 × 10{sup 49} erg s{sup −1}, which is significantly lower than typical short GRBs.

  17. Upper limit on NUT charge from the observed terrestrial Sagnac effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbakova, A.; Karimov, R. Kh; Izmailov, R. N.; Nandi, K. K.

    2018-06-01

    The exact Sagnac delay in the Kerr–Taub–NUT (Newman–Unti–Tamburino) spacetime is derived in the equatorial plane for non-geodesic as well as geodesic circular orbits. The resulting formula, being exact, can be directly applied to motion in the vicinity of any spinning object including black holes but here we are considering only the terrestrial case since observational data are available. The formula reveals that, in the limit of spin , the delay does not vanish. This fact is similar to the non-vanishing of Lense–Thirring precession under even though the two effects originate from different premises. Assuming a reasonable input that the Kerr–Taub–NUT corrections are subsumed in the average residual uncertainty in the measured Sagnac delay, we compute upper limits on the NUT charge n. It is found that the upper limits on n are far larger than the Earth’s gravitational mass, which has not been detected in observations, implying that the Sagnac effect cannot constrain n to smaller values near zero. We find a curious difference between the delays for non-geodesic and geodesic clock orbits and point out its implication for the well known ‘twin paradox’ of special relativity.

  18. Temporal variations of mobile carbohydrates in Abies fargesii at the upper tree limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, H S; Zhang, K R; Zhang, Q F; Xu, Y M

    2015-01-01

    Low temperatures are associated high-altitude treelines, but the functional mechanism of treeline formation remains controversial. The relative contributions of carbon limitation (source activity) and growth limitation (sink activity) require more tests across taxa and regions. We examined temporal variations of mobile carbon supply in different tissues of Abies fargesii across treeline ecotones on north- and south-facing slopes of the Qinling Mountains, China. Non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations in tissues along the altitudinal gradient on both slopes changed significantly in the early and late growing season, but not in the mid-growing season, indicating the season-dependent carbon supply status. Late in the growing season on both slopes, trees at the upper limits had the highest NSC concentrations and total soluble sugars and lowest starch concentrations compared to trees at the lower elevations. NSC concentrations tended to increase in needles and branches throughout the growing season with increasing elevation on both slopes, but declined in roots and stems. NSC concentrations across sampling dates also indicated increases in needles and branches, and decreases in roots and stem with increasing elevation. Overall altitudinal trends of NSC in A. fargesii revealed no depletion of mobile carbon reserves at upper elevation limits, suggesting limitation of sink activity dominates tree life across treeline ecotones in both north- and south-facing slopes. Carbon reserves in storage tissues (especially roots) in the late growing season might also play an important role in winter survival and early growth in spring at upper elevations on both slopes, which define the uppermost limit of A. fargesii. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Herbivory and pollen limitation at the upper elevational range limit of two forest understory plants of eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivest, Sébastien; Vellend, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Studies of species' range limits focus most often on abiotic factors, although the strength of biotic interactions might also vary along environmental gradients and have strong demographic effects. For example, pollinator abundance might decrease at range limits due to harsh environmental conditions, and reduced plant density can reduce attractiveness to pollinators and increase or decrease herbivory. We tested for variation in the strength of pollen limitation and herbivory by ungulates along a gradient leading to the upper elevational range limits of Trillium erectum (Melanthiaceae) and Erythronium americanum (Liliaceae) in Mont Mégantic National Park, Québec, Canada. In T. erectum, pollen limitation was higher at the range limit, but seed set decreased only slightly with elevation and only in one of two years. In contrast, herbivory of T. erectum increased from 60% at the upper elevational range limit. In E. americanum , we found no evidence of pollen limitation despite a significant decrease in seed set with elevation, and herbivory was low across the entire gradient. Overall, our results demonstrate the potential for relatively strong negative interactions (herbivory) and weak positive interactions (pollination) at plant range edges, although this was clearly species specific. To the extent that these interactions have important demographic consequences-highly likely for herbivory on Trillium , based on previous studies-such interactions might play a role in determining plant species' range limits along putatively climatic gradients.

  20. The upper spatial limit for perception of displacement is affected by preceding motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, Miroslava; Mateeff, Stefan; Hohnsbein, Joachim

    2009-03-01

    The upper spatial limit D(max) for perception of apparent motion of a random dot pattern may be strongly affected by another, collinear, motion that precedes it [Mateeff, S., Stefanova, M., &. Hohnsbein, J. (2007). Perceived global direction of a compound of real and apparent motion. Vision Research, 47, 1455-1463]. In the present study this phenomenon was studied with two-dimensional motion stimuli. A random dot pattern moved alternately in the vertical and oblique direction (zig-zag motion). The vertical motion was of 1.04 degrees length; it was produced by three discrete spatial steps of the dots. Thereafter the dots were displaced by a single spatial step in oblique direction. Each motion lasted for 57ms. The upper spatial limit for perception of the oblique motion was measured under two conditions: the vertical component of the oblique motion and the vertical motion were either in the same or in opposite directions. It was found that the perception of the oblique motion was strongly influenced by the relative direction of the vertical motion that preceded it; in the "same" condition the upper spatial limit was much shorter than in the "opposite" condition. Decreasing the speed of the vertical motion reversed this effect. Interpretations based on networks of motion detectors and on Gestalt theory are discussed.

  1. Upper limit for the branching ratio of KS→e+e- decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Sakeliou, L.; Aslanides, E.; Bertin, V.; Ealet, A.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Hubert, E.; Le Gac, R.; Montanet, F.; Touchard, F.; Backenstoss, G.; Leimgruber, F.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Polivka, G.; Rickenbach, R.; Schietinger, T.; Tauscher, L.; Vlachos, S.; Bargassa, P.

    1998-01-01

    A measurement of the branching ratio for K S →e + e - decay was performed with the CPLEAR detector at LEAR. Full event reconstruction together with calorimeter e/π separation allowed for powerful background rejection and high signal acceptance. The analysis on the complete set of data yields the result: BR(K S →e + e - ) -7 (90% CL), an improvement on the current experimental limit by a factor of 20

  2. Limits on inelastic dark matter from ZEPLIN-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimov, D.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Araujo, H.M. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Barnes, E.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Belov, V.A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bewick, A. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Burenkov, A.A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cashmore, R. [Brasenose College, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Chepel, V. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); Currie, A., E-mail: alastair.currie08@imperial.ac.u [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Davidge, D.; Dawson, J. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Durkin, T.; Edwards, B. [Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Horn, M.; Howard, A.S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Hughes, A.J. [Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Jones, W.G. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Kalmus, G.E. [Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-30

    We present limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section for inelastic dark matter from a reanalysis of the 2008 run of ZEPLIN-III. Cuts, notably on scintillation pulse shape and scintillation-to-ionisation ratio, give a net exposure of 63kgday in the range 20-80keV nuclear recoil energy, in which 6 events are observed. Upper limits on signal rate are derived from the maximum empty patch in the data. Under standard halo assumptions a small region of parameter space consistent, at 99% CL, with causing the 1.17tonyr DAMA modulation signal is allowed at 90% CL: it is in the mass range 45-60GeVc{sup -2} with a minimum CL of 87%, again derived from the maximum patch. This is the tightest constraint yet presented using xenon, a target nucleus whose similarity to iodine mitigiates systematic error from the assumed halo.

  3. The solar-flare infrared continuum: observational techniques and upper limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, H.S.

    1975-01-01

    Exploratory observations at 20μ and 350 μ have determined detection thresholds for solar flares in these wavelengths. In the 20μ range solar atmospheric fluctuations (the 'temperature field') set the basic limits on flare detectability at approximately 5K; at 350μ the extinction in the Earth's atmosphere provides the basic limitation of approximately 30 K. These thresholds are low enough for the successful detection of several infrared-emitting components of large flares. Limited observing time and lack of solar activity have prevented observations of large flares up to the present, but the techniques promise to be extremely useful in the future. The upper limits obtained thus far, for subflares, indicate that the thickness of the Hα flare region does not exceed approximately 10 km. This result confirms the conclusion of Suemoto and Hiei (1959) regarding the small effective thickness of the Hα-emitting regions in solar flares. (Auth.)

  4. Actinide solubility in deep groundwaters - estimates for upper limits based on chemical equilibrium calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweingruber, M.

    1983-12-01

    A chemical equilibrium model is used to estimate maximum upper concentration limits for some actinides (Th, U, Np, Pu, Am) in groundwaters. Eh/pH diagrams for solubility isopleths, dominant dissolved species and limiting solids are constructed for fixed parameter sets including temperature, thermodynamic database, ionic strength and total concentrations of most important inorganic ligands (carbonate, fluoride, phosphate, sulphate, chloride). In order to assess conservative conditions, a reference water is defined with high ligand content and ionic strength, but without competing cations. In addition, actinide oxides and hydroxides are the only solid phases considered. Recommendations for 'safe' upper actinide solubility limits for deep groundwaters are derived from such diagrams, based on the predicted Eh/pH domain. The model results are validated as far as the scarce experimental data permit. (Auth.)

  5. Upper limits on gravitational wave bursts in LIGO's second science run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Anderson, S.B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Asiri, F.; Barish, B.C.; Barnes, M.; Barton, M.A.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bork, R.; Brown, D.A.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.

    2005-01-01

    We perform a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the second science run of the LIGO detectors, using a method based on a wavelet time-frequency decomposition. This search is sensitive to bursts of duration much less than a second and with frequency content in the 100-1100 Hz range. It features significant improvements in the instrument sensitivity and in the analysis pipeline with respect to the burst search previously reported by LIGO. Improvements in the search method allow exploring weaker signals, relative to the detector noise floor, while maintaining a low false alarm rate, O(0.1) μHz. The sensitivity in terms of the root-sum-square (rss) strain amplitude lies in the range of h rss ∼10 -20 -10 -19 Hz -1/2 . No gravitational wave signals were detected in 9.98 days of analyzed data. We interpret the search result in terms of a frequentist upper limit on the rate of detectable gravitational wave bursts at the level of 0.26 events per day at 90% confidence level. We combine this limit with measurements of the detection efficiency for selected waveform morphologies in order to yield rate versus strength exclusion curves as well as to establish order-of-magnitude distance sensitivity to certain modeled astrophysical sources. Both the rate upper limit and its applicability to signal strengths improve our previously reported limits and reflect the most sensitive broad-band search for untriggered and unmodeled gravitational wave bursts to date

  6. The Canadian experience: why Canada decided against an upper limit for cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bruce E

    2004-12-01

    Canada, like the United States, held a "consensus conference on cholesterol" in 1988. Although the final report of the consensus panel recommended that total dietary fat not exceed 30 percent and saturated fat not exceed 10 percent of total energy intake, it did not specify an upper limit for dietary cholesterol. Similarly, the 1990, Health Canada publication "Nutrition Recommendations: The Report of the Scientific Review Committee" specified upper limits for total and saturated fat in the diet but did not specify an upper limit for cholesterol. Canada's Guidelines for Healthy Eating, a companion publication from Health Canada, suggested that Canadians "choose low-fat dairy products, lean meats, and foods prepared with little or no fat" while enjoying "a variety of foods." Many factors contributed to this position but a primary element was the belief that total dietary fat and saturated fat were primary dietary determinants of serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, not dietary cholesterol. Hence, Canadian health authorities focused on reducing saturated fat and trans fats in the Canadian diet to help lower blood cholesterol levels rather than focusing on limiting dietary cholesterol. In an effort to allay consumer concern with the premise that blood cholesterol level is linked to dietary cholesterol, organizations such as the Canadian Egg Marketing Agency (CEMA) reminded health professionals, including registered dietitians, family physicians and nutrition educators, of the extensive data showing that there is little relationship between dietary cholesterol intake and cardiovascular mortality. In addition, it was pointed out that for most healthy individuals, endogenous synthesis of cholesterol by the liver adjusts to the level of dietary cholesterol intake. Educating health professionals about the relatively weak association between dietary cholesterol and the relatively strong association between serum cholesterol and saturated fat and

  7. Pulsation, Mass Loss and the Upper Mass Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapp, J.; Corona-Galindo, M. G.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. La existencia de estrellas con masas en exceso de 100 M0 ha sido cuestionada por mucho tiempo. Lfmites superiores para la masa de 100 M0 han sido obtenidos de teorfas de pulsaci6n y formaci6n estelar. En este trabajo nosotros primero investigamos la estabilidad radial de estrellas masivas utilizando la aproximaci6n clasica cuasiadiabatica de Ledoux, la aproximaci6n cuasiadiabatica de Castor y un calculo completamente no-adiabatico. Hemos encontrado que los tres metodos de calculo dan resultados similares siempre y cuando una pequefia regi6n de las capas externas de la estrella sea despreciada para la aproximaci6n clasica. La masa crftica para estabilidad de estrellas masivas ha sido encontrada en acuerdo a trabajos anteriores. Explicamos Ia discrepancia entre este y trabajos anteriores por uno de los autores. Discunmos calculos no-lineales y perdida de masa con respecto a) lfmite superior de masa. The existence of stars with masses in excess of 100 M0 has been questioned for a very long time. Upper mass limits of 100 Me have been obtained from pulsation and star formation theories. In this work we first investigate the radial stability of massive stars using the classical Ledoux's quasiadiabatic approximation. the Castor quasiadiabatic approximation and a fully nonadiabatic calculation. We have found that the three methods of calculation give similar results provided that a small region in outer layers of the star be neglected for the classical approximation. The critical mass for stability of massive stars is found to be in agreement with previous work. We explain the reason for the discrepancy between this and previous work by one of the authors. We discuss non-linear calculations and mass loss with regard to the upper mass limit. Key words: STARS-MASS FUNCTION - STARS-MASS LOSS - STARS-PULSATION

  8. An upper limit on hypertriton production in collisions of Ar(1.76 A GeV) + KCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agakishiev, G.; Chernenko, S.; Fateev, O.; Zanevsky, Y.; Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Garzon, J.A.; Blanco, A.; Fonte, P.; Lopes, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Boehmer, M.; Friese, J.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Jurkovic, M.; Kruecken, R.; Maier, L.; Weber, M.; Boyard, J.L.; Hennino, T.; Liu, T.; Moriniere, E.; Ramstein, B.; Destefanis, M.; Gilardi, C.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J.S.; Metag, V.; Spruck, B.; Dohrmann, F.; Kaempfer, B.; Kotte, R.; Naumann, L.; Wendisch, C.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Dybczak, A.; Michalska, B.; Palka, M.; Przygoda, W.; Salabura, P.; Trebacz, R.; Wisniowski, M.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Lapidus, K.; Siebenson, J.; Finocchiaro, P.; Schmah, A.; Spataro, S.; Froehlich, I.; Lorenz, M.; Markert, J.; Michel, J.; Muentz, C.; Pachmayer, Y.C.; Pechenova, O.; Rehnisch, L.; Rustamov, A.; Scheib, T.; Schuldes, H.; Stroebele, H.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Galatyuk, T.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Ivashkin, A.; Karavicheva, T.; Kurepin, A.; Reshetin, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Holzmann, R.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B.W.; Lang, S.; Pechenov, V.; Pietraszko, J.; Schwab, E.; Sturm, C.; Traxler, M.; Yurevich, S.; Iori, I.; Krasa, A.; Krizek, F.; Kugler, A.; Sobolev, Yu.G.; Tlusty, P.; Wagner, V.; Kuc, H.; Mousa, J.; Tsertos, H.; Stroth, J.

    2013-01-01

    A high-statistic data sample of Ar(1.76 AGeV)+KCl events recorded with HADES is used to search for a hypertriton signal. An upper production limit per centrality-triggered event of 1.04 x 10 -3 on the 3 σ level is derived. Comparing this value with the number of successfully reconstructed Λ hyperons allows to determine an upper limit on the ratio N 3 Λ H /N Λ , which is confronted with statistical and coalescence-type model calculations. (orig.)

  9. Upper limits on the 21 cm power spectrum at z = 5.9 from quasar absorption line spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Greig, Bradley; Mesinger, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    We present upper limits on the 21 cm power spectrum at z = 5.9 calculated from the model-independent limit on the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium of x_{H I} chain Monte Carlo Epoch of Reionization analysis code, we explore the probability distribution of 21 cm power spectra consistent with this constraint on the neutral fraction. We present 99 per cent confidence upper limits of Δ2(k) limit dependent on the sampled k mode. This limit can be used as a null test for 21 cm experiments: a detection of power at z = 5.9 in excess of this value is highly suggestive of residual foreground contamination or other systematic errors affecting the analysis.

  10. An upper limit on hypertriton production in collisions of Ar(1.76 A GeV) + KCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agakishiev, G.; Chernenko, S.; Fateev, O.; Zanevsky, Y. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Garzon, J.A. [Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, LabCAF. F. Fisica, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Blanco, A.; Fonte, P.; Lopes, L.; Mangiarotti, A. [LIP-Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Coimbra (Portugal); Boehmer, M.; Friese, J.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Jurkovic, M.; Kruecken, R.; Maier, L.; Weber, M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E12, Garching (Germany); Boyard, J.L.; Hennino, T.; Liu, T.; Moriniere, E.; Ramstein, B. [Universite Paris Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay Cedex (France); Destefanis, M.; Gilardi, C.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J.S.; Metag, V.; Spruck, B. [Justus Liebig Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Dohrmann, F.; Kaempfer, B.; Kotte, R.; Naumann, L.; Wendisch, C.; Wuestenfeld, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Dybczak, A.; Michalska, B.; Palka, M.; Przygoda, W.; Salabura, P.; Trebacz, R.; Wisniowski, M. [Jagiellonian University of Cracow, Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Krakow (Poland); Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Lapidus, K.; Siebenson, J. [Excellence Cluster ' ' Origin and Structure of the Universe' ' , Garching (Germany); Finocchiaro, P.; Schmah, A.; Spataro, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Froehlich, I.; Lorenz, M.; Markert, J.; Michel, J.; Muentz, C.; Pachmayer, Y.C.; Pechenova, O.; Rehnisch, L.; Rustamov, A.; Scheib, T.; Schuldes, H.; Stroebele, H.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K. [Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Frankfurt (Germany); Galatyuk, T.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Ivashkin, A.; Karavicheva, T.; Kurepin, A.; Reshetin, A.; Sadovsky, A. [Russian Academy of Science, Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gumberidze, M. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Universite Paris Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay Cedex (France); Heinz, T.; Holzmann, R.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B.W.; Lang, S.; Pechenov, V.; Pietraszko, J.; Schwab, E.; Sturm, C.; Traxler, M.; Yurevich, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Iori, I. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Krasa, A.; Krizek, F.; Kugler, A.; Sobolev, Yu.G.; Tlusty, P.; Wagner, V. [Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Nuclear Physics Institute, Rez (Czech Republic); Kuc, H. [Jagiellonian University of Cracow, Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Krakow (Poland); Universite Paris Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay Cedex (France); Mousa, J.; Tsertos, H. [University of Cyprus, Department of Physics, Nicosia (Cyprus); Stroth, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: HADES Collaboration

    2013-11-15

    A high-statistic data sample of Ar(1.76 AGeV)+KCl events recorded with HADES is used to search for a hypertriton signal. An upper production limit per centrality-triggered event of 1.04 x 10{sup -3} on the 3 {sigma} level is derived. Comparing this value with the number of successfully reconstructed {Lambda} hyperons allows to determine an upper limit on the ratio N{sub 3{sub {Lambda}H}}/N{sub {Lambda}}, which is confronted with statistical and coalescence-type model calculations. (orig.)

  11. From the Chloride of Tungsten to the Upper Limit of the Periodic Table of Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of the physical chemical properties and the technology of manufac- turing chemically clean hexachloride of tungsten has led to unexpected results. It was found that each element of the Periodic Table of Elements has its own hyperbola in the graph “molecular mass — content of the element”. The hyperbolas differ according to the atomic mass of the elements. Lagrange’s theorem shows that the tops of the hyper- bolas approach to an upper limit. This upper limit means the heaviest element, which is possible in the Table. According to the calculation, its atomic mass is 411.66, while its number is 155.

  12. Upper pinch radius limit in EXTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1989-12-01

    A simple static equilibrium model of the Z-pinch is considered where a hot plasma core is surrounded by a cold-mantle (gas blanket). The pinch radius, defined as the radial extension of the fully ionized plasma core, is uniquely determined by the plasma particle. momentum and heat balance equations. In Extrap configurations an octupole field is introduced which imposes a magnetic separatrix on Z-pinch geometry. This makes the conditions for Extrap equilibrium 'overdetermined' when the characteristic pinch radium given by the plasma parameters tends to exceed the characteristic radius of the magnetic separatrix. In this case no conventional pinch equilibrium can exist, and part of the current which is forced into the plasma discharge by external sources must be channelled outside of the separatrix, i.e. into the surrounding support structure of the Extrap conductors and the vessel walls. A possibly existing bootstrap current in the plasma boundary layer is further expected to be 'scraped off' in this case. The present paper gives some illustrations of the marginal case of this upper pinch radius limit, in a state where the pinch current is antiparallel to the external rod currents which generate the octupole field. (authors)

  13. Upper critical field of complex superconducting networks in the continuum limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santhanam, P.; Chi, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    We propose a simple method for calculating the superconducting upper critical field of complex periodic two-dimensional networks in the continuum limit. Two specific lattices with space groups P4gm and C2mm are used to demonstrate this approach. We obtain the result that the ratio of the critical field of these networks to that of a uniform film is close to but larger than 2

  14. Paramagnetic limiting of the upper critical field of the layered organic superconductor κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu(SCN)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, F.; Brooks, J.S.; McKenzie, R.H.; Schlueter, J.A.; Williams, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    We report detailed measurements of the interlayer magnetoresistance of the layered organic superconductor κ-(BEDT-TTF) 2 Cu(SCN) 2 for temperatures down to 0.5 K and fields up to 30 T. The upper critical field is determined from the resistive transition for a wide range of temperatures and field directions. For magnetic fields parallel to the layers, the upper critical field increases approximately linearly with decreasing temperature. The upper critical field at low temperatures is compared to the Pauli paramagnetic limit, at which singlet superconductivity should be destroyed by the Zeeman splitting of the electron spins. The measured value is comparable to a value for the paramagnetic limit calculated from thermodynamic quantities but exceeds the limit calculated from BCS theory. The angular dependence of the upper critical field shows a cusplike feature for fields close to the layers, consistent with decoupled layers.

  15. Evaluation of upper limit of accident probability in a nuclear reactor in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    This work calls attention to the great probability of accident in a pessimist vision regarding optimist one. The author uses the upper limit presented in Ford Foundation report and applies it on brazilian case to an evaluation of risk of reactor accident in Brazil. (C.M.)

  16. Seasonal Dynamics of Mobile Carbon Supply in Quercus aquifolioides at the Upper Elevational Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wan-Ze; Cao, Min; Wang, San-Gen; Xiao, Wen-Fan; Li, Mai-He

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have tried to explain the physiological mechanisms of the alpine treeline phenomenon, but the debate on the alpine treeline formation remains controversial due to opposite results from different studies. The present study explored the carbon-physiology of an alpine shrub species (Quercus aquifolioides) grown at its upper elevational limit compared to lower elevations, to test whether the elevational limit of alpine shrubs (treeline formation. PMID:22479567

  17. Upper limit set for level of lightning activity on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    Because optically thick cloud and haze layers prevent lightning detection at optical wavelength on Titan, a search was conducted for lightning-radiated signals (spherics) at radio wavelengths using the planetary radioastronomy instrument aboard Voyager 1. Given the maximum ionosphere density of about 3000/cu cm, lightning spherics should be detectable above an observing frequency of 500 kHz. Since no evidence for spherics is found, an upper limit to the total energy per flash in Titan lightning of about 10 to the 6th J, or about 1000 times weaker than that of typical terrestrial lightning, is inferred.

  18. Upper limits for absorption by water vapor in the near-UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Eoin M.; Wenger, John C.; Venables, Dean S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few experimental measurements of absorption by water vapor in the near-UV. Here we report the results of spectral measurements of water vapor absorption at ambient temperature and pressure from 325 nm to 420 nm, covering most tropospherically relevant short wavelengths. Spectra were recorded using a broadband optical cavity in the chemically controlled environment of an atmospheric simulation chamber. No absorption attributable to the water monomer (or the dimer) was observed at the 0.5 nm resolution of our system. Our results are consistent with calculated spectra and recent DOAS field observations, but contradict a report of significant water absorption in the near-UV. Based on the detection limit of our instrument, we report upper limits for the water absorption cross section of less than 5×10 −26 cm 2 molecule −1 at our instrument resolution. For a typical, indicative slant column density of 4×10 23 cm 2 , we calculate a maximum optical depth of 0.02 arising from absorption of water vapor in the atmosphere at wavelengths between 340 nm and 420 nm, with slightly higher maximum optical depths below 340 nm. The results of this work, together with recent atmospheric observations and computational results, suggest that water vapor absorption across most of the near-UV is small compared to visible and infrared wavelengths. - Highlights: • The absorption cross section of water vapor was studied from 325 to 420 nm. • The upper limit was 5×10 −26 cm 2 molecule −1 above 340 nm at 0.5 nm resolution. • Our result contradicts a recent report of appreciable absorption by water vapor.

  19. 42 CFR 447.321 - Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital and clinic services... SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Outpatient Hospital and Clinic Services § 447.321 Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits...

  20. Upper limit on a stochastic background of gravitational waves from seismic measurements in the range 0.05-1 Hz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Michael; Harms, Jan

    2014-03-14

    In this Letter, we present an upper limit of ΩGW<1.2×108 on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave (GW) background integrated over a year in the frequency range 0.05-1 Hz, which improves current upper limits from high-precision laboratory experiments by about 9 orders of magnitude. The limit is obtained using the response of Earth itself to GWs via a free-surface effect described more than 40 years ago by Dyson. The response was measured by a global network of broadband seismometers selected to maximize the sensitivity.

  1. Variability of Jovian ion winds: an upper limit for enhanced Joule heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Lystrup

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that short-timescale fluctuations about the mean electric field can significantly increase the upper atmospheric energy inputs at Jupiter, which may help to explain the high observed thermospheric temperatures. We present data from the first attempt to detect such variations in the Jovian ionosphere. Line-of-sight ionospheric velocity profiles in the Southern Jovian auroral/polar region are shown, derived from the Doppler shifting of H3+ infrared emission spectra. These data were recently obtained from the high-resolution CSHELL spectrometer at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We find that there is no variability within this data set on timescales of the order of one minute and spatial scales of 640 km, putting upper limits on the timescales of fluctuations that would be needed to enhance Joule heating.

  2. Living with transversal upper limb reduction deficiency : Limitations experienced by young adults during their transition to adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankhorst, Ilse M. F.; Baars, Erwin C. T.; van Wijk, Iris; Janssen, Wim G. M.; Poelma, Margriet J.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: During transition to adulthood young adults with disabilities are at risk of experiencing limitations due to changing physical and social requirements. Purpose: To determine whether young adults with transversal upper limb reduction deficiency (tULRD) have experienced limitations in

  3. The Salty Scrambled Egg: Detection of NaCl Toward CRL 2688

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highberger, J. L.; Thomson, K. J.; Young, P. A.; Arnett, D.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2003-08-01

    NaCl has been detected toward the circumstellar envelope of the post-AGB star CRL 2688 using the IRAM 30 m telescope, the first time this molecule has been identified in a source other than IRC +10216. The J=7-->6, 11-->10, 12-->11, and 18-->17 transitions of NaCl at 1, 2, and 3 mm have been observed, as well as the J=8-->7 line of the 37Cl isotopomer. The J=12-->11 line was also measured at the ARO 12 m telescope. An unsuccessful search was additionally conducted for AlCl toward CRL 2688, although in the process new transitions of NaCN were observed. Both NaCl and NaCN were found to be present in the AGB remnant wind, as suggested by their U-shaped line profiles, indicative of emission arising from an optically thin, extended shell-like source of radius ~10"-12". These data contrast with past results in IRC +10216, where the distribution of both molecules is confined to within a few arcseconds of the star. A high degree of excitation is required for the transitions observed for NaCl and NaCN; therefore, these two species likely arise in the region where the high-velocity outflow has collided with the remnant wind. Here the effects of shocks and clumping due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities have raised the densities and temperatures significantly. The shell source is thus likely to be clumpy and irregular. The chemistry producing the sodium compounds is consequently more complex than simple LTE formation. Abundances of NaCl and NaCN, relative to H2, are f~1.6×10-10 and ~5.2×10-9, respectively, while the upper limit to AlCl is f<2×10-9. These values differ substantially from those in IRC +10216, where AlCl has an abundance near 10-7. The NaCl observations additionally indicate a chlorine isotope ratio of 35Cl/37Cl=2.1+/-0.8 in CRL 2688, suggestive of s-process enhancement of chlorine 37.

  4. Physiological responses to short-term thermal stress in mayfly (Neocloeon triangulifer) larvae in relation to upper thermal limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Sun; Chou, Hsuan; Funk, David H; Jackson, John K; Sweeney, Bernard W; Buchwalter, David B

    2017-07-15

    Understanding species' thermal limits and their physiological determinants is critical in light of climate change and other human activities that warm freshwater ecosystems. Here, we ask whether oxygen limitation determines the chronic upper thermal limits in larvae of the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer , an emerging model for ecological and physiological studies. Our experiments are based on a robust understanding of the upper acute (∼40°C) and chronic thermal limits of this species (>28°C, ≤30°C) derived from full life cycle rearing experiments across temperatures. We tested two related predictions derived from the hypothesis that oxygen limitation sets the chronic upper thermal limits: (1) aerobic scope declines in mayfly larvae as they approach and exceed temperatures that are chronically lethal to larvae; and (2) genes indicative of hypoxia challenge are also responsive in larvae exposed to ecologically relevant thermal limits. Neither prediction held true. We estimated aerobic scope by subtracting measurements of standard oxygen consumption rates from measurements of maximum oxygen consumption rates, the latter of which was obtained by treating with the metabolic uncoupling agent carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy) pheylhydrazone (FCCP). Aerobic scope was similar in larvae held below and above chronic thermal limits. Genes indicative of oxygen limitation (LDH, EGL-9) were only upregulated under hypoxia or during exposure to temperatures beyond the chronic (and more ecologically relevant) thermal limits of this species (LDH). Our results suggest that the chronic thermal limits of this species are likely not driven by oxygen limitation, but rather are determined by other factors, e.g. bioenergetics costs. We caution against the use of short-term thermal ramping approaches to estimate critical thermal limits (CT max ) in aquatic insects because those temperatures are typically higher than those that occur in nature. © 2017. Published by The Company of

  5. Upper bound limit analysis of spherical pressure vessels with protruding nozzles and associated defects at the intersection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.G.

    1981-08-01

    The limit analysis of a circumferential partial penetration defect around the intersection of a sphere and a cylinder has been investigated. An upper bound to the limit pressure has been determined by considering four independent mechanisms, and compared to an existing lower bound solution. (author)

  6. Implementation of upper limit calculation for a poisson variable by bayesian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yongsheng

    2008-01-01

    The calculation of Bayesian confidence upper limit for a Poisson variable including both signal and background with and without systematic uncertainties has been formulated. A Fortran 77 routine, BPULE, has been developed to implement the calculation. The routine can account for systematic uncertainties in the background expectation and signal efficiency. The systematic uncertainties may be separately parameterized by a Gaussian, Log-Gaussian or flat probability density function (pdf). Some technical details of BPULE have been discussed. (authors)

  7. Plot showing ATLAS limits on Standard Model Higgs production in the mass range 100-600 GeV

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The combined upper limit on the Standard Model Higgs boson production cross section divided by the Standard Model expectation as a function of mH is indicated by the solid line. This is a 95% CL limit using the CLs method in the entire mass range. The dotted line shows the median expected limit in the absence of a signal and the green and yellow bands reflect the corresponding 68% and 95% expected

  8. Plot showing ATLAS limits on Standard Model Higgs production in the mass range 110-150 GeV

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The combined upper limit on the Standard Model Higgs boson production cross section divided by the Standard Model expectation as a function of mH is indicated by the solid line. This is a 95% CL limit using the CLs method in in the low mass range. The dotted line shows the median expected limit in the absence of a signal and the green and yellow bands reflect the corresponding 68% and 95% expected

  9. Method for calculation of upper limit internal alpha dose rates to aquatic organisms with application of plutonium-239 in plankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Baptista, G.B.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the calculation of upper limit internal alpha dose rates to aquatic organisms is presented. The mean alpha energies per disintegration of radionuclides of interest are listed to be used in standard methodologies to calculate dose to aquatic biota. As an application, the upper limits for the alpha dose rates from 239 Pu to the total body of plankton are estimated based on data available in open literature [pt

  10. An upper limit on the sulphur abundance in HE 1327-2326

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; Venn, K. A.; Lambert, D. L.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Star HE 1327-2326 is a unique object, with the lowest measured iron abundance ([Fe/H] ~ -6) and a peculiar chemical composition that includes large overabundances of C, N, and O with respect to iron. One important question is whether the chemical abundances in this star reflect the chemical composition of the gas cloud from which it was formed or if they have been severely affected by other processes, such as dust-gas winnowing. Aims: We measure or provide an upper limit to the abundance of the volatile element sulphur, which can help to discriminate between the two scenarios. Methods: We observed HE 1327-2326 with the high resolution infra-red spectrograph CRIRES at the VLT to observe the S i lines of Multiplet 3 at 1045 nm. Results: We do not detect the S i line. A 3σ upper limit on the equivalent width (EW) of any line in our spectrum is EW winnowing, and the evidence coming from other elements (e.g., Na and Ti) is also inconclusive or contradictory. The formation of dust in the atmosphere versus an origin of the metals in a metal-poor supernova with extensive "fall-back" are not mutually exclusive. It is possible that dust formation distorts the peculiar abundance pattern created by a supernova with fall-back, thus the abundance ratios in HE 1327-2326 may be used to constrain the properties of the supernova(e) that produced its metals, but with some caution. Based on spectra obtained with CRIRES at the 8.2 m Antu ESO telescope, programme 386.D-0095.

  11. X-ray Bursts in Neutron Star and Black Hole Binaries from USA Data: Detections and Upper Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tournear, Derek M

    2003-02-18

    Narayan and Heyl (2002) have developed a theoretical framework to convert suitable upper limits on type I X-ray bursts from accreting black hole candidates (BHCs) into evidence for an event horizon. However, no appropriate observational limit exists in the literature. In this paper we survey 2101.2 ks of data from the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) X-ray timing experiment and 5142 ks of data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) experiment to obtain a formal constraint of this type. 1122 ks of neutron star data yield a population averaged mean burst rate of 1.69 x 10{sup -5} bursts s{sup -1} while 6081 ks of BHC data yield a 95% confidence level upper limit of 4.9 x 10{sup -7} bursts s{sup -1}. This is the first published limit of this type for Black Hole Candidates. Applying the theoretical framework of Narayan and Heyl (2002) we calculate regions of unstable luminosity where the neutron stars are expected to burst and the BHCs would be expected to burst if they had a surface. In this unstable luminosity region 464 ks of neutron star data yield an averaged mean burst rate of 4.1 x 10{sup -5} bursts s{sup -1} and 1512 ks of BHC data yield a 95% confidence level upper limit of 2.0 x 10{sup 6} bursts s{sup -1}, and a limit of > 10 {sigma} that BHCs do not burst with a rate similar to the rate of neutron stars in these unstable regions. This gives further evidence that BHCs do not have surfaces unless there is some new physics occurring on their surface.

  12. Outlier treatment for improving parameter estimation of group contribution based models for upper flammability limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    Flammability data is needed to assess the risk of fire and explosions. This study presents a new group contribution (GC) model to predict the upper flammability limit UFL oforganic chemicals. Furthermore, it provides a systematic method for outlier treatment inorder to improve the parameter...

  13. A new limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Data taken with the CYGNUS detector between 1989 and 1993 have been used to search for 1 second bursts of ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma rays from any point in the northern sky. There is no evidence for such bursts. Therefore the theory-dependent upper limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes is 6.1 x 10 5 pc -3 yr -1 at the 99% C.L.. After renormalizing previous direct searches to the same theory, this limit is the most restrictive by more than 2 orders of magnitude

  14. Upper and Lower Bound Limit Loads for Thin-Walled Pressure Vessels Used for Aerosol Cans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen John Hardy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The elastic compensation method proposed by Mackenzie and Boyle is used to estimate the upper and lower bound limit (collapse loads for one-piece aluminium aerosol cans, which are thin-walled pressure vessels subjected to internal pressure loading. Elastic-plastic finite element predictions for yield and collapse pressures are found using axisymmetric models. However, it is shown that predictions for the elastic-plastic buckling of the vessel base require the use of a full three-dimensional model with a small unsymmetrical imperfection introduced. The finite element predictions for the internal pressure to cause complete failure via collapse fall within the upper and lower bounds. Hence the method, which involves only elastic analyses, can be used in place of complex elastic-plastic finite element analyses when upper and lower bound estimates are adequate for design purposes. Similarly, the lower bound value underpredicts the pressure at which first yield occurs.

  15. The upper limit of the solar antineutrino flux according to the LSD array data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'etta, M.; Antonioli, P.; Badino, D.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of the experimental data obtained at the LSD liquid scintillation detector is carried out with the aim of searching the possible flux of electron antineutrinos from Sun. The most strong at present upper limit for the electron antineutrino flux of solar origin is determined: ≤ 1.0 x 10 5 cm -2 x s -1 (the reliability level of 90%)

  16. Upper Limits of the Fission Cross-Sections of Lead and Bismuth for Li-D Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, E.

    1945-07-01

    This report was written by E. Broda and P.K. Wright at the Cavendish Laboratory (Cambridge) in April 1945 and is about the upper limits of the fission cross sections of lead and bismuth for Li-D neutrons. This report includes the experiment description and the discussion of the results. (nowak)

  17. Evaluation of the OpenCL AES Kernel using the Intel FPGA SDK for OpenCL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Zheming [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yoshii, Kazutomo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Finkel, Hal [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cappello, Franck [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-04-20

    The OpenCL standard is an open programming model for accelerating algorithms on heterogeneous computing system. OpenCL extends the C-based programming language for developing portable codes on different platforms such as CPU, Graphics processing units (GPUs), Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). The Intel FPGA SDK for OpenCL is a suite of tools that allows developers to abstract away the complex FPGA-based development flow for a high-level software development flow. Users can focus on the design of hardware-accelerated kernel functions in OpenCL and then direct the tools to generate the low-level FPGA implementations. The approach makes the FPGA-based development more accessible to software users as the needs for hybrid computing using CPUs and FPGAs are increasing. It can also significantly reduce the hardware development time as users can evaluate different ideas with high-level language without deep FPGA domain knowledge. In this report, we evaluate the performance of the kernel using the Intel FPGA SDK for OpenCL and Nallatech 385A FPGA board. Compared to the M506 module, the board provides more hardware resources for a larger design exploration space. The kernel performance is measured with the compute kernel throughput, an upper bound to the FPGA throughput. The report presents the experimental results in details. The Appendix lists the kernel source code.

  18. Higgs Mass Constraints on a Fourth Family: Upper and Lower Limits on CKM Mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental limits on the Higgs boson mass restrict CKM mixing of a possible fourth family beyond the constraints previously obtained from precision electroweak data alone. Existing experimental and theoretical bounds on m H already significantly restrict the allowed parameter space. Zero CKM mixing is excluded and mixing of order θ Cabbibo is allowed. Upper and lower limits on 3-4 CKM mixing are exhibited as a function of m H . We use the default inputs of the Electroweak Working Group and also explore the sensitivity of both the three and four family fits to alternative inputs.

  19. Comparison on Mechanical Properties of SA508 Gr.3 Cl.1, Cl.2, and Gr.4N Low Alloy Steels for Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Chul; Park, Sang-Gyu; Lee, Bong-Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki-Hyoung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, microstructure and mechanical properties of SA508 Gr.3 Cl. 1, Cl.2, and Gr.4N low alloy steels are characterized to compare their properties. To evaluate the fracture toughness in the transition region, the master curve method according to ASTM E1921 was adopted in the cleavage transition region. Tensile tests and Charpy impact tests were also performed to evaluate the mechanical properties, and a microstructural investigation was carried out. The microstructure and mechanical properties of SA508 Gr.3 Cl.1, Cl2 and Gr.4N low alloy steels were characterized.. The predominant microstructure of SA508 Gr.4N model alloy is tempered martensite, while SA508 Gr.3 Cl.1 and Cl.2 steels show a typical tempered upper bainitic structure. SA508 Gr. 4N model alloy shows the best strength and transition behavior among the three SA508 steels. SA508 Gr.3 Cl.2 steel also has quite good strength, but there is a loss of toughness.

  20. An upper limit on the $\\tau$ neutrino mass from three- and five-prong tau decays

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    A bound on the tau neutrino mass is established using the data collected from 1991 to 1995 at Ecm = M(Z) with the ALEPH detector. Two separate limits are derived by fitting the distribution of visible energy vs invariant mass in tau+ -> pi+ pi+ pi- nu and tau+ -> pi+ pi+ pi- pi- pi+ (pi0) nu decays. The two results are combined to obtain a 95 % confidence level upper limit of 18.2 MeV/c^2 on the mass of the tau neutrino.

  1. Upper limits on the branching ratios $\\tau$ --> $\\mu\\gamma$ and $\\tau$ --> e$\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Daum, A; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Haedinger, U; Hahn, F; Hahn, M; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Ioannou, P; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köhne, J H; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Królikowski, J; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Fernandez, A; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Marvik, K; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stepaniak, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1995-01-01

    The DELPHI collaboration has searched for lepton flavour violating decays \\tau \\rightarrow \\mu \\gamma and \\tau \\rightarrow e \\gamma using a data sample of about 70~pb^{-1} of integrated luminosity corresponding to 81 000 produced \\tau^+ \\tau^- events. No candidates were found for either of the two modes. This yields branching ratio upper limits of \\rm{B}( \\tau \\rightarrow e \\gamma ) < 1.1 \\times 10^{-4} and \\rm{B} ( \\tau \\rightarrow \\mu \\gamma) < 6.2 \\times 10^{-5} at 90\\% confidence level.

  2. A size upper limit and position for the HCN maser in CIT 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlstrom, J.E.; Welch, W.J.; Goldsmith, P.F.; Lis, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    A size upper limit and position for the HCN maser in CIT 6 were determined from interferometric observations with the Hat Creek millimeter array. The maser is located at alpha(1950) = 10 h 13 m 10.942 + or - 0.012 s and delta(1950) = + 30 deg 49 arcmin 16.75 arcsec + or - 0.15, coincident with the optical image taken from the Palomar plates, within the 3 arcsec uncertainty of the latter. The size of the maser emission region is less than 0.45 arcsec, approximately 180 AU at the distance estimated for CIT 6. The small size and strong emission (40 Jy) set a lower limit to the brightness temperature of 44,000 K, further strengthening the maser interpretation. 14 refs

  3. An upper limit on the branching ratio for $\\tau$ decays into seven charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Berlich, P; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hilse, T; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Howard, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Przysiezniak, H; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Rosvick, M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schulz, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1997-01-01

    We have searched for decays of the tau lepton into seven or more charged particles, using data collected with the OPAL detector from 1990 to 1995 in e^+e^- collisions at sqrt(s) ~ M_Z. No candidate events were found and an upper limit on the branching ratio for tau decays into seven charged particles of 1.8 x 10^-5 at the 95% confidence level was determined.

  4. First all-sky upper limits from LIGO on the strength of periodic gravitational waves using the Hough transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Anderson, S.B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Asiri, F.; Barish, B.C.; Barnes, M.; Barton, M.A.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bork, R.; Brown, D.A.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.

    2005-01-01

    We perform a wide parameter-space search for continuous gravitational waves over the whole sky and over a large range of values of the frequency and the first spin-down parameter. Our search method is based on the Hough transform, which is a semicoherent, computationally efficient, and robust pattern recognition technique. We apply this technique to data from the second science run of the LIGO detectors and our final results are all-sky upper limits on the strength of gravitational waves emitted by unknown isolated spinning neutron stars on a set of narrow frequency bands in the range 200-400 Hz. The best upper limit on the gravitational-wave strain amplitude that we obtain in this frequency range is 4.43x10 -23

  5. Electric-dipole-moment enhancement factor for the thallium atom, and a new upper limit on the electric dipole moment of the electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandars, P.G.H.; Sternheimer, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    Some time ago, an accurate upper limit on a possible permanent electric dipole moment of the thallium atom in the 6 2 P 1 / 2 ground state was obtained by Gould. The result was D/sub Tl/ = [(1.3 +- 2.4) x 10 -21 cm]e. In connection with this value, a calculation of the electric dipole enhancement factor R/sub Tl/, which is defined as the ratio D/sub Tl//D/sub e/, where D/sub e/is the corresponding upper limit on a possible electric dipole moment of the (valence) electron was carried out. A value R/subTl/ = 700 was obtained, which leads to an upper limit D/sub e/ = [(1.9 +- 3.4) x 10 -24 cm]e. This result is comparable with the value D/sub e/ -24 cm)e previously obtained by Weisskopf et al. from measurements on the cesium atom, and with the result of Player and Sandars of [(0.7 +- 2.2) x 10 -24 cm]e obtained from the search for an electric dipole moment in the 3 P 2 metastable state of xenon. All three results set a stringent upper limit on the amount of a possible violation of T and P invariance in electromagnetic interactions. (U.S.)

  6. Determination of the upper mass limit for stars producing white-dwarf remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanishin, W.; Angel, J.R.P.

    1980-01-01

    We have searched ultraviolet and red plates of four open clusters (NGC 2168, 2287, 2422, and 6633) for faint blue objects which might be white dwarf members of the clusters. The most massive stars in these clusters range from 3 to 6 M/sub sun/. We find a definite concentration of faint blue objects in the clusters. This fact, plus initial photoelectric photometry, provides strong support for the identification of many of these objects as cluster white dwarfs. By modeling the expected number of possible white dwarfs in each cluster, we are able to put some limits on m/sub w/, the upper stellar mass limit for formation of white dwarfs. Our data require that some stars of at least 5 M/sub sun/ have evolved into white dwarfs and give a most probable value of 7 M/sub sun/ for m/sub w/

  7. An Upper Limit for $Br(Z^0 \\rightarrow ggg)$ from Symmetric 3-jet $Z^0$ Hadronic Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    An upper limit for $BR(Z^0\\ rightarrow 3g)$ is obtained from a correlation method, which distinguishes statistically between quark and gluon jets by using the difference in their charged particle multiplicity distributions. From the sam020AU LW

  8. The Lagrangian Multiplier Method of Finding Upper and Lower Limits to Critical Stresses of Clamped Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-01-01

    geometrica ~ boundary condi- tions of the problem. (2) The energy of the load-plate system is computed for this deflection surface and is then minimized...and interpolating to find the k that makes the seriw vanish. The correct value of m is that which gives the lowest value of k. For two half waves (m=2...the square plate, the present rekdively simple upper- and lower-limit calcula- tions show that his est,imatd limit of error is correct for this case

  9. EGRET upper limits to the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the millisecond pulsars in nearby globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, P. F.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K.; Chiang, J.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fierro, J.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.

    1994-01-01

    We report upper limits to the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a number of globular clusters. The observations were done as part of an all-sky survey by the energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) during Phase I of the CGRO mission (1991 June to 1992 November). Several theoretical models suggest that MSPs may be sources of high-energy gamma radiation emitted either as primary radiation from the pulsar magnetosphere or as secondary radiation generated by conversion into photons of a substantial part of the relativistic e(+/-) pair wind expected to flow from the pulsar. To date, no high-energy emission has been detected from an individual MSP. However, a large number of MSPs are expected in globular cluster cores where the formation rate of accreting binary systems is high. Model predictions of the total number of pulsars range in the hundreds for some clusters. These expectations have been reinforced by recent discoveries of a substantial number of radio MSPs in several clusters; for example, 11 have been found in 47 Tucanae (Manchester et al.). The EGRET observations have been used to obtain upper limits for the efficiency eta of conversion of MSP spin-down power into hard gamma rays. The upper limits are also compared with the gamma-ray fluxes predicted from theoretical models of pulsar wind emission (Tavani). The EGRET limits put significant constraints on either the emission models or the number of pulsars in the globular clusters.

  10. TLD personnel monitoring dose estimation- extending the upper limit of the dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popli, K.L.; Sathian, Deepa; Divakaran, T.; Massand, O.P.

    2001-01-01

    TLD personnel monitoring was introduced in the year 1975 in India and at present nearly 41,000 radiation workers are being monitored by 13 monitoring laboratories all over India. The BARC- TLD being used for personnel monitoring is based on CaSO 4 :Dy embedded in PTFE and semi-automatic TL reader using hot N 2 Gas for heating the dosimeters. This reader has the range to measure γ dose from ten μSv to 3 μSv and x-ray dose form 1 μ Sv to 0.3 Sv due to the higher sensitivity of CaSO 4 : Dy to lower energy photons (20keV-50 keV) generated by diagnostic x-ray units. The x-ray radiation workers are at present nearly 35% of the total radiation workers monitored and this number is expected to grow as more and more number of x-ray workers are covered under this service. The upper limit of the x-ray dose range of the instrument is 0.3 Sv, whereas in the past one year it has been observed that at least 25% of the total overexposures reported in case of x-ray workers have recorded the dose more than 0.3 Sv. This paper presents the technique developed to extend the upper limit of the range from 0.3 Sv to 1 Sv for x-rays and 10 Sv for γ rays

  11. Fermi-LAT upper limits on gamma-ray emission from colliding wind binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Michael; Reimer, O.; Reimer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Here, colliding wind binaries (CWBs) are thought to give rise to a plethora of physical processes including acceleration and interaction of relativistic particles. Observation of synchrotron radiation in the radio band confirms there is a relativistic electron population in CWBs. Accordingly, CWBs have been suspected sources of high-energy γ-ray emission since the COS-B era. Theoretical models exist that characterize the underlying physical processes leading to particle acceleration and quantitatively predict the non-thermal energy emission observable at Earth. Furthermore, we strive to find evidence of γ-ray emission from a sample of seven CWB systems: WR 11, WR 70, WR 125, WR 137, WR 140, WR 146, and WR 147. Theoretical modelling identified these systems as the most favourable candidates for emitting γ-rays. We make a comparison with existing γ-ray flux predictions and investigate possible constraints. We used 24 months of data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope to perform a dedicated likelihood analysis of CWBs in the LAT energy range. As a result, we find no evidence of γ-ray emission from any of the studied CWB systems and determine corresponding flux upper limits. For some CWBs the interplay of orbital and stellar parameters renders the Fermi-LAT data not sensitive enough to constrain the parameter space of the emission models. In the cases of WR140 and WR147, the Fermi-LAT upper limits appear to rule out some model predictions entirely and constrain theoretical models over a significant parameter space. A comparison of our findings to the CWB η Car is made.

  12. Upper limits on beauty meson production in π- collisions at 280 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badier, J.; Bourotte, J.; Mine, P.; Vanderhaghen, R.; Weisz, S.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Decamp, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lefrancois, J.; Crozon, M.; Delpierre, P.; Leray, T.; Maillard, J.; Tilquin, A.; Valentin, J.

    1983-01-01

    From events with two like-sign muons, or with three or four muons, observed in the NA3 spectrometer with 280 GeV/c incoming π - beam, we deduce upper limits on the production of beauty meson pairs Banti B. We use the leptonic branching ratios of B meson measured at CESR storage rings, and assume that no nuclear effects occur in the platinum target. We find sigma(Banti B) < 2 nb/nucleon for centrally produced Banti B pairs, and sigma(Banti B) < 10 nb/nucleon for a diffractive production. These values are one order of magnitude lower than previously published limits. As a consequence, the psipsi events observed in our experiment cannot come from Banti B decays. (orig.)

  13. What is the appropriate upper limit for added sugars consumption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, James M; Sievenpiper, John L; Lê, Kim-Anne; White, John S; Clemens, Roger; Angelopoulos, Theodore J

    2017-01-01

    Dramatic increases in obesity and diabetes have occurred worldwide over the past 30 years. Some investigators have suggested that these increases may be due, in part, to increased added sugars consumption. Several scientific organizations, including the World Health Organization, the Scientific Advisory Council on Nutrition, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee 2015, and the American Heart Association, have recommended significant restrictions on upper limits of sugars consumption. In this review, the scientific evidence related to sugars consumption and its putative link to various chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and the metabolic syndrome is examined. While it appears prudent to avoid excessive calories from sugars, the scientific basis for restrictive guidelines is far from settled. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Evaluation report on CCTF core-I reflood tests Cl-5 (Run 14), Cl-10 (Run 19) and Cl-12 (Run 21)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Murao, Yoshio

    1983-06-01

    Three tests Cl-5 (Run 14), Cl-10 (Run 19) and Cl-12 (Run 21) were performed using the Cylindrical Core Test Facility to study the effect of the containment pressure on the core cooling and the system behaviors during the reflood phase of a PWR-LOCA. The containment pressures of these tests were 0.15, 0.20 and 0.30 MPa for the tests Cl-10, Cl-5 and Cl-12, respectively. Through the comparison of the test results from these three tests, the following results were obtained. (1) The higher containment pressure gave the higher heat transfer coefficient in the core. This resulted in the lower turnaround temperature, the shorter turnaround time and the shorter quench time at the higher containment pressure. (2) In the higher containment pressure test, the higher core water head, the higher upper plenum water head, the higher downcomer water head in the early period and the lower downcomer water head in the later period were observed than those in the lower containment pressure test. This resulted in the higher pressure drop through the intact loop in the early period of the tests and the lower pressure drop in the later period of the test with the containment pressure. (3) The pressure drop through the broken cold leg pressurized the primary system. The pressure drop through the broken cold leg was decreased with the containment pressure. (4) The core inlet mass flow rate was increased with the containment pressure as observed in the FLECHT-SET phase B1 test. In quantity, however, the effect of the containment pressure on the increase of the core inlet mass flow rate was less in the CCTF than that in the FLECHT-SET. The less sensitivity in the CCTF was attributed mainly to the great pressure drop through the broken cold leg, which was not observed in the FLECHT-SET with big broken cold leg. (5) The system effect of the containment pressure was explained quantitatively. (author)

  15. Using Hashimoto thyroiditis as gold standard to determine the upper limit value of thyroid stimulating hormone in a Chinese cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Chen, Dong-Ning; Cui, Jing; Xin, Zhong; Yang, Guang-Ran; Niu, Ming-Jia; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-11-06

    Subclinical hypothyroidism, commonly caused by Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT), is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. This disorder is defined as merely having elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. However, the upper limit of reference range for TSH is debated recently. This study was to determine the cutoff value for the upper normal limit of TSH in a cohort using the prevalence of Hashimoto thyroiditis as "gold" calibration standard. The research population was medical staff of 2856 individuals who took part in health examination annually. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), TSH, thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPAb), thyroglobulin antibody (TGAb) and other biochemistry parameters were tested. Meanwhile, thyroid ultrasound examination was performed. The diagnosis of HT was based on presence of thyroid antibodies (TPAb and TGAb) and abnormalities of thyroid ultrasound examination. We used two different methods to estimate the cutoff point of TSH based on the prevalence of HT. Joinpoint regression showed the prevalence of HT increased significantly at the ninth decile of TSH value corresponding to 2.9 mU/L. ROC curve showed a TSH cutoff value of 2.6 mU/L with the maximized sensitivity and specificity in identifying HT. Using the newly defined cutoff value of TSH can detect patients with hyperlipidemia more efficiently, which may indicate our approach to define the upper limit of TSH can make more sense from the clinical point of view. A significant increase in the prevalence of HT occurred among individuals with a TSH of 2.6-2.9 mU/L made it possible to determine the cutoff value of normal upper limit of TSH.

  16. An improved limit on the axion-photon coupling from the CAST experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriamonje, S.; Aune, S.; Dafni, T.; Ferrer Ribas, E.; Giomataris, I.; Irastorza, I.G. [CEA Saclay, DAPNIA, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Autiero, D.; Barth, K.; Davenport, M.; Di Lella, L.; Lasseur, C.; Papaevangelou, T.; Placci, A.; Stewart, L.; Walckiers, L.; Zioutas, K. [CERN, European Org Nucl Res, CH-1211 Geneva 23, (Switzerland); Belov, A.; Gninenko, S. [Russian Acad Sci, Inst Nucl Res, Moscow, (Russian Federation); Beltran, B.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Gomez, H.; Irastorza, I.G.; Luzon, G.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Ortiz, A.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Villar, J. [Univ Zaragoza, Inst Fis Nucl and Altas Energias, Zaragoza, (Spain); Brauninger, H.; Englhauser, J.; Friedrich, P.; Kuster, M. [Max Planck Inst Extraterr Phys, D-85748 Garching, (Germany); Collar, J.I.; Miller, D.; Vieira, J. [Univ Chicago, Enrico Fermi Inst and KICP, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Dafni, T.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Kuster, M.; Riege, H. [Tech Univ Darmstadt, Inst Kernphys, D-64289 Darmstadt, (Germany); Eleftheriadis, C.; Liolios, A.; Savvidis, I. [Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, GR-54006 Thessaloniki, (Greece); Fanourakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kousouris, K. [Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Athens, (Greece); Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Heinsius, F.H.; Kang, D.; Konigsmann, K.; Vogel, J. [Univ Freiburg, Freiburg, (Germany)] (and others)

    2007-04-15

    We have searched for solar axions or similar particles that couple to two photons by using the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) set-up with improved conditions in all detectors. From the absence of excess x-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun, we set an upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of g{sub a{gamma}} {<=} 8.8 x 10{sup -11} GeV{sup -1} at 95% CL for m{sub a} {<=} 0.02 eV. This result is the best experimental limit over a broad range of axion masses and for m{sub a} {<=} 0.02 eV also supersedes the previous limit derived from energy-loss arguments on globular cluster stars. (authors)

  17. Directional limits on persistent gravitational waves using LIGO S5 science data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aronsson, M; Arun, K G; Aso, Y; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Belletoile, A; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bigotta, S; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Boccara, C; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Boyle, M; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Budzyński, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campagna, E; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coulon, J-P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Culter, R M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Das, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Davier, M; Davies, G; Davis, A; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Degallaix, J; del Prete, M; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Devanka, P; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Paolo Emilio, M; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Dorsher, S; Douglas, E S D; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dueck, J; Dumas, J-C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Flasch, K; Foley, S; Forrest, C; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J-D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gholami, I; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hall, P; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J-F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hoyland, D; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, H; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Krause, T; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kullman, J; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Leong, J; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J; Li, T G F; Liguori, N; Lin, H; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lu, P; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Lundgren, A D; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Mak, C; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIvor, G; McKechan, D J A; Meadors, G; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Menéndez, D F; Mercer, R A; Merill, L; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mino, Y; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohanty, S D; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreau, J; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Morioka, T; Mors, K; Mosca, S; Moscatelli, V; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P G; Nash, T; Nawrodt, R; Nelson, J; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G H; Oldenburg, R G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Page, A; Pagliaroli, G; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Pardi, S; Pareja, M; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patel, P; Pathak, D; Pedraza, M; Pekowsky, L; Penn, S; Peralta, C; Perreca, A; Persichetti, G; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Poggiani, R; Postiglione, F; Prato, M; Predoi, V; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radke, T; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rakhmanov, M; Rankins, B; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Roberts, P; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Röver, C; Rolland, L; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Sakosky, M; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; de la Jordana, L Sancho; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Santamaría, L; Santostasi, G; Saraf, S; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Satterthwaite, M; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Singer, A; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Speirits, F C; Sperandio, L; Stein, A J; Stein, L C; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sung, M; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szokoly, G P; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, J R; Taylor, R; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Thüring, A; Titsler, C; Tokmakov, K V; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C; Torrie, C I; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Trummer, J; Tseng, K; Turner, L; Ugolini, D; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vaishnav, B; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Veltkamp, C; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Villar, A E; Vinet, J-Y; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Wei, P; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Willke, B; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, K; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yu, P; Yvert, M; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2011-12-30

    The gravitational-wave (GW) sky may include nearby pointlike sources as well as stochastic backgrounds. We perform two directional searches for persistent GWs using data from the LIGO S5 science run: one optimized for pointlike sources and one for arbitrary extended sources. Finding no evidence to support the detection of GWs, we present 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper-limit maps of GW strain power with typical values between 2-20×10(-50)  strain(2) Hz(-1) and 5-35×10(-49)  strain(2) Hz(-1) sr(-1) for pointlike and extended sources, respectively. The latter result is the first of its kind. We also set 90% C.L. limits on the narrow-band root-mean-square GW strain from interesting targets including Sco X-1, SN 1987A and the Galactic center as low as ≈7×10(-25) in the most sensitive frequency range near 160 Hz.

  18. Definition of the upper reference limit for thyroglobulin antibodies according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry guidelines: comparison of eleven different automated methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aurizio, F; Metus, P; Ferrari, A; Caruso, B; Castello, R; Villalta, D; Steffan, A; Gaspardo, K; Pesente, F; Bizzaro, N; Tonutti, E; Valverde, S; Cosma, C; Plebani, M; Tozzoli, R

    2017-12-01

    In the last two decades, thyroglobulin autoantibodies (TgAb) measurement has progressively switched from marker of thyroid autoimmunity to test associated with thyroglobulin (Tg) to verify the presence or absence of TgAb interference in the follow-up of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Of note, TgAb measurement is cumbersome: despite standardization against the International Reference Preparation MRC 65/93, several studies demonstrated high inter-method variability and wide variation in limits of detection and in reference intervals. Taking into account the above considerations, the main aim of the present study was the determination of TgAb upper reference limit (URL), according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry guidelines, through the comparison of eleven commercial automated immunoassay platforms. The sera of 120 healthy males, selected from a population survey in the province of Verona, Italy, were tested for TgAb concentration using eleven IMA applied on as many automated analyzers: AIA-2000 (AIA) and AIA-CL2400 (CL2), Tosoh Bioscience; Architect (ARC), Abbott Diagnostics; Advia Centaur XP (CEN) and Immulite 2000 XPi (IMM), Siemens Healthineers; Cobas 6000 (COB), Roche Diagnostics; Kryptor (KRY), Thermo Fisher Scientific BRAHMS, Liaison XL (LIA), Diasorin; Lumipulse G (LUM), Fujirebio; Maglumi 2000 Plus (MAG), Snibe and Phadia 250 (PHA), Phadia AB, Thermo Fisher Scientific. All assays were performed according to manufacturers' instructions in six different laboratories in Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Veneto regions of Italy [Lab 1 (AIA), Lab 2 (CL2), Lab 3 (ARC, COB and LUM), Lab 4 (CEN, IMM, KRY and MAG), Lab 5 (LIA) and Lab 6 (PHA)]. Since TgAb values were not normally distributed, the experimental URL (e-URL) was established at 97.5 percentile according to the non-parametric method. TgAb e-URLs showed a significant inter-method variability. Considering the same method, e-URL was much lower than that suggested by manufacturers (m

  19. UPPER LIMITS ON THE MASSES OF 105 SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH ARCHIVAL DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beifiori, A.; Corsini, E. M.; Bonta, E. Dalla; Pizzella, A.; Coccato, L.; Bertola, F.; Sarzi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the modeling of the central emission-line width measured over subarcsecond apertures with the Hubble Space Telescope, we present stringent upper bounds on the mass of the central supermassive black hole, M . , for a sample of 105 nearby galaxies (D c (58-419 km s -1 ). For the vast majority of the objects, the derived M . upper limits run parallel and above the well-known M . -σ c relation independently of the galaxy distance, suggesting that our nebular line-width measurements trace rather well the nuclear gravitational potential. For values of σ c between 90 and 220 km s -1 , 68% of our upper limits falls immediately above the M . -σ c relation without exceeding the expected M . values by more than a factor 4.1. No systematic trends or offsets are observed in this σ c range as a function of the galaxy Hubble type or with respect to the presence of a bar. For 6 of our 12 M . upper limits with σ c -1 , our line-width measurements are more sensitive to the stellar contribution to the gravitational potential, either due to the presence of a nuclear stellar cluster or because of a greater distance compared to the other galaxies at the low-σ c end of the M . -σ c relation. Conversely, our M . upper bounds appear to lie closer to the expected M . in the most massive elliptical galaxies with values of σ c above 220 km s -1 . Such a flattening of the M . -σ c relation at its high-σ c end would appear consistent with a coevolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies driven by dry mergers, although better and more consistent measurements for σ c and K-band luminosity are needed for these kinds of objects before systematic effects can be ruled out.

  20. Living with transversal upper limb reduction deficiency: limitations experienced by young adults during their transition to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankhorst, Ilse M F; Baars, Erwin C T; Wijk, Iris van; Janssen, Wim G M; Poelma, Margriet J; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2017-08-01

    During transition to adulthood young adults with disabilities are at risk of experiencing limitations due to changing physical and social requirements. To determine whether young adults with transversal upper limb reduction deficiency (tULRD) have experienced limitations in various domains of participation during transition to adulthood and how they dealt with these limitations. Fifteen participants (mean age 21.4 years) with tULRD. A qualitative study was performed using a semi-structured interview based on the Rotterdam Transition Profile to identify the limitations experienced in participation domains. Almost all the participants reported difficulties in finding a suitable study or job. Most young adults were convinced they were suitable for almost any study or job, but their teachers and potential employers were more reserved. Few difficulties were reported on the domains leisure activities, intimate relationships/sexuality, housing/housekeeping and transportation. Participants preferred to develop their own strategies for dealing with limitations. Various aids, adaptations and prostheses were used to overcome limitations. Rehabilitation teams were infrequently consulted for advice in solving transitional problems. Young adults with tULRD experience limitations mainly in choosing and finding a suitable study or job. Rehabilitation teams may play a more extensive role in supporting individuals with transitional problems. Implications for rehabilitation Most young adults with transversal upper limb reduction deficiency (tULRD) experience limitations in study and job selection during transition to adulthood, but they do not consult the rehabilitation team. Assessment of abilities in relation to job interests and practicing job specific bimanual activities may be helpful for young adults with a tULRD. How the rehabilitation teams can meet the needs of young adults with tULRD during transitional phases, when autonomy is of growing importance, should be investigated

  1. Vegetation dynamics at the upper elevational limit of vascular plants in Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Jiri; Dvorsky, Miroslav; Kopecky, Martin; Liancourt, Pierre; Hiiesalu, Inga; Macek, Martin; Altman, Jan; Chlumska, Zuzana; Rehakova, Klara; Capkova, Katerina; Borovec, Jakub; Mudrak, Ondrej; Wild, Jan; Schweingruber, Fritz

    2016-05-04

    A rapid warming in Himalayas is predicted to increase plant upper distributional limits, vegetation cover and abundance of species adapted to warmer climate. We explored these predictions in NW Himalayas, by revisiting uppermost plant populations after ten years (2003-2013), detailed monitoring of vegetation changes in permanent plots (2009-2012), and age analysis of plants growing from 5500 to 6150 m. Plant traits and microclimate variables were recorded to explain observed vegetation changes. The elevation limits of several species shifted up to 6150 m, about 150 vertical meters above the limit of continuous plant distribution. The plant age analysis corroborated the hypothesis of warming-driven uphill migration. However, the impact of warming interacts with increasing precipitation and physical disturbance. The extreme summer snowfall event in 2010 is likely responsible for substantial decrease in plant cover in both alpine and subnival vegetation and compositional shift towards species preferring wetter habitats. Simultaneous increase in summer temperature and precipitation caused rapid snow melt and, coupled with frequent night frosts, generated multiple freeze-thaw cycles detrimental to subnival plants. Our results suggest that plant species responses to ongoing climate change will not be unidirectional upward range shifts but rather multi-dimensional, species-specific and spatially variable.

  2. Upper limits for stratospheric H2O2 and HOCl from high resolution balloon-borne infrared solar absorption spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, J. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.; Murcray, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    Solar absorption spectra from two stratospheric balloon flights have been analyzed for the presence of H2O2 and HOCl absorption in the 1230.0 to 1255.0 per cm region. The data were recorded at 0.02 per cm resolution during sunset with the University of Denver interferometer system on October 27, 1978 and March 23, 1981. Selected spectral regions were analyzed with the technique of nonlinear least squares spectral curve fitting. Upper limits of 0.33 ppbv for H2O2 and 0.36 ppbv for HOCl near 28 km are derived from the 1978 flight data while upper limits of 0.44 ppbv for H2O2 and 0.43 ppbv for HOCl at 29.5 km are obtained from the 1981 flight data.

  3. 75 FR 37994 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-1A11 (CL-600), CL-600-2A12 (CL-601), CL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... provides data for replacement of the accumulators. The commenter requests that stronger language be... numbers 1004 through 1085 inclusive; (2) Bombardier, Inc. CL-600-2A12 (CL-601) airplanes, serial numbers 3001 through 3066 inclusive; and (3) Bombardier, Inc. CL-600-2B16 (CL-601-3A, CL-601-3R, and CL- 604...

  4. A novel power efficient location-based cooperative routing with transmission power-upper-limit for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Juanfei; Calveras, Anna; Cheng, Ye; Liu, Kai

    2013-05-15

    The extensive usage of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has led to the development of many power- and energy-efficient routing protocols. Cooperative routing in WSNs can improve performance in these types of networks. In this paper we discuss the existing proposals and we propose a routing algorithm for wireless sensor networks called Power Efficient Location-based Cooperative Routing with Transmission Power-upper-limit (PELCR-TP). The algorithm is based on the principle of minimum link power and aims to take advantage of nodes cooperation to make the link work well in WSNs with a low transmission power. In the proposed scheme, with a determined transmission power upper limit, nodes find the most appropriate next nodes and single-relay nodes with the proposed algorithm. Moreover, this proposal subtly avoids non-working nodes, because we add a Bad nodes Avoidance Strategy (BAS). Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm with BAS can significantly improve the performance in reducing the overall link power, enhancing the transmission success rate and decreasing the retransmission rate.

  5. A Novel Power Efficient Location-Based Cooperative Routing with Transmission Power-Upper-Limit for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Juanfei; Calveras, Anna; Cheng, Ye; Liu, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The extensive usage of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has led to the development of many power- and energy-efficient routing protocols. Cooperative routing in WSNs can improve performance in these types of networks. In this paper we discuss the existing proposals and we propose a routing algorithm for wireless sensor networks called Power Efficient Location-based Cooperative Routing with Transmission Power-upper-limit (PELCR-TP). The algorithm is based on the principle of minimum link power and aims to take advantage of nodes cooperation to make the link work well in WSNs with a low transmission power. In the proposed scheme, with a determined transmission power upper limit, nodes find the most appropriate next nodes and single-relay nodes with the proposed algorithm. Moreover, this proposal subtly avoids non-working nodes, because we add a Bad nodes Avoidance Strategy (BAS). Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm with BAS can significantly improve the performance in reducing the overall link power, enhancing the transmission success rate and decreasing the retransmission rate. PMID:23676625

  6. Characteristics of 36ClO3 and 36Cl- uptake into pisum sativum L. seedlings: Limitations and uses of 36CPO3- as an analogue for NO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deane-Drummond, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of 36 Cl 3 - influx and 36 ClO 3 - influx into pisum sativum L.cv. Feltham First seedlings have been investigated. The kinetics of these fluxes at different external substrate concentrations were generated by computer fits to the data, and for 36 Cl - influx apparent Vsub(maxCl - ) and Ksub(m.Cl - ) were 1.62 u mol g - 1 fresh wt. h - l and 0.135 mol m -3 , respectively, (r 2 = 0.90); for 36 ClO 3 - influx apparent Vsub(max ClO 3 - ) and Ksub(m ClO 3 - ) were 15.29 u mol g -1 fresh wt. h - l and 0.69 mol m -3 respectively (r 2 =0.95). When a range of nitrate concentrations were added to 36 ClO 3 - there was no significant difference between NO 3 - or ClO 3 - at low concentrations (0.25 mol m -3 ), but some divergence at higher concentrations. Initial 36 ClO 3 - /NO 3 - influx into P. sativum seedlings was higher than that following extended incubation, which approached that of steady state net nitrate uptake. The difference between 36 ClO 3 - accumulation (J) was used to measure nitrate efflux (E). There was no detectable 36 Cl - efflux when a similar procedure was adopted using 36 Cl - efflux when a similar procedure for J was set by 1, and was stimulated in conditions of N starvation or innoculation with Rhizobium. The rate of substrate cycling (E/1) and the parameter (1 + E/J) were increased in the former case and when a mixed source of N was used in the culture medium, 36 Cl - influx was inhibited by NH 4 + regimes in these experiments. The purported anion blocker diisothiocyanostilbene-2-2' disulphonate (DIDS) inhibited 36 Cl - influx, but in the latter case only that 'induced' by N-starvation. The results are discussed in terms of current models for nitrate uptake. (author)

  7. Intra-Annual Xylem Growth of Larix principis-rupprechtii at Its Upper and Lower Distribution Limits on the Luyashan Mountain in North-Central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Altitude-related climatic factors, especially temperature, are important factors that affect tree growth in mountain forest ecosystems. The aims of this study were to estimate the intra-annual radial growth differences of Larix principis-rupprechtii (L. principis-rupprechtii between its upper and lower distribution limits, at 2740 and 2040 m a.s.l, respectively. Dynamics of xylem growth were observed by collecting microcore samples weekly during the 2011 growth season. The result indicated that different strategies were adopted at the two selected sites. Trees at the upper distribution limit adopted an “intensive strategy” with higher maximum growth rates (0.69 cell·day−1 within a shorter duration of 95 days, producing 21 new tracheids. By contrast, trees at the lower distribution limit exhibited an “extensive strategy” with lower maximum growth rates (0.53 cell·day−1 over a longer duration of 135 days, producing 50 tracheids. The soil temperature was probably the main factor limiting the onset of cambial activity for L. principis-rupprechtii, its daily mean thresholds for onset were 0 °C and 1.4 °C at the upper and lower distribution limits, respectively. These results indicate that L. principis-rupprechtii is able to adjust its xylem growth according to environmental conditions.

  8. An Upper Limit on the Functional Fraction of the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graur, Dan

    2017-07-01

    For the human population to maintain a constant size from generation to generation, an increase in fertility must compensate for the reduction in the mean fitness of the population caused, among others, by deleterious mutations. The required increase in fertility due to this mutational load depends on the number of sites in the genome that are functional, the mutation rate, and the fraction of deleterious mutations among all mutations in functional regions. These dependencies and the fact that there exists a maximum tolerable replacement level fertility can be used to put an upper limit on the fraction of the human genome that can be functional. Mutational load considerations lead to the conclusion that the functional fraction within the human genome cannot exceed 25%, and is probably considerably lower. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. Electrodeposition of Al from a 1-butylpyrrolidine-AlCl3 ionic liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giridhar Pulletikurthi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The addition of 1-butylpyrrolidine to AlCl3 results in the formation of an electrolyte that is suited to Al deposition. The feasibility of electrodepositing Al from the synthesized electrolyte was investigated. Several compositions of AlCl3 and 1-butylpyrrolidine were prepared for this purpose. These mixtures show a different phase behavior at various compositions of AlCl3 and 1-butylpyrrolidine. IR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy were employed to characterize the synthesized liquids. Among the prepared compositions, 1:1.2 mol ratio of 1-butylpyrrolidine:AlCl3 and the upper phase of 1:1.3 mol ratio of 1-butylpyrrolidine:AlCl3 were found to be suitable for Al electrodeposition at room temperature (RT. Uniform and thick (~µm thick layers of Al were obtained on copper at RT. Al deposition occured from the cationic species of AlCl3−xLy+ (where x≤2, y=1–2, and L=1-butylpyrrolidine in this electrolyte. This behavior is contrary to the well investigated classic AlCl3 based ionic liquids, where the deposition of Al occurs mainly from anionic Al2Cl7− ions.

  10. An upper limit to the secular variation of the gravitational constant from white dwarf stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Berro, Enrique; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo; Torres, Santiago [Departament de Física Aplicada, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, c/Esteve Terrades, 5, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Althaus, Leandro G. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Isern, Jordi, E-mail: garcia@fa.upc.edu, E-mail: loren@fa.upc.edu, E-mail: santi@fa.upc.edu, E-mail: althaus@fcaglp.fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: isern@ieec.cat [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    A variation of the gravitational constant over cosmological ages modifies the main sequence lifetimes and white dwarf cooling ages. Using an state-of-the-art stellar evolutionary code we compute the effects of a secularly varying G on the main sequence ages and, employing white dwarf cooling ages computed taking into account the effects of a running G, we place constraints on the rate of variation of Newton's constant. This is done using the white dwarf luminosity function and the distance of the well studied open Galactic cluster NGC 6791. We derive an upper bound Ġ/G ∼ −1.8 × 10{sup −12} yr{sup −1}. This upper limit for the secular variation of the gravitational constant compares favorably with those obtained using other stellar evolutionary properties, and can be easily improved if deep images of the cluster allow to obtain an improved white dwarf luminosity function.

  11. Liquid-vapor equilibrium in LaCl3-LuCl3 and PrCl3-NdCl3 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisel'son, L.A.; Lyzlov, Yu.N.; Solov'ev, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    The liquid-vapour equilibrium in the systems LaCl 3 -LuCl 3 and PrCl 3 -NdCl 3 was studied by the boiling-point method. It was established that the system LaCl 3 -LuCl 3 is near-ideal. In the PrCl 3 -NdCl 3 system, a considerable positive deviation from the ideal with the formation of an azeotrope was detected. The azeotrope has a ''smeared-out'' minimum, which falls on a mixture containing approximately 65 mol.% neodymium trichloride. The boiling point of this mixture at a pressure of 1 mm Hg is approximately 975 deg C. The relative volatility coefficients in both systems were studied by the Raleigh distillation method. The presence of the azeotrope in the system PrCl 3 -NdCl 3 is confirmed by the nature of the dependence of the relative volatility coefficient on the composition of the mixture

  12. New upper limit to the coronal line emission from the T Tauri star RU Lupi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahm, G F [Stockholm Observatory (Sweden); Lago, M T.V.T. [Universidade do Porto (Portugal). Grupo de Matematica Aplicada; Penston, M V [ESTEC, European Space Agency, Villafranca Satellite Tracking Station, Madrid, (Spain)

    1981-05-01

    A high dispersion AAT spectrogram sets an upper limit on the (Fe x) emission line lambda 6374.5 A in the T Tauri star RU Lupi. The intensity of any 10/sup 6/ K corona in this star is less than 600 times that of the Sun compared to a chromosphere and transition region of 3 x 10/sup 3/ to 2 x 10/sup 5/ K gas 10/sup 6/ times stronger than the Sun's. The important theoretical implications are noted.

  13. INTEGRAL Upper Limits on Gamma-Ray Emission Associated with the Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savchenko, V.; Ferrigno, C.; Natalucci, L.

    Using observations of the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), we place upper limits on the gamma-ray and hard X-ray prompt emission associated with the gravitational wave event GW150914, discovered by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration. The omnidirectional view of the INTEGRAL...... MeV energy range for typical spectral models. Our results constrain the ratio of the energy promptly released in gamma-rays in the direction of the observer to the gravitational wave energy Eγ/EGW gravitational wave...

  14. Solid-state phase transitions in CuCl under hydrostatic pressures to 12.8 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebenberg, D.H.; Mills, R.L.; Huang, C.Y.; Olsen, C.; Schmidt, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    The phase transitions in solid CuCl under hydrostatic conditions at pressures to 12.8 GPa are examined. The transition at 4.4 GPa from zinc-blende to tetragonal is observed. Our negative observations for the upper transition at 8.2 GPa and for the formation of an opaque phase due to the disproportionation reaction support the contention that pressure gradients are important in affecting the behavior of pure CuCl

  15. Acute Upper Thermal Limits of Three Aquatic Invasive Invertebrates: Hot Water Treatment to Prevent Upstream Transport of Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Jessica; Moy, Philip; de Stasio, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Transport of aquatic invasive species (AIS) by boats traveling up rivers and streams is an important mechanism of secondary spread of AIS into watersheds. Because physical barriers to AIS movement also prevent navigation, alternate methods for preventing spread are necessary while allowing upstream navigation. One promising approach is to lift boats over physical barriers and then use hot water immersion to kill AIS attached to the hull, motor, or fishing gear. However, few data have been published on the acute upper thermal tolerance limits of potential invaders treated in this manner. To test the potential effectiveness of this approach for a planned boat lift on the Fox River of northeastern WI, USA, acute upper thermal limits were determined for three AIS, adult zebra mussels ( Dreissena polymorpha), quagga mussels ( Dreissena rostriformis bugensis), and spiny water fleas ( Bythotrephes longimanus) from the local area employing temperatures from 32 to 54°C and immersion times from 1 to 20 min. Mortality was determined after immersion followed by a 20-min recovery period. Immersion at 43°C for at least 5 min was required to ensure 100% mortality for all three species, but due to variability in the response by Bythotrephes a 10 min immersion would be more reliable. Overall there were no significant differences between the three species in acute upper thermal limits. Heated water can be an efficient, environmentally sound, and cost effective method of controlling AIS potentially transferred by boats, and our results should have both specific and wide-ranging applications in the prevention of the spread of aquatic invasive species.

  16. Upper limit on the ultrahigh-energy photon flux from AGASA and Yakutsk data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubtsov, G.I.; Dedenko, L.G.; Fedorova, G.F.; Fedunin, E.Yu.; Roganova, T.M.; Glushkov, A.V.; Makarov, I.T.; Pravdin, M.I.; Sleptsov, I.E.; Gorbunov, D.S.; Troitsky, S.V.

    2006-01-01

    We present the interpretation of the muon and scintillation signals of ultrahigh-energy air showers observed by AGASA and Yakutsk extensive air shower array experiments. We consider case-by-case ten highest-energy events with known muon content and conclude that at the 95% confidence level none of them was induced by a primary photon. Taking into account statistical fluctuations and differences in the energy estimation of proton and photon primaries, we derive an upper limit of 36% at a 95% confidence level on the fraction of primary photons in the cosmic-ray flux above 10 20 eV. This result disfavors the Z-burst and superheavy dark-matter solutions to the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin-cutoff problem

  17. Limits on Spin-Dependent WIMP-Nucleon Cross Section Obtained from the Complete LUX Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fallon, S. R.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Velan, V.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.; LUX Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We present experimental constraints on the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon elastic cross sections from the total 129.5 kg yr exposure acquired by the Large Underground Xenon experiment (LUX), operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota (USA). A profile likelihood ratio analysis allows 90% C.L. upper limits to be set on the WIMP-neutron (WIMP-proton) cross section of σn=1.6 ×10-41 cm2 (σp=5 ×10-40 cm2 ) at 35 GeV c-2 , almost a sixfold improvement over the previous LUX spin-dependent results. The spin-dependent WIMP-neutron limit is the most sensitive constraint to date.

  18. Upper Limit in the Periodic Table of Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of rectangular hyperbolas is developed for the first time, by which a means for estimating the upper bound of the Periodic Table is established in calculating that its last element has an atom mass of 411.663243 and an atomic number (the nuclear charge of 155. The formulating law is given.

  19. Additional Explanations to "Upper Limit in Mendeleev’s Periodic Table - Element No.155". A Story How the Problem was Resolved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a survey for the methods how a possible upper limit in Mendeleev's Periodic Table can be found. It is show, only the method of hyperbolas leads to exact answering this question.

  20. Reduction behaviors of Zr for LiCl-KCl-ZrCl4 and LiCl-KCl-ZrCl4-CdCl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Si Hyung; Yoon, Jongho; Kim, Gha Young; Kim, Tack Jin; Shim, Joon Bo; Kim, Kwang Rag; Jung, Jae Hoo; Ahn, Do Hee; Paek, Seungwoo

    2013-01-01

    The reduction potentials of most of the zirconium ions on the solid cathode are smaller (about 0.4V) than that of uranium, and thus zirconium can be recovered prior to uranium during the reduction stage. In the case of a liquid cadmium cathode, which is one of the major cathodes, the reduction potential can be changed because zirconium reacts with the liquid cadmium. Up to now, it has not been well known what the reduction potential of Zr was on the liquid Cd cathode. According to the Cd-Zr phase diagram, there are four intermetallic compounds between cadmium and zirconium. It is easier to use the solid cathode than the liquid cadmium cathode in LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 containing CdCl 2 to identify the formation of the Cd-Zr phase. In this study, the reduction behaviors of zirconium were compared in the LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 and LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 -CdCl 2 solutions when using a solid cathode. The reduction behavior of Zr at a solid W cathode and a Cd-coated W cathode was compared in a LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 solution at 500 .deg. C. It was observed from the results using a solid W cathode that Zr 4+ ions were gradually oxidized to Zr 2+ , Zr, and ZrCl during the reduction sweep, but the final oxidation peak of Zr 2+ to Zr 4+ seemed to be unclear during the oxidation sweep. In the case of the Cd-coated W electrode, only a Cd 2 Zr phase was formed at 500 .deg. C, which seemed to be related to the melting point of Cd-Zr intermetallics. Through additional studies at different temperatures, the formation behavior will be studied

  1. Determination of Cl-36 in Irradiated Reactor Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, H.-F.; Schumann, D.; Stowasser, T.; Hartmann, E.; Kramer, A.

    2016-01-01

    Two of the three research reactors at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the reactors DIORIT and PROTEUS, contained reactor graphite. Whereas the former research reactor DIORIT has been dismantled completely the PROTEUS is subject to a future decommissioning. In case of the DIORIT the reactor graphite was conditioned applying a procedure developed at PSI. In this case the 36 Cl content had to be determined after the conditioning. The result is reported in this paper. The radionuclide inventory including 36 Cl of the graphite used in PROTEUS was measured and the results are reported in here. It has been proven that the graphite from PROTEUS has a radionuclide inventory near the detection limits. All determined radionuclide activities are far below the Swiss exemptions limits. The graphite from PROTEUS therefore poses no radioactive waste. In contrast, the 36 Cl content of graphite from DIORIT is well above the exemption limits. (author)

  2. ?????????? ?????, ?????????? ??????????? ?? ?????????? ?????????? ????? ? ?????? ???????? ZnCl2 +NH4Cl

    OpenAIRE

    Kuntyi, Orest; Zozulya, Galyna

    2010-01-01

    Zinc cementation by magnesium from ZnCl2 + NH4Cl aqueous solutions has been investigated. The amount of magnesium has been established as 0.8?2.0 g per 1 g of conditioned zinc to obtain recovery degree ? 99 %. At low concentrations of Zn2+ ions (0.025?0.1 M ZnCl2) dispersed deposit is formed with nanoparticles of reduced metal; at high concentrations (0.25?0.5 M) coarse-crystalline and fern-shaped deposit is formed. ?????????? ?????????? ????? ??????? ? ?????? ???????? ZnCl2 + NH4Cl. ????????...

  3. Interaction between Posidonia oceanica meadows upper limit and hydrodynamics of four Mediterranean beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Muro, Sandro; Ruju, Andrea; Buosi, Carla; Porta, Marco; Passarella, Marinella; Ibba, Angelo

    2017-04-01

    Posidonia oceanica meadow is considered to play an important role in the coastal geomorphology of Mediterranean beach systems. In particular, the importance of the meadow in protecting the coastline from erosion is well-recognized. Waves are attenuated by greater friction across seagrass meadows, which have the capacity to reduce water flow and therefore increase sediment deposition and accumulation as well as beach stability. The P. oceanica meadow upper limit usually occurs within the most dynamic zone of the beach system. Considering the great attention paid in the literature to the connection between the growth of P. oceanica and coastal hydrodynamics (Infantes et al., 2009; Vacchi et al., 2014; De Muro et al., 2016, 2017), this study aims at extending the previous work by investigating the combined influence of hydrodynamic parameters (e.g., wave-induced main currents and wave orbital velocity at the bottom) and different types of sea bottom (e.g., soft sediment, rocky substrates) on the position of the upper limit of the P. oceanica meadow. We applied this approach to 4 Mediterranean beach systems located on the Sardinian coastline (3 on the South and 1 on the North) and characterized by a wide range of orientations and incoming wave conditions. On these beaches, the extension of the P. oceanica meadows and the bathymetry have been obtained through detailed surveying campaigns and aerial photo analysis. In addition, high spatial resolution wave hydrodynamics have been reconstructed by running numerical simulations with Delft 3D. Offshore wave climate has been reconstructed by using measured datasets for those beaches that have a nearby buoy whose dataset is representative of the incoming wave conditions for that particular stretch of coast. Whereas, for those beaches with no availability of a representative measured dataset, wave climate has been analyzed from the NOAA hindcast dataset. From the whole range of incoming wave directions in deep waters, we

  4. New Horizons Upper Limits on O{sub 2} in Pluto’s Present Day Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammer, J. A.; Gladstone, G. R. [Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Stern, S. A.; Young, L. A.; Steffl, A. J.; Olkin, C. B. [Southwest Research Institute Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Weaver, H. A. [Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Ennico, K., E-mail: jkammer@swri.edu [NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Collaboration: New Horizons Atmospheres and Alice UV Spectrograph Teams

    2017-08-01

    The surprising discovery by the Rosetta spacecraft of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko challenged our understanding of the inventory of this volatile species on and inside bodies from the Kuiper Belt. That discovery motivated our search for oxygen in the atmosphere of Kuiper Belt planet Pluto, because O{sub 2} is volatile even at Pluto’s surface temperatures. During the New Horizons flyby of Pluto in 2015 July, the spacecraft probed the composition of Pluto’s atmosphere using a variety of observations, including an ultraviolet solar occultation observed by the Alice UV spectrograph. As described in these reports, absorption by molecular species in Pluto’s atmosphere yielded detections of N{sub 2}, as well as hydrocarbon species such as CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Our work here further examines this data to search for UV absorption from molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}), which has a significant cross-section in the Alice spectrograph bandpass. We find no evidence for O{sub 2} absorption and place an upper limit on the total amount of O{sub 2} in Pluto’s atmosphere as a function of tangent height up to 700 km. In most of the atmosphere, this upper limit in line-of-sight abundance units is ∼3 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}, which, depending on tangent height, corresponds to a mixing ratio of 10{sup −6} to 10{sup −4}, far lower than in comet 67P/CG.

  5. Seasonal dynamics of mobile carbon supply in Quercus aquifolioides at the upper elevational limit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Ze Zhu

    Full Text Available Many studies have tried to explain the physiological mechanisms of the alpine treeline phenomenon, but the debate on the alpine treeline formation remains controversial due to opposite results from different studies. The present study explored the carbon-physiology of an alpine shrub species (Quercus aquifolioides grown at its upper elevational limit compared to lower elevations, to test whether the elevational limit of alpine shrubs (<3 m in height are determined by carbon limitation or growth limitation. We studied the seasonal variations in non-structural carbohydrate (NSC and its pool size in Q. aquifolioides grown at 3000 m, 3500 m, and at its elevational limit of 3950 m above sea level (a.s.l. on Zheduo Mt., SW China. The tissue NSC concentrations along the elevational gradient varied significantly with season, reflecting the season-dependent carbon balance. The NSC levels in tissues were lowest at the beginning of the growing season, indicating that plants used the winter reserve storage for re-growth in the early spring. During the growing season, plants grown at the elevational limit did not show lower NSC concentrations compared to plants at lower elevations, but during the winter season, storage tissues, especially roots, had significantly lower NSC concentrations in plants at the elevational limit compared to lower elevations. The present results suggest the significance of winter reserve in storage tissues, which may determine the winter survival and early-spring re-growth of Q. aquifolioides shrubs at high elevation, leading to the formation of the uppermost distribution limit. This result is consistent with a recent hypothesis for the alpine treeline formation.

  6. Experimentally reducing clutch size reveals a fixed upper limit to egg size in snakes, evidence from the king ratsnake, Elaphe carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiang; Du, Wei-Guo; Li, Hong; Lin, Long-Hui

    2006-08-01

    Snakes are free of the pelvic girdle's constraint on maximum offspring size, and therefore present an opportunity to investigate the upper limit to offspring size without the limit imposed by the pelvic girdle dimension. We used the king ratsnake (Elaphe carinata) as a model animal to examine whether follicle ablation may result in enlargement of egg size in snakes and, if so, whether there is a fixed upper limit to egg size. Females with small sized yolking follicles were assigned to three manipulated, one sham-manipulated and one control treatments in mid-May, and two, four or six yolking follicles in the manipulated females were then ablated. Females undergoing follicle ablation produced fewer, but larger as well as more elongated, eggs than control females primarily by increasing egg length. This finding suggests that follicle ablation may result in enlargement of egg size in E. carinata. Mean values for egg width remained almost unchanged across the five treatments, suggesting that egg width is more likely to be shaped by the morphological feature of the oviduct. Clutch mass dropped dramatically in four- and six-follicle ablated females. The function describing the relationship between size and number of eggs reveals that egg size increases with decreasing clutch size at an ever-decreasing rate, with the tangent slope of the function for the six-follicle ablation treatment being -0.04. According to the function describing instantaneous variation in tangent slope, the maximum value of tangent slope should converge towards zero. This result provides evidence that there is a fixed upper limit to egg size in E. carinata.

  7. Heterogeneous upper-bound finite element limit analysis of masonry walls out-of-plane loaded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, G.; Zuccarello, F. A.; Olivito, R. S.; Tralli, A.

    2007-11-01

    A heterogeneous approach for FE upper bound limit analyses of out-of-plane loaded masonry panels is presented. Under the assumption of associated plasticity for the constituent materials, mortar joints are reduced to interfaces with a Mohr Coulomb failure criterion with tension cut-off and cap in compression, whereas for bricks both limited and unlimited strength are taken into account. At each interface, plastic dissipation can occur as a combination of out-of-plane shear, bending and torsion. In order to test the reliability of the model proposed, several examples of dry-joint panels out-of-plane loaded tested at the University of Calabria (Italy) are discussed. Numerical results are compared with experimental data for three different series of walls at different values of the in-plane compressive vertical loads applied. The comparisons show that reliable predictions of both collapse loads and failure mechanisms can be obtained by means of the numerical procedure employed.

  8. Study on the P-odd asymmetry of longitudinally polarized neutron transmission in 117Sn, 233Th, 239Pu isotopes and natural mixture of Cl and Pb isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abov, Yu.G.; Ermakov, O.N.; Karpikhin, I.L.; Krupchitskij, P.A.; Kuznetsov, Yu.Eh.; Perepelitsa, V.F.; Petrushin, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    The results of measurements of P-odd helicity dependence of the total cross-section a=(σsub(tot)sup(+)-σsub(tot)sup(-))/(σsub(tot)sup(+)+σsub(tot)sup(-)) for thermal neutrons on several targets are presented. The result for 117 Sn is a=(11.2+-2.6)x10 -6 . The upper limits for a in the region of several units of 10 -6 are obtained for 232 Th, 239 Pu, Cl (natural) and Pb (natural)

  9. Kinetic isotope effects in the gas phase reactions of OH and Cl with CH3Cl, CD3Cl, and 13CH3Cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gola

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic isotope effects in the reactions of CH3Cl, 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH radicals and Cl atoms were studied in relative rate experiments at 298±2 K and 1013±10 mbar. The reactions were carried out in a smog chamber using long path FTIR detection and the spectroscopic data analyzed employing a non-linear least squares spectral fitting method using measured high-resolution infrared spectra as well as absorption cross sections from the HITRAN database. The reaction rates of 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH and Cl were determined relative to CH3Cl as: kOH+CH3ClkOH+CH3Cl/kOH+13CH3Cl}kOH+13CH3Cl=1.059±0.008, kOH+CH3ClkOH+CH3Cl/kOH+CD3ClkOH+CD3Cl=3.9±0.4, kCl+CH3ClkCl+CH3Cl/kCl+13CH3ClkCl+13CH3Cl =1.070±0.010 and kCl+CH3ClkCl+CH3Cl/kCl+CD3ClkCl+CD3Cl=4.91±0.07. The uncertainties given are 2σ from the statistical analyses and do not include possible systematic errors. The unexpectedly large 13C kinetic isotope effect in the OH reaction of CH3Cl has important implications for the global emission inventory of CH3Cl.

  10. Upper-limit on the Advanced Virgo output mode cleaner cavity length noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnand, R.; Ducrot, M.; Gouaty, R.; Marion, F.; Masserot, A.; Mours, B.; Pacaud, E.; Rolland, L.; Was, M.

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Virgo detector uses two monolithic optical cavities at its output port to suppress higher order modes and radio frequency sidebands from the carrier light used for gravitational wave detection. These two cavities in series form the output mode cleaner. We present a measured upper limit on the length noise of these cavities that is consistent with the thermo-refractive noise prediction of 8×10-16~m~Hz-1/2 at 15 Hz. The cavity length is controlled using Peltier cells and piezo-electric actuators to maintain resonance on the incoming light. A length lock precision of 3.5×10-13 m is achieved. These two results are combined to demonstrate that the broadband length noise of the output mode cleaner in the 10-60 Hz band is at least a factor 10 below other expected noise sources in the Advanced Virgo detector design configuration.

  11. Electrochemical characterisation of CaCl2 deficient LiCl-KCl-CaCl2 eutectic melt and electro-deoxidation of solid UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri Maha Vishnu, D.; Sanil, N.; Mohandas, K. S.; Nagarajan, K.

    2016-03-01

    The CaCl2 deficient ternary eutectic melt LiCl-KCl-CaCl2 (50.5: 44.2: 5.3 mol %) was electrochemically characterised by cyclic voltammetry and polarization techniques in the context of its probable use as the electrolyte in the electrochemical reduction of solid UO2 to uranium metal. Tungsten (cathodic polarization) and graphite (anodic polarization) working electrodes were used in these studies carried out in the temperature range 623 K-923 K. The cathodic limit of the melt was observed to be set by the deposition of Ca2+ ions followed by Li+ ions on the tungsten electrode and the anodic limit by oxidation of chloride ions on the graphite electrode (chlorine evolution). The difference between the onset potential of deposition of Ca2+ and Li+ was found to be 0.241 V at a scan rate of 20 mV/s at 623 K and the difference decreased with increase in temperature and vanished at 923 K. Polarization measurements with stainless steel (SS) cathode and graphite anode at 673 K showed the possibility of low-energy reactions occurring on the UO2 electrode in the melt. UO2 pellets were cathodically polarized at 3.9 V for 25 h to test the feasibility of electro-reduction to uranium in the melt. The surface of the pellets was found reduced to U metal.

  12. A New Limit on CMB Circular Polarization from SPIDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, J. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bergman, A. S.; Bihary, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Doré, O.; Duivenvoorden, A. J.; Eriksen, H. K.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, J. P.; Fissel, L. M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Freese, K.; Galloway, M.; Gambrel, A. E.; Gandilo, N. N.; Ganga, K.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hartley, J.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G.; Holmes, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Huang, Z.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kuo, C. L.; Kermish, Z. D.; Li, S.; Mason, P. V.; Megerian, K.; Moncelsi, L.; Morford, T. A.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nolta, M.; Padilla, I. L.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Ruud, T. M.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Song, X.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Van Der List, J. F.; Weber, A. C.; Wehus, I. K.; Wiebe, D. V.; Young, E. Y.

    2017-08-01

    We present a new upper limit on cosmic microwave background (CMB) circular polarization from the 2015 flight of Spider, a balloon-borne telescope designed to search for B-mode linear polarization from cosmic inflation. Although the level of circular polarization in the CMB is predicted to be very small, experimental limits provide a valuable test of the underlying models. By exploiting the nonzero circular-to-linear polarization coupling of the half-wave plate polarization modulators, data from Spider's 2015 Antarctic flight provide a constraint on Stokes V at 95 and 150 GHz in the range 33< {\\ell }< 307. No other limits exist over this full range of angular scales, and Spider improves on the previous limit by several orders of magnitude, providing 95% C.L. constraints on {\\ell }({\\ell }+1){C}{\\ell }{VV}/(2π ) ranging from 141 to 255 μK2 at 150 GHz for a thermal CMB spectrum. As linear CMB polarization experiments become increasingly sensitive, the techniques described in this paper can be applied to obtain even stronger constraints on circular polarization.

  13. A New Limit on CMB Circular Polarization from SPIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, J. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bergman, A. S.; Bihary, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Doré, O.; Duivenvoorden, A. J.; Eriksen, H. K.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, J. P.; Fissel, L. M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Freese, K.; Galloway, M.; Gambrel, A. E.; Gandilo, N. N.; Ganga, K.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hartley, J.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G.; Holmes, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Huang, Z.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kuo, C. L.; Kermish, Z. D.; Li, S.; Mason, P. V.; Megerian, K.; Moncelsi, L.; Morford, T. A.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nolta, M.; Padilla, I. L.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Ruud, T. M.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Song, X.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; List, J. F. Van Der; Weber, A. C.; Wehus, I. K.; Wiebe, D. V.; Young, E. Y.

    2017-08-01

    We present a new upper limit on CMB circular polarization from the 2015 flight of SPIDER, a balloon-borne telescope designed to search for $B$-mode linear polarization from cosmic inflation. Although the level of circular polarization in the CMB is predicted to be very small, experimental limits provide a valuable test of the underlying models. By exploiting the non-zero circular-to-linear polarization coupling of the HWP polarization modulators, data from SPIDER's 2015 Antarctic flight provides a constraint on Stokes $V$ at 95 and 150 GHz from $33<\\ell<307$. No other limits exist over this full range of angular scales, and SPIDER improves upon the previous limit by several orders of magnitude, providing 95% C.L. constraints on $\\ell (\\ell+1)C_{\\ell}^{VV}/(2\\pi)$ ranging from 141 $\\mu K ^2$ to 203 $\\mu K ^2$ at 150 GHz for a thermal CMB spectrum. As linear CMB polarization experiments become increasingly sensitive, the techniques described in this paper can be applied to obtain stronger constraints on circular polarization.

  14. Biodegradation of the High Explosive Hexanitrohexaazaiso-wurtzitane (CL-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Nicolich

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aerobic biodegradability of the high explosive CL-20 by activated sludge and the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been investigated. Although activated sludge is not effective in degrading CL-20 directly, it can mineralize the alkaline hydrolysis products. Phanerochaete chrysosporium degrades CL-20 in the presence of supplementary carbon and nitrogen sources. Biodegradation studies were conducted using various nutrient media under diverse conditions. Variables included the CL-20 concentration; levels of carbon (as glycerol and ammonium sulfate and yeast extract as sources of nitrogen. Cultures that received CL-20 at the time of inoculation transformed CL-20 completely under all nutrient conditions studied. When CL-20 was added to pre-grown cultures, degradation was limited. The extent of mineralization was monitored by the 14CO2 time evolution; up to 51% mineralization was achieved when the fungus was incubated with [14C]-CL-20. The kinetics of CL-20 biodegradation by Phanerochaete chrysosporium follows the logistic kinetic growth model.

  15. INTEGRAL Upper Limits on Gamma-Ray Emission Associated with the Gravitational Wave Event GW150914

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savchenko, V.; Ferrigno, C.; Mereghetti, S.

    2016-01-01

    Using observations of the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), we place upper limits on the gamma-ray and hard X-ray prompt emission associated with the gravitational wave event GW150914, which was discovered by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration. The omnidirectional view...... in the 75 keV-2 MeV energy range for typical spectral models. Our results constrain the ratio of the energy promptly released in gamma-rays in the direction of the observer to the gravitational wave energy Eγ/EGW ... of the gravitational wave source, based on the available predictions for prompt electromagnetic emission....

  16. New age- and sex-specific criteria for QT prolongation based on rate correction formulas that minimize bias at the upper normal limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautaharju, Pentti M; Mason, Jay W; Akiyama, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    Existing formulas for rate-corrected QT (QTc) commonly fail to properly adjust the upper normal limits which are more critical than the mean QTc for evaluation of prolonged QT. Age- and sex-related differences in QTc are also often overlooked. Our goal was to establish criteria for prolonged QTc using formulas that minimize QTc bias at the upper normal limits. Strict criteria were used in selecting a study group of 57,595 persons aged 5 to 89 years (54% women) and to exclude electrocardiograms (ECG) with possible disease-associated changes. Two QT rate adjustment formulas were identified which both minimized rate-dependency in the 98 th percentile limits: QTcmod, based on an electrophysiological model (QTcMod = QTx(120 + HR)/180)), and QTcLogLin, a power function of the RR interval with exponents 0.37 for men and 0.38 for women. QTc shortened in men during adolescence and QTcMod became 13 ms shorter than in women at age 20-29 years. The sex difference was maintained through adulthood although decreasing with age. The criteria established for prolonged QTc were: Age < 40 years, men 430 ms, women 440 ms; Age 40 to 69, men 440 ms, women 450 ms; Age ≥ 70 years, men 455 ms, and women 460 ms. Sex difference in QTc originates from shortened QT in adolescent males. Upper normal limits for QTc vary substantially by age and sex, and it is essential to use age- and sex-specific criteria for evaluation of QT prolongation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Maximum time-dependent space-charge limited diode currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griswold, M. E. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Fisch, N. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Recent papers claim that a one dimensional (1D) diode with a time-varying voltage drop can transmit current densities that exceed the Child-Langmuir (CL) limit on average, apparently contradicting a previous conjecture that there is a hard limit on the average current density across any 1D diode, as t → ∞, that is equal to the CL limit. However, these claims rest on a different definition of the CL limit, namely, a comparison between the time-averaged diode current and the adiabatic average of the expression for the stationary CL limit. If the current were considered as a function of the maximum applied voltage, rather than the average applied voltage, then the original conjecture would not have been refuted.

  18. High 36Cl/Cl ratios in Chernobyl groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, Céline; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Simonucci, Caroline; Van Meir, Nathalie; Fifield, L. Keith; Diez, Olivier; Bassot, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    After the explosion of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in April 1986, contaminated material was buried in shallow trenches within the exclusion zone. A 90 Sr plume was evidenced downgradient of one of these trenches, trench T22. Due to its conservative properties, 36 Cl is investigated here as a potential tracer to determine the maximal extent of the contamination plume from the trench in groundwater. 36 Cl/Cl ratios measured in groundwater, trench soil water and leaf leachates are 1–5 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical natural 36 Cl/Cl ratio. This contamination occurred after the Chernobyl explosion and currently persists. Trench T22 acts as an obvious modern point source of 36 Cl, however other sources have to be involved to explain such contamination. 36 Cl contamination of groundwater can be explained by dilution of trench soil water by uncontaminated water (rainwater or deep groundwater). With a plume extending further than that of 90 Sr, radionuclide which is impacted by retention and decay processes, 36 Cl can be considered as a suitable tracer of contamination from the trench in groundwater provided that modern release processes of 36 Cl from trench soil are better characterized. - Highlights: • High 36 Cl/Cl ratios measured in the Chernobyl Pilot Site groundwater. • Trench T22 acts as a modern source of groundwater contamination by 36 Cl but other sources are involved. • Contamination results from dilution of a contaminated “T22” soil water with rainwater. • Processes involved in the modern release need to be investigated

  19. The upper limits of the SNR in radiography and CT with polyenergetic x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the upper limits of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in radiography and computed tomography (CT) with polyenergetic x-ray sources. In x-ray imaging, monoenergetic x-rays provide a higher SNR compared to polyenergetic x-rays. However, the SNR in polyenergetic x-ray imaging can be increased when a photon-counting detector is used and x-rays are optimally weighted according to their energies. For a particular contrast/background combination and at a fixed x-ray entrance skin exposure, the SNR in energy-weighting x-ray imaging depends on tube voltage and can be maximized by selecting the optimal tube voltage. The SNR in energy-weighted x-ray images acquired at this optimal tube voltage is the highest SNR that can be achieved with polyenergetic x-ray sources. The optimal tube voltages and the highest SNR were calculated and compared to the SNR of monoenergetic x-ray imaging. Monoenergetic, energy-weighting polyenergetic and energy-integrating polyenergetic x-ray imagings were simulated at a fixed entrance skin exposure of 20 mR. The tube voltages varied in the range of 30-140 kVp with 10 kV steps. Contrast elements of CaCO 3 , iodine, adipose and tumor with thicknesses of 280 mg cm -2 , 15 mg cm -2 , 1 g cm -2 and 1 g cm -2 , respectively, inserted in a soft tissue background with 10 cm and 20 cm thicknesses, were used. The energy weighting also improves the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in CT when monoenergetic CT projections are optimally weighted prior to CT reconstruction (projection-based weighting). Alternatively, monoenergetic CT images are reconstructed, optimally weighted and composed to yield a final CT image (image-based weighting). Both projection-based and image-based weighting methods improve the CNR in CT. An analytical approach was used to determine which of these two weighting methods provides the upper limit of the CNR in CT. The energy-weighting method was generalized and expanded as a weighting method applicable in

  20. LASER RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS (BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS): Conversion of KrCl and XeCl laser radiation to the visible spectral range by stimulated Raman scattering in lead vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtushenko, Gennadii S.; Mel'chenko, S. V.; Panchenko, Aleksei N.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.

    1990-04-01

    Conversion of KrCl and XeCl laser radiation by stimulated Raman scattering was achieved in lead vapor. The KrCl laser radiation was converted into three lines in the visible region at λ = 406, 590, and 723 nm by transitions from both the ground and first excited levels of the lead atom. The conversion efficiency of XeCl laser radiation of low spatial coherence was found to be limited by the activation of a competing nonlinear process.

  1. Surface structure and reaction property of CuCl2-PdCl2 bimetallic catalyst in methanol oxycarbonylation: A DFT approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Qingsen; Wang, Shengping; Shen, Yongli; Yan, Bing; Wu, Yuanxin; Ma, Xinbin

    2014-01-01

    Surface structure of CuCl 2 -PdCl 2 bimetallic catalyst (Wacker-type catalyst) was built employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and the reaction mechanism of methanol oxycarbonylation over the CuCl 2 -PdCl 2 surfaces was also investigated. On the CuCl 2 -PdCl 2 surface, the active site for methanol oxidation was confirmed as Cu-Cl-Cu (Pd). Comparing with pure CuCl 2 surface, the introduction of Pd atom causes the electron repopulation on the surface and lowers the energy barrier for methanol oxidation, but the number of the active site decreases with the increasing of Pd doping volume. Agreed with previous experimental results, the Pd site is most favorable for the CO insertion, indicated by the lowest activation barrier for the formation of COOCH 3 on Pd atom. The lowest energy barrier for the formation of DMC appears when COOCH 3 species adsorbed on Pd atom and methoxyl adsorbed on Cu atoms, which is 0.42 eV. Finally, the reconstruction of the unsaturated surface is a spontaneous and exothermic process. Comparing with other surfaces, the rate-limiting step, methanol oxidation, on CuCl 2 -PdCl 2 surface with Pd/Cu = 1:17 has the lowest energy barrier, which is agreed with the experimental observation that PdCl 2 -CuCl 2 catalyst with Pd/Cu = 1:20 has the favorable activity. The adsorbed methoxyl will further lower the activation barrier of methanol oxidation, which is agreed with experimental observation that the Wacker-type catalysts have an induction period in the methanol oxidative carbonylation system.

  2. Raman spectra of the system TeCl4-SbCl5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockner, W.; Demiray, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Raman spectra of the solid and molten TeCl 4 . SbCl 5 addition compound and of some TeCl 4 -SbCl 5 mixtures have been recorded. Two modifications of the crystalline TeCl 4 -SbCl 5 compound have been found. The structure of the melt can be described by the equilibrium TeCl 3 + + SbCl 6 - reversible TeCl 4 + SbCl 5 lying on the left side. Mixtures with other stoichiometry contain the 1:1 adduct only and excess TeCl 4 or SbCl 5 , respectively. Such melts are built up by the ionic species TeCl 3 + and SbCl 6 - also and TeCl 4 or SbCl 5 according to stoichiometry. (author)

  3. Effect of pH Upper Control Limit on Nutrient Solution Component and Water Spinach Growth under Hydroponics

    OpenAIRE

    Xuzhang Xue; Yinkun Li; Feng Li; Fang Zhang; Wenzhong Guo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, experiment with four levels of nutrient solution pH control upper limit was conducted to explore the optimal nutrient solution pH management scheme under hydroponics by evaluating the nutrient solution characters i.e., pH, Electric Conductivity (EC), nitrate, soluble phosphorus (soluble-P), water spinach growth and quality. The results showed that the nutrient solution pH was 8.2 and unsuitable for water spinach growth under the treatment with no pH regulation during the experi...

  4. Upper Limits on a Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background Using LIGO and Virgo Interferometers at 600-1000 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; hide

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of omega(sub GW)(f) = omega(sub 3) (f/900Hz)3, of omega(sub 3) < 0.33, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of h(sub 100) = 0.72. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

  5. Determination of 36Cl in nuclear waste from reactor decommissioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Frøsig, Lars; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2007-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of Cl-36 in nuclear waste such as graphite, heavy concrete, steel, aluminum, and lead was developed. Several methods were investigated for decomposing the samples. AgCl precipitation was used to separate Cl-36 from the matrix elements, followed by ion......-exchange chromatography to remove interfering radionuclides. The purified Cl-36 was then measured by liquid scintillation counting. The chemical yield of chlorine, as measured by ICPMS, is above 70% and the decontamination factors for all interfering radionuclides are greater than 10(6). The detection limit...

  6. High (36)Cl/Cl ratios in Chernobyl groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Céline; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Simonucci, Caroline; Van Meir, Nathalie; Fifield, L Keith; Diez, Olivier; Bassot, Sylvain; Simler, Roland; Bugai, Dmitri; Kashparov, Valery; Lancelot, Joël

    2014-12-01

    After the explosion of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in April 1986, contaminated material was buried in shallow trenches within the exclusion zone. A (90)Sr plume was evidenced downgradient of one of these trenches, trench T22. Due to its conservative properties, (36)Cl is investigated here as a potential tracer to determine the maximal extent of the contamination plume from the trench in groundwater. (36)Cl/Cl ratios measured in groundwater, trench soil water and leaf leachates are 1-5 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical natural (36)Cl/Cl ratio. This contamination occurred after the Chernobyl explosion and currently persists. Trench T22 acts as an obvious modern point source of (36)Cl, however other sources have to be involved to explain such contamination. (36)Cl contamination of groundwater can be explained by dilution of trench soil water by uncontaminated water (rainwater or deep groundwater). With a plume extending further than that of (90)Sr, radionuclide which is impacted by retention and decay processes, (36)Cl can be considered as a suitable tracer of contamination from the trench in groundwater provided that modern release processes of (36)Cl from trench soil are better characterized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reactions UF{sub 4} - ClF, UF{sub 4} - ClF{sub 3}, UF{sub 5} - ClF, UF{sub 5} - ClF{sub 3}; Reactions UF{sub 4} - ClF, UF{sub 4} - ClF{sub 3}, UF{sub 5} - ClF, UF{sub 5} - ClF{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luce, M; Benoit, R; Hartmanshenn, O [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The reaction between ClF{sub 3} and UF{sub 4} is partially explained by the study of the reactions of the three systems: UF{sub 4}-ClF, UF{sub 5}-ClF and UF{sub 5}-ClF{sub 3}. The analytical techniques used are: the micro-sublimation, the infra-red spectroscopy and the thermogravimetry. The origin of the by-products is indicated. (authors) [French] La reaction entre ClF{sub 3} et UF{sub 4} est partiellement expliquee grace a l'etude des reactions des trois systemes UF{sub 4}-ClF, UF{sub 5}-ClF et UF{sub 5}-ClF{sub 3}. Les techniques analytiques utilisees sont: la micro-sublimation, la spectroscopie infrarouge et la thermogravimetrie. L'origine des sous-produits est indiquee. (auteurs)

  8. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the Φ--(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egiyan, H.; Langheinrich, J.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Holtrop, M.; Lu, H.; Mattione, P.; Mutchler, G.; Park, K.; Smith, E. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Zhao, Z. W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Contalbrigo, M.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; de Vita, R.; de Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niculescu, G.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.

    2012-01-01

    We searched for the Φ--(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the Ξ-π--decay channel using CLAS. The invariant-mass spectrum of the Ξ-π- system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M=1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90%-confidence-level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of Φ--(1860) with a consecutive decay into Ξ-π- in the photon-energy range 4.5GeV

  9. 36Cl AMS measurement with 3 MV tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huijuan; Guan Yongjing; Zhang Wei; Jiang Shan; He Ming

    2012-01-01

    Developing the 36 Cl and other medium heavy isotopes measurement at 3 MV AMS facilities is one of the vital trends in AMS measurement. To further increase suppression factor of 36 S, the energy loss straggling and angular straggling of 36 C1 and 36 S ions in various counter gases (Pl0, isobutane and propane) were investigated. Some water samples were measured with the energy of 32 MeV, the results are in good agreement with the result by ion energy of 72 MeV. The results indicate that the detection limit of 36 C1 with 3 MV AMS facility is approximately 36 Cl/Cl ≈ l0 -14 , and the uncertainty is 30% for the sample with isotopic ration 36 Cl/Cl ≈ lO -13 . (authors)

  10. Implications from the upper limit of radio afterglow emission of FRB 131104/Swift J0644.5-5111

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    A $\\gamma$-ray transient, Swift J0644.5-5111, has been claimed to be associated with FRB 131104. The $\\gamma$-ray energy output is estimated as $E_\\gamma \\approx 5\\times 10^{51}$\\,erg at the nominal $z\\approx 0.55$ redshift implied by the dispersion measure of FRB 131104. However, a long-term radio imaging follow-up observations only place an upper limit on the radio afterglow flux of Swift J0644.5-5111. Applying the external shock model, we make a detailed constraint on the afterglow paramet...

  11. Upper and lower limits of the proton stoichiometry of cytochrome c oxidation in rat liver mitoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynafarje, B; Costa, L E; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-25

    The stoichiometry of vectorial H+ translocation coupled to oxidation of added ferrocytochrome c by O2 via cytochrome-c oxidase of rat liver mitoplasts was determined employing a fast-responding O2 electrode. Electron flow was initiated by addition of either ferrocytochrome c or O2. When the rates were extrapolated to level flow, the H+/O ratios in both cases were less than but closely approached 4; the directly observed H+/O ratios significantly exceeded 3.0. The mechanistic H+/O ratio was then more closely fixed by a kinetic approach that eliminates the necessity for measuring energy leaks and is independent of any particular model of the mechanism of energy transduction. From two sets of kinetic measurements, an overestimate and an underestimate and thus the upper and lower limits of the mechanistic H+/O ratio could be obtained. In the first set, the utilization of respiratory energy was systematically varied through changes in the concentrations of valinomycin or K+. From the slope of a plot of the initial rates of H+ ejection (JH) and O2 uptake (JO) obtained in such experiments, the upper limit of the H+/O ratio was in the range 4.12-4.19. In the second set of measurements, the rate of respiratory energy production was varied by inhibiting electron transport. From the slope of a plot of JH versus JO, the lower limit of the H+/O ratio, equivalent to that at level flow, was in the range 3.83-3.96. These data fix the mechanistic H+/O ratio for the cytochrome oxidase reaction of mitoplasts at 4.0, thus confirming our earlier measurements (Reynafarje, B., Alexandre, A., Davies, P., and Lehninger, A. L. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 7218-7222). Possible reasons for discrepancies in published reports on the H+/O ratio of cytochrome oxidase in various mitochondrial and reconstituted systems are discussed.

  12. The crystal structure of TeCl3+AuCl4-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.G.; Jentsch, D.; Schwarzmann, E.

    1986-01-01

    TeCl 3 + AuCl 4 - crystallizes in the triclinic space group Panti 1 with a=7.564(2), b=7.720(3), c=8.964(3) A, α=78.26(3), β=88.84(3), γ=89.35(3) 0 , Z=2. The structure was refined to R 0.041 for 1380 reflections. The cation polyhedron, including secondary Te...Cl interactions, is a square pyramid with mean Te-Cl 2.294, Te...Cl 3.028 A. The secondary interactions link the ions to form centrosymmetric (TeCl 3 .AuCl 4 ) 2 dimers. (orig.)

  13. Physiologic upper limits of pore size of different blood capillary types and another perspective on the dual pore theory of microvascular permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Hemant

    2010-08-11

    Much of our current understanding of microvascular permeability is based on the findings of classic experimental studies of blood capillary permeability to various-sized lipid-insoluble endogenous and non-endogenous macromolecules. According to the classic small pore theory of microvascular permeability, which was formulated on the basis of the findings of studies on the transcapillary flow rates of various-sized systemically or regionally perfused endogenous macromolecules, transcapillary exchange across the capillary wall takes place through a single population of small pores that are approximately 6 nm in diameter; whereas, according to the dual pore theory of microvascular permeability, which was formulated on the basis of the findings of studies on the accumulation of various-sized systemically or regionally perfused non-endogenous macromolecules in the locoregional tissue lymphatic drainages, transcapillary exchange across the capillary wall also takes place through a separate population of large pores, or capillary leaks, that are between 24 and 60 nm in diameter. The classification of blood capillary types on the basis of differences in the physiologic upper limits of pore size to transvascular flow highlights the differences in the transcapillary exchange routes for the transvascular transport of endogenous and non-endogenous macromolecules across the capillary walls of different blood capillary types. The findings and published data of studies on capillary wall ultrastructure and capillary microvascular permeability to lipid-insoluble endogenous and non-endogenous molecules from the 1950s to date were reviewed. In this study, the blood capillary types in different tissues and organs were classified on the basis of the physiologic upper limits of pore size to the transvascular flow of lipid-insoluble molecules. Blood capillaries were classified as non-sinusoidal or sinusoidal on the basis of capillary wall basement membrane layer continuity or lack thereof

  14. Applying Adjacent Hyperbolas to Calculation of the Upper Limit of the Periodic Table of Elements, with Use of Rhodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the earlier study (Khazan A. Upper Limit in Mendeleev's Periodic Table - Element No.155. 2nd ed., Svenska fysikarkivet, Stockholm, 2010 the author showed how Rhodium can be applied to the hyperbolic law of the Periodic Table of Elements in order to calculate, with high precision, all other elements conceivable in the Table. Here we obtain the same result, with use of fraction linear functions (adjacent hyperbolas.

  15. Upper limits of a cosmic infrared background flux as determined by X- and gamma-ray observations on M87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Cambridge Univ.; Harwit, M.; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY

    1982-01-01

    Upper limits on the energy density of infrared photons in the radio lobe regions of M87 are derived using measurements of the X-ray and gamma-ray emission. The calculations are based on an inverse Compton scattering model initiated by radio-flux producing electrons. It is shown that the energy density of infrared photons in the radio lobe regions is similar than 2 eV cm -3 . (orig.)

  16. Nearly half of the adolescents in an Italian school-based study exceeded the recommended upper limits for daily caffeine consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Barbara; Lapolla, Rosa; Rutigliano, Irene; Pettoello Mantovani, Massimo; Campanozzi, Angelo

    2018-06-01

    No data are available on caffeine consumption among Italian adolescents. We investigated caffeine intake from coffee, soft drinks and energy drinks in a sample of Italian adolescents and determined if they exceeded the recommended limits. The study comprised 1213 adolescents with a mean age of 15.1 years (range 12-19) from four schools in Foggia, southern Italy. Caffeine intake was assessed using an anonymous self-reported questionnaire during the 2013/2014 school year. We calculated the percentage of daily caffeine consumers, their mean intake of caffeine from beverages and the contribution of each beverage category to the total caffeine intake. Approximately 76% of the sample consumed caffeine every day, amounting to 125.5 ± 69.2 mg/day and 2.1 ± 1.2 mg/kg/day. When we applied the reference values from the Academy of Pediatrics, we found that 46% of the adolescents exceeded the recommended upper limits. Coffee was the most frequently consumed caffeinated drink and the main contributor to daily caffeine intake. More than three quarters (76%) of the Italian adolescents in our study drank coffee on a daily basis and nearly half (46%) exceeded the recommended upper limits. Strategies are needed to reduce caffeine consumption by adolescents. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Re-evaluation of the fludrocortisone test: duration, NaCl supplementation and cut-off limits for aldosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdahl, Christina; Bergenfelz, Anders; Larsson, Johanna; Nerbrand, Christina; Valdemarsson, Stig; Wihl, Anders; Isaksson, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common form of secondary hypertension. Thus, the aims of this study were: (1) to clarify whether the fludrocortisone suppression test (FST), which confirms autonomous aldosterone secretion, is reliable when carried out during a shorter period of time and (2) to confirm the importance of NaCl supplementation. The cut-off limits already obtained for aldosterone in healthy subjects during the FST were applied in hypertensive patients with a high aldosterone to renin ratio (ARR). The healthy subjects were allocated to three groups. Fludrocortisone was administered 4 times daily over 4 days and sodium chloride was supplemented in 3 different doses. The result was applied in 24 hypertensive patients, in 24 healthy subjects (10 women (23-38 years old) and 14 men (23-58 years old)) and in 24 patients with hypertension and high ARR (16 women (45-74 years old) and 8 men (56-73 years old)). Blood pressure, aldosterone, renin, potassium and sodium were measured. After three days of FST, there was a significant decrease in the serum level of aldosterone in the healthy subjects, regardless of high or low sodium chloride supplementation (p<0.001). The decrease in serum aldosterone was significantly less pronounced in patients with PA than in healthy subjects and hypertensive patients without PA (p<0.001). The 95th percentile of plasma aldosterone at the end of the test was 225 pmol/L. The FST can be shortened to 3 days and a daily 500 mg NaCl supplementation is sufficient. A cut-off value for aldosterone of 225 pmol/L after 4 days with FST is appropriate.

  18. 36Cl-AMS measurements with 3-MV tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huijuan; Guan Yongjing; Zhang Wei; Jiang Shan; Ming He

    2013-01-01

    36 C- is one of the most interesting nuclides in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements. The application of 36 Cl has been widely applied in various fields. All most all of 36 Cl AMS measurements at natural isotopic concentrations have yet been performed at tandem accelerator with 5 MV or higher terminal voltage. The measure improvement of 36 Cl and other medium heavy isotopes performed at 3 MV in AMS facilities is one of the hottest topics in AMS measurements. In order to increase the suppression factor of 36 S, the energy loss straggling and angular straggling of 36 Cl and 36 S ions in various counter gases (P10, isobutane and propane) were investigated. Some groundwater samples were measured with energy of 32 MeV, and the results were in good agreement with the result obtained with ion energy of 72 MeV. The results indicate that the approximate detection limit of 36 Cl in 3 MV AMS facility is 36 Cl/Cl=1 × 10 -14 , and the uncertainty is 30% when the sample with isotopic ration 36 Cl/Cl≈10 -13 . (authors)

  19. Water relations and microclimate around the upper limit of a cloud forest in Maui, Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsch, Sybil G; Crausbay, Shelley D; Giambelluca, Thomas W; Weintraub, Alexis E; Longman, Ryan J; Asbjornsen, Heidi; Hotchkiss, Sara C; Dawson, Todd E

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of atmospheric demand on both plant water relations and daily whole-tree water balance across the upper limit of a cloud forest at the mean base height of the trade wind inversion in the tropical trade wind belt. We measured the microclimate and water relations (sap flow, water potential, stomatal conductance, pressure-volume relations) of Metrosideros polymorpha Gaudich. var. polymorpha in three habitats bracketing the cloud forest's upper limit in Hawai'i to understand the role of water relations in determining ecotone position. The subalpine shrubland site, located 100 m above the cloud forest boundary, had the highest vapor pressure deficit, the least amount of rainfall and the highest levels of nighttime transpiration (EN) of all three sites. In the shrubland site, on average, 29% of daily whole-tree transpiration occurred at night, while on the driest day of the study 50% of total daily transpiration occurred at night. While EN occurred in the cloud forest habitat, the proportion of total daily transpiration that occurred at night was much lower (4%). The average leaf water potential (Ψleaf) was above the water potential at the turgor loss point (ΨTLP) on both sides of the ecotone due to strong stomatal regulation. While stomatal closure maintained a high Ψleaf, the minimum leaf water potential (Ψleafmin) was close to ΨTLP, indicating that drier conditions may cause drought stress in these habitats and may be an important driver of current landscape patterns in stand density. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Flow of river water into a Karstic limestone aquifer. 1. Tracing the young fraction in groundwater mixtures in the Upper Floridan Aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E.; McConnell, J.B.; Drenkard, S.; Schlosser, P.; Michel, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The quality of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia is affected locally by discharge of Withlacoochee River water through sinkholes in the river bed. Data on transient tracers and other dissolved substances, including Cl - , 3 H, tritiogenic helium-3 ( 3 He), chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113), organic C (DOC), O 2 (DO), H 2 S, CH 4 , δ 18 O, δD, and 14 C were investigated as tracers of Withlacoochee River water in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The concentrations of all tracers were affected by dilution and mixing. Dissolved Cl - , δ 18 O, δD, CFC-12, and the quantity ( 3 H+ 3 He) are stable in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer, whereas DOC, DO, H 2 S, CH 4 , 14 C, CFC-11, and CFC-113 are affected by microbial degradation and other geochemical processes occurring within the aquifer. Groundwater mixing fractions were determined by using dissolved Cl - and δ 18 O data, recognizing 3 end-member water types in the groundwater mixtures: (1) Withlacoochee River water (δ 18 O=-2.5±0.3per thousand, Cl - =12.2±2 mg/l), (2) regional infiltration water (δ 18 O=-4.2±0.1per thousand, Cl - =2.3±0.1 mg/l), and (3) regional paleowater resident in the Upper Floridan aquifer (δ 18 O=-3.4±0.1per thousand, Cl - =2.6±0.1 mg/l) (uncertainties are ±1σ). Error simulation procedures were used to define uncertainties in mixing fractions. Fractions of river water in groundwater range from 0 to 72% and average 10%. The influence of river-water discharge on the quality of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer was traced from the sinkhole area on the Withlacoochee River 25 km SE in the direction of regional groundwater flow. Infiltration of water is most significant to the N and NW of Valdosta, but becomes negligible to the S and SE in the direction of general thickening of post-Eocene confining beds overlying the Upper Floridan aquifer. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. Flow of river water into a Karstic limestone aquifer. 1. Tracing the young fraction in groundwater mixtures in the Upper Floridan Aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E. [U.S. Geological Survey, 432 National Center, Reston, VA (United States); McConnell, J.B. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3039 Amwiler Rd., Atlanta, GA (United States); Drenkard, S.; Schlosser, P. [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY (United States); Michel, R.L. [U.S. Geological Survey, Mail Stop 434, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    he quality of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer near Valdosta, Georgia is affected locally by discharge of Withlacoochee River water through sinkholes in the river bed. Data on transient tracers and other dissolved substances, including Cl{sup -}, {sup 3}H, tritiogenic helium-3 ({sup 3}He), chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113), organic C (DOC), O{sub 2} (DO), H{sub 2}S, CH{sub 4}, {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}D, and {sup 14}C were investigated as tracers of Withlacoochee River water in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The concentrations of all tracers were affected by dilution and mixing. Dissolved Cl{sup -}, {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}D, CFC-12, and the quantity ({sup 3}H+{sup 3}He) are stable in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer, whereas DOC, DO, H{sub 2}S, CH{sub 4}, {sup 14}C, CFC-11, and CFC-113 are affected by microbial degradation and other geochemical processes occurring within the aquifer. Groundwater mixing fractions were determined by using dissolved Cl{sup -} and {delta}{sup 18}O data, recognizing 3 end-member water types in the groundwater mixtures: (1) Withlacoochee River water ({delta}{sup 18}O=-2.5{+-}0.3per thousand, Cl{sup -}=12.2{+-}2 mg/l), (2) regional infiltration water ({delta}{sup 18}O=-4.2{+-}0.1per thousand, Cl{sup -}=2.3{+-}0.1 mg/l), and (3) regional paleowater resident in the Upper Floridan aquifer ({delta}{sup 18}O=-3.4{+-}0.1per thousand, Cl{sup -}=2.6{+-}0.1 mg/l) (uncertainties are {+-}1{sigma}). Error simulation procedures were used to define uncertainties in mixing fractions. Fractions of river water in groundwater range from 0 to 72% and average 10%. The influence of river-water discharge on the quality of water in the Upper Floridan aquifer was traced from the sinkhole area on the Withlacoochee River 25 km SE in the direction of regional groundwater flow. Infiltration of water is most significant to theN and NW of Valdosta, but becomes negligible to the S and SE in the direction of general thickening of post-Eocene confining

  2. Upper limits on gravitational-wave bursts radiated from stellar-core collapses in our galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masaki; Akutsu, Tomomi; Akutsu, Tomotada

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of observations with the TAMA300 gravitational-wave detector, targeting burst signals from stellar-core collapse events. We used an excess-power filter to extract gravitational-wave candidates, and developed two methods to reduce fake events caused by non-stationary noises of the detector. These analysis methods were applied to real data from the TAMA300 interferometric gravitational wave detector. We compared the data-processed results with those of a Monte Carlo simulation with an assumed galactic-event distribution model and with burst waveforms expected from numerical simulations of stellar-core collapses, in order to interpret the event candidates from an astronomical viewpoint. We set an upper limit of 5.0 x 10 3 events s -1 on the burst gravitational-wave event rate in our galaxy with a confidence level of 90%

  3. Improvement of pre-treatment method for 36Cl/Cl measurement of Cl in natural groundwater by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Kotaro; Hasegawa, Takuma

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of 36 Cl/Cl by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a useful method to trace hydrological processes in groundwater. For accurate estimation, separation of SO 4 2- from Cl - in groundwater is required because 36 S affects AMS measurement of 36 Cl. Previous studies utilized the difference in solubility between BaSO 4 and BaCl 2 (BaSO 4 method) to chemically separate SO 4 2- from Cl - . However, the accuracy of the BaSO 4 method largely depends on operator skill, and consequently Cl - recovery is typically incomplete (70-80%). In addition, the method is time consuming (>1 week), and cannot be applied directly to dilute solutions. In this study, a method based on ion-exchange column chromatography (column method) was developed for separation of Cl - and SO 4 2- . Optimum conditions were determined for the diameter and height of column, type and amount of resin, type and concentration of eluent, and flow rate. The recovery of Cl - was almost 100%, which allowed complete separation from SO 4 2- . The separation procedure was short ( 4 methods, and then analyzed by AMS to estimate 36 S counts and 36 Cl/Cl values. 36 S counts in samples processed by the column method were stable and lower than those from the BaSO 4 method. The column method has the following advantages over the BaSO 4 method: (1) complete and stable separation of Cl - and SO 4 2- , (2) less operator influence on results, (3) short processing time ( - , and (5) concentration of Cl - and separation from SO 4 2- in the one system for dilute solutions.

  4. VERITAS UPPER LIMIT ON THE VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE RADIO GALAXY NGC 1275

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Celik, O.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Cogan, P.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.

    2009-01-01

    The recent detection by the Fermi γ-ray space telescope of high-energy γ-rays from the radio galaxy NGC 1275 makes the observation of the very high energy (VHE: E>100 GeV) part of its broadband spectrum particularly interesting, especially for the understanding of active galactic nuclei with misaligned multi-structured jets. The radio galaxy NGC 1275 was recently observed by VERITAS at energies above 100 GeV for about 8 hr. No VHE γ-ray emission was detected by VERITAS from NGC 1275. A 99% confidence level upper limit of 2.1% of the Crab Nebula flux level is obtained at the decorrelation energy of approximately 340 GeV, corresponding to 19% of the power-law extrapolation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope result.

  5. Applying Adjacent Hyperbolas to Calculation of the Upper Limit of the Periodic Table of Elements, with Use of Rhodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the earlier study (Khazan A. Upper Limit in Mendeleev’s Periodic Table — Ele- ment No. 155. 2nd ed., Svenska fysikarkivet, Stockholm, 2010 the author showed how Rhodium can be applied to the hyperbolic law of the Periodic Table of Elements in or- der to calculate, with high precision, all other elements conceivable in the Table. Here we obtain the same result, with use of fraction linear functions (adjacent hyperbolas.

  6. Limits on the effective quark radius from inclusive $ep$ scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Antonelli, S; Aushev, V; Behnke, O; Behrens, U; Bertolin, A; Bloch, I; Boos, EG; Brock, I; Brook, NH; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Bussey, PJ; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Catterall, CD; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cooper-Sarkar, AM; Corradi, M; Dementiev, RK; Devenish, RCE; Dusini, S; Foster, B; Gach, G; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Gladilin, LK; Golubkov, Yu A; Grzelak, G; Guzik, M; Hain, W; Hochman, D; Hori, R; Ibrahim, ZA; Iga, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Januschek, F; Jomhari, NZ; Kadenko, I; Kananov, S; Karshon, U; Kaur, P; Kisielewska, D; Klanner, R; Klein, U; Korzhavina, IA; Kotański, A; Kötz, U; Kovalchuk, N; Kowalski, H; Krupa, B; Kuprash, O; Kuze, M; Levchenko, BB; Levy, A; Limentani, S; Lisovyi, M; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Longhin, A; Lontkovskyi, D; Lukina, OYu; Makarenko, I; Malka, J; Mohamad Idris, F; Mohammad Nasir, N; Myronenko, V; Nagano, K; Nobe, T; Nowak, RJ; Onishchuk, Yu; Paul, E; Perlański, W; Pokrovskiy, NS; Przybycien, M; Roloff, P; Ruspa, M; Saxon, DH; Schioppa, M; Schneekloth, U; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Shcheglova, LM; Shevchenko, R; Shkola, O; Shyrma, Yu; Singh, I; Skillicorn, IO; Słomiński, W; Solano, A; Stanco, L; Stefaniuk, N; Stern, A; Stopa, P; Sztuk-Dambietz, J; Tassi, E; Tokushuku, K; Tomaszewska, J; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Turkot, O; Tymieniecka, T; Verbytskyi, A; Wan Abdullah, WAT; Wichmann, K; Wing, M; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Zakharchuk, N; Żarnecki, AF; Zawiejski, L; Zenaiev, O; Zhautykov, BO; Zotkin, DS; Bhadra, S; Gwenlan, C; Hlushchenko, O; Polini, A; Mastroberardino, A; Sukhonos, D

    2016-01-01

    The high-precision HERA data allows searches up to TeV scales for Beyond the Standard Model contributions to electron-quark scattering. Combined measurements of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections in neutral and charged current $ep$ scattering corresponding to a luminosity of around 1 fb$^{-1}$ have been used in this analysis. A new approach to the beyond the Standard Model analysis of the inclusive $ep$ data is presented; simultaneous fits of parton distribution functions together with contributions of "new physics" processes were performed. Results are presented considering a finite radius of quarks within the quark form-factor model. The resulting 95% C.L. upper limit on the effective quark radius is $0.43\\cdot 10^{-16}$ cm.

  7. Cl-rich hydrous mafic mineral assemblages in the Highiș massif, Apuseni Mountains, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Bernard; Tatu, Mihai

    2016-08-01

    The Guadalupian (Mid-Permian) Highiș massif (Apuseni Mountains, Romania) displays a bimodal igneous suite of mafic (gabbro, diorite) and A-type felsic (alkali feldspar granite, albite granite, and hybrid granodiorite) rocks. Amphibole is widespread throughout the suite, and yields markedly high chlorine contents. Three groups are identified: Cl-rich potassic hastingsite (2.60-3.40 wt% Cl) within A-type felsic rocks and diorite, mildly Cl-rich pargasite to hornblende (0.80-1.90 wt% Cl) within gabbro, and low F-Cl hornblende within gabbro and hybrid granodiorite. Coexisting biotite is either Cl-rich within diorite, or F-Cl-poor to F-rich within A-type felsic rocks. Chlorine and fluorine are distributed in both mafic phases, according to the F-Fe and Cl-Mg avoidance rules. The low-Ti contents suggest subsolidus compositions. Cl-rich amphibole within diorite and A-type felsic rocks yields a restricted temperature range - from 575 °C down to 400 °C, whereas mildly Cl-rich amphibole within gabbro displays the highest range - from 675 to 360 °C. Temperatures recorded by Cl-rich biotite within diorite range from 590 to 410 °C. Biotite within A-type felsic rocks yields higher temperatures than amphibole: the highest values- from 640 to 540 °C - are recorded in low-F-Cl varieties, whereas the lowest values- from 535 to 500 °C - are displayed by F-rich varieties. All data point to halogen-rich hydrothermal fluids at upper greenschist facies conditions percolating through fractures and shear zones and pervasively permeating the whole Highiș massif, with F precipitating as interstitial fluorite and Cl incorporating into amphibole, during one, or possibly several, hydrothermal episodes that would have occurred during a ~ 150 My-long period of time extending from the Guadalupian (Mid-Permian) to the Albian (Mid-Cretaceous).

  8. Determination of the equilibrium constant of FeZrCl6 formation from FeCl3 and ZrCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdonosov, S.S.; Kharisov, B.I.; Nikitin, M.I.

    1992-01-01

    Equilibrium pressures of chlorine formed in the course of reaction FeCl 3 +ZrCl 4 ↔ FeZrCl 6 +0.5 Cl 2 were determined at the temperatures of 250-325 deg C. The values of equilibrium constant K p of the reaction mentioned at the temperatures of 250, 275, 300 and 325 deg were calculated, taking into consideration the determined values of p Cl2 and literature data on equilibrium pressures of ZrCl 4 and FeCl 3 vapours

  9. Surface structure and reaction property of CuCl{sub 2}-PdCl{sub 2} bimetallic catalyst in methanol oxycarbonylation: A DFT approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qingsen [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Shengping, E-mail: spwang@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Shen, Yongli; Yan, Bing [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wu, Yuanxin [School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430073 (China); Ma, Xinbin [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Surface structure of CuCl{sub 2}-PdCl{sub 2} bimetallic catalyst (Wacker-type catalyst) was built employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and the reaction mechanism of methanol oxycarbonylation over the CuCl{sub 2}-PdCl{sub 2} surfaces was also investigated. On the CuCl{sub 2}-PdCl{sub 2} surface, the active site for methanol oxidation was confirmed as Cu-Cl-Cu (Pd). Comparing with pure CuCl{sub 2} surface, the introduction of Pd atom causes the electron repopulation on the surface and lowers the energy barrier for methanol oxidation, but the number of the active site decreases with the increasing of Pd doping volume. Agreed with previous experimental results, the Pd site is most favorable for the CO insertion, indicated by the lowest activation barrier for the formation of COOCH{sub 3} on Pd atom. The lowest energy barrier for the formation of DMC appears when COOCH{sub 3} species adsorbed on Pd atom and methoxyl adsorbed on Cu atoms, which is 0.42 eV. Finally, the reconstruction of the unsaturated surface is a spontaneous and exothermic process. Comparing with other surfaces, the rate-limiting step, methanol oxidation, on CuCl{sub 2}-PdCl{sub 2} surface with Pd/Cu = 1:17 has the lowest energy barrier, which is agreed with the experimental observation that PdCl{sub 2}-CuCl{sub 2} catalyst with Pd/Cu = 1:20 has the favorable activity. The adsorbed methoxyl will further lower the activation barrier of methanol oxidation, which is agreed with experimental observation that the Wacker-type catalysts have an induction period in the methanol oxidative carbonylation system.

  10. Separation of CsCl and SrCl_2 from a ternary CsCl-SrCl_2-LiCl via a zone refining process for waste salt minimization of pyroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Moonsoo; Choi, Ho Gil; Yi, Kyung Woo; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Jong Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    The purification of LiCl salt mixture has traditionally been carried out by a melt crystallization process. To improve the throughput of zone refining, three heaters were installed in the zone refiner. The zone refining method was used to grow pure LiCl salt ingots from LiCl-CsCl-SrCl_2 salt mixture. The main investigated parameters were the heater speed and the number of passes. A change in the LiCl crystal grain size was observed according to the horizontal direction. From each zone refined salt ingot, samples were collected horizontally. To analyze the concentrations of Sr and Cs, an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer were used, respectively. The experimental results show that Sr and Cs concentrations at the initial region of the ingot were low and reached their peak at the final freezing region of the salt ingot. Concentration results of zone refined salt were compared with theoretical results yielded by the proposed model to validate its predictions. The k_e_f_f of Sr and Cs were 0.13 and 0.11, respectively. The decontamination factors of Sr and Cs were 450 and 1650, respectively. - Highlights: • The LiCl-CsCl-SrCl_2 salt ingot was purified by zone refining technique to minimize waste salt. • The concentration distribution of Cs and Sr were analyzed by mass transfer equation. • The decontamination factors of Cs and Sr were 1600 and 450 respectively in case of 60% of recovery yield.

  11. Surface Transient Binding-Based Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (STB-FCS), a Simple and Easy-to-Implement Method to Extend the Upper Limit of the Time Window to Seconds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sijia; Wang, Wenjuan; Chen, Chunlai

    2018-05-10

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is a powerful single-molecule tool that is able to capture kinetic processes occurring at the nanosecond time scale. However, the upper limit of its time window is restricted by the dwell time of the molecule of interest in the confocal detection volume, which is usually around submilliseconds for a freely diffusing biomolecule. Here, we present a simple and easy-to-implement method, named surface transient binding-based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (STB-FCS), which extends the upper limit of the time window to seconds. We further demonstrated that STB-FCS enables capture of both intramolecular and intermolecular kinetic processes whose time scales cross several orders of magnitude.

  12. Upper-airway flow limitation and transcutaneous carbon dioxide during sleep in normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimpilä, Ville; Jernman, Riina; Lassila, Katariina; Uotila, Jukka; Huhtala, Heini; Mäenpää, Johanna; Polo, Olli

    2017-08-01

    Sleep during pregnancy involves a physiological challenge to provide sufficient gas exchange to the fetus. Enhanced ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia may protect from deficient gas exchange, but sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) may predispose to adverse events. The aim of this study was to analyze sleep and breathing in healthy pregnant women compared to non-pregnant controls, with a focus on CO 2 changes and upper-airway flow limitation. Healthy women in the third trimester and healthy non-pregnant women with normal body mass index (BMI) were recruited for polysomnography. Conventional analysis of sleep and breathing was performed. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide (TcCO 2 ) was determined for each sleep stage. Flow-limitation was analyzed using the flattening index and TcCO 2 values were recorded for every inspiration. Eighteen pregnant women and 12 controls were studied. Pregnancy was associated with shorter sleep duration and more superficial sleep. Apnea-hypopnea index, arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation, flow-limitation, snoring or periodic leg movements were similar in the two groups. Mean SaO 2 and minimum SaO 2 were lower and average heart rate was higher in the pregnant group. TcCO 2 levels did not differ between groups but variance of TcCO 2 was smaller in pregnant women during non-rapid eye movement (NREM). TcCO 2 profiles showed transient TcCO 2 peaks, which seem specific to pregnancy. Healthy pregnancy does not predispose to SDB. Enhanced ventilatory control manifests as narrowing threshold of TcCO 2 between wakefulness and sleep. Pregnant women have a tendency for rapid CO 2 increases during sleep which might have harmful consequences if not properly compensated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. GeV GAMMA-RAY FLUX UPPER LIMITS FROM CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Buehler, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Blasi, P.; Bonamente, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of diffuse radio emission associated with clusters of galaxies indicates populations of relativistic leptons infusing the intracluster medium (ICM). Those electrons and positrons are either injected into and accelerated directly in the ICM, or produced as secondary pairs by cosmic-ray ions scattering on ambient protons. Radiation mechanisms involving the energetic leptons together with the decay of neutral pions produced by hadronic interactions have the potential to produce abundant GeV photons. Here, we report on the search for GeV emission from clusters of galaxies using data collected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope from 2008 August to 2010 February. Thirty-three galaxy clusters have been selected according to their proximity and high mass, X-ray flux and temperature, and indications of non-thermal activity for this study. We report upper limits on the photon flux in the range 0.2-100 GeV toward a sample of observed clusters (typical values (1-5) x10 -9 photon cm -2 s -1 ) considering both point-like and spatially resolved models for the high-energy emission and discuss how these results constrain the characteristics of energetic leptons and hadrons, and magnetic fields in the ICM. The volume-averaged relativistic-hadron-to-thermal energy density ratio is found to be <5%-10% in several clusters.

  14. Use of thermodynamic calculation for investigating phase diagram of the ternary system NaCl-PbCl2-NdCl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostygov, V.I.; Potemin, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculation of meltability diagram of ternary system NaCl-PbCl 2 -NdCl 3 with the use of literature and experimental data on meltability diagrams of binary systems forming it, as well as data on crystallization heats of the components, has been carried out. Equations are derived under condition of pseudoperfection of the ternary system. 64 mol.% PbCl 2 , 26 mol.% NaCl, 10 mol.% NdCl 3 and average temperature of crystallization 391 deg C correspond to the calculated composition of the ternary eutectics, 49 mol.% PbCl 2 , 35 mol.% NaCl, 16 mol.% NdCl 3 and average temperature of peritectic transformation 416 deg C - to the composition of the ternary peritectic. The results obtained agree well with the experimental data

  15. Quantum remnants in the classical limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, A.M.; Plastino, A.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze here the common features of two dynamical regimes: a quantum and a classical one. We deal with a well known semi-classic system in its route towards the classical limit, together with its purely classic counterpart. We wish to ascertain i) whether some quantum remnants can be found in the classical limit and ii) the details of the quantum-classic transition. The so-called mutual information is the appropriate quantifier for this task. Additionally, we study the Bandt–Pompe's symbolic patterns that characterize dynamical time series (representative of the semi-classical system under scrutiny) in their evolution towards the classical limit. - Highlights: • We investigate the classical limit (CL) of a well known semi classical model. • The study is made by reference to the Bandt Pompe symbolic approach. • The number and type of associated symbols changes as one proceeds towards the CL. • We ascertain which symbols pertaining to the quantum zone remain in the CL.

  16. Quantum remnants in the classical limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, A.M., E-mail: kowalski@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Física (IFLP-CCT-Conicet), Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Científicas (CIC) (Argentina); Plastino, A., E-mail: plastino@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Física (IFLP-CCT-Conicet), Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Argentina' s National Research Council (CONICET) (Argentina); SThAR, EPFL Innovation Park, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-09-16

    We analyze here the common features of two dynamical regimes: a quantum and a classical one. We deal with a well known semi-classic system in its route towards the classical limit, together with its purely classic counterpart. We wish to ascertain i) whether some quantum remnants can be found in the classical limit and ii) the details of the quantum-classic transition. The so-called mutual information is the appropriate quantifier for this task. Additionally, we study the Bandt–Pompe's symbolic patterns that characterize dynamical time series (representative of the semi-classical system under scrutiny) in their evolution towards the classical limit. - Highlights: • We investigate the classical limit (CL) of a well known semi classical model. • The study is made by reference to the Bandt Pompe symbolic approach. • The number and type of associated symbols changes as one proceeds towards the CL. • We ascertain which symbols pertaining to the quantum zone remain in the CL.

  17. High-level ab initio calculations on HGeCl and the equilibrium geometry of the A1A'' state derived from Franck-Condon analysis of the single-vibronic-level emission spectra of HGeCl and DGeCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Daniel K W; Chau, Foo-Tim; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2010-02-01

    CCSD(T) and/or CASSCF/MRCI calculations have been carried out on the X(1)A' and A(1)A'' states of HGeCl. The fully relativistic effective core potential, ECP10MDF, and associated standard valence basis sets of up to the aug-cc-pV5Z quality were employed for Ge. Contributions from core correlation and extrapolation to the complete basis set limit were included in determining the computed equilibrium geometrical parameters and relative electronic energy of these two states of HGeCl. Based on the currently, most systematic CCSD(T) calculations performed in this study, the best theoretical geometrical parameters of the X(1)A' state are r(e)(HGe) = 1.580 +/- 0.001 A, theta(e) = 93.88 +/- 0.01 degrees and r(e)(GeCl) = 2.170 +/- 0.001 A. In addition, Franck-Condon factors including allowance for anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation between these two states of HGeCl and DGeCl were calculated employing CCSD(T) and CASSCF/MRCI potential energy functions, and were used to simulate A(1)A'' --> X(1)A' SVL emission spectra of HGeCl and DGeCl. The iterative Franck-Condon analysis (IFCA) procedure was carried out to determine the equilibrium geometrical parameters of the A(1)A'' state of HGeCl by matching the simulated, and available experimental SVL emission spectra of HGeCl and DGeCl of Tackett et al., J Chem Phys 2006, 124, 124320, using the available, estimated experimental equilibrium (r(e)(z)) structure for the X(1)A' state, while varying the equilibrium geometrical parameters of the A(1)A'' state systematically. Employing the derived IFCA geometry of r(e)(HGe) = 1.590 A, r(e)(GeCl) = 2.155 A and theta(e)(HGeCl) = 112.7 degrees for the A(1)A'' state of HGeCl in the spectral simulation, the simulated absorption and SVL emission spectra of HGeCl and DGeCl agree very well with the available experimental LIF and SVL emission spectra, respectively. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Upper Limits on the 21 cm Epoch of Reionization Power Spectrum from One Night with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, A. H.; Yatawatta, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Brentjens, M. A.; Zaroubi, S.; Asad, K. M. B.; Hatef, M.; Jelić, V.; Mevius, M.; Offringa, A. R.; Pandey, V. N.; Vedantham, H.; Abdalla, F. B.; Brouw, W. N.; Chapman, E.; Ciardi, B.; Gehlot, B. K.; Ghosh, A.; Harker, G.; Iliev, I. T.; Kakiichi, K.; Majumdar, S.; Mellema, G.; Silva, M. B.; Schaye, J.; Vrbanec, D.; Wijnholds, S. J.

    2017-03-01

    We present the first limits on the Epoch of Reionization 21 cm H I power spectra, in the redshift range z = 7.9-10.6, using the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) High-Band Antenna (HBA). In total, 13.0 hr of data were used from observations centered on the North Celestial Pole. After subtraction of the sky model and the noise bias, we detect a non-zero {{{Δ }}}{{I}}2={(56+/- 13{mK})}2 (1-σ) excess variance and a best 2-σ upper limit of {{{Δ }}}212< {(79.6{mK})}2 at k = 0.053 h cMpc-1 in the range z = 9.6-10.6. The excess variance decreases when optimizing the smoothness of the direction- and frequency-dependent gain calibration, and with increasing the completeness of the sky model. It is likely caused by (I) residual side-lobe noise on calibration baselines, (II) leverage due to nonlinear effects, (III) noise and ionosphere-induced gain errors, or a combination thereof. Further analyses of the excess variance will be discussed in forthcoming publications.

  19. SEPARATION OF CsCl FROM LiCl-CsCl MOLTEN SALT BY COLD FINGER MELT CRYSTALLIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSHUA R. VERSEY

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a fundamental understanding of a cold finger melt crystallization technique by exploring the heat and mass transfer processes of cold finger separation. A series of experiments were performed using a simplified LiCl-CsCl system by varying initial CsCl concentrations (1, 3, 5, and 7.5 wt%, cold finger cooling rates (7.4, 9.8, 12.3, and 14.9 L/min, and separation times (5, 10, 15, and 30 min. Results showed a potential recycling rate of 0.36 g/min with a purity of 0.33 wt% CsCl in LiCl. A CsCl concentrated drip formation was found to decrease crystal purity especially for smaller crystal formations. Dimensionless heat and mass transfer correlations showed that separation production is primarily influenced by convective transfer controlled by cooling gas flow rate, where correlations are more accurate for slower cooling gas flow rates.

  20. Thermodynamic Upper Bound on Broadband Light Coupling with Photonic Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zongfu; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2012-01-01

    to an upper bound dictated by the second law of thermodynamics. Such bound limits how efficient light can be coupled to any photonic structure. As one example of application, we use this upper bound to derive the limit of light absorption in broadband solar

  1. Definition of the upper reference limit of glycated albumin in blood donors from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellia, Chiara; Zaninotto, Martina; Cosma, Chiara; Agnello, Luisa; Lo Sasso, Bruna; Bivona, Giulia; Plebani, Mario; Ciaccio, Marcello

    2017-11-27

    Glycated Albumin (GA) has been proposed as a short-term indicator of glycemic homeostasis. The aim of this study is to describe the distribution of GA in a large sample of blood donors from Italy to evaluate whether demographic features, namely age and sex, could influence GA levels and define specific reference limits. The study included 1334 Italian blood donors. GA was measured using an enzymatic method (quantILab Glycated Albumin, IL Werfen, Germany). The upper reference limit (URL) was calculated using the non-parametric percentile method. A modest, although significant, increase of GA was observed in relation to age (psex (12% [11.3-12.8] in males; 12.2% [11.4-13.1] in females; p=0.01). After excluding individuals with fasting plasma glucose ≥7 mmol/L, the calculated GA URL was 14.5% (95% CI: 14.3-14.7). Subjects with GA>14.5% presented a mean age of 48.4±12.2 years, 66.7% were males and the mean glucose was 6.88±2.5 mmol/L. GA in Caucasians shows a similar increasing trend at older ages documented in other ethnicities. The definition of the URL in this population could be useful for both clinical studies, which will clarify the role of GA for diagnosing and monitoring diabetes, and will encourage the introduction of GA in clinical practice.

  2. Injuries to the upper extremities in polytrauma: limited effect on outcome more than ten years after injury - a cohort study in 629 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macke, C; Winkelmann, M; Mommsen, P; Probst, C; Zelle, B; Krettek, C; Zeckey, C

    2017-02-01

    To analyse the influence of upper extremity trauma on the long-term outcome of polytraumatised patients. A total of 629 multiply injured patients were included in a follow-up study at least ten years after injury (mean age 26.5 years, standard deviation 12.4). The extent of the patients' injury was classified using the Injury Severity Score. Outcome was measured using the Hannover Score for Polytrauma Outcome (HASPOC), Short Form (SF)-12, rehabilitation duration, and employment status. Outcomes for patients with and without a fracture of the upper extremity were compared and analysed with regard to specific fracture regions and any additional brachial plexus lesion. In all, 307 multiply-injured patients with and 322 without upper extremity injuries were included in the study. The groups with and without upper limb injuries were similar with respect to demographic data and injury pattern, except for midface trauma. There were no significant differences in the long-term outcome. In patients with brachial plexus lesions there were significantly more who were unemployed, required greater retraining and a worse HASPOC. Injuries to the upper extremities seem to have limited effect on long-term outcome in patients with polytrauma, as long as no injury was caused to the brachial plexus. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:255-60. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  3. Evaluation report on CCTF core-I reflood tests Cl-17(Run 36) and Cl-20(Run 39)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Yoshio; Iguchi, Tadashi

    1983-02-01

    In the safety analysis of the reflood phase of a PWR LOCA, the core thermo-hydrodynamic behavior is analyzed as a phenomena in a single channel core. In other words, the core thermo-hydrodynamic behavior is treated one-dimensionally. In order to confirm the validity of the one-dimensional treatment, tests named Asymmetric power test Cl-17(Run 36) and Asymmetric temperature test Cl-20(Run 39) were performed, whose test conditions were similar to the base case test Cl-5(Run 14) (the reference test for the parametric effect tests) except for the power distribution and the initial temperature distribution in core, respectively. First the results of the base case test were investigated. And the results of Asymmetric power test and Asymmetric temperature test were compared with the results of the base case test. The main conclusions are as follows: (1) The water accumulation was observed along the whole core even above quench front almost simultaneously just after reflood initiation and almost terminated within 20 to 30 seconds. The flow pattern was recognized as a slug flow. (2) In the lower two-thirds of the core, bottom quench was observed and the core water accumulation was one-dimensional even under the thermally asymmetric conditions. (3) In the upper portion of the core, the multi-dimensional effect was observed, i.e. the top quench occurred locally. (4) The water accumulation behavior or void fraction in the lower two-thirds of the core, i.e. our concerning region for the peak clad temperature analysis, and the core behavior for system analysis can be one-dimensionally analyzed with a representing single channel core. (author)

  4. Separation of CsCl and SrCl{sub 2} from a ternary CsCl-SrCl{sub 2}-LiCl via a zone refining process for waste salt minimization of pyroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Moonsoo [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ho Gil; Yi, Kyung Woo; Hwang, Il Soon [Graduate School of Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hyeon, E-mail: jonglee@cnu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Rapid Solidified Materials Research Center, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34134 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The purification of LiCl salt mixture has traditionally been carried out by a melt crystallization process. To improve the throughput of zone refining, three heaters were installed in the zone refiner. The zone refining method was used to grow pure LiCl salt ingots from LiCl-CsCl-SrCl{sub 2} salt mixture. The main investigated parameters were the heater speed and the number of passes. A change in the LiCl crystal grain size was observed according to the horizontal direction. From each zone refined salt ingot, samples were collected horizontally. To analyze the concentrations of Sr and Cs, an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer were used, respectively. The experimental results show that Sr and Cs concentrations at the initial region of the ingot were low and reached their peak at the final freezing region of the salt ingot. Concentration results of zone refined salt were compared with theoretical results yielded by the proposed model to validate its predictions. The k{sub eff} of Sr and Cs were 0.13 and 0.11, respectively. The decontamination factors of Sr and Cs were 450 and 1650, respectively. - Highlights: • The LiCl-CsCl-SrCl{sub 2} salt ingot was purified by zone refining technique to minimize waste salt. • The concentration distribution of Cs and Sr were analyzed by mass transfer equation. • The decontamination factors of Cs and Sr were 1600 and 450 respectively in case of 60% of recovery yield.

  5. Limits on the effective quark radius from inclusive ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Sciences; Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration; and others

    2016-04-15

    The high-precision HERA data allows searches up to TeV scales for Beyond the Standard Model contributions to electron-quark scattering. Combined measurements of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections in neutral and charged current ep scattering corresponding to a luminosity of around 1 fb{sup -1} have been used in this analysis. A new approach to the beyond the Standard Model analysis of the inclusive ep data is presented; simultaneous fits of parton distribution functions together with contributions of ''new physics'' processes were performed. Results are presented considering a finite radius of quarks within the quark form-factor model. The resulting 95% C.L. upper limit on the effective quark radius is 0.43.10{sup -16} cm.

  6. Limits on the effective quark radius from inclusive ep scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.

    2016-04-01

    The high-precision HERA data allows searches up to TeV scales for Beyond the Standard Model contributions to electron-quark scattering. Combined measurements of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections in neutral and charged current ep scattering corresponding to a luminosity of around 1 fb -1 have been used in this analysis. A new approach to the beyond the Standard Model analysis of the inclusive ep data is presented; simultaneous fits of parton distribution functions together with contributions of ''new physics'' processes were performed. Results are presented considering a finite radius of quarks within the quark form-factor model. The resulting 95% C.L. upper limit on the effective quark radius is 0.43.10 -16 cm.

  7. Electric conductivity of PCl5-ZrCl4, PCl5-TaCl5, and PCl5-MoCl5 molten mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Red'kin, A.A.; Moskalenko, N.I.

    1997-01-01

    When mixing individual molecular melts of PCl 5 with ZrCl 4 , TaCl 5 or with MoCl 5 , an essential (by several orders) increase in electric conductivity (up to 0.02-0.1 Ohm -1 ·cm -1 ), which stems, in all probability, from the appearance of complex ions PCl 4 + , ZrCl 5 - , ZrCl 6 2- , TaCl 5 - and MoCl 6 - in the molten mixtures as a result of chemical interaction

  8. Nanoscale Coloristic Pigments: Upper Limits on Releases from Pigmented Plastic during Environmental Aging, In Food Contact, and by Leaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neubauer, Nicole; Scifo, Lorette; Navratilova, Jana

    2017-01-01

    The life cycle of nanoscale pigments in plastics may cause environmental or human exposure by various release scenarios. We investigated spontaneous and induced release with mechanical stress during/after simulated sunlight and rain degradation of polyethylene (PE) with organic and inorganic pigm...... investigated scenarios, with upper limits of 10 mg/m2 or 1600 particles/mL. This is the first holistic confirmation that pigment nanomaterials remain strongly contained in a plastic that has low diffusion and high persistence such as the polyolefin High Density Polyethylene (HDPE)....

  9. A study on flammability limits of fuel mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shigeo; Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Akifumi; Tokuhashi, Kazuaki; Sekiya, Akira

    2008-07-15

    Flammability limit measurements were made for various binary and ternary mixtures prepared from nine different compounds. The compounds treated are methane, propane, ethylene, propylene, methyl ether, methyl formate, 1,1-difluoroethane, ammonia, and carbon monoxide. The observed values of lower flammability limits of mixtures were found to be in good agreement to the calculated values by Le Chatelier's formula. As for the upper limits, however, some are close to the calculated values but some are not. It has been found that the deviations of the observed values of upper flammability limits from the calculated ones are mostly to lower concentrations. Modification of Le Chatelier's formula was made to better fit to the observed values of upper flammability limits. This procedure reduced the average difference between the observed and calculated values of upper flammability limits to one-third of the initial value.

  10. Seperation of CsCl from LiCl-CsCl molten salt by cold finger melt cryst allization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versey, Joshua R. [Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Program University of Idaho, Idaho (United States); Phongikaroon, Supathorn [Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (Korea, Republic of); Simpson, Michael F. [Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering University of Utah, Utah (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study provides a fundamental understanding of a cold finger melt crystallization technique by exploring the heat and mass transfer processes of cold finger separation. A series of experiments were performed using a simplified LiCl-CsCl system by varying initial CsCl concentrations (1, 3, 5, and 7.5 wt%), cold finger cooling rates (7.4, 9.8, 12.3, and 14.9 L/min), and separation times (5, 10, 15, and 30 min). Results showed a potential recycling rate of 0.36 g/min with a purity of 0.33 wt% CsCl in LiCl. A CsCl concentrated drip formation was found to decrease crystal purity especially for smaller crystal formations. Dimensionless heat and mass transfer correlations showed that separation production is primarily influenced by convective transfer controlled by cooling gas flow rate, where correlations are more accurate for slower cooling gas flow rates.

  11. Dark matter electron anisotropy. A universal upper limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borriello, Enrico; Maccione, Luca; Cuoco, Alessandro

    2010-12-01

    Indirect searches of particle Dark Matter (DM) with high energy Cosmic Rays (CR) are affected by large uncertainties, coming both from the DM side, and from poor understanding of the astrophysical backgrounds. We show that, on the contrary, the DM intrinsic degree of anisotropy in the arrival directions of high energy CR electrons and positrons does not suffer from these unknowns. Furthermore, if contributions from possible local sources are neglected, the intrinsic DM anisotropy sets the maximum degree of total anisotropy. As a consequence, if some anisotropy larger than the DM upper bound is detected, its origin could not be ascribed to DM, and would constitute an unambiguous evidence for the presence of astrophysical local discrete sources of high energy electrons and positrons. The Fermi-LAT will be able to probe such scenarios in the next years. (orig.)

  12. Distribution of {sup 36}Cl/Cl in a river-recharged aquifer: Implications for the fallout rate of bomb-produced {sup 36}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosaki, Yuki, E-mail: tosaki@tac.tsukuba.ac.j [Sustainable Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Massmann, Gudrun [Institute of Geological Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Malteserstrasse 74-100, 12249 Berlin (Germany); Tase, Norio [Sustainable Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Sasa, Kimikazu; Takahashi, Tsutomu [Tandem Accelerator Complex, Research Facility Center for Science and Technology, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Matsushi, Yuki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Tamari, Michiko [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Nagashima, Yasuo [Tandem Accelerator Complex, Research Facility Center for Science and Technology, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Bessho, Kotaro; Matsumura, Hiroshi [Radiation Science Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Distribution of {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in a river-recharged aquifer was investigated in the Oderbruch area, northeastern Germany. The aquifer is confined up to 3.5-4 km inland, where it changes to an unconfined condition. The {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in the confined area were in the range between 4.6 x 10{sup -14} and 23.1 x 10{sup -14}, showing a peak at 2-3 km away from the river. A plot of {sup 36}Cl/Cl vs. reciprocal Cl{sup -} concentrations indicated possible effect of the Cl{sup -} concentration variation on the observed {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios. After accounting for this effect, the estimated {sup 36}Cl fallout rates for the last 30 yrs show reasonable agreement with the Dye-3 data and the mid-latitude background value. The results suggest that a local {sup 36}Cl fallout curve can be constructed from groundwater when dispersive mixing is of minor importance.

  13. Atmospheric chemistry of CF3CF═CH2 and (Z)-CF3CF═CHF: Cl and NO3 rate coefficients, Cl reaction product yields, and thermochemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Lazarou, Yannis G; Talukdar, Ranajit K; Burkholder, James B

    2011-01-20

    Rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reactions of Cl atoms and NO(3) radicals with 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene, CF(3)CF═CH(2) (HFO-1234yf), and 1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropene, (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF (HFO-1225ye), are reported. Cl-atom rate coefficients were measured in the fall-off region as a function of temperature (220-380 K) and pressure (50-630 Torr; N(2), O(2), and synthetic air) using a relative rate method. The measured rate coefficients are well represented by the fall-off parameters k(0)(T) = 6.5 × 10(-28) (T/300)(-6.9) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1) and k(∞)(T) = 7.7 × 10(-11) (T/300)(-0.65) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for CF(3)CF═CH(2) and k(0)(T) = 3 × 10(-27) (T/300)(-6.5) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1) and k(∞)(T) = 4.15 × 10(-11) (T/300)(-0.5) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for (Z)-CF(3)C═CHF with F(c) = 0.6. Reaction product yields were measured in the presence of O(2) to be (98 ± 7)% for CF(3)C(O)F and (61 ± 4)% for HC(O)Cl in the CF(3)CF═CH(2) reaction and (108 ± 8)% for CF(3)C(O)F and (112 ± 8)% for HC(O)F in the (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF reaction, where the quoted uncertainties are 2σ (95% confidence level) and include estimated systematic errors. NO(3) reaction rate coefficients were determined using absolute and relative rate methods. Absolute measurements yielded upper limits for both reactions between 233 and 353 K, while the relative rate measurements yielded k(3)(295 K) = (2.6 ± 0.25) × 10(-17) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k(4)(295 K) = (4.2 ± 0.5) × 10(-18) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for CF(3)CF═CH(2) and (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF, respectively. The Cl-atom reaction with CF(3)CF═CH(2) and (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF leads to decreases in their atmospheric lifetimes and global warming potentials and formation of a chlorine-containing product, HC(O)Cl, for CF(3)CF═CH(2). The NO(3) reaction has been shown to have a negligible impact on the atmospheric lifetimes of CF(3)CF═CH(2) and (Z)-CF(3)CF═CHF. The energetics for the reaction of Cl, NO(3), and OH with CF

  14. Hg0 and HgCl2 Reference Gas Standards: ?NIST Traceability ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and NIST have collaborated to establish the necessary procedures for establishing the required NIST traceability of commercially-provided Hg0 and HgCl2 reference generators. This presentation will discuss the approach of a joint EPA/NIST study to accurately quantify the true concentrations of Hg0 and HgCl2 reference gases produced from high quality, NIST-traceable, commercial Hg0 and HgCl2 generators. This presentation will also discuss the availability of HCl and Hg0 compressed reference gas standards as a result of EPA's recently approved Alternative Methods 114 and 118. Gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) and oxidized mercury (HgCl2) reference standards are integral to the use of mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (Hg CEMS) for regulatory compliance emissions monitoring. However, a quantitative disparity of approximately 7-10% has been observed between commercial Hg0 and HgCl2 reference gases which currently limits the use of (HgCl2) reference gas standards. Resolving this disparity would enable the expanded use of (HgCl2) reference gas standards for regulatory compliance purposes.

  15. Simple preparations of Pd6Cl12, Pt6Cl12, and Qn[Pt2Cl8+n], n=1, 2 (Q=TBA+, PPN+) and structural characterization of [TBA][Pt2Cl9] and [PPN]2[Pt2Cl10].C7H8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Amico, Daniela Belli; Calderazzo, Fausto; Marchetti, Fabio; Ramello, Stefano; Samaritani, Simona

    2008-02-04

    The hexanuclear Pd6Cl12, i.e., the crystal phase classified as beta-PdCl2, was obtained by reacting [TBA]2[Pd2Cl6] with AlCl3 (or FeCl3) in CH2Cl2. The action of AlCl3 on PtCl42-, followed by digestion of the resulting solid in 1,2-C2H4Cl2 (DCE), CHCl3, or benzene, produced Pt6Cl12.DCE, Pt6Cl12.CHCl3, or Pt6Cl12.C6H6, respectively. Treating [TBA]2[PtCl6] with a slight excess of AlCl3 afforded [TBA][Pt2Cl9], whose anion was established crystallographically to be constituted by two "PtCl6" octahedra sharing a face. Dehydration of H2PtCl6.nH2O with SOCl2 gave an amorphous compound closely analyzing as PtCl4, reactive with [Q]Cl in SOCl2 to yield [Q][Pt2Cl9] or [Q]2[Pt2Cl10], depending on the [Q]Cl/Pt molar ratio (Q=TBA+, PPN+). A single-crystal X-ray diffraction study has shown [PPN]2[Pt2Cl10].C7H8 to contain dinuclear anions formed by two edge-sharing PtCl6 octahedra.

  16. An explanation of the preferential formation of less stable isomers in three-body reactions - Cl + NO2 + M ClO + NO2 + M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.S.; Baldwin, A.C.; Golden, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    A realistic assessment of the potential depletion of stratospheric ozone due to manmade emissions requires a knowledge of the sources and sinks of the potential threat. The reactions ClO + NO 2 + M yield products and Cl + NO 2 + M yield products are of interest because they represent possible sink mechanism for both odd chlorine and odd nitrogen species. In this paper, the Troe method (1977) is used to calculate the low-pressure limit rate constants of the above three-body reactions. The result for the Cl + NO 2 + M reaction is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental finding of Niki et al. (1978), where both nitryl chloride and chlorine nitrate are products of the cited reaction. An explanation is proposed to account for apparent discrepancy between the measured rate constants for ClO + NO 2 + M in the forward and reverse directions. Stratospheric implications are also discussed

  17. Mechanism of the Suzuki–Miyaura Cross-Coupling Reaction Mediated by [Pd(NHC)(allyl)Cl] Precatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Meconi, Giulia Magi

    2017-05-24

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the activation mechanism for the precatalyst series [Pd]-X-1–4 derived from [Pd(IPr)(R-allyl)X] species by substitutions at the terminal position of the allyl moiety ([Pd] = Pd(IPr); R = H (1), Me (2), gem-Me2 (3), Ph (4), X = Cl, Br). Next, we have investigated the Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reaction for the active catalyst species IPr-Pd(0) using 4-chlorotoluene and phenylboronic acid as substrates and isopropyl alcohol as a solvent. Our theoretical findings predict an upper barrier trend, corresponding to the activation mechanism for the [Pd]-Cl-1–4 series, in good agreement with the experiments. They indeed provide a quantitative explanation of the low yield (12%) displayed by [Pd]-Cl-1 species (ΔG⧧ ≈ 30.0 kcal/mol) and of the high yields (≈90%) observed in the case of [Pd]-Cl-2–4 complexes (ΔG⧧ ≈ 20.0 kcal/mol). Additionally, the studied Suzuki–Miyaura reaction involving the IPr-Pd(0) species is calculated to be thermodynamically favorable and kinetically facile. Similar investigations for the [Pd]-Br-1–4 series, derived from [Pd(IPr)(R-allyl)Br], indicate that the oxidative addition step for IPr-Pd(0)-mediated catalysis with 4-bromotoluene is kinetically more favored than that with 4-chlorotoluene. Finally, we have explored the potential of Ni-based complexes [Ni((IPr)(R-allyl)X] (X = Cl, Br) as Suzuki–Miyaura reaction catalysts. Apart from a less endergonic reaction energy profile for both precatalyst activation and catalytic cycle, a steep increase in the predicted upper energy barriers (by 2.0–15.0 kcal/mol) is calculated in the activation mechanism for the [Ni]-X-1–4 series compared to the [Pd]-X-1–4 series. Overall, these results suggest that Ni-based precatalysts are expected to be less active than the Pd-based precatalysts for the studied Suzuki–Miyaura reaction.

  18. Ab initio calculation of intermolecular potentials for dimer Cl_2-Cl_2 and prediction of second virial coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thanh Duoc; Nguyen Thi Ai Nhung; Tran Duong; Pham Van Tat

    2015-01-01

    The results presented in this paper are the ab initio intermolecular potentials and the second virial coefficient, B_2 (T) of the dimer Cl_2-Cl_2. These ab initio potentials were proposed by the quantum chemical calculations at high level of theory CCSD(T) with basis sets of Dunning valence correlation-consistent aug-cc-pVmZ (m = 2, 3); these results were extrapolated to complete basis set limit aug-cc-pV23Z. The ab initio energies of complete basis set limit aug-cc-pV23Z resulted from the exponential extrapolation were used to construct the 5-site pair potential functions. The second virial coefficients for this dimer were predicted from those with four-dimensional integration. The second virial coefficients were also corrected to first-order quantum effects. The results turn out to be in good agreement with experimental data, if available, or with those from empirical correlation. The quality of ab initio 5-site potentials proved the reliability for prediction of molecular thermodynamic properties. (author)

  19. A REVISED AGE FOR UPPER SCORPIUS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY AMONG THE F-TYPE MEMBERS OF THE SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS OB ASSOCIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecaut, Mark J.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Bubar, Eric J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States)

    2012-02-20

    We present an analysis of the ages and star formation history of the F-type stars in the Upper Scorpius (US), Upper Centaurus-Lupus (UCL), and Lower Centaurus-Crux (LCC) subgroups of Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen), the nearest OB association. Our parent sample is the kinematically selected Hipparcos sample of de Zeeuw et al., restricted to the 138 F-type members. We have obtained classification-resolution optical spectra and have also determined the spectroscopic accretion disk fraction. With Hipparcos and 2MASS photometry, we estimate the reddening and extinction for each star and place the candidate members on a theoretical H-R diagram. For each subgroup we construct empirical isochrones and compare to published evolutionary tracks. We find that (1) our empirical isochrones are consistent with the previously published age-rank of the Sco-Cen subgroups; (2) subgroups LCC and UCL appear to reach the main-sequence turn-on at spectral types {approx}F4 and {approx}F2, respectively. An analysis of the A-type stars shows US reaching the main sequence at about spectral type {approx}A3. (3) The median ages for the pre-main-sequence members of UCL and LCC are 16 Myr and 17 Myr, respectively, in agreement with previous studies, however we find that (4) Upper Sco is much older than previously thought. The luminosities of the F-type stars in US are typically a factor of {approx}2.5 less luminous than predicted for a 5 Myr old population for four sets of evolutionary tracks. We re-examine the evolutionary state and isochronal ages for the B-, A-, and G-type Upper Sco members, as well as the evolved M supergiant Antares, and estimate a revised mean age for Upper Sco of 11 {+-} 1 {+-} 2 Myr (statistical, systematic). Using radial velocities and Hipparcos parallaxes we calculate a lower limit on the kinematic expansion age for Upper Sco of >10.5 Myr (99% confidence). However, the data are statistically consistent with no expansion. We reevaluate the inferred masses for the known

  20. New searches for the C-noninvariant decay π0→3γ and the rare decay π0→4γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonough, J.; Highland, V.L.; McFarlane, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A search for the charge-conjugation-noninvariant decay π 0 →3γ has been made using the Crystal Box of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. No signal in excess of background was observed, resulting in a branching-ratio upper limit of 3.1 x 10/sup -8/ (90% C.L.). A new upper limit of 2 x 10/sup -8/ (90% C.L.) was also established for the allowed decay π 0 →4γ

  1. Using isotope 36Cl to study utilization of Cl by crops and distribution and movement of Cl in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jiarong; Wen Xianfang; Tang Nianxin

    1991-06-01

    Results from using isotope 36 Cl show that a large quantity of Cl is absorbed and utilized by spring wheat, cotton and tobacco from the chloride fertilizers. The utilization coefficient of Cl increases with the growing time of plants and reaches peak at mature stage. The utilization coefficient of above plants are 26.72%, 3317% and 26.19% respectively. The absorption and utilization of residual Cl in soil is much smaller than that in fertilizers, and the utilization coefficient is decreasing with the increasing of growth season. For spring wheat, utilization coefficient is 12.7% in second season and 9.3% in third season. The ability of absorbing and utilizing Cl from organic materials by crops is very low and the utilization coefficient is 10% or less, that depends on circumstances. For rice the utilization coefficient is 3.1% in dry land and 24.3% in flooded land. The distribution of absorbed Cl is mainly in stalk, a little in husk and a few in seeds and roots. After irrigating water it is equivalent to 9.1 mm of rainfall in soil, the Cl moves rapidly to depth 10∼12 cm. Cl moves faster in porous soil than in clay soil, and faster in horizontal direction than in vertical direction

  2. Deposition, Accumulation, and Alteration of Cl(-), NO3(-), ClO4(-) and ClO3(-) Salts in a Hyper-Arid Polar Environment: Mass Balance and Isotopic Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew; Davila, Alfonso F.; Boehlke, J. K.; Sturchio, Neil C.; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Estrada, Nubia; Brundrette, Megan; Lacell, Denis; McKay, Christopher P.; Poghosyan, Armen; hide

    2016-01-01

    The salt fraction in permafrost soils/sediments of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Antarctica can be used as a proxy for cold desert geochemical processes and paleoclimate reconstruction. Previous analyses of the salt fraction in MDV permafrost soils have largely been conducted in coastal regions where permafrost soils are variably affected by aqueous processes and mixed inputs from marine and stratospheric sources. We expand upon this work by evaluating permafrost soil/sediments in University Valley, located in the ultraxerous zone where both liquid water transport and marine influences are minimal. We determined the abundances of Cl(-), NO3(-, ClO4(-)and ClO3(-)in dry and ice-cemented soil/sediments, snow and glacier ice, and also characterized Cl(-) and NO3(-) isotopically. The data are not consistent with salt deposition in a sublimation till, nor with nuclear weapon testing fall-out, and instead point to a dominantly stratospheric source and to varying degrees of post depositional transformation depending on the substrate, from minimal alteration in bare soils to significant alteration (photodegradation and/or volatilization) in snow and glacier ice. Ionic abundances in the dry permafrost layer indicate limited vertical transport under the current climate conditions, likely due to percolation of snowmelt. Subtle changes in ClO4(-)/NO3(-) ratios and NO3(-) isotopic composition with depth and location may reflect both transport related fractionation and depositional history. Low molar ratios of ClO3(-)/ClO4(-) in surface soils compared to deposition and other arid systems suggest significant post depositional loss of ClO3(-), possibly due to reduction by iron minerals, which may have important implications for oxy-chlorine species on Mars. Salt accumulation varies with distance along the valley and apparent accumulation times based on multiple methods range from approximately 10 to 30 kyr near the glacier to 70-200 kyr near the valley mouth. The relatively

  3. Thermodynamic properties of thulium and ytterbium in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoselova, A., E-mail: A.Novoselova@ihte.uran.ru [Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry, Ural Division, Russian Academy of Science, S. Kovalevskaya Str., 22, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Smolenski, V. [Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry, Ural Division, Russian Academy of Science, S. Kovalevskaya Str., 22, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: > Tm and Yb chloride compounds as fission products. > The investigation of electrochemical properties of lanthanides. > Determination of the apparent standard redox potentials of the couple Ln(III)/Ln(II) in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic at (823 to 973) K. > The calculation of the basic thermodynamic properties of redox reaction in molten salt. - Abstract: This work presents the results of a study of the Tm{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 2+} and Yb{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 2+} couple redox potentials vs. Cl{sup -}/Cl{sub 2} reference electrode at the temperature range (823 to 973) K in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic by direct potentiometric method. Initial concentrations of TmCl{sub 3} and YbCl{sub 3} in solvents did not exceed 5.0 mol%. Basic thermodynamic properties of the reactions TmCl{sub 2(l)} + 1/2 Cl{sub 2(g)} {r_reversible} TmCl{sub 3(l)} and YbCl{sub 2(l)} + 1/2 Cl{sub 2(g)} {r_reversible} YbCl{sub 3(l)} were calculated using the temperature dependencies of apparent standard potentials of the couples E{sub Tm{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 2+*}} and E{sub Yb{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 2+*}}.

  4. cl-Supercontinuous Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Singh

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Basic properties of cl-supercontinuity, a strong variant of continuity, due to Reilly and Vamanamurthy [Indian J. Pure Appl. Math., 14 (1983, 767–772], who call such maps clopen continuous, are studied. Sufficient conditions on domain or range for a continuous function to be cl-supercontinuous are observed. Direct and inverse transfer of certain topological properties under cl-supercontinuous functions are studied and existence or nonexistence of certain cl-supercontinuous function with specified domain or range is outlined.

  5. First remote sensing measurements of ClOOCl along with ClO and ClONO2 in activated and deactivated Arctic vortex conditions using new ClOOCl IR absorption cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Birk

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Active chlorine species play a dominant role in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone in the polar vortices during the late winter and early spring seasons. Recently, the correct understanding of the ClO dimer cycle was challenged by the release of new laboratory absorption cross sections (Pope et al., 2007 yielding significant model underestimates of observed ClO and ozone loss (von Hobe et al., 2007. Under this aspect, nocturnal Arctic stratospheric limb emission measurements carried out by the balloon version of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-B from Kiruna (Sweden on 11 January 2001 and 20/21 March 2003 have been reanalyzed with regard to the chlorine reservoir species ClONO2 and the active species, ClO and ClOOCl (Cl2O2. New laboratory measurements of IR absorption cross sections of ClOOCl for various temperatures and pressures allowed for the first time the retrieval of ClOOCl mixing ratios from remote sensing measurements. High values of active chlorine (ClOx of roughly 2.3 ppbv at 20 km were observed by MIPAS-B in the cold mid-winter Arctic vortex on 11 January 2001. While nighttime ClOOCl shows enhanced values of nearly 1.1 ppbv at 20 km, ClONO2 mixing ratios are less than 0.1 ppbv at this altitude. In contrast, high ClONO2 mixing ratios of nearly 2.4 ppbv at 20 km have been observed in the late winter Arctic vortex on 20 March 2003. No significant ClOx amounts are detectable on this date since most of the active chlorine has already recovered to its main reservoir species ClONO2. The observed values of ClOx and ClONO2 are in line with the established polar chlorine chemistry. The thermal equilibrium constants between the dimer formation and its dissociation, as derived from the balloon measurements, are on the lower side of reported data and in good agreement with values recommended by von Hobe et al. (2007. Calculations with the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry model (EMAC using

  6. Limits on the production of direct photons in 200 A GeV$^{32}$S + Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, R; Awes, T C; Barlag, C; Berger, F; Bloomer, M A; Blume, C; Bock, D L; Böck, R K; Bohne, E M; Bucher, D; Claesson, G; Claussen, A; Clewing, G; Debbe, R; Dragon, L; Dubovik, Yu; Eklund, A; Fokin, S L; Franz, A; Garpman, S I A; Glasow, R; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Gutbrod, H H; Hansen, O; Hölker, G; Idh, J; Ippolitov, M S; Jacobs, P; Kampert, K H; Karadzhev, K; Kolb, B W; Lebedev, A; Löhner, H; Lund, I; Man'ko, V I; Moskowitz, B E; Nikolaev, S; Nystrand, J; Obenshain, F E; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Peitzmann, Thomas; Plasil, F; Poskanzer, A M; Purschke, M L; Ritter, H G; Roters, B; Saini, S; Santo, R; Schlagheck, H; Schmidt, H R; Söderström, K; Sørensen, S P; Stankus, P; Steffens, K; Steinhäuser, P; Stenlund, E; Stüken, D; Vinogradov, A; Wegner, H; Young, G R

    1996-01-01

    A search for the production of direct photons in S+Au collisions at 200\\cdotA~GeV has been carried out in the CERN-WA80 experiment. For central collisions the measured photon excess at each p_T, averaged over the range 0.5~GeV/c~ \\leq p_T \\leq 2.5~GeV/c, corresponded to 5.0\\% of the total inclusive photon yield with a statistical error of \\sigma_{\\rm stat}=0.8\\% and a systematic error of \\sigma_{\\rm syst}=5.8\\%. Upper limits on the invariant yield for direct photon production at the 90\\%~C.L. are presented. Possible implications for the dynamics of high-energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed.

  7. Reactions UF4 - ClO2F and UF5 - ClO2F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, Raymond; Besnard, Ginette; Hartmanshenn, Olivier; Luce, Michel; Mougin, Jacques; Pelissie, Jean

    1970-02-01

    The study of the reaction UF 4 - ClO 2 F between 0 deg. and 100 deg. C, by various techniques (micro-sublimation, isopiestic method, IR and UV spectrography, thermogravimetry and X-ray diffraction) shows that intermediate steps are possible before the production of UF 5 . The whole reaction may be schematised by two equations: (1) n UF 4 + ClO 2 F → n UF x + ClO 2 (4 4 + ClO 2 F → UF x + 1/2 Cl 2 + O 2 . The more the temperature rises, the more the second equation becomes experimentally verified. The reaction at 0 deg. C between UF 5 and ClO 2 F may be represented by: UF 5 + ClO 2 F → UF 6 ClO 2 . The reactions: UF 5 + ClO 2 F → UF 6 + ClO 2 , UF 5 + ClO 2 F → UF 6 + 1/2 Cl 2 + O 2 are verified, the first and the second at 25 deg. C., the second from 50 deg. to 150 deg. C. From the results of AGRON it is possible to predict the residual solids before complete volatilization as UF 6 . The IR spectra of ClO 2 F adsorbed on UF 4 and UF x at 60 deg. C have been compared with those of gaseous ClO 2 F and UF 6 adsorbed on UF 4 . (authors) [fr

  8. Changing storm track diffusivity and the upper limit to poleward latent heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, R.

    2010-12-01

    Poleward atmospheric energy transport plays a key role in the climate system by helping set the mean equator-pole temperature gradient. The mechanisms controlling the response of poleward heat flux to climate change are still poorly understood. Recent work shows that midlatitude poleward latent heat flux in atmospheric GCMs generally increases as the climate warms but reaches an upper limit at sufficiently high temperature and decreases with further warming. The reasons for this non-monotonic behavior have remained unclear. Simple arguments suggests that the latent heat flux Fl should scale as Fl ˜ vref qs, where vref is a typical meridional velocity in the baroclinic zone and qs is saturation humidity. While vref decreases with temperature, qs increases much more rapidly, so this scaling implies monotonically increasing moisture flux. We study this problem using a series of simulations employing NCAR’s CAM3 GCM coupled to a slab-ocean aquaplanet and spanning a wide range of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We find that a modified scaling, Fl ˜ vref2 qs, describes the changes in moisture flux much more accurately. Using Lagrangian trajectory analysis, we explain the success of this scaling in terms of changes in the mixing length, which contracts proportionally to vref.

  9. Cyclic voltammetric study of the reduction of U(III) to uranium metal in molten LiCl-NaCl-CaCl2-BaCl2-UCl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poa, D.S.; Tomczuk, Z.; Steunenberg, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemistry of the reduction of UCl 3 to uranium metal in molten LiCl-NaCl-CaCl 2 -BaCl 2 (49.7-8.0-26.5-15.8 mol %) containing dissolved UCl 3 . The purpose of the study was to obtain information on the kinetics of the reaction, which will be used in the design of electrorefining equipment for the reprocessing of core and blanket fuel discharged from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). The electrorefining operation employs the above salt as the electrolyte and a liquid cadmium pool as the anode

  10. 26Al and 36Cl AMS system at University of Tsukuba: A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, Kimikazu; Nagashima, Yasuo; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Seki, Riki; Tosaki, Yuki; Sueki, Keisuke; Bessho, Kotaro; Matsumura, Hiroshi; Miura, Taichi; He, Ming

    2007-01-01

    With the current AMS system on the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator at University of Tsukuba, we are able to measure the long-lived radioisotopes of 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl and 129 I by employing a molecular pilot beam method that stabilizes the terminal voltage with 0.1% accuracy. Several major improvements have been made to increase the sensitivity of the AMS system to 26 Al and 36 Cl radioisotopes. For 26 Al-AMS, the ions extracted from the ion source have been changed from Al - to AlO - by using an Al 2 O 3 target sample. In addition, 26 MgO - molecular ions are used as a pilot beam to control the terminal voltage through slit current feedback. Also, a fully-stripping AMS technique is used to achieve an effective detection limit of better than 5 x 10 -15 for the 26 Al/ 27 Al ratio. For 36 Cl-AMS, the terminal voltage has been increased from 9 MV to 10 MV, thereby increasing the energy of the 36 Cl 9+ beam to 100 MeV. This energy increment helps us to get a clearer separation between 36 Cl and 36 S in a new ΔE-E detector. In addition, the yield of 36 Cl 9+ is increased by 1.5 times as a result of the higher ion energy at the terminal stripper foil. The standard deviation of the fluctuations of the 36 Cl/ 35 Cl ratio is within ±2%, and the effective detection limit is better than 2.0 x 10 -14

  11. Thermodynamics properties of plutonium in NaCl-KCl and CaCl2 at 1073 K and in liquid gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertin, D.; Ched'homme, S.; Bourges, G.; Pescayre, L.; Sanchez, S.; Picard, G.

    2004-01-01

    Cadmium and bismuth metal are mostly used as solvent in nuclear pyrochemical processes and especially in actinides/lanthanides separations. Gallium metal has been chosen because no literature values are available with plutonium and its regeneration by refining at low temperature is possible. Electrochemical window of gallium metal and activity coefficient of plutonium in gallium have been determined by using potentiometric method. Secondly, the electrochemical properties of plutonium have been studied in molten equimolar NaCl/KCl and CaCl 2 at 1073 K by cyclic voltammetry. The standard potentials of Pu(III)/Pu redox couple, respectively, -2,54 V and -2,51 V, led to the calculation of the activity coefficients of Pu(III). In CaCl 2 the complexation of Pu(III) ions is lower and the voltage gap between Pu(III)/Pu couple and the solvent limit is higher. The new data on plutonium electrochemistry in molten chlorides and liquid gallium media combined with literature data on lanthanides suggest that gallium can be a good solvent metal for pyro-chemistry separation. (authors)

  12. Limits on dark matter annihilation in the sun using the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Adrián-Martínez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A search for muon neutrinos originating from dark matter annihilations in the Sun is performed using the data recorded by the ANTARES neutrino telescope from 2007 to 2012. In order to obtain the best possible sensitivities to dark matter signals, an optimisation of the event selection criteria is performed taking into account the background of atmospheric muons, atmospheric neutrinos and the energy spectra of the expected neutrino signals. No significant excess over the background is observed and 90% C.L. upper limits on the neutrino flux, the spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-sections are derived for WIMP masses ranging from 50 GeV to 5 TeV for the annihilation channels WIMP+WIMP→bb¯,W+W− and τ+τ−.

  13. Intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations in molten RbCl-AgCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, S. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI, SPring-8), Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kawakita, Y. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shimakura, H. [Faculty of Pharmacy, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Ohara, K. [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI, SPring-8), Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukami, T. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Takeda, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    A first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) is observed in the X-ray total structure factor of a molten mixture of RbCl-AgCl, while both pure melts of RbCl and AgCl do not exhibit FSDP individually. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the origin of the FSDP with the polarizable ion model (PIM). Coexistence of covalent Ag–Cl and ionic Rb–Cl bonds leads the system to evolve intermediate range ordering, which is simulated by introducing the induced polarization in different ways between Ag–Cl with fully polarizable treatment based on Vashishta-Raman potential and Rb–Cl with suppression over-polarization in the nearest neighbor contribution based on Born-Meyer potential. The partial structure factors for both the Ag–Ag and Rb–Rb correlations, S{sub AgAg}(Q) and S{sub RbRb}(Q), show a positive contribution to the FSDP, while S{sub AgRb}(Q) for the Ag–Rb correlation exhibits a negative contribution, indicating that Ag and Rb ions are distributed in an alternating manner within the intermediate-range length scale. The origin of the intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations can be ascribed to the preferred direction of the dipole moments of anions in the PIM.

  14. Intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations in molten RbCl-AgCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, S.; Kawakita, Y.; Shimakura, H.; Ohara, K.; Fukami, T.; Takeda, S.

    2015-01-01

    A first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) is observed in the X-ray total structure factor of a molten mixture of RbCl-AgCl, while both pure melts of RbCl and AgCl do not exhibit FSDP individually. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the origin of the FSDP with the polarizable ion model (PIM). Coexistence of covalent Ag–Cl and ionic Rb–Cl bonds leads the system to evolve intermediate range ordering, which is simulated by introducing the induced polarization in different ways between Ag–Cl with fully polarizable treatment based on Vashishta-Raman potential and Rb–Cl with suppression over-polarization in the nearest neighbor contribution based on Born-Meyer potential. The partial structure factors for both the Ag–Ag and Rb–Rb correlations, S AgAg (Q) and S RbRb (Q), show a positive contribution to the FSDP, while S AgRb (Q) for the Ag–Rb correlation exhibits a negative contribution, indicating that Ag and Rb ions are distributed in an alternating manner within the intermediate-range length scale. The origin of the intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations can be ascribed to the preferred direction of the dipole moments of anions in the PIM

  15. ZnCl 2- and NH 4Cl-hydroponics gel electrolytes for zinc-carbon batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, N. H.; Ismail, Y. M. Baba; Mohamad, A. A.

    Absorbency testing is used to determine the percentage of ZnCl 2 or NH 4Cl solution absorbed by a hydroponics gel (HPG). It is found that the absorbency of ZnCl 2 or NH 4Cl solution decreases with increasing solution concentration. The conductivity of ZnCl 2- and NH 4Cl-HPG electrolytes is dependent on the solution concentration. A mixture of salt solution with HPG yields excellent gel polymer electrolytes with conductivities of 0.026 and 0.104 S cm -1 at 3 M ZnCl 2 and 7 M NH 4Cl, respectively. These gel electrolytes are then used to produce zinc-carbon cells. The fabricated cells give capacities of 8.8 and 10.0 mAh, have an internal resistance of 25.4 and 19.8 Ω, a maximum power density of 12.7 and 12.2 mW cm -2, and a short-circuit current density of 29.1 and 33.9 mA cm -2 for ZnCl 2- and NH 4Cl-HPG electrolytes, respectively.

  16. 36Cl production and mobility in the Cigar Lake uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornett, R.J.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Cramer, J.J.; Andrew, H.R.; Koslowsky, V.T.

    2010-01-01

    Can accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) studies validate risk assessments of the long-term behaviour of contaminants such as radionuclides? AMS measurements on samples from the 1.3 billion-year-old Cigar Lake uranium ore deposit provide one approach to address this question. In Cigar Lake, elevated concentrations of uranium enhance the in situ neutron flux that produces 36 Cl and other radionuclides. We calculated the production of 36 Cl using a Monte Carlo neutron transport code. We then tested for the loss of 36 Cl from ore samples collected from an 8 m stratigraphic section through the deposit by comparing the predicted values (assuming equilibrium between production and decay) with the concentrations measured by AMS. The 36 Cl:Cl atom ratios within the ore were more than two orders of magnitude higher than in the surrounding host rock and ranged from 4 to 64 x 10 -12 . The 36 Cl concentrations in the ore, rock, clay and fracture infilling minerals all agree with the values predicted by the Monte Carlo simulations. We conclude that 36 Cl has very limited mobility. Even in matrix adjacent to more permeable fractures, there is no evidence that the measured isotopic ratios deviate significantly from the predicted values.

  17. Electric conductivity of PCl{sub 5}-ZrCl{sub 4}, PCl{sub 5}-TaCl{sub 5}, and PCl{sub 5}-MoCl{sub 5} molten mixtures; Ehlektroprovodnost` rasplavlennykh sistem PCl{sub 5}-ZrCl{sub 4}, PCl{sub 5}-TaCl{sub 5}, i PCl{sub 5}-MoCl{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A B; Red` kin, A A; Moskalenko, N I [Inst. Vysokotemperaturnoj Ehlektrokhimii UrO RAN, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-05-01

    When mixing individual molecular melts of PCl{sub 5} with ZrCl{sub 4}, TaCl{sub 5} or with MoCl{sub 5}, an essential (by several orders) increase in electric conductivity (up to 0.02-0.1 Ohm{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup -1}), which stems, in all probability, from the appearance of complex ions PCl{sub 4}{sup +}, ZrCl{sub 5}{sup -}, ZrCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, TaCl{sub 5}{sup -} and MoCl{sub 6}{sup -} in the molten mixtures as a result of chemical interaction. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Negative chlorine ion chemistry in the upper stratosphere and its application to an artificially created dense electron cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Prasad

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses new potential reactions of chlorine-bearing anions (negative ions in the upper stratosphere. These reactions are then applied to the negative-ion chemistry following the injection of an electron cloud of very high density, of the order of 106-107 e- cm-3, in the 40-45-km region. The idea is to evaluate the recently proposed scheme to mitigate ozone depletion by converting the reactive chlorine atoms at these altitudes into Cl- ions which are unreactive towards ozone, i.e., electron scavenging of Cl. We find that the previously neglected photodetachment from Cl- is fast. For an overhead sun, this process may have a rate coefficient of 0.08 s-1 when multiple scattering is included. The rate could be even higher, depending on the ground albedo. Switching reaction between Cl-·H2O and HCl might lead to the formation of Cl-·HCl anion. Possible reactions of Cl-·H2O and Cl-·HCl with O atoms could produce ClO- and Cl-2. The production of ClO- in this manner is significant because Cl- having a high photodetachment rate constant would be regenerated in the very likely reactions of ClO- with O. When these possibilities are considered, then it is found that the chlorine anions may not be the major ions inside the electron cloud due to the rapid photodetachment from Cl-. Furthermore, in such a cloud, there may be the hazard that the Cl--Cl-·H2O-ClO--Cl- cycle amounts to catalytic destruction of two O atoms. Thus, the scheme could be risky if practised in the altitude region where atomic oxygen is an important constituent. Similar conclusions apply even if the ClO- species forms ClO-3 by three-body association with O2, instead of reacting with O. It must be emphasized that the present study is speculative at this time, because none of the relevant reactions have been investigated in the laboratory as yet. Nevertheless, it is very safe to say that the scheme of ozone preservation by electron scavenging of the upper stratospheric Cl is

  19. Franck-Condon Simulations including Anharmonicity of the Ã(1)A''-X̃(1)A' Absorption and Single Vibronic Level Emission Spectra of HSiCl and DSiCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Daniel W K; Lee, Edmond P F; Chau, Foo-Tim; Dyke, John M

    2009-03-10

    RCCSD(T) and/or CASSCF/MRCI calculations have been carried out on the X̃(1)A' and Ã(1)A'' states of HSiCl employing basis sets of up to the aug-cc-pV5Z quality. Contributions from core correlation and extrapolation to the complete basis set limit were included in determining the computed equilibrium geometrical parameters and relative electronic energy of these two states of HSiCl. Franck-Condon factors which include allowance for anharmonicity and Duschinsky rotation between these two states of HSiCl and DSiCl were calculated employing RCCSD(T) and CASSCF/MRCI potential energy functions, and were used to simulate the Ã(1)A'' ← X̃(1)A' absorption and Ã(1)A'' → X̃(1)A' single vibronic level (SVL) emission spectra of HSiCl and DSiCl. Simulated absorption and experimental LIF spectra, and simulated and observed Ã(1)A''(0,0,0) → X̃(1)A' SVL emission spectra, of HSiCl and DSiCl are in very good agreement. However, agreement between simulated and observed Ã(1)A''(0,1,0) → X̃(1)A' and Ã(1)A''(0,2,1) → X̃(1)A' SVL emission spectra of DSiCl is not as good. Preliminary calculations on low-lying excited states of HSiCl suggest that vibronic interaction between low-lying vibrational levels of the Ã(1)A'' state and highly excited vibrational levels of the ã(3)A'' is possible. Such vibronic interaction may change the character of the low-lying vibrational levels of the Ã(1)A'' state, which would lead to perturbation in the SVL emission spectra from these vibrational levels.

  20. Influência das concavidades radiculares nas perdas clínicas de inserção, detectadas no exame clínico periodontal inicial The influence of root concavities on clinical attachment loss diagnosed at the initial evaluation of periodontal patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Emilio PUSTIGLIONI

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste estudo foi estabelecer a influência das concavidades radiculares na perda clínica de inserção (PCI diagnosticada no exame clínico periodontal inicial. Os dados de PCI foram obtidos dos primeiros e segundos pré-molares, caninos, incisivos laterais e centrais superiores e inferiores, de 163 pacientes. Os dados foram coletados das fichas periodontais dos pacientes que procuraram a Clínica do curso de Pós-Graduação em Periodontia da FOUSP. Foi realizada sondagem em todos os dentes para que se obtivesse as seguintes medidas: distância da linha esmalte cemento à margem gengival, profundidade clínica de sondagem (PCS nos sítios distovestibular (DV, centrovestibular (CV, mesiovestibular (MV, distolingual (DL, centrolingual (CL e mesiolingual (ML. Os dados foram incluídos no estudo quando pelo menos um dos sítios apresentasse PCI ³ 4 mm. Após a análise estatística (Friedman ANOVA test CV e CL mostraram valores de PCI estatisticamente menores para todos os dentes superiores e inferiores. Clinicamente CV mostrou os menores valores de perda clínica de inserção entre todos os dentes analisados, seguido de CL. Embora, baseados em nossos resultados, não exista correlação estatística entre PCI e a presença de concavidades radiculares, não podemos subestimar as últimas no exame clínico inicial, diagnóstico, prognóstico, planejamento cirúrgico e na fase de controle e manutenção do tratamento periodontal.The purpose of this study was to establish the influence of root concavities on clinical attachment loss (CAL that was diagnosed at the initial evaluation of periodontal patients. CAL data were analyzed in the following teeth of 163 patients: upper and lower second and first bicuspids, cuspids, lateral and central incisors. Data were retrieved from the initial dental chart of patients seeking treatment at the Periodontics Graduate Clinic, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo. Probing was accomplished

  1. Electric Mars: The first direct measurement of an upper limit for the Martian "polar wind" electric potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Glyn; Mitchell, David; Glocer, Alex; Grebowsky, Joseph; Peterson, W. K.; Connerney, Jack; Andersson, Laila; Espley, Jared; Mazelle, Christian; Sauvaud, Jean-André; Fedorov, Andrei; Ma, Yingjuan; Bougher, Steven; Lillis, Robert; Ergun, Robert; Jakosky, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    An important mechanism in the generation of polar wind outflow is the ambipolar electric potential which assists ions in overcoming gravity and is a key mechanism for Terrestrial ionospheric escape. At Mars, open field lines are not confined to the poles, and outflow of ionospheric electrons is observed far into the tail. It has thus been hypothesized that a similar electric potential may be present at Mars, contributing to global ionospheric loss. However, no direct measurements of this potential have been made. In this pilot study, we examine photoelectron spectra measured by the Solar Wind Electron Analyzer instrument on the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) Mars Scout to put an initial upper bound on the total potential drop in the ionosphere of Mars of Φ♂ ≾⊥ 2V , with the possibility of a further ≾4.5 V potential drop above this in the magnetotail. If the total potential drop was close to the upper limit, then strong outflows of major ionospheric species (H+, O+, and O2+) would be expected. However, if most of the potential drop is confined below the spacecraft, as expected by current theory, then such a potential would not be sufficient on its own to accelerate O2+ to escape velocities, but would be sufficient for lighter ions. However, any potential would contribute to atmospheric loss through the enhancement of Jeans escape.

  2. Increased seedling establishment via enemy release at the upper elevational range limit of sugar maple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urli, Morgane; Brown, Carissa D; Narváez Perez, Rosela; Chagnon, Pierre-Luc; Vellend, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The enemy release hypothesis is frequently invoked to explain invasion by nonnative species, but studies focusing on the influence of enemies on natural plant range expansion due to climate change remain scarce. We combined multiple approaches to study the influence of plant-enemy interactions on the upper elevational range limit of sugar maple (Acer saccharum) in southeastern Québec, Canada, where a previous study had demonstrated intense seed predation just beyond the range limit. Consistent with the hypothesis of release from natural enemies at the range limit, data from both natural patterns of regeneration and from seed and seedling transplant experiments showed higher seedling densities at the range edge than in the core of the species' distribution. A growth chamber experiment manipulating soil origin and temperature indicated that this so-called "happy edge" was not likely caused by temperature (i.e., the possibility that climate warming has made high elevation temperatures optimal for sugar maple) or by abiotic soil factors that vary along the elevational gradient. Finally, an insect-herbivore-exclusion experiment showed that insect herbivory was a major cause of seedling mortality in the core of sugar maple's distribution, whereas seedlings transplanted at or beyond the range edge experienced minimal herbivory (i.e., enemy release). Insect herbivory did not completely explain the high levels of seedling mortality in the core of the species' distribution, suggesting that seedlings at or beyond the range edge may also experience release from pathogens. In sum, while some effects of enemies are magnified beyond range edges (e.g., seed predation), others are dampened at and beyond the range edge (e.g., insect herbivory), such that understanding the net outcome of different biotic interactions within, at and beyond the edge of distribution is critical to predicting species' responses to global change. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  3. OpenCL programming guide

    CERN Document Server

    Munshi, Aaftab; Mattson, Timothy G; Fung, James; Ginsburg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Using the new OpenCL (Open Computing Language) standard, you can write applications that access all available programming resources: CPUs, GPUs, and other processors such as DSPs and the Cell/B.E. processor. Already implemented by Apple, AMD, Intel, IBM, NVIDIA, and other leaders, OpenCL has outstanding potential for PCs, servers, handheld/embedded devices, high performance computing, and even cloud systems. This is the first comprehensive, authoritative, and practical guide to OpenCL 1.1 specifically for working developers and software architects. Written by five leading OpenCL authorities, OpenCL Programming Guide covers the entire specification. It reviews key use cases, shows how OpenCL can express a wide range of parallel algorithms, and offers complete reference material on both the API and OpenCL C programming language. Through complete case studies and downloadable code examples, the authors show how to write complex parallel programs that decompose workloads across many different devices. They...

  4. Upper bounds on superpartner masses from upper bounds on the Higgs boson mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, M E; Casas, J A; Delgado, A

    2012-01-13

    The LHC is putting bounds on the Higgs boson mass. In this Letter we use those bounds to constrain the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) parameter space using the fact that, in supersymmetry, the Higgs mass is a function of the masses of sparticles, and therefore an upper bound on the Higgs mass translates into an upper bound for the masses for superpartners. We show that, although current bounds do not constrain the MSSM parameter space from above, once the Higgs mass bound improves big regions of this parameter space will be excluded, putting upper bounds on supersymmetry (SUSY) masses. On the other hand, for the case of split-SUSY we show that, for moderate or large tanβ, the present bounds on the Higgs mass imply that the common mass for scalars cannot be greater than 10(11)  GeV. We show how these bounds will evolve as LHC continues to improve the limits on the Higgs mass.

  5. A new experimental limit for the stability of the electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V.; Krivosheina, I.V.; Titkova, I.V.

    2007-01-01

    A lower limit of >1.22x10 26 yr (68% c.l.) has been determined for the mean life time of electron decay via the branch e - ->γ+ν e . The limit was deduced from the spectra measured in the period 1995-2003 with the full set-up of 5 enriched 76 Ge detectors of the Heidelberg-Moscow ββ experiment in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. One of the detectors, and the setup 1 consisting of four detectors show an indication of a signal on a 1.4σ C.L. The best limit given by a single detector is 1.93x10 26 yr. The result is the by far sharpest limit obtained with Ge detectors. When comparing it with other limits, e.g. that from Borexino [H.O. Back, et al., Phys. Lett. B 525 (2002) 29] it may be essential to note that the present limit has been deduced from the raw data without any treatment of the background, and also, that the energy resolution in the present experiment is much larger than in the other most sensitive experiments. Combined with the best laboratory limit on the photon mass the present result gives the following restriction for charge nonconservation: ε eνγ -98 (68% c.l.) or -97 (90% c.l.)

  6. A retrieved upper limit of CS in Neptune's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, T.; Mizuno, A.; Nagahama, T.; Hirota, A.; Nakajima, T.

    2012-12-01

    We present our new result of CS(J=7-6), CO(J=3-2) observations of Neptune's atmosphere carried out with 10-m ASTE sub-mm waveband telescope on August 2010. As a result, while CS line was not detected with 6.4 mK 1-sigma r.m.s. noise level, CO line was detected as 282 mK with 9.7 mK noise level in antenna temperature scale. All of the observations were carried out with 512 MHz bandwidth and 500 kHz resolution, the total integration time for CS and CO were 23 m 40 s and 11 m 00 s, respectively. Abundances have been obtained from the comparison between the intensity and the synthesis spectra modeled by plane parallel 1-D radiative transfer code assuming various mixing ratio of each gas. The retrieved upper limit of CS mixing ratio was 0.03 ppb throughout tropopause to stratosphere. CO mixing ratio have been retrieved 1.0 ppm with errors +0.3 and -0.2 ppm, and the result was consistent with previous observation [1]. The origin of abundant CO in Neptune's atmosphere has been long discussed since its mixing ratio is 30 - 500 times higher than the value of other gas giants [2][3][4]. Assuming that all of CO is produced by thermochemical equilibrium process in deep interior of Neptune, required O/H value in interior is 440 times higher than the solar value [5]. For this reason, it is claimed that the external CO supply source, such as the impact of comet or asteroid, is also the possible candidates of the origin of CO along with the internal supply source [6]. In this observation, we searched the remnant gas of cometary impact in Neptune's atmosphere. Along with CO and HCN, CS could be one of the possible candidate of the remnant gas of cometary impact since CS was largely produced after the impact of comet SL/9 on Jupiter while many other major sulfur compounds have not been detected. Actually, derived L37-40. [7]Moreno et al., 2003. Planetary and Space Sciences 51, 591-611 [8]Zahnle et al.,1995. GRL 22, 1593-1596 [9]Feuchtgruber et al., 1999. Proceeding of the conference

  7. Apparent molar volumes for dilute solutions of NaClO4 and [Co(en) 3](ClO4)3 in D2O and H2O at 278-318 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottomley, G.A.; Glossop, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    Apparent molar volumes for dilute solutions of NaClO 4 and [Co(en) 3 ](ClO 4 ) 3 in D 2 O and H 2 O were measured by using a dilatometry technique at 278, 298 and 318K. Comparison of limiting slopes with the Debye-Huckel predictions from the dielectric constant and compressibility of H 2 O and D 2 O is complicated by ion pairing. The apparent molar volumes for NaClO 4 were less in D 2 O than in H 2 O. The complex [Co(en) 3 ](ClO 4 ) 3 when studied in D 2 O had its amine protons exchanged by deuterium; this did not allow a direct comparison of the apparent molar volumes of the protonated complex in each solvent system, but revealed a large isotope effect. The apparent molar volumes of the [Co(en) 3 ](ClO 4 ) 3 showed a much larger temperature dependence than that of NaClO 4

  8. Thermodynamics properties of plutonium in NaCl-KCl and CaCl{sub 2} at 1073 K and in liquid gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambertin, D.; Ched' homme, S.; Bourges, G.; Pescayre, L.; Sanchez, S.; Picard, G

    2004-07-01

    Cadmium and bismuth metal are mostly used as solvent in nuclear pyrochemical processes and especially in actinides/lanthanides separations. Gallium metal has been chosen because no literature values are available with plutonium and its regeneration by refining at low temperature is possible. Electrochemical window of gallium metal and activity coefficient of plutonium in gallium have been determined by using potentiometric method. Secondly, the electrochemical properties of plutonium have been studied in molten equimolar NaCl/KCl and CaCl{sub 2} at 1073 K by cyclic voltammetry. The standard potentials of Pu(III)/Pu redox couple, respectively, -2,54 V and -2,51 V, led to the calculation of the activity coefficients of Pu(III). In CaCl{sub 2} the complexation of Pu(III) ions is lower and the voltage gap between Pu(III)/Pu couple and the solvent limit is higher. The new data on plutonium electrochemistry in molten chlorides and liquid gallium media combined with literature data on lanthanides suggest that gallium can be a good solvent metal for pyro-chemistry separation. (authors)

  9. Density of molten salt Mixtures of eutectic LiCl-KCl containing UCl{sub 3}, CeCl{sub 3}, or LaCl{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.; Simpson, M. F. [Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Densities of molten salt mixtures of eutectic LiCl-KCl with UCl{sub 3}, CeCl{sub 3}, or LaCl{sub 3} at various concentrations (up to 13 wt%) were measured using a liquid surface displacement probe. Linear relationships between the mixture density and the concentration of the added salt were observed. For LaCl{sub 3} and CeCl{sub 3}, the measured densities were signifcantly higher than those previously reported from Archimedes’ method. In the case of LiCl-KCl-UCl{sub 3}, the data ft the ideal mixture density model very well. For the other salts, the measured densities exceeded the ideal model prediction by about 2%.

  10. An assessment of racial differences in the upper limits of normal ALT levels in children and the effect of obesity on elevated values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliethermes, S; Ma, M; Purtell, C; Balasubramanian, N; Gonzalez, B; Layden, T J; Cotler, S J

    2017-10-01

    Childhood obesity is a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and poses important public health issues for children. Racial differences in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels among children have not been described. This study aimed to identify racial differences in upper limit normal (ULN) ALT levels and evaluate the effect of obesity on elevated levels in children without other metabolic risk factors. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys and clinical data from the Loyola University Health System were used to determine ULN ALT by race and gender. Quantile regression was used to evaluate the impact of obesity on elevated ALT and to identify potential risk factors for ALT above the ULN. Upper limit normal (ULN) ALT was approximately 28.0 and 21.0-24.0 U/L for boys and girls, respectively. No significant difference in ULN ALT across race was observed. Obesity was significantly associated with elevated ALT; obese children with elevated ALT had values 10 U/L higher than normal-weight children. Racial differences in ALT levels among adults are not evident in children. Obesity, in the absence of metabolic risk factors and other causes of liver disease, is associated with elevated ALT, providing evidence against the concept of healthy obesity in children. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  11. Outcomes of the Bobath concept on upper limb recovery following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Carolyn; Dodd, Karen J; Brock, Kim

    2004-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the Bobath concept at reducing upper limb impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions after stroke. Electronic databases were searched to identify relevant trials published between 1966 and 2003. Two reviewers independently assessed articles for the following inclusion criteria: population of adults with upper limb disability after stroke; stated use of the Bobath concept aimed at improving upper limb disability in isolation from other approaches; outcomes reflecting changes in upper limb impairment, activity limitation or participation restriction. Of the 688 articles initially identified, eight met the inclusion criteria. Five were randomized controlled trials, one used a single-group crossover design and two were single-case design studies. Five studies measured impairments including shoulder pain, tone, muscle strength and motor control. The Bobath concept was found to reduce shoulder pain better than cryotherapy, and to reduce tone compared to no intervention and compared to proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF). However, no difference was detected for changes in tone between the Bobath concept and a functional approach. Differences did not reach significance for measures of muscle strength and motor control. Six studies measured activity limitations, none of these found the Bobath concept was superior to other therapy approaches. Two studies measured changes in participation restriction and both found equivocal results. Comparisons of the Bobath concept with other approaches do not demonstrate superiority of one approach over the other at improving upper limb impairment, activity or participation. However, study limitations relating to methodological quality, the outcome measures used and contextual factors investigated limit the ability to draw conclusions. Future research should use sensitive upper limb measures, trained Bobath therapists and homogeneous samples to identify the influence of

  12. UPPER LIMITS FROM FIVE YEARS OF BLAZAR OBSERVATIONS WITH THE VERITAS CHERENKOV TELESCOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Archer, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Biteau, J. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Buchovecky, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Chen, X. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Eisch, J. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Falcone, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Fleischhack, H., E-mail: wystan.benbow@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: matteo.cerruti@lpnhe.in2p3.fr, E-mail: caajohns@ucsc.edu [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Collaboration: VERITAS collaboration; and others

    2016-06-01

    Between the beginning of its full-scale scientific operations in 2007 and 2012, the VERITAS Cherenkov telescope array observed more than 130 blazars; of these, 26 were detected as very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ -ray sources. In this work, we present the analysis results of a sample of 114 undetected objects. The observations constitute a total live-time of ∼570 hr. The sample includes several unidentified Fermi -Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources (located at high Galactic latitude) as well as all the sources from the second Fermi -LAT catalog that are contained within the field of view of the VERITAS observations. We have also performed optical spectroscopy measurements in order to estimate the redshift of some of these blazars that do not have spectroscopic distance estimates. We present new optical spectra from the Kast instrument on the Shane telescope at the Lick observatory for 18 blazars included in this work, which allowed for the successful measurement or constraint on the redshift of four of them. For each of the blazars included in our sample, we provide the flux upper limit in the VERITAS energy band. We also study the properties of the significance distributions and we present the result of a stacked analysis of the data set, which shows a 4 σ excess.

  13. Estimation of the upper limit of aerosol nanoparticles penetration through inhomogeneous fibrous filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podgorski, Albert

    2009-01-01

    The fully segregated flow model (FSFM) was formulated to describe filtration of aerosol nanoparticles in polydisperse fibrous filters made of fibers with different diameters. The model is capable of predicting significantly higher penetration of nanoparticles through polydisperse filters than it may be expected from the classical theory applied to a mean fiber diameter. The model was solved numerically in the case of the log-normal fiber size distribution, and a simple correlation between the actual penetration through a polydisperse filter and the one calculated for the geometric mean fiber diameter was proposed. Equivalent fiber diameter for deposition due to Brownian diffusion was determined and it was found to be dependent on particle size and filter's polydispersity degree, being significantly greater than any mean fiber diameter. It was noted that it is impossible to select any one universal mean fiber diameter to describe penetration of nanoparticles with different sizes. It was also shown that in the case of a polydisperse fibrous filter the apparent exponent of the Peclet number based on the mean fiber diameter is greater than the expected value of -2/3 for diffusional deposition in a monodisperse filter. This prediction is in agreement with the available experimental data. The FSFM is expected to give the estimation of the upper limit of nanoparticles penetration in polydisperse fibrous filters.

  14. UPPER LIMITS FROM FIVE YEARS OF BLAZAR OBSERVATIONS WITH THE VERITAS CHERENKOV TELESCOPES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Buchovecky, M.; Byrum, K.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Fleischhack, H.

    2016-01-01

    Between the beginning of its full-scale scientific operations in 2007 and 2012, the VERITAS Cherenkov telescope array observed more than 130 blazars; of these, 26 were detected as very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ -ray sources. In this work, we present the analysis results of a sample of 114 undetected objects. The observations constitute a total live-time of ∼570 hr. The sample includes several unidentified Fermi -Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources (located at high Galactic latitude) as well as all the sources from the second Fermi -LAT catalog that are contained within the field of view of the VERITAS observations. We have also performed optical spectroscopy measurements in order to estimate the redshift of some of these blazars that do not have spectroscopic distance estimates. We present new optical spectra from the Kast instrument on the Shane telescope at the Lick observatory for 18 blazars included in this work, which allowed for the successful measurement or constraint on the redshift of four of them. For each of the blazars included in our sample, we provide the flux upper limit in the VERITAS energy band. We also study the properties of the significance distributions and we present the result of a stacked analysis of the data set, which shows a 4 σ excess.

  15. Electrodeposition of Al-Ta alloys in NaCl-KCl-AlCl{sub 3} molten salt containing TaCl{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Kazuki; Matsushima, Hisayoshi; Ueda, Mikito, E-mail: mikito@eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Electrodeposition of Al-Ta alloys in an AlCl{sub 3}-NaCl-KCl-TaCl{sub 5} melt was carried out. • We were obtained 72 at% Ta-Al alloy at 0.3 V. • Amorphous Ta-Al was formed in high Ta concentration. - Abstract: To form Al-Ta alloys for high temperature oxidation resistance components, molten salt electrolysis was carried out in an AlCl{sub 3}-NaCl-KCl melt containing TaCl{sub 5} at 423 K. The voltammogram showed two cathodic waves at 0.45 V and 0.7 V vs. Al/Al(III), which may correspond to reduction from Ta(V) to Ta(III) and from Ta(III) to tantalum metal, respectively. Electrodeposits of Al and Ta were obtained in the range from −0.05 to 0.3 V and the highest concentration of Ta in the electrodeposit was 72 at% at 0.3 V. With increasing Ta content in the alloy, the morphology of the electrodeposits became powdery and the particle size smaller.

  16. Improved upper limits on the stochastic gravitational-wave background from 2009-2010 LIGO and Virgo data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C-H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Le Roux, A; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Luijten, E; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyers, P; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Milde, S; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moesta, P; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Kumar, D Nanda; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quiroga, G; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rodruck, M; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; Ter Braack, A P M; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yang, Z; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J

    2014-12-05

    Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the Universe that is unavailable through standard electromagnetic observations, making its study of fundamental importance to understanding the evolution of the Universe. We carry out a search for the stochastic background with the latest data from the LIGO and Virgo detectors. Consistent with predictions from most stochastic gravitational-wave background models, the data display no evidence of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal. Assuming a gravitational-wave spectrum of Ω_{GW}(f)=Ω_{α}(f/f_{ref})^{α}, we place 95% confidence level upper limits on the energy density of the background in each of four frequency bands spanning 41.5-1726 Hz. In the frequency band of 41.5-169.25 Hz for a spectral index of α=0, we constrain the energy density of the stochastic background to be Ω_{GW}(f)waves.

  17. The collectins CL-L1, CL-K1 and CL-P1, and their roles in complement and innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Soren W K; Ohtani, Katsuki; Roy, Nitai

    2016-01-01

    as CL-LK) and its activation of the lectin pathway via MASPs, drew new attention in the complement biology, which was further strengthened by the observed interactions between CL-P1 and CRP-C1q-factor H or properdin. Deficiency of either CL-K1 or MASP-3 has been demonstrated in 3MC syndrome patients...

  18. NbCl 5 and CrCl 3 catalysts effect on synthesis and hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two kinds of novel materials, Mg–1.6 mol% Ni–0.4 mol% NiO–2 mol% MCl (MCl = NbCl5, CrCl3), along with Mg–1.6 mol% Ni–0.4 mol% NiO for comparison, were examined for their potential use in hydrogen storage applications, having been fabricated via cryomilling. The effects of NbCl5 and CrCl3 on hydrogen storage ...

  19. Upper Limits on the Presence of Central Massive Black Holes in Two Ultra-compact Dwarf Galaxies in Centaurus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voggel, Karina T.; Seth, Anil C.; Neumayer, Nadine; Mieske, Steffen; Chilingarian, Igor; Ahn, Christopher; Baumgardt, Holger; Hilker, Michael; Nguyen, Dieu D.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; den Brok, Mark; Strader, Jay

    2018-05-01

    The recent discovery of massive black holes (BHs) in the centers of high-mass ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) suggests that at least some are the stripped nuclear star clusters of dwarf galaxies. We present the first study that investigates whether such massive BHs, and therefore stripped nuclei, also exist in low-mass (M < 107 M ⊙) UCDs. We constrain the BH masses of two UCDs located in Centaurus A (UCD 320 and UCD 330) using Jeans modeling of the resolved stellar kinematics from adaptive optics data obtained with the SINFONI integral field spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope (VLT/SINFONI). No massive BHs are found in either UCD. We find a 3σ upper limit on the central BH mass in UCD 330 of M • < 1.0 × 105 M ⊙, which corresponds to 1.7% of the total mass. This excludes a high-mass fraction BH and would only allow low-mass BHs similar to those claimed to be detected in Local Group globular clusters. For UCD 320, poorer data quality results in a less constraining 3σ upper limit of M • < 1 × 106 M ⊙, which is equal to 37.7% of the total mass. The dynamical mass-to-light ratios of UCD 320 and UCD 330 are not inflated compared to predictions from stellar population models. The non-detection of BHs in these low-mass UCDs is consistent with the idea that elevated dynamical mass-to-light ratios do indicate the presence of a substantial BH. Although no massive BHs are detected, these systems could still be stripped nuclei. The strong rotation (v/σ of 0.3–0.4) in both UCDs and the two-component light profile in UCD 330 support the idea that these UCDs may be stripped nuclei of low-mass galaxies whose BH occupation fraction is not yet known.

  20. Upper Extremity Injured Workers Stratified by Current Work Status: An Examination of Health Characteristics, Work Limitations and Work Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Pichora

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Upper extremity injured workers are an under-studied population. A descriptive comparison of workers with shoulder, elbow and hand injuries reporting to a Canadian Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB clinic was undertaken. Objective: To determine if differences existed between injury groups stratified by current work status. Methods: All WSIB claimants reporting to our upper extremity clinic between 2003 and 2008 were approached to participate in this descriptive study. 314 working and 146 non-working WSIB claimants completed the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH; Short Form health survey (SF36; Worker’s Limitations Questionnaire and the Work Instability Scale. Various parametric and non-parametric analyses were used to assess significant differences between groups on demographic, work and health related variables. Results: Hand, followed by the shoulder and elbow were the most common site of injury. Most non-workers listed their current injury as the reason for being off work, and attempted to return to work once since their injury occurrence. Non-workers and a subset of workers at high risk for work loss showed significantly worse mental functioning. Workers identified physical demands as the most frequent injury-related on the job limitation. 60% of current workers were listed as low risk for work loss on the Work Instability Scale. Conclusions: Poorer mental functioning, being female and sustaining a shoulder injury were risk factors for work instability. Our cohort of injured non-workers were unable to return to work due to their current injury, reinforcing the need to advocate for modified duties, shorter hours and a work environment where stress and injury recurrence is reduced. Future studies examining pre-injury depression as a risk factor for prolonged work absences are warranted.

  1. Sub-threshold excited Cl Kβ (K-V) x-ray fluorescence from CF3Cl molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Cowan, P.L.; Lindle, D.W.; LaVilla, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    With the availability of tunable synchrotron radiation sources, unoccupied molecular orbits (below vacuum level) can be selectively populated producing highly excited neutral molecules. X-ray fluorescence spectra from molecules were obtained with excitation below the ionization threshold and were observed to have significant intensity changes, absolute and relative energy position shifts and line width changes as compared to fluorescence spectra excited above the threshold. As an example, the Cl Kβ (K-V) emission spectra from CF 3 Cl vapor are presented. The energy shifts and intensity changes are explained in terms of perturbation effects due to the presence of an electron in an unoccupied molecular orbital. The narrow line widths obtained in the spectra excited below threshold are explained in terms of the ''effective'' hole production region in a core state limited by the broadening of the unoccupied level. The change in line widths as a function of below-threshold excitation energy is proposed as a novel technique to study the localized properties and reorganization effects of a hole in a core level. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. Negative chlorine ion chemistry in the upper stratosphere and its application to an artificially created dense electron cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Prasad

    Full Text Available This paper discusses new potential reactions of chlorine-bearing anions (negative ions in the upper stratosphere. These reactions are then applied to the negative-ion chemistry following the injection of an electron cloud of very high density, of the order of 106-107 e- cm-3, in the 40-45-km region. The idea is to evaluate the recently proposed scheme to mitigate ozone depletion by converting the reactive chlorine atoms at these altitudes into Cl- ions which are unreactive towards ozone, i.e., electron scavenging of Cl. We find that the previously neglected photodetachment from Cl- is fast. For an overhead sun, this process may have a rate coefficient of 0.08 s-1 when multiple scattering is included. The rate could be even higher, depending on the ground albedo. Switching reaction between Cl-·H2O and HCl might lead to the formation of Cl-·HCl anion. Possible reactions of Cl-·H2O and Cl-·HCl with O atoms could produce ClO- and Cl-2. The production of ClO- in this manner is significant because Cl- having a high photodetachment rate constant would be regenerated in the very likely reactions of ClO- with O. When these possibilities are considered, then it is found that the chlorine anions may not be the major ions inside the electron cloud due to the rapid photodetachment from Cl-. Furthermore, in such a cloud, there may be the hazard that the Cl--Cl-·H2O-ClO--Cl- cycle amounts to catalytic destruction of two O atoms. Thus, the scheme could be risky if practised in the altitude region where atomic oxygen is an important constituent. Similar conclusions apply even if the ClO- species forms ClO-3 by three-body association with O2

  3. Limits on rare exclusive decays of B mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, P.; Besson, D.; Bowcock, T.; Giles, R.T.; Hassard, J.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.M.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Gentile, T.; Haas, P.; Hempstead, M.; Jensen, T.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Behrends, S.; Guida, J.M.; Guida, J.A.; Morrow, F.; Poling, R.; Thorndike, E.H.; Tipton, P.; Alam, M.S.; Katayama, N.; Kim, I.J.; Sun, C.R.; Tanikella, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Chen, A.; Garren, L.; Goldberg, M.; Holmes, R.; Horwitz, N.; Jawahery, A.; Lubrano, P.; Moneti, G.C.; Sharma, V.; Csorna, S.E.; Mestayer, M.D.; Panvini, R.S.; Word, G.B.; Bean, A.; Bobbink, G.J.; Brock, I.C.; Engler, A.; Ferguson, T.; Kraemer, R.W.; Rippich, C.; Vogel, H.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Blucher, E.; Cassel, D.G.; Copie, T.; DeSalvo, R.; DeWire, J.W.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Gilchriese, M.G.D.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Halling, A.M.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Holzner, S.; Ito, M.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kowalewski, R.; Kreinick, D.L.; Kubota, Y.; Mistry, N.B.; Mueller, J.; Namjoshi, R.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; Perticone, D.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Read, K.; Riley, D.; Silverman, A.; Stone, S.; Yi Xia; Sadoff, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    We have set upper limits for rare exclusive decays of B mesons arising from higher order processes in the standard model of electroweak interactions. Such decays may occur via ''penguin diagrams'' in B decay. We also set an upper limit on a lepton-number-violating decay mode of the neutral B meson. (orig.)

  4. Experimental determination of the H2O + 15 wt% NaCl and H2O + 25 wt% NaCl liquidi to 1.4 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, P.; Schmidt, C.

    2009-12-01

    The binary H2O+NaCl is one of the most important model systems for chloridic fluids in many geologic environments such as the Earth’s crust, upper mantle, and subducting slabs, and is also applicable to extraterrestrial icy planetary bodies (e.g., Manning 2004, Zolensky et al., 1999). The knowledge on phase equilibria and PVTx properties of this system is still fragmentary at high pressures, e.g., very little has been reported on liquidi at compositions Daniel 2008). In this study, we investigated the liquidus of 15 and 25 wt% NaCl solutions at pressures up to 1.4 GPa. The experiments were performed using a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (Bassett et al. 1993) modified for Raman spectroscopy and accurate temperature measurements. A quartz chip, halite, and water were loaded into the sample chamber, which also contained a small trapped air bubble (10 vol%) when it was sealed. The actual salinity was then determined from measurement of the vapor-saturated liquidus temperature. The sample chamber was then compressed until the bubble disappeared. After freezing, phase transitions occurring with increasing temperature were observed optically, and the pressure was determined from the frequency shift of the 464 cm-1 Raman line of quartz (Schmidt and Ziemann 2000). The sample chamber was then compressed further, and the experiment was repeated at various bulk densities until a pressure of ~1.4 GPa was attained. At some conditions, Raman spectra were acquired for identification of the phase assemblage. The solution always crystallized to a single phase upon cooling above ~0.15 GPa at 25 wt% NaCl and above ~1 GPa at 15 wt% NaCl. Raman spectra in the OH stretching region indicate that this phase contains or is a NaCl hydrate other than hydrohalite, probably in solid solution with ice. Melting of this phase produced liquid and hydrohalite and/or ice VI. Ice VI was the last solid that dissolved upon heating, between 1100 MPa, 3 °C and 1370 MPa, 17 °C for 15 wt% NaCl and at

  5. Morphological, Physiological, and Structural Responses of Two Species of Artemisia to NaCl Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yong Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of salt stress on Artemisia scoparia and A. vulgaris “Variegate” were examined. A. scoparia leaves became withered under NaCl treatment, whereas A. vulgaris “Variegate” leaves were not remarkably affected. Chlorophyll content decreased in both species, with a higher reduction in A. scoparia. Contents of proline, MDA, soluble carbohydrate, and Na+ increased in both species under salt stress, but A. vulgaris “Variegate” had higher level of proline and soluble carbohydrate and lower level of MDA and Na+. The ratios of K+/Na+, Ca2+/Na+, and Mg2+/Na+ in A. vulgaris “Variegate” under NaCl stress were higher. Moreover, A. vulgaris “Variegate” had higher transport selectivity of K+/Na+ from root to stem, stem to middle mature leaves, and upper newly developed leaves than A. scoparia under NaCl stress. A. vulgaris “Variegate” chloroplast maintained its morphological integrity under NaCl stress, whereas A. scoparia chloroplast lost integrity. The results indicated that A. scoparia is more sensitive to salt stress than A. vulgaris “Variegate.” Salt tolerance is mainly related to the ability of regulating osmotic pressure through the accumulation of soluble carbohydrates and proline, and the gradient distribution of K+ between roots and leaves was also contributed to osmotic pressure adjustment and improvement of plant salt tolerance.

  6. Targeting multiple heterogeneous hardware platforms with OpenCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Paul A.; Kozacik, Stephen T.; Humphrey, John R.; Paolini, Aaron; Kuller, Aryeh; Kelmelis, Eric J.

    2014-06-01

    The OpenCL API allows for the abstract expression of parallel, heterogeneous computing, but hardware implementations have substantial implementation differences. The abstractions provided by the OpenCL API are often insufficiently high-level to conceal differences in hardware architecture. Additionally, implementations often do not take advantage of potential performance gains from certain features due to hardware limitations and other factors. These factors make it challenging to produce code that is portable in practice, resulting in much OpenCL code being duplicated for each hardware platform being targeted. This duplication of effort offsets the principal advantage of OpenCL: portability. The use of certain coding practices can mitigate this problem, allowing a common code base to be adapted to perform well across a wide range of hardware platforms. To this end, we explore some general practices for producing performant code that are effective across platforms. Additionally, we explore some ways of modularizing code to enable optional optimizations that take advantage of hardware-specific characteristics. The minimum requirement for portability implies avoiding the use of OpenCL features that are optional, not widely implemented, poorly implemented, or missing in major implementations. Exposing multiple levels of parallelism allows hardware to take advantage of the types of parallelism it supports, from the task level down to explicit vector operations. Static optimizations and branch elimination in device code help the platform compiler to effectively optimize programs. Modularization of some code is important to allow operations to be chosen for performance on target hardware. Optional subroutines exploiting explicit memory locality allow for different memory hierarchies to be exploited for maximum performance. The C preprocessor and JIT compilation using the OpenCL runtime can be used to enable some of these techniques, as well as to factor in hardware

  7. Numerical Limit Analysis:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Limit State analysis has a long history and many prominent researchers have contributed. The theoretical foundation is based on the upper- and lower-bound theorems which give a very comprehensive and elegant formulation on complicated physical problems. In the pre-computer age Limit State analysis...... also enabled engineers to solve practical problems within reinforced concrete, steel structures and geotechnics....

  8. Temperature dependence of thermal pressure for NaCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandra K.; Pande, Brijesh K.; Pandey, Anjani K.

    2018-05-01

    Engineering applications of the materials can be explored upto the desired limit of accuracy with the better knowledge of its mechanical and thermal properties such as ductility, brittleness and Thermal Pressure. For the resistance to fracture (K) and plastic deformation (G) the ratio K/G is treated as an indication of ductile or brittle character of solids. In the present work we have tested the condition of ductility and brittleness with the calculated values of K/G for the NaCl. It is concluded that the nature of NaCl can be predicted upto high temperature simply with the knowledge of its elastic stiffness constant only. Thermoelastic properties of materials at high temperature is directly related to thermal pressure and volume expansion of the materials. An expression for the temperature dependence of thermal pressure is formulated using basic thermodynamic identities. It is observed that thermal pressure ΔPth calculated for NaCl by using Kushwah formulation is in good agreement with the experimental values also the thermal pressure increases with the increase in temperature.

  9. Upper limit for the D2H+ ortho-to-para ratio in the prestellar core 16293E (CHESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastel, C.; Caselli, P.; Ceccarelli, C.; Bacmann, A.; Lis, D. C.; Caux, E.; Codella, C.; Beckwith, J. A.; Ridley, T.

    2012-11-01

    The H_3^+ ion plays a key role in the chemistry of dense interstellar gas clouds where stars and planets are forming. The low temperatures and high extinctions of such clouds make direct observations of H_3^+ impossible, but lead to large abundances of H2D+ and D2H+, which are very useful probes of the early stages of star and planet formation. The ground-state rotational ortho-D2H+ 11,1-00,0 transition at 1476.6 GHz in the prestellar core 16293E has been searched for with the Herschel HIFI instrument, within the CHESS (Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star forming regions) Key Program. The line has not been detected at the 21 mK km s-1 level (3σ integrated line intensity). We used the ortho-H2D+ 11,0-11,1 transition and para-D2H+ 11,0-10,1 transition detected in this source to determine an upper limit on the ortho-to-para D2H+ ratio as well as the para-D2H+/ortho-H2D+ ratio from a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis. The comparison between our chemical modeling and the observations suggests that the CO depletion must be high (larger than 100), with a density between 5 × 105 and 106 cm-3. Also the upper limit on the ortho-D2H+ line is consistent with a low gas temperature (~11 K) with a ortho-to-para ratio of 6 to 9, i.e. 2 to 3 times higher than the value estimated from the chemical modeling, making it impossible to detect this high frequency transition with the present state of the art receivers. The chemical network is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/547/A33Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  10. Upper limits for the circular dichroism for the C 1s and O 1s core excitation of methyl oxirane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruemper, G; Lischke, T; Fukuzawa, H; Reinkoester, A; Ueda, K

    2007-01-01

    The circular dichroism (CD) in the total and partial ion yields of methyl-oxirane C 3 H 6 O was measured at the C 1s and O 1s edges. The difference of the response of the chiral molecule to circularly polarized light with opposite handedness was found to be less than 0.2% for the total ion yield and less than 0.5% for the partial ion yield. Additionally we tried to find a dipole allowed molecular orientation CD effect by analysing the fragmentation in the forward and backward direction. For this effect we found an upper limit of 1-2% for all abundant ionic fragments

  11. 76 FR 41653 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-2A12 (CL-601) and CL-600-2B16 (CL-601-3A...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains the NPRM, the.... Model CL-600-2A12 (CL-601) airplanes, serial numbers 3001 through 3066 inclusive on which Bombardier... Variants) airplanes, serial numbers 5001 through 5194 inclusive on which Bombardier Service Bulletin 601...

  12. New high (> or =6M/sub sun/) upper mass limit for planetary nebula formation, and a new high lower mass bound for carbon detonation supernova models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuchman, Y.; Sack, N.; Barkat, Z.

    1978-01-01

    Envelope ejection leading to a planetary nebula has been recently shown to occur as the terminal point of the Mira stage. The ejection is due to a diverging pulsational instability, not to a dynamical one. It is found that in this case (and for Population I, mixing length=1 pressure scale height) the upper mass limit for formation of planetary nebulae is at least 6 M/sub sun/. It thus follows that the lower mass limit for realization of carbon detonation model configurations is also at last 6 M/sub sun/

  13. First upper limits on the radar cross section of cosmic-ray induced extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abou Bakr Othman, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Besson, D.; Blake, S. A.; Byrne, M.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Gillman, W. H.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hanson, J. C.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jayanthmurthy, C.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kunwar, S.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Prohira, S.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rezazadeh-Reyhani, A.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Schurig, D.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takai, H.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Venkatesh, S.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2017-01-01

    TARA (Telescope Array Radar) is a cosmic ray radar detection experiment colocated with Telescope Array, the conventional surface scintillation detector (SD) and fluorescence telescope detector (FD) near Delta, Utah, U.S.A. The TARA detector combines a 40 kW, 54.1 MHz VHF transmitter and high-gain transmitting antenna which broadcasts the radar carrier over the SD array and within the FD field of view, towards a 250 MS/s DAQ receiver. TARA has been collecting data since 2013 with the primary goal of observing the radar signatures of extensive air showers (EAS). Simulations indicate that echoes are expected to be short in duration (∼ 10 μs) and exhibit rapidly changing frequency, with rates on the order 1 MHz/μs. The EAS radar cross-section (RCS) is currently unknown although it is the subject of over 70 years of speculation. A novel signal search technique is described in which the expected radar echo of a particular air shower is used as a matched filter template and compared to waveforms obtained by triggering the radar DAQ using the Telescope Array fluorescence detector. No evidence for the scattering of radio frequency radiation by EAS is obtained to date. We report the first quantitative RCS upper limits using EAS that triggered the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detector. The transmitter is under the direct control of experimenters, and in a radio-quiet area isolated from other radio frequency (RF) sources. The power and radiation pattern are known at all times. Forward power up to 40 kW and gain exceeding 20 dB maximize energy density in the radar field. Continuous wave (CW) transmission gives 100% duty cycle, as opposed to pulsed radar. TARA utilizes a high sample rate DAQ (250 MS/s). TARA is colocated with a large state-of-the-art conventional CR observatory, allowing the radar data stream to be sampled at the arrival times of known cosmic ray events. Each of these attributes of the TARA detector has been discussed in detail in the literature [8]. A map

  14. Thermal gravimetric analysis of the CsCuCl3, Cs2CuCl4 and Cs2CuCl4x2H2O crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soboleva, L.V.; Vasil'eva, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal characteristics of crystals of Cs 2 CuCl 4 , Cs 2 CuCl 4 x2H 2 O, and CsCuCl 3 were investigated thermogravimetrically. The derivatogram of the Cs 2 CuCl 4 crystal is characterized by the presence of a single endothermal effect at 505 deg C. The derivatogram of the Cs 2 CuCl 4 x2H 2 O crystal contains three endothermal effects: at 40, 135, and 480 deg C. The derivatogram of the CsCuCl 3 crystal shows the presence of two endothermal effects at 142 and 455 deg C. The thermogravimetric data on Cs 2 CuCl 4 and CsCuCl 3 crystals reveal crystal decomposition on melting; hence, these crystals cannot be grown from melts

  15. Detections and Sensitive Upper Limits for Methane and Related Trace Gases on Mars during 2003-2014, and planned extensions in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Novak, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    Five groups report methane detections on Mars; all results suggest local release and high temporal variability [1-7]. Our team searched for CH4 on many dates and seasons and detected it on several dates [1, 9, 10]. TLS (Curiosity rover) reported methane upper limits [6], and then detections [7] that were consistent in size with earlier reports and that also showed rapid modulation of CH4 abundance.[8] argued that absorption features assigned to Mars 12CH4 by [1] might instead be weak lines of terrestrial 13CH4. If not properly removed, terrestrial 13CH4 signatures would appear on the blue wing of terrestrial 12CH4 even when Mars is red-shifted - but they do not (Fig. S6 of [1]), demonstrating that terrestrial signatures were correctly removed. [9] demonstrated that including the dependence of δ13CH4 with altitude did not affect the residual features, nor did taking δ13CH4 as zero. Were δ13CH4 important, its omission would have overemphasized the depth of 13CH4 terrestrial absorption, introducing emission features in the residual spectra [1]. However, the residual features are seen in absorption, establishing their origin as non-terrestrial - [8] now agrees with this view.We later reported results for multiple organic gases (CH4, CH3OH, H2CO, C2H6, C2H2, C2H4), hydroperoxyl (HO2), three nitriles (N2O, NH3, HCN) and two chlorinated species (HCl, CH3Cl) [9]. Most of these species cannot be detected with current space assets, owing to instrumental limitations (e.g., spectral resolving power). However, the high resolution infrared spectrometers (NOMAD, ACS) on ExoMars 2016 (Trace Gas Orbiter) will begin measurements in late 2016. In solar occultation, TGO sensitivities will far exceed prior capabilities.We published detailed hemispheric maps of H2O and HDO on Mars, inferring the size of a lost early ocean [10]. In 2016, we plan to acquire 3-D spatial maps of HDO and H2O with ALMA, and improved maps of organics with iSHELL/NASA-IRTF.References: [1] Mumma et al. Sci09

  16. Upper limits from the LIGO and TAMA detectors on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Anderson, S.B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Asiri, F.; Barish, B.C.; Barnes, M.; Barton, M.A.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bork, R.; Brown, D. A.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Chandler, A.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the first joint search for gravitational waves by the TAMA and LIGO collaborations. We looked for millisecond-duration unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in 473 hr of coincident data collected during early 2003. No candidate signals were found. We set an upper limit of 0.12 events per day on the rate of detectable gravitational-wave bursts, at 90% confidence level. From software simulations, we estimate that our detector network was sensitive to bursts with root-sum-square strain amplitude above approximately 1-3x10 -19 Hz -1/2 in the frequency band 700-2000 Hz. We describe the details of this collaborative search, with particular emphasis on its advantages and disadvantages compared to searches by LIGO and TAMA separately using the same data. Benefits include a lower background and longer observation time, at some cost in sensitivity and bandwidth. We also demonstrate techniques for performing coincidence searches with a heterogeneous network of detectors with different noise spectra and orientations. These techniques include using coordinated software signal injections to estimate the network sensitivity, and tuning the analysis to maximize the sensitivity and the livetime, subject to constraints on the background

  17. Partitioning of K, Cl, S and P during combustion of poplar and brassica energy crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Díaz-Ramírez, Maryori; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Glarborg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    K-, Cl-, S- and P-release from a herbaceous (brassica) and a short rotation coppice (poplar) cultivated in the Mediterranean region, have been investigated under combustion conditions [500-1100 °C]. Contrary to brassica, Cl- and S-release from poplar were substantial for all temperatures tested....... Low-temperature [500-700 °C] Cl-release from the high-Cl brassica appeared to be primarily limited by the fuel chemical composition and secondarily by interactions of the ash-forming elements with the fuel organic matrix. Below 700 °C, Cl-release was nearly 50%, whereas complete dechlorination...... resulted around 800 °C. S-release from brassica was up to 40% at low temperature. Above 1000 °C, additional S-release was observed presumably by sulfate dissociation. K-release was linked to Cl-release around 700 °C and, gradually increased afterwards. At 1100 °C, nearly 60% of K in poplar was retained...

  18. Experimental limits from ATLAS on Standard Model Higgs production.

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Experimental limits from ATLAS on Standard Model Higgs production in the mass range 110-600 GeV. The solid curve reflects the observed experimental limits for the production of a Higgs of each possible mass value (horizontal axis). The region for which the solid curve dips below the horizontal line at the value of 1 is excluded with a 95% confidence level (CL). The dashed curve shows the expected limit in the absence of the Higgs boson, based on simulations. The green and yellow bands correspond (respectively) to 68%, and 95% confidence level regions from the expected limits. Higgs masses in the narrow range 123-130 GeV are the only masses not excluded at 95% CL

  19. Limitations of Cl2/O2-based ICP-RIE of deep holes for planar photonic crystals in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaspar, Peter; Fougner, Christopher; Kappeler, Roman; Jaeckel, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    A detailed study of dry-etching of high-aspect-ratio holes into an indium phosphide substrate is presented for a Cl 2 /O 2 -based plasma chemistry. The etching is performed in an inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching reactor. The separate influence of the various etching parameters on the quality of the etched holes is identified. Quality measures such as high aspect ratio, hole cylindricity and verticality as well as sidewall smoothness can be controlled by varying the ICP power, the relative O 2 flow rate and the self-bias of the plasma. We were able to clearly identify trade-offs that have to be made and limitations of the etching chemistry/technology used: If the aspect ratio improves, then the cylindricity also improves, whereas the verticality and the sidewall smoothness degrade. In previous reports, a certain ambiguity is generally observed in the sense that different process parameters exhibit partially contradicting trade-offs. We show that this behaviour can be remedied by a careful selection of the variable parameters. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Determination of 36Cl/Cl ratio in ground water using the accelerator mass spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Suman; Deodhar, A.S.; Saravana Kumar, U.; Surendran, P.; Shrivastava, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nair, J.P.; Yadav, M.L.; Hemalatha, M.; Sparrow, H.; Mahata, K.; Thomas, R.G.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Kailas, S.; Kale, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) programme using the 14 MV Pelletron Accelerator at Mumbai has been initiated with major emphasis on the determination of 36 Cl in water samples, of interest to hydrology and environment. In order to carry out the AMS measurement, a beam chopper to cut down beam intensity by a factor of 20 has been developed and commissioned. A multi-anode gas -si detector has been built to separate 36 Cl from the interfering 36 S. A new TPS system has been procured to operate the machine in the GVM mode. Standard and blank samples from Prime lab, Purdue have been employed in these measurements to standardise the technique for 36 Cl/Cl ratio determination. The detector was calibrated using the stable 35,37 Cl ions. The background 36 Cl in the system has been measured using the blank sample from Purdue and it was estimated that the ratio of 36 Cl/Cl was of the order of 10 -13 in the present setup. Ground water samples collected from South India were converted to AgCl and put in the SNICS ion source for the AMS measurements. These ground water samples, with 14 C content estimated to be in the range of 1 to 4 pMC indicate that the samples may be more than 35,000 years old. Using the AMS technique we have determined the 36 Cl/Cl ratio values for these ground water samples. They are found to range between 2 to 5 x 10 -12 . Additional measurements are planned to determine the age of the water samples and to understand the reasons for the observed high values of 36 Cl in these samples. (author)

  1. Thermodynamic Modeling of Poorly Complexing Metals in Concentrated Electrolyte Solutions: An X-Ray Absorption and UV-Vis Spectroscopic Study of Ni(II) in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Brugger, Joël; Etschmann, Barbara; Ngothai, Yung; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and speciation of aqueous Ni(II)-chloride complexes is important for understanding Ni behavior in hydrometallurgical extraction. The effect of concentration on the first-shell structure of Ni(II) in aqueous NiCl2 and NiCl2-MgCl2 solutions was investigated by Ni K edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at ambient conditions. Both techniques show that no large structural change (e.g., transition from octahedral to tetrahedral-like configuration) occurs. Both methods confirm that the Ni(II) aqua ion (with six coordinated water molecules at R Ni-O = 2.07(2) Å) is the dominant species over the whole NiCl2 concentration range. However, XANES, EXAFS and UV-Vis data show subtle changes at high salinity (> 2 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2), which are consistent with the formation of small amounts of the NiCl+ complex (up to 0.44(23) Cl at a Ni-Cl distance of 2.35(2) Å in 5.05 mol∙kg-1 NiCl2) in the pure NiCl2 solutions. At high Cl:Ni ratio in the NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, small amounts of [NiCl2]0 are also present. We developed a speciation-based mixed-solvent electrolyte (MSE) model to describe activity-composition relationships in NiCl2-MgCl2-H2O solutions, and at the same time predict Ni(II) speciation that is consistent with our XAS and UV-Vis data and with existing literature data up to the solubility limit, resolving a long-standing uncertainty about the role of chloride complexing in this system. PMID:25885410

  2. ZnCl{sub 2}- and NH{sub 4}Cl-hydroponics gel electrolytes for zinc-carbon batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, N.H.; Ismail, Y.M. Baba; Mohamad, A.A. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2008-01-21

    Absorbency testing is used to determine the percentage of ZnCl{sub 2} or NH{sub 4}Cl solution absorbed by a hydroponics gel (HPG). It is found that the absorbency of ZnCl{sub 2} or NH{sub 4}Cl solution decreases with increasing solution concentration. The conductivity of ZnCl{sub 2}- and NH{sub 4}Cl-HPG electrolytes is dependent on the solution concentration. A mixture of salt solution with HPG yields excellent gel polymer electrolytes with conductivities of 0.026 and 0.104 S cm{sup -1} at 3 M ZnCl{sub 2} and 7 M NH{sub 4}Cl, respectively. These gel electrolytes are then used to produce zinc-carbon cells. The fabricated cells give capacities of 8.8 and 10.0 mAh, have an internal resistance of 25.4 and 19.8 {omega}, a maximum power density of 12.7 and 12.2 mW cm{sup -2}, and a short-circuit current density of 29.1 and 33.9 mA cm{sup -2} for ZnCl{sub 2}- and NH{sub 4}Cl-HPG electrolytes, respectively. (author)

  3. The centrifugal sudden distorted wave method for chemical reactions: Application to Cl+HCl → ClH+Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaee, B.; Connor, J.N.L.; Schatz, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe a method for calculating cross sections for atom plus diatom reactive collisions based on the centrifugal sudden distorted wave (CSDW) approximation. This method is nearly exact at low energies where reactive cross sections are small. Representative CPU times are given for applications of CSDW method to the Cl + HCl → ClH + Cl reaction using CDC 7600, Cyber 176, Cyber 205, Cray XMP and Cray 2 computers. Calculations show that the product HCl molecule is highly rotationally excited, (receiving 40-50% of the available energy) and that the shape of the product rotational distribution is nearly independent of reagent rotational state. The authors also calculated product differential cross sections and find them to be backward peaked at low energies

  4. New Paleomagnetic Data From Upper Gabbros Supports Limited Rotation of Central Semail Massif in Oman Ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, A. J.; Sarah, T.; Hartley, E.; Martin, J.

    2017-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data from northern massifs of the Oman ophiolite demonstrate substantial clockwise rotations prior to or during obduction, yet data from southern massifs are recently suggested to be remagnetized during obduction and show subsequent smaller counterclockwise rotations. To better understand paleomagnetic data from the southern massifs, we conducted a detailed paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of 21 sites in upper gabbros and 5 sites in lower crustal gabbros within the central Semail massif. Samples treated with progressive thermal demagnetization yield interpretable magnetizations with dominant unblocking between 500-580°C that implies characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) components carried by low-titanium magnetite and nearly pure magnetite. Rock magnetic and scanning electron microscopy data provide additional support of the carriers of magnetization. ChRMs from sites with samples containing partially-serpentinized olivine are similar to sites with samples lacking olivine, where the carriers appear to be fine magnetite intergrowths in pyroxene. The overall in situ and tilt-corrected mean directions from upper gabbros are distinct from the lower gabbros, from previous data within the massif, and also directions from similar crustal units in adjacent Rustaq and Wadi Tayin massifs. After tilt correction for 10-15° SE dip of the crust-mantle boundary, the mean direction from upper gabbros is nearly coincident with in situ lower gabbros. The tilt-corrected direction from upper gabbros is also consistent with an expected direction from the Late Cretaceous apparent polar wander path for Arabia at the age of crustal accretion ( 95Ma). These results suggest the upper crustal section in Semail has likely only experienced minor tilting since formation and acquisition of magnetization. Due to slow cooling of middle to lower gabbros in fast-spread crust, the lower gabbro sites likely cooled later or after obduction, and thus yield a distinct

  5. Good news for conservation: mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA data detect limited genetic signatures of inter-basin fish transfer in Thymallus thymallus (Salmonidae from the Upper Drava River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meraner A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, numerous populations of European grayling, Thymallus thymallus, have been suffering from stocking-induced genetic admixture of foreign strains into wild populations. Concordantly, genetic introgression was also reportedfor grayling stocks inhabiting the Upper Drava River, but all published genetic data based on specimens caught at least a decade ago, when stocking load was strong. Here, we applied mitochondrial control region sequencing and nuclear microsatellite genotyping to Upper Drava grayling fry collections and reference samples to update patterns and extent of human-mediated introgression. In contrast to previous data, we highlighted an almost genetic integrity of Drava grayling, evidencing limited genetic signatures of trans-basin stocking for grayling of Northern Alpine Danubian origin. Recent hybridisation was detected only twice among sixty-nine samples, while several cases of later-generation hybrids were disclosed by linking mitochondrial sequence to nuclear genetic data. The observed past, but very limited recent genetic introgression in grayling from Upper Drava seems to reflect shifting stocking trends, changing from massive introduction of trans-basin fish to more conservation-oriented strategies during the last 27 years. In a conservation context, we encourage pursuing the use of local wild grayling for supportive- and captive-breeding, but underline the need for genetic approaches in brood-stock selection programs. Finally, our integrated results from sibship reconstruction validate our strictly fry-based sampling scheme, thus offering a reasonable alternative also for other rheophilic fish species with similar life-history characteristics.

  6. Terahertz reflection spectroscopy of aqueous NaCl and LiCl solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Merbold, Hannes

    2010-01-01

    frequencies. Whereas both the real and imaginary part of the permittivity of NaCl increases with concentration,we see that the imaginary part of the permittivity of LiCl (related to the absorption)decreases with increasing salt concentration. We relate these changes to the behavior...

  7. Thermodynamic Upper Bound on Broadband Light Coupling with Photonic Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zongfu

    2012-10-01

    The coupling between free space radiation and optical media critically influences the performance of optical devices. We show that, for any given photonic structure, the sum of the external coupling rates for all its optical modes are subject to an upper bound dictated by the second law of thermodynamics. Such bound limits how efficient light can be coupled to any photonic structure. As one example of application, we use this upper bound to derive the limit of light absorption in broadband solar absorbers. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  8. Reactions of POxCly- ions with O2(a 1[Delta]g), H2O, and Cl2 at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midey, Anthony J.; Dotan, Itzhak; Viggiano, A. A.

    2008-06-01

    The rate constants and product branching ratios for the reactions of phosphorus oxychloride anions, POxCly- for x = 1-2 and y = 1-3, with O2(a 1[Delta]g), Cl2, and H2O have been measured in a selected ion flow tube (SIFT) at 298 K. A mixture of O2(a 1[Delta]g) in O2 has been produced using a recently designed chemical singlet oxygen generator (sparger) with an emission detection scheme adopted previously in our laboratory. The experiments continue a series of investigations into the oxidation reactions of POxCly- ions, searching for pathways to the terminal PO2- and PO3- ions observed in combustion chemistry with POCl3 present. None of the POxCly- ions react with H2O or O2(a 1[Delta]g). The O2(a 1[Delta]g) rate constants have a limit of <1 × 10-11 cm3 s-1, except for PO2Cl- where a limit of <5 × 10-11 cm3 s-1 has been determined. The H2O rate constants have limits of <1 × 10-11 cm3 s-1. All of the POxCly- ions react with Cl2, excluding PO3- and PO2Cl2-. Depending on the reactant ion, Cl-, Cl2- or PO2Cl2- product ions form.

  9. Heterogeneous computing with OpenCL

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous Computing with OpenCL teaches OpenCL and parallel programming for complex systems that may include a variety of device architectures: multi-core CPUs, GPUs, and fully-integrated Accelerated Processing Units (APUs) such as AMD Fusion technology. Designed to work on multiple platforms and with wide industry support, OpenCL will help you more effectively program for a heterogeneous future. Written by leaders in the parallel computing and OpenCL communities, this book will give you hands-on OpenCL experience to address a range of fundamental parallel algorithms. The authors explore memory spaces, optimization techniques, graphics interoperability, extensions, and debugging and profiling. Intended to support a parallel programming course, Heterogeneous Computing with OpenCL includes detailed examples throughout, plus additional online exercises and other supporting materials.

  10. The Cathodic Behavior of Ti(III) Ion in a NaCl-2CsCl Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Jiao, Shuqiang; Hu, Liwen; Guo, Zhancheng

    2016-02-01

    The cathodic behavior of Ti(III) ions in a NaCl-2CsCl melt was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and square wave voltammetry with a tungsten electrode being the working electrode at different temperatures. The results show that the cathodic behavior of Ti(III) ion consists of two irreversible steps: Ti3+ + e = Ti2+ and Ti2+ + 2 e = Ti. The diffusion coefficient for the Ti(III) ion in the NaCl-2CsCl eutectic is 1.26 × 10-5 cm2 s-1 at 873 K (600 °C), increases to be 5.57 × 10-5 cm2 s-1 at 948K (675°C), and further rises to 10.8 × 10-5 cm2 s-1 at 1023 (750 °C). Moreover, galvanostatic electrolysis performed on a titanium electrode further presents the feasibility of electrodepositing metallic titanium in the molten NaCl-2CsCl-TiCl3 system.

  11. A Limit on the Branching Ratio of the Flavor-Changing Top Quark Decay T→Zc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramonov, Alexander Andreevich [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2009-06-01

    We have used the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF-II) to set upper limits on the branching ratio of the flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) top quark decay t → Zc using a technique employing ratios of W and Z production, measured in 1.52 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ data. The analysis uses a comparison of two decay chains, p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ → WbWb → ℓvbjjb and p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ ZcWb → ℓ+- cjjb, to cancel systematic uncertainties in acceptance, efficiency, and luminosity. We validate the MC modeling of acceptance and efficiency for lepton identification over the multi-year dataset also using a ratio of W and Z production, in this case the observed ratio of inclusive production of W to Z-bosons, a technique that will be essential for precision comparisons with the standard model at the LHC. We introduce several methods of determining backgrounds to the W and Z samples. To improve the discrimination against SM backgrounds to top quark decays, we calculate the top mass for each event with two leptons and four jets assuming it is a t$\\bar{t}$ event with one of the top quarks decaying to Zc. The upper limit on the Br(t → Zc) is estimated from a likelihood constructed with the {ell}+- cjjb top mass distribution and the number of ℓvbjjb events. Limits are set as a function of the helicity of the Z-boson produced in the FCNC decay. For 100%-longitudinally-polarized Z-bosons we find a limit of 8.3% (95% C.L.).

  12. Cl- channels of the gastric parietal cell that are active at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuppoletti, J; Baker, A M; Malinowska, D H

    1993-06-01

    HCl secretion across mammalian gastric parietal cell apical membrane may involve Cl- channels. H(+)-K(+)-ATPase-containing membranes isolated from gastric mucosa of histamine-stimulated rabbits were fused to planar lipid bilayers. Channels were recorded with symmetric 800 mM CsCl solutions, pH 7.4. A linear current-voltage (I-V) relationship was obtained, and conductance was 28 +/- 1 pS at 800 mM CsCl. Conductance was 6.9 +/- 2 pS at 150 mM CsCl. Reversal potential was +22 mV with a fivefold cis-trans CsCl concentration gradient, indicating that the channel was anion selective with a discrimination ratio of 6:1 for Cl- over Cs+. Anion selectivity of the channel was I- > Cl- > or = Br- > NO3-, and gluconate was impermeant. Channels obtained at pH 7.4 persisted when pH of medium bathing the trans side of the bilayer (pHtrans) was reduced to pH 3, without a change in conductance, linearity of I-V relationship, or ion selectivity. In contrast, asymmetric reduction of pH of medium bathing the cis side of the bilayer from 7.4 to 3 always resulted in loss of channel activity. At pH 7.4, open probability (Po) of the channel was voltage dependent, i.e., predominantly open at +80 mV but mainly closed at -80 mV. In contrast, with low pHtrans, channel Po at -80 mV was increased 3.5-fold. The Cl- channel was Ca2+ indifferent. In absence of ionophores, ion selectivity for support of H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and H+ transport was consistent with that exhibited by the channel and could be limited by substitution with NO3-, whereas maximal H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity was indifferent to anion present, demonstrating that anion transport can be rate limiting. Cl- channels with similar characteristics (conductance, linear I-V relationship, and ion selectivity) were also present in H(+)-K(+)-ATPase-containing vesicles isolated from resting (cimetidine-treated) gastric mucosa, exhibiting at -80 mV a pH-independent approximately 3.5-fold lower Po than stimulated vesicle channels. At -80 m

  13. On the Necessity of Using Element No.155 in the Chemical Physical Calculations: Again on the Upper Limit in the Periodic Table of Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available It is shown how the properties of different elements of the Periodic System of Elements can be obtained using the properties of the theoretically predicted heaviest element No.155 (it draws the upper principal limit of the Table, behind which stable elements cannot exist. It is suggested how the properties of element No.155 can be used in the synthesis of superheavy elements. An analysis of nuclear reactions is also produced on the same basis.

  14. Chemical effects of (n, γ) nuclear reaction on (Mo6Cl8)Cl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fucugauchi, L.A.; Millan, S.; Mondragon, A.; Solache-Rios, M.

    1994-01-01

    The chemical effects of 98 Mo(n, γ) 99 Mo reaction on molybdenum(II) chloride [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 4 ] have been studied. Retention, thermal and radiolytical annealing were determined. It was found that this molybdenum compound has low retention, a negligible tendency to thermal annealing and a virtual insensitivity to hydrolysis. For practical applications in the enrichment of 99 Mo by the Shilard-Chalmers method, molybdenum(II) chloride [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 4 ] appears to offer good prospects. (author) 14 refs.; 2 figs

  15. Verification of an immunoturbidimetric assay for heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) on a clinical chemistry platform and establishment of the upper reference limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Molin, Simona; Cappellini, Fabrizio; Falbo, Rosanna; Signorini, Stefano; Brambilla, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is an early biomarker of cardiac injury. Randox Laboratories developed an immunoturbidimetric H-FABP assay for non-proprietary automated clinical chemistry analysers that could be useful in the emergency department. We verified the analytical performances claimed by Randox Laboratories on Roche Cobas 6000 clinical chemistry platform in use in our laboratory, and we defined our own 99th percentile upper reference limit for H-FABP. For the verification of method performances, we used pools of spared patient samples from routine and two levels of quality control material, while samples for the reference value study were collected from 545 blood donors. Following CLSI guidelines we verified limit of blank (LOB), limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantitation (LOQ), repeatability and within-laboratory precision, trueness, linearity, and the stability of H-FABP in EDTA over 24h. The LOQ (3.19 μg/L) was verified with a CV% of 10.4. The precision was verified for the low (mean 5.88 μg/L, CV=6.7%), the medium (mean 45.28 μg/L, CV=3.0%), and the high concentration (mean 88.81 μg/L, CV=4.0%). The trueness was verified as well as the linearity over the indicated measurement interval of 0.747-120 μg/L. The H-FABP in EDTA samples is stable throughout 24h both at room temperature and at 4 °C. The H-FABP 99th percentile upper reference limit for all subjects (3.60 μg/L, 95% CI 3.51-3.77) is more appropriate than gender-specific ones that are not statistically different. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved Limits on Scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles from Reanalysis of 2013 LUX Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Bradley, A.; Bramante, R.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chapman, J. J.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; de Viveiros, L.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, K. R.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Ihm, M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Malling, D. C.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Ott, R. A.; Palladino, K. J.; Pangilinan, M.; Pease, E. K.; Phelps, P.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.; LUX Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We present constraints on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP)-nucleus scattering from the 2013 data of the Large Underground Xenon dark matter experiment, including 1.4 ×104 kg day of search exposure. This new analysis incorporates several advances: single-photon calibration at the scintillation wavelength, improved event-reconstruction algorithms, a revised background model including events originating on the detector walls in an enlarged fiducial volume, and new calibrations from decays of an injected tritium β source and from kinematically constrained nuclear recoils down to 1.1 keV. Sensitivity, especially to low-mass WIMPs, is enhanced compared to our previous results which modeled the signal only above a 3 keV minimum energy. Under standard dark matter halo assumptions and in the mass range above 4 GeV c-2 , these new results give the most stringent direct limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section. The 90% C.L. upper limit has a minimum of 0.6 zb at 33 GeV c-2 WIMP mass.

  17. Electrochemical characterisation of CaCl2 deficient LiCl–KCl–CaCl2 eutectic melt and electro-deoxidation of solid UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Maha Vishnu, D.; Sanil, N.; Mohandas, K.S.; Nagarajan, K.

    2016-01-01

    The CaCl 2 deficient ternary eutectic melt LiCl–KCl–CaCl 2 (50.5: 44.2: 5.3 mol %) was electrochemically characterised by cyclic voltammetry and polarization techniques in the context of its probable use as the electrolyte in the electrochemical reduction of solid UO 2 to uranium metal. Tungsten (cathodic polarization) and graphite (anodic polarization) working electrodes were used in these studies carried out in the temperature range 623 K–923 K. The cathodic limit of the melt was observed to be set by the deposition of Ca 2+ ions followed by Li + ions on the tungsten electrode and the anodic limit by oxidation of chloride ions on the graphite electrode (chlorine evolution). The difference between the onset potential of deposition of Ca 2+ and Li + was found to be 0.241 V at a scan rate of 20 mV/s at 623 K and the difference decreased with increase in temperature and vanished at 923 K. Polarization measurements with stainless steel (SS) cathode and graphite anode at 673 K showed the possibility of low–energy reactions occurring on the UO 2 electrode in the melt. UO 2 pellets were cathodically polarized at 3.9 V for 25 h to test the feasibility of electro-reduction to uranium in the melt. The surface of the pellets was found reduced to U metal. - Highlights: • Electrochemically characterized LiCl–KCl–CaCl 2 (50.5: 44.2: 5.3 mol %) melt by CV, LSV and polarization techniques. • Ca 2+ deposits first on tungsten working electrode followed by Li + . Cl − discharges on graphite to liberate chlorine gas. • Surface of UO 2 pellet reduced to U in the melt with low carbon contamination of melt. • Slow reduction of UO 2 due to slow kinetics and low solubility of oxide ions in the low temperature melt.

  18. The murine choroid plexus epithelium expresses the 2Cl-/H+-exchanger ClC-7 and Na+/H+ exchanger NHE6 in the luminal membrane domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkier, Helle H; Christensen, Henriette L; Christensen, Inga B

    2017-01-01

    , but the pH value seems nonetheless maintained within narrow limits, even when faced with acid/base challenges. The involvement of choroid plexus acid/base transporters in CSF pH regulation is highlighted by the expression of several acid/base transporters in the epithelium. The aim of the current study...... was to identify novel acid/base transporters expressed in the luminal membrane of the choroid plexus epithelium to pave the way for systematic investigations of each candidate transporter in the regulation of CSF pH. Mass spectrometry analysis of proteins from epithelial cells isolated by fluorescence activated...... cell sorting identified the Cl-/H+ exchangers ClC-3, -4, -5, and -7 in addition to known choroid plexus acid/base transporters. RT-PCR on FACS isolated epithelial cells confirmed the expression of the corresponding mRNAs, as well as NHE6 mRNA. Both NHE6 and ClC-7 were immunolocalized to the luminal...

  19. Electronic structure and optical properties of Cs2HgCl4: DFT calculations and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentyev, A. A.; Gabrelian, B. V.; Vu, V. T.; Parasyuk, O. V.; Fedorchuk, A. O.; Khyzhun, O. Y.

    2016-10-01

    A high-quality single crystal of cesium mercury tetrabromide, Cs2HgCl4, was synthesized by using the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method and its electronic structure was studied from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. In particular, X-ray photoelectron spectra were measured for both pristine and Ar+ ion-bombarded Cs2HgCl4 single crystal surfaces. The present XPS measurements indicate that the Cs2HgCl4 single crystal surface is sensitive with respect to Ar+ ion-bombardment: such a treatment changes substantially its elemental stoichiometry. With the aim of exploring total and partial densities of states within the valence band and conduction band regions of the Cs2HgCl4 compound, band-structure calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) using the augmented plane wave + local orbitals (APW + lo) method as incorporated within the WIEN2k package are performed. The calculations indicate that the Cl 3p states are the principal contributors in the upper portion of the valence band, while the Hg 5d and Cs 5p states dominate in its lower portion. In addition, the calculations allow for concluding that the unoccupied Cl p and Hg s states are the main contributors to the bottom of the conduction band. Furthermore, main optical characteristics of Cs2HgCl4, namely dispersion of the absorption coefficient, real and imaginary parts of dielectric function, electron energy-loss spectrum, refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical reflectivity, are elucidated based on the DFT calculations.

  20. Uptake of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) by the earthworm Eisenia fetida through dermal contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Ping; Escalon, B. Lynn; Hayes, Charolett A.; Perkins, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    The explosive compound hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) has been shown to cause both lethal and sublethal (reproductive and neurotoxic) effects in exposed oligochaetes. However, whether worms take up CL-20 and how much CL-20 enters worm bodies leading to toxicity (e.g., lethality) remain to be determined. In the present study, we used high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and radiolabeled tracer methods to investigate the CL-20 uptake in the whole worm body after contact exposures. Worms (Eisenia fetida) were exposed to filter paper spiked with non-radioactive or [U- 14 C]-labeled CL-20 for 1-3 d. The radiolabeled tracer method allowed us to detect the parent compound and transformation products in worms exposed to as low as 0.04 μg CL-20 cm -2 of filter paper. The HPLC method without radiolabeled tracer was far less sensitive with a detection limit of 2.17 μg CL-20 cm -2 . Using the radiolabeled tracer, we were able to demonstrate that the worm body concentration linearly correlated to the filter paper concentration ≤ 0.34 μg cm -2 (r = 0.94) if no breakdown products are assumed. At higher concentrations, the body concentration increased slowly and saturated at around 11 μg g -1 dry mass resulting in an estimated lethal critical body burden of 10-15 μg CL-20 g -1 dry mass. These findings demonstrate that CL-20 or potential transformation products are taken into the earthworm body through dermal contact. This information should prove valuable in assessing the bioaccumulation potential and ecological risks of CL-20

  1. Uptake of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) by the earthworm Eisenia fetida through dermal contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Ping [SpecPro, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)], E-mail: ping.gong@erdc.usace.army.mil; Escalon, B. Lynn; Hayes, Charolett A. [SpecPro, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); Perkins, Edward J. [Environmental Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)

    2008-02-01

    The explosive compound hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) has been shown to cause both lethal and sublethal (reproductive and neurotoxic) effects in exposed oligochaetes. However, whether worms take up CL-20 and how much CL-20 enters worm bodies leading to toxicity (e.g., lethality) remain to be determined. In the present study, we used high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and radiolabeled tracer methods to investigate the CL-20 uptake in the whole worm body after contact exposures. Worms (Eisenia fetida) were exposed to filter paper spiked with non-radioactive or [U-{sup 14}C]-labeled CL-20 for 1-3 d. The radiolabeled tracer method allowed us to detect the parent compound and transformation products in worms exposed to as low as 0.04 {mu}g CL-20 cm{sup -2} of filter paper. The HPLC method without radiolabeled tracer was far less sensitive with a detection limit of 2.17 {mu}g CL-20 cm{sup -2}. Using the radiolabeled tracer, we were able to demonstrate that the worm body concentration linearly correlated to the filter paper concentration {<=} 0.34 {mu}g cm{sup -2} (r = 0.94) if no breakdown products are assumed. At higher concentrations, the body concentration increased slowly and saturated at around 11 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry mass resulting in an estimated lethal critical body burden of 10-15 {mu}g CL-20 g{sup -1} dry mass. These findings demonstrate that CL-20 or potential transformation products are taken into the earthworm body through dermal contact. This information should prove valuable in assessing the bioaccumulation potential and ecological risks of CL-20.

  2. An upper bound for the proton temperature anisotrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    This tutorial describes recent research concerning the upper bound on the hot proton temperature anisotropy imposed by wave-particle scattering due to enhanced fluctuations from the electromagnetic proton cyclotron anisotropy instability. This upper bound, which has been observed in both the magnetosheath and the outer magnetosphere, represents a limited closure relation for the equations of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics. Such a closure relation has the potential to improve the predictive capability of large-scale anisotropic models of the magnetosphere

  3. Plutonium Critical Mass Curve Comparison to Mass at Upper Subcritical Limit (USL) Using Whisper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Whisper is computational software designed to assist the nuclear criticality safety analyst with validation studies with the MCNP ® Monte Carlo radiation transport package. Standard approaches to validation rely on the selection of benchmarks based upon expert judgment. Whisper uses sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) methods to select relevant benchmarks to a particular application or set of applications being analyzed. Using these benchmarks, Whisper computes a calculational margin. Whisper attempts to quantify the margin of subcriticality (MOS) from errors in software and uncertainties in nuclear data. The combination of the Whisper-derived calculational margin and MOS comprise the baseline upper subcritical limit (USL), to which an additional margin may be applied by the nuclear criticality safety analyst as appropriate to ensure subcriticality. A series of critical mass curves for plutonium, similar to those found in Figure 31 of LA-10860-MS, have been generated using MCNP6.1.1 and the iterative parameter study software, WORM S olver. The baseline USL for each of the data points of the curves was then computed using Whisper 1.1. The USL was then used to determine the equivalent mass for plutonium metal-water system. ANSI/ANS-8.1 states that it is acceptable to use handbook data, such as the data directly from the LA-10860-MS, as it is already considered validated (Section 4.3 4) ''Use of subcritical limit data provided in ANSI/ANS standards or accepted reference publications does not require further validation.''). This paper attempts to take a novel approach to visualize traditional critical mass curves and allows comparison with the amount of mass for which the k eff is equal to the USL (calculational margin + margin of subcriticality). However, the intent is to plot the critical mass data along with USL, not to suggest that already accepted handbook data should have new and more rigorous requirements for validation.

  4. Influence of TiCl4 post-treatment condition on TiO2 electrode for enhancement photovoltaic efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Tae Sung; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Bark, Chung Wung; Choi, Hyung Wook

    2014-10-01

    Titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) treatment processed by chemical bath deposition is usually adopted as pre- and post-treatment for nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) film deposition in the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) technology. TiCl4 post-treatment is a widely known method capable of improving the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells. In this work, the effect of TiCl4 post-treatment on the TiO2 electrode is proposed and compared to the untreated film. A TiO2 passivating layer was deposited on FTO glass by RF magnetron sputtering. The TiO2 sol prepared sol-gel method, nanoporous TiO2 upper layer was deposited by screen printing method on the passivating layer. TiCl4 post-treatment was deposited on the substrate by hydrolysis of TiCl4 aqueous solution. Crystalline structure was adjusted by various TiCl4 concentration and dipping time: 20 mM-150 mM and 30 min-120 min. The conversion efficiency was measured by solar simulator (100 mW/cm2). The dye-sensitized solar cell using TiCl4 post-treatment was measured the maximum conversion efficiency of 5.04% due to electron transport effectively. As a result, the DSSCs based on TiCl4 post-treatment showed better photovoltaic performance than cells made purely of TiO2 nanoparticles. The relative DSSCs devices are characterized in terms of short circuit current density, open circuit voltage, fill factor, conversion efficiency.

  5. Fibroma osificante periférico: caso clínico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoila Beatriz Carbonell Muñoz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl fibroma osificante periférico es una lesión reactiva, se considera que se origina de las células del ligamento periodontal; son lesiones benignas de tejido conectivo con focos de calcificación generalmente asintomáticas. En este artículo se presenta un caso de fibroma osificante periférico, permitiendo destacar la importancia clínica de este tipo de patología poco frecuente y con una actualizada revisión de literatura se busca afianzar conocimientos que conlleven a un correcto diagnóstico y adecuado manejo terapéutico para la resolución de la patología. El caso clínico trata de una paciente de 30 años de edad que acude a consulta por presentar lesión tumoral a nivel del cuerpo mandibular izquierdo. Previa valoración clínica y radiográfica, se sometió a la paciente al retiro quirúrgico de la lesión, el examen histopatológico reportó el diagnóstico de fibroma osificante periférico. (DUAZARY 2010, 223 - 227AbstractThe peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF is a reactive lesion who originates in the cells of the periodontal ligament. They are benign tumors of connective tissue usually asymptomatic and they are located in both jaws with greater predilection in the upper jaw, in the region of the interdental papilla and adjacent teeth. It´s presented a case of a 30 years old patient who was attended for an injury tumor located at the left of the mandibular body. After clinical assessment the patient was submitted to surgical removal of the lesion, the review reported histopathologic diagnosis of peripheral ossifying fibroma.Keywords: peripheral ossifying fibroma; Fibroma with Calcification; Calcifying Fibroblastic Granuloma.

  6. Separating NaCl and AlCl3·6H2O Crystals from Acidic Solution Assisted by the Non-Equilibrium Phase Diagram of AlCl3-NaCl-H2O(-HCl Salt-Water System at 353.15 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaigang Cheng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracting AlCl3·6H2O from acid leaching solution through crystallization is one of the key processes to extracting aluminum from fly ash, coal gangue and other industrial solid wastes. However, the obtained products usually have low purity and a key problem is the lack of accurate data for phase equilibrium. This paper presented the non-equilibrium phase diagrams of AlCl3-NaCl-H2O (HCl salt-water systems under continuous heating and evaporation conditions, which were the main components of the acid leaching solution obtained through a sodium-assisted activation hydrochloric acid leaching process. The ternary system was of a simple eutonic type under different acidities. There were three crystalline regions; the crystalline regions of AlCl3·6H2O, NaCl and the mixture AlCl3·6H2O/NaCl, respectively. The phase diagram was used to optimize the crystallization process of AlCl3·6H2O and NaCl. A process was designed to evaporate and remove NaCl at the first stage of the evaporation process, and then continue to evaporate and crystallize AlCl3·6H2O after solid-liquid separation. The purities of the final salt products were 99.12% for NaCl and up to 97.35% for AlCl3·6H2O, respectively.

  7. Luminescence properties of undoped CsCaCl3 and CsSrCl3 crystalline scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Yutaka; Saeki, Keiichiro; Koshimizu, Masanori; Asai, Keisuke; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic luminescence properties of undoped CsCaCl 3 and CsSrCl 3 crystalline scintillators were studied. The crystal samples were grown by a vertical Bridgman method. Photoluminescence spectra of the crystals showed Auger-free luminescence (AFL) at 310 nm and self-trapped emission (STE) at 400 nm for CsCaCl 3 and 465 nm for CsSrCl 3 , when vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light at 84 nm and 160 nm excited the crystals. X-ray excited radioluminescence spectra of the crystals showed some emission bands in the 280-600 nm wavelength range, which are owing to AFL, STE, and other origins such as lattice defects and impurities. Scintillation light yield was 400-300 ph/MeV, and the principal scintillation decay time about 2.5 ns and 12 ns for CsCaCl 3 and 1.8 ns and 13 ns for CsSrCl 3 . (author)

  8. Physiologic upper limit of pore size in the blood-tumor barrier of malignant solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Gary L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The existence of large pores in the blood-tumor barrier (BTB of malignant solid tumor microvasculature makes the blood-tumor barrier more permeable to macromolecules than the endothelial barrier of most normal tissue microvasculature. The BTB of malignant solid tumors growing outside the brain, in peripheral tissues, is more permeable than that of similar tumors growing inside the brain. This has been previously attributed to the larger anatomic sizes of the pores within the BTB of peripheral tumors. Since in the physiological state in vivo a fibrous glycocalyx layer coats the pores of the BTB, it is possible that the effective physiologic pore size in the BTB of brain tumors and peripheral tumors is similar. If this were the case, then the higher permeability of the BTB of peripheral tumor would be attributable to the presence of a greater number of pores in the BTB of peripheral tumors. In this study, we probed in vivo the upper limit of pore size in the BTB of rodent malignant gliomas grown inside the brain, the orthotopic site, as well as outside the brain in temporalis skeletal muscle, the ectopic site. Methods Generation 5 (G5 through generation 8 (G8 polyamidoamine dendrimers were labeled with gadolinium (Gd-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid, an anionic MRI contrast agent. The respective Gd-dendrimer generations were visualized in vitro by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Following intravenous infusion of the respective Gd-dendrimer generations (Gd-G5, N = 6; Gd-G6, N = 6; Gd-G7, N = 5; Gd-G8, N = 5 the blood and tumor tissue pharmacokinetics of the Gd-dendrimer generations were visualized in vivo over 600 to 700 minutes by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. One additional animal was imaged in each Gd-dendrimer generation group for 175 minutes under continuous anesthesia for the creation of voxel-by-voxel Gd concentration maps. Results The estimated diameters of Gd-G7 dendrimers were 11 ± 1 nm and those of Gd-G8

  9. The Use of Limited Fluid Resuscitation and Blood Pressure-Controlling Drugs in the Treatment of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Concomitant with Hemorrhagic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bo; Li, Mao-Qin; Li, Jia-Qiong

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the limited fluid resuscitation regimen combined with blood pressure-controlling drugs in treating acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage concomitant with hemorrhagic shock. A total of 51 patients were enrolled and divided into a group that received traditional fluid resuscitation group (conventional group, 24 patients) and a limited fluid resuscitation group (study group, 27 patients). Before and after resuscitation, the blood lactate, base excess, and hemoglobin values, as well as the volume of fluid resuscitation and resuscitation time were examined. Compared with conventional group, study group had significantly better values of blood lactate, base excess, and hemoglobin (all p controlling drugs effectivelyxxx maintains blood perfusion of vital organs, improves whole body perfusion indicators, reduces the volume of fluid resuscitation, and achieves better bleeding control and resuscitation effectiveness.

  10. Development and validation of an universal interface for compound-specific stable isotope analysis of chlorine (37Cl/35Cl) by GC-high-temperature conversion (HTC)-MS/IRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renpenning, Julian; Hitzfeld, Kristina L; Gilevska, Tetyana; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2015-03-03

    A universal application of compound-specific isotope analysis of chlorine was thus far limited by the availability of suitable analysis techniques. In this study, gas chromatography in combination with a high-temperature conversion interface (GC-HTC), converting organic chlorine in the presence of H2 to gaseous HCl, was coupled to a dual-detection system, combining an ion trap mass spectrometer (MS) and isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The combination of the MS/IRMS detection enabled a detailed characterization, optimization, and online monitoring of the high-temperature conversion process via ion trap MS as well as a simultaneous chlorine isotope analysis by the IRMS. Using GC-HTC-MS/IRMS, chlorine isotope analysis at optimized conversion conditions resulted in very accurate isotope values (δ(37)Cl(SMOC)) for measured reference material with known isotope composition, including chlorinated ethylene, chloromethane, hexachlorocyclohexane, and trichloroacetic acids methyl ester. Respective detection limits were determined to be <15 nmol Cl on column with achieved precision of <0.3‰.

  11. Difference in tree growth responses to climate at the upper treeline: Qilian Juniper in the Anyemaqen Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jianfeng; Gou, Xiaohua; Chen, Fahu; Li, Jinbao; Liu, Puxing; Zhang, Yong; Fang, Keyan

    2008-08-01

    Three ring-width chronologies were developed from Qilian Juniper (Sabina przewalskii Kom.) at the upper treeline along a west-east gradient in the Anyemaqen Mountains. Most chronological statistics, except for mean sensitivity (MS), decreased from west to east. The first principal component (PC1) loadings indicated that stands in a similar climate condition were most important to the variability of radial growth. PC2 loadings decreased from west to east, suggesting the difference of tree-growth between eastern and western Anyemaqen Mountains. Correlations between standard chronologies and climatic factors revealed different climatic influences on radial growth along a west-east gradient in the study area. Temperature of warm season (July-August) was important to the radial growth at the upper treeline in the whole study area. Precipitation of current May was an important limiting factor of tree growth only in the western (drier) upper treeline, whereas precipitation of current September limited tree growth in the eastern (wetter) upper treeline. Response function analysis results showed that there were regional differences between tree growth and climatic factors in various sampling sites of the whole study area. Temperature and precipitation were the important factors influencing tree growth in western (drier) upper treeline. However, tree growth was greatly limited by temperature at the upper treeline in the middle area, and was more limited by precipitation than temperature in the eastern (wetter) upper treeline.

  12. Study of the decay /sup 184/Hg. -->. /sup 184/Au (Tsub(1/2)=30s). [Lifetime, upper limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettles, W G; Beraud, R; Cole, J D; Hamilton, J H; Ramayya, A V; Kawakami, H [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA). Dept. of Physics; Sastry, K S.R. [Massachusetts Univ., Amherst (USA); Spejewski, E H

    1978-04-01

    The radioactive decay of /sup 184/Hg to /sup 184/Au was studied on line with the UNISOR isotope separator. The 184 mass chain was entered at /sup 184/Tl and /sup 184/Hg by bombarding an isotopically-enriched target of /sup 180/W with /sup 14/N ions of 177 MeV. Multiscale singles and ..gamma..-..gamma..-time coincidence studies were carried out. No previous levels have been assigned to /sup 184/Au. From the coincidence data eight levels at 156.2, 159.1, 247.7, 282.8, 295.1, 392.4, 418.0 and 412.4 keV are assigned and two tentative levels at 534.0 and 551.6 keV are proposed. By using the delayed coincidence technique, a half-life of 36+-6 nanoseconds was measured for the 156.2 keV first-excited level and upper limits of 2 nanoseconds were determined for the half-lives of levels at 159.1, 247.7, 295.1 and 392.4 keV.

  13. 36Cl AMS measurement of JCO samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, D.; Seki, R.; Nagashima, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Kume, H.; Mawatari, R.

    2000-01-01

    A critical nuclear accident occurred at the nuclear fuel processing facility, JCO, in Tokaimura, Ibaraki prefecture, Japan on 30 September 1999, and a lot of neutron particle were released in the environment. In order to estimate the total neutron flux, we measured the yield of 36 Cl radioisotopes in the samples being collected from the accident site. The neutron flux can be estimated from the ratio of 36 Cl to 35 Cl because the 36 Cl nuclei are created from 35 Cl through a thermal neutron capture process, 35 Cl(n,γ) 36 Cl. (author)

  14. Experimental studies on cycling stable characteristics of inorganic phase change material CaCl2·6H2O-MgCl2·6H2O modified with SrCl2·6H2O and CMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meizhi; Yang, Luwei; Zhang, Zhentao

    2018-01-01

    By means of mass ratio method, binary eutectic hydrated salts inorganic phase change thermal energy storage system CaCl2·6H2O-20wt% MgCl2·6H2O was prepared, and through adding nucleating agent 1wt% SrCl2·6H2O and thickening agent 0.5wt% carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC), inoganic phase change material (PCM) modified was obtained. With recording cooling-melting curves simultaneously, this PCM was frozen and melted for 100 cycles under programmable temperature control. After per 10 cycles, the PCM was charaterized by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and density meter, then analysing variation characteristics of phase change temperature, supercooling degree, superheat degree, latent heat, crystal structure and density with the increase of cycle index. The results showed that the average values of average phase change temperature for cooling and heating process were 25.70°C and 27.39°C respectively with small changes. The average values of average supercooling and superheat degree were 0.59°C and 0.49°C respectively, and the maximum value was 1.10°C. The average value and standard deviation of latent heat of fusion were 120.62 J/g and 1.90 J/g respectively. Non-molten white solid sediments resulted from phase separation were tachyhydrite (CaMg2Cl6·12H2O), which was characterized by XRD. Measuring density of the PCM after per 10 cycles, and the results suggested that the total mass of tachyhydrite was limited. In summary, such modified inoganic PCM CaCl2·6H2O-20wt% MgCl2·6H2O-1wt% SrCl2·6H2O-0.5wt% CMC could stay excellent circulation stability within 100 cycles, and providing reference value in practical use.

  15. Electrochemical Deposition of Aluminum from NaCl-AlCl3 Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Hjuler, H. A.; Berg, Rolf W.

    1990-01-01

    Electrochemical deposition of aluminum from NaAlCl4 melts saturated with NaCl onto a glassy carbon electrode at175°C has been studied by voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and constant current deposition. The deposition of aluminumwas found to proceed via a nucleation/growth mechanism, and the nucle......Electrochemical deposition of aluminum from NaAlCl4 melts saturated with NaCl onto a glassy carbon electrode at175°C has been studied by voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and constant current deposition. The deposition of aluminumwas found to proceed via a nucleation/growth mechanism......, and the nucleation process was found to be progressive.The morphology of aluminum deposits was examined with photomicroscopy. It was shown that depending on the currentdensities (c.d.) applied, three types of aluminum deposits could be obtained, namely, spongy deposits formed at lower c.d.(below 0.7 mA/cm2), smooth...... layers deposited at intermediate c.d. (between 2 and 10 mA/cm2), and dendritic or porous depositsobtained at high c.d. (above 15 mA/cm2). However, the smooth aluminum deposits were about five times more voluminousthan the theoretical value. The spongy deposits were formed due to difficulties...

  16. Ages of young star clusters, massive blue stragglers, and the upper mass limit of stars: Analyzing age-dependent stellar mass functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, F. R. N.; Izzard, R. G.; Langer, N.; Stolte, A.; Hußmann, B. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie der Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); De Mink, S. E. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); De Koter, A.; Sana, H. [Astronomical Institute " Anton Pannekoek" , Amsterdam University, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gvaramadze, V. V. [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Universitetskij Pr. 13, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Liermann, A., E-mail: fschneid@astro.uni-bonn.de [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    Massive stars rapidly change their masses through strong stellar winds and mass transfer in binary systems. The latter aspect is important for populations of massive stars as more than 70% of all O stars are expected to interact with a binary companion during their lifetime. We show that such mass changes leave characteristic signatures in stellar mass functions of young star clusters that can be used to infer their ages and to identify products of binary evolution. We model the observed present-day mass functions of the young Galactic Arches and Quintuplet star clusters using our rapid binary evolution code. We find that the shaping of the mass function by stellar wind mass loss allows us to determine the cluster ages as 3.5 ± 0.7 Myr and 4.8 ± 1.1 Myr, respectively. Exploiting the effects of binary mass exchange on the cluster mass function, we find that the most massive stars in both clusters are rejuvenated products of binary mass transfer, i.e., the massive counterpart of classical blue straggler stars. This resolves the problem of an apparent age spread among the most luminous stars exceeding the expected duration of star formation in these clusters. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to probe stochastic sampling, which support the idea of the most massive stars being rejuvenated binary products. We find that the most massive star is expected to be a binary product after 1.0 ± 0.7 Myr in Arches and after 1.7 ± 1.0 Myr in Quintuplet. Today, the most massive 9 ± 3 stars in Arches and 8 ± 3 in Quintuplet are expected to be such objects. Our findings have strong implications for the stellar upper mass limit and solve the discrepancy between the claimed 150 M {sub ☉} limit and observations of four stars with initial masses of 165-320 M {sub ☉} in R136 and of supernova 2007bi, which is thought to be a pair-instability supernova from an initial 250 M {sub ☉} star. Using the stellar population of R136, we revise the upper mass limit to values in the range

  17. Ages of young star clusters, massive blue stragglers, and the upper mass limit of stars: Analyzing age-dependent stellar mass functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, F. R. N.; Izzard, R. G.; Langer, N.; Stolte, A.; Hußmann, B.; De Mink, S. E.; Anton Pannekoek, Amsterdam University, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands))" data-affiliation=" (Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, Amsterdam University, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands))" >De Koter, A.; Anton Pannekoek, Amsterdam University, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands))" data-affiliation=" (Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, Amsterdam University, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands))" >Sana, H.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Liermann, A.

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars rapidly change their masses through strong stellar winds and mass transfer in binary systems. The latter aspect is important for populations of massive stars as more than 70% of all O stars are expected to interact with a binary companion during their lifetime. We show that such mass changes leave characteristic signatures in stellar mass functions of young star clusters that can be used to infer their ages and to identify products of binary evolution. We model the observed present-day mass functions of the young Galactic Arches and Quintuplet star clusters using our rapid binary evolution code. We find that the shaping of the mass function by stellar wind mass loss allows us to determine the cluster ages as 3.5 ± 0.7 Myr and 4.8 ± 1.1 Myr, respectively. Exploiting the effects of binary mass exchange on the cluster mass function, we find that the most massive stars in both clusters are rejuvenated products of binary mass transfer, i.e., the massive counterpart of classical blue straggler stars. This resolves the problem of an apparent age spread among the most luminous stars exceeding the expected duration of star formation in these clusters. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to probe stochastic sampling, which support the idea of the most massive stars being rejuvenated binary products. We find that the most massive star is expected to be a binary product after 1.0 ± 0.7 Myr in Arches and after 1.7 ± 1.0 Myr in Quintuplet. Today, the most massive 9 ± 3 stars in Arches and 8 ± 3 in Quintuplet are expected to be such objects. Our findings have strong implications for the stellar upper mass limit and solve the discrepancy between the claimed 150 M ☉ limit and observations of four stars with initial masses of 165-320 M ☉ in R136 and of supernova 2007bi, which is thought to be a pair-instability supernova from an initial 250 M ☉ star. Using the stellar population of R136, we revise the upper mass limit to values in the range 200-500 M ☉ .

  18. Ages of Young Star Clusters, Massive Blue Stragglers, and the Upper Mass Limit of Stars: Analyzing Age-dependent Stellar Mass Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F. R. N.; Izzard, R. G.; de Mink, S. E.; Langer, N.; Stolte, A.; de Koter, A.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Hußmann, B.; Liermann, A.; Sana, H.

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars rapidly change their masses through strong stellar winds and mass transfer in binary systems. The latter aspect is important for populations of massive stars as more than 70% of all O stars are expected to interact with a binary companion during their lifetime. We show that such mass changes leave characteristic signatures in stellar mass functions of young star clusters that can be used to infer their ages and to identify products of binary evolution. We model the observed present-day mass functions of the young Galactic Arches and Quintuplet star clusters using our rapid binary evolution code. We find that the shaping of the mass function by stellar wind mass loss allows us to determine the cluster ages as 3.5 ± 0.7 Myr and 4.8 ± 1.1 Myr, respectively. Exploiting the effects of binary mass exchange on the cluster mass function, we find that the most massive stars in both clusters are rejuvenated products of binary mass transfer, i.e., the massive counterpart of classical blue straggler stars. This resolves the problem of an apparent age spread among the most luminous stars exceeding the expected duration of star formation in these clusters. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to probe stochastic sampling, which support the idea of the most massive stars being rejuvenated binary products. We find that the most massive star is expected to be a binary product after 1.0 ± 0.7 Myr in Arches and after 1.7 ± 1.0 Myr in Quintuplet. Today, the most massive 9 ± 3 stars in Arches and 8 ± 3 in Quintuplet are expected to be such objects. Our findings have strong implications for the stellar upper mass limit and solve the discrepancy between the claimed 150 M ⊙ limit and observations of four stars with initial masses of 165-320 M ⊙ in R136 and of supernova 2007bi, which is thought to be a pair-instability supernova from an initial 250 M ⊙ star. Using the stellar population of R136, we revise the upper mass limit to values in the range 200-500 M ⊙.

  19. Retrievals of chlorine chemistry kinetic parameters from Antarctic ClO microwave radiometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kremser

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Key kinetic parameters governing the partitioning of chlorine species in the Antarctic polar stratosphere were retrieved from 28 days of chlorine monoxide (ClO microwave radiometer measurements made during the late winter/early spring of 2005 at Scott Base (77.85° S, 166.75° E. During day-time the loss of the ClO dimer chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl occurs mainly by photolysis. Some time after sunrise, a photochemical equilibrium is established and the ClO/ClOOCl partitioning is determined by the ratio of the photolysis frequency, J, and the dimer formation rate, kf. The values of J and kf from laboratory studies remain uncertain to a considerable extent, and as a complement to these ongoing studies, the goal of this work is to provide a constraint on that uncertainty based on observations of ClO profiles in the Antarctic. First an optimal estimation technique was used to derive J/kf ratios for a range of Keq values. The optimal estimation forward model was a photochemical box model that takes J, kf, and Keq as inputs, together with a priori profiles of activated chlorine (ClOx = ClO+2×ClOOCl, profiles of ozone, temperature, and pressure. JPL06 kinetics are used as a priori in the optimal estimation and for all other chemistry in the forward model. Using the more recent JPL09 kinetics results in insignificant differences in the retrieved value of J/kf. A complementary approach was used to derive the optimal kinetic parameters; the full parameter space of J, kf, Keq and ClOx was sampled to find the minimum in differences between measured and modelled ClO profiles. Furthermore, values of Keq up to 2.0 times larger than recommended by JPL06 were explored to test the sensitivity of the

  20. Effects of dilute aqueous NaCl solution on caffeine aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Bhanita; Paul, Sandip, E-mail: sandipp@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati 781039, Assam (India)

    2013-11-21

    The effect of salt concentration on association properties of caffeine molecule was investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations in isothermal-isobaric ensemble of eight caffeine molecules in pure water and three different salt (NaCl) concentrations, at 300 K temperature and 1 atm pressure. The concentration of caffeine was taken almost at the solubility limit. With increasing salt concentration, we observe enhancement of first peak height and appearance of a second peak in the caffeine-caffeine distribution function. Furthermore, our calculated solvent accessible area values and cluster structure analyses suggest formation of higher order caffeine cluster on addition of salt. The calculated hydrogen bond properties reveal that there is a modest decrease in the average number of water-caffeine hydrogen bonds on addition of NaCl salt. Also observed are: (i) decrease in probability of salt contact ion pair as well as decrease in the solvent separated ion pair formation with increasing salt concentration, (ii) a modest second shell collapse in the water structure, and (iii) dehydration of hydrophobic atomic sites of caffeine on addition of NaCl.

  1. Effects of dilute aqueous NaCl solution on caffeine aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Bhanita; Paul, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    The effect of salt concentration on association properties of caffeine molecule was investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations in isothermal-isobaric ensemble of eight caffeine molecules in pure water and three different salt (NaCl) concentrations, at 300 K temperature and 1 atm pressure. The concentration of caffeine was taken almost at the solubility limit. With increasing salt concentration, we observe enhancement of first peak height and appearance of a second peak in the caffeine-caffeine distribution function. Furthermore, our calculated solvent accessible area values and cluster structure analyses suggest formation of higher order caffeine cluster on addition of salt. The calculated hydrogen bond properties reveal that there is a modest decrease in the average number of water-caffeine hydrogen bonds on addition of NaCl salt. Also observed are: (i) decrease in probability of salt contact ion pair as well as decrease in the solvent separated ion pair formation with increasing salt concentration, (ii) a modest second shell collapse in the water structure, and (iii) dehydration of hydrophobic atomic sites of caffeine on addition of NaCl

  2. Spinal fusion limits upper body range of motion during gait without inducing compensatory mechanisms in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewijn, R M; Kingma, I; de Kleuver, M; Schimmel, J J P; Keijsers, N L W

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies show a limited alteration of gait at normal walking speed after spinal fusion surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), despite the presumed essential role of spinal mobility during gait. This study analyses how spinal fusion affects gait at more challenging walking speeds. More specifically, we investigated whether thoracic-pelvic rotations are reduced to a larger extent at higher gait speeds and whether compensatory mechanisms above and below the stiffened spine are present. 18 AIS patients underwent gait analysis at increasing walking speeds (0.45 to 2.22m/s) before and after spinal fusion. The range of motion (ROM) of the upper (thorax, thoracic-pelvic and pelvis) and lower body (hip, knee and ankle) was determined in all three planes. Spatiotemporal parameters of interest were stride length and cadence. Spinal fusion diminished transverse plane thoracic-pelvic ROM and this difference was more explicit at higher walking speeds. Transversal pelvis ROM was also decreased but this effect was not affected by speed. Lower body ROM, step length and cadence remained unaffected. Despite the reduction of upper body ROM after spine surgery during high speed gait, no altered spatiotemporal parameters or increased compensatory ROM above or below the fusion (i.e. in the shoulder girdle or lower extremities) was identified. Thus, it remains unclear how patients can cope so well with such major surgery. Future studies should focus on analyzing the kinematics of individual spinal levels above and below the fusion during gait to investigate possible compensatory mechanisms within the spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Climate limits across space and time on European forest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, A. L. S.; Neumann, M.; Hasenauer, H.

    2017-12-01

    The impact climate has on forests has been extensively studied. However, the large scale effect climate has on forest structures, such as average diameters, heights and basal area are understudied in a spatially explicit manner. The limits, tipping points and thresholds that climate places on forest structures dictate the services a forest may provide, the vulnerability of a forest to mortality and the potential value of the timber there within. The majority of current research either investigates climate impacts on forest pools and fluxes, on a tree physiological scale or on case studies that are used to extrapolate results and potential impacts. A spatially explicit study on how climate affects forest structure over a large region would give valuable information to stakeholders who are more concerned with ecosystem services that cannot be described by pools and fluxes but require spatially explicit information - such as biodiversity, habitat suitability, and market values. In this study, we quantified the limits that climate (maximum, minimum temperature and precipitation) places on 3 forest structures, diameter at breast height, height, and basal area throughout Europe. Our results show clear climatic zones of high and low upper limits for each forest structure variable studied. We also spatially analyzed how climate restricts the potential bio-physical upper limits and creates tipping points of each forest structure variable and which climate factors are most limiting. Further, we demonstrated how the climate change has affected 8 individual forests across Europe and then the continent as a whole. We find that diameter, height and basal area are limited by climate in different ways and that areas may have high upper limits in one structure and low upper limits in another limitted by different climate variables. We also found that even though individual forests may have increased their potential upper limit forest structure values, European forests as a whole

  4. Volatility of components of saturated vapours of UCl4-CsCl and UCl4-LiCl molten mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, M.V.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Salyulev, A.B.; Komarov, V.E.; Posokhin, Yu.V.; Afonichkin, V.K.

    1979-01-01

    The flow method has been used for measuring the volatility of the components from UCl 4 -CsCl and UCl 4 -LiCl melted mixtures containing 2.0, 5.0, 12.0, 25.0, 33.0, 50.0, 67.0, and 83.0 mol.% of UCl 4 within the temperature ranges of 903-1188 K and 740-1200 K, respectively. The chemical composition of saturated vapours above the melted salts has been determined. The melted mixtures in question exhibit negative deviation from ideal behaviour. Made was the conclusion about the presence in a vapour phase, along with monomeric UCl 4 , LiCl, CsCl and Li 2 Cl 2 , Cs 2 Cl 2 dimers of double compounds of the MeUCl 5 most probable composition. Their absolute contribution into a total pressure above the UCl 4 -CsCl melted mixtures is considerably smaller than above the UCl 4 -LiCl mixtures

  5. An upper and lower bound of the Medication Possession Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperber CM

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Christian M Sperber, Suren R Samarasinghe, Grace P Lomax Patient Connect Limited, Guildford, UK Background: The Medication Possession Ratio (MPR is a ubiquitous and central measurement for adherence in the health care industry. However, attempts to standardize its calculation have failed, possibly due to the opacity of a single, static MPR, incapability of directly lending itself to a variety of studies, and challenges of comparing the value across studies. This work shows that the MPR strictly depends on the length of the time interval over which it is measured as well as on the dominant dispense quantity for short time intervals. Furthermore, removing a proportion of the patient cohort based on the number of acquisitions may also have a severe impact on the MPR. Therefore, it is suggested that the MPR is represented as a trend over a range of time intervals. To this end, an upper and lower bound of the MPR trend is developed with an upper bound acknowledging patients who change their treatment and the lower bound acknowledging patients who discontinue their treatment.Purpose: Introducing a representation of the MPR value as a trend rather than a static number by developing a quantitative description of an upper and lower bound of the MPR trend, while shedding light on the impacts on prefiltering the patient cohort.Patients and methods: Anonymized patient-level data was utilized as an example for a suggested calculation of an upper and lower bound of the MPR.Results: Representation of the MPR for a predefined time interval precludes a reliable MPR assessment. A quantitative approach is suggested to generate an upper and lower trend of the MPR while emphasizing the impact on removing patients with a limited number of acquisitions.Conclusion: An upper and lower trend makes the MPR more transparent and allows a better comparison across different studies. Removing patients with a limited number of acquisitions should be avoided. Keywords: MPR

  6. Bumetanide increases Cl--dependent short-circuit current in late distal colon: Evidence for the presence of active electrogenic Cl- absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lieqi; Fang, Xiefan; Winesett, Steven P; Cheng, Catherine Y; Binder, Henry J; Rivkees, Scott A; Cheng, Sam X

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian colonic epithelia consist of cells that are capable of both absorbing and secreting Cl-. The present studies employing Ussing chamber technique identified two opposing short-circuit current (Isc) responses to basolateral bumetanide in rat distal colon. Apart from the transepithelial Cl--secretory Isc in early distal colon that was inhibited by bumetanide, bumetanide also stimulated Isc in late distal colon that had not previously been identified. Since bumetanide inhibits basolateral Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC) in crypt cells and basolateral K+-Cl- cotransporter (KCC) in surface epithelium, we proposed this stimulatory Isc could represent a KCC-mediated Cl- absorptive current. In support of this hypothesis, ion substitution experiments established Cl- dependency of this absorptive Isc and transport inhibitor studies demonstrated the involvement of an apical Cl- conductance. Current distribution and RNA sequencing analyses revealed that this Cl- absorptive Isc is closely associated with epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) but is not dependent on ENaC activity. Thus, inhibition of ENaC by 10 μM amiloride or benzamil neither altered the direction nor its activity. Physiological studies suggested that this Cl- absorptive Isc senses dietary Cl- content; thus when dietary Cl- was low, Cl- absorptive Isc was up-regulated. In contrast, when dietary Cl- was increased, Cl- absorptive Isc was down-regulated. We conclude that an active Cl- extrusion mechanism exists in ENaC-expressing late distal colon and likely operates in parallel with ENaC to facilitate NaCl absorption.

  7. Origin of halides (Cl- and Br-) and of their stable isotopes (d37Cl and d81Br) at the Tournemire URL (France) - Experimental and numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir-Bey, Nassim; Matray, Jean-Michel

    2014-05-01

    This work is part of research conducted by the Institute of Radiological and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) on the geological disposal of High-Level and Intermediate-Level Long-Lived (HL-ILLL) radioactive waste in deep clayrocks. In France, the choice of the potential host rock for the geological storage is focused on the Callovian-Oxfordian (COx) of Meuse/Haute-Marne from its low permeability, capacity for self- sealing, high sorption and ability to radionuclide (RN) transport by diffusion. IRSN, which plays an expert role for ASN has its own underground research laboratory in a clayrock which has strong analogies to the COx. This is the Toarcian/Domerian clayrock located at Tournemire in southern Aveyron in France. The purpose of this study was to assess the transfer of RN in the Tournemire clayrock through the study of halides contents and of their stable isotopes (Cl-, Br-, Cl-/Br-, d37Cl, d81Br). The approach used was multiple and consisted for halides to: 1) Assess their stock in different fractions of the rock by applying several techniques including i) alkaline fusion for their total stock, ii) leaching to access their stock in porewater and to mineral phases sensitive to dissolution iii) cubic diffusion for their stock in porewater, 2) Get their diffusive transport parameters of a selection of samples from the upper Toarcian by cubic diffusion experiments modelled using the Hytec transport code developed by Mines ParisTech and 3) Model their transport after palaeohydrogeological known changes of the Tournemire massif. The experimental approach, conducted at the LAME lab, did not lead to an operational protocol for the alkaline fusion due to an incomplete rock dissolution. Leaching was used to characterize the concentrations of halides in the fractions of pore water and of minerals sensitive to dissolution. The results show levels of halides much higher than those of pore water with very low Cl/Br ratios likely resulting from the dissolution of mineral species. The

  8. Environmental and health risks of chlorine trifluoride (ClF3), an alternative to potent greenhouse gases in the semiconductor industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Tien

    2011-06-15

    The first accident involving chlorine trifluoride (ClF(3)) in the history of semiconductor fabrication processes occurred on 28 July 2006 at Hsinchu (Taiwan), resulting in a large release of the highly reactive material and causing the chemical burn to several workers. ClF(3) is used primarily as an in situ cleaning gas in the manufacture of semiconductor silicon-wafer devices in replacement of perfluorocompounds (PFCs) because they have the high potential to contribute significantly to the global warming. This article aimed at reviewing ClF(3) in the physicochemical properties, the industrial uses, and the environmental implications on the basis of its toxicity, reactivity, health hazards and exposure limits. The health hazards of probable decomposition/hydrolysis products from ClF(3) were also evaluated based on their basic physicochemical properties and occupational exposure limits. The occupational exposure assessment was further discussed to understand potentially hazardous risks caused by hydrogen fluoride and fluorides from the decomposition/hydrolysis products of ClF(3). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimate of the upper limit of amplitude of Solar Cycle No. 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbergleit, V. M; Larocca, P. A [Departamento de Fisica, UBA (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    AA* indices of values greater than 60 10{sup -9} Tesla are considered in order to characterize geomagnetic storms since the available series of these indices comprise the years from 1868 to 1998 (The longest existing interval of geomagnetic activity). By applying the precursor technique we have performed an analysis of the storm periods and the solar activity, obtaining a good correlation between the number of storms ({alpha})(characterized by the AA* indices) and the amplitudes of each solar cycle ({zeta}) and those of the next ({mu}). Using the multiple regression method applied to {alpha}=A+B{zeta} +C{mu}, the constants are calculated and the values found are: A=-33 {+-}18, B= 0.74{+-}0.13 y C= 0.56{+-}0.13. The present statistical method indicates that the current solar cycle (number 23) would have an upper limit of 202{+-}57 monthy mean sunspots. This value indicates that the solar activity would be high causing important effects on the Earth's environment. [Spanish] Se consideran los valores de los indices AA* de valor mayor que 60 10{sup -9} Tesla para caracterizar tormentas geomagneticas ya que las series disponibles de estos indices van desde 1868 hasta 1998 (el mas largo intervalo de la actividad geomagnetica existente). Aplicando la tecnica del precursor hemos realizado un analisis de los periodos de tormentas y la actividad solar obteniendo una buena correlacion entre el numero de tormentas ({alpha}) (caracterizado por los indices AA*) y las amplitudes de los ciclos solares corriente ({zeta}) y el proximo ({mu}). Usando el metodo de regresion multiple aplicado a {alpha}=A+B{zeta} +C{mu}, las consonantes resultaron: A=-33 {+-}18, B= 0.74{+-}0.13 y C= 0.56{+-}0.13. El metodo estadistico presentado indica que el ciclo actual (numero 23) tendria un pico de 202{+-} 57 manchas mensuales promedio. Este valor indica que la actividad solar seria alta produciendo importantes efectos en el medio ambiente terrestre.

  10. Phase equilibria and interaction between the CsCl-PbCl{sub 2}-PbO system components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, Pavel A.; Zakiryanova, Irina D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekatherinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of High Temperature Electrochemistry; Kholkina, Anna S.; Bausheva, Alexandra V.; Khudorozhkova, Anastasia O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekatherinburg (Russian Federation). Inst. of High Temperature Electrochemistry; Ural Federal Univ., Ekatherinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    Thermal analysis was applied to determine liquidus temperatures in the CsCl-PbCl{sub 2}-PbO system, with the PbO concentration ranging from 0 to 20 mol%. The temperature dependence of the PbO solubility in the CsCl-PbCl{sub 2} eutectic melt was studied, and the thermodynamic parameters of the PbO dissolution were calculated. The type, morphology, and composition of oxychloride ionic groupings in the melt were determined in situ using Raman spectroscopy.

  11. Cross-sections for sup 3 sup 6 Cl from Ti at E sub p =35-150 MeV Applications to in-situ exposure dating

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, D; Hotchkis, M

    2000-01-01

    We have measured the low-energy yield of sup 3 sup 6 Cl from Ti for proton energies from 35 to 150 MeV. Thin Ti foil irradiations were performed at the Harvard University Cyclotron Laboratory and sup 3 sup 6 Cl concentrations were determined using the ANTARES AMS facility at ANSTO. Cross-sections ranged smoothly with energy from 0.32+-0.05 mb at 35 MeV to 5.3+-0.4 mb at 150 MeV. Results for E<110 MeV are new, while the upper region from 110 to 150 MeV agrees well with overlapping data from other studies. The in-situ production rate for sup 3 sup 6 Cl from Ti at the earth's surface and high latitude based on this excitation function and calculations of Masarik and Reedy (normalised to the mean measured yield of sup 3 sup 6 Cl from Ca) is estimated at approx(13+-3) atoms sup 3 sup 6 Cl (g Ti yr) sup - sup 1. We thus conclude that in Ti-rich, Ca-poor rocks or in typical basalts, sup 3 sup 6 Cl yield from Ti can amount to approx 5-10% of total. This is similar to the contribution from slow muon capture on sup ...

  12. Vasopressin alters the mechanism of apical Cl- entry from Na+:Cl- to Na+:K+:2Cl- cotransport in mouse medullary thick ascending limb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, A.; Grossman, E.B.; Lombardi, M.; Hebert, S.C. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Experiments were performed using in vitro perfused medullary thick ascending limbs of Henle (MTAL) and in suspensions of MTAL tubules isolated from mouse kidney to evaluate the effects of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on the K+ dependence of the apical, furosemide-sensitive Na{sup +}:Cl{sup {minus}} cotransporter and on transport-related oxygen consumption (QO{sub 2}). In isolated perfused MTAL segments, the rate of cell swelling induced by removing K+ from, and adding one mM ouabain to, the basolateral solution (ouabain(zero-K+)) provided an index to apical cotransporter activity and was used to evaluate the ionic requirements of the apical cotransporter in the presence and absence of AVP. In the absence of AVP cotransporter activity required Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, but not K{sup +}, while the presence of AVP the apical cotransporter required all three ions. {sup 86}Rb{sup +} uptake into MTAL tubules in suspension was significant only after exposure of tubules to AVP. Moreover, {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake was unaffected by extracellular K+ in the absence of AVP while after AVP exposure {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake was strictly K{sup +}-dependent. The AVP-induced coupling of K{sup +} to the Na{sup +}:Cl{sup {minus}} cotransporter resulted in a doubling in the rate of NaCl absorption without a parallel increase in the rate of cellular {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake or transport-related oxygen consumption. These results indicate that arginine vasopressin alters the mode of a loop diuretic-sensitive transporter from Na{sup +}:Cl{sup {minus}} cotransport to Na{sup +}:K{sup +}:2Cl{sup {minus}} cotransport in the mouse MTAL with the latter providing a distinct metabolic advantage for sodium transport. A model for AVP action on NaCl absorption by the MTAL is presented and the physiological significance of the coupling of K{sup +} to the apical Na{sup +}:Cl{sup {minus}} cotransporter in the MTAL and of the enhanced metabolic efficiency are discussed.

  13. Etude structurale et vibrationnelle d'un nouveau composé complexe de cobalt: [Co(imidazole)4Cl]Cl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbel, Amira; Mhiri, Tahar; Graia, Mohsen

    2015-10-01

    In the title complex, chlorido-tetra-kis-(1H-imidazole-κN (3))cobalt(II) chloride, [CoCl(C3H4N2)4]Cl, the Co(II) cation has a distorted square-pyramidal coordination environment. It is coordinated by four N atoms of four imidazole (Im) groups in the basal plane, and by a Cl atom in the apical position. It is isostructural with [Cu(Im)4Cl]Cl [Morzyk-Ociepa et al. (2012 ▸). J. Mol. Struct. 1028, 49-56] and [Cu(Im)4Br]Br [Hossaini Sadr et al. (2004 ▸). Acta Cryst. E60, m1324-m1326]. In the crystal, the [CoCl(C3H4N2)4](+) cations and Cl(-) anions are linked via N-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, forming layers parallel to (010). These layers are linked via C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds and C-H⋯π and π-π [inter-centroid distance = 3.794 (2) Å] inter-actions, forming a three-dimensional framework. The IR spectrum shows vibrational bands typical for imidazol groups. The monoclinic unit cell of the title compound emulates an ortho-rhom-bic cell as its β angle is close to 90°. The crystal is twinned, with the refined ratio of twin components being 0.569 (1):0.431 (1).

  14. The NANOGrav Nine-year Data Set: Limits on the Isotropic Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background

    OpenAIRE

    Arzoumanian, Zaven; Brazier, Adam; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Chamberlin, Sydney; Chatterjee, Shami; Christy, Brian; Cordes, Jim; Cornish, Neil; Demorest, Paul; Deng, Xihao; Dolch, Tim; Ellis, Justin; Ferdman, Rob; Fonseca, Emmanuel; Garver-Daniels, Nate

    2015-01-01

    We compute upper limits on the nanohertz-frequency isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB) using the 9-year data release from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration. We set upper limits for a GWB from supermassive black hole binaries under power law, broken power law, and free spectral coefficient GW spectrum models. We place a 95\\% upper limit on the strain amplitude (at a frequency of yr$^{-1}$) in the power law model of $A...

  15. Effect of TiCl4 treatment on the refractive index of nanoporous TiO2 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeeyoung; Lee, Myeongkyu

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the effect of TiCl4 treatment on the refractive index of a nanoporous TiO2 film. A nanoparticulate TiO2 film prepared on a glass substrate was immersed in a TiCl4 aqueous solution. The subsequent reaction of TiCl4 with H2O produces TiO2 and thus modifies the density and the refractive index of the film. With increasing TiCl4 concentration, the refractive index initially increased and then declined after being maximized (n = 2.02 at 633 nm) at 0.08 M concentration. A refractive index change as large as 0.45 could be obtained with the TiCl4 treatment, making it possible to achieve diffraction efficiency exceeding 80% in a diffraction grating-embedded TiO2 film. For high TiCl4 concentrations of 0.32 M and 0.64 M, the refractive index remained nearly unchanged. This was attributed to the limited permeability of high-viscosity TiCl4 solutions into the nanoporous films. The measured pore size distributions were in good agreement with the results of a diffraction analysis and refractive index measurement.

  16. Measurement of cosmogenic 36Cl/Cl in young volcanic rocks: An application of accelerator mass spectrometry in geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavy, B.D.; Phillips, F.M.; Elmore, D.; Kubik, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    We have measured 36 Cl/Cl ratios in a number of young volcanic rocks in order to test the feasibility of using 36 Cl buildup as a geochronometer for materials less than about 700,000 years old. All of the analyzed rocks have been dated independently using K-Ar or other radiometric dating methods and have exposure histories that are known or can be reasonably assumed. Measured 36 Cl/Cl ratios in these rocks are in good agreement with the calculated in-situ 36 Cl buildup curve. These analyses indicate that AMS measurement of 36 Cl buildup in young rocks is a potentially powerful new method for dating materials that had previously been undatable, and as such will have broad applications in volcanology, tectonics, geophysics, and Quaternary research

  17. Characterization of the human pH- and PKA-activated ClC-2G(2 alpha) Cl- channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, A M; Stroffekova, K; Knapp, L M; Kupert, E Y; Cuppoletti, J; Malinowska, D H

    1997-08-01

    A ClC-2G(2 alpha) Cl- channel was identified to be present in human lung and stomach, and a partial cDNA for this Cl- channel was cloned from a human fetal lung library. A full-length expressible human ClC-2G(2 alpha) cDNA was constructed by ligation of mutagenized expressible rabbit ClC-2G(2 alpha) cDNA with the human lung ClC-2G(2 alpha) cDNA, expressed in oocytes, and characterized at the single-channel level. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinase (PKA) treatment increased the probability of opening of the channel (Po). After PKA activation, the channel exhibited a linear (r = 0.99) current-voltage curve with a slope conductance of 22.1 +/- 0.8 pS in symmetric 800 mM tetraethylammonium chloride (TEACl; pH 7.4). Under fivefold gradient conditions of TEACl, a reversal potential of +21.5 +/- 2.8 mV was measured demonstrating anion-to-cation discrimination. As previously demonstrated for the rabbit ClC-2G(2 alpha) Cl- channel, the human analog, hClC-2G(2 alpha), was active at pH 7.4 as well as when the pH of the extracellular face of the channel (trans side of the bilayer; pHtrans) was asymmetrically reduced to pH 3.0. The extent of PKA activation was dependent on pHtrans. With PKA treatment, Po increased fourfold with a pHtrans of 7.4 and eightfold with a pHtrans of 3.0. Effects of sequential PKA addition followed by pHtrans reduction on the same channel suggested that the PKA- and pH-dependent increases in channel Po were separable and cumulative. Northern analysis showed ClC-2G(2 alpha) mRNA to be present in human adult and fetal lung and adult stomach, and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction showed this channel to be present in the adult human lung and stomach at about one-half the level found in fetal lung. The findings of the present study suggest that the ClC-2G(2 alpha) Cl- channel may play an important role in Cl- transport in the fetal and adult human lung.

  18. The upper and lower limits of the mechanistic stoichiometry of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Stoichiometry of oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, A D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-07-15

    Determination of the intrinsic or mechanistic P/O ratio of oxidative phosphorylation is difficult because of the unknown magnitude of leak fluxes. Applying a new approach developed to overcome this problem (see our preceding paper in this journal), the relationships between the rate of O2 uptake [( Jo)3], the net rate of phosphorylation (Jp), the P/O ratio, and the respiratory control ratio (RCR) have been determined in rat liver mitochondria when the rate of phosphorylation was systematically varied by three specific means. (a) When phosphorylation is titrated with carboxyatractyloside, linear relationships are observed between Jp and (Jo)3. These data indicate that the upper limit of the mechanistic P/O ratio is 1.80 for succinate and 2.90 for 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation. (b) Titration with malonate or antimycin yields linear relationships between Jp and (Jo)3. These data give the lower limit of the mechanistic P/O ratio of 1.63 for succinate and 2.66 for 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation. (c) Titration with a protonophore yields linear relationships between Jp, (Jo)3, and (Jo)4 and between P/O and 1/RCR. Extrapolation of the P/O ratio to 1/RCR = 0 yields P/O ratios of 1.75 for succinate and 2.73 for 3-hydroxybutyrate oxidation which must be equal to or greater than the mechanistic stoichiometry. When published values for the H+/O and H+/ATP ejection ratios are taken into consideration, these measurements suggest that the mechanistic P/O ratio is 1.75 for succinate oxidation and 2.75 for NADH oxidation.

  19. Improved 36Cl performance at the ASTER HVE 5 MV accelerator mass spectrometer national facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkel, R.; Arnold, M.; Aumaître, G.; Benedetti, L.; Bourlès, D.; Keddadouche, K.; Merchel, S.

    2013-01-01

    The HVE 5 MV ASTER AMS national facility at CEREGE was accepted in 2007. Since then we have continued to optimize performance for 36 Cl. Cl-36 analyses use AgCl, a Cs negative ion sputter source, Ar stripping to +5 in the terminal of the Tandetron™ accelerator at 5 MV and a silicon nitride post-acceleration stripper foil to enhance suppression of 36 S relative to 36 Cl. The major challenges to obtaining the desired performance for Earth science applications are ion source memory, mass fractionation effects, 36 S isobar suppression and sensitivity. Redesign of the SO110 ion source by HVE to change the size of the aperture and the shape of cathode significantly reduced ion source memory to less than ∼0.1%, a level that can be compensated for by matching standards to samples. We observe small systematic drifts in 35 Cl/ 37 Cl ratios over time, the source of which is not yet determined. Measurement of standards indicates that this effect limits the precision of 35 Cl/ 37 Cl ratio determination to about 2%. 36 S is suppressed in several ways. First, the sample chemistry has been designed to reduce S to low levels. Second, cathodes are constructed of low-S nickel, enabling direct target loading without the use of AgBr pre-packing. Third, a post-acceleration Si 3 N 4 stripper foil differentially absorbs energy from 36 Cl and 36 S. A subsequent electrostatic deflector is then able to suppress 36 S by a factor of ∼240 relative to 36 Cl. Differential energy loss in the detector further suppresses 36 S by about 10 −4 , for an overall suppression factor of 4 × 10 −7 . 36 S count rates are typically equivalent to a background 36 Cl/Cl of ∼10 −15 . At typical 35 Cl currents of ∼20 μA Cl 5+ samples with 36 Cl/ 35 Cl of 6 × 10 −14 can be measured to ±5% statistical uncertainty with 1 h of analysis time. Typical machine blanks have 36 Cl/Cl ∼2 × 10 −15 .

  20. First limits on the very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission of a fast radio burst. H.E.S.S. observations of FRB 150418

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Coffaro, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; Dewilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'c.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Richter, S.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; Superb Collaboration; Jankowski, F.; Keane, E. F.; Petroff, E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Following the detection of the fast radio burst FRB150418 by the SUPERB project at the Parkes radio telescope, we aim to search for very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission. Methods: Follow-up observations in the very-high energy gamma-ray domain were obtained with the H.E.S.S. imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system within 14.5 h of the radio burst. Results: The obtained 1.4 h of gamma-ray observations are presented and discussed. At the 99% C.L. we obtained an integral upper limit on the gamma-ray flux of Φγ(E > 350 GeV) FRB 150418. Conclusions: No hints for high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418 were found. Taking absorption on the extragalactic background light into account and assuming a distance of z = 0.492 based on radio and optical counterpart studies and consistent with the FRB dispersion, we constrain the gamma-ray luminosity at 1 TeV to L < 5.1 × 1047 erg/s at 99% C.L.

  1. Charging induced emission of neutral atoms from NaCl nanocube corners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceresoli, Davide; Zykova-Timan, Tatyana; Tosatti, Erio

    2008-01-01

    Detachment of neutral cations/anions from solid alkali halides can in principle be provoked by donating/subtracting electrons to the surface of alkali halide crystals, but generally constitutes a very endothermic process. However, the amount of energy required for emission is smaller for atoms located in less favorable positions, such as surface steps and kinks. For a corner ion in an alkali halide cube the binding is the weakest, so it should be easier to remove that atom, once it is neutralized. We carried out first principles density functional calculations and simulations of neutral and charged NaCl nanocubes, to establish the energetics of extraction of neutralized corner ions. Following hole donation (electron removal) we find that detachment of neutral Cl corner atoms will require a limited energy of about 0.8 eV. Conversely, following the donation of an excess electron to the cube, a neutral Na atom is extractable from the corner at the lower cost of about 0.6 eV. Since the cube electron affinity level (close to that a NaCl(100) surface state, which we also determine) is estimated to lie about 1.8 eV below vacuum, the overall energy balance upon donation to the nanocube of a zero-energy electron from vacuum will be exothermic. The atomic and electronic structure of the NaCl(100) surface, and of the nanocube Na and Cl corner vacancies are obtained and analyzed as a byproduct

  2. Efficiency and limitations of the upper airway mucosa as an air conditioner evaluated from the mechanisms of bronchoconstriction in asthmatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, A; Terada, N; Okamoto, Y; Togawa, K

    1985-01-01

    To elucidate a limit to the efficiency of the upper airway mucosa as an air conditioner, the temperatures of the inspiratory air and mucosa were measured in the cervical trachea. Both of them were affected only minimally by change of atmospheric air temperature during resting nose breathing, but were affected greatly by change of mode of breathing. During hyperventilation through the mouth, when the atmospheric air temperature was 1 degree C, a temperature difference of 9 degrees C was noted between inspiratory air in the cervical trachea and body temperature, together with a mucosal temperature fall by 1.86 +/- 0.61 degree C. Wearing of a mask caused a rise of 3 degrees C in the inspiratory air temperature in the cervical trachea.

  3. Alterações fisiológicas do sistema nervoso central de rã pelas toxinas de Cl. perfringens, Cl. oedematiens e Cl. septicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genésio Pacheco

    1947-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors carried on experiences in order to confirm the neurotoxic theory of gas gangrene explained by Pacheco & Costa, uning preparations of isolated cord-posterior train of Leptodactylus ocellatus as described by OZORIO DE ALMEIDA & Cols. Frogs were intoxicated 3 days before the test with parcially purified toxins of Cl. perfringens, Cl. oedematiens and Cl. septicum. The intoxication produced a shortening of spinal reflexes duration time of such preparations, showing a typical alteration of the reflex activity of the spinal cord.

  4. Luminescence of BaCl2:Eu2+ particles dispersed in the NaCl host excited by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushak, A.S.; Savchyn, P.V.; Vistovskyy, V.V.; Demkiv, T.M.; Dacyuk, J.R.; Myagkota, S.V.; Voloshinovskii, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    BaCl 2 :Eu 2+ microcrystals embedded in the NaCl host have been obtained in the NaCl–BaCl 2 (1 mol%)–EuCl 3 (0.02 mol%) crystalline system. The influence of the annealing conditions on the formation of such particles has been studied. In particular, long-term annealing (at 200 °S during 100 h) promotes the microcrystals formation in the NaCl–BaCl 2 –Eu crystalline system. The subsequent heat treatment (annealed at 600 °S during 72 h and quenched to room temperature) is shown to lead to the destruction of the majority of these particles. The luminescent-kinetic properties of BaCl 2 :Eu 2+ microcrystals have been studied upon the ultra-violet excitation by the synchrotron radiation. The X-ray excited luminescence has been measured in order to estimate the distribution of europium ions between microcrystals and the NaCl host. The excitation mechanisms of Eu 2+ ions in the NaCl–BaCl 2 –Eu crystalline system are discussed. - Highlights: ► The formation of BaCl 2 :Eu 2+ microcrystals of 1–100 μm size embedded in the NaCl host is revealed. ► Annealing at 600 °C leads to the destruction of significant number of embedded microcrystals. ► The luminescent parameters of microcrystals is similar to ones of single crystal analogs.

  5. Upper temperature tolerance of North Atlantic and North Pacific geographical isolates of Chondrus species (Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüning, K.; Guiry, M. D.; Masuda, M.

    1987-09-01

    The upper survival temperature for most isolates of Chondrus crispus from localities ranging from northern Norway and Iceland to Spain, and for an isolate from Nova Scotia, was 28 °C after 2 weeks of exposure to temperatures of 20 31 °C at intervals of 1 °C. An upper survival limit of 29 °C was exhibited by a few European isolates from the English Channel, the North Sea, and one Irish isolate from the upper intertidal. The warm-temperate Japanese species C. nipponicus and C. giganteus forma flabellatus survived 30 °C, whereas 29 °C was the upper survival limit for the coldtemperature C. pinnulatus forma pinnulatus from northern Japan. A possible origin of C. crispus in the north Pacific is discussed.

  6. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules. [Relaxation rates, self-relaxation, upper limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasch, C.J.

    1978-09-01

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 295/sup 0/K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 295/sup 0/K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ..delta..J transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references.

  7. CL møder sptogfagsdidaktikken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Svendsen

    2011-01-01

    I artiklen diskuteres den didaktiske kontekst for brugen af CL (Cooperative Learning) i sprogundervisningen. Indledningsvis stilles følgende spørgsmål: Hvor kommer de indholdsfrie CL-strukturer fra, og hvad sker der når man inddrager dem i sprogundervisningen? I besvarelsen af disse spørgsmål ind...... inddrages antologien Cooperative Learning and Second Language Teaching (McCafferty, Steven G. 2006)......I artiklen diskuteres den didaktiske kontekst for brugen af CL (Cooperative Learning) i sprogundervisningen. Indledningsvis stilles følgende spørgsmål: Hvor kommer de indholdsfrie CL-strukturer fra, og hvad sker der når man inddrager dem i sprogundervisningen? I besvarelsen af disse spørgsmål...

  8. A Search for Rarely Seen Ultraviolet Coma Emissions and New Species Upper Limits at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Using the Rosetta-Alice Ultraviolet Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, J.; Stern, S. A.; Parker, J. W.; Keeney, B. A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Feldman, P.; Steffl, A.; Feaga, L. M.; Bertaux, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Alice far/extreme-UV spectrograph aboard Rosetta is one of three US instruments provided by NASA; it is the first UV spectrograph to reach any comet. Numerous scientific results have been obtained regarding 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by this instrument. Here we summarize two new sets of results from a search for rarely appearing atomic and molecular spectral emission features and a grand sum spectrum allowing us to place new atomic and molecular neutral and ionized species upper limits in the comet's coma.

  9. Treatment of upper airway resistance syndrome in adults: Where do we stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana B.M. de Godoy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the available literature regarding Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS treatment. Methods: Keywords “Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome,” “Sleep-related Breathing Disorder treatment,” “Obstructive Sleep Apnea treatment” and “flow limitation and sleep” were used in main databases. Results: We found 27 articles describing UARS treatment. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP has been the mainstay therapy prescribed but with limited effectiveness. Studies about surgical treatments had methodological limitations. Oral appliances seem to be effective but their efficacy is not yet established. Conclusion: Randomized controlled trials with larger numbers of patients and long-term follow-up are important to establish UARS treatment options.

  10. Study of liquid scintillator in detecting the PMN-CL, Ly-CL and extracellular matrix in liver fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianxing; Cao Rui; Liang Qizhong; Zou Xiaowei

    1997-01-01

    Chemiluminescence (CL) of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and lymphocyte(Ly) in blood of patients with cirrhosis has two peaks. Basic peak value of PMN-CL and Ly-CL is increased, the maximal peak values of Zym-PMN and PHA-Ly are decreased, phagolyosis and opsonic function is also decreased, extracellular matrix (ECM) is all increased, HA is positively correlated with 'child' sort (r = 0.96, A>B>C). It suggests that OR is produced and released during CL and superoxide phosphatides is produced by OR in ECM of cirrhosis. It injures the membrane of cells and tissue. Analysis of CL is aided to study the development mechanism of liver fibrosis

  11. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying into two muons in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=13TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson decaying to two muons is presented using data recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2016 at a center-of-mass energy of $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $35.9~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. Limits are set on the cross section of the Higgs boson decaying to two muons for mass hypotheses between $120$ and $130~\\mathrm{GeV}$. For a Higgs boson with a mass of $125~\\mathrm{GeV}$ decaying to two muons, the $95\\%$ confidence level (CL) observed (expected) upper limit on the production rate is found to be $2.64$ ($2.08$) times the SM value. The combination with data recorded at center-of-mass energies of $7$ and $8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ yields a $95\\%$ CL observed (expected) upper limit of $2.64$ ($1.89$) times the SM value. This corresponds to an upper limit on the Higgs boson branching fraction to muons of $5.7\\times10^{-4}$, assuming the SM production cross sections.

  12. The Research and Implementation of MUSER CLEAN Algorithm Based on OpenCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y.; Chen, K.; Deng, H.; Wang, F.; Mei, Y.; Wei, S. L.; Dai, W.; Yang, Q. P.; Liu, Y. B.; Wu, J. P.

    2017-03-01

    It's urgent to carry out high-performance data processing with a single machine in the development of astronomical software. However, due to the different configuration of the machine, traditional programming techniques such as multi-threading, and CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture)+GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) have obvious limitations in portability and seamlessness between different operation systems. The OpenCL (Open Computing Language) used in the development of MUSER (MingantU SpEctral Radioheliograph) data processing system is introduced. And the Högbom CLEAN algorithm is re-implemented into parallel CLEAN algorithm by the Python language and PyOpenCL extended package. The experimental results show that the CLEAN algorithm based on OpenCL has approximately equally operating efficiency compared with the former CLEAN algorithm based on CUDA. More important, the data processing in merely CPU (Central Processing Unit) environment of this system can also achieve high performance, which has solved the problem of environmental dependence of CUDA+GPU. Overall, the research improves the adaptability of the system with emphasis on performance of MUSER image clean computing. In the meanwhile, the realization of OpenCL in MUSER proves its availability in scientific data processing. In view of the high-performance computing features of OpenCL in heterogeneous environment, it will probably become the preferred technology in the future high-performance astronomical software development.

  13. Methyl chloride in the upper troposphere observed by the CARIBIC passenger aircraft observatory: Large-scale distributions and Asian summer monsoon outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, T.; Baker, A. K.; Oram, D.; Sauvage, C.; O'Sullivan, D.; Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Montzka, S. A.; Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.

    2014-05-01

    We present spatial and temporal variations of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) in the upper troposphere (UT) observed mainly by the Civil Aircraft for Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container (CARIBIC) passenger aircraft for the years 2005-2011. The CH3Cl mixing ratio in the UT over Europe was higher than that observed at a European surface baseline station throughout the year, indicative of a persistent positive vertical gradient at Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes. A series of flights over Africa and South Asia show that CH3Cl mixing ratios increase toward tropical latitudes, and the observed UT CH3Cl level over these two regions and the Atlantic was higher than that measured at remote surface sites. Strong emissions of CH3Cl in the tropics combined with meridional air transport through the UT may explain such vertical and latitudinal gradients. Comparisons with carbon monoxide (CO) data indicate that noncombustion sources in the tropics dominantly contribute to forming the latitudinal gradient of CH3Cl in the UT. We also observed elevated mixing ratios of CH3Cl and CO in air influenced by biomass burning in South America and Africa, and the enhancement ratios derived for CH3Cl to CO in those regions agree with previous observations. In contrast, correlations indicate a high CH3Cl to CO ratio of 2.9 ± 0.5 ppt ppb-1 in the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone and domestic biofuel emissions in South Asia are inferred to be responsible. We estimated the CH3Cl emission in South Asia to be 134 ± 23 Gg Cl yr-1, which is higher than a previous estimate due to the higher CH3Cl to CO ratio observed in this study.

  14. Electrochemical characterisation of CaCl{sub 2} deficient LiCl–KCl–CaCl{sub 2} eutectic melt and electro-deoxidation of solid UO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sri Maha Vishnu, D., E-mail: smvd2@cam.ac.uk; Sanil, N.; Mohandas, K.S.; Nagarajan, K.

    2016-03-15

    The CaCl{sub 2} deficient ternary eutectic melt LiCl–KCl–CaCl{sub 2} (50.5: 44.2: 5.3 mol %) was electrochemically characterised by cyclic voltammetry and polarization techniques in the context of its probable use as the electrolyte in the electrochemical reduction of solid UO{sub 2} to uranium metal. Tungsten (cathodic polarization) and graphite (anodic polarization) working electrodes were used in these studies carried out in the temperature range 623 K–923 K. The cathodic limit of the melt was observed to be set by the deposition of Ca{sup 2+} ions followed by Li{sup +} ions on the tungsten electrode and the anodic limit by oxidation of chloride ions on the graphite electrode (chlorine evolution). The difference between the onset potential of deposition of Ca{sup 2+} and Li{sup +} was found to be 0.241 V at a scan rate of 20 mV/s at 623 K and the difference decreased with increase in temperature and vanished at 923 K. Polarization measurements with stainless steel (SS) cathode and graphite anode at 673 K showed the possibility of low–energy reactions occurring on the UO{sub 2} electrode in the melt. UO{sub 2} pellets were cathodically polarized at 3.9 V for 25 h to test the feasibility of electro-reduction to uranium in the melt. The surface of the pellets was found reduced to U metal. - Highlights: • Electrochemically characterized LiCl–KCl–CaCl{sub 2} (50.5: 44.2: 5.3 mol %) melt by CV, LSV and polarization techniques. • Ca{sup 2+} deposits first on tungsten working electrode followed by Li{sup +}. Cl{sup −} discharges on graphite to liberate chlorine gas. • Surface of UO{sub 2} pellet reduced to U in the melt with low carbon contamination of melt. • Slow reduction of UO{sub 2} due to slow kinetics and low solubility of oxide ions in the low temperature melt.

  15. The question of an upper bound on entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, A.

    1982-08-01

    We discuss the possibility, and significance, of an upper bound on entropy in the light of the arguments of Bekenstein and Unruh and Wald. We obtain a stricter bound than Bekenstein does, and point out some limitations with regard to its significance. (author)

  16. Mass defect of 37Cl(t, p)39Cl: Coulomb displacement energy of the T=5/2, Jsup(π)=3+/2 states in 39Cl-39Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antony, M.S.; Britz, J.; Bueb, J.B.; Pape, A.

    1984-01-01

    From the Q-value (5701.9+-2.5)keV of the reaction 37 Cl(t, p) 39 Cl, the ground-state mass defect of 39 Cl is found to be (-29802.8+-2.5)keV, an improvement upon the existing value of (-29803+-18)keV. The Coulomb displacement energy of the mirror nuclei 39 Cl- 39 Ar for T=5/2, Jsup(π)=3 + /2 is found to be (6422.1+-10.6)keV. The r 0 parameter of the charge radius is approximately 1.32 fm for A=39

  17. The upper reference limit for thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies is method-dependent: A collaborative study with biomedical industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Ferrari, Anna; Castello, Roberto; Metus, Paolo; Caruso, Beatrice; Perosa, Anna Rosa; Sirianni, Francesca; Stenner, Elisabetta; Steffan, Agostino; Villalta, Danilo

    2016-01-15

    The determination of the upper reference limit (URL) for thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (TPOAbs) is a contentious issue, because of the difficulty in defining the reference population. The aim of this study was to establish the URL (eURL) for TPOAbs, according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to compare them with those obtained in a female counterpart, by the use of six commercial automated platforms. 120 healthy males and 120 healthy females with NACB-required characteristics (Lumipulse G1200, Fujirebio. Within each method, TPOAbs values had a high degree of dispersion and the eURLs were lower than those stated by the manufacturer. A statistically significant difference (p0.05). Despite the analytical harmonization, the wide dispersion of the results and the differences of the eURLs between methods suggest the need of further studies focusing on TPO antigen preparations as the possible source of variability between different assays. In addition, the lack of clinical significant difference between males and females, in terms of TPOAb eURLs, confirms the suitability of the NACB recommendations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Search for resonances in the mass distribution of jet pairs with one or two jets identified as $b$-jets in proton--proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; ATLAS Collaboration; Abbott, Brad; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Abhayasinghe, Deshan Kavishka; Abidi, Syed Haider; Abouzeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adelman, Jahred; Adersberger, Michael; Adiguzel, Aytul; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Afik, Yoav; Agheorghiesei, Catalin; Aguilar Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akatsuka, Shunichi; Akesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akilli, Ece; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albicocco, Pietro; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Alderweireldt, Sara Caroline; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allaire, Corentin; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alvarez Piqueras, Damian; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Ambroz, Luca; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante Eric; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amoroso, Simone; Amrouche, Cherifa Sabrina; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anelli, Christopher Ryan; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anisenkov, Alexey; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Anthony, Matthew Thomas; Antonelli, Mario; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque Espinosa, Juan Pedro; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Araujo Pereira, Rodrigo; Arce, Ayana; Ardell, Rose Elisabeth; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Armstrong, Alexander Iii; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Asimakopoulou, Eleni Myrto; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkin, Ryan Justin; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahmani, Marzieh; Baluch Bahrasemani, Sina; Bailey, Adam; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Bakalis, Christos; Baker, Keith; Bakker, Pepijn Johannes; Bakshi Gupta, Debottam; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Balz, Johannes; Banas, Elzbieta; Bandyopadhyay, Anjishnu; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barbe, William Mickael; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barkeloo, Jason Tylor Colt; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnea, Rotem; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batlamous, Souad; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bauer, Kevin Thomas; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Helge Christoph; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Ayda; Beddall, Andrew; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beermann, Thomas Alfons; Begalli, Marcia; Begel, Michael; Behera, Arabinda; Behr, Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Bellos, Panagiotis; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Bergsten, Laura Jean; Beringer, Juerg; Berlendis, Simon Paul; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Besjes, Geert-jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Betti, Alessandra; Bevan, Adrian John; Beyer, Julien-christopher; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bindi, Marcello; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Biswal, Jyoti Prakash; Bittrich, Carsten; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blue, Andrew; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boerner, Daniela; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolz, Arthur Eugen; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Bonilla, Johan Sebastian; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Bouaouda, Khalil; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozson, Adam James; Bracinik, Juraj; Brahimi, Nihal; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Braren, Frued; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Brickwedde, Bernard; Briglin, Daniel Lawrence; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel Andreas; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Bruno, Salvatore; Brunt, Benjamin Hylton; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burch, Tyler James; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burger, Angela Maria; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas; Buescher, Daniel; Buescher, Volker; Buschmann, Eric; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabras, Grazia; Cabrera Urban, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cai, Huacheng; Cairo, Valentina Maria; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Calvetti, Milene; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cao, Tingting; Cao, Yumeng; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carlson, Benjamin Taylor; Carminati, Leonardo; Carney, Rebecca; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carra, Sonia; Carrillo Montoya, German David; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casha, Albert Francis; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castelijn, Remco; Castillo, Florencia Luciana; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Celebi, Emre; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Wing Sheung; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Cheng; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Jing; Chen, Jue; Chen, Shion; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yu-heng; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Kingman; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chiu, I-huan; Chiu, Yu Him Justin; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Yun Sang; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chu, Ming Chung; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Michael Ryan; Clark, Philip James; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coimbra, Artur Cardoso; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Conde Muino, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Constantinescu, Serban; Conventi, Francesco; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Felix; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Corradi, Massimo; Corrigan, Eric Edward; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Costa, Maria Jose; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Crane, Jonathan; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Creager, Rachael Ann; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vincent; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto Gomez, Ana Rosario; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Curatolo, Maria; Cuth, Jakub; Czekierda, Sabina; Czodrowski, Patrick; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dahbi, Salah-eddine; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; D'amen, Gabriele; Damp, Johannes Frederic; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Daneri, Maria Florencia; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dartsi, Olympia; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Daubney, Thomas; D'Auria, Saverio; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davis, Douglas; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vasconcelos Corga, Kevin; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Delmastro, Marco; Delporte, Charles; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Demarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; D'eramo, Louis; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Devesa, Maria Roberta; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Bello, Francesco Armando; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Petrillo, Karri Folan; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Dias do vale, Tiago; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Dickinson, Jennet; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Díez Cornell, Sergio; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dittus, Fido; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobre, Monica; Dodsworth, David; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; D'onofrio, Adelina; D'Onofrio, Monica; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dreyer, Etienne; Dreyer, Timo; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte Campderros, Jorge; Dubinin, Filipp; Dubovsky, Michal; Dubreuil, Arnaud; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducourthial, Audrey; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudder, Andreas Christian; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Duehrssen, Michael; Dulsen, Carsten; Dumancic, Mirta; Dumitriu, Ana Elena; Duncan, Anna Kathryn; Dunford, Monica; Duperrin, Arnaud; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Dueren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Duvnjak, Damir; Dyndal, Mateusz; Dysch, Samuel; Dziedzic, Bartosz Sebastian; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; El Kosseifi, Rima; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Epland, Matthew Berg; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Errede, Steven; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Estrada Pastor, Oscar; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Ezzi, Mohammed; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Fabiani, Veronica; Facini, Gabriel John; Faisca Rodrigues Pereira, Rui Miguel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falke, Peter Johannes; Falke, Saskia; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; FARRELL, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Feickert, Matthew; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Minyu; Fenton, Michael James; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Fiedler, Frank; Filipcic, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Fischer, Cora; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Rob Roy Mac Gregor; Flick, Tobias; Flierl, Bernhard Matthias; Flores, Lucas Macrorie; Flores Castillo, Luis; Fomin, Nikolai; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Foerster, Fabian Alexander; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia Maria; Freund, Benjamin; Spolidoro Freund, Werner; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz Pawel; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadow, Paul Philipp; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram; Gamboa Goni, Rodrigo; Gan, KK; Ganguly, Sanmay; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia Pascual, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gavrilyuk, Alexander; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gee, Norman; Geisen, Jannik; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Helene; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gessner, Gregor; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghasemi Bostanabad, Meisam; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiacomi, Nico; Giannetti, Paola; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gillberg, Dag Ingemar; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugliarelli, Gilberto; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giulini, Maddalena; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos; Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian Maximilian Volker; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Goncalves Gama, Rafael; Goncalo, Ricardo; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; Gonnella, Francesco; Gonski, Julia Lynne; Gonzalez de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorisek, Andrej; Goshaw, Alfred; Goessling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gottardo, Carlo Alberto; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Goy, Corinne; Gozani, Eitan; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Graham, Emily Charlotte; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Chloe; Gray, Heather; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Jorn; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Grud, Christopher; Grummer, Aidan; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guerguichon, Antinea; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gugel, Ralf; Gui, Bin; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Wen; Guo, Yicheng; Guo, Ziyu; Gupta, Ruchi; Gurbuz, Saime; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutelman, Benjamin Jacque; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Guzik, Marcin Pawel; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Hageboeck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Han, Kunlin; Han, Liang; Han, Shuo; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handl, David Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hankache, Robert; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Eva; Hansen, Jorgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew Straiton; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, Ahmed; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havener, Laura Brittany; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard; Hayden, Daniel; Hayes, Christopher; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Heath, Matthew Peter; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heer, Sebastian; Heidegger, Kim Katrin; Heilman, Jesse; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon Frank-thomas; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Held, Alexander; Hellesund, Simen; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernandez Jimenez, Yesenia; Herr, Holger; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Herwig, Theodor Christian; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Higashino, Satoshi; Higon-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hildebrand, Kevin; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hill, Kurt Keys; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hils, Maximilian; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hiti, Bojan; Hladik, Ondrej; Hlaluku, Dingane Reward; Hoad, Xanthe; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Hohov, Dmytro; Holmes, Tova Ray; Holzbock, Michael; Homann, Michael; Honda, Shunsuke; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Honle, Andreas; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horn, Philipp; Horton, Arthur James; Horyn, Lesya Anna; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hostiuc, Alexandru; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hrdinka, Julia; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huebner, Michael; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Huhtinen, Mika; Hunter, Robert Francis; Huo, Peng; Hupe, Andre Marc; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Hyneman, Rachel; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Igonkina, Olga; Iguchi, Ryunosuke; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Iltzsche Speiser, Franziska; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Isacson, Max Fredrik; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivina, Anna; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jacka, Petr; Jackson, Paul; Jacobs, Ruth Magdalena; Jain, Vivek; Jakel, Gunnar; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Janus, Piotr Andrzej; Jarlskog, Goeran; Javadov, Namig; Javurek, Tomas; Javurkova, Martina; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jelinskas, Adomas; Jenni, Peter; Jeong, Jihyun; Jeske, Carl; Jezequel, Stephane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Morales, Fabricio Andres; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Christian; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Roger; Jones, Samuel David; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Junggeburth, Johannes Josef; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanjir, Luka; Kano, Yuya; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kar, Deepak; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kay, Ellis Fawn; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John Stakely; Kellermann, Edgar; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kendrick, James Andrew; Kepka, Oldrich; Kersten, Susanne; Kersevan, Borut Paul; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kiehn, Moritz; Kilby, Callum Robert; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; Kirchmeier, David; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitali, Vincent; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klapdor-kleingrothaus, Thorwald; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klingl, Tobias; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klitzner, Felix Fidelio; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith B F G; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Koehler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Natalia; Koeneke, Karsten; Koenig, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinides, Vasilis; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Konya, Balazs; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Konstantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kourlitis, Evangelos; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitrii; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Krauss, Dominik; Kremer, Jakub Andrzej; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Jiri; Kroll, Joe; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krueger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kulinich, Yakov Petrovich; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kupfer, Tobias; Kuprash, Oleg; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurth, Matthew Glenn; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; La Ruffa, Francesco; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lack, David Philip John; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Joern Christian; Langenberg, Robert Johannes; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Lapertosa, Alessandro; Laplace, Sandrine; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Tak Shun; Laudrain, Antoine; Law, Alexander Thomas; Laycock, Paul; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi Paul; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee JR, Lawrence; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmann, Niklaus; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Les, Robert; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Leveque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Dave; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Quanyin; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lie, Ki; Liem Arvidsson, Sebastian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Chiao-ying; Lin, Kuan-yu; Lin, Tai-hua; Linck, Rebecca Anne; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Little, Jared David; Liu, Bo; Liu, Bingxuan; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Jesse Kar Kee; Liu, Kun; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Peilian; Liu, Yanwen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Yanlin; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo, Cheuk Yee; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loesle, Alena; Loew, Kevin Michael; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopez Lopez, Jorge Andres; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Losel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, Xuanhong; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lozano Bahilo, Jose Julio; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Miaoran; Lu, Nan; Lu, Yun-Ju; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Fred; Luise, Ilaria; Lukas, Wolfgang; 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Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc Bao; Tackmann, Kerstin; Kinghorn-taenzer, Joseph Peter; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Tahirovic, Elvedin; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takasugi, Eric Hayato; Takeda, Kosuke; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanioka, Ryo; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarek Abouelfadl Mohamed, Ahmed; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarna, Grigore; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Alan James; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Tee, Amy Selvi; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temple, Darren Brian; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thais, Savannah Jennifer; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothee; Thiele, Fabian; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Stan; Thompson, Paul; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Tian, Yun; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Todt, Stefanie; Tojo, Junji; Tokar, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomiwa, Kehinde Gbenga; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia; Tornambe, Peter; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torro Pastor, Emma; Tosciri, Cecilia; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Treado, Colleen Jennifer; Trefzger, Thomas; Tresoldi, Fabio; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocme, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trovatelli, Monica; Trovato, Fabrizio; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsai, Fang-ying; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Turchikhin, Semen; Turgeman, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tzovara, Eftychia; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Uno, Kenta; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usui, Junya; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vadla, Knut Oddvar Hoie; Vaidya, Amal; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valente, Marco; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Vallance, Robert Adam; Vallier, Alexis Roger Louis; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Daalen, Tal Roelof; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; Van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varni, Carlo; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez Arenas, Gerardo Alexis; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Furelos, David; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Vecchio, Valentina; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Vergel Infante, Carlos Miguel; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Ambrosius Thomas; Vermeulen, Jos; Vetterli, Michel; Viaux Maira, Nicolas; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vishwakarma, Akanksha; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Von Buddenbrock, Stefan Erich; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Sfiligoj, Tina; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Zenis, Tibor; Zivkovic, Lidija; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner-kuhr, Jeannine; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakamiya, Kotaro; Walbrecht, Verena Maria; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Ann Miao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Peilong; Wang, Qing; Wang, Renjie; Wang, Rongkun; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Wei; Wang, Wenxiao; Wang, Weitao; Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Zirui; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Aaron Foley; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Christian; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stephen Albert; Weber, Sebastian Mario; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weirich, Marcel; Weiser, Christian; Wells, Pippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Weston, Thomas Daniel; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Aaron; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Whitmore, Ben William; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Wilkins, Lewis Joseph; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkels, Emma; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wobisch, Markus; Wolf, Anton; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolff, Robert; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Vincent Wai Sum; Woods, Natasha Lee; Worm, Steven; Wosiek, Barbara; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xi, Zhaoxu; Xia, Ligang; Xu, Da; Xu, Hanlin; Xu, Lailin; Xu, Tairan; Xu, Wenhao; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yajima, Kazuki; Yallup, David Paul; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamane, Fumiya; Yamatani, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Siqi; Yang, Yi-lin; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yigitbasi, Efe; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Christopher John; Young, Charles; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yue, Xiaoguang; Yuen, Stephanie Pui Yan; Bin Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zacharis, George; Zaffaroni, Ettore; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zambito, Stefano; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaripovas, Donatas Ramilas; Zeissner, Sonja Verena; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zemaityte, Gabija; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zenin, Oleg; Zerwas, Dirk; Zgubic, Miha; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Liqing; Zhang, Matt; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Maosen; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, You; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Heling; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zhulanov, Vladimir; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zoch, Knut; Zorbas, Theodoros Georgio; Zou, Rui; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2018-01-01

    A search for new resonances decaying into jets containing $b$-hadrons in $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented in the dijet mass range from 0.57 TeV to 7 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of up to 36.1 fb$^{-1}$ collected in 2015 and 2016 at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV. No evidence of a significant excess of events above the smooth background shape is found. Upper cross-section limits and lower limits on the corresponding signal mass parameters for several types of signal hypotheses are provided at 95% CL. In addition, 95% CL upper limits are set on the cross-sections for new processes that would produce Gaussian-shaped signals in the di-$b$-jet mass distributions.

  19. SnCl2/TiCl3-Mediated Deoximation of Oximes in an Aqueous Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsun Chuang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple procedure for SnCl2/TiCl3-mediated deoximation of ketoximes in an aqueous solvent is reported. Under the conditions developed in this effort, various ketones and aldehydes are produced in good to excellent yields.

  20. Upper limits to the detection of ammonia from protoplanetary disks around HL Tauri and L1551-IRS 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Jose F.; Torrelles, Jose M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    We present NH3(1, 1) and (2, 2) observations of the young stellar sources HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5 using the VLA in its B-configuration, which provides an angular resolution of about 0.4 arcsec (about 50 AU at 140 pc) at 1.3 cm wavelength. Our goal was to detect and resolve circumstellar molecular disks with radius of the order of 100 AU around these two sources. No ammonia emission was detected toward either of them. The 3-sigma levels were 2.7 mJy/beam and 3.9 mJy/beam for HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5, respectively, with a velocity resolution of about 5 km/s. With this nondetection, we estimate upper limits to the mass of the proposed protoplanetary molecular disks (within a radius of 10 AU from the central stars) on the order of 0.02/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for HL Tau and 0.1/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for L1551-IRS 5.

  1. A short overview of upper limb rehabilitation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macovei, S.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    As some studies show, the number of people over 65 years old increases constantly, leading to the need of solution to provide services regarding patient mobility. Diseases, accidents and neurologic problems affect hundreds of people every day, causing pain and lost of motor functions. The ability of using the upper limb is indispensable for a human being in everyday activities, making easy tasks like drinking a glass of water a real challenge. We can agree that physiotherapy promotes recovery, but not at an optimal level, due to limited financial and human resources. Hence, the need of robot-assisted rehabilitation emerges. A robot for upper-limb exercises should have a design that can accurately control interaction forces and progressively adapt assistance to the patients’ abilities and also to record the patient's motion and evolution. In this paper a short overview of upper limb rehabilitation devices is presented. Our goal is to find the shortcomings of the current developed devices in terms of utility, ease of use and costs, for future development of a mechatronic system for upper limb rehabilitation.

  2. Electrolytic reduction runs of 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li{sub 2}O-LiCl molten salt using metal anode shrouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun-Young, E-mail: eychoi@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong; Heo, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Min Ku [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sun Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Sang-Chae; Hur, Jin-Mok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Ten electrolytic reduction or oxide reduction (OR) runs of a 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li{sub 2}O-LiCl molten salt at 650 °C were conducted using metal anode shrouds. During this procedure, an anode shroud surrounds a platinum anode and discharges hot oxygen gas from the salt to outside of the OR apparatus, thereby preventing corrosion of the apparatus. In this study, a number of anode shrouds made of various metals were tested. Each metallic anode shroud consisted of a lower porous shroud for the salt phase and an upper nonporous shroud for the gas phase. A stainless steel (STS) wire mesh with five-ply layer was a material commonly used for the lower porous shroud for the OR runs. The metals tested for the upper nonporous shroud in the different OR runs are STS, nickel, and platinum- or silver-lined nickel. The lower porous shroud showed no significant damage during two consecutive OR runs, but exhibited signs of damage from three or more runs due to thermal stress. The upper nonporous shrouds made up of either platinum- or silver-lined nickel showed excellent corrosion resistance to hot oxygen gas while STS or nickel without any platinum or silver lining exhibited poor corrosion resistance. - Highlights: •Electrolytic reduction runs of a 0.6 kg scale-simulated oxide fuel in a Li{sub 2}O-LiCl molten salt at 650 °C were conducted using metal anode shrouds. •Each metallic anode shroud consisted of a lower porous shroud for the salt phase and an upper nonporous shroud for the gas phase. •The upper nonporous shrouds made up of noble metal-lined nickel showed excellent corrosion resistance to hot oxygen gas.

  3. Setting an Upper Limit on Gas Exchange Through Sea-Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, P.; Monahan, E. C.; Andreas, E. L.

    2016-02-01

    Air-sea gas exchange parameterization is critical to understanding both climate forcing and feedbacks and is key in biogeochemistry cycles. Models based on wind speed have provided empirical estimates of gas exchange that are useful though it is likely that at high wind speeds of over 10 m/s there are important gas exchange parameters including bubbles and sea spray that have not been well constrained. Here we address the sea-spray component of gas exchange at these high wind speeds to set sn upper boundary condition for the gas exchange of the six model gases including; nobel gases helium, neon and argon, diatomic gases nitrogen and oxygen and finally, the more complex gas carbon dioxide. Estimates are based on the spray generation function of Andreas and Monahan and the gases are tested under three scenarios including 100 percent saturation and complete droplet evaporation, 100 percent saturation and a more realistic scenario in which a fraction of droplets evaporate completely, a fraction evaporate to some degree and a fraction returns to the water side without significant evaporation. Finally the latter scenario is applied to representative under saturated concentrations of the gases.

  4. Biodegradation of the Nitramine Explosive CL-20

    OpenAIRE

    Trott, Sandra; Nishino, Shirley F.; Hawari, Jalal; Spain, Jim C.

    2003-01-01

    The cyclic nitramine explosive CL-20 (2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane) was examined in soil microcosms to determine whether it is biodegradable. CL-20 was incubated with a variety of soils. The explosive disappeared in all microcosms except the controls in which microbial activity had been inhibited. CL-20 was degraded most rapidly in garden soil. After 2 days of incubation, about 80% of the initial CL-20 had disappeared. A CL-20-degrading bacterial strain, Agrobact...

  5. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantification of human collectin 11 (CL-11, CL-K1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, L.; Henriksen, M.L.; Brandt, J.; Palarasah, Y.; Waters, A.; Beales, P.L.; Holmskov, U.; Jørgensen, T.J.D.; Nielsen, C.; Skjodt, K.; Hansen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Collectin 11 (CL-11), also referred to as collectin kidney 1 (CL-K1), is a pattern recognition molecule that belongs to the collectin group of proteins involved in innate immunity. It interacts with glycoconjugates on pathogen surfaces and has been found in complex with mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease 1 (MASP-1) and/or MASP-3 in circulation. Mutation in the CL-11 gene was recently associated with the developmental syndrome 3MC. In the present study, we established and thoroughly validated a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on two different monoclonal antibodies. The assay is highly sensitive, specific and shows excellent quantitative characteristics such as reproducibility, dilution linearity and recovery (97.7–104%). The working range is 0.15–34 ng/ml. The CL-11 concentration in two CL-11-deficient individuals affected by the 3MC syndrome was determined to be below 2.1 ng/ml. We measured the mean serum CL-11 concentration to 284 ng/ml in 100 Danish blood donors, with a 95% confidence interval of 269–299 ng/ml. There was no significant difference in the CL-11 concentration measured in matched serum and plasma samples. Storage of samples and repeated freezing and thawing to a certain extent did not influence the ELISA. This ELISA offers a convenient and reliable method for studying CL-11 levels in relation to a variety of human diseases and syndromes. PMID:22301270

  6. CO2 Absorption and Magnesium Carbonate Precipitation in MgCl2–NH3–NH4Cl Solutions: Implications for Carbon Capture and Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available CO2 absorption and carbonate precipitation are the two core processes controlling the reaction rate and path of CO2 mineral sequestration. Whereas previous studies have focused on testing reactive crystallization and precipitation kinetics, much less attention has been paid to absorption, the key process determining the removal efficiency of CO2. In this study, adopting a novel wetted wall column reactor, we systematically explore the rates and mechanisms of carbon transformation from CO2 gas to carbonates in MgCl2–NH3–NH4Cl solutions. We find that reactive diffusion in liquid film of the wetted wall column is the rate-limiting step of CO2 absorption when proceeding chiefly through interactions between CO2(aq and NH3(aq. We further quantified the reaction kinetic constant of the CO2–NH3 reaction. Our results indicate that higher initial concentration of NH4Cl ( ≥ 2 mol · L − 1 leads to the precipitation of roguinite [ ( NH 4 2 Mg ( CO 3 2 · 4 H 2 O ], while nesquehonite appears to be the dominant Mg-carbonate without NH4Cl addition. We also noticed dypingite formation via phase transformation in hot water. This study provides new insight into the reaction kinetics of CO2 mineral carbonation that indicates the potential of this technique for future application to industrial-scale CO2 sequestration.

  7. Chemistry of Frozen NaCl and MgSO4 Brines - Implications for Surface Expression of Europa's Ocean Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. V.; Hodyss, R. P.; Choukroun, M.; Vu, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The composition of Europa's subsurface ocean is a critical determinant of its habitability, but current analysis of the ocean composition is limited to its expression on the Europan surface. While there is observational evidence indicating that ocean materials make their way to the surface, our understanding of the chemical processes that can alter this material under Europan surface conditions is limited. We present experimental data on the chemistry of mixed solutions of NaCl and MgSO4 as they are frozen to 100 K, replicating the conditions that may occur when subsurface ocean fluids are emplaced onto Europa's surface. Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to study the formation of salts during the freezing process, and the interaction of ions in the frozen brines. Our data indicate that mixed aqueous solutions of NaCl and MgSO4 form Na2SO4 and MgCl2 preferentially when frozen, rather than making NaCl and MgSO4 precipitates. The detection of epsomite (MgSO4Ÿ•7H2O) on Europa's surface may therefore imply an ocean composition relatively low in sodium, unless radiolytic chemistry converts MgCl2 to MgSO4 as suggested by Hand and Brown 2013 (ApJ 145 110). These results have important implications for the interpretation of remote sensing data of Europa's surface.

  8. Diffusion of calcium in pure and doped NaCl; Diffusion du calcium dans NaCl pur et dope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slifkin, L; Brebec, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    We have determined, by diffusion experiments of Ca in pure and doped NaCl, the activation energy for the calcium jumps and the binding energy between calcium ion and vacancy. (authors) [French] Nous avons determine, par des mesures de diffusion du Ca dans NaCl pur et NaCl dope avec CaCl{sub 2}, l'energie d'activation relative aux sauts du calcium et l'energie de liaison lacune-calcium. (auteurs)

  9. LiCl+CaCl/sub 2//H/sub 2/O pair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isshiki, N; Kamoshida, J

    1985-01-01

    Absorption heat pump is very useful for the utilization of new energy of low temperature difference by the following four view points. (a) possibility of using any kind of heat source of low temperature difference natural energy and industrial waste heat. (b) Possibility of being used for either of both generation of heat and power (co-generation), (c) good for long term storage and distance transportation of energy. (d) Possibility of applying any kind of chemical pair which have reversible thermo-chemical reaction with a lot of varieties. Among many thermo-chemical pairs, the pair of LiCl + CaCl/sub 2//H/sub 2/O has been selected and investigated in the R and D of developing power generation system. The reason of this selection is that this pair have been thought to be most practical, inexpensive, and powerful for our purpose. The system of heat and power cogeneration system has been selected as the object of application of the absorption system, and especially power generation has been studied. Then, in order to inquire the possibility of power generation and energy storage, a four wheeled vehicle driven by the power of the pair of L1Cl = CaCl/sub 2//H/sub 2/O has been assembled and tested with success. In this paper the general aspects of this study is reported briefly, and the future possibility of the absorption heat pump and power generation is discussed.

  10. Upper mantle fluids evolution, diamond formation, and mantle metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Sverjensky, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    During mantle metasomatism, fluid-rock interactions in the mantle modify wall-rock compositions. Previous studies usually either investigated mineral compositions in xenoliths and xenocrysts brought up by magmas, or examined fluid compositions preserved in fluid inclusions in diamonds. However, a key study of Panda diamonds analysed both mineral and fluid inclusions in the diamonds [1] which we used to develop a quantitative characterization of mantle metasomatic processes. In the present study, we used an extended Deep Earth Water model [2] to simulate fluid-rock interactions at upper mantle conditions, and examine the fluids and mineral assemblages together simultaneously. Three types of end-member fluids in the Panda diamond fluid inclusions include saline, rich in Na+K+Cl; silicic, rich in Si+Al; and carbonatitic, rich in Ca+Mg+Fe [1, 3]. We used the carbonatitic end-member to represent fluid from a subducting slab reacting with an excess of peridotite + some saline fluid in the host environment. During simultaneous fluid mixing and reaction with the host rock, the logfO2 increased by about 1.6 units, and the pH increased by 0.7 units. The final minerals were olivine, garnet and diamond. The Mg# of olivine decreased from 0.92 to 0.85. Garnet precipitated at an early stage, and its Mg# also decreased with reaction progress, in agreement with the solid inclusions in the Panda diamonds. Phlogopite precipitated as an intermediate mineral and then disappeared. The aqueous Ca, Mg, Fe, Si and Al concentrations all increased, while Na, K, and Cl concentrations decreased during the reaction, consistent with trends in the fluid inclusion compositions. Our study demonstrates that fluids coming from subducting slabs could trigger mantle metasomatism, influence the compositions of sub-lithospherc cratonic mantle, precipitate diamonds, and change the oxygen fugacity and pH of the upper mantle fluids. [1] Tomlinson et al. EPSL (2006); [2] Sverjensky, DA et al., GCA (2014

  11. The cosmogenic radionuclides 7Be, 10Be, and 36Cl in precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knies, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Two-thirds of atmospheric 7 Be (t 1/2 =53 d), 10 Be(t 1/2 = 1.5 My), and 36 Cl(t 1/2 =0.3 My) is produced in the stratosphere and one-third in the troposphere. The residence time of these radionuclides in the stratosphere is a few years and in the troposphere is a few weeks. Since 7 Be's half-life is short compared to its residence time in the stratosphere and similar to its residence time in the troposphere, the 7 Be/ 10 Be and 7 Be/ 36 Cl ratios should have distinct tropospheric and stratospheric values. Consequently, these isotopes can be used to study processes that involve mixing of air from the troposphere and stratosphere. Relationships between the radionuclide concentrations and air mass history, event type, season, and the major cation and anion concentrations will be presented. Evidence and mechanisms for the fractionation of the 36 Cl and 10 Be concentrations as a function of event type will be presented. Evidence and mechanisms for the fractionation of the 36 Cl and 10 Be concentrations as a function of event type will be presented. A departure from the theoretical 10 Be/ 36 Cl production rate ratio of ∼40 is seen only in one direction with an apparent limit right at the calculated ratio. For this reason, a new theoretical calculation of the 10 Be/ 36 Cl production rate ratio was undertaken. The new calculated value is ∼9.3. This value is in good agreement with the measured mean values in both the Greenland ice sheet and West Lafayette, IN wet precipitation of 8.1 and 9.1 respectively

  12. Interaction of different poisons with MgCl{sub 2}/TiCl{sub 4} based Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahri-Laleh, Naeimeh, E-mail: n.bahri@ippi.ac.ir

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • The interactions between different classes of poison molecules and TiCl{sub 4}/MgCl{sub 2} type Ziegler-Natta catalyst is considered. • Poisons strongly stabilize MgCl{sub 2} crystal surfaces, mostly Ti active center relative to the unpoisoned solid. • Poison molecules decrease catalyst activity by increasing E{sub TS} in olefin polymerization. • Poison molecules do not have significant effect in stereospecifity of ZN catalysts in propylene polymerization. - Abstract: Adsorption of different poison molecules on activated MgCl{sub 2} is investigated within DFT using a cluster model of the MgCl{sub 2} surface with (MgCl{sub 2}){sub 16} formula containing four 4-coordinated and eight 5-coordinated Mg atoms as (110) and (104) surfaces, respectively. Studied poison molecules are chosen as possible impurities in hydrocarbon solvents and monomer feeds and contain water, hydrogensulfide, carbondioxide, molecular oxygen and methanol. First, adsorption of 1–4 molecules of different poisons to the (104) and (110) lateral cuts of MgCl{sub 2}, as well as their adsorption on [MgCl{sub 2}]/TiCl{sub 2}Et active center and AlEt{sub 3} cocatalyst is considered. Results reveal that poisons strongly stabilize both crystal surfaces, mostly Ti active center relative to the unpoisoned solid. Second, energy barrier (E{sub TS}) for ethylene insertion in the presence of different poisons located on the first and second Mg atom relative to the active Ti is calculated. While poison molecule located on the second Mg does not change E{sub TS}, coordination of it into the first Mg atom increases E{sub TS} by 0.9–1.2 kcal mol{sup −1}. In the last part of this manuscript, the stereoselective behavior of active Ti species, with and without poison molecules and external electron donor, is fully explored.

  13. Are Price Limits Effective? An Examination of an Artificial Stock Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotao; Ping, Jing; Zhu, Tao; Li, Yuelei; Xiong, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the inter-day effects of price limits policies that are employed in agent-based simulations. To isolate the impact of price limits from the impact of other factors, we built an artificial stock market with higher frequency price limits hitting. The trading mechanisms in this market are the same as the trading mechanisms in China's stock market. Then, we designed a series of simulations with and without price limits policy. The results of these simulations demonstrate that both upper and lower price limits can cause a volatility spillover effect and a trading interference effect. The process of price discovery will be delayed if upper price limits are imposed on a stock market; however, this phenomenon does not occur when lower price limits are imposed.

  14. Synchrotron radiation studies on luminescence of Eu2+-doped LaCl3 microcrystals embedded in a NaCl matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchyn, P.V.; Vistovskyy, V.V.; Pushak, A.S.; Voloshinovskii, A.S.; Gektin, A.V.; Pankratov, V.; Popov, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    LaCl 3 :Eu 2+ microcrystals dispersed in the NaCl matrix have been obtained in the NaCl–LaCl 3 (1 mol.%)–EuCl 3 (0.1 mol.%) crystalline system. The low-temperature luminescent properties of these microcrystals have been studied upon the VUV and UV excitation by the synchrotron radiation. The spectroscopic parameters as well as decay time constants of Eu 2+ -doped LaCl 3 host have been established. The excitation mechanism of divalent europium centers through energy transfer and reabsorption is discussed.

  15. Heat capacity of Sr10(PO4)6Cl2 and Ca10(PO4)6Cl2 by DSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkata Krishnan, R.; Jena, Hrudananda; Govindan Kutty, K.V.; Nagarajan, K.

    2008-01-01

    Strontium and calcium chloroapatites were synthesized by wet chemical method, characterized by X-ray diffraction and are found to be phase pure materials. The measured room temperature lattice parameter of Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 Cl 2 is a = 9.523 A, c = 6.855 A and for Sr 10 (PO 4 ) 6 Cl 2 is a = 9.876 A, c = 7.188 A. Heat capacity measurements were carried out on Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 Cl 2 and Sr 10 (PO 4 ) 6 Cl 2 by DSC in the temperature range 298-800 K. The heat capacity values of Sr 10 (PO 4 ) 6 Cl 2 is higher at all temperatures than Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 Cl 2 . Enthalpy and entropy increments were computed. Heat capacity values of Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 Cl 2 and Sr 10 (PO 4 ) 6 Cl 2 at 298 K are 758 and 868 J K -1 mol -1 , respectively

  16. Volatility of components of saturated vapours of UCl/sub 4/-CsCl and UCl/sub 4/-LiCl molten mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, M V; Kudyakov, V Ya; Salyulev, A B; Komarov, V E; Posokhin, Yu V; Afonichkin, V K

    1979-01-01

    The flow method has been used for measuring the volatility of the components from UCl/sub 4/-CsCl and UCl/sub 4/-LiCl melted mixtures containing 2.0, 5.0, 12.0, 25.0, 33.0, 50.0, 67.0, and 83.0 mol.% of UCl/sub 4/ within the temperature ranges of 903-1188 K and 740-1200 K, respectively. The chemical composition of saturated vapours above the melted salts has been determined. The melted mixtures in question exhibit negative deviation from ideal behaviour. Made was the conclusion about the presence in a vapour phase, along with monomeric UCl/sub 4/, LiCl, CsCl and Li/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/, Cs/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ dimers of double compounds of the MeUCl/sub 5/ most probable composition. Their absolute contribution into a total pressure above the UCl/sub 4/-CsCl melted mixtures is considerably smaller than above the UCl/sub 4/ -LiCl mixtures.

  17. The structure of PbCl2 on the {100} surface of NaCl and its consequences for crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Eleanor R.; Brugman, Sander J. T.; Blijlevens, Melian A. R.; Smets, Mireille M. H.; de Poel, Wester; van Enckevort, Willem J. P.; Meijer, Jan A. M.; Vlieg, Elias

    2018-04-01

    The role that additives play in the growth of sodium chloride is a topic which has been widely researched but not always fully understood at an atomic level. Lead chloride (PbCl2) is one such additive which has been reported to have growth inhibition effects on NaCl {100} and {111}; however, no definitive evidence has been reported which details the mechanism of this interaction. In this investigation, we used the technique of surface x-ray diffraction to determine the interaction between PbCl2 and NaCl {100} and the structure at the surface. We find that Pb2+ replaces a surface Na+ ion, while a Cl- ion is located on top of the Pb2+. This leads to a charge mismatch in the bulk crystal, which, as energetically unfavourable, leads to a growth blocking effect. While this is a similar mechanism as in the anticaking agent ferrocyanide, the effect of PbCl2 is much weaker, most likely due to the fact that the Pb2+ ion can more easily desorb. Moreover, PbCl2 has an even stronger effect on NaCl {111}.

  18. An upper limit for slow-earthquake zones: self-oscillatory behavior through the Hopf bifurcation mechanism from a spring-block model under lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Rodríguez, Valentina; Campos-Cantón, Eric; Barboza-Gudiño, Rafael; Femat, Ricardo

    2017-08-01

    The complex oscillatory behavior of a spring-block model is analyzed via the Hopf bifurcation mechanism. The mathematical spring-block model includes Dieterich-Ruina's friction law and Stribeck's effect. The existence of self-sustained oscillations in the transition zone - where slow earthquakes are generated within the frictionally unstable region - is determined. An upper limit for this region is proposed as a function of seismic parameters and frictional coefficients which are concerned with presence of fluids in the system. The importance of the characteristic length scale L, the implications of fluids, and the effects of external perturbations in the complex dynamic oscillatory behavior, as well as in the stationary solution, are take into consideration.

  19. Corrosion of type 316 stainless steel in molten LiF-LiCl-LiBr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of LiF-LiCl-LiBr salt make it attractive as a solvent for extracting tritium from a fusion reactor lithium blanket. Consequently, the corrosion of type 316 stainless steel by flowing (about 15 mm/s) LiF-LiCl-LiBr at a maximum temperature of 535 0 C was studied to determine whether compatibility with the structural material would be limiting in such a system. The corrosion rate was found to be low ( 0 C (approximately that of type 316 stainless steel exposed to lithium flowing at a similar velocity). At the proposed operating temperature (less than or equal to approx. 535 0 C), however, it appears that type 316 stainless steel has acceptable compatibility with the tritium-processing salt LiF-LiCl-LiBr for use with a lithium blanket

  20. Comparison of effects of ATP-MgCl2 and adenosine-MgCl2 on renal function following ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumpio, B.E.; Hull, M.J.; Baue, A.E.; Chaudry, I.H.

    1987-01-01

    ATO-MgCl 2 administration had been shown to accelerate the recovery of renal function following warm ischemia. However, since the major breakdown product of ATP is adenosine, the relative contribution of ATP vs. adenosine in improving renal function following ischemia remains to be determined. To study this, kidneys were subjected to 45 min of normothermic ischemia and then perfused at 100 mmHg with oxygenated Krebs-HCO 3 buffer containing albumin, [ 3 H]inulin, substrates, and either 0.3 mM ATP-MgCl 2 or adenosine-MgCl 2 for 110 min. Perfusate and timed urine samples were collected and analyzed for radioactivity and [Na + ]. The functional parameters indicated that although adenosine-MgCl 2 treatment provided a transient improvement, it failed to provided a sustained improvement in renal function or attain control valued compared with ATP-MgCl 2 treatment. Thus, the salutary effects of ATP-MgCl 2 following warm ischemia in the kidney are not mediated by adenosine

  1. A novel dual-ratiometric-response fluorescent probe for SO2/ClO- detection in cells and in vivo and its application in exploring the dichotomous role of SO2 under the ClO- induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Kun; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Guang; Yu, Fabiao; Liu, Yuxia; Cao, Ziping; Li, Guoliang; Zhao, Xianen; Xia, Lian; Chen, Lingxin; Wang, Hua; You, Jinmao

    2017-07-01

    Intracellular reactive sulfur species and reactive oxygen species play vital roles in immunologic mechanism. As an emerging signal transmitter, SO 2 can be generated as the anti-oxidant, while SO 2 is also a potential oxidative stress-inducer in organism. Aiming to elucidate in-depth the dichotomous role of SO 2 under oxidative stress, we designed a dual-response fluorescent probe that enabled the respective or successive detection of SO 2 and ClO - . The probe itself emits the red fluorescence (625 nm) which can largely switch to blue (410 nm) and green fluorescence (500 nm) respectively in response to SO 2 and ClO - , allowing the highly selective and accurate ratiometric quantification for both SO 2 and ClO - in cells. Moreover the ultrafast (SO 2 : <60 s; ClO - : within sec) and highly sensitive (detection limits: SO 2 : 3.5 nM; ClO - : 12.5 nM) detection were achieved. With the robust applicability, the developed probe was successfully used to quantify SO 2 and endogenous ClO - in respectively the HeLa cells and the RAW 264.7 cells, as well as to visualize the dynamic of SO 2 /ClO - in zebrafish. The fluorescent imaging studies and flow cytometry analysis confirmed the burst-and-depletion and meanwhile the oxidative-and-antioxidative effects of intracellular SO 2 under the NaClO induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiative forcing calculations for CH3Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, A.S.; Grant, K.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    Methyl chloride, CH 3 Cl, is the major natural source of chlorine to the stratosphere. The production of CH 3 Cl is dominated by biological sources from the oceans and biomass burning. Production has a seasonal cycle which couples with the short lifetime of tropospheric CH 3 Cl to produce nonuniform global mixing. As an absorber of infrared radiation, CH 3 Cl is of interest for its potential affect on the tropospheric energy balance as well as for its chemical interactions. In this study, we estimate the radiative forcing and global warming potential (GWP) of CH 3 Cl. Our calculations use an infrared radiative transfer model based on the correlated k-distribution algorithm for band absorption. Global and annual average vertical profiles of temperature and trace gas concentration were assumed. The effects of clouds are modeled using three layers of global and annual average cloud optical properties. A radiative forcing value of 0.0053 W/m 2 ppbv was obtained for CH 3 Cl and is approximately linear in the background abundance. This value is about 2 percent of the forcing of CFC-11 and about 300 times the forcing of CO 2 , on a per molecule basis. The radiative forcing calculation for CH 3 Cl is used to estimate the global warming potential (GWP) of CH 3 Cl. The results give GWPs for CH 3 Cl of the order of 25 at a time of 20 years(CO 2 = 1). This result indicates that CH 3 Cl has the potential to be a major greenhouse gas if significant human related emissions were introduced into the atmosphere

  3. Chemical effects of nuclear transformations in mixed crystals. 7. Chemical effects of the 35Cl(n,γ)36Cl nuclear reaction in K2ReCl6-K2ReBr6 mixed crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.; Diefallah, E.H.M.; Martin, S.

    1981-01-01

    The solid-state reactions occurring during the moderation of recoiling 36 Cl, produced by the (n,γ) reaction, have been studied in K 2 ReCl 6 -K 2 ReBr 6 mixed crystals. The main reaction products are Re 36 ClCl 5 2- , Re 36 ClBr 5 2- , and 36 Cl - , but the more intimately mixed species Re 36 ClCl/sub n/Br/sub 5-n/ 2- (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) are found in significant amounts. The production of the different recoil-labeled species can be explained by elementary impact models: 6% of the recoils do not leave their original lattice site (primary retetion); between 6% and 23%, dependent upon the mixed-crystal composition, appear as interstitials; 31 to 48% give rise to direct displacement reactions of one halide ligand; and 40% produce larger disruption by substitution of at least two halide ligands. The results have been compared with Roessler's 38 Cl recoil experiments

  4. On the temperature dependence of flammability limits of gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shigeo; Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Akifumi; Tokuhashi, Kazuaki

    2011-03-15

    Flammability limits of several combustible gases were measured at temperatures from 5 to 100 °C in a 12-l spherical flask basically following ASHRAE method. The measurements were done for methane, propane, isobutane, ethylene, propylene, dimethyl ether, methyl formate, 1,1-difluoroethane, ammonia, and carbon monoxide. As the temperature rises, the lower flammability limits are gradually shifted down and the upper limits are shifted up. Both the limits shift almost linearly to temperature within the range examined. The linear temperature dependence of the lower flammability limits is explained well using a limiting flame temperature concept at the lower concentration limit (LFL)--'White's rule'. The geometric mean of the flammability limits has been found to be relatively constant for many compounds over the temperature range studied (5-100 °C). Based on this fact, the temperature dependence of the upper flammability limit (UFL) can be predicted reasonably using the temperature coefficient calculated for the LFL. However, some compounds such as ethylene and dimethyl ether, in particular, have a more complex temperature dependence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The first direct limit on the $t$ quark lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, Ayana Tamu [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation presents the first direct limit on the t quark lifetime, measured in $t\\bar{t}$ pair production candidate events from a 318 pb-1 sample of $p +\\bar{p}$ collisions recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Candidate events are identified by a leptonically decaying W± boson and three or more jets, at least one of which contains a secondary vertex. In each event we measure the transverse track-to-beam displacement (impact parameter) of the lepton from the W± decay, and compare the distribution to templates constructed from $t\\bar{t}$ event simulations with a variable t lifetime. Anticipated background distributions are measured with a combination of Monte Carlo event simulation and control samples, and included in the templates. We determine the following limits: cτt < 52.5µm @ 95% C.L. cτt < 43.5µm @ 90% C.L. We thus conclude that the top mean lifetime is less than 145 fs (175 fs) at 90% (95%) C.L.

  6. Analytical investigation of AlCl[3]/SO[2]Cl[2] catholyte materials for secondary fuze reserve batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Paul Charles; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Segall, Judith M.; Malizia, Louis A., Jr.; Cherry, Brian Ray; Andrews, Nicholas L.; Clark, Nancy H.; Alam, Todd Michael; Ingersoll, David T.; Tallant, David Robert; Simpson, Regina Lynn; Boyle, Timothy J.; Garcia, Manuel Joseph

    2004-05-01

    Exploration of the fundamental chemical behavior of the AlCl{sub 3}/SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} catholyte system for the ARDEC Self-Destruct Fuze Reserve Battery Project under accelerated aging conditions was completed using a variety of analytical tools. Four different molecular species were identified in this solution, three of which are major. The relative concentrations of the molecular species formed were found to depend on aging time, initial concentrations, and storage temperature, with each variable affecting the kinetics and thermodynamics of this complex reaction system. We also evaluated the effect of water on the system, and determined that it does not play a role in dictating the observed molecular species present in solution. The first Al-containing species formed was identified as the dimer [Al({mu}-Cl)Cl{sub 2}]{sub 2}, and was found to be in equilibrium with the monomer, AlCl{sub 3}. The second species formed in the reaction scheme was identified by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies as [Cl{sub 2}Al({mu}-O{sub 2}SCl)]{sub 2} (I), a scrambled AlCl{sub 3}{center_dot}SO{sub 2} adduct. The SO{sub 2}(g) present, as well as CL{sub 2}(g), was formed through decomposition of SO{sub 2}CL{sub 2}. The SO{sub 2}(g) generated was readily consumed by AlCl{sub 3} to form the adduct 1 which was experimentally verified when 1 was also isolated from the reaction of SO{sub 2}(g) and AlCl {sub 3}. The third species found was tentatively identified as a compound having the general formula {l_brace}[Al(O)Cl{sub 2}][OSCl{sub 2}]{r_brace}{sub n}. This was based on {sup 27}Al NMR data that revealed a species with tetrahedrally coordinated Al metal centers with increased oxygen coordination and the fact that the precipitate, or gel, that forms over time was shown by Raman spectroscopic studies to possess a component that is consistent with SOCl{sub 2}. The precursor to the precipitate should have similar constituents, thus the assignment of {l_brace}[Al(O)Cl{sub 2}][OSCl{sub 2

  7. Spectral-element Seismic Wave Propagation on CUDA/OpenCL Hardware Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, D. B.; Videau, B.; Pouget, K.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wave propagation codes are essential tools to investigate a variety of wave phenomena in the Earth. Furthermore, they can now be used for seismic full-waveform inversions in regional- and global-scale adjoint tomography. Although these seismic wave propagation solvers are crucial ingredients to improve the resolution of tomographic images to answer important questions about the nature of Earth's internal processes and subsurface structure, their practical application is often limited due to high computational costs. They thus need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities to improving the current state of knowledge. At present, numerous large HPC systems embed many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) to enhance numerical performance. Such hardware accelerators can be programmed using either the CUDA programming environment or the OpenCL language standard. CUDA software development targets NVIDIA graphic cards while OpenCL was adopted by additional hardware accelerators, like e.g. AMD graphic cards, ARM-based processors as well as Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. For seismic wave propagation simulations using the open-source spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE, we incorporated an automatic source-to-source code generation tool (BOAST) which allows us to use meta-programming of all computational kernels for forward and adjoint runs. Using our BOAST kernels, we generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages within the source code package. Thus, seismic wave simulations are able now to fully utilize CUDA and OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show benchmarks of forward seismic wave propagation simulations using SPECFEM3D_GLOBE on CUDA/OpenCL GPUs, validating results and comparing performances for different simulations and hardware usages.

  8. Thermoluminescence and F centers of manganese doped NaCl and NaCl-CKl crystals exposed to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somera, L.; Cruz Z, E.; Roman L, J.; Hernandez A, J. M.; Murrieta S, H.

    2015-10-01

    Alkali halides crystals doped with rare earths or transition metals have been widely studied due to the luminescence properties. In particular, NaCl and KCl single crystals present thermally stimulated luminescence (Tl) after gamma irradiation. The NaCl and the NaCl KCl mixed crystal doped with manganese (MnCl 2 ) impurity were grown by using the Czochralski method. The emission characteristic of Mn 2+ was observed at 543 nm. The crystals were exposed between 0.02 and 10 kGy gamma dose from 60 Co irradiator. Optical absorption at room temperature shows the peaked band at 452 nm corresponding to the manganese impurity. The F bands, was ascribed to the electron trapped in the anion vacancy in the lattice, were obtained at 452 nm and 455 nm belonging to NaCl:Mn and NaCl KCl:Mn, respectively. The F band increases as the doses increase and it was bleaching by the UV light at 470 nm. The glow curves of the samples show the first glow peak between 92-103 degrees C, while the second main peak was observed at 183 degrees C for the undoped NaCl and at 148 and 165 degrees C for the NaCl:Mn and NaCl-KCl:Mn, respectively. The main peak was slowly bleaching when the irradiated sample was illuminated with F (470 nm) light. Optical bleaching confirms that the F center has an important participation in the thermoluminescent response. The glow curves structure from the thermal bleaching suggests the participation of different kind of traps. Also, the kinetics parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and the kinetic order (b) were investigated. (Author)

  9. Thermoluminescence and F centers of manganese doped NaCl and NaCl-CKl crystals exposed to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somera, L.; Cruz Z, E.; Roman L, J. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Hernandez A, J. M.; Murrieta S, H., E-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.mx [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Alkali halides crystals doped with rare earths or transition metals have been widely studied due to the luminescence properties. In particular, NaCl and KCl single crystals present thermally stimulated luminescence (Tl) after gamma irradiation. The NaCl and the NaCl KCl mixed crystal doped with manganese (MnCl{sub 2}) impurity were grown by using the Czochralski method. The emission characteristic of Mn{sup 2+} was observed at 543 nm. The crystals were exposed between 0.02 and 10 kGy gamma dose from {sup 60}Co irradiator. Optical absorption at room temperature shows the peaked band at 452 nm corresponding to the manganese impurity. The F bands, was ascribed to the electron trapped in the anion vacancy in the lattice, were obtained at 452 nm and 455 nm belonging to NaCl:Mn and NaCl KCl:Mn, respectively. The F band increases as the doses increase and it was bleaching by the UV light at 470 nm. The glow curves of the samples show the first glow peak between 92-103 degrees C, while the second main peak was observed at 183 degrees C for the undoped NaCl and at 148 and 165 degrees C for the NaCl:Mn and NaCl-KCl:Mn, respectively. The main peak was slowly bleaching when the irradiated sample was illuminated with F (470 nm) light. Optical bleaching confirms that the F center has an important participation in the thermoluminescent response. The glow curves structure from the thermal bleaching suggests the participation of different kind of traps. Also, the kinetics parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and the kinetic order (b) were investigated. (Author)

  10. Upper Bound for Neutron Emission from Sonoluminescing Bubbles in Deuterated Acetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camara, C. G.; Putterman, S. J.; Hopkins, S. D.; Suslick, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    An experimental search for nuclear fusion inside imploding bubbles of degassed deuterated acetone at 0 degree sign C driven by a 15 atm sound field and seeded with a neutron generator reveals an upper bound that is a factor of 10 000 less than the signal reported by Taleyarkhan et al. The strength of our upper bound is limited by the weakness of sonoluminescence, which we ascribe to the relatively high vapor pressure of acetone

  11. Infrared studies of ortho-para conversion at Cl-atom and H-atom impurity centers in cryogenic solid hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raston, P.L.; Kettwich, S.C.; Anderson, D.T.

    2010-01-01

    We report infrared spectroscopic studies of H 2 ortho-para (o/p) conversion in solid hydrogen doped with Cl-atoms at 2 K while the Cl + H 2 (υ = 1) → HCl + H infrared-induced chemical reaction is occurring. The Cl-atom doped hydrogen crystals are synthesized using 355 nm in situ photodissociation of Cl 2 precursor molecules. For hydrogen solids with high ortho-H 2 fractional concentrations (X o = 0.55), the o/p conversion kinetics is dominated by Cl-atom catalyzed conversion with a catalyzed conversion rate constant K cc = 1.16(11) min -1 and the process is rate-limited by ortho-H 2 quantum diffusion. For hydrogen crystals with low ortho-H2 concentrations (X o = 0.03), single-exponential decay of the ortho-H 2 concentration with time is observed which is attributed to H-atom catalyzed o/p conversion by the H-atoms produced during the infrared-induced Cl + H 2 reaction. The measured H-atom catalyzed o/p conversion kinetics indicates the H-atoms are mobile under these conditions in agreement with previous ESR measurements.

  12. Single-Crystal Growth of Cl-Doped n-Type SnS Using SnCl2 Self-Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Yuki; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sugiyama, Taiki; Yanagi, Hiroshi

    2018-06-05

    SnS is a promising photovoltaic semiconductor owing to its suitable band gap energy and high optical absorption coefficient for highly efficient thin film solar cells. The most significant carnage is demonstration of n-type SnS. In this study, Cl-doped n-type single crystals were grown using SnCl 2 self-flux method. The obtained crystal was lamellar, with length and width of a few millimeters and thickness ranging between 28 and 39 μm. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed the single crystals had an orthorhombic unit cell. Since the ionic radii of S 2- and Cl - are similar, Cl doping did not result in substantial change in lattice parameter. All the elements were homogeneously distributed on a cleaved surface; the Sn/(S + Cl) ratio was 1.00. The crystal was an n-type degenerate semiconductor with a carrier concentration of ∼3 × 10 17 cm -3 . Hall mobility at 300 K was 252 cm 2 V -1 s -1 and reached 363 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at 142 K.

  13. Implications from the Upper Limit of Radio Afterglow Emission of FRB 131104/Swift J0644.5-5111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing

    2017-02-01

    A γ-ray transient, Swift J0644.5-5111, has been claimed to be associated with FRB 131104. However, a long-term radio imaging follow-up observation only placed an upper limit on the radio afterglow flux of Swift J0644.5-5111. Applying the external shock model, we perform a detailed constraint on the afterglow parameters for the FRB 131104/Swift J0644.5-5111 system. We find that for the commonly used microphysics shock parameters (e.g., {ɛ }e=0.1, {ɛ }B=0.01, and p = 2.3), if the fast radio burst (FRB) is indeed cosmological as inferred from its measured dispersion measure (DM), the ambient medium number density should be ≤slant {10}-3 {{cm}}-3, which is the typical value for a compact binary merger environment but disfavors a massive star origin. Assuming a typical ISM density, one would require that the redshift of the FRB be much smaller than the value inferred from DM (z\\ll 0.1), implying a non-cosmological origin of DM. The constraints are much looser if one adopts smaller {ɛ }B and {ɛ }e values, as observed in some gamma-ray burst afterglows. The FRB 131104/Swift J0644.5-5111 association remains plausible. We critically discuss possible progenitor models for the system.

  14. O surgimento da clínica psicológica: da prática curativa aos dispositivos de promoção da saúde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline de Oliveira Moreira

    Full Text Available O presente artigo pretende trabalhar com o conceito de clínica psicológica e tenta definir esse campo de atuação do psicólogo através de uma análise histórica do surgimento dessa prática e de uma reflexão sobre os limites do modelo de clínica como prática individual de consultório, em contraposição a um modelo de clínica chamada social, que sustenta novas atuações no campo da Psicologia, no Brasil. Assim, iremos, primeiramente, buscar as origens etimológicas, históricas e reflexivas do termo clínica. Em seguida, pretendemos refletir sobre as articulações entre a Psicologia e o individualismo moderno, e, ainda, sobre os limites da clínica entendida como prática liberal, privada e individualizante. Por fim, defenderemos, para além da cisão entre clínica e política, presente no modelo tradicional, uma definição de clínica social como prática ética e política das intervenções, comprometida com a promoção da saúde e engajada na realidade social brasileira.

  15. 36Cl in shallow, perched aquifers from central Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, S.; Elmore, D.; Fritz, S. J.

    1994-06-01

    36Cl/Cl ratios and chloride concentrations were measured in several shallow, perched aquifers situated within glacial till in west-central Indiana (USA). Most of these aquifers show 36Cl/Cl ratios which have to be attributed to admixed 36Cl from nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s. Two wells from Purdue's Horticultural Farm tap perched aquifers uninfluenced by anthropogenic sources of chloride, and their 36Cl/Cl ratios are comparable with ratios measured in modern, local precipitation. As such, the chloride contents of these wells (1 to 3 ppm) reflect evaporative concentration of the precipitation's chloride contents (averaging 0.17 ppm) in the vadose zone. Since one of these two wells (HA-2a) does not contain any detectable tritium, we conclude that recent pre-bomb 36Cl/Cl ratios and 36Cl deposition in precipitation are quite similar to those in modern precipitation. We attribute the slight 36Cl excess of about 20% in both of these wells largely to 36Cl deposition associated with dry fall-out. As much as 2 × 10 4 at. 36Cl/cm 2 might reach the surface via dry fall-out annually.

  16. Limits on neutrino masses from tritium beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Bonn, J; Bornschein, L; Flatt, B; Kraus, C V; Otten, E W; Schall, J P; Thuemmler, T; Weinheimer, C

    2002-01-01

    The presently lowest limit for the mass of the electron neutrino is m nu < 2.2 eV (95 % C.L.) derived from measurements at Mainz up to 1999. The data taken in 2000 are not fully analyzed yet but limits of possible distortions as reported by the Troitsk group can be given. The next generation neutrino mass experiment KATRIN is briefly discussed.

  17. HOCl and Cl2 observations in marine air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sommariva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cl atoms in the marine atmosphere may significantly impact the lifetimes of methane and other hydrocarbons. However, the existing estimates of Cl atom levels in marine air are based on indirect evidence. Here we present measurements of the Cl precursors HOCl and Cl2 in the marine boundary layer during June of 2009 at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory in the eastern tropical Atlantic. These are the first measurements of tropospheric HOCl. HOCl and Cl2 levels were low in air with open ocean back trajectories, with maximum levels always below 60 and 10 ppt (pmol/mol, respectively. In air with trajectories originating over Europe, HOCl and Cl2 levels were higher, with HOCl maxima exceeding 100 ppt each day and Cl2 reaching up to 35 ppt. The increased Cl cycling associated with long distance pollutant transport over the oceans likely impacts a wide geographic area and represents a mechanism by which human activities have increased the reactivity of the marine atmosphere. Data-constrained model simulations indicate that Cl atoms account for approximately 15 % of methane destruction on days when aged polluted air arrives at the site. A photochemical model does not adequately simulate the observed abundances of HOCl and Cl2, raising the possibility of an unknown HOCl source.

  18. Structural phase transitions in CsPbCl/sub 3/ and RbCdCl/sub 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plesko, S; Kind, R; Roos, J [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Zuerich. Lab. of Solid State Physics

    1978-08-01

    Structural phase transitions in CsPbCl/sub 3/ have been investigated by /sup 133/Cs and /sup 87/Rb nuclear magnetic resonance. The space groups of the room temperature phase in CsPbCl/sub 3/ and of two unknown phases in RbCdCl/sub 3/ could be clarified. Thus both perovskites show the same phase sequence from cubic Pm3m-O sub(h)sup(1) to tetragonal P4/mbm-D sub(4h)sup(5), orthorhombic Cmcm-D sub(2h)sup(17) and further orthorhombic Pnma-D sub(2h)sup(16).

  19. Fundamental limitations of cavity-assisted atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovale-Álvarez, M.; Brown, D. D.; Jones, A. W.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Miao, H.; Freise, A.

    2017-11-01

    Atom interferometers employing optical cavities to enhance the beam splitter pulses promise significant advances in science and technology, notably for future gravitational wave detectors. Long cavities, on the scale of hundreds of meters, have been proposed in experiments aiming to observe gravitational waves with frequencies below 1 Hz, where laser interferometers, such as LIGO, have poor sensitivity. Alternatively, short cavities have also been proposed for enhancing the sensitivity of more portable atom interferometers. We explore the fundamental limitations of two-mirror cavities for atomic beam splitting, and establish upper bounds on the temperature of the atomic ensemble as a function of cavity length and three design parameters: the cavity g factor, the bandwidth, and the optical suppression factor of the first and second order spatial modes. A lower bound to the cavity bandwidth is found which avoids elongation of the interaction time and maximizes power enhancement. An upper limit to cavity length is found for symmetric two-mirror cavities, restricting the practicality of long baseline detectors. For shorter cavities, an upper limit on the beam size was derived from the geometrical stability of the cavity. These findings aim to aid the design of current and future cavity-assisted atom interferometers.

  20. The Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford Phase Spaces with a Lower and Upper Length Scales and Clifford Group Geometric Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, C

    2004-01-01

    We construct the Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford-Phase spaces with an upper and lower length scales (infrared/ultraviolet cutoff). The invariance symmetry leads naturally to the real Clifford algebra Cl (2, 6, R ) and complexified Clifford Cl_C ( 4 ) algebra related to Twistors. We proceed with an extensive review of Smith's 8D model based on the Clifford algebra Cl ( 1 ,7) that reproduces at low energies the physics of the Standard Model and Gravity; including the derivation of all the coupling constants, particle masses, mixing angles, ....with high precision. Further results by Smith are discussed pertaining the interplay among Clifford, Jordan, Division and Exceptional Lie algebras within the hierarchy of dimensions D = 26, 27, 28 related to bosonic string, M, F theory. Two Geometric actions are presented like the Clifford-Space extension of Maxwell's Electrodynamics, Brandt's action related the 8D spacetime tangent-bundle involving coordinates and velocities (Finsler geometries) followed by a...

  1. Reflections on the present and future of upper limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Dario; Amsüss, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in research and media attention on active upper limb prostheses, presently the most common commercial upper limb prosthetic devices are not fundamentally different from solutions offered almost one century ago. Limited information transfer for both control and sensory-motor integration and challenges in socket technology have been major obstacles. By analysing the present state-of-the-art and academic achievements, we provide our opinion on the future of upper limb prostheses. We believe that surgical procedures for muscle reinnervation and osseointegration will become increasingly clinically relevant; muscle electrical signals will remain the main clinical means for prosthetic control; and chronic electrode implants, first in muscles (control), then in nerves (sensory feedback), will become viable clinical solutions. After decades of suspended clinically relevant progress, it is foreseeable that a new generation of upper limb prostheses will enter the market in the near future based on such advances, thereby offering substantial clinical benefit for patients.

  2. Electrical Conductivity of Molten DyCl3-NaCl and DyCl3-KCl Systems: An Approach to Structural Interpretations of Rare Earth Chloride Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Yasuhiko; Ohkubo, Takahiro

    2017-11-01

    Electrical conductivities (κs) of molten DyCl3-NaCl and DyCl3-KCl systems were estimated by measuring the impedances of each mixture melt at any temperature and/or frequency. The molar volumes (Vms) were measured by dilatometry and represented as a polynomial empirical equation of temperature and composition. Due to both the properties, the molar conductivities (Λms) were calculated and their temperature and/or composition dependences were discussed from the standpoint of structural features as well. The κs increased curvilinearly with increasing temperature across the whole composition ranges. This trend was also applied to the Λms which was fitted by an Arrhenius-type equation. The relationship of Λms with melt composition was studied and the Λms were found to decrease with increasing composition of DyCl3. These findings were interpreted based on the results of structural science so far reported, and finally, the relationship between Λms and the structures of pure rare earth chloride melts was discussed.

  3. 36Cl measurements of Hiroshima concrete samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhiro, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.

    2002-01-01

    The 36 Cl AMS studies are reported. A new steps of procedure of a sample preparation is developed and a tremendous reduction of sulphur background has been achieved. The 36 Cl contents of two atomic bombed concrete samples, old Hiroshima Bank one and Gokoku Shrine one, have been measured as a function of 36 Cl to Cl ratio by the Tsukuba AMS system. The 36 Cl to Cl ratio of the old Hiroshima Bank sample shows very nice agreement with the result of γ measurement of 152 Eu. Otherwise, the ratio is about 20% smaller than an estimation by the DS86 dosimetry system. A result of the Gokoku Shrine sample is also smaller than a depth profile estimation by the same DS86. It might be clear that the DS86 has a tendency of overestimation. It seems that a calculation method and/or the parameters used in the calculation are requested to be improved. (author)

  4. Be-10 and Cl-36 interlaboratory comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchel, Silke [CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence (France); FZD, Dresden (Germany); Bremser, Wolfram [BAM, Berlin (Germany); Alfimov, Vasily; Christl, Marcus; Kubik, Peter W. [PSI/ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Arnold, Maurice; Aumaitre, Georges; Benedetti, Lucilla; Bourles, Didier L.; Braucher, Regis [CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence (France); Caffee, Marc [PRIME Lab, Purdue, IN (United States); Fifield, L. Keith; Tims, Stephen G. [ANU, Canberra (Australia); Finkel, Robert C. [CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence (France); LLNL, Livermore, CA (United States); Freeman, Stewart P.H.T.; Wilcken, Klaus M.; Xu, Sheng [SUERC, East Kilbride (United Kingdom); Ruiz-Gomez, Aaron [CNA, Sevilla (Spain); Rood, Dylan H. [LLNL, Livermore, CA (United States); Sasa, Kimikazu [University of Tsukuba (Japan); Steier, Peter; Wallner, Anton [VERA, Wien (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    Driven by the progress in AMS and its spreading application within geosciences, measurements of increasing numbers of samples with low isotopic ratios will be required in the future. Therefore, we have examined the linearity of {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be as a function of isotope ratio by distributing 3 secondary standards (dilutions of NIST4325: 10{sup -12}-10{sup -14}) to 9 AMS labs. The problem of low ratio samples is even more crucial for {sup 36}Cl mainly due to the high volatility of chlorine. Thus, we have prepared large quantities of 3 {sup 36}Cl/Cl solutions from a certified {sup 36}Cl activity (NIST4943) by dilution with NaCl. AgCl precipitated from these solutions (10{sup -11}-10{sup -13}) has been distributed to 9 AMS labs. Some measurements are still ongoing. First results from 6 labs for each nuclide show that these interlaboratory exercises are very valuable.

  5. Old groundwater in parts of the upper Patapsco aquifer, Atlantic Coastal Plain, Maryland, USA: Evidence from radiocarbon, chlorine-36 and helium-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Niel; Eggleston, John R.; Raffensperger, Jeff P.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Casile, Gerolamo C.; Andreasen, D.C.

    2012-01-01

    Apparent groundwater ages along two flow paths in the upper Patapsco aquifer of the Maryland Atlantic Coastal Plain, USA, were estimated using 14C, 36Cl and 4He data. Most of the ages range from modern to about 500 ka, with one sample at 117 km downgradient from the recharge area dated by radiogenic 4He accumulation at more than one Ma. Last glacial maximum (LGM) water was located about 20 km downgradient on the northern flow path, where the radiocarbon age was 21.5 ka, paleorecharge temperatures were 0.5–1.5  °C (a maximum cooling of about 12 °C relative to the modern mean annual temperature of 13 °C), and Cl–, Cl/Br, and stable isotopes of water were minimum. Low recharge temperatures (typically 5–7 °C) indicate that recharge occurred predominantly during glacial periods when coastal heads were lowest due to low sea-level stand. Flow velocities averaged about 1.0 m a–1 in upgradient parts of the upper Patapsco aquifer and decreased from 0.13 to 0.04 m a–1 at 40 and 80 km further downgradient, respectively. This study demonstrates that most water in the upper Patapsco aquifer is non-renewable on human timescales under natural gradients, thus highlighting the importance of effective water-supply management to prolong the resource.

  6. Volta potential of clad AA2024 aluminium after exposure to CeCl3 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreatta, F.; Druart, M.-E.; Marin, E.; Cossement, D.; Olivier, M.-G.; Fedrizzi, L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Alkaline etch of clad AA2024 enhances precipitation of Ce compounds. • Exposure to CeCl 3 solution decreases Volta potential of alkaline etched substrate. • Ce compounds reduce the driving force for initiation of localized attack. - Abstract: AA2024 clad with AA1050 was immersed in CeCl 3 solution to promote deposition of cerium species. The deposition occurs on the entire sample surface for the alkaline etched substrate, while it is very limited for the degreased substrate. The surface potential (Volta potential) was investigated by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy after different immersion times in CeCl 3 solution. The preferential deposition of Ce compounds at Al–Fe intermetallic sites progressively reduces their Volta potential difference relative to the matrix in the alkaline etched substrate. This reduces the susceptibility to localized attack of the intermetallics as proven by potentiodynamic polarization measurements

  7. Cl- channels in apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Sirianant, Lalida

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable feature of apoptosis is the initial massive cell shrinkage, which requires opening of ion channels to allow release of K(+), Cl(-), and organic osmolytes to drive osmotic water movement and cell shrinkage. This article focuses on the role of the Cl(-) channels LRRC8, TMEM16/anoctamin......, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in cellular apoptosis. LRRC8A-E has been identified as a volume-regulated anion channel expressed in many cell types. It was shown to be required for regulatory and apoptotic volume decrease (RVD, AVD) in cultured cell lines. Its presence also......(-) channels or as regulators of other apoptotic Cl(-) channels, such as LRRC8. CFTR has been known for its proapoptotic effects for some time, and this effect may be based on glutathione release from the cell and increase in cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although we find that CFTR is activated...

  8. Explosive phenomena in heavily irradiated NaCl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    denHartog, HW; Vainshtein, DI; Matthews, GE; Williams, RT

    1997-01-01

    In heavily irradiated NaCl crystals explosive phenomena can be initiated during irradiation or afterwards when samples are heated to temperatures between 100 and 250 degrees C. During irradiation of NaCl Na and Cl-2 precipitates and void structures are produced along with the accumulation of stored

  9. High-temperature chemistry of HCl and Cl2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelucchi, Matteo; Frassoldati, Alessio; Faravelli, Tiziano

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature chlorine chemistry was updated and the inhibition mechanisms involving HCl and Cl2 were re-examined. The thermochemistry was obtained using the Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) approach, resulting in improved data for chlorine-containing species of interest. The HCl/Cl2....... The validation was carried out on selected experimental data from laminar flames, shock tubes and plug flow reactors. Systems containing Cl2 showed high sensitivity to Cl2 +M⇌Cl+Cl+M; the rate constant for this reaction has a significant uncertainty and there is a need for an accurate high...... chemistry discussed in the paper was based on reference and experimental measurements of rate constants available in the literature. By coupling the new HCl/Cl2 subset with the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) syngas mechanism a kinetic mechanism consisting of 25 species and 102 reactions was obtained...

  10. Roughness generation during Si etching in Cl{sub 2} pulsed plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourey, Odile; Petit-Etienne, Camille; Cunge, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.cunge@cea.fr; Darnon, Maxime; Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Brichon, Paulin; Lattu-Romain, Eddy; Pons, Michel; Joubert, Olivier [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CEA-Leti Minatec, LTM, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2016-07-15

    Pulsed plasmas are promising candidates to go beyond limitations of continuous waves' plasma. However, their interaction with surfaces remains poorly understood. The authors investigated the silicon etching mechanism in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) Cl{sub 2} operated either in an ICP-pulsed mode or in a bias-pulsed mode (in which only the bias power is pulsed). The authors observed systematically the development of an important surface roughness at a low duty cycle. By using plasma diagnostics, they show that the roughness is correlated to an anomalously large (Cl atoms flux)/(energetic ion flux) ratio in the pulsed mode. The rational is that the Cl atom flux is not modulated on the timescale of the plasma pulses although the ion fluxes and energy are modulated. As a result, a very strong surface chlorination occurs during the OFF period when the surface is not exposed to energetic ions. Therefore, each energetic ion in the ON period will bombard a heavily chlorinated silicon surface, leading to anomalously high etching yield. In the ICP pulsed mode (in which the ion energy is high), the authors report yields as high as 40, which mean that each individual ion impacts will generate a “crater” of about 2 nm depth at the surface. Since the ion flux is very small in the pulsed ICP mode, this process is stochastic and is responsible for the roughness initiation. The roughness expansion can then be attributed partly to the ion channeling effect and is probably enhanced by the formation of a SiClx reactive layer with nonhomogeneous thickness over the topography of the surface. This phenomenon could be a serious limitation of pulsed plasma processes.

  11. Crystallographic characterization of cement pastes hydrated with NaCl; Caracterizacao cristalografica de pastas de cimento hidratadas com NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Carina Gabriela de Melo e; Martinelli, Antonio Eduardo; Melo, Dulce Maria Araujo; Melo, Marcus Antonio de Freitas; Melo, Vitor Rodrigo de Melo e [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    One of the major current challenges faced by oil companies is the exploration of pre salt basins. Salt layers deposited upon the evaporation of ocean water and continental separation are mainly formed by NaCl and isolate immense oil reservoirs. The mechanical stability and zonal isolation of oil wells that run through salt layers must be fulfilled by cement sheaths saturated with NaCl to assure chemical compatibility between cement and salt layer. The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of NaCl addition on the hydration of oil well cement slurries as well as identifying the nature of crystalline phases present in the hardened cement. To that end, cement slurries containing NaCl were mixed, hardened and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The results revealed that the presence of NaCl affects the formation of hydration products by the presence of Friedel's salt. The intensity of the corresponding peaks increase as the contents of NaCl in the slurry increase. High concentrations of NaCl in Portland slurries increase the setting time of cement and the presence of Friedel's salt decreases the strength of the hardened cement. (author)

  12. Regeneration of upper-elevation red oak in the White Mountains of New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    William B. Leak; Mariko. Yamasaki

    2013-01-01

    Northern red oak occurs in limited amounts with a mixture of softwoods on the shallow soils at upper elevations in northern New England. These stands are important for wildlife habitat and forest diversity as well as a modest amount of timber harvesting. Little experience or research is available on how to regenerate upper-elevation oak. However, an examination of a 35...

  13. Investigation of the magnetic structure of KFeCl3, KFeBr3, Rb2MnCl4, and Rb3Mn2Cl7 compounds with magnetic correlations in one and two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurewitz, E.

    1976-12-01

    The crystallographic structure of KFeCl 3 and KFeBr 3 consists of (FeCl) - octahedra packed in isolated zigzagging chains. These compounds order antiferromagnetically at Tsub(N) approximately 16 deg K and Tsub(N) approximately 9.5 deg K, respectively. Below Tsub(N) the Fe 2+ magnetic moments within a chain are ferromagnetically coupled, parallel to the chain axis, while the chains are coupled antiferromagnetically. In the temperatures Tsub(N) 3 has magnetic correlations within the chains only, whereas the correlations between the chains are negligible. Moessbauer effect measurements at these temperatures show a distinct hyperfine magnetic splitting, characteristic of relaxation phenomena. Cs 2 MnCl 4 , Rb 2 MnCl 4 and Rb 3 Mn 2 Cl 7 belong to the Asub(n+1)Bsub(n)Xsub(3n+1) family of compounds, with the Dsub(4h)sup(17) space group. These compounds order antiferromagnetically at Tsub(N) approximately 55 deg K for Cs 2 MnCl 4 and Rb 2 MnCl 4 , and Tsub(N) approximately 64.5 deg K for Rb 3 Mn 2 Cl 7 . Below Tsub(N) each Mn 2+ moment is along the c-axis and is coupled antiferromagnetically to the moments of its nearest neighbours (nn). These compounds behave like a two-dimensional antiferromagnet at T >= Tsub(N). Neutron scans of the reciprocal space exhibit rods of reflections along c vectorsup(*). The negligible interactions between next nn sets of MnCl 2 layers, a distance c vector apart, yield both in Rb 2 MnCl 4 and in Rb 3 Mn 2 Cl 7 , two distinctive magnetic structures (polytypes) below Tsub(N). (author)

  14. Studies of the effects of TiCl3 in LiBH4/CaH2/TiCl3 reversible hydrogen storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dongan; Yang Jun; Ni Jun; Drews, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We systematically studied the effects of TiCl 3 in LiBH 4 /CaH 2 /TiCl 3 hydrogen storage system. ► It is found that adding 0.25 TiCl 3 produces fully reversible hydrogen absorption and desorption and a lower desorption temperature. ► LiCl experiences four different states, i.e. “formed-solid solution-molten solution-precipitation”, in the whole desorption process of the system. ► The incorporation of LiCl into LiBH 4 forms more viscous molten LiBH 4 ·LiCl, leading to fast kinetics. ► The precipitation and re-incorporation of LiCl into LiBH 4 lead to a fully reversible complex hydrogen storage system. - Abstract: In the present study, the effects of TiCl 3 on desorption kinetics, absorption/desorption reversibility, and related phase transformation processes in LiBH 4 /CaH 2 /TiCl 3 hydrogen storage system was studied systematically by varying its concentration (x = 0, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.25). The results show that LiCl forms during ball milling of 6LiBH 4 /CaH 2 /xTiCl 3 and that as temperature increases, o-LiBH 4 transforms into h-LiBH 4 , into which LiCl incorporates, forming solid solution of LiBH 4 ·LiCl, which melts above 280 °C. Molten LiBH 4 ·LiCl is more viscous than molten LiBH 4 , preventing the clustering of LiBH 4 and the accompanied agglomeration of CaH 2 , and thus preserving the nano-sized phase arrangement formed during ball milling. Above 350 °C, the molten solution LiBH 4 ·LiCl further reacts with CaH 2 , precipitating LiCl. The main hydrogen desorption reaction is between molten LiBH 4 ·LiCl and CaH 2 and not between molten LiBH 4 and CaH 2 . This alters the hydrogen reaction thermodynamics and lowers the hydrogen desorption temperature. In addition, the solid–liquid nano-sized phase arrangement in the nano-composites improves the hydrogen reaction kinetics. The reversible incorporation/precipitation of LiCl at the hydrogen reaction temperature and during temperature cycling makes the 6LiBH 4 /CaH 2 /0.25TiCl 3

  15. Two-center three-electron bonding in ClNH{sub 3} revealed via helium droplet infrared laser Stark spectroscopy: Entrance channel complex along the Cl + NH{sub 3} → ClNH{sub 2} + H reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Christopher P.; Douberly, Gary E., E-mail: douberly@uga.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2556 (United States); Xie, Changjian; Guo, Hua [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Kaufmann, Matin [Department of Physical Chemistry II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-04-28

    Pyrolytic dissociation of Cl{sub 2} is employed to dope helium droplets with single Cl atoms. Sequential addition of NH{sub 3} to Cl-doped droplets leads to the formation of a complex residing in the entry valley to the substitution reaction Cl + NH{sub 3} → ClNH{sub 2} + H. Infrared Stark spectroscopy in the NH stretching region reveals symmetric and antisymmetric vibrations of a C{sub 3v} symmetric top. Frequency shifts from NH{sub 3} and dipole moment measurements are consistent with a ClNH{sub 3} complex containing a relatively strong two-center three-electron (2c–3e) bond. The nature of the 2c–3e bonding in ClNH{sub 3} is explored computationally and found to be consistent with the complexation-induced blue shifts observed experimentally. Computations of interconversion pathways reveal nearly barrierless routes to the formation of this complex, consistent with the absence in experimental spectra of two other complexes, NH{sub 3}Cl and Cl–HNH{sub 2}, which are predicted in the entry valley to the hydrogen abstraction reaction Cl + NH{sub 3} → HCl + NH{sub 2}.

  16. Crystal structures of ZnCl2·2.5H2O, ZnCl2·3H2O and ZnCl2·4.5H2O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hennings

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The formation of different complexes in aqueous solutions is an important step in understanding the behavior of zinc chloride in water. The structure of concentrated ZnCl2 solutions is governed by coordination competition of Cl− and H2O around Zn2+. According to the solid–liquid phase diagram, the title compounds were crystallized below room temperature. The structure of ZnCl2·2.5H2O contains Zn2+ both in a tetrahedral coordination with Cl− and in an octahedral environment defined by five water molecules and one Cl− shared with the [ZnCl4]2− unit. Thus, these two different types of Zn2+ cations form isolated units with composition [Zn2Cl4(H2O5] (pentaaqua-μ-chlorido-trichloridodizinc. The trihydrate {hexaaquazinc tetrachloridozinc, [Zn(H2O6][ZnCl4]}, consists of three different Zn2+ cations, one of which is tetrahedrally coordinated by four Cl− anions. The two other Zn2+ cations are each located on an inversion centre and are octahedrally surrounded by water molecules. The [ZnCl4] tetrahedra and [Zn(H2O6] octahedra are arranged in alternating rows parallel to [001]. The structure of the 4.5-hydrate {hexaaquazinc tetrachloridozinc trihydrate, [Zn(H2O6][ZnCl4]·3H2O}, consists of isolated octahedral [Zn(H2O6] and tetrahedral [ZnCl4] units, as well as additional lattice water molecules. O—H...O hydrogen bonds between the water molecules as donor and ZnCl4 tetrahedra and water molecules as acceptor groups leads to the formation of a three-dimensional network in each of the three structures.

  17. Approaching the Shockley-Queisser limit: General assessment of the main limiting mechanisms in photovoltaic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vossier, Alexis; Gualdi, Federico; Dollet, Alain; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    In principle, the upper efficiency limit of any solar cell technology can be determined using the detailed-balance limit formalism. However, “real” solar cells show efficiencies which are always below this theoretical value due to several limiting mechanisms. We study the ability of a solar cell architecture to approach its own theoretical limit, using a novel index introduced in this work, and the amplitude with which the different limiting mechanisms affect the cell efficiency is scrutinized as a function of the electronic gap and the illumination level to which the cell is submitted. The implications for future generations of solar cells aiming at an improved conversion of the solar spectrum are also addressed

  18. A micro-CL system and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zenghui; Yuan, Lulu; Liu, Baodong; Wei, Cunfeng; Sun, Cuili; Yin, Pengfei; Wei, Long

    2017-11-01

    The computed laminography (CL) method is preferable to computed tomography for the non-destructive testing of plate-like objects. A micro-CL system is developed for three-dimensional imaging of plate-like objects. The details of the micro-CL system are described, including the system architecture, scanning modes, and reconstruction algorithm. The experiment results of plate-like fossils, insulated gate bipolar translator module, ball grid array packaging, and printed circuit board are also presented to demonstrate micro-CL's ability for 3D imaging of flat specimens and universal applicability in various fields.

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE ORIG ORIG CT for upper abdominal pathology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIG. 14. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • March 2007. ORIG. Abstract. Background. Current practice at our institution for routine abdominal. CT includes coverage from the diaphragm to the symphysis pubis and therefore includes pelvic organs. Limited upper abdominal imaging exists in other modalities, and tailoring the ...

  20. Characterization of glial cell K-Cl cotransport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Kenneth B E; Adragna, Norma C; Fyffe, Robert E W; Lauf, Peter K

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of K-Cl cotransport (KCC) consists of at least 4 isoforms, KCC 1, 2, 3, and 4 which, in multiple combinations, exist in most cells, including erythrocytes and neuronal cells. We utilized reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and ion flux studies to characterize KCC activity in an immortalized in vitro cell model for fibrous astrocytes, the rat C6 glioblastoma cell. Isoform-specific sets of oligonucleotide primers were synthesized for NKCC1, KCC1, KCC2, KCC3, KCC4, and also for NKCC1 and actin. K-Cl cotransport activity was determined by measuring either the furosemide-sensitive, or the Cl(-)-dependent bumetanide-insensitive Rb(+) (a K(+) congener) influx in the presence of the Na/K pump inhibitor ouabain. Rb(+) influx was measured at a fixed external Cl concentrations, [Cl(-)](e), as a function of varying external Rb concentrations, [Rb(+)](e), and at a fixed [Rb(+)](e) as a function of varying [Cl(-)](e), and with equimolar Cl replacement by anions of the chaotropic series. RT-PCR of C6 glioblastoma (C6) cells identified mRNA for three KCC isoforms (1, 3, and 4). NKCC1 mRNA was also detected. The apparent K(m) for KCC-mediated Rb(+) influx was 15 mM [Rb(+)](e), and V(max) 12.5 nmol Rb(+) * mg protein(-1) * minute(-1). The calculated apparent K(m) for external Cl(-) was 13 mM and V(max) 14.4 nmol Rb(+) * mg protein(-1) * minute(-1). The anion selectivity sequence of the furosemide-sensitive Rb(+) influx was Cl(-)>Br-=NO(3)(-)>I(-)=SCN(-)>Sfm(-) (sulfamate). Established activators of K-Cl cotransport, hyposmotic shock and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) pretreatment, stimulated furosemide-sensitive Rb(+) influx. A ñ50% NEM-induced loss of intracellular K(+) was prevented by furosemide. We have identified by RT-PCR the presence of three distinct KCC isoforms (1, 3, and 4) in rat C6 glioblastoma cells, and functionally characterized the anion selectivity and kinetics of their collective sodium-independent cation-chloride cotransport

  1. Neutron-star mass limit in the bimetric theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporaso, G.; Brecher, K.

    1977-01-01

    The ''neutron''-star upper mass limit is examined in Rosen's bimetric theory of gravitation. An exact solution, approximate scaling law, and numerical integration of the hydrostatic equilibrium equation show the dependence of the mass limit on the assumed equation of state. As in general relativity, that limit varies roughly as 1/√rho 0 , where rho 0 is the density above which the equation of state becomes ''stiff.'' Unlike general relativity, the stiffer the equation of state, the higher the mass limit. For rho 0 = 2 x 10 14 g/cm 3 and P = (rho - rho 0 ) c 2 , we found M/sub max/ = 81M/sub sun/. This mass is consistent with causality and experimental tests of gravitation and nuclear physics. For dp/drho > c 2 it appears that the upper mass limit can become arbitrarily large

  2. A density model based on the Modified Quasichemical Model and applied to the (NaCl + KCl + ZnCl2) liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouzilleau, Philippe; Robelin, Christian; Chartrand, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A model for the density of multicomponent inorganic liquids. ► The density model is based on the Modified Quasichemical Model. ► Application to the (NaCl + KCl + ZnCl 2 ) ternary liquid. ► A Kohler–Toop-like asymmetric interpolation method was used. - Abstract: A theoretical model for the density of multicomponent inorganic liquids based on the Modified Quasichemical Model has been presented previously. By introducing in the Gibbs free energy of the liquid phase temperature-dependent molar volume expressions for the pure components and pressure-dependent excess parameters for the binary (and sometimes higher-order) interactions, it is possible to reproduce, and eventually predict, the molar volume and the density of the multicomponent liquid phase using standard interpolation methods. In the present article, this density model is applied to the (NaCl + KCl + ZnCl 2 ) ternary liquid and a Kohler–Toop-like asymmetric interpolation method is used. All available density data for the (NaCl + KCl + ZnCl 2 ) liquid were collected and critically evaluated, and optimized pressure-dependent model parameters have been found. This new volumetric model can be used with Gibbs free energy minimization software, to calculate the molar volume and the density of (NaCl + KCl + ZnCl 2 ) ternary melts.

  3. 36Cl/Cl ratios in geothermal systems: preliminary measurements from the Coso Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimz, G.J.; Moore, J.N.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    The 36 Cl/Cl isotopic composition of chlorine in geothermal systems can be a useful diagnostic tool in characterizing hydrologic structure, in determining the origins and age of waters within the systems, and in differentiating the sources of chlorine (and other solutes) in the thermal waters. The 36 Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples from the Coso, California geothermal field have been measured for these purposes. The results indicate that most of the chlorine is not derived from the dominant granitoid that host the geothermal system. If the chlorine was originally input into the Coso subsurface through meteoric recharge, that input occurred at least 1-1.25 million years ago. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic sources. In either case, the results indicate that most of the chlorine in the thermal waters has existed within the granitoid host rocks for no more than about 100,00-200,00 years. this residence time for the chlorine is similar to residence times suggested by other researchers for chlorine in deep groundwaters of the Mono Basin north of the Coso field

  4. 36Cl/Cl ratios in geothermal systems: preliminary measurements from the Coso Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G.J.; Moore, J.N.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1997-07-01

    The {sub 36}Cl/Cl isotopic composition of chlorine in geothermal systems can be a useful diagnostic tool in characterizing hydrologic structure, in determining the origins and age of waters within the systems, and in differentiating the sources of chlorine (and other solutes) in the thermal waters. The {sub 36}Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples from the Coso, California geothermal field have been measured for these purposes. The results indicate that most of the chlorine is not derived from the dominant granitoid that host the geothermal system. If the chlorine was originally input into the Coso subsurface through meteoric recharge, that input occurred at least 1-1.25 million years ago. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic sources. In either case, the results indicate that most of the chlorine in the thermal waters has existed within the granitoid host rocks for no more than about 100,00-200,00 years. this residence time for the chlorine is similar to residence times suggested by other researchers for chlorine in deep groundwaters of the Mono Basin north of the Coso field.

  5. Electrokinetic properties of tantalum oxide deposited on model substrate in NaCl and LiCl solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorova, M.P.; Bogdanova, N.F.; Ermakova, L.Eh.; Bobrov, P.V.

    1997-01-01

    Electrokinetic characteristics of tantalum oxide have been studied using a model system - a plane-parallel capillary in chloride solutions containing monocharge (H + , Na + , Li + ) counterions in a wide range of pH and concentrations. It is shown that position of isoelectric point (IEP) of Ta 2 O 5 depends on concentration and type of counterion, moreover, the dependence is not explained in the framework of classical notions of the influence of counterion specific adsorption on IEP position. Electrokinetic potential of Ta 2 O-5 surface at the background of diluted LiCl solutions is higher in its absolute value, than at the background of NaCl solutions according to direct lyotropic series. The results of measurements of the capillary resistance dependence on pH at the background of NaCl and LiCl solutions 10 -3 -10 -1 M are used for the calculation of efficiency and specific surface conductivity factors

  6. Reduction behavior of UO22+ in molten LiCl–RbCl and LiCl–KCl eutectics by using tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Takayuki; Uehara, Akihiro; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Yamana, Hajimu

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of uranium from UO 2 2+ to UO 2 + or U 4+ in molten LiCl–RbCl and LiCl–KCl eutectics was examined by using tungsten and chlorine gas. Spectrophotometric technique was adopted to determine the concentration of uranium species. When tungsten was immersed into the LiCl–RbCl eutectic melt at 400 °C without supplying chlorine gas, 36% of the total weight of the hexavalent of UO 2 2+ was reduced to the pentavalent of UO 2 + . Under purging chlorine gas into the melt, 96% of UO 2 2+ was reduced to the tetravalent of U 4+ . Tungsten oxy-chloride of WOCl 4 was produced via the reductions of UO 2 2+ , which was volatized from the melt and adsorbed on the upper part of experimental cell. On the other hand, 84% of UO 2 2+ in the LiCl–KCl eutectic melt at 500 °C was reduced to U 4+ by using tungsten and chlorine gas

  7. OpenCL Performance Evaluation on Modern Multicore CPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hwan Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing heterogeneous platforms for computation has become a general trend, making the portability issue important. OpenCL (Open Computing Language serves this purpose by enabling portable execution on heterogeneous architectures. However, unpredictable performance variation on different platforms has become a burden for programmers who write OpenCL applications. This is especially true for conventional multicore CPUs, since the performance of general OpenCL applications on CPUs lags behind the performance of their counterparts written in the conventional parallel programming model for CPUs. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of OpenCL applications on out-of-order multicore CPUs from the architectural perspective. We evaluate OpenCL applications on various aspects, including API overhead, scheduling overhead, instruction-level parallelism, address space, data location, data locality, and vectorization, comparing OpenCL to conventional parallel programming models for CPUs. Our evaluation indicates unique performance characteristics of OpenCL applications and also provides insight into the optimization metrics for better performance on CPUs.

  8. Reaction between ethylenediamine and acetone on a platinum(II) complex. Crystal structure of [PtCl(en)(PBu3)][PtCl(ien)(PBu3)]Cl2 x CH3COCH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelka, J.; Bois, C.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of [PtCl(en)(PBu 3 )][PtCl(ien)(PBu 3 )]Cl 2 CH 3 COCH 3 (en = ethylenediamine and ien = N-iso-propylideneethylenediamine) is reported herein. The crystal structure of the compound determined by x-ray absorption analysis and 1 H and 31 P NMR spectral data of the compound are reported. 11 references, 2 figures, 3 tables

  9. Limit on mass differences in the Weinberg model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1977-01-01

    Within the Weinberg model mass differences between members of a multiplet generate further mass differences between the neutral and charged vector bosons. The experimental situation on the Weinberg model leads to an upper limit of about 800 GeV on mass differences within a multiplet. No limit on the

  10. Detecting inter-aquifer leakage in areas with limited data using hydraulics and multiple environmental tracers, including 4He, 36Cl/Cl, 14C and 87Sr/86Sr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Stacey C.; Wohling, Daniel L.; Keppel, Mark N.; Post, Vincent E. A.; Love, Andrew J.; Shand, Paul; Tyroller, Lina; Kipfer, Rolf

    2017-11-01

    The investigation of regionally extensive groundwater systems in remote areas is hindered by a shortage of data due to a sparse observation network, which limits our understanding of the hydrogeological processes in arid regions. The study used a multidisciplinary approach to determine hydraulic connectivity between the Great Artesian Basin (GAB) and the underlying Arckaringa Basin in the desert region of Central Australia. In order to manage the impacts of groundwater abstraction from the Arckaringa Basin, it is vital to understand its connectivity with the GAB (upper aquifer), as the latter supports local pastoral stations and groundwater-dependent springs with unique endemic flora and fauna. The study is based on the collation of available geological information, a detailed analysis of hydraulic data, and data on environmental tracers. Enhanced inter-aquifer leakage in the centre of the study area was identified, as well as recharge to the GAB from ephemeral rivers and waterholes. Throughout the rest of the study area, inter-aquifer leakage is likely controlled by diffuse inter-aquifer leakage, but the coarse spatial resolution means that the presence of additional enhanced inter-aquifer leakage sites cannot be excluded. This study makes the case that a multi-tracer approach along with groundwater hydraulics and geology provides a tool-set to investigate enhanced inter-aquifer leakage even in a groundwater basin with a paucity of data. A particular problem encountered in this study was the ambiguous interpretation of different age tracers, which is attributed to diffusive transport across flow paths caused by low recharge rates.

  11. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantification of human collectin 11 (CL-11, CL-K1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selman, L; Henriksen, M L; Brandt, J

    2012-01-01

    -associated serine protease 1 (MASP-1) and/or MASP-3 in circulation. Mutation in the CL-11 gene was recently associated with the developmental syndrome 3MC. In the present study, we established and thoroughly validated a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on two different monoclonal antibodies....... The assay is highly sensitive, specific and shows excellent quantitative characteristics such as reproducibility, dilution linearity and recovery (97.7-104%). The working range is 0.15-34 ng/ml. The CL-11 concentration in two CL-11-deficient individuals affected by the 3MC syndrome was determined...... and thawing to a certain extent did not influence the ELISA. This ELISA offers a convenient and reliable method for studying CL-11 levels in relation to a variety of human diseases and syndromes....

  12. Cl--HCO-3 antiport in rat lacrimal gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.W.; Bradley, M.E.; Mircheff, A.K.

    1988-01-01

    With the use of analytical subcellular fractionation and tracer uptake methods the authors have demonstrated the presence of a Cl - -HCO - 3 antiport mechanism in the rat exorbital lacrimal gland. They find that outwardly directed gradients of HCO - 3 and of 35 Cl - accelerated the flux of 36 Cl - into isolated membrane vesicles. Because vesicle membrane potentials were clamped to 0 mV with K + -valinomycin, the observed anion gradient-dependent acceleration of Cl - influx could not be attributed to conductive fluxes. The antiporter had an apparent K 0.5 for Cl - between 6 and 10 mM. It was sensitive to the stilbene derivatives 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS) and 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS). It was also sensitive to the loop diuretic furosemide, which has frequently been used in tests for NaKCl 2 symporter activity. Other anions inhibited anion gradient-driven Cl - influx in the sequence SCN - > NO - 3 > Cl - HCO - 3 > SO 2- 4 . The density distribution of Cl - -HCO - 3 antiport activity indicated that ∼80% of the transporter was associated with intracellular membranes, suggesting the presence of cytoplasmic pools of functional antiporters. Because several studies have already shown the presence of Na + -H + antiporter activity in lacrimal acinar cell basolateral membranes, a cellular model for lacrimal acinar electrolyte secretion is proposed in which a parallel array of Cl - -HCO - 3 and Na + -H + antiporters mediates the Na + -dependent accumulation of Cl - against its electrochemical potential gradient

  13. Effects of hypoxia and ocean acidification on the upper thermal niche boundaries of coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Rasmus; Johansen, Jacob L; Rummer, Jodie L; Esbaugh, Andrew J

    2017-07-01

    Rising ocean temperatures are predicted to cause a poleward shift in the distribution of marine fishes occupying the extent of latitudes tolerable within their thermal range boundaries. A prevailing theory suggests that the upper thermal limits of fishes are constrained by hypoxia and ocean acidification. However, some eurythermal fish species do not conform to this theory, and maintain their upper thermal limits in hypoxia. Here we determine if the same is true for stenothermal species. In three coral reef fish species we tested the effect of hypoxia on upper thermal limits, measured as critical thermal maximum (CT max ). In one of these species we also quantified the effect of hypoxia on oxygen supply capacity, measured as aerobic scope (AS). In this species we also tested the effect of elevated CO 2 (simulated ocean acidification) on the hypoxia sensitivity of CT max We found that CT max was unaffected by progressive hypoxia down to approximately 35 mmHg, despite a substantial hypoxia-induced reduction in AS. Below approximately 35 mmHg, CT max declined sharply with water oxygen tension ( P w O 2 ). Furthermore, the hypoxia sensitivity of CT max was unaffected by elevated CO 2 Our findings show that moderate hypoxia and ocean acidification do not constrain the upper thermal limits of these tropical, stenothermal fishes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Limit on the production of a low-mass vector boson in e+e−→Uγ, U→e+e− with the KLOE experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anastasi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a new force beyond the Standard Model is compelling because it could explain several striking astrophysical observations which fail standard interpretations. We searched for the light vector mediator of this dark force, the U boson, with the KLOE detector at the DAΦNE e+e− collider. Using an integrated luminosity of 1.54 fb−1, we studied the process e+e−→Uγ, with U→e+e−, using radiative return to search for a resonant peak in the dielectron invariant-mass distribution. We did not find evidence for a signal, and set a 90% CL upper limit on the mixing strength between the Standard Model photon and the dark photon, ε2, at 10−6–10−4 in the 5–520 MeV/c2 mass range.

  15. Search for fractional charge and heavy stable particles at PETRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, W.; Canzler, T.; Cords, D.; Dittmann, P.; Eichler, R.; Felst, R.; Haidt, D.; Kawabata, S.; Krehbiel, H.; Naroska, B.

    1980-01-01

    A search has been made for new particles with charge Q = 2/3, 1, 4/3, 5/3 produced in e + e - -reactions at PETRA. The energy range was Esub(cm) = 27-35 GeV. No such particles were found. Upper limits for the cross-section depending on the assumed mass and production spectrum are given. For Q = 2/3 quarks with mass less than 12 GeVs 2 , upper limits sigma(q anti q)/sigma(μμ) >= 10 - 2 (90% C.L.) are obtained both for inclusive and exclusive production. For the lifetime of the B-meson (msub(B) = 5 GeV/c 2 ) an upper limit tau - 9 s is obtained. (orig.)

  16. Explosive hydrogen brning of 35Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilidas, C.; Goerres, J.; Ross, J.G.; Scheller, K.W.; Wiescher, M.; Azuma, R.E.; Roters, G.; Trautvetter, H.P.; Evans, H.C.

    1994-01-01

    Proton threshold states in 36 Ar have been studied via the reactions 35 Cl( 3 He,d) 36 Ar, 32 S( 6 Li,d) 36 Ar, 32 S(α,γ) 36 Ar, 35 Cl(p,γ) 36 Ar and 35 Cl(p,α) 32 S to investigate their influence on a possible SCl reaction cycle in explosive hydrogen burning. Three new states in 36 Ar have been observed in the ( 3 He,d) reaction at E x =8806, 8887 and 8923 keV. Deuteron angular distributions were measured for 14 states near the 35 Cl+p threshold and were analyzed with DWBA calculations. Values of transferred orbital angular momenta, spectroscopic factors and proton partial widths were determined. Gamma-ray spectra have been measured at ten (p,γ) resonances. Three new resonances were observed at E R =311, 416 and 627 keV, corresponding to 36 Ar states at E x =8806, 8909 and 9117 keV, respectively. Excitation and resonance energies, γ-ray branching ratios and resonance strengths are presented. The astrophysical implications of our results for explosive hydrogen burning of 35 Cl are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Measurements of cross section of e+e−→pp¯π0 at center-of-mass energies between 4.008 and 4.600 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ablikim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on e+e− annihilation data samples collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider at 13 center-of-mass energies from 4.008 to 4.600 GeV, measurements of the Born cross section of e+e−→pp¯π0 are performed. No significant resonant structure is observed in the measured energy dependence of the cross section. The upper limit on the Born cross section of e+e−→Y(4260→pp¯π0 at the 90% C.L. is determined to be 0.01 pb. The upper limit on the ratio of the branching fractions B(Y(4260→pp¯π0B(Y(4260→π+π−J/ψ at the 90% C.L. is determined to be 0.02%.

  18. Sinteza i fizičko-hemijske karakteristike eksploziva HNIW (CL-20 / Synthesis and physicochemical properties of the HNIW (CL-20 explosive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Lukić-Anđelković

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Novo jedinjenje CL-20 je ciklični nitramin sa najvećom kristalnom gustinom (iznad 2,0 g/cm3 i najsnažniji nenuklearni eksploziv. Opisana je sinteza HNIW ili CL-20 u tri stepena. CL-20 ima najveću gustinu i brzinu detonacije među poznatim eksplozivima, kao i najveću energiju među energetskim dodacima koji se koriste kao dodaci za eksplozive, barute i kompozitna raketna goriva. Prikazani su neki sastavi na bazi CL-20, energetskih polimera, aluminijuma i amonijumperhlorata, kao i gustine i brzine njihove detonacije. / The new compound CL-20, a cyclic nitramine with the highest crystal density (over 2.0 g/cm3, is the most powerful non-nuclear explosive. The three-step synthesis of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW or CL-20 has been described. The CL-20 has the highest density and the highest detonation velocity among existing explosives as well as the highest energy among existing energetic ingredients for explosives, gun propellants and rocket propellants. Same explosive formulations based on the CL-20, energetic polymers, aluminium and ammoniumperchlorate are presented. Their densities and detonation velocities are also presented.

  19. A novel approach to derive halo-independent limits on dark matter properties

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer, Francesc; Ibarra, Alejandro; Wild, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method that allows to place an upper limit on the dark matter elastic scattering cross section with nucleons which is independent of the velocity distribution. Our approach combines null results from direct detection experiments with indirect searches at neutrino telescopes, and goes beyond previous attempts to remove astrophysical uncertainties in that it directly constrains the particle physics properties of the dark matter. The resulting halo-independent upper limits on the sc...

  20. Investigation of the reaction 35Cl(τ, α)34Cl at Eτ = 15 MeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasteren, J.J.M. van; Sikora, B.; Steld, A. van der

    1974-01-01

    The 35Cl(τ, α)34C reaction has been used to study the properties of 34Cl levels up to an excitation energy of 5 MeV. Angular distributions of 37 levels were measured with a split-pole magnetic spectrograph, at a bombarding energy of 15 MeV. New levels have been found at 3847, 3964, 4206, 4321 and

  1. Short-pulse CO2-laser damage studies of NaCl and KCl windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newnam, B.E.; Nowak, A.V.; Gill, D.H.

    1979-01-01

    The damage resistance of bare surfaces and the bulk interior of NaCl and KCl windows was measured with a short-pulse CO 2 laser at 10.6 μm. Parametric studies with 1.7-ns pulses indicated that adsorbed water was probably the limiting agent on surface thresholds in agreement with previous studies at long pulsewidths. Rear-surface thresholds up to 7 J/cm 2 were measured for polished NaCl windows, whereas KCl surfaces damaged at approximately 60% of this level. The breakdown electric-field thresholds of exit surfaces were only 50% of the value of the bulk materials. The pulsewidth dependence of surface damage from 1 to 65 ns, in terms of incident laser fluence, increased as t/sup 1/3/

  2. Upper limit to the deuterium abundance and a measurement of the pickering-β line in the low excitation planetary IC 418

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Vaux, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of detecting a weak spectrum line, deuterium alpha, very near in wavelength to H/sub alpha/, assumed to be thousands of times as strong, is discussed from the point of view of optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio. A spectrometer consisting of three pressure scanning Fabry-Perot etalons with low reflectivity coatings was found to be the best instrument for this experiment. While no feature attributable to deuterium was detected in the planetary nebula IC 418, an upper limit relative to hydrogen of 3.4 x 10 -5 was established at the 95% confidence level. The significance of this result is discussed in light of the role played by deuterium in cosmology. The intensity ratio of the Pickering beta line (n'' = 6, n' = 4 transition of ionized helium) relative to H/sub alpha/ was measured to be 6.5 x 10 -5 . Observations of the nebular continuum made at five wavelengths in the red and near infrared are summarized and compared with predicted intensities

  3. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg -> H -> W^+W^- and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Dubna, JINR /Oklahoma U. /Michigan State U. /Tata Inst. /Illinois U., Chicago /Florida State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /St. Petersburg, INP /Illinois U., Urbana /Sao Paulo, IFT /Munich U. /University Coll. London /Oxford U. /St. Petersburg, INP /Duke U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Chonnam Natl. U. /Florida U. /Osaka City U.

    2010-05-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.o6 TeV. With 4.8 fb{sup -1} of itnegrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% Confidence Level upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.75 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.38 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.83 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, they exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 131 and 204 Gev.

  4. A mass spectrometric study of the neutral and ionic vapor components of ytterbium chlorides; formation enthalpies of YbCl2 and YbCl3 molecules, and YbCl3- and YbCl4- ions in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, F.Yh.; Kudin, L.S.; Pogrebnoj, A.M.; Butman, M.F.; Burdukovskaya, G.G.

    1997-01-01

    Ionic and neutral components of saturated vapour over the ytterbium di-and trichloride is studied through the Knudsen effusive method with mass-spectromic registration of evaporated products within the temperature range of 1000-1300 K. It is found that ytterbium trichloride is subjected to thermal decomposition with formation of ytterbium dichloride and molecular chloride. Sublimation enthalpy and enthalpy of YbCl 2 and YbCl 3 molecules formation in a gaseous phase at 298 K, comprising 356±6, 293±8, -425±6 and -667±6 kJ/mole correspondingly, are determined with application of 2 and 3 thermodynamical laws. Enthalpies of YbCl 3 - and YbCl 4 - negative ions formation in a gaseous phase at 298 K equal to -895 and -1211±30 kJ/mole correspondingly are calculated by measured equilibrium constants ion-molecular reaction. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  5. CT arteriography of the upper abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasuo, K; Matsuura, K; Baba, H; Numaguchi, Y; Komaki, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1980-04-01

    The technique of CT arteriography was introduced, and CT images of the upper abdomen were explained. Very clear enhancement of parenchyma and vessels (especially portal vein) of the object organs could be obtained by CT arteriography of the upper abdomen, anatomical structures of organs were identified more easily by CT arteriography than by conventional CT, and the amount of information obtained was increased by using CT arteriography. However, the indication of CT arteriography must be limited, because of its complexity that CT arteriography is performed after angiography and involves the invasion of patients' bodies. As described in many reports, CT arteriography is useful for malignant tumors of the liver, and it is worthwhile, especially when surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma is considered. CT arteriography for organs except the liver has not been discussed sufficiently. Therefore, an application of this method for other organs must be decided after consideration of the balance of the amount of information obtained by CT arteriography with invasion to patients.

  6. Fundamental limitations on V/STOL terminal guidance due to aircraft characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkovitch, J.; Lamont, C. W.; Lochtie, D. W.

    1971-01-01

    A review is given of limitations on approach flight paths of V/STOL aircraft, including limits on descent angle due to maximum drag/lift ratio. A method of calculating maximum drag/lift ratio of tilt-wing and deflected slipstream aircraft is presented. Derivatives and transfer functions for the CL-84 tilt-wing and X-22A tilt-duct aircraft are presented. For the unaugmented CL-84 in steep descents the transfer function relating descent angle to thrust contains a right-half plane zero. Using optimal control theory, it is shown that this zero causes a serious degradation in the accuracy with which steep flight paths can be followed in the presence of gusts.

  7. Factors Effecting the Fate and Transport of CL-20 in the Vadose Zone and Groundwater: Final Report 2002 - 2004 SERDP Project CP-1255

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Riley, Robert G.; Devary, Brooks J.; Girvin, Donald C.; Resch, Charles T.; Campbell, James A.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Thompson, Karen T.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Qasim, Mohammad M.; Gamerdinger, Amy P.; Lemond, Luke A.

    2005-06-01

    This SERDP-funded project was initiated to investigate the fate of CL-20 in the subsurface environment, with a focus on identification and quantification of geochemical and microbial reactions of CL-20. CL-20 can be released to the surface and subsurface terrestrial environment by: a) manufacturing processes, b) munition storage, and c) use with low order detonation or unexploded ordnance. The risk of far-field subsurface migration was assessed through labora-tory experiments with a variety of sediments and subsurface materials to quantify processes that control CL-20 sorption-limited migration and degradation. Results of this study show that CL-20 will exhibit differing behavior in the subsurface terrestrial environment: 1. CL-20 on the sediment surface will photodegrade and interact with plants/animals (described in other SERDP projects CU 1254, 1256). CL-20 will exhibit greater sorption in humid sediments to organic matter. Transport will be solubility limited (i.e., low CL-20 aqueous solubility). 2. CL-20 infiltration into soils (<2 m) from spills will be subject to sorption to soil organic matter (if present), and low to high biodegradation rates (weeks to years) depending on the microbial population (greater in humid environment). 3. CL-20 in the vadose zone (>2 m) will be, in most cases, subject to low sorption and low degradation rates, so would persist in the subsurface environment and be at risk for deep migration. Low water content in arid regions will result in a decrease in both sorption and the degradation rate. Measured degradation rates in unsaturated sediments of years would result in significant subsurface migration distances. 4. CL-20 in groundwater will be subject to some sorption but likely very slow degradation rates. CL-20 sorption will be greater than RDX. Most CL-20 degradation will be abiotic (ferrous iron and other transition metals), because most deep subsurface systems have extremely low natural microbial populations. Degradation rates

  8. Human ClC-6 is a late endosomal glycoprotein that associates with detergent-resistant lipid domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Ignoul

    and ClC-7 when cotransfected in COS-1 cells. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that human ClC-6 is an endosomal glycoprotein that partitions in detergent resistant lipid domains. The differential sorting of endogenous (late endosomal versus overexpressed (early and recycling endosomal ClC-6 is reminiscent of that of other late endosomal/lysosomal membrane proteins (e.g. LIMP II, and is consistent with a rate-limiting sorting step for ClC-6 between early endosomes and its final destination in late endosomes.

  9. Crystal Structure of Na3MoCl6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Beran

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The ternary chloride Na3MoCl6 is obtained as red crystals from a disproportionation reaction of molybdenum dichloride, {Mo6}Cl12, in an acidic NaCl/AlCl3 melt at 350 °C. The crystal structure (trigonal, P-31c, a = 687.1(1, c = 1225.3(2 pm, Z = 2, V = 501,0(1 106 pm3 is that of Na3CrCl6: within a hexagonal closest-packing of chloride ions two thirds of the octahedral voids are filled between the AB double layers with Na+/Mo3+, and between the BA layers with Na+.

  10. Oncoplastic Surgery for Upper/Upper Inner Quadrant Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Joseph; Chen, Dar-Ren; Wang, Yu-Fen; Lai, Hung-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Tumors located in the upper/upper inner quadrant of the breast warrant more attention. A small lesion relative to the size of breast in this location may be resolved by performing a level I oncoplastic technique. However, a wide excision may significantly reduce the overall quality of the breast shape by distorting the visible breast line. From June 2012 to April 2015, 36 patients with breast cancer located in the upper/upper inner quadrant underwent breast-conservation surgery with matrix rotation mammoplasty. According to the size and location of the tumor relative to the nipple-areola complex, 11 patients underwent matrix rotation with periareolar de-epithelialization (donut group) and the other 25 underwent matrix rotation only (non-donut group). The cosmetic results were self-assessed by questionnaires. The average weights of the excised breast lumps in the donut and non-donut groups were 104.1 and 84.5 g, respectively. During the 3-year follow-up period, local recurrence was observed in one case and was managed with nipple-sparing mastectomy followed by breast reconstruction with prosthetic implants. In total, 31 patients (88.6%) ranked their postoperative result as either acceptable or satisfactory. The treated breasts were also self-evaluated by 27 patients (77.1%) to be nearly identical to or just slightly different from the untreated side. Matrix rotation is an easy breast-preserving technique for treating breast cancer located in the upper/upper inner quadrant of the breast that requires a relatively wide excision. With this technique, a larger breast tumor could be removed without compromising the breast appearance.

  11. A summary of the low upper shelf toughness safety margin issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The low upper shelf toughness issue has a long history, beginning with the choice of materials for the submerged arc welding process, but also potentially involving the use of A302-B plate. Criteria for vessels containing low upper shelf materials have usually been expressed in terms of the Charpy upper shelf impact energy. Although these criteria have had several different bases, the range of limiting values for wall thicknesses approaching 229 mm (9 in.) has remained between 54 to 68J (40 to 50 ft lbs). Allowable values for vessels with thinner walls and/or only circumferential low upper shelf welds might conceivably be less. A decision on criteria to be incorporated into the ASME Code is now being made. Choices to be made concern the method for estimating the decrease in upper shelf impact energy, flaw geometry for circumferential welds, statistical significance of toughness values, the choice between J D and J M , reference pressure, safety factors and the inclusion of tearing stability calculations by means of R curve extrapolation. NRC research programs have contributed significantly to the resolution of the low upper shelf issue. These programs embrace all aspects of the issue, including material characterization, large scale testing, analysis and criteria development. 52 refs., 5 figs

  12. AcEST: CL1889Contig1 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CL1889Contig1 491 2 Adiantum capillus-veneris contig: CL1889contig1 sequence. Link ...apillus-veneris contig: CL1889contig1 sequence. Link to clone list Link to clone list Clone ID BP919609 BP91

  13. No solid solution compounds in between the binaries. Syntheses and crystal structures of Nb(Br{sub 0.62(4)}Cl{sub 0.38(4)}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and NbI{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reckeweg, Olaf; Schleid, Thomas [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    2018-04-01

    The anion-mixed niobium tetrahalides Nb(Br{sub 0.62(4)}Cl{sub 0.38(4)}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and NbI{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} were obtained by heating NbBr{sub 5} with NbCl{sub 5} and NbI{sub 5} with NbCl{sub 5}, respectively, in equimolar ratios with niobium metal in evacuated, torch-sealed silica ampoules at 720 K for 3 days. The orthorhombic title compounds form as very brittle black needles and were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction [space group: Immm, Z=4; a=704.27(6), b=824.13(7), c=929.64(8) pm for Nb(Br{sub 0.62(4)}Cl{sub 0.38(4)}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and a=753.76(6), b=829.38(7) and c=983.41(8) pm for NbI{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}]. Surprisingly enough, these mixed-anionic halides are not isostructural with either NbCl{sub 4}, NbBr{sub 4} or NbI{sub 4}, but crystallize isotypically with TaI{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, thus being examples for differential site occupancy stabilized materials. Structural features of other niobium(IV) halides are compiled and compared to those of Nb(Br{sub 0.62(4)}Cl{sub 0.38(4)}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and NbI{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Except for NbF{sub 4}, they all exhibit chains of trans-edge connected [NbX{sub 6}]{sup 2-} octahedra, which allow Peierls distortions to form Nb-Nb single bonds. The packing of these chains differ, however, depending on the actual halide or mixed-halide combination.

  14. Upper Bound Solution for the Face Stability of Shield Tunnel below the Water Table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xilin Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By FE simulation with Mohr-Coulomb perfect elastoplasticity model, the relationship between the support pressure and displacement of the shield tunnel face was obtained. According to the plastic strain distribution at collapse state, an appropriate failure mechanism was proposed for upper bound limit analysis, and the formula to calculate the limit support pressure was deduced. The limit support pressure was rearranged to be the summation of soil cohesion c, surcharge load q, and soil gravity γ multiplied by their corresponding coefficients Nc, Nq, and Nγ, and parametric studies were carried out on these coefficients. In order to consider the influence of seepage on the face stability, the pore water pressure distribution and the seepage force on the tunnel face were obtained by FE simulation. After adding the power of seepage force into the equation of the upper bound limit analysis, the total limit support pressure for stabilizing the tunnel face under seepage condition was obtained. The total limit support pressure was shown to increase almost linearly with the water table.

  15. Thermodynamics of HfCl4-KCl molten mixtures containing HfCl4 up to 33.3 mol. per cent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, M.V.; Salyulev, A.B.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    Based on measurements of saturated vapour pressure in components of melted mixtures of HfCl 4 -KCl, depending on temperature and concentration, calculated are the results of changes in activity coefficients of hafnium tetrachloride and potassium chloride on transition from diluted solutions, where the Henry law is met, to those concentrated where the law is disobeyed. Growth in the activity coefficient of HfCl 4 is due to dissociation of complex groups of HfCl 6 2- into complexes with a lesser number of ligands and decreasing relative binding energy of Hf 4+ -Cl - there. In this case, marked changes take place in partial enthalpy and entropy of hafnium tetrachloride mixing. Similar dependences are observed for potassium chloride, but they are expressed considerably weaker. Evaporation enthalpy and entropy are calculated for HfCl 4 and KCl monomers from their melted mixtures of various concentrations

  16. Search for single top-quark production via flavour changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro