WorldWideScience

Sample records for cl supplkment au

  1. The crystal structure of TeCl3+AuCl4-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.G.; Jentsch, D.; Schwarzmann, E.

    1986-01-01

    TeCl 3 + AuCl 4 - crystallizes in the triclinic space group Panti 1 with a=7.564(2), b=7.720(3), c=8.964(3) A, α=78.26(3), β=88.84(3), γ=89.35(3) 0 , Z=2. The structure was refined to R 0.041 for 1380 reflections. The cation polyhedron, including secondary Te...Cl interactions, is a square pyramid with mean Te-Cl 2.294, Te...Cl 3.028 A. The secondary interactions link the ions to form centrosymmetric (TeCl 3 .AuCl 4 ) 2 dimers. (orig.)

  2. Origin of the p-type character of AuCl3 functionalized carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Murat, Altynbek

    2014-02-13

    The microscopic origin of the p-type character of AuCl3 functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated using first-principles self-interaction corrected density functional theory (DFT). Recent DFT calculations suggest that the p-type character of AuCl3 functionalized CNTs is due to the Cl atoms adsorbed on the CNTs. We test this hypothesis and show that adsorbed Cl atoms only lead to a p-type character for very specific concentrations and arrangements of the Cl atoms, which furthermore are not the lowest energy configurations. We therefore investigate alternative mechanisms and conclude that the p-type character is due to the adsorption of AuCl4 molecules. The unraveling of the exact nature of the p-doping adsorbates is a key step for further development of AuCl3 functionalized CNTs in water sensor applications. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  3. Mechanism of H2O-Induced Conductance Changes in AuCl4-Functionalized CNTs

    KAUST Repository

    Murat, Altynbek

    2015-04-30

    We employ ab initio self-interaction corrected density functional theory combined with the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method to study the electronic and quantum transport properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with AuCl4 molecules. In particular, we investigate the electronic structure and characterize the conductance for different concentrations and configurations of randomly distributed AuCl4 molecules with and without the adsorption of H2O. We thus propose a mechanism that explains the origin of the recently observed resistivity changes of AuCl4-functionalized CNTs upon H2O adsorption. We find that water adsorption shifts the highest occupied Cl and Au states down in energy and thereby reduces the scattering of the electrons around the Fermi energy, hence enhancing the conductivity. Our results help in the development of highly sensitive nanoscale H2O vapor sensors based on AuCl4-functionalized CNTs. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  4. Influence of gold species (AuCl4(-) and AuCl2(-)) on self-assembly of PS-b-P2VP in solutions and morphology of composite thin films fabricated at the air/liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingjuan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xiaokai; Lee, Yong-Ill; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2016-01-21

    Composite thin films doped with Au species were fabricated at an air/liquid interface via a series of steps, including the mass transfer of polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) across the liquid/liquid interface between a DMF/CHCl3 solution and an aqueous solution containing either AuCl4(-) or AuCl2(-), self-assembly of PS-b-P2VP in a mixed DMF-water solution, and adsorption and further self-organization of the formed aggregates at the air/liquid interface. This is a new approach for fabricating composite polymer films and can be completed within a very short time. AuCl4(-) and AuCl2(-) ions were found to significantly influence the self-assembly behavior of the block copolymer and the morphologies of the composite films, leading to the formation of nanowire arrays and a foam structure at the air/liquid interface, respectively, which originated from rod-like micelles and microcapsules that had formed in the respective solutions. The effect of the metal complex was analyzed based on the packing parameters of the amphiphilic polymer molecules in different microenvironments and the interactions between the pyridine groups and the metal chloride anions. In addition, these composite thin films exhibited stable and durable performance as heterogeneous catalysts for the hydrogenation of nitroaromatics in aqueous solutions.

  5. Electrocrystallization of Au nanoparticles on glassy carbon from HClO4 solution containing [AuCl4]-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komsiyska, L.; Staikov, G.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of electrocrystallization of Au nanoparticles on glassy carbon (GC) were investigated in the system GC/1 mM KAuCl 4 + 0.1 M HClO 4 . Experimental results show that the gold electrodeposition follows the so-called Volmer-Weber growth mechanism involving formation and growth of 3D Au nanoparticles on an unmodified GC substrate. The analysis of current transients shows that at relatively positive electrode potentials (E ≥ 0.84 V) the deposition kinetics corresponds to the theoretical model for progressive nucleation and diffusion-controlled 3D growth of Au nanoparticles. The potential dependence of the nucleation rate extracted from the current transients is in agreement with the atomistic theory of nucleation. At sufficiently negative electrode potentials (E ≤ 0.64 V) the nucleation frequency becomes very high and the nucleation occurs instantaneously. Based on this behaviour is applied a potentiostatic double-pulse routine, which allows controlled electrodeposition of Au nanoparticles with a relatively narrow size distribution

  6. Genome Wide Transcriptome Analysis reveals ABA mediated response in Arabidopsis during Gold (AuCl4- treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh eShukla

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The unique physico-chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs find manifold applications in diagnostics, medicine and catalysis. Chemical synthesis produces reactive AuNPs and generates hazardous by-products. Alternatively, plants can be utilized to produce AuNPs in an eco-friendly manner. To better control the biosynthesis of AuNPs, we need to first understand the detailed molecular response induced by AuCl4- In this study, we carried out global transcriptome analysis in root tissue of Arabidopsis grown for 12- hours in presence of gold solution (HAuCl4 using the novel unbiased Affymetrix exon array. Transcriptomics analysis revealed differential regulation of a total of 704 genes and 4900 exons. Of these, 492 and 212 genes were up- and downregulated, respectively. The validation of the expressed key genes, such as glutathione-S-transferases, auxin responsive genes, cytochrome P450 82C2, methyl transferases, transducin (G protein beta subunit, ERF transcription factor, ABC, and MATE transporters, was carried out through quantitative RT-PCR. These key genes demonstrated specific induction under AuCl4- treatment relative to other heavy metals, suggesting a unique plant-gold interaction. GO enrichment analysis reveals the upregulation of processes like oxidative stress, glutathione binding, metal binding, transport, and plant hormonal responses. Changes predicted in biochemical pathways indicated major modulation in glutathione mediated detoxification, flavones and derivatives, and plant hormone biosynthesis. Motif search analysis identified a highly significant enriched motif, ACGT, which is an abscisic acid responsive core element (ABRE, suggesting the possibility of ABA- mediated signaling. Identification of abscisic acid response element (ABRE points to the operation of a predominant signaling mechanism in response to AuCl4- exposure. Overall, this study presents a useful picture of plant-gold interaction with an identification of

  7. Origin of the p-type character of AuCl3 functionalized carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Murat, Altynbek; Rungger, Ivan; Jin, Chengjun; Sanvito, Stefano; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic origin of the p-type character of AuCl3 functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated using first-principles self-interaction corrected density functional theory (DFT). Recent DFT calculations suggest that the p

  8. Gold chloride clusters with Au(III) and Au(I) probed by FT-ICR mass spectrometry and MP2 theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Kono H

    2014-05-07

    Microsolvated clusters of gold chloride are probed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and scalar relativistic electronic structure calculations. Electrospray ionization of aqueous AuCl3 leads to mononuclear clusters of types [AuCl2](+)(H2O)n (n = 0-4), [AuOHCl](+)(H2O)n (n = 0-1) and [AuCl2](+)(HCl)2(H2O)n (n = 0-4). In addition, strong ion signals due to dinuclear [Au2Cl5-xOHx](+)(H2O)n (x = 0-1) are present in ESI mass spectra of aqueous AuCl3, with the abundance of individual dinuclear species controlled by the concentration-dependent variation of the precursor complexes [AuCl2-xOHx](+)(H2O)n and AuCl3. Equilibrium structures, energies and thermodynamic properties of mono- and dinuclear gold clusters have been predicted using MP2 and CCSD(T) theory, and these data have been applied to examine the influence of microsolvation on cluster stability. Specifically, results from CCSD(T) calculations indicate that non-covalently bound ion-neutral complexes Au(+)(Cl2)(H2O)n, with formal Au(I), are the dominant forms of mononuclear gold with n = 0-2, while higher hydrates (n > 2) are covalently bound [AuCl2](+)(H2O)n complexes in which gold exists as Au(III). MP2 calculations show that the lowest energy structure of dinuclear gold is an ion-molecule cluster [Au2Cl(Cl2)2](+) consisting of a single-bridged digold-chloronium ion bound end-on to two dichlorine ligands, with two higher energy isomers, single-bridged [Au2Cl3(Cl2)](+) and double-bridged [Au2Cl5](+) clusters. Finally, AuAu interactions in the singly-bridged clusters [Au2Cl(Cl2)2](+)(H2O)n and [Au2Cl3(Cl2)](+)(H2O)n are examined employing a wide range of computational tools, including natural bond order (NBO) analysis and localized orbital locator (LOL) profiles.

  9. NaNO3/NaCl Oxidant and Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) Capped Gold Nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a Novel Green Route for AuNPs Detection in Electrochemical Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Marzo, Adaris M; Hoyos-de-la-Torre, Raquel; Baldrich, Eva

    2018-03-20

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been exploited as signal-producing tags in electrochemical biosensors. However, the electrochemical detection of AuNPs is currently performed using corrosive acid solutions, which may raise health and environmental concerns. Here, oxidant salts, and specifically the environmentally friendly and occupational safe NaNO 3 /NaCl mixture, have been evaluated for the first time as potential alternatives to the acid solutions traditionally used for AuNPs electrooxidation. In addition, a new strategy to improve the sensitivity of the biosensor through PEG-based ligand exchange to produce less compact and easier to oxidize AuNPs immunoconjugates is presented too. As we show, the electrochemical immunosensor using NaNO 3 /NaCl measurement solution for AuNPs electrooxidation and detection, coupled to the employment of PEG-capped nanoimmunoconjugates, produced results comparable to classical HCl detection. The procedure developed was next tested for human matrix metallopeptidase-9 (hMMP9) analysis, exhibiting a 0.18-23 ng/mL linear range, a detection limit of 0.06 ng/mL, and recoveries between 95 and 105% in spiked human plasma. These results show that the procedure developed is applicable to the analysis of protein biomarkers in blood plasma and could contribute to the development of more environmentally friendly AuNP-based electrochemical biosensors.

  10. Gold(I) Complexes with N-Donor Ligands. 2.(1) Reactions of Ammonium Salts with [Au(acac-kappaC(2))(PR(3))] To Give [Au(NH(3))L](+), [(AuL)(2)(&mgr;(2)-NH(2))](+), [(AuL)(4)(&mgr;(4)-N)](+), or [(AuL)(3)(&mgr;(3)-O)](+). A New and Facile Synthesis of [Au(NH(3))(2)](+) Salts. Crystal Structure of [{AuP(C(6)H(4)OMe-4)(3)}(3)(&mgr;(3)-O)]CF(3)SO(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, José; Chicote, María-Teresa; Guerrero, Rita; Jones, Peter G.; Ramírez De Arellano, M. Carmen

    1997-09-24

    The complexes [Au(acac-kappaC(2))(PR(3))] (acac = acetylacetonate, R = Ph, C(6)H(4)OMe-4) react with (NH(4))ClO(4) to give amminegold(I), [Au(NH(3))(PR(3))]ClO(4), amidogold(I), [(AuPR(3))(2)(&mgr;(2)-NH(2))]ClO(4), or nitridogold(I), [(AuPR(3))(4)(&mgr;(4)-N)]ClO(4), complexes, depending on the reaction conditions. Similarly, [Au(acac-kappaC(2))(PPh(3))] reacts with (NH(3)R')OTf (OTf = CF(3)SO(3)) (1:1) or with [H(3)N(CH(2))(2)NH(2)]OTf (1:1) to give (amine)gold(I) complexes [Au(NH(2)R')(PPh(3))]OTf (R' = Me, C(6)H(4)NO(2)-4) or [(AuPPh(3))(2){&mgr;(2)-H(2)N(CH(2))(2)NH(2)}](OTf)(2), respectively. The ammonium salts (NH(2)R'(2))OTf (R' = Et, Ph) react with [Au(acac-kappaC(2))(PR(3))] (R = Ph, C(6)H(4)OMe-4) (1:2) to give, after hydrolysis, the oxonium salts [(AuPR(3))(3)(&mgr;(3)-O)]OTf (R = Ph, C(6)H(4)OMe-4). When NH(3) is bubbled through a solution of [AuCl(tht)] (tht = tetrahydrothiophene), the complex [Au(NH(3))(2)]Cl precipitates. Addition of [Au(NH(3))(2)]Cl to a solution of AgClO(4) or TlOTf leads to the isolation of [Au(NH(3))(2)]ClO(4) or [Au(NH(3))(2)]OTf, respectively. The crystal structure of [(AuPR(3))(3)(&mgr;(3)-O)]OTf.Me(2)CO (R = C(6)H(4)OMe-4) has been determined: triclinic, space group P&onemacr;, a = 14.884(3) Å, b = 15.828(3) Å, c = 16.061(3) Å, alpha = 83.39(3) degrees, beta = 86.28(3) degrees, gamma = 65.54(3) degrees, R1 (wR2) = 0.0370 (0.0788). The [(AuPR(3))(3)(&mgr;(3)-O)](+) cation shows an essentially trigonal pyramidal array of three gold atoms and one oxygen atom with O-Au-P bond angles of ca. 175 degrees and Au.Au contacts in the range 2.9585(7)-3.0505(14) Å. These cations are linked into centrosymmetric dimers through two short Au.Au [2.9585(7), 3.0919(9) Å] contacts. The gold atoms of the dimer form a six-membered ring with a chair conformation.

  11. Synthesis of axially chiral oxazoline-carbene ligands with an N-naphthyl framework and a study of their coordination with AuCl·SMe(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feijun; Li, Shengke; Qu, Mingliang; Zhao, Mei-Xin; Liu, Lian-Jun; Shi, Min

    2012-01-01

    Axially chiral oxazoline-carbene ligands with an N-naphthyl framework were successfully prepared, and their coordination behavior with AuCl·SMe(2) was also investigated, affording the corresponding Au(I) complexes in moderate to high yields.

  12. Exploring the Photoreduction of Au(III) Complexes in the Gas-Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Jesse C.; Kaufman, Sydney H.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2010-06-01

    We have used photodissociation spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure and photoreduction of Au(III) in gas-phase complexes containing Cl- and OH-. The gas-phase electronic spectrum of [AuCl_4]- closely resembles the aqueous solution spectrum, showing a lack of strong solvatochromic shifts. Substitution of Cl- ligands with OH- results in a strong blue shift, in agreement with ligand-field theory. Upon excitation, [AuCl_4]- can dissociate by loss of either one or two neutral Cl atoms, resulting in the reduction of gold from Au(III) to Au(II) and Au(I) respectively. The hydroxide substituted complex, [AuCl_2(OH)_2]-, demonstrates similar behavior but the only observable fragment channel is the loss of two neutral OH ligands, leading only to Au(I).

  13. Weak aurophilic interactions in a series of Au(III) double salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshev, Alexander N; Chernysheva, Maria V; Hirva, Pipsa; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu; Haukka, Matti

    2015-08-28

    In this work, several new examples of rare Au(III)Au(III) aurophilic contacts are reported. A series of gold(iii) double salts and complexes, viz. [AuX2(L)][AuX4] (L = 2,2'-bipyridyl, X = Cl , Br ; L = 2,2'-bipyrimidine, X = Cl , Br ; L = 2,2'-dipyridylamine, X = Cl , Br ), [AuX3(biq)] (biq = 2,2'-biquinoline, X = Cl , Br ), [LH][AuX4] (L = 2,2'-bipyridyl, X = Cl ; L = 2,2'-bipyrimidine, X = Cl ; L = 2,2'-dipyridylamine, X = Cl , Br ; L = 2,2'-biquinoline, X = Cl , Br ), [AuBr2(bpy)]2[AuBr4][AuBr2] , [AuCl2(bpm)][AuCl2] , (bpmH)2[AuBr4][AuBr2] , and (dpaH)[AuBr2] (, , and were reported earlier) was synthesized by coordination of a particular ligand to the Au(III) center and subsequent reduction of the formed product with acetone. Inspection of the X-ray structural data for , , and indicates that the Au(III) metal centers approach each other closer than the sum of their van der Waals radii, thus forming the aurophilic contacts, which were confirmed by topological charge density analysis according to the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM). In , , and , such contacts are located only between the metal centers of the ion pair, whereas in , the aurophilic interactions form the cation-anion-anion array, and in , the aurophilicity exists between the gold atoms of the cations. It was also demonstrated that the interatomic distance alone is not a reliable measure of the aurophilic interactions, at least at the weakest limit of the interaction strength, and it needs to be complemented with structural analysis of the whole molecule and computational results.

  14. The solubility of Pd and Au in hydrous intermediate silicate melts: The effect of oxygen fugacity and the addition of Cl and S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Neal A.; Zajacz, Zoltan; Brenan, James M.

    2018-06-01

    The solubilities of Pd and Au in a hydrous trachyandesitic melt were experimentally determined at 1000 °C and 200 MPa at oxygen fugacity (ƒO2) from 0.45 log units below to 6.55 log units above the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO). The effect of adding metal-binding ligands (i.e. Cl and S) to the silicate melt was also studied. The solubility of Au increases from 0.15 ± 0.1 to 3.85 ± 1.48 ppm in Cl- and S-free melts with ƒO2 increasing from NNO-0.45 to NNO+6.55 with a slope that suggests that it is present in 1+ oxidation state over the entire studied ƒO2 range. On the other hand, Pd solubility, shows a more moderate increase with ƒO2, especially in the lower half of the studied range, increasing from 2.66 ± 0.25 ppm at NNO-0.45 to only 3.62 ± 0.38 ppm at NNO+1.72 in Cl- and S-free melts. Overall, the variation in Pd solubility as a function of ƒO2 indicates Pd being dissolved in the silicate melt in both zero and 1+ oxidation state, with the former being dominant below NNO+4.5. At NNO-0.45 to +3.48, the addition of 3170-4060 ppm Cl to the silicate melt increased the solubility of Au by an average factor of 1.5, in comparison to Cl-free melts. However, at NNO+6.55, Au solubility increased by a factor of 2.5. The addition of Cl had a negligible effect on the solubility of Pd except for a large increase (factor of 2.4) at NNO+6.55. At reducing conditions (NNO-0.45), the addition of 170 ppm S to the silicate melt increased the solubility of Au by a factor of ∼4 but did not change the solubility of Pd in comparison to S-free melts. The observation that Pd is dominantly present as Pd0 at NNO one may expect similar behavior in fluids degassing from magmas at depth, the lack of oxidized Pd species could be an important factor behind the scarcity of economically viable Pd-rich magmatic-hydrothermal deposits observed in nature.

  15. The effect of Au amount on size uniformity of self-assembled Au nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S-H; Wang, D-C; Chen, G-Y; Chen, K-Y [Graduate School of Engineering Science and Technology, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China)

    2008-03-15

    The self-assembled fabrication of nanostructure, a dreaming approach in the area of fabrication engineering, is the ultimate goal of this research. A finding was proved through previous research that the size of the self-assembled gold nanoparticles could be controlled with the mole ratio between AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} and thiol. In this study, the moles of Au were fixed, only the moles of thiol were adjusted. Five different mole ratios of Au/S with their effect on size uniformity were investigated. The mole ratios were 1:1/16, 1:1/8, 1:1, 1:8, 1:16, respectively. The size distributions of the gold nanoparticles were analyzed by Mac-View analysis software. HR-TEM was used to derive images of self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The result reached was also the higher the mole ratio between AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} and thiol the bigger the self-assembled gold nanoparticles. Under the condition of moles of Au fixed, the most homogeneous nanoparticles in size distribution derived with the mole ratio of 1:1/8 between AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} and thiol. The obtained nanoparticles could be used, for example, in uniform surface nanofabrication, leading to the fabrication of ordered array of quantum dots.

  16. Cluster-to-cluster transformation among Au6, Au8 and Au11 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiuqing; Fu, Junhong; Lin, Xinzhang; Fu, Xuemei; Yan, Jinghui; Wu, Ren'an; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jiahui

    2018-05-22

    We present the cluster-to-cluster transformations among three gold nanoclusters, [Au6(dppp)4]2+ (Au6), [Au8(dppp)4Cl2]2+ (Au8) and [Au11(dppp)5]3+ (Au11). The conversion process follows a rule that states that the transformation of a small cluster to a large cluster is achieved through an oxidation process with an oxidizing agent (H2O2) or with heating, while the conversion of a large cluster to a small one occurs through a reduction process with a reducing agent (NaBH4). All the reactions were monitored using UV-Vis spectroscopy and ESI-MS. This work may provide an alternative approach to the synthesis of novel gold nanoclusters and a further understanding of the structural transformation relationship of gold nanoclusters.

  17. Uptake of Au(III) Ions by Aluminum Hydroxide and Their Spontaneous Reduction to Elemental Gold (Au(0)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama; Matsukado; Uchida; Motomura; Watanabe; Izawa

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of AuCl(4)(-) ions during the formation of aluminum hydroxide at pH 6 was examined. With an increase in NaCl concentration, the content of gold taken up by aluminum hydroxide decreased, suggesting that chloro-hydroxy complexes of Au(III) ion were taken up due to the formation of Al-O-Au bonds. It was found unexpectedly that the Au(III) ions taken up were spontaneously reduced to elemental gold without addition of a specific reducing reagent and then colloidal gold particles were formed. The mechanisms for the uptake of Au(III) ions by aluminum hydroxide and for their spontaneous reduction are discussed. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. Synthesis of nir-sensitive Au-Au{sub 2}S nanocolloids for drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, L.; Chow, G.M

    2003-01-15

    Near IR (NIR) sensitive Au-Au{sub 2}S nanocolloids were prepared by mixing HAuCl{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S in aqueous solutions. An anti-tumor drug, cis-platin, was adsorbed onto Au-Au{sub 2}S nanoparticle surface via the 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) layers. The results show that the degree of adsorption of cis-platin onto Au-Au{sub 2}S nanoparticles was controlled by the solution pH value, and the drug release was sensitive to near-infrared irradiation. The cis-platin-loaded Au-Au{sub 2}S nanocolloids can be potentially applied as NIR activated drug delivery carrier.

  19. Fabrication of Pt/Au concentric spheres from triblock copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Haeng-Deog; Park, Soojin; Russell, Thomas P

    2010-02-23

    Dispersion of an aqueous H(2)PtCl(6) solution into a trifluorotoluene (TFT) solution of a polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO) triblock copolymer produced an emulsion-induced hollow micelle (EIHM), comprising a water nanodroplet stabilized by PEO, H(2)PtCl(6)/P2VP, and PS, sequentially. The following addition of an aqueous LiAuCl(4) solution into the dispersion led to a coordination of LiAuCl(4) and PEO. The resulting spherical EIHM structure was transformed to a hollow cylindrical micelle by the fusion of spherical EIHM with the addition of methanol. This structural transition was reversible by the alternative addition of methanol and TFT. Oxygen plasma was used to generate Pt/Au concentric spheres and hollow cylindrical Pt/Au nano-objects.

  20. A spectrophotometric study of aqueous Au(III) halide-hydroxide complexes at 25-80 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Al; McPhail, D. C.; Brugger, Joël

    2009-06-01

    The mobility and transport of gold in low-temperature waters and brines is affected by the aqueous speciation of gold, which is sensitive in particular to pH, oxidation and halide concentrations. In this study, we use UV-Vis spectrophotometry to identify and measure the thermodynamic properties of Au(III) aqueous complexes with chloride, bromide and hydroxide. Au(III) forms stable square planar complexes with hydroxide and halide ligands. Based on systematic changes in the absorption spectra of solutions in three binary systems NaCl-NaBr, NaCl-NaOH and NaBr-NaOH at 25 °C, we derived log dissociation constants for the following mixed and end-member halide and hydroxide complexes: [AuCl 3Br] -, [AuCl 2Br 2] -, [AuBr 3Cl] - and [AuBr 4] -; [AuCl 3(OH)] -, [AuCl 2(OH) 2] -, [AuCl(OH) 3] - and [Au(OH) 4] -; and [AuBr 3(OH)] -, [AuBr 2(OH) 2] - and [AuBr(OH) 3] -. These are the first reported results for the mixed chloride-bromide complexes. Increasing temperature to 80 °C resulted in an increase in the stability of the mixed chloride-bromide complexes, relative to the end-member chloride and bromide complexes. For the [AuCl (4-n)(OH) n] - series of complexes ( n = 0-4), there is an excellent agreement between our spectrophotometric results and previous electrochemical results of Chateau et al. [Chateau et al. (1966)]. In other experiments, the iodide ion (I -) was found to be unstable in the presence of Au(III), oxidizing rapidly to I 2(g) and causing Au to precipitate. Predicted Au(III) speciation indicates that Au(III) chloride-bromide complexes can be important in transporting gold in brines with high bromide-chloride ratios (e.g., >0.05), under oxidizing (atmospheric), acidic (pH < 5) conditions. Native gold solubility under atmospheric oxygen conditions is predicted to increase with decreasing pH in acidic conditions, increasing pH in alkaline conditions, increasing chloride, especially at acid pH, and increasing bromide for bromide/chloride ratios greater than 0

  1. Determination of Au, Sb, As, Br, Na, K, Cd, Mn and Cl in rice from Vietnam by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Van, L.; Teherani, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    Gold, antimony, arsenic, bromine, sodium, potassium, cadmium, manganese and chlorine were determined by neutron activation analysis in various rice seed, brand layer and husk samples from Vietnam. The following concentration values were found: Au 0.05-0.28 ppm, Sb 0.05-1.08 ppm, As 0.08-0.94 ppm, Br 0.82-6.72 ppm, Na 16.71-25.71 ppm, K 2582-5163 ppm, Mn 19.26-33.43 ppm, Cd 0.51-2.42 ppm and Cl 205.20-828.61 ppm in rice seed. Statistically significant differences in Au, Sb, Cd contents were detected in rice seed and husk, as well as brand layer and husk. (author) 8 refs.; 3 figs

  2. Green synthesis and characterization of Au@Pt core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles using gallic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojun; Zheng, Hongmei; Shen, Ming; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiaosan

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we developed a facile and benign green synthesis approach for the successful fabrication of well-dispersed urchin-like Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) using gallic acid (GA) as both a reducing and protecting agent. The proposed one-step synthesis exploits the differences in the reduction potentials of AuCl4- and PtCl62-, where the AuCl4- ions are preferentially reduced to Au cores and the PtCl62- ions are then deposited continuously onto the Au core surface as a Pt shell. The as-prepared Au@Pt NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM); high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM); scanning electron microscope (SEM); UV-vis absorption spectra (UV-vis); X-ray diffraction (XRD); Fourier transmission infrared spectra (FT-IR). We systematically investigated the effects of some experimental parameters on the formation of the Au@Pt NPs, i.e., the reaction temperature, the molar ratios of HAuCl4/H2PtCl6, and the amount of GA. When polyvinylpyrrolidone K-30 (PVP) was used as a protecting agent, the Au@Pt core-shell NPs obtained using this green synthesis method were better dispersed and smaller in size. The as-prepared Au@Pt NPs exhibited better catalytic activity in the reaction where NaBH4 reduced p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol. However, the results showed that the Au@Pt bimetallic NPs had a lower catalytic activity than the pure Au NPs obtained by the same method, which confirmed the formation of Au@Pt core-shell nanostructures because the active sites on the surfaces of the Au NPs were covered with a Pt shell.

  3. Expedient Syntheses of Neutral and Cationic Au(I)–NHC Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Veenboer, Richard M. P.

    2017-09-08

    The synthesis and isolation of gold(I) precatalysts often requires the generation of several isolable intermediates as well as numerous purification steps. New protocols for the expedient synthesis of neutral [Au(OH)(NHC)] and [Au(CH2COCH3)(NHC)] species from [AuCl(NHC)] or [AuCl(DMS)] precursors bearing a variety of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands are presented. These methods can be employed in a telescoping manner for the synthesis of catalytically relevant [Au(NTf2)(NHC)] and [Au(NHC)(NCCH3)][BF4] complexes. These attractive methods are straightforward and practical leading to various complexes in high isolated yields and purity.

  4. Expedient Syntheses of Neutral and Cationic Au(I)–NHC Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Veenboer, Richard M. P.; Gasperini, Danila; Nahra, Fady; Cordes, David B.; Slawin, Alexandra M. Z.; Cazin, Catherine S. J.; Nolan, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis and isolation of gold(I) precatalysts often requires the generation of several isolable intermediates as well as numerous purification steps. New protocols for the expedient synthesis of neutral [Au(OH)(NHC)] and [Au(CH2COCH3)(NHC)] species from [AuCl(NHC)] or [AuCl(DMS)] precursors bearing a variety of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands are presented. These methods can be employed in a telescoping manner for the synthesis of catalytically relevant [Au(NTf2)(NHC)] and [Au(NHC)(NCCH3)][BF4] complexes. These attractive methods are straightforward and practical leading to various complexes in high isolated yields and purity.

  5. Effect of Au Precursor and Support on the Catalytic Activity of the Nano-Au-Catalysts for Propane Complete Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshid M. Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic activity of nano-Au-catalyst(s for the complete propane oxidation was investigated. The results showed that the nature of both Au precursor and support strongly influences catalytic activity of the Au-catalyst(s for the propane oxidation. Oxidation state, size, and dispersion of Au nanoparticles in the Au-catalysts, surface area, crystallinity, phase structure, and redox property of the support are the key aspects for the complete propane oxidation. Among the studied Au-catalysts, the AuHAuCl4-Ce catalyst is found to be the most active catalyst.

  6. Summary of gold nanoparticles obtained by reduction Au3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corzo Lucioni, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    In the present investigation were synthesized nanoparticles (NPs) of gold by oxidation-reduction reactions at boiling temperature, starting from dilute solutions of acid tetrachloroauric: H[AuCl 4 ].3H 2 O as a precursor in the presence of organic reducing agents such as trisodium citrate: Na 3 C 6 H 5 O 7 .2H 2 O; potassium sodium tartrate: KNaC 4 H 4 O 6 .4H 2 O and sodium borohydride: inorganic reducing agent NaBH 4 . With the aim of evaluating the particle size according to the type of reducing agent, is designed a series of experiments in which the reducing agent is changed, keeping it constant concentrations, but varying the concentration of H[AuCl 4 ]. The particle size and the absorbance of the plasmon Au were measured in a particle size analyzer and a UV - visible, respectively. In turn, the effect of pH variation on the size of the NP Au, maintaining concentrations of H [AuCl 4 ] constant and reducing agent trisodium citrate, at different pH values under the same conditions. (author).

  7. NaCl islands decorated with 2D or 3D 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiaonan; Silly, Fabien

    2010-01-01

    The formation of PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride) nanostrutures on Au(1 1 1)-(22x√(3)) covered with NaCl islands has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Atomically resolved STM images show that NaCl grows as (1 0 0)-terminated layers on Au(1 1 1)-(22x√(3)). Local atomic hexagonal packing has also been observed in the NaCl(1 0 0) layer. At submonolayer NaCl coverage, PTCDA forms two-dimensional islands on the Au(1 1 1) surface and nucleate preferentially at the NaCl island step edges. When the Au surface is fully covered with NaCl layers, PTCDA molecules form three-dimensional molecular clusters decorating the step edges of NaCl layers.

  8. NaCl islands decorated with 2D or 3D 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xiaonan [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, NL-9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Silly, Fabien, E-mail: Fabien.silly@cea.fr [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, NL-9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); CEA, IRAMIS, SPCSI, Nanostructures and Organic Semiconductors Laboratory, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); UPMC, IPCM, UMR CNRS 7201, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2010-01-15

    The formation of PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride) nanostrutures on Au(1 1 1)-(22x{radical}(3)) covered with NaCl islands has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Atomically resolved STM images show that NaCl grows as (1 0 0)-terminated layers on Au(1 1 1)-(22x{radical}(3)). Local atomic hexagonal packing has also been observed in the NaCl(1 0 0) layer. At submonolayer NaCl coverage, PTCDA forms two-dimensional islands on the Au(1 1 1) surface and nucleate preferentially at the NaCl island step edges. When the Au surface is fully covered with NaCl layers, PTCDA molecules form three-dimensional molecular clusters decorating the step edges of NaCl layers.

  9. Origin of selenium–gold interaction in F2CSe⋯AuY (Y = CN, F, Cl, Br, OH, and CH3): Synergistic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xin; Yang, Yu-Ping; Li, Qing-Zhong; Li, Hai-Bei

    2016-01-01

    Selenium–gold interaction plays an important role in crystal materials, molecular self-assembly, and pharmacochemistry involving gold. In this paper, we unveiled the mechanism and nature of selenium–gold interaction by studying complexes F 2 CSe⋯AuY (Y = CN, F, Cl, Br, OH, and CH 3 ). The results showed that the formation of selenium–gold interaction is mainly attributed to the charge transfer from the lone pair of Se atom to the Au—Y anti-bonding orbital. Energy decomposition analysis indicated that the polarization energy is nearly equivalent to or exceeds the electrostatic term in the selenium–gold interaction. Interestingly, the chalcogen–gold interaction becomes stronger with the increase of chalcogen atomic mass in F 2 CX⋯AuCN (X = O, S, Se, and Te). The cyclic ternary complexes are formed with the introduction of NH 3 into F 2 CSe⋯AuY, in which selenium–gold interaction is weakened and selenium–nitrogen interaction is strengthened due to the synergistic effects.

  10. Synthesis of Au and Au/Cu alloy nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by using microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangari, Vijaya K.; Dey, Sanchita; Jeelani, Shaik

    2010-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles and gold-copper alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by reduction of chloroauric acid (HAuCl_4.xH_2O) and co-reduction of chloroauric acid (HAuCl_4.xH_2O) and Copper(II) acetate [(CH_3COO)_2Cu.H_2O] by ethylene glycol through microwave irradiation technique. In this reaction ethylene glycol used as a solvent and also reducing agent. The cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) used as surfactant. Au nanoparticles and Au-Cu nanoparticles on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotube also produced by using same procedure. The XRD analysis confirmed the formation of Au and Au-Cu alloy nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes(CNTs). The morphology and size of the particles were examined by the transmission electron microscopy. The EDS analysis on individual particles confirmed that the presence of two metals in a particle in case of alloy nanoparticle. The results presented here show that a variety of well defined metal and metal alloy nanoparticles can be produced by using the microwave polyol process with in a short period of time. (author)

  11. In-Plane Angular Effect of Magnetoresistance of Quasi-One-Dimensional Organic Metals, (DMET) 2AuBr 2 and (TMTSF) 2ClO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Harukazu; Saito, Kazuya; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Koichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Ikemoto, Isao

    1997-08-01

    Comparative study is presented for the in-plane angular effect of magnetoresistance of quasi-one-dimensional organic conductors, (DMET)2AuBr2 and (TMTSF)2ClO4. The magnetoresistance for the magnetic and electrical fields parallel and perpendicular to the most conducting plane, respectively, was measured at 4.2 K and up to 7.0 T. (DMET)2AuBr2 shows an anomalous hump in the field-orientation dependence of the magnetoresistance for the magnetic field nearly parallel to the most conducting axis and this is very similar to what previously reported for (DMET)2I3. Weak anomaly was detected for the magnetoresistance of (TMTSF)2ClO4 in the Relaxed state, while no anomaly was observed in the SDW phase in the Quenched state. By comparing the numerical angular derivatives of the magnetoresistance, it is shown that the anomaly in the in-plane angular effect continuously develops from zero magnetic field and is closely related to the quasi-one-dimensional Fermi surface. A simple method is proposed to estimate the anisotropy of the transfer integral from the width of the hump anomaly.

  12. Site-Selective Carving and Co-Deposition: Transformation of Ag Nanocubes into Concave Nanocrystals Encased by Au-Ag Alloy Frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jaewan; Wang, Daniel; Ding, Yong; Zhang, Jiawei; Qin, Dong

    2018-01-23

    We report a facile synthesis of Ag nanocubes with concave side faces and Au-Ag alloy frames, namely Ag@Au-Ag concave nanocrystals, by titrating HAuCl 4 solution into an aqueous mixture of Ag nanocubes, ascorbic acid (H 2 Asc), NaOH, and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) at an initial pH of 11.6 under ambient conditions. Different from all previous studies involving poly(vinylpyrrolidine), the use of CTAC at a sufficiently high concentration plays an essential role in carving away Ag atoms from the side faces through galvanic replacement. Concurrent co-deposition of Au and Ag atoms via chemical reduction at orthogonal sites on the surface of Ag nanocubes leads to the generation of Ag@Au-Ag concave nanocrystals with well-defined and controllable structures. Specifically, in the presence of CTAC-derived Cl - ions, the titrated HAuCl 4 is maintained in the AuCl 4 - species, enabling its galvanic replacement with the Ag atoms located on the side faces of nanocubes. The released Ag + ions can be retained in the soluble form of AgCl 2 - by complexing with the Cl - ions. Both the AuCl 4 - and AgCl 2 - in the solution are then reduced by ascorbate monoanion, a product of the neutralization reaction between H 2 Asc and NaOH, to Au and Ag atoms for their preferential co-deposition onto the edges and corners of the Ag nanocubes. Compared with Ag nanocubes, the Ag@Au-Ag concave nanocrystals exhibit much stronger SERS activity at an excitation of 785 nm, making it feasible to monitor the Au-catalyzed reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol by NaBH 4 in situ. When the Ag cores are removed, the concave nanocrystals evolve into Au-Ag nanoframes with controllable ridge thicknesses.

  13. Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Anion Exchange in a Gadolinium MOF: Incorporation of POMs and [AuCl4]−

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier López-Cabrelles

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The encapsulation of functional molecules inside porous coordination polymers (also known as metal-organic frameworks, MOFs has become of great interest in recent years at the field of multifunctional materials. In this article, we present a study of the effects of size and charge in the anion exchange process of a Gd based MOF, involving molecular species like polyoxometalates (POMs, and [AuCl4]−. This post-synthetic modification has been characterized by IR, EDAX, and single crystal diffraction, which have provided unequivocal evidence of the location of the anion molecules in the framework.

  14. Developing an aqueous approach for synthesizing Au and M@Au (M = Pd, CuPt) hybrid nanostars with plasmonic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Jingshan; Yu, Junjie; Xiong, Yalin; Lin, Zhuoqing; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Deren

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropic Au nanoparticles show unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties, which make it attractive in optical, sensing, and biomedical applications. In this contribution, we report a general and facile strategy towards aqueous synthesis of Au and M@Au (M = Pd, CuPt) hybrid nanostars by reducing HAuCl4 with ethanolamine in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). According to electron microscopic observation and spectral monitoring, we found that the layered...

  15. Reacción de ligandos azufrados con el complejo au2pt (ch2p(Sph24,cl2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Garzón

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la reacción de intercambio del cloro en el complejo au2pt (ch2p(Sph24,cl2 por los ligandos SCH2Ph-,S2CN(CH2CH3,2- y SCN-. Los nuevos derivados azufrados se caracterizan por análisis químico, espectroscopia infrarroja, electrónica y resonancia magnética nuclear protónica. Los ligandos se coordinan por el azufre a los dos átomos sw oro metálico en forma simétrica. El análisis elemental concuerda con las estequiomctrías y estructuras propuestas.

  16. Electronic Absorption and MCD Spectra for Pd(AuPPh(3))(8)(2+), Pt(AuPPh(3))(8)(2+), and Related Platinum-Centered Gold Cluster Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrowski, Michael J.; Mason, W. Roy

    1997-03-26

    Electronic absorption and 7.0 T magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra in the UV-vis region, 1.6 to approximately 4.0 &mgr;m(-)(1) (1 &mgr;m(-)(1) = 10(4) cm(-)(1)) are reported for [Pd(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2) and [Pt(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2) in acetonitrile solutions at room temperature. The MCD spectra are better resolved than the absorption spectra and consist of both A and B terms. The spectra are interpreted in terms of D(4)(d)() skeletal geometry and MO's that are approximated by 5s and 6s orbitals for Pd and Pt/Au atoms, respectively. The lowest energy excited configurations and states are attributed to intraframework (IF) Au(8)(2+) transitions. Evidence is also presented for Pt 5d --> Au 6s transitions in the MCD spectra for Pt(AuPPh(3))(8)(2+). Acetonitrile solution absorption and MCD spectra for the related Pt-centered cluster complexes [Pt(CO)(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2), [Pt(AuP(p-tolyl)(3))(8)](NO(3))(2), [Pt(CuCl)(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2), [Pt(AgNO(3))(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2), [Pt(Hg)(2)(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2), [Pt(HgCl)(2)(AuPPh(3))(8)](BF(4))(2), and [Pt(HgNO(3))(2)(AuPPh(3))(8)](BF(4))(2) are also reported and interpreted within the context of the model developed for the M(AuPPh(3))(8)(2+) complexes.

  17. Monolayer-Enriched Production of Au-Decorated WS2 Nanosheets via Defect Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunklin, Jeremy R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lafargue, Paul [Ruprecht-Karls University Heidelberg; Higgins, Thomas M. [Ruprecht-Karls University Heidelberg; Forcherio, Gregory T. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory; Benamara, Mourad [University of Arkansas; McEvoy, Niall [Trinity College Dublin; Roper, D. Keith [University of Arkansas; Coleman, Jonathan N. [Trinity College Dublin; Vaynzof, Yana [Ruprecht-Karls University Heidelberg; Backes, Claudia [Ruprecht-Karls University Heidelberg

    2018-04-06

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) represent a diverse, emerging source of two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures with broad application in optoelectronics and energy. Chemical functionalization has evolved into a powerful tool to tailor properties of these 2D TMDs; however, functionalization strategies have been largely limited to the metallic 1T-polytype. The work herein illustrates that 2H-semiconducting liquid-exfoliated tungsten disulfide (WS2) undergoes a spontaneous redox reaction with gold (III) chloride (AuCl3). Au nanoparticles (NPs) predominantly nucleate at nanosheet edges with tuneable NP size and density. AuCl3 is preferentially reduced on multi-layer WS2 and resulting large Au aggregates are easily separated from the colloidal dispersion by simple centrifugation. This process may be exploited to enrich the dispersions in laterally large, monolayer nanosheets. It is proposed that thiol groups at edges and defects sides reduce the AuCl3 to Au0 and are in turn oxidized to disulfides. Optical emission, i.e. photoluminescence, of the monolayers remained pristine, while the electrocatalytic activity towards the hydrogen evolution reaction is significantly improved. Taken together, these improvements in functionalization, fabrication, and catalytic activity represent an important advance in the study of these emerging 2D nanostructures.

  18. Nature of the bonding in the AuNgX (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe; X = F, Cl, Br, I) molecules. Topological study on electron density and the electron localization function (ELF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarewicz, Emilia; Gordon, Agnieszka J; Berski, Slawomir

    2015-03-19

    Topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) has been carried out for the AuNgX (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe; X = F, Cl, Br, I) molecules using the wave function approximated by the CCSD, MP2, and DFT(B3LYP, M062X) methods including zero-order regular approximation (ZORA). In the Ng-F bond, the bonding disynaptic attractor V(Ng,F) is missing; therefore, there are no signs of the covalent binding. The nature of the Au-Ng bond depends on the computational method used. Analysis of the ELF carried out for the AuArF and AuXeF molecules, with the wave function approximated by the CCSD and MP2 methods, shows the V(Au,Ng) attractor possibly corresponding to a partially covalent binding between the gold and noble gas atom. However, its very small basin population (<1e) and a very large value of the variance of the basin population suggest that the Au-Ng bond has a very delocalized character. Such bond nature may be related to the charge shift concept with a resonance of the Au(-+)NgX, Au(+-)NgX hybrids. The weakest Au-Ng bond, in terms of the smallest amount of electron density for the V(Au,Ng) basin, is found for the AuKrF molecule with the CCSD method (0.13e). The MP2 method, however, does not yield any V(Au, Ng) population; hence, the covalent Au-Kr bond is not confirmed. Because the V(Au,Ng) attractor is also not observed with the DFT method, the proper characterization of the Au-Ng bond requires proper description of correlation effects. Additional studies on the Au2 and [AuXe](+) molecules, performed at the CCSD and B3LYP levels, exhibit no V(Au,Au) and V(Au,Xe) bonding basins either.

  19. Constructing theoretical M-shell spectra for Mg-like Au through Cl-like Au ions in gold plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamasha, Safeia; Alshaiub, Rania

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical atomic structure and spectra data for electric dipole transitions in six gold ions (Au 67+ through Au 62+ ) are produced using the flexible atomic code (FAC). The produced data contain energy levels, radiative transition rates and oscillator strengths with Δn≠0 (n = 3 → 4, 5, 6, 7). All M-shell strong lines for the six gold ions are also identified. The produced data and constructed spectra revealed the presence of a wide variety of ionization stages of Au with several blended spectral lines in the spectral range (1.7-4.4 Å). Calculated energy levels are compared against published values, which were calculated using the multi-reference many body perturbation theory that includes higher order quantum electrodynamics corrections effects. Favorable agreement with <0.26% difference was observed.

  20. Releasing of Sputtered Au Film by Dissolving Sacrificial Layer and Its Self-Standing on Perforated Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yu; Fujii, Yuma; Yamano, Masafumi; Harigai, Toru; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Sakaki, Hironao; Kondo, Kiminori

    2015-09-01

    Free-standing thin films such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) and gold (Au) have been attracted increasing interests as film targets used in the laser-driven ion acceleration experiment. One of the methods to make the free-standing thin film is to use a soluble sacrifice layer. In this study, the fabrication technique of self-standing Au thin film is presented. Gelatin, oblate, silk fibroin, and NaCl were examined as a. Au thin films were deposited by DC plasma sputtering on sacrifice layers. The gelatin and oblate were used as the sacrificial layer and the supporting substrate. Silk fibroin was coated on glass substrates by a spin coater. The NaCl sacrificial layers were deposited on flat Si substrates by the vacuum vapor deposition system. Sputtered Au thin films were released by immersing the substrates in purified water. Self-standing Au thin films were fabricated by scooping up the released Au thin film on a perforated substrate. The highest quality of the self-standing Au thin film was achieved by using NaCl sacrificial layer. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research and Toukai Foundation for Technology.

  1. One-step synthesis of graphene-Au nanoparticle hybrid materials from metal salt-loaded micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X; Zhang, X W; Meng, J H; Wang, H L; Yin, Z G; Wu, J L; Gao, H L

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present a facile one-step method to synthesize graphene-Au nanoparticle (NP) hybrid materials by using HAuCl 4 -loaded poly(styrene)-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-P2VP) micelles as solid carbon sources. N-doped graphene with controllable thickness can be grown from PS-P2VP micelles covered by a Ni capping layer by an annealing process; simultaneously, the HAuCl 4 in the micelles were reduced into Au NPs under a reductive atmosphere to form Au NPs on graphene. The decoration of Au NPs leads to an obviously enhanced electrical conductivity and a slightly increased work function of graphene due to the electron transfer effect. The graphene-Au NP hybrid materials also exhibit a localized surface plasmon resonance feature of Au NPs. This work provides a novel and accessible route for the one-step synthesis of graphene-Au NP hybrid materials with high quality, which might be useful for future applications in optoelectronic devices. (paper)

  2. Synthesis of Pd-Au bimetallic nanocrystals via controlled overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byungkwon; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yu, Taekyung; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Rycenga, Matthew; Xia, Younan

    2010-03-03

    This paper describes the synthesis of Pd-Au bimetallic nanocrystals with controlled morphologies via a one-step seeded-growth method. Two different reducing agents, namely, L-ascorbic acid and citric acid, were utilized for the reduction of HAuCl(4) in an aqueous solution to control the overgrowth of Au on cubic Pd seeds. When L-ascorbic acid was used as the reducing agent, conformal overgrowth of Au on the Pd nanocubes led to the formation of Pd-Au nanocrystals with a core-shell structure. On the contrary, localized overgrowth of Au was observed when citric acid was used as the reducing agent, producing Pd-Au bimetallic dimers. Through this morphological control, we were able to tune the localized surface plasmon resonance peaks of Pd-Au bimetallic nanostructures in the visible region.

  3. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Combined with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Elucidates Differential Substitution Pathways of Au(I) and Au(III) with Zinc Fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbehausen, Camilla; de Paiva, Raphael Enoque Ferraz; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Gomes, Saulo Quintana; Du, Zhifeng; Corbi, Pedro Paulo; Lima, Frederico Alves; Farrell, Nicholas

    2018-01-02

    A combination of two elements' (Au, Zn) X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) allowed the elucidation of differential substitution pathways of Au(I) and Au(III) compounds reacting with biologically relevant zinc fingers (ZnFs). Gold L 3 -edge XAS probed the interaction of gold and the C-terminal Cys 2 HisCys finger of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7, and the Cys 2 His 2 human transcription factor Sp1. The use of model compounds helped assign oxidation states and the identity of the gold-bound ligands. The computational studies accurately reproduced the experimental XAS spectra and allowed the proposition of structural models for the interaction products at early time points. The direct electrophilic attack on the ZnF by the highly thiophilic Au(I) resulted in a linear P-Au-Cys coordination sphere after zinc ejection whereas for the Sp1, loss of PEt 3 results in linear Cys-Au-Cys or Cys-Au-His arrangements. Reactions with Au(III) compounds, on the other hand, showed multiple binding modes. Prompt reaction between [AuCl(dien)] 2+ and [Au(dien)(DMAP)] 3+ with Sp1 showed a partially reduced Au center and a final linear His-Au-His coordination. Differently, in the presence of NCp7, [AuCl(dien)] 2+ readily reduces to Au(I) and changes from square-planar to linear geometry with Cys-Au-His coordination, while [Au(dien)(DMAP)] 3+ initially maintains its Au(III) oxidation state and square-planar geometry and the same first coordination sphere. The latter is the first observation of a "noncovalent" interaction of a Au(III) complex with a zinc finger and confirms early hypotheses that stabilization of Au(III) occurs with N-donor ligands. Modification of the zinc coordination sphere, suggesting full or partial zinc ejection, is observed in all cases, and for [Au(dien)(DMAP)] 3+ this represents a novel mechanism for nucleocapsid inactivation. The combination of XAS and TD-DFT presents the first direct experimental

  4. Impedance analysis of oxygen reduction in Au nanoparticles; Analisis por impedancia de la reduccion de oxigeno sobre nanoparticulas de Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Huerta, G.; Ramos-Sanchez, G. [Cinvestav-IPN, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: gervazkez@gmail.com; Antano-Lopez, R. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica S. C., Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico); Solorza-Feria, O. [Cinvestav-IPN, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    Nanometric-sized ({approx}5nm) Au particles were synthesized using the chemical reduction of AuCl{sub 3} with NaBH{sub 4}. The Au particles were analyzed with x-ray diffraction (XRD), finding that the particles are highly crystalline, with a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure. The impedance spectrums obtained in 0.5M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution saturated with O{sub 2}, at potentials greater than 0.38 V vs NHE, show one single temperature constant associated with the reduction in O{sub 2} on Au particles, producing hydrogen peroxide (O{sub 2} +2H{sup +} + 2e{sup -} =H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). At potentials less than 0.38 V, a second constant temperature appears associated with a second process, that is, the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to H{sub 2}O. [Spanish] Particulas de Au con tamano nanometrico ({approx}5nm) fueron sintetizadas a partir de la reduccion quimica del AuCl{sub 3} con NaBH{sub 4}. Las particulas de Au fueron analizadas con difraccion de rayos X (XRD), se encontro que las particulas son altamente cristalinas, con una estructura cubica centrada en las caras (FCC). Los espectros de impedancia obtenidos en solucion 0.5M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} saturada con O{sub 2}, a potenciales mayores de 0.38 V vs NHE muestran una sola constante de tiempo, asociada a la reduccion de O{sub 2} sobre las particulas de Au, dando como producto peroxido de hidrogeno (O{sub 2} +2H{sup +} + 2e{sup -} =H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). A potenciales menores de 0.38 V aparece una segunda constante de tiempo, asociada a un segundo proceso, i.e. la reduccion del H{sub 2}O{sub 2} a H{sub 2}O.

  5. Observation of Au + AuAu + Au + ρ0 and Au + AuAu* + Au* + ρ0 with STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, K.

    2002-01-01

    First observation of the reactions Au + AuAu + Au + ρ 0 and Au + AuAu* + Au* + ρ 0 with the STAR detector are reported. The ρ are produced at small perpendicular momentum, as expected if they couple coherently to both nuclei. Models of vector meson production and the correlation with nuclear breakup are discussed, as well as a fundamental test of quantum mechanics that is possible with the system. (author)

  6. The electric dipole moments in the ground states of gold oxide, AuO, and gold sulfide, AuS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruohan; Yu, Yuanqin; Steimle, Timothy C; Cheng, Lan

    2017-02-14

    The B 2 Σ - - X 2 Π 3/2 (0,0) bands of a cold molecular beam sample of gold monoxide, AuO, and gold monosulfide, AuS, have been recorded at high resolution both field free and in the presence of a static electric field. The observed electric field induced splittings and shifts were analyzed to produce permanent electric dipole moments, μ→ el , of 2.94±0.06 D and 2.22±0.05 D for the X 2 Π 3/2 (v = 0) states of AuO and AuS, respectively. A molecular orbital correlation diagram is used to rationalize the trend in ground state μ→ el values for AuX (X = F, Cl, O, and S) molecules. The experimentally determined μ→ el are compared to those computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) level augmented with a perturbative inclusion of triple excitations (CCSD(T)) level of theory.

  7. Au@Pd core-shell nanobricks with concave structures and their catalysis of ethanol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjin; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Shengchun; Ding, Bingjun; Song, Xiaoping

    2013-10-01

    Au@Pd core-shell nanobricks (CNBs) with concave surfaces and Pd shells with a thickness of approximately 5 nm were synthesized by co-reduction of HAuCl4 and H2 PdCl4 in the presence of Au seeds and Ag ions. These as-synthesized concave CNBs exhibit significantly enhanced catalytic activity for the electrooxidation of ethanol in alkaline media compared to the commercially-used Pd black. The improved performance of the Au@Pd CNBs can be attributed to the exposed stepped surfaces, high-index facets, and the synergistic effects of the core and shell metals. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Preparation, Spectroscopic Characterization, and Frontier MO Study of the Heteronuclear Luminescent [Pt(2)Au(2)(dmb)(2)(PPh(3))(4)](PF(6))(2) Cluster (dmb = 1,8-Diisocyano-p-menthane). A Cluster with a Formal Au(0)-Au(0) Bond Encapsulated inside a "Pt(2)(dmb)(2)(2+) " Fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianle; Drouin, Marc; Harvey, Pierre D.

    1999-11-01

    The title compound is prepared from the direct reaction of Pt(2)(dba)(3) (dba = dibenzylideneacetone) and [Au(PPh(3))(2)](PF(6)) in the presence of 1,8-diisocyano-p-methane (dmb), with Pt(2)(dmb)(2)Cl(2), [Pt(4)(dmb)(4)(PPh(3))(2)](PF(6))(2), and (PPh(3))AuCl being formed as parallel products. X-ray crystallography reveals the presence of a quasi-linear PPh(3)Au-AuPPh(3) fragment encapsulated inside a "Pt(2)(dmb)(2)(2+)" ring which is axially coordinated with two PPh(3) ligands. The d(AuAu) is 2.5977(6) Å and is indicative of a strong Au-Au single bond. The IR nu(CN) data reveal that the Pt oxidation state is I, which places the Au oxidation state at 0. The PtAu distances are 2.8422(5) and 2.8082(5) Å. The Raman-active nu(Au(2)), nu(PtAu) (b(2g) + a(g)), nu(PtP), nu(AuP), and nu(PtC) are found at 121.2, approximately 100, 85.5, 162.1, 183.1, and 457.2, and 440.9 cm(-)(1), respectively. The PtAu (0.67 mdyn Å(-)(1)) and Au(2) (1.21 mdyn Å(-)(1)) force constants (F) confirm the presence of medium PtAu and strong Au(2) bonding interactions. The absorption spectra are characterized by strong bands at lambda(max) (epsilon, M(-1) cm(-1)) at 316 (32 300), 366 (37 800), and 418 nm (21 500) and lower intensity features at 516 (2860) and 655 nm (834). The cluster is luminescent at low temperatures (solid and frozen glasses), and in the solid state at room temperature, and exhibits an emission band at approximately 875 nm, and an emission lifetime, tau(e), of 4.4 +/- 0.4 ns (solvent = butyronitrile, T = 77 K).

  9. Spontaneous decoration of Au nanoparticles on micro-patterned reduced graphene oxide shaped by focused laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Y. C.; Tok, E. S.; Teoh, H. F.; Sow, C. H.

    2015-01-01

    We report a facile, two-step method for the micro-landscaping of Au nanoparticles(NPs) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) film en route to micro-patterned Au(NPs)-rGO hybrid functional materials. This method employs a focused laser beam to first locally convert GO to rGO before immersing the micro-patterned GO-rGO film into HAuCl 4 solution. The rGO micro-pattern, shaped by the focused laser beam, serves as nucleation sites for the reduction of Au ions. The reduction mechanism that governs the decoration of Au NPs on rGO films is akin to electroless deposition process. In this instance, surface charges that are formed during laser reduction of GO to rGO provide active nucleation sites for Au 3+ ions to form Au NPs when HAuCl 4 solution is introduced. The number density, the size, and size distribution of the Au NPs can thus be directly tuned and preferentially anchored onto the rGO micro-pattern by varying the incident laser power, the scanning speed of the laser, or the concentration of HAuCl 4 . The resulting hybrid materials can be used as a substrate for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). Using Rhodamine 6G as the test subject, we found an improvement of SERS enhancement over bare rGO of up to four times, depending on the size of the Au NPs

  10. Spontaneous decoration of Au nanoparticles on micro-patterned reduced graphene oxide shaped by focused laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Y. C.; Tok, E. S. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Teoh, H. F. [Graduate School of Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Sow, C. H. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Graduate School of Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, Singapore 117456 (Singapore)

    2015-02-07

    We report a facile, two-step method for the micro-landscaping of Au nanoparticles(NPs) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) film en route to micro-patterned Au(NPs)-rGO hybrid functional materials. This method employs a focused laser beam to first locally convert GO to rGO before immersing the micro-patterned GO-rGO film into HAuCl{sub 4} solution. The rGO micro-pattern, shaped by the focused laser beam, serves as nucleation sites for the reduction of Au ions. The reduction mechanism that governs the decoration of Au NPs on rGO films is akin to electroless deposition process. In this instance, surface charges that are formed during laser reduction of GO to rGO provide active nucleation sites for Au{sup 3+} ions to form Au NPs when HAuCl{sub 4} solution is introduced. The number density, the size, and size distribution of the Au NPs can thus be directly tuned and preferentially anchored onto the rGO micro-pattern by varying the incident laser power, the scanning speed of the laser, or the concentration of HAuCl{sub 4}. The resulting hybrid materials can be used as a substrate for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). Using Rhodamine 6G as the test subject, we found an improvement of SERS enhancement over bare rGO of up to four times, depending on the size of the Au NPs.

  11. Photoluminescence enhancement in few-layer WS2 films via Au nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin Yuk Choi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nano-composites of two-dimensional atomic layered WS2 and Au nanoparticles (AuNPs have been fabricated by sulfurization of sputtered W films followed by immersing into HAuCl4 aqueous solution. The morphology, structure and AuNPs distribution have been characterized by electron microscopy. The decorated AuNPs can be more densely formed on the edge and defective sites of triangle WS2. We have compared the optical absorption and photoluminescence of bare WS2 and Au-decorated WS2 layers. Enhancement in the photoluminescence is observed in the Au-WS2 nano-composites, attributed to localized surface plasmonic effect. This work provides the possibility to develop photonic application in two-dimensional materials.

  12. The sources and evolution of mineralising fluids in iron oxide-copper-gold systems, Norrbotten, Sweden: Constraints from Br/Cl ratios and stable Cl isotopes of fluid inclusion leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, S. A.; Smith, M. P.

    2009-10-01

    We have analysed the halogen concentrations and chlorine stable isotope composition of fluid inclusion leachates from three spatially associated Fe-oxide ± Cu ± Au mineralising systems in Norrbotten, Sweden. Fluid inclusions in late-stage veins in Fe-oxide-apatite deposits contain saline brines and have a wide range of Br/Cl molar ratios, from 0.2 to 1.1 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values from -3.1‰ to -1.0‰. Leachates from saline fluid inclusions from the Greenstone and Porphyry hosted Cu-Au prospects have Br/Cl ratios that range from 0.2 to 0.5 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values from -5.6‰ to -1.3‰. Finally, the Cu-Au deposits hosted by the Nautanen Deformation Zone (NDZ) have Br/Cl molar ratios from 0.4 to 1.1 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values that range from -2.4‰ to +0.5‰, although the bulk of the data fall within 0‰ ± 0.5‰. The Br/Cl ratios of leachates are consistent with the derivation of salinity from magmatic sources or from the dissolution of halite. Most of the isotopic data from the Fe-oxide-apatite and Greenstone deposits are consistent with a mantle derived source of the chlorine, with the exception of the four samples with the most negative values. The origin of the low δ 37Cl values in these samples is unknown but we suggest that there may have been some modification of the Cl-isotope signature due to fractionation between the mineralising fluids and Cl-rich silicate assemblages found in the alteration haloes around the deposits. If such a process has occurred then a modified crustal source of the chlorine for all the samples cannot be ruled out although the amount of fractionation necessary to generate the low δ 37Cl values would be significantly larger. The source of Cl in the NDZ deposits has a crustal signature, which suggests the Cl in this system may be derived from (meta-) evaporites or from input from crustal melts such as granitic pegmatites of the Lina Suite.

  13. Corrosion of Dental Au-Ag-Cu-Pd Alloys in 0.9 % Sodium Chloride Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Atsushi; Kusayanagi, Yukiharu

    2005-01-01

    Two Au-Ag-Cu-Pd dental casting alloys (Au:12% and 20%) used. The test solutions used 0.9 % NaCl solution (isotonic sodium chloride solution), 0.9 % NaCl solution containing 1 % lactic acid, and 0.9 % NaCl solution containing 1 % lactic acid and 0.1 mol dm -3 Na 2 S. The surface of two samples in three sample solutions was not natural discoloration during one year. The alloy containing 12 % gold was easily alloyed and the composition was uniform comparing with the alloy containing 20 % gold. The rest potentials have not a little effect after three months. The kinds of metals could not definitely from the oxidation and reduction waves of metal on the cyclic voltammograms. The dissolutions of gold and palladium were 12 % Au sample in the 0.9 % NaCl solution containing 1 % lactic acid and 0.1 mol dm -3 Na 2 S. The pH of solution had an affect on dissolution of copper, and sulfur ion had an affect on dissolution of silver. The copper dissolved amount from 20 % gold sample was about 26 times comparing with that of 12 % gold sample in the 0.9 % solution containing 1 % lactic acid. Corrosion products were silver chloride and copper chloride in NaCl solution, and silver sulfide and copper sulfide in NaCl solution containing Na 2 S

  14. Developing an aqueous approach for synthesizing Au and M@Au (M = Pd, CuPt) hybrid nanostars with plasmonic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jingshan; Yu, Junjie; Xiong, Yalin; Lin, Zhuoqing; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Deren

    Anisotropic Au nanoparticles show unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties, which make it attractive in optical, sensing, and biomedical applications. In this contribution, we report a general and facile strategy towards aqueous synthesis of Au and M@Au (M = Pd, CuPt) hybrid nanostars by reducing HAuCl4 with ethanolamine in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). According to electron microscopic observation and spectral monitoring, we found that the layered epitaxial growth mode (i.e., Frank-van der Merwe mechanism) contributes to the enlargement of the core, while, the random attachment of Au nanoclusters onto the cores accounts for the formation of the branches. Both of them are indispensable for the formation of the nanostars. The LSPR properties of the Au nanoparticles have been well investigated with morphology control via precursor amount and growth temperature. The Au nanostars showed improved surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) performance for rhodamine 6G due to their sharp edges and tips, which were therefore confirmed as good SERS substrate to detect trace amount of molecules.

  15. NaCl islands decorated with 2D or 3D 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Xiaonan; Silly, Fabien

    2010-01-01

    The formation of PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride) nanostrutures on Au(1 1 1)-(22 x root 3) covered with NaCl islands has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Atomically resolved STM images show that NaCl grows as (1 0 0)-terminated layers on Au(1 1 1)-(22 x

  16. Nanocomposite films containing Au nanoparticles formed by electrochemical reduction of metal ions in the multilayer films as electrocatalyst for dioxygen reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Minghua; Shen Yan; Cheng Wenlong; Shao Yong; Sun Xuping; Liu Baifeng; Dong Shaojun

    2005-01-01

    Through electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly, AuCl 4 - anions and [tetrakis(N-methylpyridyl)porphyrinato] cobalt (CoTMPyP) cations were alternately deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates, and 4-aminobenzoic acid modified glassy carbon electrode. Electrochemical reduction of AuCl 4 - anions sandwiched between CoTMPyP layers leads to the in situ formation of Au nanoparticles in the multilayer films. Regular growth of the multilayer films is monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy. UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry confirm the formation of Au nanoparticles in the multilayer films after electrochemical reduction of AuCl 4 - anions. Atomic force spectroscopy verifies that the as-prepared Au nanoparticles are uniformly distributed with average particles diameters of 20-25 nm. The resulting composite films containing Au nanoparticles with high stability exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of dioxygen. Rotating disk electrode voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode voltammetry demonstrate the Au nanoparticles-containing films can catalyze two-electron reduction of O 2 to H 2 O 2 in O 2 -saturated 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 solution

  17. Iron and chlorine as guides to stratiform Cu-Co-Au deposits, Idaho Cobalt Belt, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, J.T.; Connor, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Cu-Co-Au deposits of the Idaho Cobalt Belt are in lithostratigraphic zones of the Middle Proterozoic Yellowjacket Formation characterized by distinctive chemical and mineralogical compositions including high concentrations of Fe (15- > 30 wt. percent Fe2O3), Cl (0.1-1.10 wt. percent), and magnetite or biotite (> 50 vol. percent). The Cu-Co-Au deposits of the Blackbird mine are stratabound in Fe-silicate facies rocks that are rich in biotite, Fe, and Cl, but stratigraphically equivalent rocks farther than 10 km from ore deposits have similar compositions. A lower lithostratigraphic zone containing magnetite and small Cu-Co-Au deposits extends for more than 40 km. The Fe-rich strata are probably exhalative units related to mafic volcanism and submarine hot springs, but the origin of the high Cl concentrations is less clear. Former chlorine-rich pore fluids are suggested by the presence of supersaline fluid inclusions, by Cl-rich biotite and scapolite (as much as 1.87 percent Cl in Fe-rich biotite), and by high Cl concentrations in rock samples. Chlorine is enriched in specific strata and in zones characterized by soft-sediment deformation, thus probably was introduced during sedimentation or diagenesis. Unlike some metasedimentary rocks containing scapolite and high Cl, the Yellowjacket Formation lacks evidence for evaporitic strata that could have been a source of Cl. More likely, the Cl reflects a submarine brine that carried Fe, K, and base metals. Strata containing anomalous Fe-K-Cl are considered to be a guide to sub-basins favorable for the occurrence of stratiform base-metal deposits. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  18. In-situ growth of AuNPs on WS2@U-bent optical fiber for evanescent wave absorption sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suzhen; Zhao, Yuefeng; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yang, Cheng; Xiu, Xianwu; Li, Chonghui; Li, Zhen; Zhao, Xiaofei; Man, Baoyuan

    2018-05-01

    The sensitivity of the evanescent wave absorption sensor is always a hot topic which has been attracted researchers' discussion. It is still a challenge for developing the effective sensor to sensitively detect some biochemical molecules solution in a simple and low-cost way. In this paper, an evanescent wave absorption (EWA) sensor has been presented based on the U-bent multimode fiber coated with tungsten disulfide (WS2) film and in-situ growth of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the detection of ethanol solution and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. Benefitted from the effective light coupling produced between U-bent probe and AuNPs, we attained the optimal size of the AuNPs by changing the reaction time between WS2 and tetrachloroauric acid (HAuCl4). With the AuNPs/WS2@U-bent optical fiber, we discussed the behaviors of EWA sensor, such as sensitivity, reproducibility, fast response-recovery time and stability. The sensitivity (△A/△C) of the proposed AuNPs/WS2@U-bent optical fiber EWA sensor is 0.65 for the detection of the ethanol solution. Besides, the AuNPs/WS2@U-bent optical fiber EWA sensor exhibits high sensitivity in detection of the sodium chloride (NaCl), which can reach 1.5 when the proposed sensor was immersed into NaCl solution. Our work demonstrates that the U-bent optical fiber EWA sensor may have promising applications in testing the solution of concentration.

  19. Synthesis of SERS active Au nanowires in different noncoordinating solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou Xiaomiao; Zhang Xiaoling, E-mail: zhangxl@bit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, School of Science (China); Fang Yan, E-mail: fangyan@mail.cnu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Nano-Photonics and Nano-Structure (NPNS), Capital Normal University (China); Chen Shutang; Li Na; Zhou Qi [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, School of Science (China)

    2011-06-15

    Au nanowires with length up to micrometers were synthesized through a simple and one-pot solution growth method. HAuCl{sub 4} was reduced in a micellar structure formed by 1-octadecylamine and oleic acid in hexane, heptane, toluene and chloroform, respectively. As the non-polarity of noncoordinating solvents can affect the nucleation and growth rates of Au nanostructures, Au nanowires with different diameters could be obtained by changing the noncoordinating solvents in the synthetic process. The influences of the solvents on the morphology of Au nanowires were systematically studied. When using hexane as reaction solvent, the product turned to be high portion of Au nanowires with more uniform size than the others. Furthermore, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum of 2-thionaphthol was obtained on the Au nanowire-modified substrate, indicating that the as-synthesized Au nanowires have potential for highly sensitive optical detection application.

  20. Alkyne hydroarylation with Au N-heterocyclic carbene catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Tubaro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mono- and dinuclear gold complexes with N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC ligands have been employed as catalysts in the intermolecular hydroarylation of alkynes with simple unfunctionalised arenes. Both mono- and dinuclear gold(III complexes were able to catalyze the reaction; however, the best results were obtained with the mononuclear gold(I complex IPrAuCl. This complex, activated with one equivalent of silver tetrafluoroborate, exhibited under acidic conditions at room temperature much higher catalytic activity and selectivity compared to more commonly employed palladium(II catalysts. Moreover, the complex was active, albeit to a minor extent, even under neutral conditions, and exhibited lower activity but higher selectivity compared to the previously published complex AuCl(PPh3. Preliminary results on intramolecular hydroarylations using this catalytic system indicate, however, that alkyne hydration by traces of water may become a serious competing reaction.

  1. Electrical and optical properties of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) oxidized with poly(4-styrenesulfonate) and AuCl3-doped reduced graphene oxide/single-walled carbon nanotube films for ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong Ryong; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Kyeong Heon; Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2014-12-01

    We report the effects of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) oxidized with poly(4-styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) and gold chloride (AuCl) co-doping on the electrical and optical properties of reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) films fabricated by dipcoating methods. The RGO/SWNT films were doped with both AuCl3 dissolved in nitromethane and PSS hole injection layers by spin coating to improve their electrical properties by increasing the work function of the RGO/SWNT films, thereby reducing the Schottky barrier height between the RGO/SWNT and p-GaN films. As a result, we obtained a reduced sheet resistance of 851.9 Ω/Ω and a contact resistance of 1.97 x 10(-1) Ω x cm2, together with a high transmittance of 84.1% at 380 nm. The contact resistance of these films should be further reduced to fully utilize the feature of the electrode scheme proposed in this work, but the current result suggests its potential use as a transparent conductive electrode for ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

  2. Magnetic ground state of quasi-two-dimensional organic conductor, τ-(EDO-S,S-DMEDT-TTF)2(AuCl2)1+y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, T; Yasuzuka, S; Yoshino, H; Fujiwara, H; Sugimoto, T; Nishio, Y; Kajita, K; Anyfantis, G A; Papavassiliou, G C; Murata, K

    2006-01-01

    To understand the interplay between transport and magnetic properties, quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) organic conductor τ-(EDO-S,S-DMEDTTTF) 2 (AuCl 2 ) 1+y was studied by measurements of electric resistivity ( ρ a , ρ c ), magnetoresistance (MR), susceptibility (χ) and specific heat (C) in the temperature region between 1 K and 300 K. In spite of the fact that the drastic changes were observed in ρ a , ρ c , MR and χ at T C = 20 K, no anomaly was seen in C. The concentration of spins estimated from M-H curve is about 360 ppm, which is difficult to detect anomaly in C. These data suggest that the number of spins is very small in the ground state like spin-glass system

  3. Effects of chlorine and oxygen coverage on the structure of the Au(111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Thomas A.; Friend, Cynthia M.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effects of Cl and O coverage on the atomic structure of the Au(111) surface using density functional theory calculations. We find that the release and incorporation of gold atoms in the adsorbate layer becomes energetically favorable only at high coverages of either O or Cl (>0.66 ML (monolayer) for O and >0.33 ML for Cl), whereas adsorption without the incorporation of gold is favorable at lower coverages. The bonding between the adsorbate and gold substrate changes significantly with coverage, becoming more covalent (less ionic) at higher Cl and O coverage. This is based on the fact that at higher coverages there is less ionic charge transfer to the adsorbate, while the electron density in the region between the adsorbate and a surface gold atom is increased. Our results illustrate that the O and Cl coverage on Au(111) can dramatically affect its structure and bonding, which are important features in any application of gold involving these adsorbates.

  4. Synthesis of Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with concave Au nanocuboids as seeds and their enhanced electrocatalytic properties in the ethanol oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lingyu; Li, Lidong; Peng, Yi; Guo, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Herein, a new type of uniform and well-structured Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) with highly active concave Au nanocuboids (NCs) as seeds was successfully synthesized by using the classic seed-mediated method. Electrochemical measurements were conducted to demonstrate their greatly enhanced catalytic performance in the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). It was found that the electrochemical performance for Au@Pt BNPs with the concave Au NCs as seeds, which were enclosed by {611} high-index facets, could be seven times higher than that of the Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with regular spherical Au NPs as seeds. Furthermore, our findings show that the morphology and electrocatalytic activity of the Au@Pt BNPs can be tuned simply by changing the compositional ratios of the growth solution. The lower the amount of H2PtCl6 used in the growth solution, the thinner the Pt shell grew, and the more high-index facets of concave Au NCs seeds were exposed in Au@Pt BNPs, leading to higher electrochemical activity. These as-prepared concave Au@Pt BNPs will open up new strategies for improving catalytic efficiency and reducing the use of the expensive and scarce resource of platinum in the ethanol oxidation reaction, and are potentially applicable as electrochemical catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  5. Synthesis of Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with concave Au nanocuboids as seeds and their enhanced electrocatalytic properties in the ethanol oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Lingyu; Li, Lidong; Peng, Yi; Guo, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Herein, a new type of uniform and well-structured Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) with highly active concave Au nanocuboids (NCs) as seeds was successfully synthesized by using the classic seed-mediated method. Electrochemical measurements were conducted to demonstrate their greatly enhanced catalytic performance in the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). It was found that the electrochemical performance for Au@Pt BNPs with the concave Au NCs as seeds, which were enclosed by {611}high-index facets, could be seven times higher than that of the Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with regular spherical Au NPs as seeds. Furthermore, our findings show that the morphology and electrocatalytic activity of the Au@Pt BNPs can be tuned simply by changing the compositional ratios of the growth solution. The lower the amount of H_2PtCl_6 used in the growth solution, the thinner the Pt shell grew, and the more high-index facets of concave Au NCs seeds were exposed in Au@Pt BNPs, leading to higher electrochemical activity. These as-prepared concave Au@Pt BNPs will open up new strategies for improving catalytic efficiency and reducing the use of the expensive and scarce resource of platinum in the ethanol oxidation reaction, and are potentially applicable as electrochemical catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells. (paper)

  6. Reduced Graphene Oxide/Au Nanocomposite for NO2 Sensing at Low Operating Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A reduced grapheme oxide (rGO/Au hybrid nanocomposite has been synthesized by hydrothermal treatment using graphite and HAuCl4 as the precursors. Characterization, including X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectra, X-ray photoelecton spectroscopy (XPS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, indicates the formation of rGO/Au. A gas sensor fabricated with rGO/Au nanocomposite was applied for NO2 detection at 50 °C. Compared with pure rGO, rGO/Au nanocomposite exhibits higher sensitivity, a more rapid response–recovery process and excellent reproducibility.

  7. A benign route to fabricate nanoporous gold through electrochemical dealloying of Al-Au alloys in a neutral solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Qian; Wang Xiaoguang; Qi Zhen [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang Yan [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jiwei Road 106, Jinan 250022 (China); Zhang Zhonghua [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China)], E-mail: zh_zhang@sdu.edu.cn

    2009-11-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) ribbons have been fabricated through electrochemical dealloying of melt-spun Al-Au alloys with 20-50 at.% Au in a 10 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution under potential control at room temperature. The microstructures of NPG were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The microstructures of the NPG ribbons strongly depend upon the phase constitutions of the starting Al-Au alloys. The single-phase Al{sub 2}Au or AlAu intermetallic compound can be fully dealloyed, resulting in the formation of NPG with a homogeneous porous structure. The separate dealloying of Al{sub 2}Au and AlAu in the two-phase Al-45 Au alloy leads to the formation of NPG composites (NPGCs). In addition, the dealloying of the Al-20 Au alloy comprising {alpha}-Al and Al{sub 2}Au leads to the formation of NPG with bimodal channel size distributions. According to the ligament size, the surface diffusivity of Au adatoms along the alloy/electrolyte interface has been evaluated and increases with increasing applied potential. The dealloying mechanism in the neutral NaCl solution has been explained based upon pourbaix diagram and chloride ion effect.

  8. Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and d+Au collisions:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    In this talk I will review PHOBOS data on charged particle multiplicities, obtained in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at RHIC. The general features of the Au+Au pseudorapidity distributions results will be discussed and compared to those of /line{p}p collisions. The total charged particle multiplicity, scaled by the number of participant pairs, is observed to be about 40% higher in Au+Au collisions than in /line{p}p and d+Au systems, but, surprisingly at the same level of e+e- collisions. Limiting fragmentation scaling is seen to be obeyed in Au+Au collisions.

  9. Synthesis and optical properties of Au decorated colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahmasebi, Nemat; Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanoparticles were prepared by pulsed laser ablation (PLA). • A very fine metallic Au particles or coating are decorated on the surface of tungsten oxide nanoparticles. • UV–Vis spectroscopy shows an absorption peak at ∼530 nm which is due to SPR effect of gold. • After exposing to hydrogen gas, Au/WO_3 colloidal nanoparticles show excellent gasochromic coloring. - Abstract: In this study, colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles were fabricated by pulsed laser ablation of tungsten target using the first harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) in deionized water. After ablation, a 0.33 g/lit HAuCl_4 aqueous solution was added into as-prepared colloidal nanoparticles. In this process, Au"3"+ ions were reduced to decorate gold metallic state (Au"0) onto colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles surface. The morphology and chemical composition of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied by AFM, XRD, TEM and XPS techniques. UV–Vis analysis reveals a distinct absorption peak at ∼530 nm. This peak can be attributed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au and confirms formation of gold state. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that Au ions’ reduction happens after adding HAuCl_4 solution into as-prepared colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscope shows that an Au shell has been decorated onto colloidal WO_3 nanoparticles. Noble metal decorated tungsten oxide nanostructure could be an excellent candidate for photocatalysis, gas sensing and gasochromic applications. Finally, the gasochromic behavior of the synthesized samples was investigated by H_2 and O_2 gases bubbling into the produced colloidal Au/WO_3 nanoparticles. Synthesized colloidal nanoparticles show excellent coloration contrast (∼80%) through NIR spectra.

  10. Properties and electrochemical behaviors of AuPt alloys prepared by direct-current electrodeposition for lithium air batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jinqiu; Li, Da; Zhu, Yiming; Chen, Miaomiao; An, Maozhong; Yang, Peixia; Wang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    AuPt catalyst has a prospective application in a lithium air battery because of its bi-function on catalyzing Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) and Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER). Electrodeposition is an in-situ convenient technology for catalyst preparation without chemical residue. In an acid electrolyte, AuPt alloy catalysts were electrodeposited on carbon paper. The effect of main salt concentration, electrodeposition time and current density were studied by deposit micromorphology observation, structure analyses and composition testing. Catalytic abilities of AuPt alloys were measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in an ionic liquid of EMI-TFSI/Li-TFSI [1- Ethyl - 3- methylimidazolium–bis (trifluoromethanesulphonyl) imide/lithium–bis (trifluoromethanesulphonyl) imide]. The electrochemical behaviors of Au, Pt and AuPt deposits were also measured. An optimized direct-current electrodeposition process of getting high active AuPt catalyst is concluded, which is an aqueous solution containing 6.7∼10 mmol · L −1 HAuCl 4 , 10∼13.3 mmol · L −1 H 2 PtCl 6 and 0.5 mol · L −1 H 2 SO 4 as the electrolyte, current density of 20mA · cm −2 and electrodeposition time of 8∼34 s. The co-deposition of AuPt alloy is an irregular co-deposition controlled by diffusion, while gold atoms enter the platinum’s crystal lattice in the structure of AuPt alloy. The increase of the concentration of H 2 PtCl 6 in the electrolyte, the extension of the electrodeposition time or the raise of the current density can improve the content of Pt in the deposit. The clusters’ diameters of AuPt catalysts decrease to 150∼250 nm by adjusting current densities during electrodeposition

  11. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Aspergillum sp. WL-Au for degradation of aromatic pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Pei, Xiaofang; Shen, Wenli; Zhang, Xuwang; Wang, Jingwei; Zhang, Zhaojing; Li, Shuzhen; You, Shengnan; Ma, Fang; Zhou, Jiti

    2017-04-01

    A simple method for synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using Aspergillum sp. WL-Au was presented in this study. According to UV-vis spectra and transmission electron microscopy images, the shape and size of AuNPs were affected by different parameters, including buffer solution, pH, biomass and HAuCl4 concentrations. Phosphate sodium buffer was more suitable for extracellular synthesis of AuNPs, and the optimal conditions for AuNPs synthesis were pH 7.0, biomass 100 mg/mL and HAuCl4 3 mM, leading to the production of spherical and pseudo-spherical nanoparticles. The biosynthesized AuNPs possessed excellent catalytic activities for the reduction of 2-nitrophenol, 3-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, o-nitroaniline and m-nitroaniline in the presence of NaBH4, and the catalytic rate constants were calculated to be 6.3×10-3 s-1, 5.5×10-3 s-1, 10.6×10-3 s-1, 8.4×10-3 s-1 and 13.8×10-3 s-1, respectively. The AuNPs were also able to catalyze the decolorization of various azo dyes (e.g. Cationic Red X-GRL, Acid Orange II and Acid scarlet GR) using NaBH4 as the reductant, and the decolorization rates reached 91.0-96.4% within 7 min. The present study should provide a potential candidate for green synthesis of AuNPs, which could serve as efficient catalysts for aromatic pollutants degradation.

  12. Synthesis of Fulvic Acid-Coated Magnetite (Fe3O4–FA and Its Application for the Reductive Adsorption of [AuCl4]–

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Anggo Krisbiantoro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fulvic acid-coated magnetite (Fe3O4–FA has been synthesized through coprecipitation method using NH4OH. Synthesis conducted by cheap and environmentally friendly preparation used iron salts and extracted fulvic acid (FA from Peat soil of Rawa Pening, Central Java, Indonesia. Characterization using FT–IR indicated that the coating of FA on Fe3O4 occurred through the formation of chemical bond between iron of Fe3O4 and carboxyl group of FA. The XRD measurement indicated that coated Fe3O4 successfully dispersed in smaller size than uncoated Fe3O4, i.e. from 16.67 to 14.84 nm for Fe3O4 and Fe3O4–FA, respectively. Synthesized Fe3O4–FA has pHPZC 6.37 and stable at pH > 3.0. The extracted FA has total acidity 866.61 cmol kg–1, –COOH content 229.77 cmol kg–1 and –OH content 636.84 cmol kg–1. Fe3O4–FA has total acidity 494.86 cmol kg–1, –COOH content 67.80 cmol kg–1 and –OH content 427.06 cmol kg–1. The adsorption rate constant (k of [AuCl4]– on Fe3O4–A according to the Ho kinetic model was 8006.53 g mol–1 min–1. The adsorption capacity (qmax according to Langmuir isotherm model was 1.24 × 10–4 mol g–1. The presence of reduction towards the adsorbed [AuCl4]– was shown by the appearance of peaks at 2θ: 37.41; 43.66; 64.25, and 76.67° in the XRD diffractogram.

  13. Experimental modeling of Au and Pt coupled transport by chloride hydrothermal fluids at 350-450°C and 500-1000 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotov, A. V.; Tagirov, B. R.; Koroleva, L. A.; Volchenkova, V. A.

    2017-09-01

    The coupled solubility of Au(cr) and Pt(cr) has been measured in acidic chloride solutions at 350-450°C and 0.5 and 1 kb using the autoclave technique with determination of dissolved metal contents after quenching. The constants of the reaction combining the dominant species of Au and Pt in high-temperature hydrothermal fluids ( K (Au-Pt)) have been determined: 2 Au(cr) + PtCl4 2- = Pt(cr) + 2AuCl2 -; log K (Au-Pt) =-1.02 ± 0.25 (450°C, 1 kb), 0.09 ± 0.15 (450°C, 0.5 kb), and -1.31 ± 0.20 (350°C, 1 kb). It has been established that the factors affecting the Au/Pt concentration ratio in hydrothermal fluids and precipitated ores are temperature, pressure, redox potential, and sulfur fugacity. An increase in temperature results in an increase in the Au/Pt concentration ratio (up to 550°C at P = 1 kb). A decrease in pressure and redox potential leads to enrichment of fluid in Au. An increase in sulfur fugacity in the stability field of Pt sulfides results in increase in the Au/Pt concentration ratio. Native platinum is replaced by sulfide mineral in low-temperature systems enriched in Pt (relative to Au).

  14. Deposition of Au/TiO2 film by pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Chongjun; Zhao Quanzhong; Zhao Qitao; Qiu Jianrong; Zhu Congshan

    2006-01-01

    Au nanoparticles, which were photoreduced by a Nd:YAG laser in HAuCl 4 solution containing TiO 2 colloid and accompanied by the TiO 2 particles, were deposited on the substrate surface. The film consisting of Au/TiO 2 particles was characterized by the absorption spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The adhesion between the film and substrate was evaluated by using adhesive tape test. It was found that the presence of TiO 2 dramatically enhanced the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate, as well as the deposition rate of film. The mechanism for the deposition of Au/TiO 2 film was also discussed

  15. Cu₂O-Au nanocomposites for enzyme-free glucose sensing with enhanced performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiyan; Wang, Fenyun; Fang, Zhen; Liu, Xiaowang

    2012-06-15

    A facile method for the synthesis of Cu(2)O-Au nanocomposites has been reported by injecting Cu(2)O nanocubes into Au precursor directly with the assistance of ultrasound radiation at room temperature. The ultrasound radiation is not a necessary requirement but can make the distribution of Au nanoparticles more homogenous. The formation of Cu(2)O-Au nanocomposites is attributed to following two reasons. The first one is the difference in the reduction potential between Cu(2+)/Cu(2)O and AuCl(4)(-)/Au, which can also be considered as the driving force for the redox reaction. The other one is the low lattice mismatch between (200) planes of Cu(2)O and (200) facets of Au, which is favorable for the formation of heterostructure. The electrochemical investigation demonstrates that the performances of Cu(2)O nanocubes in enzyme-free glucose sensing have been improved significantly after the decoration of Au nanoparticles which may be derived from the polarization effect provided by Au nanoparticles. As-prepared Cu(2)O-Au nanocomposites have great potential in enzyme-free glucose sensing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Spherical and polygonal shape of Au nanoparticles coated functionalized polymer microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ting; Li, Yingzhi; Zhang, Junxian; Qi, Yalong; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Qinghua, E-mail: qhzhang@dhu.edu.cn

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • PS/PPy with well-defined core/shell structures was prepared in aqueous solution. • Au NPs were coated on PS/PPy by the fixation and continuous growth process. • Mercapto-groups played a role in the number and morphology of Au shell. • PS/PPy/Au had homogeneous and dense Au coatings with different shape. - Abstract: Uniform polystyrene (PS)/polypyrrole (PPy) composite microspheres with well-defined core/shell structures are synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are successfully coated on the surface of PS/PPy microspheres by means of electrostatic interactions due to the functionalized PPy coatings supplying sufficient amino groups and the additive of mercapto acetic acid. Furthermore, the as-prepared PS/PPy/Au microspheres serving as seeds facilitate Au NPs further growth by in situ reduction in HAuCl{sub 4} solution to obtain PS/PPy/Au spheres with the core/shell/shell structure. Morphology observation demonstrates that the monodisperse PS/PPy/Au microspheres compose of uniform cores and the compact coatings containing distinct two layers. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope confirm the existence of PPy and Au on the surface of the composite spheres. This facile approach to preparing metal-coated polymer spheres supplies the potential applications in biosensors, electronics and medical diagnosis.

  17. Atomistic Simulations of Functional Au-144(SR)(60) Gold Nanoparticles in Aqueous Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Gurtovenko, A. A.; Martinez-Seara, H.

    2012-01-01

    and Cl-/Na+ counterions, respectively. The radial distribution functions show that the side chains and terminal groups show significant flexibility. The orientation of water is distinct in the first solvation shell, and AuNPs cause a long-range effect in the solvent structure. The radial electrostatic...... of the nanoparticle together with surrounding ions and water. We focus on Au-144 nanoparticles that comprise a nearly spherical Au core (diameter similar to 2 nm), a passivating Au-S interface, and functionalized alkanethiol chains. Cationic and anionic AuNPs have been modeled with amine and carboxyl terminal groups...... in aqueous solutions. They suggest that electrostatics is one of the central factors in complexation of AuNPs with other nanomaterials and biological systems, and that effects of electrostatics as water-mediated interactions are relatively long-ranged, which likely plays a role in, e.g., the interplay...

  18. Composition and source of salinity of ore-bearing fluids in Cu-Au systems of the Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Roberto; Rusk, Brian; Emsbo, Poul; Monteiro, Lena

    2009-01-01

    The composition and Cl/Br – NaCl ratios of highly saline aqueous inclusions from large tonnage (> 100 t) IOCG deposits (Sossego, Alvo 118, and Igarapé Bahia) and a Paleoproterozoic intrusion-related Cu-Au-(Mo-W-Bi-Sn) deposit (Breves; Ca-dominated (5 to 10 times more than in porphyry Cu-Au fluids), and contain percent level concentrations of Na and K. IOCG inclusion fluids, however, contain higher Sr, Ba, Pb, and Zn concentrations, but significantly less Bi, than the intrusion-related Breves inclusion fluids. Cu is consistently below detection limits in brine inclusions from the IOCG and intrusion-related systems and Fe was not detected in the latter. Cl/Br and Na/Cl ratios of the IOCG inclusion fluids range from entirely evaporative brines (bittern fluids; e.g. Igarapé Bahia and Alvo 118) to values that indicate mixing with magma-derived brines. Cl/Br and Na/Cl ratios of the Breves inclusion fluids strongly suggest the involvement of magmatic brines, but that possibly also incorporated bittern fluids. Collectively, these data demonstrate that residual evaporative and magmatic brines were important components of the fluid regime involved in the formation of Cu-Au systems in the Carajás Mineral Province.

  19. Intermetallic Competition in the Fragmentation of Trimetallic Au-Zn-Alkali Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Johannes; Cayir, Merve; Walg, Simon P; Di Martino-Fumo, Patrick; Thiel, Werner R; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon

    2016-02-12

    Cationization is a valuable tool to enable mass spectrometric studies on neutral transition-metal complexes (e.g., homogenous catalysts). However, knowledge of potential impacts on the molecular structure and catalytic reactivity induced by the cationization is indispensable to extract information about the neutral complex. In this study, we cationize a bimetallic complex [AuZnCl3 ] with alkali metal ions (M(+) ) and investigate the charged adducts [AuZnCl3 M](+) by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IR-MPD) in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal a μ(3) binding motif of all alkali ions to the three chlorido ligands. The cationization induces a reorientation of the organic backbone. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) studies reveal switches of fragmentation channels by the alkali ion and by the CID amplitude. The Li(+) and Na(+) adducts prefer the sole loss of ZnCl2 , whereas the K(+) , Rb(+) , and Cs(+) adducts preferably split off MCl2 ZnCl. Calculated energetics along the fragmentation coordinate profiles allow us to interpret the experimental findings to a level of subtle details. The Zn(2+) cation wins the competition for the nitrogen coordination sites against K(+) , Rb(+) , and Cs(+) , but it loses against Li(+) and Na(+) in a remarkable deviation from a naive hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB) concept. The computations indicate expulsion of MCl2 ZnCl rather than of MCl and ZnCl2 . © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. La clé de Salomon

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, José Rodrigues dos

    2014-01-01

    Alors qu’une équipe de chercheurs du CERN est sur le point de réussir à observer le Bosson de Higgs, plus connu sous le nom de particule de Dieu, le corps de Franck Bellamy, chef de la CIA, est retrouvé dans les locaux du célèbre laboratoire Genevois. Dans les mains de la victime, les enquêteurs retrouvent un mystérieux message : « La clé : Tomás Noronha ». Désigné coupable, le cryptologue devient en quelques heures la principale cible de la CIA, bien décidée à venger Bellamy. Pour prouver son innocence, Tomás n’a qu’une solution : résoudre le crime au péril de sa vie. Ainsi débute une enquête à couper le souffle qui amènera notre héros à révéler des découvertes scientifiques des plus troublantes. L'âme existe-t-elle ? Y a-t-il une vie après la mort ? Dans cette suite de La Formule de Dieu, José Rodrigues dos Santos prouve une nouvelle fois qu’il est un des grands maîtres du thriller. La Clé de Salomon est un roman qui, au-delà de l’action, utilise la science pour ...

  1. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticle-Embedded Silver Cubic Mesh Nanostructures Using AgCl Nanocubes for Plasmonic Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jang Ho; Kim, Byung-Ho; Lee, Jae-Seung

    2017-11-01

    A novel room-temperature aqueous synthesis for gold nanoparticle-embedded silver cubic mesh nanostructures using AgCl templates via a template-assisted coreduction method is developed. The cubic AgCl templates are coreduced in the presence of AuCl 4 - and Ag + , resulting in the reduction of AuCl 4 - into gold nanoparticles on the outer region of AgCl templates, followed by the reduction of AgCl and Ag + into silver cubic mesh nanostructures. Removal of the template clearly demonstrates the delicately designed silver mesh nanostructures embedded with gold nanoparticles. The synthetic mechanism, structural properties, and surface functionalization are spectroscopically investigated. The plasmonic photocatalysis of the cubic mesh nanostructures for the degradation of organic pollutants and removal of highly toxic metal ions is investigated; the photocatalytic activity of the cubic mesh nanostructures is superior to those of conventional TiO 2 catalysts and they are catalytically functional even in natural water, owing to their high surface area and excellent chemical stability. The synthetic development presented in this study can be exploited for the highly elaborate, yet, facile design of nanomaterials with outstanding properties. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Carbon monoxide oxidation on bimetallic Ru/Au(111 surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROLF-JÜRGEN BEHM

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical deposition of Ru on Au(111 was performed in 0.5 M H2SO4+10-4 M RuCl3 . The obtained bimetallic Ru/Au(111 surfaces were character-ised by cyclic voltammetry and in situ STM in 0.5 MH2SO4. The Ru deposit consists of nanoscale islands, which merge with increasing coverage. Two different types of bimetallic Ru/Au(111 surfaces with respect to the distribution of Ru islands over the Au(111 substrate surface were obtained. When the deposition was performed at potentials more positive than the range of Au(111 reconstruction, homogeneous nucleation occured resulting in a random distribution of Ru islands. When the deposition was performed on reconstructed Au(111 at low overpotentials, selective nucleation occured resulting in the replication of the Au(111 reconstruction. Only at higher deposition overpotentials, can multilayer deposits be formed, which exhibit a very rough surface morphology. The electrocatalytic activity of such structurally well defined Ru/Au(111 bimetallic surfaces was studied towards CO oxidation with the Ru coverage ranging from submonolayer to several monolayer. COstripping commences at about 0.2 Vand occurs over a broad potential range. The observed influence of the Ru structure on the CO stripping voltammetry is explained by local variations in the COadsorption energy, caused by differences in the local Ru structure and by effects induced by the Au(111 substrate.

  3. Carbon nanotubes-supported PtAu-alloy nanoparticles for electro-oxidation of formic acid with remarkable activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yancui; Zhang Weide; Chen Caihong; Zhang Jiaqi

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Electro-oxidation of HCOOH over PtAu at lower potential, higher peak current. → The stability of the PtAu catalyst is high. → Au in the PtAu catalyst promotes utilization of Pt. - Abstract: PtAu-alloy nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were successfully prepared by simultaneous reduction of H 2 PtCl 6 .6H 2 O and HAuCl 4 .3H 2 O with sodium borohydride as a reducing reagent and sodium citrate as a stabilizing reagent. The morphology and composition of the composite catalyst were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show that the PtAu alloy nanoparticles with an average diameter of about 3.5 nm and narrow size distribution are supported on MWCNTs. Electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid at the PtAu/MWCNTs nanocomposite electrode was investigated in a solution containing 0.50 M H 2 SO 4 as a supporting electrolyte and 0.50 M formic acid by cyclic voltammogram and chronoamperometry. The results demonstrate that the PtAu/MWCNTs catalyst exhibits higher activity and stability for electro-oxidation of formic acid than the commercial Pt/C catalyst, reflecting by its lower onset potential (-0.05 V), oxidation mainly occurring in low potential range of -0.05 ± 0.65 V and higher peak current density of 3.12 mA cm -2 . The result of CO stripping voltammetry discloses that gold in the PtAu/MWCNTs nanocomposite enhances the catalytic activity and stability.

  4. Geology, mineralization, and fluid inclusion study of the Kuru-Tegerek Au-Cu-Mo skarn deposit in the Middle Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Serguei G.; Kryazhev, Sergey; Dvurechenskaya, Svetlana

    2018-02-01

    The Kuru-Tegerek Cu-Au-Mo deposit is situated in a system of Late Carboniferous subduction-related magmatic arcs of the Middle Tien Shan, which together constitute a metallogenic belt of Cu-Au-Mo (±W) porphyry, with local skarns, deposits. The deposit is related to magnetite-series gabbro-diorite to tonalite intrusion. It contains prograde magnesian and calcic skarns with abundant magnetite, associated with gabbro-diorite, and retrograde skarn with Cu mineralization, formed after intrusion of tonalite. Subsequent propylitic alteration introduced abundant chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite, and native Au culminating in zones overprinting magnetite and garnet skarn. Later quartz-muscovite-carbonate veins, formed after intrusion of late mafic quartz monzogabbro dikes, contain chalcopyrite, pyrite, arsenopyrite and other sulfides and sulfosalts, tellurides, and native Au. The earliest retrograde skarn garnet contains gaseous low-salinity (1.7-3.4 wt.% NaCl eq.) fluid inclusions homogenizing at 460-500 °C into vapor, indicating that the early fluid released from crystallizing magma was a low-density vapor. It was followed by more saline (4.0-5.0 wt.% NaCl eq.), high-temperature (400-440 °C) aqueous fluid, as fluid release from the magma progressed. Boiling of this fluid at temperatures of 420 to 370 °C and a pressure of 350-300 bar produced a low-salinity (0.6-1.2 wt.% NaCl eq.), essentially gaseous, and high-salinity (from 39 to 31 wt.% NaCl eq.) brine, with possible metal (including Cu) partitioning into both gaseous and aqueous-saline phases. Boiling was coeval with sulfide deposition in the retrograde skarn. The latest episode of the retrograde skarn stage included direct separation of saline ( 40-42 wt.% NaCl eq.) fluid from crystallizing magma. The separation of saline ( 40 to 14 wt.% NaCl eq.) fluids from a crystallizing magmatic melt continued during the propylitic stage, when fluid cooling from 370 to 320 °C, together with decreasing fO2, caused Cu and especially

  5. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Red-Light Emitting Au Nanoclusters with the Use of Egg White

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jinghan; Yan, Lei; Sang, Aohua; Yuan, Hongyan; Zheng, Baozhan; Xiao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    We developed a simple, cost-effective, and eco-friendly method to synthesize gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with red fluorescence. The experiment was performed using HAuCl[subscript 4], egg white, Na[subscript 2]CO[subscript 3] (known as soda ash or washing soda), and a microwave oven. In our experiment, fluorescent AuNCs were prepared within a…

  6. Photocatalytically active Au/TiO2 films deposited by two-step spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balashev, Konstantin; Georgiev, Petar; Simeonova, Sylvia; Stambolova, Irina; Blaskov, Vladimir; Vassilev, Sasho; Eliyas, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystalline TiO 2 and surface gold-modified films (Au/TiO 2 ) are obtained by two step spray pyrolysis process. Titanium tetrachloride (TiCl 4 ) was used as inorganic titanium precursor. The Au nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of sprayed TiO 2 films, obtained by the classical Turkevich method. The AFM analyses have revealed that the roughness of Au/TiO 2 is twice lower than that of the reference titania film. Some globular species are visible on the surface, which could be either individual Au nanoparticles or Au nanoparticles’ agglomerates embedded into the TiO 2 film. The photocatalytic activity in the oxidative degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye under visible light of the Au/TiO 2 films was estimated in a semi-batch reactor. Surface gold modified TiO 2 films revealed higher photocatalytic efficiency than the reference sample. Key words: Au nanoparticles, photocatalysis, azo dye, titania, nanosized

  7. The anti-tumour properties and biodistribution (as determined by the radiolabeled equivalent) of Au-compounds intended as potential chemotherapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nell, M.J. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pretoria, P.O. Box 2034, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Wagener, J.M. [Radiochemistry, NECSA (South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Ltd.), P.O. Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)], E-mail: jwagener@necsa.co.za; Zeevaart, J.R. [CARST, North West University, Mafikeng Campus, P. Bag X2046, Mmabatho 2735 (South Africa); Kilian, E. [Department of Pharmacology, Onderstepoort, University of Pretoria, P.O. Box 2034, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Mamo, M.A.; Layh, M. [Molecular Sciences Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits, 2050 Johannesburg (South Africa); Coyanis, M. [Project AuTEK, Mintek, Private Bag X3015, Randburg 2125 (South Africa); Rensburg, C.E.J. van [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pretoria, P.O. Box 2034, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2009-07-15

    The anti-tumour activity of the Au (I) phosphine complex [Au(dppe{sub 2}]Cl was first discovered in the mid 1980s although promising results were obtained it did not pass clinical studies because of its toxicity to organs such as the liver and heart. The aim of this study was to determine whether the two novel gold compounds (MM5 and MM6), selected for this study, have higher selectivity for cancer cells with less toxicity towards normal cells than [Au(dppe){sub 2}]Cl, and also to determine whether they have improved bio distribution compared to [Au(dppe){sub 2}]Cl. The Au-compounds as potential chemotherapeutic drugs were evaluated by using radioactive tracers in the in vitro and in vivo studies. Results obtained from these experiments showed that the uptake of these experimental compounds was dependent on their octanol/water partition coefficient. However; the inhibition of cell growth did not correlate with the uptake of these compounds by the cells that were tested. In terms of the total uptake it was found that the compounds that were less lipophilic (MM5, MM6) were taken up less efficiently in cells than those that are more lipophilic. Therefore hydrophilic drugs are expected to have a limited biodistribution compared to lipophilic drugs. This might imply a more selective tumour uptake.

  8. Au-Pt-Au nanoraspberry structures used for mercury ion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiang-Hao; Huang, Shuai; Wen, Xiaoyan; Li, Min; Lu, Haifei

    2017-12-01

    Detection of Hg2+ with high sensitivity is of great significance in the biochemical sensing field. Quantitative of Hg2+ was realized based on the influence of Hg2+ on the UV-vis absorption performance of Au-Pt-Au core-shell nanoraspberry (APA)-rhodamine-6G (R6G) structure. First, APA sol was added into R6G indicator solution and the UV-vis absorption signal intensity of R6G was evidently promoted. The signal intensity monotonously increased as more APA sol was added. However, when HgCl2 solution was introduced, the signal intensity declined. A linear relationship between Hg2+ concentration and signal intensity at 527 nm was revealed, based on which quantitative determination of Hg2+ could be realized. Hg2+ detection sensitivity was measured to be 0.031 a.u./M with a limit of detection of 10-7 M and the response time was 20 s. A high Hg2+ detection selectivity over Cu2+, Na+, Li+, and K+ was demonstrated. Due to its simplicity and high sensitivity, the proposed method could find an extensive application prospect in the Hg2+ detection field.

  9. Efficient seed-mediated method for the large-scale synthesis of Au nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Waqqar; Bhatti, Arshad Saleem; Ruitenbeek, Jan M. van

    2017-01-01

    Seed-mediated methods are widely followed for the synthesis of Au nanorods (NRs). However, mostly dilute concentrations of the Au precursor (HAuCl_4) are used in the growth solution, which leads to a low final concentration of NRs. Attempts of increasing the concentration of NRs by simply increasing the concentration of HAuCl_4, other reagents in the growth solution and seeds lead to a faster growth kinetics which is not favourable for NR growth. Herein, we demonstrate that the increase in growth kinetics for high concentrations of reagents in growth solution can be neutralised by decreasing the pH of the solution. The synthesis of the NRs can be scaled up by using higher concentrations of reagents and adding an optimum concentration of HCl in the growth solution. The concentration of HAuCl_4 in the growth solution can be increased up to 5 mM, and 10–20 times more NRs can be synthesised for the same reaction volume compared to that of the conventional seed-mediated method. We have also noticed that a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-to-HAuCl_4 molar ratio of 50 is sufficient for obtaining high yield of NRs.

  10. Efficient seed-mediated method for the large-scale synthesis of Au nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Waqqar; Bhatti, Arshad Saleem [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Physics (Pakistan); Ruitenbeek, Jan M. van, E-mail: Ruitenbeek@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden University, Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory (Netherlands)

    2017-03-15

    Seed-mediated methods are widely followed for the synthesis of Au nanorods (NRs). However, mostly dilute concentrations of the Au precursor (HAuCl{sub 4}) are used in the growth solution, which leads to a low final concentration of NRs. Attempts of increasing the concentration of NRs by simply increasing the concentration of HAuCl{sub 4}, other reagents in the growth solution and seeds lead to a faster growth kinetics which is not favourable for NR growth. Herein, we demonstrate that the increase in growth kinetics for high concentrations of reagents in growth solution can be neutralised by decreasing the pH of the solution. The synthesis of the NRs can be scaled up by using higher concentrations of reagents and adding an optimum concentration of HCl in the growth solution. The concentration of HAuCl{sub 4} in the growth solution can be increased up to 5 mM, and 10–20 times more NRs can be synthesised for the same reaction volume compared to that of the conventional seed-mediated method. We have also noticed that a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-to-HAuCl{sub 4} molar ratio of 50 is sufficient for obtaining high yield of NRs.

  11. Well-resolved oil-soluble Au-doped ZnCdS quantum dots and enhancing doping emission with In-codoping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Ruosheng, E-mail: zengrsh@gznu.edu.cn [School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang 550001 (China); Sun, Zhiguo [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang 550001 (China); Zhou, Chunjiao [College of Science, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Fang, Cheng; Han, Guo-Cheng [School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Chen, Zhencheng, E-mail: chenzhcheng@guet.edu.cn [School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2016-06-25

    Highly emissive semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with tunable color are valuable in many applications such as solid state lighting and bio-imaging. Herein, we report a facile synthetic method to Au:ZnCdS and Au:ZnCdS/ZnS core/shell QDs with tunable emission color. The highly active Au precursor (HAuCl{sub 4}) is prevented to be decomposed at high reaction temperature using 1-dodecanethiol (DDT) as the surface ligand. High-quality Au:ZnCdS/ZnS core/shell QDs are prepared and the highest photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) can achieve 42% by overcoating of ZnS layer over the bare Au:ZnCdS core QDs. Furthermore, through using Au{sup +} ion as the primary dopants and trivalent cation In{sup 3+} as co-dopants, the PL QY can be enhanced significantly because compensation of In{sup 3+} ion-codoping for the charge imbalance from Au{sup +}-doping. This codoping strategy may be applied to other related optical materials to control the optical properties based on our understanding for physical mechanism. - Highlights: • High-quality oil-soluble Au:ZnCdS/ZnS QDs were prepared for the first time. • The highly active HAuCl4 is prevented to decompose by using 1-dodecanethiol. • The highest PL QY of Au:ZnCdS/ZnS QDs can achieve 42% by overcoating ZnS layer. • The PL QY of QDs can be significantly enhanced by Au{sup +}, In{sup 3+}-codoping.

  12. Site-specific growth of Au particles on ZnO nanopyramids under ultraviolet illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Kexin

    2011-01-01

    In this work, wurtzite ZnO nanocrystals with unique "pyramid" morphology were firstly prepared via solvothermal synthesis. It was determined that the ZnO nanopyramids are grown along the polar c-axis with the vertexes pointing to the [001] direction. When the mixture of ZnO nanopyramids and Au precursor (HAuCl4) was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) illumination, Au particles were site-specifically formed on the vertexes of ZnO nanopyramids. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposite showed significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity as compared to the bare ZnO nanopyramids. First-principles based calculations well explained the formation of ZnO nanopyramids as well as the site-specific growth of Au, and revealed that during the photocatalysis process the Au particles can accommodate photoelectrons and thus facilitate the charge separation. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Um Caso Clínico de Hipotonia Neonatal

    OpenAIRE

    Graça, André; Pedroso, Helena; Ferreira, José Carlos; Pinheiro, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Os autores descrevem um caso clínico de um recém-nascido que se apresentou com um quadro clínico de hipotonia, fácies miopática e artrogripose. A observação da mãe, que demonstrou claramente o fenómeno de miotonia, permitiu suspeitar do diagnóstico de distrofia miotónica congénita, sendo o diagnóstico confirmado por genética molecular. A evolução no período neonatal foi relativamente favorável, uma vez que não desenvolveu quadro de dificuldade respiratória e que a dificuldade alimentar foi au...

  14. A Study of the Influence of Percentage of Copper on the Structural and Optical Properties of Au-Cu Nanoparticle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parivash Mashayekhi Shams

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Here we present our experimental results in synthesizing Au-Cu nano-particles with tunable localized surface plasmon resonance frequency through wet-chemical at temperature room. The reaction is performed in the presence of ascorbic acid as a reducing agent and polyvinyl pyrrolidone as capping agent via four different procedures: (1 mixture of 90% HAuCl4 and 10% CuSO4.5H2O precursors, (2 mixture of 75% HAuCl4 and 25% CuSO4.5H2O precursors, (3 mixture of 50% HAuCl4 and 50% CuSO4.5H2O precursors (4 mixture of 25% HAuCl4 and 75% CuSO4.5H2O precursors. Effect of different percentages of Cu on Au nanoparticles has been analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM with EDAX analysis, DRS UV-Vis, and Fourier transform IR spectra (FTIR analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis revealed that the nanoparticles are of cubic structure without an impure phase. The successful doping of the Cu into the Au host was evident by XRD line shiftings. The increasing percentage of copper leads to the decreasing grain size. With the increase of Cu2+ to Au3+ ratio in the Cu2+/Au3+ mixed solution (> 50% Cu, XRD lines show no shifting. The average crystal sizes of the particles at room temperature were less than 9.9 nm. The surface plasmon resonance peak shifts from 380 to 340 nm, party due to the change in particle size. SEM images show a spherical shape and the size of nanoparticles becomes smaller with increasing the percentage of copper. Moreover, in the molar ratio of Cu2+/Au3+ = 75/25 (>50% Cu, mixture of spherical and trigonal nanoparticles were prepared. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR showed the coordination and conjugation nanoparticles with N and O atoms of C-N and C=O bonds.

  15. Transformation of Ag nanocubes into Ag-Au hollow nanostructures with enriched Ag contents to improve SERS activity and chemical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yin; Zhang, Qiang; Fu, Zheng-Wen; Qin, Dong

    2014-03-12

    We report a strategy to complement the galvanic replacement reaction between Ag nanocubes and HAuCl4 with co-reduction by ascorbic acid (AA) for the formation of Ag-Au hollow nanostructures with greatly enhanced SERS activity. Specifically, in the early stage of synthesis, the Ag nanocubes are sharpened at corners and edges because of the selective deposition of Au and Ag atoms at these sites. In the following steps, the pure Ag in the nanocubes is constantly converted into Ag(+) ions to generate voids owing to the galvanic reaction with HAuCl4, but these released Ag(+) ions are immediately reduced back to Ag atoms and are co-deposited with Au atoms onto the nanocube templates. We observe distinctive SERS properties for the Ag-Au hollow nanostructures at visible and near-infrared excitation wavelengths. When plasmon damping is eliminated by using an excitation wavelength of 785 nm, the SERS activity of the Ag-Au hollow nanostructures is 15- and 33-fold stronger than those of the original Ag nanocubes and the Ag-Au nanocages prepared by galvanic replacement without co-reduction, respectively. Additionally, Ag-Au hollow nanostructures embrace considerably improved stability in an oxidizing environment such as aqueous H2O2 solution. Collectively, our work suggests that the Ag-Au hollow nanostructures will find applications in SERS detection and imaging.

  16. A novel sandwich-type electrochemical aptasensor based on GR-3D Au and aptamer-AuNPs-HRP for sensitive detection of oxytetracycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Wang, Yu; Xu, Wei; Leng, Xueqi; Wang, Hongzhi; Guo, Yuna; Huang, Jiadong

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, a novel sandwich-type electrochemical aptasensor has been fabricated and applied for sensitive and selective detection of antibiotic oxytetracycline (OTC). This sensor was based on graphene-three dimensional nanostructure gold nanocomposite (GR-3D Au) and aptamer-AuNPs-horseradish peroxidase (aptamer-AuNPs-HRP) nanoprobes as signal amplification. Firstly, GR-3D Au film was modified on glassy carbon electrode only by one-step electrochemical coreduction with graphite oxide (GO) and HAuCl 4 at cathodic potentials, which enhanced the electron transfer and loading capacity of biomolecules. Then the aptamer and HRP modified Au nanoparticles provide high affinity and ultrasensitive electrochemical probe with excellent specificity for OTC. Under the optimized conditions, the peak current was linearly proportional to the concentration of OTC in the range of 5×10 -10 -2×10 -3 gL -1 , with a detection limit of 4.98×10 -10 gL -1 . Additionally, this aptasensor had the advantages in high sensitivity, superb specificity and showed good recovery in synthetic samples. Hence, the developed sandwich-type electrochemical aptasensor might provide a useful and practical tool for OTC determination and related food safety analysis and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthesis and Structure Determination of a New Au20 Nanocluster Protected by Tripodal Tetraphosphine Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Zhang, Qianfan [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Williard, Paul G. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Wang, Lai-Sheng [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2014-03-31

    We report the synthesis and structure determination of a new Au20 nanocluster coordinated by four tripodal tetraphosphine (PP3) ligands {PP3 = tris[2-(diphenylphosphino)ethyl]phosphine}. Single-crystal Xray crystallography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry show that the cluster assembly can be formulated as [Au20(PP3)4]Cl4. The Au20 cluster consists of an icosahedral Au13 core and a seven-Au-atom partial outer shell arranged in a local C3 symmetry. One PP3 ligand coordinates to four Au atoms in the outer shell, while the other three PP3 ligands coordinate to one Au atom from the outer shell and three Au atoms from the surface of the Au13 core, giving rise to an overall chiral 16-electron Au cluster core with C3 symmetry.

  18. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H. [Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Tahara, S. [Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Okada, T. [Niigata College of Technology, Kamishin’eicho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2076 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  19. Ligand-modulated interactions between charged monolayer-protected Au144 (SR)60 gold nanoparticles in physiological saline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Oscar; Chen, Liao; Whetten, Robert; Yacaman, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    We studied the interactions of functionalized Au144 nanoparticles (NPs) in a near-physiological environment through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The AuNPs were coated with a homogeneous selection of 60 thiolates: 11-mercapto-1-undecanesulfonate, 5-mercapto-1-pentanesulfonate, 5-mercapto-1-pentane-amine, 4-mercapto-benzoate or 4-mercapto-benzamide. These ligands were selected to elucidate how the aggregation behavior depends on the ligands' sign of charge, length, and flexibility. Simulating the dynamics of a pair of identical AuNPs in a cell of saline of 150 mM NaCl in addition to 120 Na+/Cl- counter-ions, we computed the aggregation affinities from the potential of mean force as a function of the pair separation. We found that NPs coated with negatively charged, short ligands have the strongest affinities mediated by multiple Na+ counter-ions residing on a plane in-between the pair and forming ``salt bridges'' to both NPs. Positively charged NPs have weaker affinities, as Cl counter-ions form fewer and weaker salt bridges. The longer ligands' large fluctuations disfavor the forming of salt bridges, enable hydrophobic contact between the exposed hydrocarbon chains and interact at greater separations due to the fact that the screening effect is rather incomplete. Supported by the CONACYT, NIH, NSF and TACC.

  20. Two complexes of Pt(IV) and Au(III) with 2,2'-dipyridylamine and 2,2'-dipyridylaminide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshev, Alexander N; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu; Haukka, Matti

    2014-12-01

    Two noble metal complexes involving ancillary chloride ligands and chelating 2,2'-bipyridylamine (Hdpa) or its deprotonated derivative (dpa), namely [bis(pyridin-2-yl-κN)amine]tetrachloridoplatinum(IV), [PtCl4(C10H9N3)], and [bis(pyridin-2-yl-κN)aminido]dichloridogold(III), [AuCl2(C10H8N3)], are presented and structurally characterized. The metal atom in the former has a slightly distorted octahedral coordination environment, formed by four chloride ligands and two pyridyl N atoms of Hdpa, while the metal atom in the latter has a slightly distorted square-planar coordination environment, formed by two chloride ligands and two pyridyl N atoms of dpa. The difference in conjugation between the pyridine rings in normal and deprotonated 2,2'-dipyridylamine is discussed on the basis of the structural features of these complexes. The influence of weak interactions on the supramolecular structures of the complexes, providing one-dimensional chains of [PtCl4(C10H9N3)] and dimers of [AuCl2(C10H8N3)], are discussed.

  1. Cu2O-directed in situ growth of Au nanoparticles inside HKUST-1 nanocages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongxin; Liu, Ting; Tian, Long; Zhang, Linlin; Yao, Lili; Tan, Taixing; Xu, Jin; Han, Xiaohui; Liu, Dan; Wang, Cheng

    2016-12-07

    Controllable integration of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is attracting considerable attention as the obtained composite materials always show synergistic effects in applications of catalysis, delivery, as well as sensing. Herein, a Cu 2 O-directed in situ growth strategy was developed to integrate Au nanoparticles and HKUST-1. In this strategy, Cu 2 O@HKUST-1 core-shell heterostructures, HKUST-1 nanocages, Cu 2 O@Au@HKUST-1 sandwich core-shell heterostructures and Au@HKUST-1 balls-in-cage heterostructures were successfully synthesized. Cu 2 O@HKUST-1 core-shell heterostructures were synthesized by soaking Cu 2 O nanocrystals in benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid solution. The well-defined Cu 2 O@HKUST-1 core-shell heterostructures were demonstrated to be dominated by the ratio of Cu 2+ cations to btc 3- ligands in solution during the period of HKUST-1 formation. Cu 2 O@Au@HKUST-1 sandwich core-shell or Au@HKUST-1 balls-in-cage heterostructures were obtained by impregnating HAuCl 4 into Cu 2 O@HKUST-1 core-shell heterostructures. Due to the porosity of HKUST-1 and reducibility of Cu 2 O, HAuCl 4 could pass through the HKUST-1 shell and be reduced by the Cu 2 O core in situ forming Au nanoparticles. Finally, CO oxidation reaction at high temperatures was carried out to assess the catalytic functionality of the obtained composite heterostructures. This strategy can circumvent some drawbacks of the existing approaches for integrating MNPs and MOFs, such as nonselective deposition of MNPs at the outer surface of the MOF matrices, extreme treatment conditions and additional surface modifications.

  2. Uniform formation of Au coated polystyrene core-shell structure using metallization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoungseob; Koo, Jonghyun; Roh, Yonghan, E-mail: yhroh@skku.edu

    2011-08-01

    There are several methods for the fabrication of core-shell particles, including chemical reduction and self-assembly. In this study, the chemical reduction method was used to fabricate 100 nm, Au-coated polystyrene nanoparticles. The formation of the gold layer was based on the increase of gold coverage by the reaction with aniline and HAuCl{sub 4}. This method allowed for efficient control of the gold coverage and led to relatively stable products. The formation of Au clusters on the surface of the 100 nm polystyrene beads was characterized by scanning electron microscope and high resolution tunneling electron microscope. As a result, the Au-coated nanoparticles can be used in various applications such as surface plasmon resonators, drug delivery systems and electronic optical devices.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Poly(Amidoamine Dendrimers Encapsulatd 198Au Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ritawidya1,2

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy or internal radiotherapy is one of many methods used for treatment of cancer. This modality requires an agent with radionuclides that emits  or β particle with a proper energy. 198Au (99% β max = 0.96 MeV and t1/2 = 2.69 days is one of radionuclides that has been considered to be effective for the above-mentioned purpose. The purpose of this research was to synthesis and characterize poly(amidoamine (PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated 198Au nanoparticles as a new brachytherapy agent. PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated 198Au nanoparticles was successfully synthesized by a bottom-up method using sodium borohydride as a reductor. Purification was then performed by a size exclusion chromatography in order to separate large Au nanoparticles that were formed outside the cavity of PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers. Prior to the synthesis of PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated 198Au nanoparticles, the synthetic procedure was first established by using a non-radioactive Au. The PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated Au nanoparticles produced was then characterized by using an UV-Vis spectroscopy, a transmission electron microscopy (TEM, particle size analyzer (PSA, and an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS. Characterization results revealed that PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated Au nanoparticles that were prepared from a reaction mixture of PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers and Au HAuCl4 with mol ratio of 2.8, was found to be a proper formula. It produced PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated Au nanoparticles with diameter of 1.743 nm, spheris, uniform and drug loading value of 26.34%. This formula was then used in synthesis using radioactive Au, 198Au. Characterization results of PAMAM G3.0 dendrimers encapsulated 198Au nanoparticles gave a radiochemical purity of 99.4% and zero charge.

  4. Biogenic synthesis of Ag-Au-In decorated on rGO nanosheet and its antioxidant and biological activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Moushumi; Sonowal, Shashanka; Saikia, Indranirekha; Boruah, Purna K.; Das, Manash R.; Tamuly, Chandan

    2017-09-01

    Au-Ag-In-rGO nanocomposite was synthesized using fruit extract of Zanthoxylum rhetsa which is an eco-friendly, simple and green method. It was characterized by UV-visible, FT-IR, XRD, XPS, EDX, TEM technique. The antioxidant capacity of the nanocomposite was evaluated in presence of AgNO3, HAuCl4 and InCl3 solution respectively at 25 °C. The results showed significant antioxidant activity in presence of 1  ×  10-5 mM AgNO3 solution. The antibacterial activity of Au-Ag-In-rGO nanoparticles was carried out against the gram  -ve bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and gram  +ve bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus. The bacterial growth kinetics was studied. The bacterial strain E. coli and S. aureus showed complete inhibition at concentration 100 µg ml-1. The activity is more effective in case of Au-Ag-In-rGO compared to GO.

  5. A3-Coupling catalyzed by robust Au nanoparticles covalently bonded to HS-functionalized cellulose nanocrystalline films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Lin Huang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We decorated HS-functionalized cellulose nanocrystallite (CNC films with monodisperse Au nanoparticles (AuNPs to form a novel nanocomposite catalyst AuNPs@HS-CNC. The uniform, fine AuNPs were made by the reduction of HAuCl4 solution with thiol (HS- group-functionalized CNC films. The AuNPs@HS-CNC nanocomposites were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, TEM, ATR-IR and solid-state NMR. Characterizations suggested that the size of the AuNPs was about 2–3 nm and they were evenly distributed onto the surface of CNC films. Furthermore, the unique nanocomposite Au@HS-CNC catalyst displayed high catalytic efficiency in promoting three-component coupling of an aldehyde, an alkyne, and an amine (A3-coupling either in water or without solvent. Most importantly, the catalyst could be used repetitively more than 11 times without significant deactivation. Our strategy also promotes the use of naturally renewable cellulose to prepare reusable nanocomposite catalysts for organic synthesis.

  6. Novel electrochemical redox-active species: one-step synthesis of polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd and its application for multiplexed immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyuan; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2015-11-01

    Electrochemical redox-active species play crucial role in electrochemically multiplexed immunoassays. A one-pot method for synthesizing four kinds of new electrochemical redox-active species was reported using HAuCl4 and Na2PdCl4 as dual oxidating agents and aniline derivatives as monomers. The synthesized polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd composites, namely poly(N-methyl-o-benzenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-o-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd and poly(3,3’,5,5’-tetramethylbenzidine)-Au/Pd, exhibited electrochemical redox activity at -0.65 V, -0.3 V, 0.12 V, and 0.5 V, respectively. Meanwhile, these composites showed high H2O2 electrocatalytic activity because of the presence of Au/Pd. The as-prepared composites were used as electrochemical immunoprobes in simultaneous detection of four tumor biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA199), carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA724), and alpha fetoprotein (AFP)). This immunoassay shed light on potential applications in simultaneous gastric cancer (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, CA724) and liver cancer diagnosis (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, AFP). The present strategy to the synthesize redox species could be easily extended to other polymers such as polypyrrole derivatives and polythiophene derivatives. This would be of great significance in the electrochemical detection of more analytes.

  7. Preparation and use of Cu nanoclusters as fluorescent probes to determine Au(III) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jinshui, E-mail: jsliu@sina.com; Wang, Bin; Xu, Meijiao; Wang, Lizhen; Zhou, Zihan

    2017-05-15

    Polyethyleneimine-capped Cu nanoclusters (PEI-CuNCs) with a mean diameter of 2.5 nm and that emitted blue light at 485 nm were synthesized. The fluorescence of PEI-CuNCs was strongly quenched when Au(III) ions were present. Because of this specific response, a PEI-CuNC-based fluorescent turn-off sensor was developed. Under optimum conditions, a good linear relationship (R{sup 2}=0.993) was found between the relative fluorescence intensity (F{sub 0}/F) and the Au(III) ion concentration between 0.5 and 15 µM. The detection limit for Au(III) ions was 0.06 µM. The quenching mechanism was assessed by performing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra studies. The fluorescence quenching was ascribed to photo-induced electron transfer from the PEI-CuNCs to the AuCl{sub 4}{sup −} occur. Using The method described is a new way of quantifying Au(III) ions.

  8. Synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles via room-temperature electron reduction with argon glow discharge as electron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Manman; Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Argon glow discharge has been employed as a cheap, environmentally friendly, and convenient electron source for simultaneous reduction of HAuCl4 and PdCl2 on the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrate. The thermal imaging confirms that the synthesis is operated at room temperature. The reduction is conducted with a short time (30 min) under the pressure of approximately 100 Pa. This room-temperature electron reduction operates in a dry way and requires neither hydrogen nor extra heating nor chemical reducing agent. The analyses using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm all the metallic ions have been reduced. The characterization with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) shows that AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are formed. There also exist some highly dispersed Au and Pd monometallic particles that cannot be detected by XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of their small particle sizes. The observed AuPd alloyed nanoparticles are spherical with an average size of 14 nm. No core-shell structure can be observed. The room-temperature electron reduction can be operated in a larger scale. It is an easy way for the synthesis of AuPd alloyed nanoparticles.

  9. Sodium citrate assisted facile synthesis of AuPd alloy networks for ethanol electrooxidation with high activity and durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yanling; Zhu, Zhijun; Lu, Xiaolin; Zhou, H. Susan

    2016-10-01

    The direct ethanol fuel cell is an emerging energy conversion device for which palladium is considered as the one of the most effective components for anode catalyst, however, its widespread application has been still limited by the activity and durability of the anode catalyst. In this work, AuPd alloy networks (NWs) are synthesized using H2PdCl4 and HAuCl4 as precursors reduced by NaBH4 in the presence of sodium citrate (SC). The results reveal that SC plays significant role in network structure, resulting in the enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the catalyst. This self-supported AuPd NWs catalyst exhibits much higher electrochemical catalytic activity than commercial Pd/C catalyst toward ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline solution. Significantly, AuPd NWs catalyst shows extremely high durability at the beginning of the chronoamperometry test, and as high as 49% of the mass current density (1.41 A/mgPd) remains after 4000 s current-time test at -0.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in N2-saturated KOH-ethanol solution. This strategy provides a facile method for the preparation of alloy networks with high electrochemical activity, and can be potentially expanded to a variety of electrochemical applications.

  10. Water-soluble phosphine-protected Au9 clusters: Electronic structures and nuclearity conversion via phase transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hiroshi; Tsubota, Shuhei

    2017-08-01

    In this article, isolation, exploration of electronic structures, and nuclearity conversion of water-soluble triphenylphosphine monosulfonate (TPPS)-protected nonagold (Au9) clusters are outlined. The Au9 clusters are obtained by the reduction of solutions containing TPPS and HAuCl4 and subsequent electrophoretic fractionation. Mass spectrometry and elemental analysis reveal the formation of [Au9(TPPS)8]5- nonagold cluster. UV-vis absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of aqueous [Au9(TPPS)8]5- are quite similar to those of [Au9(PPh3)8]3+ in organic solvent, so the solution-phase structures are likely similar for both systems. Simultaneous deconvolution analysis of absorption and MCD spectra demonstrates the presence of some weak electronic transitions that are essentially unresolved in the UV-vis absorption. Quantum chemical calculations for a model compound [Au9(pH3)8]3+ show that the possible (solution-phase) skeletal structure of the nonagold cluster has D2h core symmetry rather than C4-symmetrical centered crown conformation, which is known as the crystal form of the Au9 compound. Moreover, we find a new nuclearity conversion route from Au9 to Au8; that is, phase transfer of aqueous [Au9(TPPS)8]5- into chloroform using tetraoctylammonium bromide yields [Au8(TPPS)8]6- clusters in the absence of excess phosphine.

  11. Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)/poly(vinyl alcohol) sensitizing system for solution photogeneration of small Ag, Au, and Cu crystallites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchev, A S; Shulyak, T S; Slaten, B L; Gale, W F; Mills, G

    2005-04-28

    Illumination of air-free aqueous solutions containing sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and poly(vinyl alcohol) with 350 nm light results in benzophenone ketyl radicals of the polyketone. The polymer radicals form with a quantum yield 0.02 and decay with a second-order rate constant 6 orders of magnitude lower than that of typical alpha-hydroxy radicals. Evidence is presented that the polymeric benzophenone ketyl radicals reduce Ag+, Cu2+, and AuCl4- to metal particles of nanometer dimensions. Decreases in the reduction rates with increasing Ag(I), Cu(II), and Au(III) concentrations are explained using a kinetic model in which the metal ions quench the excited state of the polymeric benzophenone groups, which forms the macromolecular radicals. Quenching is fastest for Ag+, whereas Cu2+ and AuCl4- exhibit similar rate constants. Particle formation becomes more complex as the number of equivalents needed to reduce the metal ions increases; the Au(III) system is an extreme case where the radical reactions operate in parallel with secondary light-initiated and thermal reduction channels. For each metal ion, the polymer-initiated photoreactions produce crystallites possessing distinct properties, such as a very strong plasmon in the Ag case or the narrow size distribution exhibited by Au particles.

  12. L'amenagement du territoire au Benin : Les rendez-vous manques ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le leadership est une variable-clé de l'aménagement du territoire. L'histoire, à travers l'expérience de certains pays, en donne la démonstration. Le cas certainement le plus illustratif est celui de la France au sortir de la Seconde guerre mondiale. La « politique de reconstruction de la France libérée » a connu son ...

  13. Universal Multifunctional Nanoplatform Based on Target-Induced in Situ Promoting Au Seeds Growth to Quench Fluorescence of Upconversion Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiongqiong; Chen, Hongyu; Fang, Aijin; Wu, Xinyang; Liu, Meiling; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2017-12-22

    Construction of a new multifunctional chemo/biosensing platform for small biomolecules and tumor markers is of great importance in analytical chemistry. Herein, a novel universal multifunctional nanoplatform for biomolecules and enzyme activity detection was proposed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and target-inducing enlarged gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The reductive molecule such as H 2 O 2 can act as the reductant to reduce HAuCl 4 , which will make the Au seeds grow. The enlarged AuNPs can effectively quench the fluorescence of UCNPs owing to the good spectral overlap between the absorption band of the AuNPs and the emission band of the UCNPs. Utilizing the FRET between the UCNPs and enlarged AuNPs, good linear relationship between the fluorescence of UCNPs and the concentration of H 2 O 2 can be found. Based on this strategy, H 2 O 2 related molecules such as l-lactate, glucose, and uric acid can also be quantified. On the basis of UCNPs and PVP/HAuCl 4 , a general strategy for other reductants such as ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), or enzyme activity can be established. Therefore, the universal multifunctional nanoplatform based on UCNPs and the target-inducing in situ enlarged Au NPs will show its potential as a simple method for the detection of some life related reductive molecules, enzyme substrates, as well as enzyme activity.

  14. Carbon monoxide oxidation on a Au(111 surface modified by spontaneously deposited Ru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROLF-JÜRGEN BEHM

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous deposition of Ru on Au(111 was performed in 10-3 M RuCl3 + 0.5 M H2SO4 solution. The obtained surface was characterized by STM under potential control in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution. The coverage of the Au(111 terraces by deposited Ru was estimated by STM to be 0.02 ML. Step decoration could be noticed in the STM images, which indicates that the steps, as lined defects, are active sites for the nucleation of Ru monolayer islands, while the random distribution of Ru nuclei, observed on the terraces indicates point defects as active sites. The electrocatalytic activity of Au(111 surface modified by spontaneously deposited Ru was studied towards CO oxidation. The significant enhancement in the reaction rate compared to CO oxidation on a pure Au(111 surface, indicated that the edges of the deposited Ru islands were the active sites for the reaction.

  15. Sonochemical synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of air-stable Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wei; He Quanguo; Chen Hong; Tang Jianxin; Nie Libo

    2007-01-01

    Air-stable nanoparticles of Fe 3 O 4 /Au were prepared via sonolysis of a solution mixture of hydrogen tetrachloroaureate(III) trihydrate (HAuCl 4 ) and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES)-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles with further drop-addition of sodium citrate. The Fe 3 O 4 /Au nanoparticles were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Nanoparticles of Fe 3 O 4 /Au obtained under appropriate conditions possess a very high saturation magnetization of about 63 emu g -1 and their average diameter is about 30 nm

  16. Platinum(iv) prodrug conjugated Pd@Au nanoplates for chemotherapy and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Saige; Chen, Xiaolan; Wei, Jingping; Huang, Yizhuan; Weng, Jian; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-03-01

    Owing to the excellent near infrared (NIR) light absorption and efficient passive targeting toward tumor tissue, two-dimensional (2D) core-shell PEGylated Pd@Au nanoplates have great potential in both photothermal therapy and drug delivery systems. In this work, we successfully conjugate Pd@Au nanoplates with a platinum(iv) prodrug c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(O2CCH2CH2CO2H)2] to obtain a nanocomposite (Pd@Au-PEG-Pt) for combined photothermal-chemotherapy. The prepared Pd@Au-PEG-Pt nanocomposite showed excellent stability in physiological solutions and efficient Pt(iv) prodrug loading. Once injected into biological tissue, the Pt(iv) prodrug was easily reduced by physiological reductants (e.g. ascorbic acid or glutathione) into its cytotoxic and hydrophilic Pt(ii) form and released from the original nanocomposite, and the NIR laser irradiation could accelerate the release of Pt(ii) species. More importantly, Pd@Au-PEG-Pt has high tumor accumulation (29%ID per g), which makes excellent therapeutic efficiency at relatively low power density possible. The in vivo results suggested that, compared with single therapy the combined thermo-chemotherapy treatment with Pd@Au-PEG-Pt resulted in complete destruction of the tumor tissue without recurrence, while chemotherapy using Pd@Au-PEG-Pt without irradiation or photothermal treatment using Pd@Au-PEG alone did not. Our work highlights the prospects of a feasible drug delivery strategy of the Pt prodrug by using 2D Pd@Au nanoplates as drug delivery carriers for multimode cancer treatment.Owing to the excellent near infrared (NIR) light absorption and efficient passive targeting toward tumor tissue, two-dimensional (2D) core-shell PEGylated Pd@Au nanoplates have great potential in both photothermal therapy and drug delivery systems. In this work, we successfully conjugate Pd@Au nanoplates with a platinum(iv) prodrug c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(O2CCH2CH2CO2H)2] to obtain a nanocomposite (Pd@Au-PEG-Pt) for combined photothermal-chemotherapy. The

  17. Arrays of Au-TiO{sub 2} Janus-like nanoparticles fabricated by block copolymer templates and their photocatalytic activity in the degradation of methylene blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Xiaoning; Liu Jun; Yang Hui; Sun Jiuchuan [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fluorine Chemistry and Chemical Materials, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, 106 Jiwei Road, Jinan 250022 (China); Li Xue, E-mail: lixue0312@yahoo.com [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fluorine Chemistry and Chemical Materials, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, 106 Jiwei Road, Jinan 250022 (China); Zhang Xiaokai [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, 88 Wenhuadong Road, Jinan 250014 (China); Jia Yuxi, E-mail: jia_yuxi@sdu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {center_dot} Fabrication of an array of Au-titania Janus nanoparticles on silicon substrate. {center_dot} PS-b-PEO block copolymer is used as templates. {center_dot} Au-TiO{sub 2} Janus-like nanoparticles exhibit higher photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: A simple approach towards the fabrication of an array of Au-titania Janus-like nanoparticles is presented. Monolayer organic-inorganic hybrid films are produced by spin coating the mixture of polystyrene-block-poly (ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO)/HAuCl{sub 4} solution and titania sol-gel precursor solution. HAuCl{sub 4} and titania are incorporated in the PEO domains. After removing the organic matrix by deep UV irradiation, arrays of Au-TiO{sub 2} Janus-like nanoparticles on the substrate surface are obtained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are employed to characterize the Janus-like nanoparticles. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) chosen as the test reaction to examine the photocatalytic activity of the Au-TiO{sub 2} Janus-like nanoparticles is shown to be more effective as compared to that of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles or Au-TiO{sub 2} composite nanoparticles. The increased photocatalytic activity of Au-TiO{sub 2} Janus-like nanoparticles is attributed to the Au-TiO{sub 2} heterointerfaces.

  18. Innate stimulatory capacity of high molecular weight transition metals Au (gold) and Hg (mercury).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Alsalem, Inás W A; Bontkes, Hetty J; Verstege, Marleen I; Gibbs, Sue; von Blomberg, B M E; Scheper, Rik J; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2015-03-01

    Nickel, cobalt and palladium ions can induce an innate immune response by triggering Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 which is present on dendritic cells (DC). Here we studied mechanisms of action for DC immunotoxicity to gold and mercury. Next to gold (Na3Au (S2O3)2⋅2H2O) and mercury (HgCl2), nickel (NiCl2) was included as a positive control. MoDC activation was assessed by release of the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-8. Also PBMC were studied, and THP-1 cells were used as a substitution for DC for evaluation of cytokines and chemokines, as well as phenotypic, alterations in response to gold and mercury. Our results showed that both Na3Au (S2O3)2⋅2H2O and HgCl2 induce substantial release of IL-8, but not IL-6, CCL2 or IL-10, from MoDc, PBMC, or THP-1 cells. Also gold and, to a lesser extent mercury, caused modest dendritic cell maturation as detected by increased membrane expression of CD40 and CD80. Both metals thus show innate immune response capacities, although to a lower extent than reported earlier for NiCl2, CoCl2 and Na2 [PdCl4]. Importantly, the gold-induced response could be ascribed to TLR3 rather than TLR4 triggering, whereas the nature of the innate mercury response remains to be clarified. In conclusion both gold and mercury can induce innate immune responses, which for gold could be ascribed to TLR3 dependent signalling. These responses are likely to contribute to adaptive immune responses to these metals, as reflected by skin and mucosal allergies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optical contrast spectra studies for determining thickness of stage-1 graphene-FeCl{sub 3} intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Wen-Peng, E-mail: han-wenpeng@163.com, E-mail: yunze.long@163.com; Yan, Xu; Zhao, Hui [College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Li, Qiao-Qiao; Lu, Yan [State Key Laboratory for Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Long, Yun-Ze, E-mail: han-wenpeng@163.com, E-mail: yunze.long@163.com [College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Optoelectronic Devices, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Because of novel features in their structural, electronic, magnetic and optical properties, especially potential applications in nanoelectronics, the few-layer graphene intercalation compounds (FLGICs) have been intensively studied recently. In this work, the dielectric constant of the doped graphene of stage-1 FeCl{sub 3}-GIC is obtained by fitting the optical contrast spectra. And fully intercalated stage-1 FeCl{sub 3}-FLGICs were prepared by micromechanical cleavage method from graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) for the first time. Finally, we demonstrated that the thickness of stage-1 FeCl{sub 3}-GICs by micromechanical cleavage can be determined by optical contrast spectra. This method also can be used to other FLGICs, such as SbCl{sub 5}-FLGICs and AuCl{sub 5}-FLGICs, etc.

  20. Microarray analysis of Arabidopsis under gold exposure to identify putative genes involved in the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Devesh; Krishnamurthy, Sneha; Sahi, Shivendra V

    2015-03-01

    Very little is known about the genes responsible for Au uptake, reduction and detoxification in plants, which indeed essential to understand the complex trait of AuNP biosynthesis. We designed a targeted experiment to elucidate the response of plant at transcriptional level under Au exposure, and a microarray was performed on root tissue treated with AuCl4 (-) in the absence of nutrient media to record specific gene expression signature. Here, we describe the experimental procedures and data analysis in detail to reproduce the results (available at GEO database under GSE55436) published by Shukla et al. (2014) [1] in the Frontiers in Plant Sciences. The data produced from this study provide significant information of genes which may be used to enhance the AuNP biosynthesis.

  1. The magmatic model for the origin of Archean Au-quartz vein ore systems: an assessment of the evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spooner, E.T.C.

    1991-01-01

    The magmatic model for the origin of Archean Au-quartz vein ore systems suggests that Au was derived by partition between silicate (± sulphide) melts of certain compositions and H 2 O-CO 2 -NaCl magmatic fluids. Supporting evidence includes partial/structural geological relationships, timing relationships, H and C isotope geochemistry, probable primary Au enrichment in the Lamaque stocks, and fluid inclusion volatile geochemistry. Evidence is currently negative with respect to various within- and sub-greenstone belt metamorphic/deep crustal fluid models for primary Au mineralization; however a U-Pb age for vein stage 3 sphene from the Camflo deposit, Quebec which is ∼ 55-60 Ma younger than the host stock at 2685-2680 Ma indicates dissolution/reprecipitation of Au by late, (?) upper crustal saline fluids. Evidence is accumulating that epithermal-meso thermal Au-Ag mineralization in island arc and cordilleran settings may also have been magmatically derived ± high level fluid mixing from calc-alkaline, shoshonitic and other igneous compositions. (author)

  2. Fabrication and characterization of thin films of covalently interconnected Au{sub 55} clusters; Herstellung und Charakterisierung duenner Filme aus kovalent vernetzten Au{sub 55}-Clustern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollmeier, K.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of the present thesis was the synthesis of novel ligands for the Au{sub 55} for the production of interconnected arrangements. First an approach could be optimized, where Au{sub 55}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 12}Cl{sub 6} on PVP was arranged on the phase boundary of water and dichloromethane, whereby the system was further chemically stabilized by addition of a phosphate containing buffer solution and the change of the polymer connected with this. The obtained cluster layers exhibited extensions of several mm{sup 2}, whereby however the layers were not completely closed. Additionally on the layers stabilized with PVP aging problems and the formation of nanocrystals resulting from this could be observed. Next it was tried to connect the gold clusters covalently together. Furthermore the preparation of octavinyldisilanolsilsesquioxane-stabilized Au{sub 55} clusters was shown. In the first performed polymerization attempts by this cluster layers of many cm{sup 2} could be produced. In a further reaction the polymerization of the gold cluster by means of vinyl-substituated triphylene phosphate was successfully performed.

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Structural Investigation of AuPt Nanoparticles Synthesized Using a Direct Electrochemical Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapp, Aliya S; Duan, Zhiyao; Marcella, Nicholas; Luo, Long; Genc, Arda; Ringnalda, Jan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Henkelman, Graeme; Crooks, Richard M

    2018-05-11

    In this report, we examine the structure of bimetallic nanomaterials prepared by an electrochemical approach known as hydride-terminated (HT) electrodeposition. It has been shown previously that this method can lead to deposition of a single Pt monolayer on bulk-phase Au surfaces. Specifically, under appropriate electrochemical conditions and using a solution containing PtCl 4 2- , a monolayer of Pt atoms electrodeposits onto bulk-phase Au immediately followed by a monolayer of H atoms. The H atom capping layer prevents deposition of Pt multilayers. We applied this method to ∼1.6 nm Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) immobilized on an inert electrode surface. In contrast to the well-defined, segregated Au/Pt structure of the bulk-phase surface, we observe that HT electrodeposition leads to the formation of AuPt quasi-random alloy NPs rather than the core@shell structure anticipated from earlier reports relating to deposition onto bulk phases. The results provide a good example of how the phase behavior of macro materials does not always translate to the nano world. A key component of this study was the structure determination of the AuPt NPs, which required a combination of electrochemical methods, electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and theory (DFT and MD).

  4. La tuberculose iléo-caecale : à propos de deux cas au CHU ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le traitement antituberculeux instauré était conforme au protocole du programme national burkinabè de lutte contre la tuberculose. L'évolution a été favorable dans les deux cas. Mots clés: tuberculose - jonction iléocaécale - traitement antituberculeux - chirurgie. English Abstract. The ileo-caecal tuberculosis is rare and ...

  5. Functionalization of Fe3O4/SiO2 with N-(2-Aminoethyl-3-aminopropyl for Sorption of [AuCl4]-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryono Nuryono

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of Fe3O4/SiO2 modified with N-(2-aminoethyl-3-aminopropyl group (Fe3O4/SiO2/ED via coating method and its application for adsorption-desorption of anionic gold in aqueous solution have been conducted. The synthesized product was characterized with an X-ray diffractometer (XRD, a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectrophotometer and a transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Adsorption of Au(III was conducted in a batch system and the variables included pH, contact time, and initial concentration were investigated. Results showed that magnetite/silica has been successfully functionalized with N-(2-aminoethyl-3-aminopropyl in a homogeneous system. Kinetics study showed that adsorption of Au(III followed the pseudo-second order model with rate constant of 0.710 g mmol L-1min-1. Furthermore, the experimental data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model with the maximum adsorption capacity for Au(III of 142.9 mg g-1 and the energy of 25.0 kJ mol-1. Gold loaded on the Fe3O4/SiO2/ED could be easily desorbed with 0.2 mol L-1 HCl containing 2 wt.% of thiourea with recovery of 99.8%. Fe3O4/SiO2/ED was reusable and stable in 5 cycles of adsorption-desorption with recovery more than 90%. Fe3O4/SiO2/ED showed high selectivity towards Au(III in the multimetal system Au(III/Cu(II/Cr(VI with the coefficient selectivity for αAu-Cu of 227.5and for αAu-Cr of 12.3.

  6. Human erythrocytes and neuroblastoma cells are affected in vitro by Au(III) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwalsky, Mario; Gonzalez, Raquel; Villena, Fernando; Aguilar, Luis F.; Sotomayor, Carlos P.; Bolognin, Silvia; Zatta, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Gold compounds are well known for their neurological and nephrotoxic implications. However, haematological toxicity is one of the most serious toxic and less studied effects. The lack of information on these aspects of Au(III) prompted us to study the structural effects induced on cell membranes, particularly that of human erythrocytes. AuCl 3 was incubated with intact erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) and molecular models of the erythrocyte membrane. The latter consisted of multibilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine, phospholipids classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. This report presents evidence that Au(III) interacts with red cell membranes as follows: (a) in scanning electron microscopy studies on human erythrocytes it was observed that Au(III) induced shape changes at a concentration as low as 0.01 μM; (b) in isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes Au(III) induced a decrease in the molecular dynamics and/or water content at the glycerol backbone level of the lipid bilayer polar groups in a 5-50 μM concentration range, and (c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that Au(III) in the 10 μm-1 mM range induced increasing structural perturbation only to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers. Additional experiments were performed in human neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y. A statistically significant decrease of cell viability was observed with Au(III) ranging from 0.1 μM to 100 μM.

  7. Fabrication and photoelectrochemical properties of ZnS/Au/TiO2 nanotube array films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Juan; Xu, Lu; Guo, Ya; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Du, Rong-Gui; Lin, Chang-Jian

    2013-03-21

    A highly ordered TiO(2) nanotube array film was fabricated by an anodic oxidation method. The film was modified by Au nanoparticles (NPs) formed by a deposition-precipitation technique and was covered with a thin ZnS shell prepared by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The photoelectrochemical properties of the prepared ZnS/Au/TiO(2) composite film were evaluated by incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE), and photopotential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements under white light illumination. The results indicated that the Au NPs could expand the light sensitivity range of the film and suppress the electron-hole recombination, and the ZnS shell could inhibit the leakage of photogenerated electrons from the surface of Au NPs to the ZnS/electrolyte interface. When the 403 stainless steel in a 0.5 M NaCl solution was coupled to the ZnS/Au/TiO(2) nanotube film photoanode under illumination, its potential decreased by 400 mV, showing that the composite film had a better photocathodic protection effect on the steel than that of a pure TiO(2) nanotube film.

  8. Self-assembled vertically aligned Au nanorod arrays for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of Cannabinol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliken, Sarah; Fraser, Jeff; Poirier, Shawn; Hulse, John; Tay, Li-Lin

    2018-05-01

    Self-assembled multi-layered vertically aligned gold nanorod (AuNR) arrays have been fabricated by a simple preparation process that requires a balance between the particle concentration and the ionic strength of the solvent. An experimentally determined critical AuNR concentration of 2.0 nM and 50 mM NaCl produces well-ordered vertically aligned hexagonally close-packed AuNR arrays. We demonstrate surface treatment via UV Ozone cleaning of such samples to allow introduction of analyte molecules (benzenethiol and cannabinol) for effective surface enhanced Raman scattering detection. This is the first demonstration of the SERS analysis of cannabinol. This approach demonstrates a cost-effective, high-yield and simple fabrication route to SERS sensors with application in the screening for the cannabinoids.

  9. Self-assembled GaN nano-column grown on Si(111) substrate using Au+Ga alloy seeding method by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Byung-Young; Ko, Eun-A; Song, Jae-Chul; Kang, Dong-Hun; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, In-Hwan; Kannappan, Santhakumar; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2007-01-01

    Single-crystal GaN nano-column arrays were grown on Au-coated silicon (111) substrate by Au-Ga alloy seeding method using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The nano-column arrays were studied as a function of growth parameters and Au thin film thickness. The diameter and length of the as-grown nano-column vary from 100 to 500 nm and 4 to 6 μm, respectively. The surface morphology and optical properties of the nano-columns were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), cathodoluminescence (CL) and photoluminescence (PL). The Au+Ga alloy droplets were found to be uniformly distributed on silicon surface. Further, SEM image reveals a vertical growth and cylindrical in shape GaN nano-column. The chemical composition of the nano-column, which composed of gallium and nitrogen ions, was estimated by EDX. CL reveals a strong band edge emission from the GaN nano-column. PL spectra show a peak at 365.7 nm with a full-width half maximum (FWHM) of 65 meV which indicates good optical quality GaN nano-column with low dislocation density. Our results suggest that single crystal GaN nano-column can be grown on Au+Ga alloy on silicon substrate with a low dislocation density for better device performances. (author)

  10. Chiral magnetic effect search in p+Au, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Metastable domains of fluctuating topological charges can change the chirality of quarks and induce local parity violation in quantum chromodynamics. This can lead to observable charge separation along the direction of the strong magnetic field produced by spectator protons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, a phenomenon called the chiral magnetic effect (CME). A major background source for CME measurements using the charge-dependent azimuthal correlator (Δϒ) is the intrinsic particle correlations (such as resonance decays) coupled with the azimuthal elliptical anisotropy (v2). In heavy-ion collisions, the magnetic field direction and event plane angle are correlated, thus the CME and the v2-induced background are entangled. In this report, we present two studies from STAR to shed further lights on the background issue. (1) The Δϒ should be all background in small system p+Au and d+Au collisions, because the event plane angles are dominated by geometry fluctuations uncorrelated to the magnetic field direction. However, significant Δϒ is observed, comparable to the peripheral Au+Au data, suggesting a background dominance in the latter, and likely also in the mid-central Au+Au collisions where the multiplicity and v2 scaled correlator is similar. (2) A new approach is devised to study Δϒ as a function of the particle pair invariant mass (minv) to identify the resonance backgrounds and hence to extract the possible CME signal. Signal is consistent with zero within uncertainties at high minv. Signal at low minv, extracted from a two-component model assuming smooth mass dependence, is consistent with zero within uncertainties.

  11. Size and composition tunable Ag-Au alloy nanoparticles by replacement reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingbo; Lee, J Y; Yang Jun; Boothroyd, Chris; Zhang Jixuan

    2007-01-01

    Ag-Au alloy nanoparticles with tunable size and composition were prepared by a replacement reaction between Ag nanoparticles and HAuCl 4 at elevated temperatures. The formation of homogeneous alloy nanoparticles was confirmed by selected-area energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SAEDX), UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction. This method leverages upon the rapid interdiffusion of Ag and Au atoms in the reduced dimension of a nanoparticle, elevated temperatures and the large number of vacancy defects created in the replacement reaction. This method of preparation has several notable advantages: (1) independent tuning of the size and composition of alloy nanoparticles; (2) production of alloy nanoparticles in high concentrations; (3) general utility in the synthesis of alloy nanoparticles that cannot be obtained by the co-reduction method

  12. Uniform Au@Pt core-shell nanodendrites supported on molybdenum disulfide nanosheets for the methanol oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shao; Zhang, Chi; Yuwen, Lihui; Liu, Xingfen; Wang, Lihua; Fan, Chunhai; Wang, Lianhui

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we presented a facile seeded growth method to prepare high-quality three-dimensional (3D) Au@Pt bimetallic nanodendrite-decorated molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets (Au@Pt/MoS2). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM exhibited that Au@Pt core-shell nanostructures were dispersed onto the surface of MoS2 nanosheets. More importantly, the thickness of the Pt shell of the Au@Pt bimetallic nanodendrites on the surface of the MoS2 nanosheets could be easily tuned via simply changing the synthesis parameters, such as the concentration of H2PtCl6, reaction time and temperature, which greatly influence the catalytic ability of Au@Pt/MoS2 nanohybrids. Both cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) demonstrated that the as-prepared Au@Pt/MoS2 nanohybrids possessed much higher electrocatalytic activity and stability than Pt/MoS2 or commercial Pt/C catalyst. The peak current mass density of the selected Au@Pt/MoS2 was 6.24 A mg-1, which was 3389 and 20.3 times those of Pt/C (0.00184 A mg-1) and Pt/MoS2 (0.307 A mg-1), respectively. The presented method may be a facile approach for the synthesis of MoS2-supported bimetallic nanocomposites, which is significant for the development of high performance MoS2-based sensors and catalysts.Herein, we presented a facile seeded growth method to prepare high-quality three-dimensional (3D) Au@Pt bimetallic nanodendrite-decorated molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets (Au@Pt/MoS2). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM exhibited that Au@Pt core-shell nanostructures were dispersed onto the surface of MoS2 nanosheets. More importantly, the thickness of the Pt shell of the Au@Pt bimetallic nanodendrites on the surface of the MoS2 nanosheets could be easily tuned via simply changing the synthesis parameters, such as the concentration of H2PtCl6, reaction time and temperature, which greatly influence the catalytic ability of Au@Pt/MoS2 nanohybrids. Both cyclic voltammetry (CV

  13. Pt/Au nanoalloy supported on alumina and chlorided alumina: DFT and experimental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, N.; Falamaki, C.; Ghorbanzadeh Ahangari, M.

    2018-04-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was used to explore the adsorption of Pt/Au nanoalloy onto a pure and chlorided γ-Al2O3(110) surface, which has been applied in numerous catalytic reactions. First, we considered the adsorption properties of Pt clusters (n ≤ 5) onto the Al2O3(110) surface to determine the most stable Pt cluster on alumina surface in reforming processes. After full structural relaxations of Pt clusters at various configurations on alumina, our computed results expressed that the minimum binding energy (‑5.67 eV) is accrued for Pt4 cluster and the distance between the nearest Pt atom in the cluster to the alumina surface is equal to 1.13 Å. Then, we investigated the binding energies, geometries, and electronic properties of adsorbed Aun clusters (n ≤ 6) on the γ-Al2O3(110) surface. Our studied showed that Au5 was the most thermodynamically stable structure on γ-Al2O3. Finally, we inspected these properties for adsorbed Au clusters onto the Pt4-decorated alumina (Aun/Pt4-alumina) system. The binding energy of the Au4/Pt4-alumina system was ‑5.01 eV, and the distance between Au4 cluster and Pt4-alumina was 1.33 Å. The Au4/Pt4alumina system was found to be the most stable nanometer-sized catalyst design. At last, our first-principles calculations predicted that the best position of embedment Cl on the Au4/Pt4-alumina.

  14. Successful synthesis and thermal stability of immiscible metal Au-Rh, Au-Ir andAu-Ir-Rh nanoalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, Yury; Plyusnin, Pavel; Sharafutdinov, Marat; Makotchenko, Evgenia; Korenev, Sergey

    2017-05-01

    We successfully prepared face-centred cubic nanoalloys in systems of Au-Ir, Au-Rh and Au-Ir-Rh, with large bulk miscibility gaps, in one-run reactions under thermal decomposition of specially synthesised single-source precursors, namely, [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6], [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6] х [Rh(NO2)6]1-х and [AuEn2][Rh(NO2)6]. The precursors employed contain all desired metals ‘mixed’ at the atomic level, thus providing significant advantages for obtaining alloys. The observations using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that the nanoalloy structures are composed of well-dispersed aggregates of crystalline domains with a mean size of 5 ± 3 nm. Еnergy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) measurements confirm the formation of AuIr, AuRh, AuIr0.75Rh0.25, AuIr0.50Rh0.50 and AuIr0.25Rh0.75 metastable solid solutions. In situ high-temperature synchrotron XRD (HTXRD) was used to study the formation mechanism of nanoalloys. The observed transformations are described by the ‘conversion chemistry’ mechanism characterised by the primary development of particles comprising atoms of only one type, followed by a chemical reaction resulting in the final formation of a nanoalloy. The obtained metastable nanoalloys exhibit essential thermal stability. Exposure to 180 °C for 30 h does not cause any dealloying process.

  15. Synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates from hexagonal-close-packed Au square sheets

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Zhanxi

    2015-03-17

    The synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic (fcc) Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates is reported through the epitaxial growth of Pt on hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) Au square sheets (AuSSs). The Pt-layer growth results in a hcp-to-fcc phase transformation of the AuSSs under ambient conditions. Interestingly, the obtained fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates demonstrate a unique (101)f orientation with the same atomic arrangement extending from the Au core to the Pt shell. Importantly, this method can be extended to the epitaxial growth of Pd on hcp AuSSs, resulting in the unprecedented formation of fcc Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates with (101)f orientation. Additionally, a small amount of fcc (100)f-oriented Au@Pt and Au@Pd square nanoplates are obtained with the Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates, respectively. We believe that these findings will shed new light on the synthesis of novel noble bimetallic nanostructures. Phase change: Ultrathin Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates were prepared from Au square sheets. A phase transformation from hexagonal close-packed (hcp) to face-centered cubic (fcc) is observed upon coating the hcp Au square sheets with Pt or Pd under ambient conditions. The prepared fcc Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates demonstrate unique (101)f orientation (picture shows a typical fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplate). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Stability and enzyme inhibition activities of au nanoparticles using an aqueous extract of clove as a reducing and stabilizing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, A.; Khan, I.; Naz, S.S.; Islam, N.U.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized in one pot using aqueous extract of clove buds (CB) to reduce HAuCl/sub 4/ and stabilize gold in its atomic form at room temperature. To determine the potential of gold nanoparticles with clove buds (AuCB) for in vivo applications, the stability of the nanoparticles was explored as a function of temperature, pH and salt concentration. The suspensions were found to be stable for salt concentrations up to 1 mol/L, temperatures of up to 100 degree C and a pH range of 2-13. Our results indicate that CB exhibited comparable activities to standards of urease and carbonic anhydrase, but its conjugation to Au knocks out the enzyme inhibition activity by about two times. In case of xanthine oxidase activity, CB and its gold Au bio-conjugates (AuCB) are found to be absolutely inactive. (author)

  17. The Electronic Properties and L3 XANES of Au and Nano-Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiu, Y.M.; Zhang, P.; Sham, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    The electronic properties of Au crystal and nano Au have been investigated by theory and experiment. Molecularly capped nano-Au was synthesized using the two-phase method. Au nano-particles have been characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). They retain the fcc crystal structure. Their sizes have been determined to be in a range from 5.5 nm to 1.7 nm. The L3 X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) of nano-Au and Au foil have been recorded using synchrotron radiation, and examined by theoretical calculation based on the first principles. Both theory and experiment show that the nano-Au particles have essentially all the Au L3 XANES features of bulk Au in the near edge region with less pronounced resonance peaks. It is also shown that nano Au exhibits lower 4f binding energy than bulk Au in good agreement with quantum confined Au systems reported previously.

  18. 100-MeV proton beam intensity measurement by Au activation analysis using {sup 197}Au(p, pn){sup 196}Au and {sup 197}Au(p, p3n){sup 194}Au reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari Oranj, Leila [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Nam-Suk; Oh, Joo-Hee [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hee-Seock, E-mail: lee@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The proton beam intensity of a 100-MeV proton linac at the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) was measured by an Au activation analysis using {sup 197}Au(p, pn){sup 196}Au and {sup 197}Au(p, p3n){sup 194}Au reactions to determine the accuracy and precision of beam intensity measurement using Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The target, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, was arranged in a stack consisting of Au, Al foils and Pb plates. The yields of produced radio-nuclei in Au foils were obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The FLUKA code was employed to calculate the energy spectrum of protons onto the front surface of Au foils located at three different depth points of the target and also to investigate the condition of incident beam on the target. A good agreement was found between the beam intensity measurements using the activation analysis method at three different depth points of the target. An excellent agreement was also observed between the beam intensity measurements using the Au activation analysis method and the dosimetry method using Gafchromic film.

  19. Nano-spatial parameters from 3D to 2D lattice dimensionality by organic variant in [ZnCl4]- [R]+ hybrid materials: Structure, architecture-lattice dimensionality, microscopy, optical Eg and PL correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajit; Verma, Sanjay K.; Alvi, P. A.; Jasrotia, Dinesh

    2016-04-01

    The nanospatial morphological features of [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ hybrid derivative depicts 28 nm granular size and 3D spreader shape packing pattern as analyzed by FESEM and single crystal XRD structural studies. The organic moiety connect the inorganic components through N-H+…Cl- hydrogen bond to form a hybrid composite, the replacement of organic derivatives from 2-methylpyridine to 2-Amino-5-choloropyridine results the increase in granular size from 28nm to 60nm and unit cell packing pattern from 3D-2D lattice dimensionality along ac plane. The change in optical energy direct band gap value from 3.01eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ (HM1) to 3.42eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H5ClN2]+ (HM2) indicates the role of organic moiety in optical properties of hybrid materials. The photoluminescence emission spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 370 to 600 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.66a.u. at 438 nm for (HM1) and 370 to 600 nm with max peak intensity of 9.91 a.u. at 442 nm for (HM2), indicating that the emission spectra lies in visible range. PL excitation spectra depicts the maximum excitation intensity [9.8] at 245.5 nm for (HM1) and its value of 9.9 a.u. at 294 nm, specify the excitation spectra lies in UV range. Photoluminescence excitation spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 280 to 350 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.4 a.u. at 285.5 nm and 9.9 a.u. at 294 and 297 nm, indicating excitation in the UV spectrum. Single crystal growth process and detailed physiochemical characterization such as XRD, FESEM image analysis photoluminescence property reveals the structure stability with non-covalent interactions, lattice dimensionality (3D-2D) correlations interweaving into the design of inorganic-organic hybrid materials.

  20. 197 Au Mössbauer study of the gold species adsorbed on carbon from cyanide solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongolo, K.; Bahr, A.; Friedl, J.; Wagner, F. E.

    1990-04-01

    The gold species present on activated carbon after adsorption from solutions of Au(CN)2 - have been studied by197Au Mössbauer spectroscopy as a function of the pH value of the solution, the loading of the carbon, the coadsorption of polyvalent cations, and the treatment of the samples after adsorption. The gold was found to be adsorbed mainly as Au(CN)2 -. Coadsorbed polyvalent cations (Ca²+, Gd³+) have no influence on the Mössbauer parameters of the adsorbed gold complex. After adsorption from acidic solutions (pH ≲ 4), one finds a substantial amount of adsorbed gold with Mössbauer parameters similar to those of crystalline AuCN. Presumably, this gold is bound in Aux(CN)x+1 oligomers which form during drying. An additional product with Mössbauer parameters close to those of KAu(CN)2Cl2 was observed on dried samples after adsorption at pH 1. A minor gold species with an uncommonly small electric quadrupole splitting was found on wet carbons but disappeared on drying.

  1. Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals with concave cubic shapes: kinetically controlled synthesis and electrocatalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Niu, Wenxin; Zhao, Jianming; Zhu, Shuyun; Yuan, Yali; Hua, Lianzhe; Xu, Guobao

    2013-01-01

    A new type of concave cubic Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals is synthesized through a kinetically controlled growth process. Pd nanocubes of 56 nm are used as the inner core, and CTAC and Br(-) are used as the capping agent and selective adsorbent, respectively. A suitable ratio of HAuCl4 and cubic Pd seeds and the presence of Br(-) anions are critical to the growth of the concave cubic Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals. The fast deposition rate on the corners of the cubic Pd seeds promotes the overgrowth of the Au outer shell along the direction, leading to the formation of concave cubic nanostructures. The reduction process is monitored by the surface plasmon resonance spectra of the nanocrystals, and the extinction band became broader and red shifted as the nanocrystals became larger. The electrocatalytic properties of the concave cubic Pd@Au core-shell nanocrystals were investigated with the cathodic electrochemiluminescence reaction of luminol and H2O2. A possible electrocatalytic mechanism was proposed and analyzed.

  2. 75 FR 37994 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-1A11 (CL-600), CL-600-2A12 (CL-601), CL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... provides data for replacement of the accumulators. The commenter requests that stronger language be... numbers 1004 through 1085 inclusive; (2) Bombardier, Inc. CL-600-2A12 (CL-601) airplanes, serial numbers 3001 through 3066 inclusive; and (3) Bombardier, Inc. CL-600-2B16 (CL-601-3A, CL-601-3R, and CL- 604...

  3. Coprecipitation of gold(III) complex ions with manganese(II) hydroxide and their stoichiometric reduction to atomic gold (Au(0)): analysis by Mössbauer spectroscopy and XPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Mamiko; Ohashi, Hironori; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Kurisaki, Tsutomu; Wakita, Hisanobu; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2008-03-01

    To elucidate the formation process of precursor of gold-supported manganese dioxide (MnO2), the coprecipitation behavior of [AuCl4-n(OH)n](-) (n=0-4) (Au(III)) complex ions with manganese(II) hydroxide (Mn(OH)2 and the change in their chemical state were examined. The Au(III) complex ions were rapidly and effectively coprecipitated with Mn(OH)(2) at pH 9. According to the Mössbauer spectra for gold (Au) coprecipitated with Mn(OH)2, below an Au content of 60 wt% in the coprecipitates, all of the coprecipitated Au existed in the atomic state (Au(0)), while, above an Au content of 65 wt%, part of the gold existed in the Au(III) state, and the proportion increased with increasing coprecipitated Au content. Based on the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Mn(II) in Mn(OH)2 converted to Mn(IV) in conjunction with coprecipitation of Au(III) complex ions. These results indicate that the rapid stoichiometric reduction of Au(III) to Au(0) is caused by electron transfer from Mn(II) in Mn(OH)2 to the Au(III) complex ion through an Mn-O-Au bond.

  4. Prise en charge de l'hematurie au chu Sylvanus Olympio de Lome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Une transfusion sanguine avait été réalisée dans 64,8% des cas et nous avions enregistré 4 cas de décès. Conclusion : Les hématuries sont relativement fréquentes au Togo et souvent de causes tumorales. Elles nécessitent une prise en charge précoce pour un meilleur pronostic. Mots clés : hématurie, épidémiologie, ...

  5. Multifunctional Fe3O4/Au core/satellite nanocubes: an efficient chemical synthesis, characterization and functionalization of streptavidin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohamed; RamuluTorati, Sri; Kim, CheolGi

    2017-02-14

    A novel and efficient chemical approach for the synthesis of Fe 3 O 4 /Au core/satellite nanocubes is reported. In a one-pot reaction, metallic Au nanodots were successfully deposited on the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) functionalized Fe 3 O 4 nanocube surface for the fabrication of a core/satellite structure (Fe 3 O 4 /Au) by the reduction of HAuCl 4 using ammonia. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping revealed that small Au nanodots of about 2 nm average size decorated the surface of Fe 3 O 4 nanocubes. X-ray diffraction data was used to confirm the formation of both the phases of a cubic inverse spinel structure for Fe 3 O 4 and a bcc structure for Au in the core/satellite structure of Fe 3 O 4 /Au nanocubes. The magnetic properties of the seed Fe 3 O 4 nanocubes and Fe 3 O 4 /Au core/satellite nanocubes were measured by using a superconducting quantum interference device at 300 K. For biological application purposes, the as-synthesized Fe 3 O 4 /Au core/satellite nanocubes were functionalized by cysteamine followed by successful immobilization of streptavidin protein as confirmed through the fluorescence confocal microscopy images.

  6. Controllable synthesis and enhanced electrochemical properties of multifunctional Au(core)Co(3)O(4shell) nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianqiang; Wen, Zhenhai; Wang, Qiang; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Jianhua; Li, Jinghong

    2006-12-07

    Multifunctional Au(core)Co(3)O(4shell) nanocubes were synthesized through the introduction of chloroauric acid (HAuCl(4)) into a typical hydrothermal system after a solvothermal process was completed to form metastable Co(3)O(4) hollow nanospheres in the presence of sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS), which served as the surfactant. The strategy suggested that HAuCl(4) played a vital role in the shape transformation and core/shell structure formation, and the sizes of the nanocubes can be tunable through control of the acid concentration. The core/shell structure of the nanocubes was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and element analysis (EA) measurements. Moreover, Li ion battery measurement indicated that trace Au intercalation altered not only the size and shape of the Co(3)O(4) nanoparticles but also greatly increased their electrochemical properties. These multifunctional nanocubes will be not only helpful to study physical chemistry properties of magnetic nanocrystals but also are expected to find use in many fields such as biomolecular detection and analysis, sensor, electrochemistry, and Li ion batteries.

  7. High-p$_{T}$ Tomography of d+Au and Au+Au at SPS, RHIC, and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Vitev, I; Vitev, Ivan; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2002-01-01

    The interplay of nuclear effects on the p_T > 2 GeV inclusive hadron spectra in d+Au and Au+Au reactions at root(s) = 17, 200, 5500 GeV is compared to leading order perturbative QCD calculations for elementary p+p (p-bar+p) collisions. The competition between nuclear shadowing, Cronin effect, and jet energy loss due to medium-induced gluon radiation is predicted to lead to a striking energy dependence of the nuclear suppression/enhancement pattern in A+A reactions. We show that future d+Au data can used to disentangle the initial and final state effects.

  8. Liquid-vapor equilibrium in LaCl3-LuCl3 and PrCl3-NdCl3 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisel'son, L.A.; Lyzlov, Yu.N.; Solov'ev, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    The liquid-vapour equilibrium in the systems LaCl 3 -LuCl 3 and PrCl 3 -NdCl 3 was studied by the boiling-point method. It was established that the system LaCl 3 -LuCl 3 is near-ideal. In the PrCl 3 -NdCl 3 system, a considerable positive deviation from the ideal with the formation of an azeotrope was detected. The azeotrope has a ''smeared-out'' minimum, which falls on a mixture containing approximately 65 mol.% neodymium trichloride. The boiling point of this mixture at a pressure of 1 mm Hg is approximately 975 deg C. The relative volatility coefficients in both systems were studied by the Raleigh distillation method. The presence of the azeotrope in the system PrCl 3 -NdCl 3 is confirmed by the nature of the dependence of the relative volatility coefficient on the composition of the mixture

  9. Local structure of disordered Au-Cu and Au-Ag alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenkel, A. I.; Machavariani, V. Sh.; Rubshtein, A.; Rosenberg, Yu.; Voronel, A.; Stern, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) and x-ray-diffraction (XRD) measurements of disordered alloys Au x Cu 1-x and Au 0.5 Ag 0.5 prepared by melt spinning were performed. In the Au 0.5 Ag 0.5 alloy, no significant local deviations of the atoms from the average fcc lattice were detected while in Au x Cu 1-x alloys, significant deviations of atoms from the average fcc lattice were found. Mean-square vibrations of the Cu-Cu distances revealed by the XAFS in Au x Cu 1-x alloys indicate the weakening of contact between Cu atoms in the dilute limit. Our computer simulation for Au x Cu 1-x clusters of 10 5 atoms reproduces the main features of both the XAFS and XRD data

  10. Galvanic replacement-free deposition of Au on Ag for core-shell nanocubes with enhanced chemical stability and SERS activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yin; Liu, Jingyue; Fu, Zheng-Wen; Qin, Dong

    2014-06-11

    We report a robust synthesis of Ag@Au core-shell nanocubes by directly depositing Au atoms on the surfaces of Ag nanocubes as conformal, ultrathin shells. Our success relies on the introduction of a strong reducing agent to compete with and thereby block the galvanic replacement between Ag and HAuCl4. An ultrathin Au shell of 0.6 nm thick was able to protect the Ag in the core in an oxidative environment. Significantly, the core-shell nanocubes exhibited surface plasmonic properties essentially identical to those of the original Ag nanocubes, while the SERS activity showed a 5.4-fold further enhancement owing to an improvement in chemical enhancement. The combination of excellent SERS activity and chemical stability may enable a variety of new applications.

  11. One-step synthesis of redox-active polymer/AU nanocomposites for electrochemical immunoassay of multiplexed tumor markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Rong, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhanfang; Han, Hongliang

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a simple and sensitive multiplexed immunoassay protocol for simultaneous electrochemical determination of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was designed using redox-active nanocomposites. As the redox-active species, the poly(o-phenylenediamine) (POPD)/Au nanocomposite and poly(vinyl ferrocene-2-aminothiophenol) (poly(VFc-ATP))/Au nanocomposite were obtained by one-step method which HAuCl4 was used as the oxidant. With Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), the nanocomposites were successful to immobilize labeled anti-CEA and anti-AFP as the immunosensing probes. The proposed electrochemical immunoassay enabled the simultaneous monitoring of AFP and CEA in a wide range of 0.01-100ngmL(-1). The detection limits was 0.006ngmL(-1) for CEA and 0.003ngmL(-1) for AFP (S/N=3). The assay results of serum samples with the proposed method were well consistent with the reference values from standard ELISA method. And the negligible cross-reactivity between the two analytes makes it possesses potential promise in clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nuclear spin of 185Au and hyperfine structure of 188Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekstroem, C.; Ingelman, S.; Wannberg, G.

    1977-03-01

    The nuclear spin of 185 Au, I = 5/2, and the hyperfine separation of 188 Au, Δγ = +- 2992(30) MHz, have been measured with the atomic-beam magnetic resonance method. The spin of 185 Au indicates a deformed nuclear shape in the ground state. The small magnetic moment of 188 Au is close in value to those of the heavier I = 1 gold isotopes 190 192 194 Au, being located in a typical transition region. (Auth.)

  13. Evidence of final-state suppression of high-p{_ T} hadrons in Au + Au collisions using d + Au measurements at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged hadrons with pT 2 GeV/c). In contrast, the d + Au nuclear modification factor exhibits no suppression of the high-pT yields. These measurements suggest a large energy loss of the high-pT particles in the highly interacting medium created in the central Au + Au collisions. The lack of suppression in d + Au collisions suggests that it is unlikely that initial state effects can explain the suppression in the central Au + Au collisions. PACS: 25.75.-q

  14. Comparative efficiencies of photothermal destruction of malignant cells using antibody-coated silica-Au nanoshells, hollow Au/Ag nanospheres and Au nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Fong-Yu; Chen, Chen-Tai; Yeh, Chen-Sheng, E-mail: csyeh@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Chemistry, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2009-10-21

    Three Au-based nanomaterials (silica-Au nanoshells, hollow Au/Ag nanospheres and Au nanorods) were evaluated for their comparative photothermal efficiencies at killing three types of malignant cells (A549 lung cancer cells, HeLa cervix cancer cells and TCC bladder cancer cells) using a CW NIR laser. Photodestructive efficiency was evaluated as a function of the number of nanoparticles required to destroy the cancer cells under 808 nm laser wavelength at fixed laser power. Of the three nanomaterials, silica/Au nanoshells needed the minimum number of particles to produce effective photodestruction, whereas Au nanorods needed the largest number of particles. Together with the calculated photothermal conversion efficiency, the photothermal efficiency rankings are silica-Au nanoshells > hollow Au/Ag nanospheres > Au nanorods. Additionally, we found that HeLa cells seem to present better heat tolerance than the other two cancer cell lines.

  15. Reduction behaviors of Zr for LiCl-KCl-ZrCl4 and LiCl-KCl-ZrCl4-CdCl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Si Hyung; Yoon, Jongho; Kim, Gha Young; Kim, Tack Jin; Shim, Joon Bo; Kim, Kwang Rag; Jung, Jae Hoo; Ahn, Do Hee; Paek, Seungwoo

    2013-01-01

    The reduction potentials of most of the zirconium ions on the solid cathode are smaller (about 0.4V) than that of uranium, and thus zirconium can be recovered prior to uranium during the reduction stage. In the case of a liquid cadmium cathode, which is one of the major cathodes, the reduction potential can be changed because zirconium reacts with the liquid cadmium. Up to now, it has not been well known what the reduction potential of Zr was on the liquid Cd cathode. According to the Cd-Zr phase diagram, there are four intermetallic compounds between cadmium and zirconium. It is easier to use the solid cathode than the liquid cadmium cathode in LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 containing CdCl 2 to identify the formation of the Cd-Zr phase. In this study, the reduction behaviors of zirconium were compared in the LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 and LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 -CdCl 2 solutions when using a solid cathode. The reduction behavior of Zr at a solid W cathode and a Cd-coated W cathode was compared in a LiCl-KCl-ZrCl 4 solution at 500 .deg. C. It was observed from the results using a solid W cathode that Zr 4+ ions were gradually oxidized to Zr 2+ , Zr, and ZrCl during the reduction sweep, but the final oxidation peak of Zr 2+ to Zr 4+ seemed to be unclear during the oxidation sweep. In the case of the Cd-coated W electrode, only a Cd 2 Zr phase was formed at 500 .deg. C, which seemed to be related to the melting point of Cd-Zr intermetallics. Through additional studies at different temperatures, the formation behavior will be studied

  16. English for au pairs the au pair's guide to learning English

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    English for Au Pairs has interlinked stories about a group of au pairs new to England. Marta, an 18-year-old from Poland arrives in the UK to work as an au pair. Throughout her year-long stay she has many different experiences - some bad, some good - but with the support of her host family she finds new friends and improves her English. English for Au Pairs offers insight into the joys and difficulties of being an au pair while at the same time reinforcing English language learning through grammar explanations and exercises.

  17. ?????????? ?????, ?????????? ??????????? ?? ?????????? ?????????? ????? ? ?????? ???????? ZnCl2 +NH4Cl

    OpenAIRE

    Kuntyi, Orest; Zozulya, Galyna

    2010-01-01

    Zinc cementation by magnesium from ZnCl2 + NH4Cl aqueous solutions has been investigated. The amount of magnesium has been established as 0.8?2.0 g per 1 g of conditioned zinc to obtain recovery degree ? 99 %. At low concentrations of Zn2+ ions (0.025?0.1 M ZnCl2) dispersed deposit is formed with nanoparticles of reduced metal; at high concentrations (0.25?0.5 M) coarse-crystalline and fern-shaped deposit is formed. ?????????? ?????????? ????? ??????? ? ?????? ???????? ZnCl2 + NH4Cl. ????????...

  18. Electron diffraction on amorphous and crystalline AuAl2 , AuGa2 and AuIn2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohorquez, A.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental (in situ) measurements of electron diffraction and resistivity of amorphous and crystalline AuAl 2 , AuGa 2 and AuIn 2 thin films were performed. Thin films were produced by quench condensation. Interference and atomic distribution functions were analyzed assuming the same short range order for the three systems in the amorphous phase. The experimental results do not agree with this assumption, giving evidence that the short range order is not the same for the three amorphous systems. Further discussion of interference and atomic distribution functions shows a more evident tendency in amorphous AuIn 2 where short order of AuIn 2 and In can be inferred. (Author)

  19. Aspect ratio control of Au nanorods via covariation of the total amount of HAuCl{sub 4} and ascorbic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiao [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430070, Hubei (China); Wang, Moo-Chin, E-mail: mcwang@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Feng, Jinyang [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430070, Hubei (China); Zhao, Xiujian, E-mail: opluse@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan 430070, Hubei (China)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The AR value decreased as the total amount of [HAuCl{sub 4}] and [AA] increasing. • The UV–vis absorption spectra showed the peak wavelength of TSPR at around 530 nm. • The wavelength of LSPR had a red-shifted effect. - Abstract: Controlling the aspect ratio (AR) of gold nanorods (GNRs) via covariation of the total concentrations of HAuCl{sub 4} ([HAuCl{sub 4}]) and ascorbic acid ([AA]) has been studied. Characteristics of GNRs were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) absorption spectrophotometry. TEM results showed that single crystalline GNRs grew along an elongated growth direction of [100]. TEM results also revealed that the quantity of plate shaped and nearly spherical nanoparticles increased as the total amount of [HAuCl{sub 4}] and [AA] decreased. The AR value measured from TEM images decreased from 4.74 to 2.41 as the total amount of [HAuCl{sub 4}] and [AA] was increased from 0.305 to 2.44 mM. The UV–vis absorption spectra of all samples showed that the wavelength of transverse surface plasmon resonance (TSPR) peak appeared at around 530 nm for all samples. The wavelength of longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak increased from 640 to 894 nm as the total amount of [HAuCl{sub 4}] and [AA] decreased from 2.44 to 0.305 mM. The wavelength of LSPR peak shows a red-shifted effect except when the total amount of [HAuCl{sub 4}] and [AA] was 0.122 mM.

  20. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Wu; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  1. Preparation of dendritic Ag/Au bimetallic nanostructures and their application in surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Zao; Chen Shanjun; Chen Yan; Luo Jiangshan; Wu Weidong; Yi Yougen; Tang Yongjian

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic Ag/Au bimetallic nanostructures have been synthesized via a multi-stage galvanic replacement reaction of Ag dendrites in a chlorauric acid (HAuCl 4 ) solution at room temperature. After five stages of replacement reaction, one obtains structures with protruding nanocubes; these will mature into many porous structures with a few Ag atoms that are left over dendrites. The morphological and compositional changes which evolved with reaction stages were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The replacement of Ag with Au was confirmed. A formation mechanism involving the original development of Ag dendrites into porous structures with the growth of Au nanocubes on this underlying structure as the number of reaction stages is proposed. This was confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The dendritic Ag/Au bimetallic nanostructures could be used as efficient SERS active substrates. It was found that the SERS enhancement ability was dependent on the stage of galvanic replacement reaction. - Highlights: ► Dendritic Ag/Au bimetallic nanostructures have been synthesized. ► Protruding cubic nanostructures obtained after 5 stages mature into porous structures. ► SERS results allow confirm the proposed formation mechanism. ► The nanostructures could be used as efficient SERS active substrates.

  2. RGO/Au NPs/N-doped CNTs supported on nickel foam as an anode for enzymatic biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Zhang, Lingling; Han, Yujie; Yu, You; Xu, Miao; Zhang, Xueping; Huang, Liang; Dong, Shaojun

    2017-11-15

    In this study, three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide/Au NPs/nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (RGO/Au NPs/N-doped CNTs) assembly supported on nickel foam was utilized as an anode for enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs). 3D RGO/Au NPs was obtained by electrodepositing reduced graphene oxide on nickel foam (Ni foam), while Au NPs were co-deposited during the process. Afterwards, nitrogen doped CNTs (N-CNTs) were allowed to grow seamlessly on the surfaces of 3D RGO/Au NPs via a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. In this nanostructure, Au NPs co-deposition and nitrogen doping offer more active sites for bioelectrocatalysis. Additionally, N-CNTs were demonstrated providing high specific surface area for enzyme immobilization and facilitating the electron transfer between glucose oxidase (GOx) and electrode. The resulting bioanode achieved efficient glucose oxidation with high current densities of 7.02mAcm -2 (0.3V vs. Ag/AgCl). Coupling with a Pt cathode, the fabricated glucose/air biofuel cell exhibited an open-circuit potential of 0.32V and generated a maximum power density 235µWcm -2 at 0.15V. This novel electrode substrate achieved high performance in current density at bioelectrochemical systems and could be useful for further exploiting the application of three dimensional carbon-based nanomaterials in EBFCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Age-hardening and related phase transformation in an experimental Ag-Cu-Pd-Au alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seol, Hyo-Joung; Lee, Doung-Hun; Lee, Hee-Kyung; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu; Kwon, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2006-01-01

    The age-hardening behaviour, phase transformation and related microstructural changes of an experimental Ag-Cu-Pd-Au alloy were examined by means of hardness test, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The specimen alloy showed apparent age-hardenability at the aging temperatures of 350 deg. C and 400 deg. C. By aging the solution-treated specimen at 400 deg. C, two phases of the Ag-rich α 1 phase and the Pd-containing Cu-rich α 2 phase were transformed into four phases of the Ag-rich α 1 ' phase, the Cu-rich α 2 ' phase, the CsCl-type CuPd phase and the AuCu(I) ordered phase. Microstructure of the solution-treated specimen consisted of the Ag-rich α 1 matrix, Cu-rich α 2 particle-like structures of various sizes and the lamellar structure of the α 1 and α 2 phases. When the peak hardness was obtained, the very fine lamellar structure consisting of the Ag-rich α 1 ' and Cu-rich α 2 ' phases was newly formed in the matrix. By further aging, the very fine lamellar structure grew and coarsened apparently, and the matrix was covered with the coarsened lamellar structure. The hardness increase was considered to be caused mainly by the diffusion and precipitation of Cu from the Ag-rich α 1 matrix, and the hardness decrease in the latter stage of age-hardening process was caused by the coarsening of the very fine lamellar structure. The CsCl-type CuPd phase and the AuCu(I) ordered phase did not contribute to the hardness increase

  4. Au@Ag core/shell cuboids and dumbbells: Optical properties and SERS response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Liu, Zhonghui; Ye, Jian; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have conclusively shown that the plasmonic properties of Au nanorods can be finely controlled by Ag coating. Here, we investigate the effect of asymmetric silver overgrowth of Au nanorods on their extinction and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties for colloids and self-assembled monolayers. Au@Ag core/shell cuboids and dumbbells were fabricated through a seed-mediated anisotropic growth process, in which AgCl was reduced by use of Au nanorods with narrow size and shape distribution as seeds. Upon tailoring the reaction rate, monodisperse cuboids and dumbbells were synthesized and further transformed into water-soluble powders of PEGylated nanoparticles. The extinction spectra of AuNRs were in excellent agreement with T-matrix simulations based on size and shape distributions of randomly oriented particles. The multimodal plasmonic properties of the Au@Ag cuboids and dumbbells were investigated by comparing the experimental extinction spectra with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The SERS efficiencies of the Au@Ag cuboids and dumbbells were compared in two options: (1) individual SERS enhancers in colloids and (2) self-assembled monolayers formed on a silicon wafer by drop casting of nanopowder solutions mixed with a drop of Raman reporters. By using 1,4-aminothiophenol Raman reporter molecules, the analytical SERS enhancement factor (AEF) of the colloidal dumbbells was determined to be 5.1×106, which is an order of magnitude higher than the AEF=4.0×105 for the cuboids. This difference can be explained by better fitting of the dumbbell plasmon resonance to the excitation laser wavelength. In contrast to the colloidal measurements, the AEF=5×107 of self-assembled cuboid monolayers was almost twofold higher than that for dumbbell monolayers, as determined with rhodamine 6G Raman reporters. According to TEM data and electromagnetic simulations, the better SERS response of the self-assembled cuboids is due to uniform

  5. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions at STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Adamczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au+Au and minimum-bias d+Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  6. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, JK; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, EC; Averichev, GS; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, AK; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, LC; Bordyuzhin, IG; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, D; Brandin, AV; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, JM; Cebra, D; Cervantes, MC; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, X; Chen, JH; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, HJ; Das, S; De Silva, LC; Debbe, RR; Dedovich, TG; Deng, J; Derevschikov, AA; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, JL; Draper, JE; Du, CM; Dunkelberger, LE; Dunlop, JC; Efimov, LG; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, CE; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, CA; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, DS; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, JW; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, GW; Hofman, DJ; Horvat, S; Huang, T; Huang, B; Huang, HZ; Huang, X; Huck, P

    2015-10-23

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  7. Kinetic isotope effects in the gas phase reactions of OH and Cl with CH3Cl, CD3Cl, and 13CH3Cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gola

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic isotope effects in the reactions of CH3Cl, 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH radicals and Cl atoms were studied in relative rate experiments at 298±2 K and 1013±10 mbar. The reactions were carried out in a smog chamber using long path FTIR detection and the spectroscopic data analyzed employing a non-linear least squares spectral fitting method using measured high-resolution infrared spectra as well as absorption cross sections from the HITRAN database. The reaction rates of 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH and Cl were determined relative to CH3Cl as: kOH+CH3ClkOH+CH3Cl/kOH+13CH3Cl}kOH+13CH3Cl=1.059±0.008, kOH+CH3ClkOH+CH3Cl/kOH+CD3ClkOH+CD3Cl=3.9±0.4, kCl+CH3ClkCl+CH3Cl/kCl+13CH3ClkCl+13CH3Cl =1.070±0.010 and kCl+CH3ClkCl+CH3Cl/kCl+CD3ClkCl+CD3Cl=4.91±0.07. The uncertainties given are 2σ from the statistical analyses and do not include possible systematic errors. The unexpectedly large 13C kinetic isotope effect in the OH reaction of CH3Cl has important implications for the global emission inventory of CH3Cl.

  8. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin–rotation constants in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br and {sup 127}I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demissie, Taye B., E-mail: taye.b.demissie@uit.no; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Jaszuński, Michał [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44, 01 224 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin–rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in {sup 175}LuX and {sup 197}AuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin–rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin–rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin–rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin–rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  9. La participation des personnes utilisatrices aux exercices de planification et d'organisation des services de santé mentale au Québec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Clément

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cet article documente la manière dont s'est renouvelé et s'est transformé au fil du temps le projet de faire participer les usagers aux exercices de planification et d'organisation des services de santé mentale au Québec (Canada. Pour ce faire, les auteurs reviennent sur l'ensemble des documents ministériels qui ont traité de cette question et dégage, pour les principaux moment-clés, les principales modalités de participation des usagers.

  10. Three-particle correlations from parton cascades in Au+Au collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, G.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Zhang, S.; Cai, X.Z.; Chen, J.H.; He, Z.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Long, J.L.; Shen, W.Q.; Shi, X.H.; Zhong, C.; Zuo, J.X.

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of three-particle correlations among a trigger particle and two associated particles in Au+Au collisions at s NN =200 GeV using a multi-phase transport model (AMPT) with both partonic and hadronic interactions. We found that three-particle correlation densities in different angular directions with respect to the triggered particle ('center', 'cone', 'deflected', 'near' and 'near-away') increase with the number of participants. The ratio of 'deflected' to 'cone' density approaches to 1.0 with the increasing of number of participants, which indicates that partonic Mach-like shock waves can be produced by strong parton cascades in central Au+Au collisions

  11. Solvent extraction of Au(III) for preparation of a carrier-free multitracer and an Au tracer from an Au target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weginwar, R.G.; Kobayashi, Y.; Ambe, S.; Liu, B.; Enomoto, S.; Ambe, F.

    1996-01-01

    Separation of Au(III) and various carrier-free radionuclides by solvent extraction was investigated using an Au target irradiated by an energetic heavy-ion beam. Percentage extraction of Au(III) and coextraction of the radionuclides were determined with varying parameters such as kinds of solvent, molarity of HCl or pH, and Au concentration. Under the conditions where Au(III) was effectively extracted, namely extraction with ethyl acetate or isobutyl methyl ketone from 3 mol*dm -3 HCl, carrier-free radionuclides of many elements were found to be more or less coextracted. Coextraction of radionuclides of some elements was found to increase with an increase in the concentration of Au(III). This finding is ascribed to the formation of strong association of the complex of these elements with chloroauric acid. In order to avoid serious loss of these elements by the extraction, lowering of the Au(III) concentration or the use of a masking agent such as sodium citrate is necessary. Gold(III) was shown to be effectively back extracted with a 0.1 mol*dm -3 aqueous solution of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol. Thus, a radiochemical procedure has been established for preparing a carrier-free multitracer and an Au tracer with carrier form from an Au target irradiated with a heavy-ion beam. Both tracers are now used individually for chemical and biological experiments. (author). 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Fermi surfaces properties of AuAl2, AuGa2, and AuIn2 with the CaF2-type cubic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K.; Kakihana, M.; Suzuki, F.; Yara, T.; Hedo, M.; Nakama, T.; Ōnuki, Y.; Harima, H.

    2018-05-01

    We grew high-quality single crystals of AuAl2, AuGa2, and AuIn2 with the fluorite (CaF2)-type cubic structure and determined the Fermi surface properties by the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiments using full-potential LAPW bad calculations. The Fermi surface and optical properties for three compounds were once studied from an interest of colors because AuAl2 has a striking bright reddish-purple color, whereas AuGa2 and AuIn2 are, respectively, neutral and bluish. The detected dHvA frequencies in the present study are found to be in a wide range of (0.1-13)×107 Oe. The main dHvA branches for three compounds are in excellent agreement with the theoretical ones, but some dHvA branches with small dHvA frequencies are slightly deviated from the theoretical ones, especially in AuGa2 and AuIn2.

  13. Seed-mediated growth and manipulation of Au nanorods via size-controlled synthesis of Au seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Juncheng; Duggan, Jennifer N.; Morgan, Joshua; Roberts, Christopher B.

    2012-01-01

    Seed-mediated growth of gold (Au) nanorods with highly controllable length, width, and aspect ratio was accomplished via carefully size-controlled synthesis of the original Au seeds. A slow dynamic growth of Au nanoparticle seeds was observed after reduction of the Au salt (i.e., hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (III) hydrate) by sodium borohydride (NaBH 4 ) in the presence of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). As such, the size of the Au nanoparticle seeds can therefore be manipulated through control over the duration of the reaction period (i.e., aging times of 2, 8, 48, 72, and 144 h were used in this study). These differently sized Au nanoparticles were subsequently used as seeds for the growth of Au nanorods, where the additions of Au salt, CTAB, AgNO 3 , and ascorbic acid were employed. Smaller Au nanoparticle seeds obtained via short growth/aging time resulted in Au nanorods with higher aspect ratio and thus longer longitudinal surface plasmon wavelength (LSPW). The larger Au nanoparticle seeds obtained via longer growth/aging time resulted in Au nanorods with lower aspect ratio and shorter LSPW.

  14. Controlled Synthesis of Au@AgAu Yolk-Shell Cuboctahedra with Well-Defined Facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londono-Calderon, Alejandra; Bahena, Daniel; Yacaman, Miguel J

    2016-08-02

    The synthesis of Au@AgAu yolk-shell cuboctahedra nanoparticles formed by galvanic replacement in a seed-mediated method is described. Initially, single-crystal Au seeds are used for the formation of Au@Ag core-shell nanocubes, which serve as the template material for the deposition of an external Au layer. The well-controlled synthesis yields the formation of cuboctahedra nanoparticles with smooth inner and outer Au/Ag surfaces. The deposition/oxidation process is described to understand the formation of cuboctahedra and octahedra nanoparticles. The Au core maintains the initial morphology of the seed and remains static at the center of the yolk-shell because of residual Ag. Structural analysis of the shell indicates intrinsic stacking faults (SFs) near the surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) compositional analysis show an Au-Ag nonordered alloy forming the shell. The three-dimensional structure of the nanoparticles presented open facets on the [111] as observed by electron tomography SIRT reconstruction over a stack of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. The geometrical model was validated by analyzing the direction of streaks in coherent nanobeam diffraction (NBD). The catalytic activity was evaluated using a model reaction based on the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NTP) by NaBH4 in the presence of Au@AgAu yolk-shell nanoparticles.

  15. Controlled synthesis of PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers and cap-like Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nana; Li, Lianshan; Huang, Teng; Qi, Limin

    2010-11-01

    Uniform PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers consisting of one Au nanoparticle grown on one horn of a well-defined six-horn PbS nanostar were prepared using the PbS nanostars as growth substrates for the selective deposition of Au nanoparticles. The size of the Au nanoparticles on the horns of the PbS nanostars could be readily adjusted by changing the PbS concentration for the deposition of Au nanoparticles. An optimum cetyltrimethylammonium bromide concentration and temperature were essential for the selective deposition of uniform Au nanoparticles on single horns of the PbS nanostars. Unusual PbS-Au nanoframe-nanoparticle heterodimers were obtained by etching the PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers with oxalic acid while novel cap-like Au nanoparticles were obtained by etching with hydrochloric acid. The obtained heterodimeric nanostructures and cap-like nanoparticles are promising candidates for anisotropic nanoscale building blocks for the controllable assembly of useful, complex architectures.

  16. How Does Amino Acid Ligand Modulate Au Core Structure and Characteristics in Peptide Coated Au Nanocluster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Li, Xu; Zhao, Hongkang; Zhao, Lina

    2018-03-01

    The atomic structures and the corresponding physicochemical properties of peptide coated Au nanoclusters determine their distinctive biological targeting applications. To learn the modulation of amino acid ligand on the atomic structure and electronic characteristics of coated Au core is the fundamental knowledge for peptide coated Au nanocluster design and construction. Based on our recent coated Au nanocluster configuration study (Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 11454), we built the typically simplified Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) system to more clearly learn the basic modulation information of amino acid ligand on Au core by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. There are two isomers as ligand adjacent bonding (Iso1) and diagonal bonding (Iso2) to Au13 cores. The geometry optimizations indicate the adjacent bonding Iso1 is more stable than Iso2. More important, the Au13 core of Iso1 distorts much more significantly than that of Iso2 by Cys-Au-Cys bonding through the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) analysis, which modulate their electronic characteristics in different ways. In addition, the frontier molecular orbital results of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) isomers confirm that the Au cores mainly determine the blue shifts of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) systems versus the original Au13 core in their UV-visible absorption spectrum studies. The configuration of Au13 core performs deformation under Cys-Au-Cys ligand modulation to reach new stability with distinct atomic structure and electronic properties, which could be the theory basis for peptide coated AuNCs design and construction.

  17. Au pair trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    pair-sending families in the Philippines, this dissertation examines the long-term trajectories of these young Filipinas. It shows how the au pairs’ local and transnational family relations develop over time and greatly influence their life trajectories. A focal point of the study is how au pairs...... that Filipina au pairs see their stay abroad as an avenue of personal development and social recognition, I examine how the au pairs re-position themselves within their families at home through migration, and how they navigate between the often conflicting expectations of participation in the sociality......Since 2000, thousands of young Filipino migrants have come to Denmark as au pairs. Officially, they are there to “broaden their cultural horizons” by living temporarily with a Danish host family, but they also conduct domestic labor in exchange for food and money, which allows them to send...

  18. Theoretical prediction of the noble gas complexes HeAuF and NeAuF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Ab initio calculations were carried out to investigate the structures and the stability of the noble gas complexes HeAuF and NeAuF through MP2 and CCSD(T) methods.The HeAuF was predicted to have a linear structure with weak He-Au covalent bonding,the distance of which is closer to the covalent limit in comparison with the corresponding van der Waals limit.The dissociation energy with respect to He + AuF was found to be 24 and 26 kJ·mol-1 at the CCSD(T)/basis set B and B’ levels,respectively.However,similar calculations for NeAuF indicate that NeAuF is not a stable species.

  19. Synthesis and structural property of Si nanosheets connected to Si nanowires using MnCl{sub 2}/Si powder source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Erchao [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johuku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan); Ueki, Akiko [Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc., 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Meng, Xiang [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johuku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johuku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan); Itahara, Hiroshi [Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc., 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Tatsuoka, Hirokazu, E-mail: tatsuoka.hirokazu@shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Integrated Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johuku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Si nanosheets connected to Si nanowires synthesized using a MnCl{sub 2}/Si powder source with an Au catalyst avoid the use of air-sensitive SiH{sub 4} or SiCl{sub 4}. It was evident from these structural features of the nanosheets (leaf blade) with nanowires (petiole) that the nanosheets were formed by the twin-plane reentrant-edge mechanism. The feature of the observed lattice fringes of the Si(111) nanosheets was clearly explained by the interference with the extra diffraction spots that arose due to the reciprocal lattice streaking effect. - Highlights: • New Si nanosheets connected to Si nanowires were synthesized using MnCl{sub 2}/Si powders. • The synthesis method has benefits in terms of avoiding air sensitive SiH{sub 4} or SiCl{sub 4}. • Structural property and electron diffraction of the Si nanosheets were clarified. • Odd lattice fringes of the Si nanosheets observed by HRTEM were clearly explained. - Abstract: Si nanosheets connected to Si nanowires were synthesized using a MnCl{sub 2}/Si powder source with an Au catalyst. The synthesis method has benefits in terms of avoiding conventionally used air-sensitive SiH{sub 4} or SiCl{sub 4}. The existence of the Si nanosheets connected to the Si<111> nanowires, like sprouts or leaves with petioles, was observed, and the surface of the nanosheets was Si{111}. The nanosheets were grown in the growth direction of <211> perpendicular to that of the Si nanowires. It was evident from these structural features of the nanosheets that the nanosheets were formed by the twin-plane reentrant-edge mechanism. The feature of the observed lattice fringes, which do not appear for Si bulk crystals, of the Si(111) nanosheets obtained by high resolution transmission electron microscopy was clearly explained due to the extra diffraction spots that arose by the reciprocal lattice streaking effect.

  20. Age-hardening and related phase transformation in an experimental Ag-Cu-Pd-Au alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Hyo-Joung [Department of Dental Materials, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, 1-10 Ami-dong, Seo-gu, Pusan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Doung-Hun [Department of Dental Materials, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, 1-10 Ami-dong, Seo-gu, Pusan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hee-Kyung [Department of Dental Technology, Daegu Health College, San 7 Taejeon-dong, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-722 (Korea, Republic of); Takada, Yukyo [Division of Dental Biomaterials, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Okuno, Osamu [Division of Dental Biomaterials, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kwon, Yong Hoon [Department of Dental Materials, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, 1-10 Ami-dong, Seo-gu, Pusan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Il [Department of Dental Materials, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, 1-10 Ami-dong, Seo-gu, Pusan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: hilkim@pusan.ac.kr

    2006-01-05

    The age-hardening behaviour, phase transformation and related microstructural changes of an experimental Ag-Cu-Pd-Au alloy were examined by means of hardness test, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The specimen alloy showed apparent age-hardenability at the aging temperatures of 350 deg. C and 400 deg. C. By aging the solution-treated specimen at 400 deg. C, two phases of the Ag-rich {alpha}{sub 1} phase and the Pd-containing Cu-rich {alpha}{sub 2} phase were transformed into four phases of the Ag-rich {alpha}{sub 1}{sup '} phase, the Cu-rich {alpha}{sub 2}{sup '} phase, the CsCl-type CuPd phase and the AuCu(I) ordered phase. Microstructure of the solution-treated specimen consisted of the Ag-rich {alpha}{sub 1} matrix, Cu-rich {alpha}{sub 2} particle-like structures of various sizes and the lamellar structure of the {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases. When the peak hardness was obtained, the very fine lamellar structure consisting of the Ag-rich {alpha}{sub 1}{sup '} and Cu-rich {alpha}{sub 2}{sup '} phases was newly formed in the matrix. By further aging, the very fine lamellar structure grew and coarsened apparently, and the matrix was covered with the coarsened lamellar structure. The hardness increase was considered to be caused mainly by the diffusion and precipitation of Cu from the Ag-rich {alpha}{sub 1} matrix, and the hardness decrease in the latter stage of age-hardening process was caused by the coarsening of the very fine lamellar structure. The CsCl-type CuPd phase and the AuCu(I) ordered phase did not contribute to the hardness increase.

  1. High 36Cl/Cl ratios in Chernobyl groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, Céline; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Simonucci, Caroline; Van Meir, Nathalie; Fifield, L. Keith; Diez, Olivier; Bassot, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    After the explosion of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in April 1986, contaminated material was buried in shallow trenches within the exclusion zone. A 90 Sr plume was evidenced downgradient of one of these trenches, trench T22. Due to its conservative properties, 36 Cl is investigated here as a potential tracer to determine the maximal extent of the contamination plume from the trench in groundwater. 36 Cl/Cl ratios measured in groundwater, trench soil water and leaf leachates are 1–5 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical natural 36 Cl/Cl ratio. This contamination occurred after the Chernobyl explosion and currently persists. Trench T22 acts as an obvious modern point source of 36 Cl, however other sources have to be involved to explain such contamination. 36 Cl contamination of groundwater can be explained by dilution of trench soil water by uncontaminated water (rainwater or deep groundwater). With a plume extending further than that of 90 Sr, radionuclide which is impacted by retention and decay processes, 36 Cl can be considered as a suitable tracer of contamination from the trench in groundwater provided that modern release processes of 36 Cl from trench soil are better characterized. - Highlights: • High 36 Cl/Cl ratios measured in the Chernobyl Pilot Site groundwater. • Trench T22 acts as a modern source of groundwater contamination by 36 Cl but other sources are involved. • Contamination results from dilution of a contaminated “T22” soil water with rainwater. • Processes involved in the modern release need to be investigated

  2. Bimetallic Ag-Pt and Au-Pt aggregates synthesized by radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remita, S.; Mostafavi, M.; Delcourt, M.O.

    1996-01-01

    Irradiating aqueous solutions containing both Ag 2 So 4 and K 2 PtCl 4 leads to intermetallic aggregates of various sizes according to the stabilizing agent: polyvinylalcohol, polyacrylic acid or polyacrylate. In the last case, the particle diameter is 1.5 nm. The bimetallic character is evidenced in all cases by the spectral changes of such sols compared to pure silver sols which display a characteristic surface plasmon absorption band. This plasmon band disappears when 10 to 20 at.% or more Pr is present. Observation by TEM gives an estimation of the particle sizes. Comparable results have been obtained for Au-Pt particles. (author)

  3. Bimetallic Ag-Pt and Au-Pt aggregates synthesized by radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remita, S; Mostafavi, M; Delcourt, M O [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1996-02-01

    Irradiating aqueous solutions containing both Ag{sub 2}So{sub 4} and K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} leads to intermetallic aggregates of various sizes according to the stabilizing agent: polyvinylalcohol, polyacrylic acid or polyacrylate. In the last case, the particle diameter is 1.5 nm. The bimetallic character is evidenced in all cases by the spectral changes of such sols compared to pure silver sols which display a characteristic surface plasmon absorption band. This plasmon band disappears when 10 to 20 at.% or more Pr is present. Observation by TEM gives an estimation of the particle sizes. Comparable results have been obtained for Au-Pt particles. (author).

  4. The extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from Au concentrate by thiourea solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongju; Cho, Kanghee; On, Hyunsung; Choi, Nagchoul; Park, Cheonyoung

    2013-04-01

    The cyanidation process has been used commercially for the past 100 years, there are ores that are not amenable to treatment by cyanide. Interest in alternative lixiviants, such as thiourea, halogens, thiosulfate and malononitrile, has been revived as a result of a major increase in gold price, which has stimulated new developments in extraction technology, combined with environmental concern. The Au extraction process using the thiourea solvent has many advantages over the cyanidation process, including higher leaching rates, faster extraction time and less than toxicity. The purpose of this study was investigated to the extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from two different Au concentrate (sulfuric acid washing and roasting) under various experiment conditions (thiourea concentration, pH of solvent, temperature) by thiourea solvent. The result of extraction experiment showed that the Au-Ag extraction was a fast extraction process, reaching equilibrium (maximum extraction rate) within 30 min. The Au-Ag extraction rate was higher in the roasted concentrate than in the sulfuric acid washing. The higher the Au-Ag extraction rate (Au - 70.87%, Ag - 98.12%) from roasted concentrate was found when the more concentration of thiourea increased, pH decreased and extraction temperature increased. This study informs extraction method basic knowledge when thiourea was a possibility to eco-/economic resources of Au-Ag utilization studies including the hydrometallurgy.

  5. Multifragmentation in Au + Au collisions studied with AMD-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Akira [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1998-07-01

    AMD-V is an optimum model for calculation of multifragmentation in Au + Au collisions. AMD-V consider anti-symmetry of incident nucleus, target nucleus and fragments, furthermore, it treat the quantum effect to exist many channels in the intermediate and final state. 150 and 250 MeV/nucleon incident energy were used in the experiments. The data of multifragment atom in {sup 197}Au + {sup 197}Au collisions was reproduced by AMD-V calculation using Gognny force, corresponding to the imcompressibility of nuclear substance K = 228 MeV and its mean field depend on momentum. When other interaction (SKG 2 force, corresponding to K = 373 KeV) was used an mean field does not depend on momentum, the calculation results could not reproduce the experimental values, because nucleus and deuteron were estimated too large and {alpha}-particle and intermediate fragments estimated too small. (S.Y.)

  6. Synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates from hexagonal-close-packed Au square sheets

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Zhanxi; Zhu, Yihan; Huang, Xiao; Han, Yu; Wang, Qingxiao; Liu, Qing; Huang, Ying; Gan, Chee Lip; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    @Pd rhombic nanoplates, respectively. We believe that these findings will shed new light on the synthesis of novel noble bimetallic nanostructures. Phase change: Ultrathin Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates were prepared from Au square sheets. A phase

  7. Raman spectra of the system TeCl4-SbCl5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockner, W.; Demiray, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Raman spectra of the solid and molten TeCl 4 . SbCl 5 addition compound and of some TeCl 4 -SbCl 5 mixtures have been recorded. Two modifications of the crystalline TeCl 4 -SbCl 5 compound have been found. The structure of the melt can be described by the equilibrium TeCl 3 + + SbCl 6 - reversible TeCl 4 + SbCl 5 lying on the left side. Mixtures with other stoichiometry contain the 1:1 adduct only and excess TeCl 4 or SbCl 5 , respectively. Such melts are built up by the ionic species TeCl 3 + and SbCl 6 - also and TeCl 4 or SbCl 5 according to stoichiometry. (author)

  8. Femtosecond Laser Fabricated Ag@Au and Cu@Au Alloy Nanoparticles for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Based Trace Explosives Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moram Sree Satya Bharati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein we present results from our detailed studies on the fabrication of Ag@Au and Cu@Au alloy nanoparticles (NPs using the femtosecond laser ablation in liquid technique. The NPs were obtained by ablating the pure Ag, Cu targets (bulk in HAuCl4 (5 mM solution. The absorption properties of the obtained NPs colloids were characterized using UV-Visible absorption spectrometer and their size, shape, and crystallinity were investigated using the XRD, FESEM and TEM techniques. The fabricated NPs were utilized for sensing of explosive molecules such as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (PA, 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT and a common dye methylene blue (MB using the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS technique. The detection limit in terms of weight was as low as few nano-grams in the case of nitroaromatic explosive compounds (PA, DNT and few picograms in the case of a common dye molecule (MB. Typical enhancement factors achieved were estimated to be ~104, ~105, and ~107, respectively, for PA, DNT, and MB. The significance of the present work lies in exploring the performance of the prepared NPs being used as SERS substrates for explosives detection using a portable Raman instrument. Such capability enables one to carry the spectrometer to the point of interest in the field and evaluate any hazardous samples within a short period of time.

  9. A hydrochemical investigation using 36Cl/Cl in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, Richard

    2003-03-01

    This report describes 36 Cl studies which were undertaken during the H14 financial year. The results of this study suggest that, if 36 Cl data can be obtained for groundwaters at spatial scales comparable with, or smaller than, the spatial scales of the variability in in-situ 36 Cl production in the host rock, the data could potentially be useful for interpreting groundwater origins and flow paths. Four groundwater samples and one onsen water sample from the Tono area were collected for 36 Cl analysis. The groundwater samples came from boreholes MSB-2 and MSB-4 in the MIU Construction Site, whereas the onsen water was taken from Oniiwa Onsen (Komatsuya). In addition, a single sample from borehole HDB-1 at Horonobe was also sent for analysis. Supporting rock chemical data and wireline geophysical data have also been evaluated, to provide a basis for interpreting the 36 Cl data. Rock analyses and spectral gamma wireline data were used to estimate theoretical limiting equilibrium 36 Cl/Cl ratios in the rock. These have been compared with the compositions measured for groundwater samples, enabling a judgement to be made as to: whether the waters have resided for long enough in the rock to approach equilibrium (> c. 1.5 Ma); the spatial scales of mixing of the dissolved Cl in the groundwater. The estimates of in-situ 36 Cl/Cl production made with the newly available rock chemical data and wireline geophysical data have enabled 36 Cl data obtained previously from MIU-4, KNA-6 and DH-12 during H12 and H13 to be interpreted more confidently. In particular it seems that 36 Cl/Cl ratios measured previously in groundwater samples from MIU-4 are not in equilibrium with in-situ production in the granite. Furthermore, they imply that the Cl is homogenised, at least on the scale of the upper half of borehole. In contrast, the data from DH-12 imply that the Cl could be in equilibrium with in-situ 36 Cl production in the granite, which would be consistent with a relatively long

  10. Effect of the partial NaCl substitution by other chloride salts on the volatile profile during the ripening of dry-cured lacón

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domínguez, R.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of three salting treatments (treatment II: 50% NaCl-50% KCl; III: 45% NaCl-25% KCl-20% CaCl2-10% MgCl2; IV: 30% NaCl-50% KCl-15% CaCl2-5% MgCl2 on the formation of volatile compounds throughout the process was studied and compared to those of a control “lacón” (treatment I: 100% NaCl. There was an intense formation of volatile compounds throughout the processing, particularly during the dry-ripening stage. The most abundant chemical family in all the formulations, in the final product was hydrocarbons followed by aldehydes. The total volatile compound release was more intense in the control “lacóns” (1164 AU_106·g-1dry matter than in “lacóns” from formulations II, III and IV (817-891 AUx106·g-1dry matter. The “lacóns” from formulation I showed the highest amounts of aldehydes. The “lacóns” from formulations I and II presented the highest amounts of hydrocarbons. The main conclusion is that the replacement of NaCl produces changes in the volatile profile and could be affect the aroma of “lacón”.Se estudió la influencia de tres tratamientos de salado (tratamiento II: 50 % NaCl-50 % KCl; III: 45 % NaCl-25 % KCl-20 % CaCl2-10 % MgCl2; IV: 30 % NaCl-50 % KCl-15 % CaCl2-5 % MgCl2 en la formación de compuestos volátiles durante la elaboración de lacón, en comparación con un control (tratamiento I: 100 % NaCl. Hubo una intensa formación de compuestos volátiles durante el procesado, principalmente durante la fase de secado-maduración. La familia química más abundante en el producto final fueron los hidrocarbonos, seguidos por los aldehídos. La liberación de volátiles fue más intensa en los lacones control (1164 AU_106·g-1 materia seca que en los otros lacones (817-891 AUx106· g-1 materia seca. Los lacones de la formulación I mostraron las mayores cantidades de aldehídos, y los lacones de las formulaciones I y II presentaron los mayores contenidos de hidrocarburos. La principal conclusi

  11. A detailed study of Au-Ni bimetal synthesized by the phase separation mechanism for the cathode of low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Rodrigues de Almeida, Carlos Manuel; Ramasamy, Devaraj; Almeida Loureiro, Francisco José

    2014-12-01

    A facile co-reduction and annealing synthesis route of nanospheric particles of Au-Ni bimetal with adjustable composition was developed. In a typical synthesis, a direct co-reduction of HAuCl4.4H2O and NiCl2 in aqueous solution was performed with the assistance of reductive NaBH4 and an anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) functioned as the structure-directing agent. Ultrasonic mixing was used at the same time to control the size of the particles. The morphology, microstructure and the state of the surface atoms were analyzed in detail. These nanospheres showed enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction than that of pure Au nanoparticles, demonstrated in the low temperature SOFC as cathode. The maximum power density generated is 810 mW cm-2 at 550 °C. This is a promising route of taking advantages the Phase Separation Mechanism to greatly reduce the use of noble metals in the ORR field without sacrificing the electrocatalytic activity.

  12. Synthesis of Au NP@MoS2 Quantum Dots Core@Shell Nanocomposites for SERS Bio-Analysis and Label-Free Bio-Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Fei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report a facile method using MoS2 quantum dots (QDs as reducers to directly react with HAuCl4 for the synthesis of Au nanoparticle@MoS2 quantum dots (Au NP@MoS2 QDs core@shell nanocomposites with an ultrathin shell of ca. 1 nm. The prepared Au NP@MoS2 QDs reveal high surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS performance regarding sensitivity as well as the satisfactory SERS reproducibility and stability. The limit of detection of the hybrids for crystal violet can reach 0.5 nM with a reasonable linear response range from 0.5 μM to 0.5 nM (R2 ≈ 0.974. Furthermore, the near-infrared SERS detection based on Au NP@MoS2 QDs in living cells is achieved with distinct Raman signals which are clearly assigned to the various cellular components. Meanwhile, the distinguishable SERS images are acquired from the 4T1 cells with the incubation of Au NP@MoS2 QDs. Consequently, the straightforward strategy of using Au NP@MoS2 QDs exhibits great potential as a superior SERS substrate for chemical and biological detection as well as bio-imaging.

  13. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Christof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p_T from 0.25 to 5GeV/c is studied as a function of collision centrality over a range from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p_T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  14. High (36)Cl/Cl ratios in Chernobyl groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Céline; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Simonucci, Caroline; Van Meir, Nathalie; Fifield, L Keith; Diez, Olivier; Bassot, Sylvain; Simler, Roland; Bugai, Dmitri; Kashparov, Valery; Lancelot, Joël

    2014-12-01

    After the explosion of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in April 1986, contaminated material was buried in shallow trenches within the exclusion zone. A (90)Sr plume was evidenced downgradient of one of these trenches, trench T22. Due to its conservative properties, (36)Cl is investigated here as a potential tracer to determine the maximal extent of the contamination plume from the trench in groundwater. (36)Cl/Cl ratios measured in groundwater, trench soil water and leaf leachates are 1-5 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical natural (36)Cl/Cl ratio. This contamination occurred after the Chernobyl explosion and currently persists. Trench T22 acts as an obvious modern point source of (36)Cl, however other sources have to be involved to explain such contamination. (36)Cl contamination of groundwater can be explained by dilution of trench soil water by uncontaminated water (rainwater or deep groundwater). With a plume extending further than that of (90)Sr, radionuclide which is impacted by retention and decay processes, (36)Cl can be considered as a suitable tracer of contamination from the trench in groundwater provided that modern release processes of (36)Cl from trench soil are better characterized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reactions UF{sub 4} - ClF, UF{sub 4} - ClF{sub 3}, UF{sub 5} - ClF, UF{sub 5} - ClF{sub 3}; Reactions UF{sub 4} - ClF, UF{sub 4} - ClF{sub 3}, UF{sub 5} - ClF, UF{sub 5} - ClF{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luce, M; Benoit, R; Hartmanshenn, O [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The reaction between ClF{sub 3} and UF{sub 4} is partially explained by the study of the reactions of the three systems: UF{sub 4}-ClF, UF{sub 5}-ClF and UF{sub 5}-ClF{sub 3}. The analytical techniques used are: the micro-sublimation, the infra-red spectroscopy and the thermogravimetry. The origin of the by-products is indicated. (authors) [French] La reaction entre ClF{sub 3} et UF{sub 4} est partiellement expliquee grace a l'etude des reactions des trois systemes UF{sub 4}-ClF, UF{sub 5}-ClF et UF{sub 5}-ClF{sub 3}. Les techniques analytiques utilisees sont: la micro-sublimation, la spectroscopie infrarouge et la thermogravimetrie. L'origine des sous-produits est indiquee. (auteurs)

  16. Influence of Au Nanoparticle Shape on Au@Cu2O Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of metal-semiconductor heterostructures may allow the combination of function of the corresponding components and/or the enhanced performance resulting from the interactions between all the components. In this paper, Au@Cu2O core-shell heterostructures are prepared by a seed-growth method, using different-shaped Au nanocrystals as the seeds such as nanorods, octahedra, decahedra, dots, and nanocubes. The results revealed that the final structure of Au@Cu2O was greatly influenced by the shape of the seeds used. Exposure of Cu2O{111} and Cu2O{001} favored when the overgrowth happened on Au{111} and Au{001} surface, respectively. The size of the product can also be tuned by the amount of the seeds. The results reported here provide a thinking clue to modulate the shape and size of core-shell nanocrystals, which is useful in developing new materials with desired performance.

  17. Au/ZnO nanoarchitectures with Au as both supporter and antenna of visible-light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tianyu; Chen, Wei; Hua, Yuxiang; Liu, Xiaoheng, E-mail: xhliu@mail.njust.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • An inversed Au/ZnO nanostructure was fabricated with ZnO loaded onto Au. • The Au/ZnO nanocomposites showed enhanced properties in visible-light photocatalysis. • The SPR effect of Au was considered important for visible-light photocatalysis. - Abstract: In this paper, we fabricate Au/ZnO nanostructure with smaller ZnO nanoparticles loaded onto bigger gold nanoparticles via combining seed-mediated method and sol-gel method. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposites exhibit excellent properties in photocatalysis process like methyl orange (MO) degradation and oxidative conversion of methanol into formaldehyde under visible light irradiation. The enhanced properties were ascribed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of Au nanoparticles, which could contribute to the separation of photo-excited electrons and holes and facilitate the process of absorbing visible light. This paper contributes to the emergence of multi-functional nanocomposites with possible applications in visible-light driven photocatalysts and makes the Au/ZnO photocatalyst an exceptional choice for practical applications such as environmental purification of organic pollutants in aqueous solution and the synthesis of fine chemicals and intermediates.

  18. Au/ZnO nanoarchitectures with Au as both supporter and antenna of visible-light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Chen, Wei; Hua, Yuxiang; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An inversed Au/ZnO nanostructure was fabricated with ZnO loaded onto Au. • The Au/ZnO nanocomposites showed enhanced properties in visible-light photocatalysis. • The SPR effect of Au was considered important for visible-light photocatalysis. - Abstract: In this paper, we fabricate Au/ZnO nanostructure with smaller ZnO nanoparticles loaded onto bigger gold nanoparticles via combining seed-mediated method and sol-gel method. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposites exhibit excellent properties in photocatalysis process like methyl orange (MO) degradation and oxidative conversion of methanol into formaldehyde under visible light irradiation. The enhanced properties were ascribed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of Au nanoparticles, which could contribute to the separation of photo-excited electrons and holes and facilitate the process of absorbing visible light. This paper contributes to the emergence of multi-functional nanocomposites with possible applications in visible-light driven photocatalysts and makes the Au/ZnO photocatalyst an exceptional choice for practical applications such as environmental purification of organic pollutants in aqueous solution and the synthesis of fine chemicals and intermediates.

  19. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  20. Fabricating a Homogeneously Alloyed AuAg Shell on Au Nanorods to Achieve Strong, Stable, and Tunable Surface Plasmon Resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-08-13

    Colloidal metal nanocrystals with strong, stable, and tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) can be useful in a corrosive environment for many applications including field-enhanced spectroscopies, plasmon-mediated catalysis, etc. Here, a new synthetic strategy is reported that enables the epitaxial growth of a homogeneously alloyed AuAg shell on Au nanorod seeds, circumventing the phase segregation of Au and Ag encountered in conventional synthesis. The resulting core–shell structured bimetallic nanorods (AuNR@AuAg) have well-mixed Au and Ag atoms in their shell without discernible domains. This degree of mixing allows AuNR@AuAg to combine the high stability of Au with the superior plasmonic activity of Ag, thus outperforming seemingly similar nanostructures with monometallic shells (e.g., Ag-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Ag) and Au-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Au)). AuNR@AuAg is comparable to AuNR@Ag in plasmonic activity, but that it is markedly more stable toward oxidative treatment. Specifically, AuNR@AuAg and AuNR@Ag exhibit similarly strong signals in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy that are some 30-fold higher than that of AuNR@Au. When incubated with a H2O2 solution (0.5 m), the plasmonic activity of AuNR@Ag immediately and severely decayed, whereas AuNR@AuAg retained its activity intact. Moreover, the longitudinal SPR frequency of AuNR@AuAg can be tuned throughout the red wavelengths (≈620–690 nm) by controlling the thickness of the AuAg alloy shell. The synthetic strategy is versatile to fabricate AuAg alloyed shells on different shaped Au, with prospects for new possibilities in the synthesis and application of plasmonic nanocrystals.

  1. Charged particle density distributions in Au + Au collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of ...

  2. Photocatalytic degradation of malachite green dye using Au/NaNbO_3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeissa, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of sodium niobate, which was produced using a hydrothermal method, was studied by changing the hydrothermal temperature from 100 to 250 °C. Using 250 °C hydrothermal temperature resulted in sodium niobate with a nanocube structure. The sodium niobate nanocubes were doped with gold by impregnation with an aqueous solution of HAuCl_4. The band gap of sodium niobate is approximately 3.4 eV, and it was decreased to 2.45 eV by gold doping. The surface area of sodium niobate is higher than that of Au/NaNbO_3 due to blockage of some pores of sodium niobate by gold doping. The photocatalytic performance of gold-doped sodium niobate was studied by degradation of malachite green dye using visible light irradiation. The results demonstrate that the photocatalytic performance of gold-doped sodium niobate is higher than that of sodium niobate and TiO_2 Degussa under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • Au/NaNbO_3 were used for photocatalytic degradation of malachite green dye. • Photocatalytic degradation was dependent on wt % of Au; reaction time, and weight of catalyst. • Catalyst re-use revealed the present photocatalyst remain effective and active after five cycles.

  3. Amélioration de la nutrition au Cambodge au moyen de l ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Amélioration de la nutrition au Cambodge au moyen de l'aquaculture et des jardins potagers domestiques (FCRSAI). Si l'on produit au Cambodge suffisamment de riz pour nourrir la population, la sous-alimentation maternelle et infantile y demeure quand même élevée en raison de la faible diversification des cultures et du ...

  4. [Hyp-Au-Sn9(Hyp)3-Au-Sn9(Hyp)3-Au-Hyp]-: the longest intermetalloid chain compound of tin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Mareike; Schrenk, Claudio; Block, Theresa; Pöttgen, Rainer; Schnepf, Andreas

    2017-10-12

    The reaction of the metalloid tin cluster [Sn 10 (Hyp) 4 ] 2- with (Ph 3 P)Au-SHyp (Hyp = Si(SiMe 3 ) 3 ) gave an intermetalloid cluster [Au 3 Sn 18 (Hyp) 8 ] - 1, which is the longest intermetalloid chain compound of tin to date. 1 shows a structural resemblance to binary AuSn phases, which is expected for intermetalloid clusters.

  5. Hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles as electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2012-09-27

    Hybrid alloys among gold, palladium and platinum become a new category of catalysts primarily due to their enhanced catalytic effects. Enhancement means not only their effectiveness, but also their uniqueness as catalysts for the reactions that individual metals may not catalyze. Here, preparation of hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) and their use as electrocatalysts are reported. Galvanic displacement with Ag NPs is used to obtain hollow NPs, and higher reduction potential of Au compared to Ag, Pd, and Pt helps to produce hollow Au cores first, followed by Pd or Pt shell growth. Continuous and highly crystalline shell growth was observed in Au@Pd core-shell NPs, but the sporadic and porous-like structure was observed in Au@Pt core-shell NPs. Along with hollow core-shell NPs, hollow porous Pt and hollow Au NPs are also prepared from Ag seed NPs. Twin boundaries which are typically observed in large size (>20 nm) Au NPs were not observed in hollow Au NPs. This absence is believed to be due to the role of the hollows, which significantly reduce the strain energy of edges where the two lattice planes meet. In ethanol oxidation reactions in alkaline medium, hollow Au@Pd core-shell NPs show highest current density in forward scan. Hollow Au@Pt core-shell NPs maintain better catalytic activities than metallic Pt, which is thought to be due to the better crystallinity of Pt shells as well as the alloy effect of Au cores. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Synthesis of double-shelled sea urchin-like yolk-shell Fe3O4/TiO2/Au microspheres and their catalytic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jie; Tan, Li; Wang, Ge; Yang, Mu

    2015-01-01

    Double-shelled sea urchin-like yolk-shell Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 /Au microspheres were successfully synthesized through loading Au nanoparticles on the Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 support by a in situ reduction of HAuCl 4 with NaBH 4 aqueous solution. These microspheres possess tunable cavity size, adjustable shell layers, high structural stability and large specific surface area. The Au nanoparticles of approximately 5 nm in diameter were loaded both on the TiO 2 nanofibers and inside the cavities of sea urchin-like yolk-shell Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 microspheres. The sea urchin-like structure composed of TiO 2 nanofibers ensure the good distribution of the Au nanoparticles, while the novel double-shelled yolk-shell structure guarantees the high stability of the Au nanoparticles. Furthermore, the Fe 3 O 4 magnetic core facilitates the convenient recovery of the catalyst by applying an external magnetic field. The Fe 3 O 4 /TiO 2 /Au microspheres display excellent activities and recycling properties in the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP): the rate constant is 1.84 min −1 and turnover frequency is 5457 h −1 . (paper)

  7. Evidence from d+Au measurements for final-state suppression of high-p(T) hadrons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-08-15

    We report measurements of single-particle inclusive spectra and two-particle azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons at high transverse momentum (high p(T)) in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The inclusive yield is enhanced in d+Au collisions relative to binary-scaled p+p collisions, while the two-particle azimuthal distributions are very similar to those observed in p+p collisions. These results demonstrate that the strong suppression of the inclusive yield and back-to-back correlations at high p(T) previously observed in central Au+Au collisions are due to final-state interactions with the dense medium generated in such collisions.

  8. Evidence for rapid epithermal mineralization and coeval bimodal volcanism, Bruner Au-Ag property, NV USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Dylan

    The character of Au-Ag mineralization and volcanic/hydrothermal relationships at the underexplored Miocene-age Bruner low-sulfidation epithermal Au-Ag deposit are elucidated using field and laboratory studies. Bruner is located in central Nevada within the Great Basin extensional province, near several major volcanic trends (Western Andesite, Northern Nevada Rift) associated with world-class Miocene-age epithermal Au-Ag provinces. Despite its proximity to several >1 Moz Au deposits, and newly discovered high-grade drill intercepts (to 117 ppm Au/1.5m), there is no published research on the deposit, the style of mineralization has not been systematically characterized, and vectors to mineralization remain elusive. By investigating the nature of mineralization and time-space relationships between volcanic/hydrothermal activity, the deposit has been integrated into a regional framework, and exploration targeting improved. Mineralization occurs within narrow quartz + adularia +/- pyrite veins that manifest as sheeted/stockwork zones, vein swarms, and rare 0.3-2 m wide veins hosted by two generations of Miocene high-K, high-silica rhyolite flow dome complexes overlying an andesite flow unit. The most prominent structural controls on veining are N­striking faults and syn-mineral basalt/rhyolite dikes. Productive veins have robust boiling indicators (high adularia content, bladed quartz after calcite, recrystallized colloform quartz bands), lack rhythmic banding, and contain only 1-2 stages; these veins overprint, or occur separately from another population of barren to weakly mineralized rhythmically banded quartz-only veins. Ore minerals consist of coarse Au0.5Ag 0.5 electrum, fine Au0.7Ag0.3 electrum, acanthite, uytenbogaardtite (Ag3AuS2) and minor embolite Ag(Br,Cl). Now deeply oxidized, veins typically contain Bruner appears to belong to a small subset of mid-Miocene epithermal deposits in Nevada with low base metal contents and low to no Se, related to calc

  9. Fluid inclusion and oxygen-isotope evidence for low-temperature Au-Pt-Pd (± U) mineralization at Corronation Hill, NT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, T.

    1992-01-01

    The fluid inclusion and isotope data have been used to constrain the ore genesis models for the Au-Pt-Pd-U mineralization at Coronation Hill. The fluid inclusions demonstrate that the ore fluid was strongly saline with an unusually high CaCl 2 content, and that the mineralisation was probably formed from a boiling fluid at around 140 deg C. Furthermore, the fluids were highly oxidised and the replacement of earlier chlorite by hematite is common throughout the deposit. It is concluded that both U-rich and U-poor Au-Pt-Pd mineralisation were formed by descending, low-temperature, highly oxidised, very saline, meteoric fluids. The segregation of U was controlled by fluid-rock interaction in the feldspathic or carbonate rocks. Interaction with carbonaceous or chloritic rocks resulted in a reduction in fO 2 , and consequent precipitation of U, Au, Pt and Pd. The other two types of metal associations can be explained by further reaction of the mineralizing fluids. 3 figs

  10. Influence of Au Nanoparticle Shape on Au@Cu2O Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jie; Lu, Na; Chen, Wei; Kong, Lina; Yang, Yun; Ma, Dekun; Huang, Shaoming

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of metal-semiconductor heterostructures may allow the combination of function of the corresponding components and/or the enhanced performance resulting from the interactions between all the components. In this paper, Au@Cu2O core-shell heterostructures are prepared by a seed-growth method, using different-shaped Au nanocrystals as the seeds such as nanorods, octahedra, decahedra, dots, and nanocubes. The results revealed that the final structure of Au@Cu2O was greatly influenced by ...

  11. Flow in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belt Tonjes, Marguerite; the PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    The study of flow can provide information on the initial state dynamics and the degree of equilibration attained in heavy-ion collisions. This contribution presents results for both elliptic and directed flow as determined from data recorded by the PHOBOS experiment in Au+Au runs at RHIC at \\sqrt{sNN} = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. The PHOBOS detector provides a unique coverage in pseudorapidity for measuring flow at RHIC. The systematic dependence of flow on pseudorapidity, transverse momentum, centrality and energy is discussed.

  12. A density functional theory study of the electronic properties of Os(II) and Os(III) complexes immobilized on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Boyle, N.M.; Albrecht, Tim; Murgida, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    We present a density functional theory (DFT) study of an osmium polypyridyl complex adsorbed on Au(111). The osmium polypyridyl complex [Os(bpy)(2)(P0P)Cl](n+) [bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, P0P is 4,4'-bipyridine, n = 1 for osmium(II), and n = 2 for osmium(III)] is bound to the surface through the fre...

  13. In-situ construction of Au nanoparticles confined in double-shelled TiO2/mSiO2 hollow architecture for excellent catalytic activity and enhanced thermal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yiwei; Zhou, Yuming; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Shuo; Zhang, Hongxing; Sheng, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    A facile strategy has been developed for the synthesis of H-TS-Au microspheres (MCs) with double-shelled hollow architecture and sub-5 nm Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). The synthetic procedure involves the successive sol-gel template-assisted method for the preparation of uniform hierarchical hollow-in-hollow H-TS MCs with TiO2/mSiO2 as yolks/shells, and the unique deposition-precipitation method mediated with Au(en)2Cl3 precursors for the in-situ construction of extremely stable Au NPs under a low-temperature hydrogen reduction. The synthesized H-TS-Au MCs were characterized by TEM, SEM, FTIR, XRD, BET and UV-vis absorption spectra. Catalytic activity of H-TS-Au was evaluated using the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) into 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH4. Results established that H-TS-Au MCs possessed a large-size double-shelled architecture with high structural integrity and robustness,which can effectively confine numerous tiny Au NPs and restrict them from sintering aggregation even up to further calcination at 800 °C. Owing to the advantageous structural configuration and the synergistic effect of TiO2/mSiO2 double shells, the H-TS-Au MCs were demonstrated to exhibit a remarkable catalytic activity and stability, and preserve the intact morphology after 6 repeating reduction of 4-NP.

  14. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  15. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  16. Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation as SERS substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemically pure colloidal suspensions of gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on the surface plasmon characteristics of the nanoparticles was investigated. Au:Ag colloidal suspensions were prepared by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Ag nanocolloids. The plasmon band of these mixtures was found to be highly sensitive to Au:Ag concentration ratio and wavelength of the laser beam used in the ablation process. The Au:Ag mixture consists of almost spherical shaped nanostructures with a tendency to join with adjacent ones. The surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of the Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal suspensions was tested using crystal violet as probe molecules. Enhancement in Raman signal obtained with Au:Ag substrates was found to be promising and strongly depends on its plasmon characteristics.

  17. A simple technique for direct growth of Au into a nanoporous alumina layer on conductive glass as a reusable SERS substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jiajie [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Shen, Muzhong [School of Engineering, AnHui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Liu, Siyu; Li, Feng [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Sun, Dongping, E-mail: sundpe301@163.com [School of Engineering, AnHui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Wang, Tianhe, E-mail: thwang56@126.com [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Graphical abstract: A simple technique for direct growth of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into a nanostructured porous alumina layer on conductive glass slide (PAOCG). Gold was uniformly distributed in porous alumina layer. Au/PAOCG can serve as a portable, durable and reusable SERS substrate. - Highlights: • A simple method of producing nanoporous alumina layer on conductive glasses. • A facile technique for direct growth of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into PAOCG. • It presents a general protocol for preparation of (MNPs) on conductive glasses. • Au/PAOCG exhibits high SERS sensitivity and excellent reusability. - Abstract: In this paper, we describe a simple technique for direct growth of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into a nanostructured porous alumina layer on conductive glass slide (PAOCG). PAOCG was attached firmly with a small piece of steel and was then immersed in a HAuCl{sub 4} solution. Electro-induced electrons from steel were employed to reduce AuCl{sub 4}{sup −} on PAOCG. The galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) was adopted as the fundamental mechanism for reducing metal precursors. This mechanism was further studied by open circuit potential-time (OCP-t) experiment and the result demonstrated that steel induced the continuous proceeding of this reaction. This strategy presents a simple and general protocol for preparation of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) on conductive glass substrates. The SERS properties of Au/PAOCG were investigated using aqueous crystal violet (CV) and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy) as probe molecules. Au/PAOCG allowed as low as 10{sup −9} M CV and 10{sup −8} M 4-Mpy to be detected. The reusability of this substrate was achieved by measuring the SERS spectrum of the probe molecules followed with a 400 °C heat treatment for 10 min to remove the residuals. This substrate could be reused for at least ten cycles without any significantly reduced SERS performance. Therefore, this surface can serve as a portable, durable and reusable SERS

  18. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Lee, J. W.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-01-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. The spectra were measured for transverse momenta pT from 0.25 to 4.5 GeV/c in a pseudorapidity range of 0.2<η<1.4. The evolution of the spectra is studied as a function of collision centrality, from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. The results are compared to data from proton-antiproton collisions and Au+Au collisions at lower RHIC energies. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and semi-peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing semi-peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at high pT exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  19. Toward hybrid Au nanorods @ M (Au, Ag, Pd and Pt) core-shell heterostructures for ultrasensitive SERS probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaobin; Gao, Guanhui; Kang, Shendong; Lei, Yanhua; Pan, Zhengyin; Shibayama, Tamaki; Cai, Lintao

    2017-06-01

    Being able to precisely control the morphologies of noble metallic nanostructures is of essential significance for promoting the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. Herein, we demonstrate an overgrowth strategy for synthesizing Au @ M (M = Au, Ag, Pd, Pt) core-shell heterogeneous nanocrystals with an orientated structural evolution and highly improved properties by using Au nanorods as seeds. With the same reaction condition system applied, we obtain four well-designed heterostructures with diverse shapes, including Au concave nanocuboids (Au CNs), Au @ Ag crystalizing face central cube nanopeanuts, Au @ Pd porous nanocuboids and Au @ Pt nanotrepangs. Subsequently, the exact overgrowth mechanism of the above heterostructural building blocks is further analysed via the systematic optimiziation of a series of fabrications. Remarkably, the well-defined Au CNs and Au @ Ag nanopeanuts both exhibit highly promoted SERS activity. We expect to be able to supply a facile strategy for the fabrication of multimetallic heterogeneous nanostructures, exploring the high SERS effect and catalytic activities.

  20. Reducing HAuCl4 by the C60 dianion: C60-directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into novel fullerene bound gold nanoassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Gao Xiang

    2008-01-01

    The C 60 dianion is used to reduce tetrachloroauric acid (HAuCl 4 ) for the first time; three-dimensional C 60 bound gold (Au-C 60 ) nanoclusters are obtained from C 60 -directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles due to the strong affinities of Au-C 60 and C 60 -C 60 . The process was monitored in situ by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The resulting Au-C 60 nanoclusters were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and FT-IR and Raman spectroscopies. TEM demonstrates the formation of 3D nanonetwork aggregates, which are composed of discrete gold nanocores covered with a C 60 monolayer. The SAED and XRD patterns indicate that the gold nanocores inside the capped C 60 molecules belong to the face-centred cubic crystal structure, while the C 60 molecules are amorphous. The EDS and XPS measurements validate that the Au-C 60 nanoclusters contain only Au and C elements and Au 3+ is reduced to Au 0 . FT-IR spectroscopy shows the chemiadsorption of C 60 to the gold nanocores, while Raman spectroscopy demonstrates the electron transfer from the gold nanocores to the chemiadsorbed C 60 molecules. Au-C 60 nanoclusters embedded in tetraoctyl-n-ammonium bromide (TOAB) on glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) have been fabricated and have shown stable and well-defined electrochemical responses in aqueous solution

  1. Enhanced middle-infrared light transmission through Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au aperture arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Gongli; Yao, Xiang; Ji, Xinming; Zhou, Jia; Bao, Zongming; Huang, Yiping

    2011-12-01

    The enhanced middle-infrared light transmission through Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au aperture arrays by changing the refractive index and the thickness of a dielectric layer was studied experimentally. The results indicated that the transmission spectra was highly dependent on the refractive index and the thickness of SiO(x)N(y). We found that the transmission peaks redshifted regularly along with the refractive index from 1.6 to 1.8, owing to the role of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) coupling in the Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au cascaded metallic structure. Simultaneously, a higher transmission efficiency and narrower transmission peak was obtained in Au/SiO2.1N0.3/Au cascaded metallic structure with small refractive index (1.6) than in Au/SiO0.6N1/Au cascaded metallic structure with large refractive index (1.8). When the thickness of SiO(x)N(y) changes from 0.2 to 0.4 microm, the shape of transmission spectra exhibits a large change. It was found that a higher transmission efficiency and narrower transmission peak was obtained in Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au cascaded metallic structure with a thin dielectric film (0.2 microm), with the increase of SiO(x)N(y) film's thickness, the transmission peak gradually widened and disappeared finally. This effect is useful in applications of biochemical sensing and tunable integrated plasmonic devices in the middle-infrared region.

  2. Improvement of pre-treatment method for 36Cl/Cl measurement of Cl in natural groundwater by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Kotaro; Hasegawa, Takuma

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of 36 Cl/Cl by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a useful method to trace hydrological processes in groundwater. For accurate estimation, separation of SO 4 2- from Cl - in groundwater is required because 36 S affects AMS measurement of 36 Cl. Previous studies utilized the difference in solubility between BaSO 4 and BaCl 2 (BaSO 4 method) to chemically separate SO 4 2- from Cl - . However, the accuracy of the BaSO 4 method largely depends on operator skill, and consequently Cl - recovery is typically incomplete (70-80%). In addition, the method is time consuming (>1 week), and cannot be applied directly to dilute solutions. In this study, a method based on ion-exchange column chromatography (column method) was developed for separation of Cl - and SO 4 2- . Optimum conditions were determined for the diameter and height of column, type and amount of resin, type and concentration of eluent, and flow rate. The recovery of Cl - was almost 100%, which allowed complete separation from SO 4 2- . The separation procedure was short ( 4 methods, and then analyzed by AMS to estimate 36 S counts and 36 Cl/Cl values. 36 S counts in samples processed by the column method were stable and lower than those from the BaSO 4 method. The column method has the following advantages over the BaSO 4 method: (1) complete and stable separation of Cl - and SO 4 2- , (2) less operator influence on results, (3) short processing time ( - , and (5) concentration of Cl - and separation from SO 4 2- in the one system for dilute solutions.

  3. Photocatalytic degradation of malachite green dye using Au/NaNbO{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeissa, E.S., E-mail: elhambaeissa@gmail.com

    2016-07-05

    The morphology of sodium niobate, which was produced using a hydrothermal method, was studied by changing the hydrothermal temperature from 100 to 250 °C. Using 250 °C hydrothermal temperature resulted in sodium niobate with a nanocube structure. The sodium niobate nanocubes were doped with gold by impregnation with an aqueous solution of HAuCl{sub 4}. The band gap of sodium niobate is approximately 3.4 eV, and it was decreased to 2.45 eV by gold doping. The surface area of sodium niobate is higher than that of Au/NaNbO{sub 3} due to blockage of some pores of sodium niobate by gold doping. The photocatalytic performance of gold-doped sodium niobate was studied by degradation of malachite green dye using visible light irradiation. The results demonstrate that the photocatalytic performance of gold-doped sodium niobate is higher than that of sodium niobate and TiO{sub 2} Degussa under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • Au/NaNbO{sub 3} were used for photocatalytic degradation of malachite green dye. • Photocatalytic degradation was dependent on wt % of Au; reaction time, and weight of catalyst. • Catalyst re-use revealed the present photocatalyst remain effective and active after five cycles.

  4. Au 38 (SPh) 24 : Au 38 Protected with Aromatic Thiolate Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambukwella, Milan; Burrage, Shayna; Neubrander, Marie; Baseggio, Oscar; Aprà, Edoardo; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Dass, Amala

    2017-03-21

    Au38(SR)24 is one of the most extensively investigated gold nanomolecules along with Au25(SR)18 and Au144(SR)60. However, so far it has only been prepared using aliphatic-like ligands, where R = –SC6H13, -SC12H25 and –SCH2CH2Ph. Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 when reacted with HSPh undergoes core-size conversion to Au36(SPh)24, and existing literature suggest that Au38(SPh)24 cannot be synthesized. Here, contrary to prevailing knowledge, we demonstrate that Au38(SPh)24 can be prepared if the ligand exchanged conditions are optimized, without any formation of Au36(SPh)24. Conclusive evidence is presented in the form of MALDI-MS, ESI-MS characterization, and optical spectra of Au38(SPh)24 in a solid glass form showing distinct differences from that of Au38(S-aliphatic)24. Theoretical analysis confirms experimental assignment of the optical spectrum and shows that the stability of Au38(SPh)24 is comparable to that of its aliphatic analogues, but results from different physical origins, with a significant component of ligand-ligand attractive interactions.

  5. Preferential Au precipitation at deformation-induced defects in Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S., E-mail: S.Zhang-1@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Langelaan, G. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Brouwer, J.C.; Sloof, W.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Brück, E. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Zwaag, S. van der [Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands); Dijk, N.H. van [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-01-25

    Highlights: • Fe–Au–B–N forms a good model alloy system for self healing of deformation damage. • Solute Au atoms exclusively precipitate at grain boundaries, cracks and cavities. • XPS indicates a strong tendency for Au segregation on free surfaces at 550 °C. • Interstitial B and N form hexagonal BN on free surfaces at 550 °C. • Selective Au precipitation at open volume defects can cause autonomous repair. -- Abstract: The influence of deformation-induced defects on the isothermal precipitation of Au was studied in high-purity Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys. Preferential Au precipitation upon annealing at 550 °C is observed at local plastic indentations. In fractured Fe–Au–B–N, solute Au atoms were found to heterogeneously precipitate at grain boundaries and local micro-cracks. This is supported by in-situ creep tests that showed a strong tendency for Au precipitation at cracks and cavities also formed during creep loading at 550 °C. Complementary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments indicate a strong tendency of Au, B and N segregation onto free surface during aging. The observed site-specific precipitation of Au holds interesting opportunities for defect healing in steels subjected to creep deformation.

  6. Jet-Hadron Correlations in √sNN =200 GeV p +p and Central Au +Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L., Jr.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au +Au and p +p collisions at √sNN =200 GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au +Au collisions is biased toward jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au +Au and p +p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum (pTassoc) and enhanced at low pTassoc in 0%-20% central Au +Au collisions compared to p +p collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  7. Study of Au+Au relativistic collisions with the Fopi-Phase I detector; Etude des collisions relativistes Au+Au avec le detecteur Fopi-Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupieux, P

    1995-01-01

    Au+Au relativistic collisions, in a 100-1000 MeV energy domain per nucleon, are described. Experiments have been carried out with the SIS accelerator at GSI/Darmstadt. Data are analysed with the FOPI-phase I detector. These data are compared with IQMD model (Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics) Predictions. (S.G). 80 refs., 77 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Fabrication of a novel hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on Au-(PEO106PPO70PEO106) hairy nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Yalong; Wang Yan; Zhang Guohui; Shen Jian; Zhao Wenbo; Huang Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    In this case, the Au-F127 (triblock copolymer PEO 106 PPO 70 PEO 106 , PEO is short for polyethylene oxide and PPO is the abbreviation of polypropene oxide) hybrid hairy nanospheres were obtained by the redox reaction using pluronic F127 and HAuCl 4 as precursor. A novel hemoglobin (Hb) biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing the Hb onto the Au-F127 film on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The Au-F127 nanocomposites and Hb were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), polycrystalline electron diffraction ring pattern and ultra-violet visible spectra (UV–vis). UV–vis spectra suggested that Hb in the film could keep its native secondary structure. The performances of Hb/(Au-F127) on GCE were characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and typical amperometric response (i–t) measurements. The immobilized Hb maintained its bioactivity and displayed an excellent electrochemical behavior with a formal potential of −339 mV. The resulting electrode showed an electrocatalytic activity to hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The linear response range of the H 2 O 2 biosensor was from 3.0 × 10 −7 to 5.7 × 10 −4 M with a low detection limit of 4.0 × 10 −8 M.

  9. Thermally Stable TiO2 - and SiO2 -Shell-Isolated Au Nanoparticles for In Situ Plasmon-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Hydrogenation Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Thomas; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2018-03-12

    Raman spectroscopy is known as a powerful technique for solid catalyst characterization as it provides vibrational fingerprints of (metal) oxides, reactants, and products. It can even become a strong surface-sensitive technique by implementing shell-isolated surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS). Au@TiO 2 and Au@SiO 2 shell-isolated nanoparticles (SHINs) of various sizes were therefore prepared for the purpose of studying heterogeneous catalysis and the effect of metal oxide coating. Both SiO 2 - and TiO 2 -SHINs are effective SHINERS substrates and thermally stable up to 400 °C. Nano-sized Ru and Rh hydrogenation catalysts were assembled over the SHINs by wet impregnation of aqueous RuCl 3 and RhCl 3 . The substrates were implemented to study CO adsorption and hydrogenation under in situ conditions at various temperatures to illustrate the differences between catalysts and shell materials with SHINERS. This work demonstrates the potential of SHINS for in situ characterization studies in a wide range of catalytic reactions. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  10. Development and characterisation of a novel composite electrode material consisting of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) including Au nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanardi, C.; Terzi, F.; Pigani, L.; Heras, A.; Colina, A.; Lopez-Palacios, J.; Seeber, R.

    2008-01-01

    Composite material consisting of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), including Au nanoparticles encapsulated by N-dodecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonium-1-propanesulphonate (SB12) is synthesised by constant-current method on ITO glass, in aqueous medium, leading to an electrode coating. The synthesis process is followed by UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry, both in normal-beam and in parallel-beam configurations. Under the same experimental conditions PEDOT is also synthesised by electropolymerisation only in the presence of LiClO 4 supporting electrolyte, as well in solutions also containing SB12. The data relative to the electrosynthesis of the three materials are compared. The composite material based on the conductive polymer matrix including Au nanoparticles has been characterised by SEM, TEM, ICP, Raman and UV-vis spectroscopies. The behaviour of the three different electrode coatings with respect to p-doping process has been studied by conventional electrochemical techniques and by potentiostatic and potentiodynamic UV-vis spectroelectrochemical methods. Conclusions are drawn out about the effect of the presence of the surfactant and of Au nanoparticles on the electrochemical properties of the electrode system

  11. An SFG and DFG investigation of polycrystalline Au, Au-Cu and Au-Ag-Cu electrodes in contact with aqueous solutions containing KCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Busson, Bertrand; De Gaudenzi, Gian Pietro; Mele, Claudio; Tadjeddine, Abderrahmane

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the behaviour of polycrystalline Au, Au-Cu (Cu 25%) and Au-Ag-Cu (Ag 10%, Cu 15%) electrodes in contact with neutral aqueous solutions of KCN has been studied as a function of potential by means of in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) and difference frequency generation (DFG) spectroscopies. The potential-dependent spectra have been analysed quantitatively with a model for the second-order non-linear susceptibility accounting for vibrational and electronic effects. The potential-dependence of the CN - stretching band position and of the free-electron contribution to the real part of the non-resonant component of the second-order susceptibility have been accounted for. Spectroelectrochemical results were complemented by cyclic voltammetric measurements. The chief stress in this work has been placed on systematising and quantifying the interaction between the vibrational and electronic structures of the electrodic interfaces studied. The effects of adsorbates on the electronic structure of the adsorbing electrode, as a function of electrode alloy composition and applied potential are particularly critical for the understanding of Au-alloy electrochemistry in the presence of cyanide and cyanocomplexes. The systematic comparison of SFG and DFG spectra measured under the same electrochemical conditions for Au, Au-Cu and Au-Ag-Cu electrodes discloses a rich phenomenology related to the electronic structure of the interface

  12. An SFG and DFG investigation of polycrystalline Au, Au-Cu and Au-Ag-Cu electrodes in contact with aqueous solutions containing KCN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzini, Benedetto [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universita di Lecce, v. Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)]. E-mail: benedetto.bozzini@unile.it; Busson, Bertrand [CLIO-LCP, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); De Gaudenzi, Gian Pietro [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universita di Lecce, v. Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Mele, Claudio [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universita di Lecce, v. Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Tadjeddine, Abderrahmane [UDIL-CNRS, Bat. 201, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, BP 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2007-01-16

    In this paper, the behaviour of polycrystalline Au, Au-Cu (Cu 25%) and Au-Ag-Cu (Ag 10%, Cu 15%) electrodes in contact with neutral aqueous solutions of KCN has been studied as a function of potential by means of in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) and difference frequency generation (DFG) spectroscopies. The potential-dependent spectra have been analysed quantitatively with a model for the second-order non-linear susceptibility accounting for vibrational and electronic effects. The potential-dependence of the CN{sup -} stretching band position and of the free-electron contribution to the real part of the non-resonant component of the second-order susceptibility have been accounted for. Spectroelectrochemical results were complemented by cyclic voltammetric measurements. The chief stress in this work has been placed on systematising and quantifying the interaction between the vibrational and electronic structures of the electrodic interfaces studied. The effects of adsorbates on the electronic structure of the adsorbing electrode, as a function of electrode alloy composition and applied potential are particularly critical for the understanding of Au-alloy electrochemistry in the presence of cyanide and cyanocomplexes. The systematic comparison of SFG and DFG spectra measured under the same electrochemical conditions for Au, Au-Cu and Au-Ag-Cu electrodes discloses a rich phenomenology related to the electronic structure of the interface.

  13. Determination of the equilibrium constant of FeZrCl6 formation from FeCl3 and ZrCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdonosov, S.S.; Kharisov, B.I.; Nikitin, M.I.

    1992-01-01

    Equilibrium pressures of chlorine formed in the course of reaction FeCl 3 +ZrCl 4 ↔ FeZrCl 6 +0.5 Cl 2 were determined at the temperatures of 250-325 deg C. The values of equilibrium constant K p of the reaction mentioned at the temperatures of 250, 275, 300 and 325 deg were calculated, taking into consideration the determined values of p Cl2 and literature data on equilibrium pressures of ZrCl 4 and FeCl 3 vapours

  14. Balance functions from Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D.R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M.J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielčík, Jaroslav; Bielčíková, Jana; Biritz, B.; Bland, L.C.; Bonner, B.E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A.V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M.C.D.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M.C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, Petr; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Chen, J.Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K.E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R.F.; Codrington, M.J.M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A.D.; De Silva, L.C.; Debbe, R.R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A.A.; de Souza, R.D.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J.L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J.C.; Mazumdar, M.R.D.; Efimov, L.G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R.G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangaharan, D.R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y.N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.X.; Harris, J.W.; Hays-Wehle, J.P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Hofman, D.J.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C.L.; Jones, P.G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitán, Jan; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D.P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.R.; Knospe, A.G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kushpil, Vasilij; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; LaPointe, S. (ed.); Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, Richard; Lee, Ch.; Lee, J.H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.M.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Ma, G.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O.I.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H.S.; Matulenko, Yu.A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T.S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N.G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M.K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M.M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D.A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B.K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J.M.; Netrakanti, P.K.; Ng, M.J.; Nogach, L.V.; Nurushev, S.B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E.W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B.S.; Pal, S.K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S.C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M.A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Potukuchi, B.V.K.S.; Powell, C.B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N.K.; Pujahari, P.R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R.L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H.G.; Roberts, J.B.; Rogachevskiy, O.V.; Romero, J.L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T.R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S.S.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R.N.; Skoby, M.J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H.M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J.R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M.C.; Subba, N.L.; Šumbera, Michal; Sun, X.M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D.N.; Symons, T.J.M.; de Toledo, A. S.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A.H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L.H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J.H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A.R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlustý, David; Tokarev, M. V.; Trainor, T.A.; Tram, V.N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O.D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D.G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J.A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G.M.S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S.A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Westfall, G.D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S.W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.F.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q.H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, J.B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, X.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhou, W.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y.H.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), 024905/1-024905/16 ISSN 0556-2813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : HEAVY-ION COLLISIONS * AU-AU COLLISIONS * TIME PROJECTION CHAMBER Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.416, year: 2010

  15. Separation of CsCl and SrCl_2 from a ternary CsCl-SrCl_2-LiCl via a zone refining process for waste salt minimization of pyroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Moonsoo; Choi, Ho Gil; Yi, Kyung Woo; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Jong Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    The purification of LiCl salt mixture has traditionally been carried out by a melt crystallization process. To improve the throughput of zone refining, three heaters were installed in the zone refiner. The zone refining method was used to grow pure LiCl salt ingots from LiCl-CsCl-SrCl_2 salt mixture. The main investigated parameters were the heater speed and the number of passes. A change in the LiCl crystal grain size was observed according to the horizontal direction. From each zone refined salt ingot, samples were collected horizontally. To analyze the concentrations of Sr and Cs, an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer were used, respectively. The experimental results show that Sr and Cs concentrations at the initial region of the ingot were low and reached their peak at the final freezing region of the salt ingot. Concentration results of zone refined salt were compared with theoretical results yielded by the proposed model to validate its predictions. The k_e_f_f of Sr and Cs were 0.13 and 0.11, respectively. The decontamination factors of Sr and Cs were 450 and 1650, respectively. - Highlights: • The LiCl-CsCl-SrCl_2 salt ingot was purified by zone refining technique to minimize waste salt. • The concentration distribution of Cs and Sr were analyzed by mass transfer equation. • The decontamination factors of Cs and Sr were 1600 and 450 respectively in case of 60% of recovery yield.

  16. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Montipora Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Montipora in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  17. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Leptoseris Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  18. Filipino au pairs on the move

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2016-01-01

    Most Filipina au pairs in Denmark send remittances back home, and for many, au pairing forms part of longer-term migration trajectories. This article explores how Filipina au pairs try to carve out a future for themselves abroad. It shows that they navigate within tight webs of financial interdep......Most Filipina au pairs in Denmark send remittances back home, and for many, au pairing forms part of longer-term migration trajectories. This article explores how Filipina au pairs try to carve out a future for themselves abroad. It shows that they navigate within tight webs of financial...

  19. Controllable synthesis and characterization of Fe3O4/Au composite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Yan; Jin, Yan-Yan; Si, Jian-Chao; Peng, Ming-Li; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Chen, Chao; Cui, Ya-Li

    2015-01-01

    Fe 3 O 4 /Au composite nanoparticles (GoldMag NPs) have received considerable attention because of their advantageous properties arisen from both individual Au and Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. Many efforts have been devoted to the synthesis of these composite nanoparticles. Herein, GoldMag NPs were reported to be synthesized by two-step method. Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and modified by the citric acid, and then citric acid-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were used as seeds in sodium citrate solution to reduce the HAuCl 4 . The size of obtained nanoparticles was geared from 25 to 300 nm by controlling the concentration of reactants. The GoldMag NPs were characterized by UV–vis spectrometer, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The GoldMag NPs showed good superparamagnetism at room temperature and were well dispersed in water with surface plasmon resonance absorption peak varied from 538 nm to 570 nm. - Highlights: • A low cost, simple manipulation and nontoxic approach was designed for preparation of magnetic Fe 3 O 4 /Au (GoldMag NPs) nanocomposites. • The size of GoldMag NPs could be controlled from 25 to 300 nm by varying the concentration of reactants. • GoldMag NPs possessed good magnetic response, high dispersion, and good stability

  20. φ meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    We report the STAR measurement of ψ meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at √s NN = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the ψ spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the ψ transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that ψ production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions ( bin >). The systematics of T > versus centrality and the constant ψ/K - ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for ψ production

  1. Synthesis of Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24, Au36(SPh-tBu)24, and Au30(S-tBu)18 Nanomolecules from a Common Precursor Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambukwella, Milan; Dass, Amala

    2017-10-17

    Phenylethanethiol protected nanomolecules such as Au 25 , Au 38 , and Au 144 are widely studied by a broad range of scientists in the community, owing primarily to the availability of simple synthetic protocols. However, synthetic methods are not available for other ligands, such as aromatic thiol and bulky ligands, impeding progress. Here we report the facile synthesis of three distinct nanomolecules, Au 38 (SCH 2 CH 2 Ph) 24 , Au 36 (SPh-tBu) 24 , and Au 30 (S-tBu) 18 , exclusively, starting from a common Au n (glutathione) m (where n and m are number of gold atoms and glutathiolate ligands) starting material upon reaction with HSCH 2 CH 2 Ph, HSPh-tBu, and HStBu, respectively. The systematic synthetic approach involves two steps: (i) synthesis of kinetically controlled Au n (glutathione) m crude nanocluster mixture with 1:4 gold to thiol molar ratio and (ii) thermochemical treatment of the purified nanocluster mixture with excess thiols to obtain thermodynamically stable nanomolecules. Thermochemical reactions with physicochemically different ligands formed highly monodispersed, exclusively three different core-size nanomolecules, suggesting a ligand induced core-size conversion and structural transformation. The purpose of this work is to make available a facile and simple synthetic method for the preparation of Au 38 (SCH 2 CH 2 Ph) 24 , Au 36 (SPh-tBu) 24 , and Au 30 (S-tBu) 18 , to nonspecialists and the broader scientific community. The central idea of simple synthetic method was demonstrated with other ligand systems such as cyclopentanethiol (HSC 5 H 9 ), cyclohexanethiol(HSC 6 H 11 ), para-methylbenzenethiol(pMBT), 1-pentanethiol(HSC 5 H 11 ), 1-hexanethiol(HSC 6 H 13 ), where Au 36 (SC 5 H 9 ) 24 , Au 36 (SC 6 H 11 ) 24 , Au 36 (pMBT) 24 , Au 38 (SC 5 H 11 ) 24 , and Au 38 (SC 6 H 13 ) 24 were obtained, respectively.

  2. Hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles as electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Sougrat, Rachid; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2012-01-01

    that individual metals may not catalyze. Here, preparation of hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) and their use as electrocatalysts are reported. Galvanic displacement with Ag NPs is used to obtain hollow NPs, and higher reduction potential of Au

  3. Hierarchical paramecium-like hollow and solid Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures constructed using goethite as template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Repo, Eveliina; Heikkilä, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku; Sillanpää, Mika

    2010-10-01

    Novel hollow and solid paramecium-like hierarchical Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures were constructed using goethite as template via a seed-mediated growth method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ξ-potential measurement, UV-vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), ICP-AES measurement, x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were utilized to systematically characterize the bimetallic nanostructures. It is found that the core structure of the paramecium-like bimetallic nanomaterial is closely related to reducing agent. When ascorbic acid is used as reducing agent, goethite serves as in situ sacrificed template and hollow paramecium-like bimetallic structure is obtained. When NH2OH·HCl is used, solid nanostructure with preserved goethite core is produced. Heating the reaction solution is necessary to obtain the paramecium-like morphology with rough interconnected Pt cilia shell. The thickness of Pt cilia layer can be controlled by adjusting the molar ratio of H2PtCl6 to Au nanoseeds. The overgrowth of the rough Pt cilia is proposed to be via an autocatalytic and three-dimensional heterogeneous nucleation process first through flower-like morphology. Both the hollow and solid hierarchical paramecium-like Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures show good catalytic activities.

  4. Hierarchical paramecium-like hollow and solid Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures constructed using goethite as template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Repo, Eveliina; Sillanpaeae, Mika; Heikkilae, Mikko; Leskelae, Markku

    2010-01-01

    Novel hollow and solid paramecium-like hierarchical Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures were constructed using goethite as template via a seed-mediated growth method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ξ-potential measurement, UV-vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), ICP-AES measurement, x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were utilized to systematically characterize the bimetallic nanostructures. It is found that the core structure of the paramecium-like bimetallic nanomaterial is closely related to reducing agent. When ascorbic acid is used as reducing agent, goethite serves as in situ sacrificed template and hollow paramecium-like bimetallic structure is obtained. When NH 2 OH·HCl is used, solid nanostructure with preserved goethite core is produced. Heating the reaction solution is necessary to obtain the paramecium-like morphology with rough interconnected Pt cilia shell. The thickness of Pt cilia layer can be controlled by adjusting the molar ratio of H 2 PtCl 6 to Au nanoseeds. The overgrowth of the rough Pt cilia is proposed to be via an autocatalytic and three-dimensional heterogeneous nucleation process first through flower-like morphology. Both the hollow and solid hierarchical paramecium-like Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures show good catalytic activities.

  5. Hierarchical paramecium-like hollow and solid Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures constructed using goethite as template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Wei; Repo, Eveliina; Sillanpaeae, Mika [Laboratory of Applied Environmental Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, Patteristonkatu 1, FI-50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Heikkilae, Mikko; Leskelae, Markku, E-mail: weiliuzk@yahoo.cn, E-mail: mika.sillanpaa@uef.fi [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, PO Box 55 (A.I. Virtasen aukio 1), FI-00014, Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-10-01

    Novel hollow and solid paramecium-like hierarchical Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures were constructed using goethite as template via a seed-mediated growth method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), {xi}-potential measurement, UV-vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), ICP-AES measurement, x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were utilized to systematically characterize the bimetallic nanostructures. It is found that the core structure of the paramecium-like bimetallic nanomaterial is closely related to reducing agent. When ascorbic acid is used as reducing agent, goethite serves as in situ sacrificed template and hollow paramecium-like bimetallic structure is obtained. When NH{sub 2}OH{center_dot}HCl is used, solid nanostructure with preserved goethite core is produced. Heating the reaction solution is necessary to obtain the paramecium-like morphology with rough interconnected Pt cilia shell. The thickness of Pt cilia layer can be controlled by adjusting the molar ratio of H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6} to Au nanoseeds. The overgrowth of the rough Pt cilia is proposed to be via an autocatalytic and three-dimensional heterogeneous nucleation process first through flower-like morphology. Both the hollow and solid hierarchical paramecium-like Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures show good catalytic activities.

  6. Transverse expansion in 197 Au + 197 Au collisions at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y.; Liu, F.; Liu, K.; Schweda, K.; Xu, N.

    2003-01-01

    Using the RQMD model, transverse momentum distributions and particle ratios are studied for 197 Au + 197 Au collisions at √s NN = 200 GeV. In particular, they present results on the mean transverse momentum of charged pions, charged kaons, protons and anti-protons and compare with experimental measurements. They discuss an approach to study early partonic collectivity in high energy nuclear collisions

  7. Highly Ordered Periodic Au/TiO₂ Hetero-Nanostructures for Plasmon-Induced Enhancement of the Activity and Stability for Ethanol Electro-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhao; Wang, Qiyu; Zheng, Weitao; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2016-03-02

    The catalytic electro-oxidation of ethanol is the essential technique for direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) in the area of alternative energy for the ability of converting the chemical energy of alcohol into the electric energy directly. Developing highly efficient and stable electrode materials with antipoisoning ability for ethanol electro-oxidation remains a challenge. A highly ordered periodic Au-nanoparticle (NP)-decorated bilayer TiO2 nanotube (BTNT) heteronanostructure was fabricated by a two-step anodic oxidation of Ti foil and the subsequent photoreduction of HAuCl4. The plasmon-induced charge separation on the heterointerface of Au/TiO2 electrode enhances the electrocatalytic activity and stability for the ethanol oxidation under visible light irradiation. The highly ordered periodic heterostructure on the electrode surface enhanced the light harvesting and led to the greater performance of ethanol electro-oxidation under irradiation compared with the ordinary Au NPs-decorated monolayer TiO2 nanotube (MTNT). This novel Au/TiO2 electrode also performed a self-cleaning property under visible light attributed to the enhanced electro-oxidation of the adsorbed intermediates. This light-driven enhancement of the electrochemical performances provides a development strategy for the design and construction of DAFCs.

  8. Photoluminescence from Au nanoparticles embedded in Au:oxide composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hongbo; Wen, Weijia; Wong, George K.

    2006-12-01

    Au:oxide composite multilayer films with Au nanoparticles sandwiched by oxide layers (such as SiO2, ZnO, and TiO2) were prepared in a magnetron sputtering system. Their photoluminescence (PL) spectra were investigated by employing a micro-Raman system in which an Argon laser with a wavelength of 514 nm was used as the pumping light. Distinct PL peaks located at a wavelength range between 590 and 680 nm were observed in most of our samples, with Au particle size varying from several to hundreds of nanometers. It was found that the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in these composites exerted a strong influence on the position of the PL peaks but had little effect on the PL intensity.

  9. Photoluminescence from Au nanoparticles embedded in Au:oxide composite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Hongbo; Wen Weijia; Wong, George K. L.

    2006-01-01

    Au:oxide composite multilayer films with Au nanoparticles sandwiched by oxide layers (such as SiO 2 , ZnO, and TiO 2 ) were prepared in a magnetron sputtering system. Their photoluminescence (PL) spectra were investigated by employing a micro-Raman system in which an Argon laser with a wavelength of 514 nm was used as the pumping light. Distinct PL peaks located at a wavelength range between 590 and 680 nm were observed in most of our samples, with Au particle size varying from several to hundreds of nanometers. It was found that the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in these composites exerted a strong influence on the position of the PL peaks but had little effect on the PL intensity

  10. Mise au point

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    31 mai 2013 ... traités au service de chirurgie maxillo-faciale et chirurgie plastique de l'hôpital ... qui est la fracture simple isolée du corps, on a inclut ce type de fracture ... sion latérale au niveau de la queue du sourcil. La voie vestibulaire ...

  11. Colloidal Au and Au-alloy catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells: Electrocatalysis and fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwan, Mohammed H.; Macdonald, Charles L. B.; Northwood, Derek O.; Gyenge, Elod L.

    Supported colloidal Au and Au-alloys (Au-Pt and Au-Pd, 1:1 atomic ratio) on Vulcan XC-72 (with 20 wt% metal load) were prepared by the Bönneman method. The electrocatalytic activity of the colloidal metals with respect to borohydride electro-oxidation for fuel cell applications was investigated by voltammetry on static and rotating electrodes, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. The fundamental electrochemical techniques showed that alloying Au, a metal that leads to the maximum eight-electron oxidation of BH 4 -, with Pd or Pt, well-known catalysts of dehydrogenation reactions, improved the electrode kinetics of BH 4 - oxidation. Fuel cell experiments corroborated the kinetic studies. Using 5 mg cm -2 colloidal metal load on the anode, it was found that Au-Pt was the most active catalyst giving a cell voltage of 0.47 V at 100 mA cm -2 and 333 K, while under identical conditions the cell voltage using colloidal Au was 0.17 V.

  12. Colloidal Au and Au-alloy catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells: Electrocatalysis and fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwan, Mohammed H.; Northwood, Derek O. [Department of Mechanical, Auto and Materials Engineering, University of Windsor, Windsor (Canada N9B 3P4); Macdonald, Charles L.B. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Windsor, Windsor (Canada N9B 3P4); Gyenge, Elod L. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada V6T 1Z4)

    2006-07-14

    Supported colloidal Au and Au-alloys (Au-Pt and Au-Pd, 1:1 atomic ratio) on Vulcan XC-72 (with 20wt% metal load) were prepared by the Bonneman method. The electrocatalytic activity of the colloidal metals with respect to borohydride electro-oxidation for fuel cell applications was investigated by voltammetry on static and rotating electrodes, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. The fundamental electrochemical techniques showed that alloying Au, a metal that leads to the maximum eight-electron oxidation of BH{sub 4}{sup -}, with Pd or Pt, well-known catalysts of dehydrogenation reactions, improved the electrode kinetics of BH{sub 4}{sup -} oxidation. Fuel cell experiments corroborated the kinetic studies. Using 5mgcm{sup -2} colloidal metal load on the anode, it was found that Au-Pt was the most active catalyst giving a cell voltage of 0.47V at 100mAcm{sup -2} and 333K, while under identical conditions the cell voltage using colloidal Au was 0.17V. (author)

  13. Nicolas Lyon-Caen , La boîte à Perrette, le jansénisme parisien au xviiie siècle

    OpenAIRE

    Vermander, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    Nicolas Lyon-­­­Caen publie ici sa thèse sou­­te­­nue en 2008 à l’uni­­ver­­sité Paris I (dir. Cl. Mi­­­chaud) sous le titre Mar­­chands de miracles. La bour­­geoi­­sie jan­­sé­­niste pari­­sienne au xviiie siècle, elle-­­­même pro­­lon­­ge­­ment d’une thèse de l’École des Chartes consa­­crée au finan­­ce­­ment du « parti » jan­­sé­­niste au xviiie siècle (La boîte à Perrette, 2002). Ce n’est donc pas une his­­toire de l’ensemble des jan­­sé­­nistes pari­­siens que l’on trou­­vera dans cet ou...

  14. Use of thermodynamic calculation for investigating phase diagram of the ternary system NaCl-PbCl2-NdCl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostygov, V.I.; Potemin, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculation of meltability diagram of ternary system NaCl-PbCl 2 -NdCl 3 with the use of literature and experimental data on meltability diagrams of binary systems forming it, as well as data on crystallization heats of the components, has been carried out. Equations are derived under condition of pseudoperfection of the ternary system. 64 mol.% PbCl 2 , 26 mol.% NaCl, 10 mol.% NdCl 3 and average temperature of crystallization 391 deg C correspond to the calculated composition of the ternary eutectics, 49 mol.% PbCl 2 , 35 mol.% NaCl, 16 mol.% NdCl 3 and average temperature of peritectic transformation 416 deg C - to the composition of the ternary peritectic. The results obtained agree well with the experimental data

  15. Preparation of submicron-sized spherical particles of gold using laser-induced melting in liquids and low-toxic stabilizing reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, T.; Higashi, Y.; Tsuji, M.; Ishikawa, Y.; Koshizaki, N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Submicron-sized spherical particles of gold were prepared using laser irradiation for the source gold nanoparticles stabilized by NaCl. • The source gold nanoparticles agglomeration was controlled both by the NaCl concentration of and by laser irradiation. • The formation process and the laser-fluence dependence of the particle size of gold nanoparticles in NaCl solutions differs from those in citrate solutions. • We revealed that properties of ligands are significantly important to prepare submicron-sized spherical particles and to control their size. - Abstract: Laser-induced melting in liquids (LIML) was applied to prepare spherical submicron-sized particles of gold (AuSMPs) from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized using NaCl. Because undesirable byproducts, which might be generated when organic reagents such as citrate are used as the stabilizing reagent, are not generated from NaCl by laser irradiation, AuSMPs fabricated from AuNPs stabilized by NaCl will be low toxic. The AuSMPs were obtained by laser irradiation of the source AuNPs in NaCl solutions stabilized by NaCl at the proper concentration. Similar to the preparation of AuSMPs from AuNPs stabilized by citrate, the agglomeration of the source AuNPs, which is necessary to obtain AuSMPs, was controlled both by the NaCl concentration and by laser irradiation. However, the formation process and the laser-fluence dependence of the particle size of AuSMPs differed for various NaCl solutions and citrate solutions

  16. High-temperature stability of Au/Pd/Cu and Au/Pd(P)/Cu surface finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C. E.; Hsieh, W. Z.; Lee, P. T.; Huang, Y. H.; Kuo, T. T.

    2018-03-01

    Thermal reliability of Au/Pd/Cu and Au/Pd(4-6 wt.% P)/Cu trilayers in the isothermal annealing at 180 °C were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The pure Pd film possessed a nanocrystalline structure with numerous grain boundaries, thereby facilitating the interdiffusion between Au and Cu. Out-diffusion of Cu through Pd and Au grain boundaries yielded a significant amount of Cu oxides (CuO and Cu2O) over the Au surface and gave rise to void formation in the Cu film. By contrast, the Pd(P) film was amorphous and served as a good diffusion barrier against Cu diffusion. The results of this study indicated that amorphous Pd(P) possessed better oxidation resistance and thermal reliability than crystalline Pd.

  17. Novel redox species polyaniline derivative-Au/Pt as sensing platform for label-free electrochemical immunoassay of carbohydrate antigen 199

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liyuan; Shan, Jiao; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang, E-mail: mazhanfang@cnu.edu.cn

    2016-03-10

    A novel electrochemical redox-active nanocomposite was synthesized by a one-pot method using N,N′-diphenyl-p-phenylediamine as monomer, and HAuCl{sub 4} and K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} as co-oxidizing agents. The as-prepared poly(N,N′-diphenyl-p-phenylediamine)-Au/Pt exhibited admirable electrochemical redox activity at 0.15 V, excellent H{sub 2}O{sub 2} electrocatalytic ability and favorable electron transfer ability. Based on these, the evaluation of the composite as sensing substrate for label-free electrochemical immunosensing to the sensitive detection of carbohydrate antigen 199 was described. This technique proved to be a prospective detection tool with a wide liner range from 0.001 U mL{sup −1} to 40 U mL{sup −1}, and a low detection limit of 2.3 × 10{sup −4} U mL{sup −1} (S/N = 3). In addition, this method was used for the analysis of human serum sample, and good agreement was obtained between the values and those of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, implying the potential application in clinical research. Importantly, the strategy of the present substrate could be extended to other polymer-based nanocomposites such as polypyrrole derivatives or polythiophene derivatives, and this could be of great significance for the electrochemical immunoassay. - Highlights: • A novel electrochemical redox composite PPPD-Au/Pt was synthesized by one-pot method. • PPPD-Au/Pt was used as sensing substrate for label-free electrochemical immunosensor. • The immunosensor showed wide detection range and ultralow detection limit for the detection of CA199.

  18. L’apprentissage au cern

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    pour les professions d’électronicien(ne) et de laborantin(e) en physique L’apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l’examen de fin d’apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat fédéral de capacité suisse (CFC). 6 places au total sont ouvertes au recrutement pour les deux professions. L’apprentissage dure 4 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 21 ans à la date de début de l’apprentissage ; avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire, au minimum 9e du Cycle d’orientation genevois (3e en France) ; être ressortissant d’un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Danemark, Espagne, Finlande, France, Grèce, Hongrie, Italie, Norvège, Pays-Bas, Pologne, Portugal, Royaume-Uni, République tchèque, République slovaque , Suède, Suisse) ; pour les résidents en Suisse : être ressortissant su...

  19. SEPARATION OF CsCl FROM LiCl-CsCl MOLTEN SALT BY COLD FINGER MELT CRYSTALLIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSHUA R. VERSEY

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a fundamental understanding of a cold finger melt crystallization technique by exploring the heat and mass transfer processes of cold finger separation. A series of experiments were performed using a simplified LiCl-CsCl system by varying initial CsCl concentrations (1, 3, 5, and 7.5 wt%, cold finger cooling rates (7.4, 9.8, 12.3, and 14.9 L/min, and separation times (5, 10, 15, and 30 min. Results showed a potential recycling rate of 0.36 g/min with a purity of 0.33 wt% CsCl in LiCl. A CsCl concentrated drip formation was found to decrease crystal purity especially for smaller crystal formations. Dimensionless heat and mass transfer correlations showed that separation production is primarily influenced by convective transfer controlled by cooling gas flow rate, where correlations are more accurate for slower cooling gas flow rates.

  20. Au@AuPt nanoparticles embedded in B-doped graphene: A superior electrocatalyst for determination of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xianlan; Yang, Guangming; Feng, Shaoping; Shi, Ling; Huang, Zhaolong [School of Science, Honghe University (China); Key Laboratory of Natural Pharamaceutical & Chemical Biology of Yunnan Province Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China); Pan, Haibo [Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument & Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Liu, Wei, E-mail: liuwei4728@126.com [School of Science, Honghe University (China); Key Laboratory of Natural Pharamaceutical & Chemical Biology of Yunnan Province Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • The formation of B-doped graphene (BG) with high content of a total B species use hydrothermal method with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} as reducing agent and boron source. • BG was exfoliated into monolayer nanosheet impregnated by Au@AuPt NPs because B atom creates a net positive charge to facilitate NPs adsorption. • The dispersed carboxyl units of BG can form hydrogen bonding with the phenolic hydroxyl groups of rutin, making more rutin participate in reaction. • Au@AuPt NPs can form charge accumulation or valence change on prominent part of the surface, improving the catalytic effect to rutin. • More electroactive sites were generated by doping B atoms into graphene structures, which act as multidimensional electron transport pathways. - Abstract: A hydrothermal approach was used to prepare B-doped graphene with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} as reductant and boron source. Results reveal that the boron atoms have been successfully embedded into graphene with a high content of a total B species (2.85 at.%). Then, B-doped graphene was exfoliated further into monolayer nanosheet by impregnating Au@AuPt core-shell nanoparticles (Au@AuPt NPs) because boron atom creates a net positive charge, which facilitates Au@AuPt NPs adsorption to form Au@AuPt NPs/B-doped graphene hybrid nanocatalysts. After that, the Au@AuPt NPs/B-doped hybrid suspension was dropped on glassy carbon electrode for sensing rutin. In this way, the dispersed carboxyl units of B-doped graphene can form hydrogen bonding with the phenolic hydroxyl groups of rutin, making rutin enrich easily on modified electrode surface to enhance the electrochemical response. At the same time, its electrochemical mechanism on the modified electrode was elucidated using cyclic voltammetry. It was found that its electrochemical behavior on modified electrode surface was a surface-controlled quasi-reversible process, and the charge transfer coefficient (α) and electron transfer number (n) were 0.296 and 2, respectively

  1. Recherche et ingénierie au service des acteurs de l'assainissement - Avant-propos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HEDUIT, Alain

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available L'épuration des eaux usées domestiques est un point clé de la protection des milieux aquatiques. L’Union européenne, à travers la directive relative au traitement des eaux résiduaires urbaines (DERU, 1991 et la directive cadre sur l’eau (DCE, 2000, a imposé aux États membres des obligations en termes de traitement des eaux usées et de qualité des milieux aquatiques. Ces exigences ont nécessité des efforts financiers considérables dans le domaine de l’assainissement. Lire la suite

  2. Resonance production and exotic clusters in Au+Au, d+Au and p+p collisions at √(s) = 200 AGeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besliu, Calin; Jipa, Alexandru; Lungescu, Andrea; Zgura, Sorin

    2004-01-01

    The resonance production in Au+Au, d+Au and p+p collisions at √(s) = 200 AGeV are presented. The resonances are used as a sensitive tool to examine the collision dynamics in the hadronic medium through their decay and regeneration. The modification of resonance mass, width, and shape due to phase space and dynamical effects are also discussed. The measurement of resonances provides an important tool for studying the dynamics in relativistic heavy-ion collisions by probing the time evolution of the source from chemical to kinetic freeze-out and the hadronic interactions at later stages

  3. Charge transport through O-deficient Au-MgO-Au junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M. M.; Eckern, Ulrich; Rungger, Ivan; Schuster, Cosima; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2009-01-01

    Metal-oxide heterostructures have been attracting considerable attention in recent years due to various technological applications. We present results of electronic structure and transport calculations for the Au-MgO-Au (metal-insulator-metal) heterostructure based on density-functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green’s functions method. The dependence of the conductance of the heterostructure on the thickness of the MgO interlayer and the interface spacing is studied. In addition, we address the effects of O vacancies. We observe deviations from an exponentially suppressed conductance with growing interlayer thickness caused by Au-O chemical bonds. Electronic states tracing back to O vacancies can increase the conductance. Furthermore, this effect can be enhanced by enlarging the interface spacing as the vacancy induced Mg states are shifted toward the Fermi energy.

  4. Charge transport through O-deficient Au-MgO-Au junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M. M.

    2009-12-29

    Metal-oxide heterostructures have been attracting considerable attention in recent years due to various technological applications. We present results of electronic structure and transport calculations for the Au-MgO-Au (metal-insulator-metal) heterostructure based on density-functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green’s functions method. The dependence of the conductance of the heterostructure on the thickness of the MgO interlayer and the interface spacing is studied. In addition, we address the effects of O vacancies. We observe deviations from an exponentially suppressed conductance with growing interlayer thickness caused by Au-O chemical bonds. Electronic states tracing back to O vacancies can increase the conductance. Furthermore, this effect can be enhanced by enlarging the interface spacing as the vacancy induced Mg states are shifted toward the Fermi energy.

  5. Unravelling Thiol’s Role in Directing Asymmetric Growth of Au Nanorod–Au Nanoparticle Dimers

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-12-15

    Asymmetric nanocrystals have practical significance in nanotechnologies but present fundamental synthetic challenges. Thiol ligands have proven effective in breaking the symmetric growth of metallic nanocrystals but their exact roles in the synthesis remain elusive. Here, we synthesized an unprecedented Au nanorod-Au nanoparticle (AuNR-AuNP) dimer structure with the assistance of a thiol ligand. On the basis of our experimental observations, we unraveled for the first time that the thiol could cause an inhomogeneous distribution of surface strains on the seed crystals as well as a modulated reduction rate of metal precursors, which jointly induced the asymmetric growth of monometallic dimers. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  6. Au70S20(PPh3)12: an intermediate sized metalloid gold cluster stabilized by the Au4S4 ring motif and Au-PPh3 groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzler, Sebastian; Schrenk, Claudio; Frojd, Andrew R; Häkkinen, Hannu; Clayborne, Andre Z; Schnepf, Andreas

    2018-01-02

    Reducing (Ph 3 P)AuSC(SiMe 3 ) 3 with l-Selectride® gives the medium-sized metalloid gold cluster Au 70 S 20 (PPh 3 ) 12 . Computational studies show that the phosphine bound Au-atoms not only stabilize the electronic structure of Au 70 S 20 (PPh 3 ) 12 , but also behave as electron acceptors leading to auride-like gold atoms on the exterior.

  7. Separation of CsCl and SrCl{sub 2} from a ternary CsCl-SrCl{sub 2}-LiCl via a zone refining process for waste salt minimization of pyroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Moonsoo [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ho Gil; Yi, Kyung Woo; Hwang, Il Soon [Graduate School of Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hyeon, E-mail: jonglee@cnu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Rapid Solidified Materials Research Center, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34134 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The purification of LiCl salt mixture has traditionally been carried out by a melt crystallization process. To improve the throughput of zone refining, three heaters were installed in the zone refiner. The zone refining method was used to grow pure LiCl salt ingots from LiCl-CsCl-SrCl{sub 2} salt mixture. The main investigated parameters were the heater speed and the number of passes. A change in the LiCl crystal grain size was observed according to the horizontal direction. From each zone refined salt ingot, samples were collected horizontally. To analyze the concentrations of Sr and Cs, an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer were used, respectively. The experimental results show that Sr and Cs concentrations at the initial region of the ingot were low and reached their peak at the final freezing region of the salt ingot. Concentration results of zone refined salt were compared with theoretical results yielded by the proposed model to validate its predictions. The k{sub eff} of Sr and Cs were 0.13 and 0.11, respectively. The decontamination factors of Sr and Cs were 450 and 1650, respectively. - Highlights: • The LiCl-CsCl-SrCl{sub 2} salt ingot was purified by zone refining technique to minimize waste salt. • The concentration distribution of Cs and Sr were analyzed by mass transfer equation. • The decontamination factors of Cs and Sr were 1600 and 450 respectively in case of 60% of recovery yield.

  8. Electric conductivity of PCl5-ZrCl4, PCl5-TaCl5, and PCl5-MoCl5 molten mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Red'kin, A.A.; Moskalenko, N.I.

    1997-01-01

    When mixing individual molecular melts of PCl 5 with ZrCl 4 , TaCl 5 or with MoCl 5 , an essential (by several orders) increase in electric conductivity (up to 0.02-0.1 Ohm -1 ·cm -1 ), which stems, in all probability, from the appearance of complex ions PCl 4 + , ZrCl 5 - , ZrCl 6 2- , TaCl 5 - and MoCl 6 - in the molten mixtures as a result of chemical interaction

  9. {phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2004-06-01

    We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions (). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.

  10. Optimizing the planar structure of (1 1 1) Au/Co/Au trilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumah, D P; Cebollada, A; Clavero, C; Garcia-MartIn, J M; Skuza, J R; Lukaszew, R A; Clarke, R

    2007-01-01

    Au/Co/Au trilayers are interesting for a range of applications which exploit their unusual optical and electronic transport behaviour in a magnetic field. Here we present a comprehensive structural and morphological study of a series of trilayers with 0-7 nm Co layer thickness fabricated on glass by ultrahigh vacuum vapour deposition. We use a combination of in situ electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy and x-ray scattering to determine the optimum deposition conditions for highly textured, flat and continuous layered structures. The 16 nm Au-on-glass buffer layer, deposited at ambient temperature, is found to develop a smooth (1 1 1) texture on annealing at 350 deg. C for 10 min. Subsequent growth of the Co layer at 150 deg. C produces a (1 1 1) textured film with lateral grain size of ∼150 nm in the 7 nm-thick Co layer. A simultaneous in-plane and out-of-plane Co lattice expansion is observed for the thinnest Co layers, converging to bulk values for the thickest films. The roughness of the Co layer is similar to that of the Au buffer layer, indicative of conformal growth. The 6 nm Au capping layer smoothens the trilayer surface, resulting in a surface roughness independent of the Co layer thickness

  11. Identified particles in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phobos Collaboration; Wosiek, Barbara; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    The yields of identified particles have been measured at RHIC for Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV using the PHOBOS spectrometer. The ratios of antiparticle to particle yields near mid-rapidity are presented. The first measurements of the invariant yields of charged pions, kaons and protons at very low transverse momenta are also shown.

  12. Search for hyperheavy toroidal nuclear structures formed in Au + Au collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sochocka, A.; Planeta, R.; Starypan, Z.; Benisz, A.; Hachaj, P.; Nicolis, N.G.

    2008-01-01

    We study the feasibility of an experimental observation of toroidal breakup configurations in Au+Au collisions using the CHIMERA multidetector system. BUU simulations indicate that the threshold energy for toroidal configuration is around 23 MeV/nucleon. The simulations of decay process using the ETNA code indicate the sensitivity of some observables to different studied break-up geometries. (author)

  13. Predicted Habitat Suitability for All Mesophotic Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for all mesophotic corals in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to...

  14. Simple and convenient preparation of Au-Pt core-shell nanoparticles on surface via a seed growth method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Lei; Sha Yufang; Yang Xiurong

    2006-01-01

    Au-Pt core-shell nanoparticles were prepared on glass surface by a seed growth method. Gold nanoparticles were used as seeds and ascorbic acid-H 2 PtCl 6 solutions as growth solutions to deposit Pt shell on the surface of gold nanoparticles. These core-shell nanoparticles and their growth process were examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and field-emission environmental scanning electron microscopy and the results indicated that the deposition speed was fast and nanoparticles with obvious core-shell structure could be obtained after 2 min. Moreover, this seed growth method for preparation of the core-shell nanoparticles is simple and convenient compared with other seed growth methods with NH 4 OH as a mild reductant. In addition, electrochemical experiments indicated that these Au-Pt core-shell nanoparticles had similar electrochemical properties to those of the bulk Pt electrode

  15. pH-Induced transformation of ligated Au25 to brighter Au23 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkielewicz, Magdalena; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Bertorelle, Franck; Dagany, Xavier; Bansal, Ashu K; Sajjad, Muhammad T; Samuel, Ifor D W; Sanader, Zeljka; Rozycka, Miroslawa; Wojtas, Magdalena; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta; Antoine, Rodolphe; Ozyhar, Andrzej; Samoc, Marek

    2018-05-01

    Thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters have recently attracted considerable attention due to their size-dependent luminescence characterized by a long lifetime and large Stokes shift. However, the optimization of nanocluster properties such as the luminescence quantum yield is still a challenge. We report here the transformation of Au25Capt18 (Capt labels captopril) nanoclusters occurring at low pH and yielding a product with a much increased luminescence quantum yield which we have identified as Au23Capt17. We applied a simple method of treatment with HCl to accomplish this transformation and we characterized the absorption and emission of the newly created ligated nanoclusters as well as their morphology. Based on DFT calculations we show which Au nanocluster size transformations can lead to highly luminescent species such as Au23Capt17.

  16. Jet-hadron correlations in √[s(NN)]=200  GeV p+p and central Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-03-28

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au+Au and p+p collisions at √[s(NN)]=200  GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au+Au collisions is biased toward jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au+Au and p+p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum (pTassoc) and enhanced at low pTassoc in 0%-20% central Au+Au collisions compared to p+p collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  17. Seperation of CsCl from LiCl-CsCl molten salt by cold finger melt cryst allization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versey, Joshua R. [Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Program University of Idaho, Idaho (United States); Phongikaroon, Supathorn [Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (Korea, Republic of); Simpson, Michael F. [Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering University of Utah, Utah (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study provides a fundamental understanding of a cold finger melt crystallization technique by exploring the heat and mass transfer processes of cold finger separation. A series of experiments were performed using a simplified LiCl-CsCl system by varying initial CsCl concentrations (1, 3, 5, and 7.5 wt%), cold finger cooling rates (7.4, 9.8, 12.3, and 14.9 L/min), and separation times (5, 10, 15, and 30 min). Results showed a potential recycling rate of 0.36 g/min with a purity of 0.33 wt% CsCl in LiCl. A CsCl concentrated drip formation was found to decrease crystal purity especially for smaller crystal formations. Dimensionless heat and mass transfer correlations showed that separation production is primarily influenced by convective transfer controlled by cooling gas flow rate, where correlations are more accurate for slower cooling gas flow rates.

  18. Measurements of mass-dependent azimuthal anisotropy in central p + Au, d + Au, and 3He + Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Alfred, M.; Andrieux, V.; Apadula, N.; Asano, H.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bagoly, A.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Blau, D. S.; Boer, M.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bumazhnov, V.; Campbell, S.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cervantes, R.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Chujo, T.; Citron, Z.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Dixit, D.; Do, J. H.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fan, W.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukuda, Y.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Goto, Y.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hill, J. C.; Hill, K.; Hodges, A.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jezghani, M.; Ji, Z.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Jorjadze, V.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kapukchyan, D.; Karthas, S.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, M. H.; Kimelman, B.; Kincses, D.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komkov, B.; Kotov, D.; Kudo, S.; Kurgyis, B.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leung, Y. H.; Lewis, N. A.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Loggins, V.-R.; Lökös, S.; Lovasz, K.; Lynch, D.; Majoros, T.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Masuda, H.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mihalik, D. E.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Morrow, S. I.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagai, K.; Nagashima, K.; Nagashima, T.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ottino, G. J.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, M.; Peng, J.-C.; Peng, W.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perezlara, C. E.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Phipps, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Pun, A.; Purschke, M. L.; Radzevich, P. V.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richford, D.; Rinn, T.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Runchey, J.; Safonov, A. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, K.; Sato, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shioya, T.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skoby, M. J.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takeda, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnai, G.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Ueda, Y.; Ujvari, B.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Carson, S.; Velkovska, J.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vukman, N.; Wang, X. R.; Wang, Z.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; White, A. S.; Wong, C. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xu, C.; Xu, Q.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamamoto, H.; Yanovich, A.; Yin, P.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zharko, S.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2018-06-01

    We present measurements of the transverse-momentum dependence of elliptic flow v2 for identified pions and (anti)protons at midrapidity (|η |<0.35 ), in 0%-5% central p +Au and 3He+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. When taken together with previously published measurements in d +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV, the results cover a broad range of small-collision-system multiplicities and intrinsic initial geometries. We observe a clear mass-dependent splitting of v2(pT) in d +Au and 3He+Au collisions, just as in large nucleus-nucleus (A +A ) collisions, and a smaller splitting in p +Au collisions. Both hydrodynamic and transport model calculations successfully describe the data at low pT (<1.5 GeV /c ), but fail to describe various features at higher pT. In all systems, the v2 values follow an approximate quark-number scaling as a function of the hadron transverse kinetic energy per constituent quark (K ET/nq ), which was also seen previously in A +A collisions.

  19. Electrochemical Recovery of Gold from Waste Electric and Electronic Equipment Using Circulating Particulate Bed Reactor (CPBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravinder, T.; Ali, U. F. M.; Ridwan, F. M.; Ibrahim, N.; Azmi, N. H.

    2017-06-01

    The utilization of electrochemical process recovery involving low reactant concentrations of metal requires electrodes with high mass transport rates and specific surface areas. This is essential to increase cross-sectional current densities whilst optimizing the capital and operating costs. Experimental results demonstrated that Circulating Particulate Bed Reactor (CPBE) is suitable for the recovery of low concentrations of gold from aqueous chloride solution containing {{AuCl}}4- and {{AuCl}}2- of less than 0.5 mol m-3(< 102 g m-3). Elemental gold was successfully obtained on 0.5-1 mm gr particles in an electrochemical reactor incorporating a cation- permeable membrane and operated in bath recycle mode. Depletion to concentration < 5 × 10-3 mol m-3 (< 1 g m-3) appeared to be mass transport controlled at an applied potential of +0.20 V (SCE), specific electrical energy consumption (SEEC) of ca. 800-1300 kWh h (tonne Au)-1 for cell voltages (U) of 2.0-3.0 V, and fractional current efficiencies of ca. 0.95. However, atomic absorption and UV spectrophotometry established that as the ([{{AuCl}}4-+[{{AuCl}}2-]) concentration decayed, the [{{AuCl}}4-]:[{{AuCl}}2-] molar ratio changed. A multi-step mechanism for reduction of {{AuCl}}4- ions explained this behavior in terms of changing overpotentials for {{AuCl}}4- and {{AuCl}}2- reduction as total dissolved gold concentration decreased. In addition, SEM images confirmed that adherent and coherent Au deposits were achieved with CPBE for Au deposition under mass transport control at 0.20 V (SCE).

  20. Distribution of {sup 36}Cl/Cl in a river-recharged aquifer: Implications for the fallout rate of bomb-produced {sup 36}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosaki, Yuki, E-mail: tosaki@tac.tsukuba.ac.j [Sustainable Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Massmann, Gudrun [Institute of Geological Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Malteserstrasse 74-100, 12249 Berlin (Germany); Tase, Norio [Sustainable Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Sasa, Kimikazu; Takahashi, Tsutomu [Tandem Accelerator Complex, Research Facility Center for Science and Technology, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Matsushi, Yuki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Tamari, Michiko [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Nagashima, Yasuo [Tandem Accelerator Complex, Research Facility Center for Science and Technology, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Bessho, Kotaro; Matsumura, Hiroshi [Radiation Science Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Distribution of {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in a river-recharged aquifer was investigated in the Oderbruch area, northeastern Germany. The aquifer is confined up to 3.5-4 km inland, where it changes to an unconfined condition. The {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in the confined area were in the range between 4.6 x 10{sup -14} and 23.1 x 10{sup -14}, showing a peak at 2-3 km away from the river. A plot of {sup 36}Cl/Cl vs. reciprocal Cl{sup -} concentrations indicated possible effect of the Cl{sup -} concentration variation on the observed {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios. After accounting for this effect, the estimated {sup 36}Cl fallout rates for the last 30 yrs show reasonable agreement with the Dye-3 data and the mid-latitude background value. The results suggest that a local {sup 36}Cl fallout curve can be constructed from groundwater when dispersive mixing is of minor importance.

  1. Synthesis and characterization in AuCu–Si nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novelo, T.E.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Maldonado, R.D.; Oliva, A.I.; Alonzo-Medina, G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Au/Cu bilayers with different Au:Cu concentrations (25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 at.%) were deposited on Si(100) substrates by thermal evaporation. The thicknesses of all Au/Cu bilayers were 150 nm. The alloys were prepared by thermal diffusion into a vacuum oven with argon atmosphere at 690 K during 1 h. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed different phases of AuCu and CuSi alloys in the samples after annealing process. CuSi alloys were mainly obtained for 25:75 at.% samples, meanwhile the AuCuII phase dominates for samples prepared with 50:50 at.%. Additionally, the Au:Cu alloys with 75:25 at.%, produce Au 2 Cu 3 and Au 3 Cu phases. The formed alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to study the morphology and the elemental concentration of the formed alloys. - Highlights: • AuCu/Si alloy thin films were prepared by thermal diffusion. • Alloys prepared with 50 at.% of Au produce the AuCuII phase. • Alloys prepared with 75 at.% of Au produce Au 3 Cu and Au 2 Cu 3 phases. • All alloys present diffusion of Si and Cu through the CuSi alloy formation

  2. Simple preparations of Pd6Cl12, Pt6Cl12, and Qn[Pt2Cl8+n], n=1, 2 (Q=TBA+, PPN+) and structural characterization of [TBA][Pt2Cl9] and [PPN]2[Pt2Cl10].C7H8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Amico, Daniela Belli; Calderazzo, Fausto; Marchetti, Fabio; Ramello, Stefano; Samaritani, Simona

    2008-02-04

    The hexanuclear Pd6Cl12, i.e., the crystal phase classified as beta-PdCl2, was obtained by reacting [TBA]2[Pd2Cl6] with AlCl3 (or FeCl3) in CH2Cl2. The action of AlCl3 on PtCl42-, followed by digestion of the resulting solid in 1,2-C2H4Cl2 (DCE), CHCl3, or benzene, produced Pt6Cl12.DCE, Pt6Cl12.CHCl3, or Pt6Cl12.C6H6, respectively. Treating [TBA]2[PtCl6] with a slight excess of AlCl3 afforded [TBA][Pt2Cl9], whose anion was established crystallographically to be constituted by two "PtCl6" octahedra sharing a face. Dehydration of H2PtCl6.nH2O with SOCl2 gave an amorphous compound closely analyzing as PtCl4, reactive with [Q]Cl in SOCl2 to yield [Q][Pt2Cl9] or [Q]2[Pt2Cl10], depending on the [Q]Cl/Pt molar ratio (Q=TBA+, PPN+). A single-crystal X-ray diffraction study has shown [PPN]2[Pt2Cl10].C7H8 to contain dinuclear anions formed by two edge-sharing PtCl6 octahedra.

  3. Tensile Creep Properties of the 50Au-50Cu Braze Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    The 50Au-50CU (wt.%) alloy is a solid-solution strengthened braze alloy used extensively in conventional, hermetic metal/ceramic brazing applications where low vapor pressure is a requirement. Typical metal/ceramic base materials would be Kovar TM alloy and metallized and Ni-plated 94% alumina ceramic. The elevated temperature mechanical properties are important for permitting FEA evaluation of residual stresses in metal/ceramic brazes given specific geometries and braze cooldown profiles. For material with an atomic composition of 76.084 at.% CL 23.916 Au (i.e., on the Cu-rich side of Cu 3 Au) that was annealed for 2 hr. at 750 ampersand deg;C and water quenched a Garofalo sinh equation was found to adequately characterize the minimum strain rate data over the temperature mnge 450-850 ampersand deg;C. At lower temperatures (250 arid 350 ampersand deg;C), a conventional power law equation was found to characterize the data. For samples held long periods of time at 375 ampersand deg;C (96 hrs.) and slowly cooled to room temperature, a slight strengthening reaction was observed: with the stress necessary to reach the same strain rate increasing by about 15% above the baseline annealed and quenched data. X-ray diffiction indicates that the 96 hr at 375 ampersand deg;C + slow cool condition does indeed order. The microhardness of the ordered samples indicates a value of 94.5 VHN, compared to 93.7 VHN for the baseline annealed and quenched (disordered FCC) samples. From a brazing perspective, the relative sluggishness of this ordering reaction does not appear to pose a problem for braze joints cooled at reasonable rates following brazing

  4. Au Kenya, des oiseaux nuisent à une culture adaptée au climat ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    23 août 2013 ... Selon Evans Kituyi, spécialiste de programme principal au Centre de ... principal au Gadam Sorghum Production and Marketing Project. Si les graines occupent une place de premier plan dans l'alimentation des oiseaux, ...

  5. Electrosynthesis and characterization of polypyrrole/Au nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Wei [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Li, C.M. [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)]. E-mail: ecmli@ntu.edu.sg; Chen Peng [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sun, C.Q. [School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2006-11-12

    Polypyrrole films containing gold nanoparticles (PPy/Au) were electrosynthesized on a glassy carbon electrode. This was done by applying a constant current of 1.43 mA cm{sup -2} in solutions containing colloidal Au particles and pyrrole monomer. A chloroaurate medium with a citrate/tannic acid reducing/protection agent was employed for generating the Au colloids. The PPy/Au films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Also, electrochemical behaviors of the PPy/Au films were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and AC impedance measurements. Experimental results demonstrate that PPy/Au has greater conductivity and better stability than PPy. The effect of incorporated Au nanoparticles in PPy matrix was studied and the mechanism was suggested.

  6. Raman spectroscopy of gold chloro-hydroxy speciation in fluids at ambient temperature and pressure: a re-evaluation of the effects of pH and chloride concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P. J.; LaGrange, M. S.

    1998-11-01

    Previous work on gold chloride and hydroxide speciation in fluids has shown differences in opinion as to the relative importance of gold (I) and gold (III) species, as well as for the Raman peak assignments for the various species. In addition, previous experimental work has not been consistent with theoretical predictions either of the number or of the frequencies of the peaks in the Raman spectrum. In order to re-evaluate the effect of pH on Raman spectra and speciation, solutions containing gold (III) chloride were analysed by Raman spectroscopy at ambient temperature and pressure, over a range of pH from 1 to 11. Total gold concentrations were from 0.001 to 0.02 M, with total chloride concentrations of 0.004-0.5 M. The spectra obtained are consistent with the hydrolysis sequence of square-planar Au(III) complex ions [AuCl x(OH) 4-x] -, where x = 0-4. The Au-Cl stretching peaks obtained were 348/325 Rcm -1 for [AuCl 4] -, 348/335/325 Rcm -1 for [AuCl 3(OH)] -, 337/355 Rcm -1 for [AuCl 2(OH) 2] -, and 355 Rcm -1 for [AuCl(OH) 3] -. [Au(OH) 4] - probably occurred, alongside [AuCl(OH) 3] - at pH values above 11. A dark purplish-grey precipitate (Au(I)OH) formed at high pH values. No evidence for Au(I) species was found. The spectra are more consistent with theory than previous data and show the predicted number of peaks for Au-Cl and Au-OH stretches for each species. However, the peak frequencies do not fit precisely with the predictions of Tossell (1996), particularly for Au-OH stretches. Hydrolysis of the simple chloride species occurs at lower pH values than found previously, and both gold and chloride concentration were found to affect the pH ranges of stability for the various chloro-hydroxy species. Decreasing gold concentration resulted in hydrolysis occurring at lower pH values. This is especially important in the absence of excess chloride (ΣCl = 4ΣAu). Substantial hydrolysis occurred below pH = 4 for 0.02 M Au /0.08 M Cl -, and below pH = 2 for 0.001 M

  7. Biocompatible Au@Carbynoid/Pluronic-F127 nanocomposites synthesized by pulsed laser ablation assisted CO2 recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, T.; Louro, S. R. W.; Deepak, F. L.; Romani, E. C.; Zaman, Q.; Tahir; Pandoli, O.; Cremona, M.; Freire Junior, F. L.; De Beule, P. A. A.; De St. Pierre, T.; Aucelio, R. Q.; Mariotto, G.; Gemini-Piperni, S.; Ribeiro, A. R.; Landi, S. M.; Magalhães, A.

    2018-05-01

    Ligand-free carbynoid-encapsulated gold nanocomposites (Au@Carbynoid NCs) with blue-shifted localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have been synthesized by CO2 recycling induced by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of a solid gold target in aqueous solution with NaOH at pH 7.0. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) images at not destructive acceleration voltage of 80 kV revealed carbynoid nanocrystals around the gold core, associated to the intense bond length alternation (BLA) Raman mode of the carbon atomic wires (CAWs), centered at 2124 cm-1, observed in the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) spectra. It was verified that interlinking process with sp to sp2 conversion of the CAWs is induced both by high acceleration voltage in HRTEM and high irradiance of the excitation beam used in SERS measurements. Post synthesis mixing of Pluronic-F127 copolymer with pre-synthesized Au@Carbynoid NCs allows the formation of a fully biocompatible colloidal solution of Au@Carbynoid/Copolymer NCs. SERS investigation highlights that the Raman band of the BLA mode can be used as efficient Raman tag to monitor the functionalization of the NCs with the copolymer. The biocompatibility of the NCs was demonstrated performing a study of cytotoxicity using human skin fibroblasts. As proof of principle, it was demonstrated that the photodynamic activity of the bifunctional Au@Carbynoid/PF127 NCs in the presence of chlorin e6 (Ce6) drug can be enhanced inducing the aggregation state of the colloidal suspension. The stability of the colloidal dispersions of Au@Carbynoid NCs functionalized with Pluronic-F127 is verified after centrifugation in PBS (0.15 mol L-1 NaCl) solutions, confirming the possibility to use the green carbynoid based NCs as drug-carrier in biological applications.

  8. Visual and microplate detection of aflatoxin B2 based on NaCl-induced aggregation of aptamer-modified gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan, Yunxia; Chen, Jiayi; Li, Cheng; Ping, Hua; Ma, Zhihong; Lu, Anxiang; Xie, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We describe a fast and sensitive method for the detection of aflatoxin B2 (AFB2) that is based on the addition of AFB2-sensitive aptamers to a colloidal solution of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Subsequent addition of AFB2 and NaCl to the solution causes a color change from wine-red to blue-purple. Best results are obtained at a pH value of 7.0, a 10 mM aptamer concentration, and a 2 M concentration of NaCl. The method has a linear dynamic range that extends from 0.025 to 10 ng∙mL −1 of AFB2, and the detection limit is 25 pg∙mL −1 . The method is simple, fast, highly sensitive, and enables both visual and microplate readout. (author)

  9. Chemical and electrical characteristics of annealed Ni/Au and Ni/Ir/Au contacts on AlGaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngoepe, P.N.M., E-mail: phuti.ngoepe@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Omotoso, E.; Diale, M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Swart, H.C.; Duvenhage, M.M.; Coetsee, E. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of Ni/Au and Ni/Ir/Au metal contacts deposited on AlGaN was investigated at different annealing temperatures. The samples were studied with electrical and chemical composition techniques. I–V characteristics of the Schottky diodes were optimum after 500 and 600 °C annealing for Ni/Au and Ni/Ir/Au based diodes, respectively. The depth profiles of the contacts were measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These chemical composition techniques were used to examine the evolution of the metal contacts in order to verify the influence the metals have on the electrical properties of the diodes. The insertion of Ir as a diffusion barrier between Ni and Au effected the electrical properties, improving the stability of the contacts at high temperatures. Gold diffused into the AlGaN film, degrading the electrical properties of the Ni/Au diode. At 500 °C, the insertion of Ir, however, prevented the in-diffusion of Au into the AlGaN substrate.

  10. A further extension of pnictide oxide chemistry - synthesis and structure of La{sub 2}AuP{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eul, Matthias; Moeller, Manfred H.; Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Jeitschko, Wolfgang; Poettgen, Rainer [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    The phosphide oxide La{sub 2}AuP{sub 2}O was synthesized from lanthanum filings, dried La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, gold pieces, and ground red phosphorus in the ideal 1.33:0.33:1:2 ratio in an evacuated silica tube at 1473 K. Small single crystals were obtained by recrystallization in a NaCl/KCl flux. The structure was determined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data: new type, C2/m, a = 1537.3(3), b = 427.39(8), c = 1009.2(2) pm, β = 131.02(1) , wR{sub 2} = 0.046, 1102 F{sup 2} values, 38 variables. La{sub 2}AuP{sub 2}O contains two striking structural motifs: The oxygen atoms are located in La{sub 4} tetrahedra. The latter are cis-edge-shared forming polymeric cationic [La{sub 2}O]{sup 4+} chains. These cationic units are separated and charge-balanced by [AuP{sub 2}]{sup 4-} polyanions which have monovalent gold in distorted trigonal planar phosphorus coordination. Two crystallographically independent phosphorus sites occur in the polyanion, i.e. isolated P{sup 3-} besides dumb-bells P{sub 2}{sup 4-} (P2-P2 223 pm). La{sub 2}AuP{sub 2}O, which crystallizes in the form of ruby red transparent crystals, is an electron precise phosphide oxide (4La{sup 3+})(2Au{sup +})(2P{sup 3-})(P{sub 2}{sup 4-})(2O{sup 2-}). (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Substrate-dependent Au{sub x} cluster: A new insight into Au{sub x}/CeO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Kong-Jie; Yang, Yan-Ju [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Lang, Jia-Jian [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Engineering Laboratory of Specialty Fibers and Nuclear Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315201 (China); Teng, Bo-Tao, E-mail: tbt@zjnu.cn [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Wu, Feng-Min [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Du, Shi-Yu [Engineering Laboratory of Specialty Fibers and Nuclear Energy Materials, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315201 (China); Wen, Xiao-Dong, E-mail: wxd@sxicc.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Graphical abstract: 2D Au{sub x} (x < 10) on CeO{sub 2}(110) are more stable than 3D ones, while the stability trend changes for x ≥ 10; Au{sub x} (x ≤ 4) prefer to monatomically disperse on CeO{sub 2}(100) and aggregate to 3D clusters for x > 4. - Highlights: • The stable structures of Au{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} are dependent of index surfaces of CeO{sub 2}. • Au{sub x} prefers to monatomically disperse on CeO{sub 2}(100) at low coverage. • Au{sub x} aggregates to 3D clusters on CeO{sub 2}(100) at high coverage. • 2D Au{sub x} (x < 10) are more stable than the 3D ones on CeO{sub 2}(110). • The effects on the stability of Au{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} are systematically discussed. - Abstract: To theoretically study the structures of metal clusters on oxides is very important and becomes one of the most challenging works in computational heterogeneous catalysis since many factors affect their structures and lead to various possibilities. In this work, it is very interesting to find that the stable structures and stability evolution of Au{sub x} clusters on ceria are varied with different index surfaces of CeO{sub 2}. The corresponding reasons in chemical, geometric and electronic properties are systematically explored. Au{sub x} (x = 1–4) clusters prefer to separately disperse at the O-O bridge sites on CeO{sub 2}(100) due to the low coordination number of surface O; while aggregate due to the strong Au–Au attractions when x is larger than 4. Owing to the uniform distribution of O-O bridge sites on CeO{sub 2}(111) and (100), the most stable configurations of Au{sub x} are 3D structures with bottom atoms more than top ones when x is larger than 4. However, 2D configurations of Au{sub x}/CeO{sub 2}(110) (x < 10) are more stable than the corresponding 3D structures due to the particular O-O arrangement on CeO{sub 2}(110). 3D Au{sub x} clusters across O-O-Y lines are suggested as the most stable configurations for Au{sub x}/CeO{sub 2}(110) (x ≥ 10). The present

  12. Effect of Cl2 plasma treatment and annealing on vanadium based metal contacts to Si-doped Al0.75Ga0.25N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeyrade, Mickael; Alamé, Sabine; Glaab, Johannes; Mogilatenko, Anna; Unger, Ralph-Stephan; Kuhn, Christian; Wernicke, Tim; Vogt, Patrick; Knauer, Arne; Zeimer, Ute; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2017-09-01

    In order to understand the electrical properties of V/Al/Ni/Au metal contacts to Si-doped Al0.75Ga0.25N layers, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was performed on differently treated AlGaN:Si surfaces before metal deposition, and transmission electron microscopy was used to study the semiconductor-metal interface after contact annealing at 900 °C. Cl2 plasma etching of AlGaN increases the aluminum/nitrogen ratio at the surface, and Al oxide or oxynitride is always formed by any surface treatment applied after etching. After contact annealing, a complex interface structure including amorphous AlOx and different metal phases such as Al-Au-Ni, V-Al, and V2N were found. The electrical properties of the contacts were determined by thermionic emission and/or thermionic field emission in the low voltage regime. Nearly ohmic contacts on AlGaN surfaces exposed to a Cl2 plasma were only obtained by annealing the sample at a temperature of 815 °C under N2/NH3 prior to metallization. By this treatment, the oxygen contamination on the surface could be minimized, resulting in a larger semiconductor area to be in direct contact with metal phases such as Al-rich Al-Au-Ni or V-Al and leading to a contact resistivity of 2.5 × 10-2 Ω cm2. This treatment can be used to significantly reduce the operating voltage of current deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes which will increase their wall plug efficiency and lower the thermal stress during their operation.

  13. Thiol ligand-induced transformation of Au38(SC2H4Ph)24 to Au36(SPh-t-Bu)24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chenjie; Liu, Chunyan; Pei, Yong; Jin, Rongchao

    2013-07-23

    We report a disproportionation mechanism identified in the transformation of rod-like biicosahedral Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 to tetrahedral Au36(TBBT)24 nanoclusters. Time-dependent mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy analyses unambiguously map out the detailed size-conversion pathway. The ligand exchange of Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 with bulkier 4-tert-butylbenzenethiol (TBBT) until a certain extent starts to trigger structural distortion of the initial biicosahedral Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 structure, leading to the release of two Au atoms and eventually the Au36(TBBT)24 nanocluster with a tetrahedral structure, in which process the number of ligands is interestingly preserved. The other product of the disproportionation process, i.e., Au40(TBBT)m+2(SCH2CH2Ph)24-m, was concurrently observed as an intermediate, which was the result of addition of two Au atoms and two TBBT ligands to Au38(TBBT)m(SCH2CH2Ph)24-m. The reaction kinetics on the Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 to Au36(TBBT)24 conversion process was also performed, and the activation energies of the structural distortion and disproportionation steps were estimated to be 76 and 94 kJ/mol, respectively. The optical absorption features of Au36(TBBT)24 are interpreted on the basis of density functional theory simulations.

  14. Diffusion of 1,4-butanedithiol radicals on Au(111) and Au(100): A DFT-based comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Andreas; Pehlke, Eckhard [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Organic molecules chemisorbed on surfaces hold the perspective of surface functionalization. The 1,4-butanedithiol radical chemisorbed at the Au(111) or Au(100) surface serves as a model system for the S-Au molecule-substrate bond. Density functional total-energy calculations have been carried out for the chemisorption of the radical on the unreconstructed Au surfaces, which are both known to be stabilized under electrochemical conditions. Local minima with close-by energies indicate multi-valley potential-energy surfaces, which originate from the interplay between the two S-Au adsorbate-substrate bonds and the internal degrees of freedom of the butanedithiol radical. Diffusion paths of the radical on both Au surfaces have been calculated within DFT using VASP. The diffusion barriers for translation and rotation of the radical differ. They can be fine-tuned by varying the applied potential in the electrochemical cell. This is considered theoretically by inspecting the variation of the dipole moment along the reaction paths. Consequences for the dynamics of succeeding diffusion hops are discussed.

  15. Flow and bose-einstein correlations in Au-Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phobos Collaboration; Manly, Steven; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyinski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    Argonne flow and Bose-Einstein correlations have been measured in Au-Au collisions at S=130 and 200 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. The systematic dependencies of the flow signal on the transverse momentum, pseudorapidity, and centrality of the collision, as well as the beam energy are shown. In addition, results of a 3-dimensional analysis of two-pion correlations in the 200 GeV data are presented.

  16. Transverse velocity scaling in 197Au+197Au fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukasik, J.; Hudan, S.; Lavaud, F.

    2002-07-01

    Invariant transverse-velocity spectra of intermediate-mass fragments were measured with the 4π multi-detector system INDRA for collisions of 197 Au on 197 Au at incident energies between 40 and 150 MeV per nucleon. Their scaling properties as a function of incident energy and atomic number Z are used to distinguish and characterize the emissions in (i) peripheral collisions at the projectile and target rapidities, and in (ii) central and (iii) peripheral collisions near mid-rapidity. The importance of dynamical effects is evident in all three cases and their origin is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Apprentissages techniques : L'apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    APPRENTISSAGES TECHNIQUES GESTION ET DEVELOPPEMENT DU PERSONNEL HR/PMD L'APPRENTISSAGE AU CERN pour les professions d'électronicien(ne) et de laborantin(e) en physique L'apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le Canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l'examen de fin d'apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat Fédéral de Capacité Suisse (CFC). 7 places au total sont ouvertes au recrutement pour les deux professions. L'apprentissage dure 4 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : • avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 21 ans à la date de début de l'apprentissage • avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire, au minimum 9ème du Cycle d'orientation genevois (3ème en France) • être ressortissant d'un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgiqu...

  18. Photoinduced Glycerol Oxidation over Plasmonic Au and AuM (M = Pt, Pd and Bi) Nanoparticle-Decorated TiO2 Photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedsukontorn, Trin; Saito, Nagahiro; Hunsom, Mali

    2018-01-01

    In this study, sol-immobilization was used to prepare gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-decorated titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysts at different Au weight % (wt. %) loading (Aux/TiO2, where x is the Au wt. %) and Au–M NP-decorated TiO2 photocatalysts (Au3M3/TiO2), where M is bismuth (Bi), platinum (Pt) or palladium (Pd) at 3 wt. %. The Aux/TiO2 photocatalysts exhibited a stronger visible light absorption than the parent TiO2 due to the localized surface plasmon resonance effect. Increasing the Au content from 1 wt. % to 7 wt. % led to increased visible light absorption due to the increasing presence of defective structures that were capable of enhancing the photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared catalyst. The addition of Pt and Pd coupled with the Au3/TiO2 to form Au3M3/TiO2 improved the photocatalytic activity of the Au3/TiO2 photocatalyst by maximizing their light-absorption property. The Au3/TiO2, Au3Pt3/TiO2 and Au3Pd3/TiO2 photocatalysts promoted the formation of glyceraldehyde from glycerol as the principle product, while Au3Bi3/TiO2 facilitated glycolaldehyde formation as the major product. Among all the prepared photocatalysts, Au3Pd3/TiO2 exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity with a 98.75% glycerol conversion at 24 h of reaction time. PMID:29690645

  19. Near-infrared-responsive, superparamagnetic Au@Co nanochains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadee Vittur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes a new type of nanomaterial, namely superparamagnetic Au@Co nanochains with optical extinctions in the near infrared (NIR. The Au@Co nanochains were synthesized via a one-pot galvanic replacement route involving a redox-transmetalation process in aqueous medium, where Au salt was reduced to form Au shells on Co seed templates, affording hollow Au@Co nanochains. The Au shells serve not only as a protective coating for the Co nanochain cores, but also to give rise to the optical properties of these unique nanostructures. Importantly, these bifunctional, magneto-optical Au@Co nanochains combine the advantages of nanophotonics (extinction at ca. 900 nm and nanomagnetism (superparamagnetism and provide a potentially useful new nanoarchitecture for biomedical or catalytic applications that can benefit from both activation by light and manipulation using an external magnetic field.

  20. Microstructural evolution of Au/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite films: The influence of Au concentration and thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, J., E-mail: joelborges@fisica.uminho.pt [Instituto Pedro Nunes, Laboratório de Ensaios, Desgaste e Materiais, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Centro/Departamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Kubart, T.; Kumar, S.; Leifer, K. [Solid-State Electronics, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, Uppsala SE-751 21 (Sweden); Rodrigues, M.S. [Instituto Pedro Nunes, Laboratório de Ensaios, Desgaste e Materiais, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Centro/Departamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Duarte, N.; Martins, B.; Dias, J.P. [Instituto Pedro Nunes, Laboratório de Ensaios, Desgaste e Materiais, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Vaz, F. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Centro/Departamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2015-04-01

    Nanocomposite thin films consisting of a dielectric matrix, such as titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}), with embedded gold (Au) nanoparticles were prepared and will be analysed and discussed in detail in the present work. The evolution of morphological and structural features was studied for a wide range of Au concentrations and for annealing treatments in air, for temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 °C. Major findings revealed that for low Au atomic concentrations (at.%), there are only traces of clustering, and just for relatively high annealing temperatures, T ≥ 500 °C. Furthermore, the number of Au nanoparticles is extremely low, even for the highest annealing temperature, T = 800 °C. It is noteworthy that the TiO{sub 2} matrix also crystallizes in the anatase phase for annealing temperatures above 300 °C. For intermediate Au contents (5 at.% ≤ C{sub Au} ≤ 15 at.%), the formation of gold nanoclusters was much more evident, beginning at lower annealing temperatures (T ≥ 200 °C) with sizes ranging from 2 to 25 nm as the temperature increased. A change in the matrix crystallization from anatase to rutile was also observed in this intermediate range of compositions. For the highest Au concentrations (> 20 at.%), the films tended to form relatively larger clusters, with sizes above 20 nm (for T ≥ 400 °C). It is demonstrated that the structural and morphological characteristics of the films are strongly affected by the annealing temperature, as well as by the particular amounts, size and distribution of the Au nanoparticles dispersed in the TiO{sub 2} matrix. - Highlights: • Au:TiO{sub 2} films were produced by magnetron sputtering and post-deposition annealing. • The Au concentration in the films increases with the Au pellet area. • Annealing induced microstructural changes in the films. • The nanoparticle size evolution with temperature depends on the Au concentration.

  1. Epitaxial growth of zigzag PtAu alloy surface on Au nano-pentagrams with enhanced Pt utilization and electrocatalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Cheng; Gao, Xiaohui; Zhuang, Zhihua; Cheng, Chunfeng; Zheng, Fuqin; Li, Xiaokun; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PtAu nanoalloy surface is heteroepitaxially grown on the pre-synthesized Au nano-pentagrams. • The PtAu/Au nano-pentagrams exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation. • The charge transfer resistance of PtAu/Au is lower than that of commercial Pt/C. • The durability and anti-poisoning ability of PtAu/Au is much better than those of commercial Pt/C - Abstract: Improving Pt utilization is of fundamental importance for many significant processes in energy conversion, which is strongly dependent on the surface structure of used catalysts. Based on the traditional Pt-on-Au system which has been proved to be an ideal nanostructure for improving the catalytic activity and stability of Pt, and the recent follow-up studies on this system, we introduce here a new strategy for fabricating Pt surface with high-index facets over the Pt-on-Au system. To achieve this goal, we elaborately designed and fabricated a unique zigzag PtAu alloy nanosurface on Au nano-pentagrams (PtAu/Au NPs) through epitaxial growth of Pt along the high-index facets on the pre-synthesized Au nano-pentagrams. Owing to the surface electronic interaction between Au and Pt and the exposed high-index facets from the unique morphology of zigzag PtAu alloy nanosurface, the as-prepared PtAu/Au NPs exhibited excellent electrocatalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in alkaline condition. The specific activity (8.3 mA cm"−"2) and mass activity (4.4 A mg"−"1) obtained from PtAu/Au NPs are about 5.2 and 5.5 times, respectively, higher than those from commercial Pt/C for EOR.

  2. Using isotope 36Cl to study utilization of Cl by crops and distribution and movement of Cl in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jiarong; Wen Xianfang; Tang Nianxin

    1991-06-01

    Results from using isotope 36 Cl show that a large quantity of Cl is absorbed and utilized by spring wheat, cotton and tobacco from the chloride fertilizers. The utilization coefficient of Cl increases with the growing time of plants and reaches peak at mature stage. The utilization coefficient of above plants are 26.72%, 3317% and 26.19% respectively. The absorption and utilization of residual Cl in soil is much smaller than that in fertilizers, and the utilization coefficient is decreasing with the increasing of growth season. For spring wheat, utilization coefficient is 12.7% in second season and 9.3% in third season. The ability of absorbing and utilizing Cl from organic materials by crops is very low and the utilization coefficient is 10% or less, that depends on circumstances. For rice the utilization coefficient is 3.1% in dry land and 24.3% in flooded land. The distribution of absorbed Cl is mainly in stalk, a little in husk and a few in seeds and roots. After irrigating water it is equivalent to 9.1 mm of rainfall in soil, the Cl moves rapidly to depth 10∼12 cm. Cl moves faster in porous soil than in clay soil, and faster in horizontal direction than in vertical direction

  3. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)] = 200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-10-03

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D(0)) production via the hadronic decay channel (D(0) → K(-) + π(+)) in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)] = 200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, N(bin), from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D(0) meson yields in central Au + Au collisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by N(bin), for transverse momenta p(T) > 3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate p(T) is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  4. Observation of D0 Meson Nuclear Modifications in Au +Au Collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p +p to central Au +Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au +Au collisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV /c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  5. Thermodynamic properties of thulium and ytterbium in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoselova, A., E-mail: A.Novoselova@ihte.uran.ru [Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry, Ural Division, Russian Academy of Science, S. Kovalevskaya Str., 22, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Smolenski, V. [Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry, Ural Division, Russian Academy of Science, S. Kovalevskaya Str., 22, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: > Tm and Yb chloride compounds as fission products. > The investigation of electrochemical properties of lanthanides. > Determination of the apparent standard redox potentials of the couple Ln(III)/Ln(II) in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic at (823 to 973) K. > The calculation of the basic thermodynamic properties of redox reaction in molten salt. - Abstract: This work presents the results of a study of the Tm{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 2+} and Yb{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 2+} couple redox potentials vs. Cl{sup -}/Cl{sub 2} reference electrode at the temperature range (823 to 973) K in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic by direct potentiometric method. Initial concentrations of TmCl{sub 3} and YbCl{sub 3} in solvents did not exceed 5.0 mol%. Basic thermodynamic properties of the reactions TmCl{sub 2(l)} + 1/2 Cl{sub 2(g)} {r_reversible} TmCl{sub 3(l)} and YbCl{sub 2(l)} + 1/2 Cl{sub 2(g)} {r_reversible} YbCl{sub 3(l)} were calculated using the temperature dependencies of apparent standard potentials of the couples E{sub Tm{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 2+*}} and E{sub Yb{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 2+*}}.

  6. Fluorescent probe for turn-on sensing of L-cysteine by ensemble of AuNCs and polymer protected AuNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaozhe; Qiao, Juan; Li, Nan; Qi, Li; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-06-16

    A new fluorescent probe based on ensemble of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) and polymer protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for turn-on sensing of L-cysteine was designed and prepared. The AuNCs were protected by bovine serum albumin and had strong fluorescence. The polymer protected AuNPs were synthesized by a facile in situ strategy at room temperature and could quench the fluorescence of AuNCs due to the Förster resonance energy transfer. Interestingly, it has been observed that the quenched fluorescence of AuNCs was recovered by L-cysteine, which could induce the aggregation of polymer protected AuNPs by sulfur group. Then the prepared fluorescent probe was successfully used for determination of L-Cys in human urines, which would have an evolving aspect and promote the subsequent exploration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. cl-Supercontinuous Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Singh

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Basic properties of cl-supercontinuity, a strong variant of continuity, due to Reilly and Vamanamurthy [Indian J. Pure Appl. Math., 14 (1983, 767–772], who call such maps clopen continuous, are studied. Sufficient conditions on domain or range for a continuous function to be cl-supercontinuous are observed. Direct and inverse transfer of certain topological properties under cl-supercontinuous functions are studied and existence or nonexistence of certain cl-supercontinuous function with specified domain or range is outlined.

  8. Au-nanoparticles grafted on plasma treated PE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svorcik, V.; Chaloupka, A.; Rezanka, P.; Slepicka, P.; Kolska, Z.; Kasalkova, N.; Hubacek, T.; Siegel, J.

    2010-01-01

    Polyethylene (PE) surface was treated with Ar plasma. Activated surface was grafted from methanol solution of 1,2-ethanedithiol. Then the sample was immersed into freshly prepared colloid solution of Au-nanoparticles. Finally Au layer was sputtered on the samples. Properties of the modified PE were studied using various methods: AFM, EPR, RBS and nanoindentation. It was shown that the plasma treatment results in degradation of polymer chain (AFM) and creation of free radicals by EPR. After grafting with dithiol, the concentration of free radicals declines. The presence of Au and S in the surface layer after the coating with Au-nanoparticles was proved by RBS. Plasma treatment changes PE surface morphology and increases surface roughness, too. Another significant change in surface morphology and roughness was observed after deposition of Au-nanoparticles. Nanoindentation measurements show that the grafting with Au-nanoparticles increases adhesion of subsequently sputtered Au layer.

  9. First remote sensing measurements of ClOOCl along with ClO and ClONO2 in activated and deactivated Arctic vortex conditions using new ClOOCl IR absorption cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Birk

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Active chlorine species play a dominant role in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone in the polar vortices during the late winter and early spring seasons. Recently, the correct understanding of the ClO dimer cycle was challenged by the release of new laboratory absorption cross sections (Pope et al., 2007 yielding significant model underestimates of observed ClO and ozone loss (von Hobe et al., 2007. Under this aspect, nocturnal Arctic stratospheric limb emission measurements carried out by the balloon version of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-B from Kiruna (Sweden on 11 January 2001 and 20/21 March 2003 have been reanalyzed with regard to the chlorine reservoir species ClONO2 and the active species, ClO and ClOOCl (Cl2O2. New laboratory measurements of IR absorption cross sections of ClOOCl for various temperatures and pressures allowed for the first time the retrieval of ClOOCl mixing ratios from remote sensing measurements. High values of active chlorine (ClOx of roughly 2.3 ppbv at 20 km were observed by MIPAS-B in the cold mid-winter Arctic vortex on 11 January 2001. While nighttime ClOOCl shows enhanced values of nearly 1.1 ppbv at 20 km, ClONO2 mixing ratios are less than 0.1 ppbv at this altitude. In contrast, high ClONO2 mixing ratios of nearly 2.4 ppbv at 20 km have been observed in the late winter Arctic vortex on 20 March 2003. No significant ClOx amounts are detectable on this date since most of the active chlorine has already recovered to its main reservoir species ClONO2. The observed values of ClOx and ClONO2 are in line with the established polar chlorine chemistry. The thermal equilibrium constants between the dimer formation and its dissociation, as derived from the balloon measurements, are on the lower side of reported data and in good agreement with values recommended by von Hobe et al. (2007. Calculations with the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry model (EMAC using

  10. Search for toroidal and bubble nuclei formed in the Au + Au reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planeta, R.; Brzychczyk, J.; Majka, Z. [M.Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Blicharska, J.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Zipper, W.; Schmidt, K.; Kowalski, S. [Silesian University, Institute of Physics, Katowice (Poland); Cibor, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Hachaj, P. [Cracow Univ. of Technology, Krakow (Poland); Nicolis, N. [Ioannina Univ. (Greece)

    2003-07-01

    In this contribution we present the feasibility study for the experimental observation of toroidal and bubble nuclei. This search is based on data collected by the CHIMERA collaboration for the Au + Au reaction at 15 MeV/nucleon. The beam time needed to achieve this goal is calculated for events with at least 5 heavy fragments. We found that the fraction of such events among the accumulated data is equal to 8*10{sup -4}. Assuming the Au beam intensity is 0.03 pnA and target thickness equals 0.3 mg/cm{sup 2} we estimated that 450 hours of beam time is needed to record 10{sup 6} multifragment events. Present status of the Monte-Carlo simulation predictions is shortly discussed. (A.C.)

  11. Search for toroidal and bubble nuclei formed in the Au + Au reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planeta, R.; Brzychczyk, J.; Majka, Z.; Blicharska, J.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Zipper, W.; Schmidt, K.; Kowalski, S.; Cibor, J.; Hachaj, P.; Nicolis, N.

    2003-01-01

    In this contribution we present the feasibility study for the experimental observation of toroidal and bubble nuclei. This search is based on data collected by the CHIMERA collaboration for the Au + Au reaction at 15 MeV/nucleon. The beam time needed to achieve this goal is calculated for events with at least 5 heavy fragments. We found that the fraction of such events among the accumulated data is equal to 8*10 -4 . Assuming the Au beam intensity is 0.03 pnA and target thickness equals 0.3 mg/cm 2 we estimated that 450 hours of beam time is needed to record 10 6 multifragment events. Present status of the Monte-Carlo simulation predictions is shortly discussed. (A.C.)

  12. Half-life measurements in doubly-odd sup(186,188,190)Au nuclei and the 188Hg -> Au decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, M.C.; Berg, V.; Fransson, K.; Hoeglund, A.; Oms, J.; Porquet, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    A level scheme has been established for 188 Hg -> Au decay which was studied with the online isotope separator ISOCELE. Precise conversion-electron measurements were performed with a semicircular magnetic spectrograph. The half-lives of the 16.0, 82.7 and 114.8 keV levels in 188 Au were measured with a lens electron spectrometer and reduced transition rates were deduced. Similarly the half-lives of the 36.1, 113.9, 227.7, 251.5, 288.0 and 363.6 keV levels in 186 Au and of the 28.9 and 171.5 keV levels in 190 Au were measured. Comparison of the reduced e.m. transition rates shows that a 1 + and a 2 - state have respectively the same structure in sup(186,) sup(188,) sup(190,) 192 Au, the same conclusion holding for the 1 - sub(g.s.) of sup(188,) sup(190,) 192 Au. Additional measurements in 189 , 191 Hg and 185 , 187 Au together with data from the literature enable us to interpret them as a coupling of certain quasiparticle states of neighbouring odd-A nuclei corresponding to oblate shapes. Indications are given that some other negative- and positive-parity states in 188 Au also belong to an oblate system. The nucleus 188 Au appears as the last of a series of doubly-odd gold nuclei where no shape coexistence has, as yet, been observed. (orig.)

  13. Au/SiO2 nanocomposite film substrates with a high number density of Au nanoparticles for molecular conductance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Gun; Koyama, Emiko; Kikkawa, Yoshihiro; Kirihara, Kazuhiro; Naitoh, Yasuhisa; Kim, Deok-Soo; Tokuhisa, Hideo; Kanesato, Masatoshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2007-01-01

    Au/SiO 2 nanocomposite films consisting of an extremely high number density of Au nanoparticles dispersed in a SiO 2 matrix a few nanometres thick were deposited by a co-sputtering method, and employed for molecular conductance measurement by immobilizing and bridging conjugated biphenyl molecules on dispersed Au nanoparticles. The number density of Au nanoparticles in the insulating SiO 2 matrix was approximately 14 000 μm 2 , and the average interparticle distance from their neighbours was about 8 nm. The current increased considerably up to the range of nanoamperes after the immobilization of the conjugated biphenyl molecules, 10 5 times larger than without molecules before immobilization. Although the Au nanoparticles can be connected to only 30% of all combinations of neighbouring Au nanoparticles by biphenyl molecules 2.4 nm long from the topological analysis, the biphenyl molecules can bridge most of the Au nanoparticles, and their bridging continuity is over 100 nm in length. Thus the measured current is suggested to come from the continuously bridged molecules between the Au nanoparticles. Furthermore the I-V data of the whole Au/SiO 2 nanocomposite film immobilized with conjugated molecules are confirmed to be in a reasonable range in comparison with the scanning tunnelling spectroscopy data of similar conjugated molecules

  14. Visible light photoactivity of TiO{sub 2} loaded with monometallic (Au or Pt) and bimetallic (Au/Pt) nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gołąbiewska, Anna, E-mail: annagolabiewska@o2.pl [Department of Chemical Technology, Gdansk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Lisowski, Wojciech [Mazovia Center for Surface Analysis, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Jarek, Marcin; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz [NanoBioMedical Center, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Zielińska-Jurek, Anna; Zaleska, Adriana [Department of Chemical Technology, Gdansk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Au/Pt nanoparticles enhanced TiO{sub 2} photocatalytic activity under visible irradiation. • Higher photoactivity of Au/Pt-TiO{sub 2} resulted from smaller Au/Pt particles. • Intermetallic state of AuPt favors charge transfer between the metals. • TiO{sub 2} obtained by TIP hydrolysis seems to be best matrix for Au/Pt-TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} modified with monometallic (Au or Pt) and bimetallic (Au/Pt) nanoparticles have been prepared using a water-in-oil microemulsion system (water/AOT/cyclohexane) followed by calcination step. The effect of metal ratio, reducing agent type (NaBH{sub 4} or N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), TiO{sub 2} matrix type (P-25, ST-01, TiO-5, TiO{sub 2} nanotubes or TiO{sub 2} obtained by TIP hydrolysis) as well as calcination temperature (from 350 to 650 °C) were systematically investigated. Obtained photocatalysts were characterized by UV–vis diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), BET surface area measurements, scanning transmission microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Photocatalytic activity under visible light (λ > 420 nm) has been estimated in phenol degradation reaction in aqueous phase. The results showed that phenol degradation rate under visible light in the presence of TiO{sub 2} loaded with Au/Pt nanoparticles differed from 0.7 to 2.2 μmol dm{sup −3} min{sup −1} for samples prepared using different reducing agent. Sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) favors formation of smaller Au/Pt nanoparticles and higher amount gold in Au/Pt is in the form of electronegative species (Au{sup δ−}) resulted in higher photoactivity. TiO{sub 2} obtained by TIP hydrolysis in microemulsion system seems to be the best support for Au/Pt nanoparticles from all among investigated matrix. It was also observed that enhancement of calcination temperature from 450 to 650 °C resulted in rapid drop of Au/Pt-TiO{sub 2} photoactivity under visible light

  15. Le sauvetage des juifs au Chambon-sur-Lignon à travers Les Cerfs-volants de Romain Gary

    OpenAIRE

    Letourneau, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    Dans Les Cerfs-volants (1980) Romain Gary relate la jeunesse résistante de Ludo à Cléry, un village normand inventé par l'auteur. Au sein de cette fiction, Gary, lui‑même ancien résistant aux racines juives, cite à plusieurs reprises le nom du Chambon‑sur‑Lignon, village connu pour avoir sauvé des réfugiés juifs durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. L'hommage de Gary adopte ainsi le ton de la pudeur. Surtout, la mémoire du village se déploie à travers le personnage d'Ambroise Fleury, dont certai...

  16. Voltammetry of uranyl chloride in the LiCl - KCl eutectic; Voltammetrie du chlorure d'uranyle dans l'eutectique LiCl - KC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondanaiche, J C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Spent UO{sub 2} - PuO{sub 2} fuels can be reprocessed in a molten salt media. Uranium dioxide can easily be dissolved as UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} in a molten salt bath using chlorine gas. A study of quantitative analysis of an uranyl chloride solution in the LiCl-KCl eutectic at 400 C has been performed here using voltammetry (a large area-graphite indicator electrode has been employed). The precision which is obtained is around 6 per cent for concentrations below 10{sup -2} M. Precision decreases slightly for more concentrated solutions. The study of polarization curves allowed to give a reduction mechanism for the UO{sub 2}{sup ++} ion. For dilute solutions, this reduction proceeds through the UO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. But interpretation of current-potential curves is made difficult by the dismutation reaction of the UO{sub 2} ion and by the fact that the surface of the indicator electrode is not renewed. (author) [French] Le traitement des combustibles a base d'oxydes (UO{sub 2} - PUO{sub 2}) peut etre effectue au moyen des sels fondus. Le bioxyde d'uranium passe aisement en solution sous forme de UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} dans un bain de sels fondus par action du chlore. Nous avons etudie ici l'analyse quantitative d'une solution de chlorure d'uranyle dans l'eutectique LiCl - KCl a 400 C par voltammetrie (electrode indicatrice de graphite d'assez grande surface). La precision est d'environ 6 pour cent pour les concentrations inferieures a 10{sup -2} M; elle est legerement moins bonne pour les solutions plus concentrees. L'examen des courbes de polarisation a permis de donner un mecanisme de reduction de l'ion UO{sub 2}: pour les solutions diluees, cette reduction se fait par l'intermediaire de l'ion UO{sub 2}{sup +}. Mais l'interpretation des courbes intensite-potentiel est rendue delicate par la reaction de dismutation de l'ion UO{sub 2}{sup +} et par le fait que la surface de l'electrode indicatrice n'est pas renouvelee. (auteur)

  17. Energy Dependence of Particle Multiplicities in Central Au+Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Corbo, J.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hicks, D.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Rafelski, M.; Rbeiz, M.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the pseudorapidity density of primary charged particles in Au+Au collisions at (sNN) = 200 GeV. For the 6% most central collisions, we obtain dNch/dη\\|\\|η\\|<1 = 650+/-35(syst). Compared to collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV, the highest energy studied previously, an increase by a factor of 1.14+/-0.05 at 90% confidence level, is found. The energy dependence of the pseudorapidity density is discussed in comparison with data from proton-induced collisions and theoretical predictions.

  18. Central Au on Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alard, J.P.; Amouroux, V. [Labo de Phys. Corp., IN2P3-CRNS, Univ. Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Fd. (France); Basrak, Z. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)] [and others; FOPI-Collaboration

    1995-02-06

    In nucleus-nucleus collisions the initial relative kinetic energy of target and projectile is available for internal excitation of the interacting system; it is however still not well established to what extent local equilibrium and thermalisation occur. Local equilibrium is of interest to derive, within the formalism of transport equations and of the equation of state, (EOS), general properties of compressed and excited nuclear matter. Such approach describes in relatively simple terms the complex many body interactions occuring within extended baryonic and hadronic (or quark) matter. For a basic microscopic understanding it is highly desirable to investigate the elementary in-medium interactions in relation to the free elementary processes. Excitation function measurements of central collisions between the heaviest available nuclei (like Au on Au), supply the best ground for such studies: the highest degree of thermalisation and compression is expected for such reactions. The consideration presented here of energy thermalisation and of an expanding system clusterizing at freeze-out in a situation close to the liquid gas phase transition can be of interest to astrophysics as well as to the quark gluon plasma deconfinement studied in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the higher energy regime of CERN and Brookhaven. (orig.).

  19. Centrality, Rapidity And Transverse-Momentum Dependence of Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on J/Psi Production in D Au, Cu Cu And Au Au Collisions at S(NN)**(1/2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreiro, E.G.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Fleuret, F.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Lansberg, J.P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /SLAC; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2011-11-11

    We have carried out a wide study of Cold Nuclear Matter (CNM) effects on J/{Psi} = production in dAu, CuCu and AuAu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We have studied the effects of three different gluon-shadowing parameterizations, using the usual simplified kinematics for which the momentum of the gluon recoiling against the J/{Psi} is neglected as well as an exact kinematics for a 2 {yields} 2 process, namely g + g {yields} J/{psi} + g as expected from LO pQCD. We have shown that the rapidity distribution of the nuclear modification factor R{sub dAu}, and particularly its anti-shadowing peak, is systematically shifted toward larger rapidities in the 2 {yields} 2 kinematics, irrespective of which shadowing parameterization is used. In turn, we have noted differences in the effective final-state nuclear absorption needed to fit the PHENIX dAu data. Taking advantage of our implementation of a 2 {yields} 2 kinematics, we have also computed the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear modification factor, which cannot be predicted with the usual simplified kinematics. All the corresponding observables have been computed for CuCu and AuAu collisions and compared to the PHENIX and STAR data. Finally, we have extracted the effective nuclear absorption from the recent measurements of RCP in dAu collisions by the PHENIX collaboration.

  20. Fabrication of Au-Pd Core-shell Nanoparticles using Au Thin-Film Dewetting at High Temperature and Chemical Synthesis Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Gyu; Lee, Hye-Jung; Oh, Yong-Jun [Hanbat National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Au-Pd bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) have received a lot of attention in the fields of catalysts and hydrogen sensors. In this study, Au-Pd core-shell NP arrays were successfully fabricated using two steps: formation of the ordered array of Au NPs cores via solid-state dewetting of a Au thin film on a topographic silica substrate, and Pd shell formation via chemical synthesis using two different surfactants (CTAB and CTAC). Using the CTAB surfactant in particular, a 2-D composite structure comprised of an ordered array of Au-Pd NPs, with smaller Pd NPs on the nanoscopic gaps between the Au-Pd NPs, could be formed. This structure is expected to have potential application in resistance-base hydrogen sensors.

  1. Reduction behavior of UO22+ in molten LiCl-RbCl and LiCl-KCl eutectics by using tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takayuki; Uehara, Akihiro; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Yamana, Hajimu

    2013-08-01

    The reduction of uranium from UO22+ to UO2+ or U4+ in molten LiCl-RbCl and LiCl-KCl eutectics was examined by using tungsten and chlorine gas. Spectrophotometric technique was adopted to determine the concentration of uranium species. When tungsten was immersed into the LiCl-RbCl eutectic melt at 400 °C without supplying chlorine gas, 36% of the total weight of the hexavalent of UO22+ was reduced to the pentavalent of UO2+. Under purging chlorine gas into the melt, 96% of UO22+ was reduced to the tetravalent of U4+. Tungsten oxy-chloride of WOCl4 was produced via the reductions of UO22+, which was volatized from the melt and adsorbed on the upper part of experimental cell. On the other hand, 84% of UO22+ in the LiCl-KCl eutectic melt at 500 °C was reduced to U4+ by using tungsten and chlorine gas.

  2. Disappearance of back-to-back high-pT hadron correlations in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN ] =200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Corral, M M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Magestro, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2003-02-28

    Azimuthal correlations for large transverse momentum charged hadrons have been measured over a wide pseudorapidity range and full azimuth in Au+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The small-angle correlations observed in p+p collisions and at all centralities of Au+Au collisions are characteristic of hard-scattering processes previously observed in high-energy collisions. A strong back-to-back correlation exists for p+p and peripheral Au+Au. In contrast, the back-to-back correlations are reduced considerably in the most central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial interaction as the hard-scattered partons or their fragmentation products traverse the medium.

  3. Reactions UF4 - ClO2F and UF5 - ClO2F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, Raymond; Besnard, Ginette; Hartmanshenn, Olivier; Luce, Michel; Mougin, Jacques; Pelissie, Jean

    1970-02-01

    The study of the reaction UF 4 - ClO 2 F between 0 deg. and 100 deg. C, by various techniques (micro-sublimation, isopiestic method, IR and UV spectrography, thermogravimetry and X-ray diffraction) shows that intermediate steps are possible before the production of UF 5 . The whole reaction may be schematised by two equations: (1) n UF 4 + ClO 2 F → n UF x + ClO 2 (4 4 + ClO 2 F → UF x + 1/2 Cl 2 + O 2 . The more the temperature rises, the more the second equation becomes experimentally verified. The reaction at 0 deg. C between UF 5 and ClO 2 F may be represented by: UF 5 + ClO 2 F → UF 6 ClO 2 . The reactions: UF 5 + ClO 2 F → UF 6 + ClO 2 , UF 5 + ClO 2 F → UF 6 + 1/2 Cl 2 + O 2 are verified, the first and the second at 25 deg. C., the second from 50 deg. to 150 deg. C. From the results of AGRON it is possible to predict the residual solids before complete volatilization as UF 6 . The IR spectra of ClO 2 F adsorbed on UF 4 and UF x at 60 deg. C have been compared with those of gaseous ClO 2 F and UF 6 adsorbed on UF 4 . (authors) [fr

  4. Growth and structure of Co/Au magnetic thin films; Croissance et structure des couches minces magnetiques Co/Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsot, N

    1999-01-14

    We have studied the growth and the crystallographic structure of magnetic ultra thin cobalt/gold films (Co/Au), in order to investigate the correlations between their magnetic and structural properties. Room temperature (R.T.) Co growth on Au (111) proceeds in three stages. Up to 2 Co monolayers (ML), a bilayer island growth mode is observed. Between 2 and 5 ML, coalescence of the islands occurs, covering the substrate surface and a Co/Au mixing is observed resulting from the de-construction of the Herringbone reconstruction. Finally, beyond 5 ML, the CoAu mixing is buried and the Co growth continues in a 3-D growth. Annealing studies at 600 K on this system show a smoothing effect of the Co film, and at the same time, segregation of Au atoms. The quality of the Co/Au interface (sharpness) is not enhanced by the annealing. The local order was studied by SEXAFS and the long range order by GIXRD showing that the Co film has a hexagonal close packed structure, with an easy magnetization axis perpendicular to the surface. From a local order point of view, the Co grows with an incoherent epitaxy and keeps its own bulk parameters. The GIXRD analysis shows a residual strain in the Co film of 4%. The difference observed between the local order analysis and the long range order results is explained in terms of the low dimensions of the diffracting domains. The evolution of film strains, as a function of the Co coverage, shows a marked deviation from the elastic strain theory. Modification of the strain field in the Co film as a function of the Au coverage is studied by GIXRD analysis. The Au growth study, at R.T., shows no evidence of a Au/Co mixing in the case of the Au/Co interface. The Au overlayer adopts a twinned face centred cubic structure on the rough Co film surface. (author)

  5. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions at square root of (sNN)=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-03-19

    Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons, and antiprotons are reported for square root of [sNN]=200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heary Ion Collider (RHIC). Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.

  6. Collective flow measurements with HADES in Au+Au collisions at 1.23A GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardan, Behruz; Hades Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    HADES has a large acceptance combined with a good mass-resolution and therefore allows the study of dielectron and hadron production in heavy-ion collisions with unprecedented precision. With the statistics of seven billion Au-Au collisions at 1.23A GeV recorded in 2012, the investigation of higher-order flow harmonics is possible. At the BEVALAC and SIS18 directed and elliptic flow has been measured for pions, charged kaons, protons, neutrons and fragments, but higher-order harmonics have not yet been studied. They provide additional important information on the properties of the dense hadronic medium produced in heavy-ion collisions. We present here a high-statistics, multidifferential measurement of v1 and v2 for protons in Au+Au collisions at 1.23A GeV.

  7. Cyclic voltammetric study of the reduction of U(III) to uranium metal in molten LiCl-NaCl-CaCl2-BaCl2-UCl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poa, D.S.; Tomczuk, Z.; Steunenberg, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemistry of the reduction of UCl 3 to uranium metal in molten LiCl-NaCl-CaCl 2 -BaCl 2 (49.7-8.0-26.5-15.8 mol %) containing dissolved UCl 3 . The purpose of the study was to obtain information on the kinetics of the reaction, which will be used in the design of electrorefining equipment for the reprocessing of core and blanket fuel discharged from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). The electrorefining operation employs the above salt as the electrolyte and a liquid cadmium pool as the anode

  8. Photoswitchable Faraday effect in EuS-Au nanosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Akira; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Fushimi, Koji; Hasegawa, Yasuchika [Division of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, North-13 West-8, Kita-ku, 060-8628, Sapporo (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Effective photoswitchable europium sulfide nanocrystals with gold nanoparticles using dithiol (DDT: 1,10-decanedithiol) joint molecules, EuS-Au nanosystems, are demonstrated. The TEM image indicates the formation of EuS-Au nanosystems composed of cube-shaped EuS nanocrystals and spherical Au nanoparticles. Under visible-light irradiation, a drastic change of absorption band of EuS-Au nanosystems at around 600 nm was observed. The Faraday effects of EuS-Au nanosystems were estimated using magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurements. The effective change of the MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems under visible-light irradiation was successfully observed at around 670 nm for the first time. The effective reversible changes in MCD spectra with the alternative irradiation cycles of visible light (>440 nm) and dark are also presented. The decrease rate of rotation angle at 670 nm of EuS-Au nanosystems is larger than that of absorbance. These results indicate that the effective change of MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems would be dominated not only by a drastic change of absorption band related to enhanced LSPR of Au nanoparticles but also by specific interaction between EuS and Au in nanosystem under irradiation. Illustration of photoswitch and TEM image of EuS-Au nanosystems. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Preparation of Au/Y2O3 and Au/NiO catalysts by co-precipitation and their oxidation activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreethawong, Thammanoon; Sitthiwechvijit, Norsit; Rattanachatchai, Apiwat; Ouraipryvan, Piya; Schwank, Johannes W.; Chavadej, Sumaeth

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The catalytic activity of Au catalysts supported on Y 2 O 3 and NiO prepared by co-precipitation was investigated for CO and methanol oxidation. → The phase transformation of yttrium support greatly affected the CO oxidation activity. → The Au/Y 2 O 3 exhibited the same activity as Au/NiO for the methanol oxidation while the Au/NiO gave higher activity for CO oxidation. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to investigate the catalytic activity of gold catalysts supported on two metal oxides, yttrium oxide and nickel oxide, prepared by co-precipitation for CO and methanol oxidation reactions. The TGA and XRD results confirmed that yttrium hydroxide (Y(OH) 3 ) was formed at calcination temperature below 300 deg. C. When it was calcined at 400 deg. C, the Y(OH) 3 was transformed to yttrium oxide hydroxide (YOOH). Finally, when calcination temperature was raised to 600 deg. C, the YOOH was completely transformed to yttrium oxide (Y 2 O 3 ). Interestingly, the gold loaded on YOOH calcined at 400 deg. C and gold loaded on Y 2 O 3 calcined at 500 deg. C comparatively showed the highest catalytic activity for complete CO oxidation at a reaction temperature of 300 deg. C. The 0.12% Au/Y 2 O 3 catalyst calcined at 500 deg. C was employed for both CO and methanol oxidation studies. For complete CO oxidation, the reaction temperatures of Au/Y 2 O 3 and Au/NiO catalysts were 325 deg. C and 250 deg. C, respectively. The light-off temperatures of Au/Y 2 O 3 and Au/NiO catalysts for methanol oxidation were 210 deg. C and 205 deg. C, respectively. Conclusively, the Au/Y 2 O 3 clearly exhibited the same activity as that of Au/NiO for methanol oxidation while the Au/NiO gave higher activity for CO oxidation.

  10. Light Fragment Production and Power Law Behavior in Au + Au Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F.P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D.A.; Chacon, A.D.; Chance, J.L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J.B.; Gilkes, M.L.; Hauger, J.A.; Hirsch, A.S.; Hjort, E.L.; Insolia, A.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Lisa, M.A.; Matis, H.S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Olson, D.L.; Partlan, M.D.; Porile, N.T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H.G.; Romanski, J.; Romero, J.L.; Russo, G.V.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B.K.; Symons, T.J.M.; Tincknell, M.L.; Tuve, C.; Warren, P.G.; Weerasundara, D.; Wieman, H.H.; Wolf, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    Using charged-particle-exclusive measurements of Au+Au collisions in the LBL Bevalac's EOS time projection chamber, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to 4 He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity, and beam energy. Most features of these densities above a transverse momentum threshold are consistent with momentum-space coalescence, and, in particular, the increase in sideward flow with fragment mass is generally well described by a momentum-space power law

  11. Magnetic holes in the solar wind between 0.3 AU and 17 AU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sperveslage

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic holes (MHs are depressions of the magnetic field magnitude. Turner et al. (1977 identified the first MHs in the solar wind and determined an occurrence rate of 1.5 MHs/d. Winterhalter et al. (1994 developed an automatic identification criterion to search for MHs in Ulysses data in the solar wind between 1 AU and 5.4 AU. We adopt their criterion to expand the search to the heliocentric distances down to 0.3 AU using data from Helios 1 and 2 and up to 17 AU using data from Voyager 2. We relate our observations to two theoretical approaches which describe the so-called linear MHs in which the magnetic vector varies in magnitude rather than direction. Therefore we focus on such linear MHs with a directional change less than 10º. With our observations of about 850 MHs we present the following results: Approximately 30% of all the identified MHs are linear. The maximum angle between the initial magnetic field vector and any vector inside the MH is 20º in average and shows a weak relation to the depth of the MHs. The angle between the initial magnetic field and the minimum variance direction of those structures is large and very probably close to 90º. The MHs are placed in a high β environment even though the average solar wind shows a smaller β. The widths decrease from about 50 proton inertial length in a region between 0.3 AU and 0.4 AU heliocentric distance to about 15 proton inertial length at distances larger than 10 AU. This quantity is correlated with the β of the MH environments with respect to the heliocentric distance. There is a clear preference for the occurrence of depressions instead of compressions. We discuss these results with regard to the main theories of MHs, the mirror instability and the alternative soliton approach. Although our observational results are more consistent with the soliton theory we favour a combination of both. MHs might be the remnants of initial mirror mode structures which can be described as

  12. Photoemission on gold-55-clusters derived from gold-phosphine AuP(C6H5)3Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinten, M.; Sander, I.; Steiner, P.; Kreibig, U.; Fauth, K.; Schmid, G.

    1991-01-01

    We measured XPS and UPS spectra of gold clusters with 55 atoms, embedded in an electrically isolating phosphine matrix, and of gold-phosphine, from which the clusters were chemically derived. Compared to the spectra of bulk gold the valence band spectrum and the core level spectra of the clusters showed shifts of the peaks and the fermi level to higher binding energies. The shift of the peaks could qualitatively be interpreted by a final state effect. We succeeded in a separation of bulk and surface contributions to the core level spectra and in a reasonable quantitative analysis of the valence band spectrum of the clusters. The Au 4f core level spectrum of gold-phosphine showed two peaks at 1.5 eV higher binding energies than the corresponding peaks of the clusters. (orig.)

  13. Strange baryon resonance production in sqrt s NN=200 GeV p+p and Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-09-29

    We report the measurements of Sigma(1385) and Lambda(1520) production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s{NN}]=200 GeV from the STAR Collaboration. The yields and the p(T) spectra are presented and discussed in terms of chemical and thermal freeze-out conditions and compared to model predictions. Thermal and microscopic models do not adequately describe the yields of all the resonances produced in central Au+Au collisions. Our results indicate that there may be a time span between chemical and thermal freeze-out during which elastic hadronic interactions occur.

  14. Silica-covered star-shaped Au-Ag nanoparticles as new electromagnetic nanoresonators for Raman characterisation of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajczewski, Jan; Kołątaj, Karol; Pietrasik, Sylwia; Kudelski, Andrzej

    2018-03-01

    One of the tools used for determining the composition of surfaces of various materials is shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS). SHINERS is a modification of "standard" surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), in which, before Raman spectra are recorded, the surfaces analysed are covered with a layer of plasmonic nanoparticles protected by a very thin layer of a transparent dielectric. The plasmonic cores of the core-shell nanoparticles used in SHINERS measurements generate a local enhancement of the electric field of the incident electromagnetic radiation, whereas the transparent coatings prevent the metal cores from coming into direct contact with the material being analysed. In this contribution, we propose a new type of SHINERS nanoresonators that contain spiky, star-shaped metal cores (produced from a gold/silver alloy). These spiky, star-shaped Au-Ag nanoparticles have been covered by a layer of silica. The small radii of the ends of the tips of the spikes of these plasmonic nanostructures make it possible to generate a very large enhancement of the electromagnetic field there, with the result that such SHINERS nanoresonators are significantly more efficient than the standard semi-spherical nanostructures. The Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles were synthesised by the reduction of a solution containing silver nitrate and chloroauric acid by ascorbic acid. The final geometry of the nanostructures thus formed was controlled by changing the ratio between the concentrations of AuCl4- and Ag+ ions. The shape of the synthesised star-shaped Au-Ag nanoparticles does not change significantly during the two standard procedures for depositing a layer of silica (by the decomposition of sodium silicate or the decomposition of tetraethyl orthosilicate).

  15. Surface chemistry of 2-butanol and furfural on Cu, Au and Cu/Au single crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Megginson, Rory

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the adsorption of 2-butanol and furfural was investigated on Au (111), Cu (111) and Cu/Au (111) surfaces. It was hoped that by studying how these species adsorbed on these surfaces , insight would be provided into the roles of Cu and Au in the “hydrogen free” hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol. This is a valuable process as currently furfuryl alcohol is derived from crude oil but it is possible to derive furfural from corn husk making it a greener process...

  16. Enhanced absorption in Au nanoparticles/a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells exploiting Au surface plasmon resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bianco, Giuseppe V.; Sacchetti, Alberto; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    Au nanoparticles (NPs)/(n-type)a-Si:H/(p-type)c-Si heterojunctions have been deposited combining plasma-enhanced chemical-vapour deposition (PECVD) with Au sputtering. We demonstrate that a density of {proportional_to}1.3 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} of Au nanoparticles with an approximately 20 nm diameter deposited onto (n-type)a-Si:H/(p-type)c-Si heterojunctions enhance performance exploiting the improved absorption of light by the surface plasmon resonance of Au NPs. In particular, Au NPs/(n-type)a-Si:H/(p-type)c-Si show an enhancement of 20% in the short-circuit current, J{sub SC}, 25% in the power output, P{sub max} and 3% in the fill factor, FF, compared to heterojunctions without Au NPs. Structures have been characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy and current-voltage (I-V) measurements to correlate the plasmon resonance-induced enhanced absorption of light with photovoltaic performance. (author)

  17. Intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations in molten RbCl-AgCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, S. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI, SPring-8), Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kawakita, Y. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shimakura, H. [Faculty of Pharmacy, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Ohara, K. [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI, SPring-8), Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukami, T. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Takeda, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    A first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) is observed in the X-ray total structure factor of a molten mixture of RbCl-AgCl, while both pure melts of RbCl and AgCl do not exhibit FSDP individually. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the origin of the FSDP with the polarizable ion model (PIM). Coexistence of covalent Ag–Cl and ionic Rb–Cl bonds leads the system to evolve intermediate range ordering, which is simulated by introducing the induced polarization in different ways between Ag–Cl with fully polarizable treatment based on Vashishta-Raman potential and Rb–Cl with suppression over-polarization in the nearest neighbor contribution based on Born-Meyer potential. The partial structure factors for both the Ag–Ag and Rb–Rb correlations, S{sub AgAg}(Q) and S{sub RbRb}(Q), show a positive contribution to the FSDP, while S{sub AgRb}(Q) for the Ag–Rb correlation exhibits a negative contribution, indicating that Ag and Rb ions are distributed in an alternating manner within the intermediate-range length scale. The origin of the intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations can be ascribed to the preferred direction of the dipole moments of anions in the PIM.

  18. Intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations in molten RbCl-AgCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, S.; Kawakita, Y.; Shimakura, H.; Ohara, K.; Fukami, T.; Takeda, S.

    2015-01-01

    A first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) is observed in the X-ray total structure factor of a molten mixture of RbCl-AgCl, while both pure melts of RbCl and AgCl do not exhibit FSDP individually. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the origin of the FSDP with the polarizable ion model (PIM). Coexistence of covalent Ag–Cl and ionic Rb–Cl bonds leads the system to evolve intermediate range ordering, which is simulated by introducing the induced polarization in different ways between Ag–Cl with fully polarizable treatment based on Vashishta-Raman potential and Rb–Cl with suppression over-polarization in the nearest neighbor contribution based on Born-Meyer potential. The partial structure factors for both the Ag–Ag and Rb–Rb correlations, S AgAg (Q) and S RbRb (Q), show a positive contribution to the FSDP, while S AgRb (Q) for the Ag–Rb correlation exhibits a negative contribution, indicating that Ag and Rb ions are distributed in an alternating manner within the intermediate-range length scale. The origin of the intermediate-range chemical ordering of cations can be ascribed to the preferred direction of the dipole moments of anions in the PIM

  19. ZnCl 2- and NH 4Cl-hydroponics gel electrolytes for zinc-carbon batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, N. H.; Ismail, Y. M. Baba; Mohamad, A. A.

    Absorbency testing is used to determine the percentage of ZnCl 2 or NH 4Cl solution absorbed by a hydroponics gel (HPG). It is found that the absorbency of ZnCl 2 or NH 4Cl solution decreases with increasing solution concentration. The conductivity of ZnCl 2- and NH 4Cl-HPG electrolytes is dependent on the solution concentration. A mixture of salt solution with HPG yields excellent gel polymer electrolytes with conductivities of 0.026 and 0.104 S cm -1 at 3 M ZnCl 2 and 7 M NH 4Cl, respectively. These gel electrolytes are then used to produce zinc-carbon cells. The fabricated cells give capacities of 8.8 and 10.0 mAh, have an internal resistance of 25.4 and 19.8 Ω, a maximum power density of 12.7 and 12.2 mW cm -2, and a short-circuit current density of 29.1 and 33.9 mA cm -2 for ZnCl 2- and NH 4Cl-HPG electrolytes, respectively.

  20. Electric conductivity of PCl{sub 5}-ZrCl{sub 4}, PCl{sub 5}-TaCl{sub 5}, and PCl{sub 5}-MoCl{sub 5} molten mixtures; Ehlektroprovodnost` rasplavlennykh sistem PCl{sub 5}-ZrCl{sub 4}, PCl{sub 5}-TaCl{sub 5}, i PCl{sub 5}-MoCl{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A B; Red` kin, A A; Moskalenko, N I [Inst. Vysokotemperaturnoj Ehlektrokhimii UrO RAN, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-05-01

    When mixing individual molecular melts of PCl{sub 5} with ZrCl{sub 4}, TaCl{sub 5} or with MoCl{sub 5}, an essential (by several orders) increase in electric conductivity (up to 0.02-0.1 Ohm{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup -1}), which stems, in all probability, from the appearance of complex ions PCl{sub 4}{sup +}, ZrCl{sub 5}{sup -}, ZrCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, TaCl{sub 5}{sup -} and MoCl{sub 6}{sup -} in the molten mixtures as a result of chemical interaction. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Magnetic properties and microstructure study of high coercivity Au/FePt/Au trilayer thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.K.; Yuan, F.T.; Liao, W.M.; Hsu, C.W.; Horng, Lance

    2006-01-01

    High-coercivity Au(60 nm)/FePt(δ nm)/Au(60 nm) trilayer samples were prepared by sputtering at room temperature, followed by post annealing at different temperatures. For the sample with δ=60 nm, L1 ordering transformation occurs at 500 deg. C. Coercivity (H c ) is increased with the annealing temperature in the studied range 400-800 deg. C. The H c value of the trilayer films is also varied with thickness of FePt intermediate layer (δ), from 27 kOe for δ=60 nm to a maximum value of 33.5 kOe for δ=20 nm. X-ray diffraction data indicate that the diffusion of Au atoms into the FePt L1 lattice is negligible even after a high-temperature (800 deg. C) annealing process. Furthermore, ordering parameter is almost unchanged as δ is reduced from 60 to 15 nm. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) photos indicate that small FePt Ll particles are dispersed amid the large-grained Au. We believe that the high coercivity of the trilayer sample is attributed to the small and uniform grain sizes of the highly ordered FePt particles which have perfect phase separation with Au matrix

  2. Configuration dependent deformation in 183Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, P.; Kumar, A.; Govil, I.M.; Mukherjee, G.; Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S.; Bhowmik, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    The lifetime measurements in 183 Au nucleus were carried in order to probe the deformation properties of the band built on the i 3/2 and h 9/2 configurations. The nucleus of 183 Au was populated using a reaction 28 Si( 159 Tb,4n) 183 Au at a beam energy of 140 MeV. Lifetime measurements were carried out using Recoil Distance Measurements (RDM) method

  3. Production of φ mesons in Au-Au collisions at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, B. B.; Betts, R. R.; Chang, J.; Gillitzer, A.; Henning, W. F.; Hofman, D. J.; Nanal, V.; Seto, R.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Xiang, H.

    1999-01-01

    The first measurements of φ meson production in Au-Au collisions at AGS energies are presented via the decay to K + K - . A measurement of the centrality dependence of the yield shows an increase similar to that seen for the K - with a spectral shape consistent with a relativistic Breit-Wigner distribution within the statistical errors of the present data set. Future analysis using the full data set with 4 times the statistics will allow a more accurate determination of the yields, slopes and spectral shapes

  4. Highly Stable [C60AuC60]+/- Dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Marcelo; Kuhn, Martin; Martini, Paul; Chen, Lei; Hagelberg, Frank; Kaiser, Alexander; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M

    2018-05-17

    Ionic complexes between gold and C 60 have been observed for the first time. Cations and anions of the type [Au(C 60 ) 2 ] +/- are shown to have particular stability. Calculations suggest that these ions adopt a C 60 -Au-C 60 sandwich-like (dumbbell) structure, which is reminiscent of [XAuX] +/- ions previously observed for much smaller ligands. The [Au(C 60 ) 2 ] +/- ions can be regarded as Au(I) complexes, regardless of whether the net charge is positive or negative, but in both cases, the charge transfer between the Au and C 60 is incomplete, most likely because of a covalent contribution to the Au-C 60 binding. The C 60 -Au-C 60 dumbbell structure represents a new architecture in fullerene chemistry that might be replicable in synthetic nanostructures.

  5. Heterojunction metal-oxide-metal Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au single nanowire device for spintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, K. M., E-mail: mrkongara@boisestate.edu; Punnoose, Alex; Hanna, Charles [Department of Physics, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho 83725 (United States); Padture, Nitin P. [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    In this report, we present the synthesis of heterojunction magnetite nanowires in alumina template and describe magnetic and electrical properties from a single nanowire device for spintronics applications. Heterojunction Au-Fe-Au nanowire arrays were electrodeposited in porous aluminum oxide templates, and an extensive and controlled heat treatment process converted Fe segment to nanocrystalline cubic magnetite phase with well-defined Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} interfaces as confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic measurements revealed Verwey transition shoulder around 120 K and a room temperature coercive field of 90 Oe. Current–voltage (I-V) characteristics of a single Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au nanowire have exhibited Ohmic behavior. Anomalous positive magnetoresistance of about 0.5% is observed on a single nanowire, which is attributed to the high spin polarization in nanowire device with pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase and nanocontact barrier. This work demonstrates the ability to preserve the pristine Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and well defined electrode contact metal (Au)–magnetite interface, which helps in attaining high spin polarized current.

  6. Enzymatic synthesis of gold nanoflowers with trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linmei; Weng Jian

    2010-01-01

    A one-step and eco-friendly approach for the room-temperature synthesis of trypsin-mediated three-dimensional (3D) gold nanoflowers (AuNFs) with high colloidal stability is demonstrated. To prepare AuNFs, ascorbic acid (AA) was quickly added into the premixed solution of HAuCl 4 and trypsin at pH = 5.0. The results show that the molar ratio and feeding order of reactant agents, pH and reaction time play important roles in the formation of NFs. The growth mechanism of AuNFs is suggested as three steps: (1) immobilization of AuCl 4 - ions with a positively charged trypsin template, (2) spontaneous reduction of AuCl 4 - ions with AA in situ and capping Au 0 by 12 cysteines of trypsin, (3) reduction of more AuCl 4 - ions on the Au nuclei formed in the initial stages and anisotropic growth into AuNFs.

  7. Excitation functions for 197Au (d, p)198Au, 197Au(d, 2n)197mHg, 197Au(d, 2n)197Hg and 197Au(d, p2n)196Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Xianguan; Peng Xiufeng; He Fuqing

    1987-01-01

    By using activation method and stack-foil technique, the excitation functions for d + 197 Au reaction in 6.6-13.1 MeV energy range are measured. The measured values are compared with previous results and theoretical calculations

  8. Correlated Production of Protons and Antiprotons in Au + Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Correlations between p and (anti p) at transverse momenta typical of enhanced baryon production in Au + Au collisions are reported. The PHENIX experiment has measured same and opposite sign baryon pairs in Au + Au collisions at √(ovr S NN ) = 200 GeV. Correlated production of proton and (anti p) with the trigger particle from the range 2.5 T T T range rises with increasing centrality, except for the most central collisions, where baryons show a significantly smaller number of associated mesons. These data are consistent with a picture in which hard scattered partons produce correlated p and (anti p) in the p T region of the baryon excess.

  9. OpenCL programming guide

    CERN Document Server

    Munshi, Aaftab; Mattson, Timothy G; Fung, James; Ginsburg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Using the new OpenCL (Open Computing Language) standard, you can write applications that access all available programming resources: CPUs, GPUs, and other processors such as DSPs and the Cell/B.E. processor. Already implemented by Apple, AMD, Intel, IBM, NVIDIA, and other leaders, OpenCL has outstanding potential for PCs, servers, handheld/embedded devices, high performance computing, and even cloud systems. This is the first comprehensive, authoritative, and practical guide to OpenCL 1.1 specifically for working developers and software architects. Written by five leading OpenCL authorities, OpenCL Programming Guide covers the entire specification. It reviews key use cases, shows how OpenCL can express a wide range of parallel algorithms, and offers complete reference material on both the API and OpenCL C programming language. Through complete case studies and downloadable code examples, the authors show how to write complex parallel programs that decompose workloads across many different devices. They...

  10. Mineralogical, stable isotope, and fluid inclusion studies of spatially related porphyry Cu and epithermal Au-Te mineralization, Fakos Peninsula, Limnos Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornadel, Andrew P.; Voudouris, Panagiotis Ch.; Spry, Paul G.; Melfos, Vasilios

    2012-05-01

    The Fakos porphyry Cu and epithermal Au-Te deposit, Limnos Island, Greece, is hosted in a ~20 Ma quartz monzonite and shoshonitic subvolcanic rocks that intruded middle Eocene to lower Miocene sedimentary basement rocks. Metallic mineralization formed in three stages in quartz and quartz-calcite veins. Early porphyry-style (Stage 1) metallic minerals consist of pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, bornite, sphalerite, molybdenite, and iron oxides, which are surrounded by halos of potassic and propylitic alteration. Stage 2 mineralization is composed mostly of quartz-tourmaline veins associated with sericitic alteration and disseminated pyrite and molybdenite, whereas Stage 3, epithermal-style mineralization is characterized by polymetallic veins containing pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, enargite, bournonite, tetrahedrite-tennantite, hessite, petzite, altaite, an unknown cervelleite-like Ag-telluride, native Au, and Au-Ag alloy. Stage 3 veins are spatially associated with sericitic and argillic alteration. Fluid inclusions in quartz from Stage 1 (porphyry-style) mineralization contain five types of inclusions. Type I, liquid-vapor inclusions, which homogenize at temperatures ranging from 189.5°C to 403.3°C have salinities of 14.8 to 19.9 wt. % NaCl equiv. Type II, liquid-vapor-NaCl, Type III liquid-vapor-NaCl-XCl2 (where XCl is an unknown chloride phase, likely CaCl2), and Type IV, liquid-vapor-hematite ± NaCl homogenize to the liquid phase by liquid-vapor homogenization or by daughter crystal dissolution at temperatures of 209.3 to 740.5 °C, 267.6 to 780.8 °C, and 357.9 to 684.2 °C, respectively, and, Type V, vapor-rich inclusions. Stage 2 veins are devoid of interpretable fluid inclusions. Quartz from Stage 3 (epithermal-style) veins contains two types of fluid inclusions, Type I, liquid-vapor inclusions that homogenize to the liquid phase (191.6 to 310.0 °C) with salinities of 1.40 to 9.73 wt. % NaCl equiv., and Type II, vapor-rich inclusions. Mixing

  11. Ethanol Sensing Properties of Au-functionalized NiO Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sunghoon; Kheel, Hyejoon; Sun, Gun-Joo; Hyun, Soong Keun; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Chongmu

    2016-01-01

    Pristine and Au-functionalized nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple solvo thermal route and the ethanol sensing properties of multiple-networked Au-doped and undoped NiO nanoparticle sensors were examined. The pristine and Au-functionalized NiO nanoparticle sensor showed responses of 442 and 273%, respectively, to 1000 ppm of ethanol at 325 .deg. C. The Au-functionalized NiO nanoparticle sensor showed faster response than the pristine NiO counterpart, whereas the recovery time of the former was similar to that of the latter. The optimal operating temperature of the pristine and Au-functionalized NiO nanoparticles was 325 and 350 .deg. C, respectively, by Au-doping. Both the pristine and Au-functionalized NiO nanoparticle sensors showed selectivity for ethanol gas over methanol, acetone, benzene, and toluene gases. The underlying mechanism of the enhanced sensing performance of the Au-functionalized NiO nanoparticles toward ethanol might be due to modulation of the depletion layer formed around Au particles and the Schottky barriers formed at the Au-NiO junction accompanying ethanol adsorption and desorption, the spill-over effect and high catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles and the smaller diameter of the particles in the Au-functionalized NiO sensor.

  12. Ethanol Sensing Properties of Au-functionalized NiO Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sunghoon; Kheel, Hyejoon; Sun, Gun-Joo; Hyun, Soong Keun; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Chongmu [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Pristine and Au-functionalized nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple solvo thermal route and the ethanol sensing properties of multiple-networked Au-doped and undoped NiO nanoparticle sensors were examined. The pristine and Au-functionalized NiO nanoparticle sensor showed responses of 442 and 273%, respectively, to 1000 ppm of ethanol at 325 .deg. C. The Au-functionalized NiO nanoparticle sensor showed faster response than the pristine NiO counterpart, whereas the recovery time of the former was similar to that of the latter. The optimal operating temperature of the pristine and Au-functionalized NiO nanoparticles was 325 and 350 .deg. C, respectively, by Au-doping. Both the pristine and Au-functionalized NiO nanoparticle sensors showed selectivity for ethanol gas over methanol, acetone, benzene, and toluene gases. The underlying mechanism of the enhanced sensing performance of the Au-functionalized NiO nanoparticles toward ethanol might be due to modulation of the depletion layer formed around Au particles and the Schottky barriers formed at the Au-NiO junction accompanying ethanol adsorption and desorption, the spill-over effect and high catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles and the smaller diameter of the particles in the Au-functionalized NiO sensor.

  13. Facile Synthesis of Quasi-One-Dimensional Au/PtAu Heterojunction Nanotubes and Their Application as Catalysts in an Oxygen-Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kai; Liu, Jiawei; Zhang, Huan; Huang, Zhao; Lu, Zhicheng; Foda, Mohamed F; Li, Tingting; Han, Heyou

    2015-05-11

    An intermediate-template-directed method has been developed for the synthesis of quasi-one-dimensional Au/PtAu heterojunction nanotubes by the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Au on Te/Pt core-shell nanostructures in aqueous solution. The synthesized porous Au/PtAu bimetallic nanotubes (PABNTs) consist of porous tubular framework and attached Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). The reaction intermediates played an important role in the preparation, which fabricated the framework and provided a localized reducing agent for the reduction of the Au and Pt precursors. The Pt7 Au PABNTs showed higher electrocatalytic activity and durability in the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M HClO4 than porous Pt nanotubes (PtNTs) and commercially available Pt/C. The mass activity of PABNTs was 218 % that of commercial Pt/C after an accelerated durability test. This study demonstrates the potential of PABNTs as highly efficient electrocatalysts. In addition, this method provides a facile strategy for the synthesis of desirable hetero-nanostructures with controlled size and shape by utilizing an intermediate template. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Identified hadron transverse momentum spectra in Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. Van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.

    2007-02-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons, protons, and antiprotons from Au+Au collisions at sNN = 62.4 GeV have been measured by the PHOBOS experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The identification of particles relies on three different methods: low momentum particles stopping in the first detector layers; the specific energy loss (dE/dx) in the silicon spectrometer, and time-of-flight measurement. These methods cover the transverse momentum ranges 0.03 0.2, 0.2 1.0, and 0.5 3.0 GeV/c, respectively. Baryons are found to have substantially harder transverse momentum spectra than mesons. The pT region in which the proton to pion ratio reaches unity in central Au+Au collisions at sNN = 62.4 GeV fits into a smooth trend as a function of collision energy. At low transverse mass, the spectra of various species exhibit a significant deviation from transverse mass scaling. The observed particle yields at very low pT are comparable to extrapolations from higher pT for kaons, protons and antiprotons. By comparing our results to Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV, we conclude that the net proton yield at midrapidity is proportional to the number of participant nucleons in the collision.

  15. Electrical investigation of the Au/n+–GaAs and Au/n-porous GaAs structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saghrouni, H.; Hannachi, R.; Jomni, S.; Beji, L.

    2013-01-01

    The electrical properties of Au/n + –GaAs and Au/n-porous GaAs metal–semiconductor structures were investigated using room temperature current–voltage I(V) and capacitance–voltage C(V) measurements. The electrical parameters of these structures such as ideality factor, barrier height potential, series resistance have been calculated. The obtained parameters of Au/n-porous GaAs structure were discussed and compared to those of Au/n + –GaAs structure. The series resistances and ideality factors of the two structures were seen to have approximately the same values. Furthermore, the shunt resistance and the barrier height potential values for the Au/n-porous GaAs structure were found to be different than the ones of Au/n + –GaAs structure. Furthermore the two structures showed a non-ideal I(V) behavior with an ideality factor greater than unity. Such non ideal behavior was suggested to be due to the existence of high density of trap and the forward I(V) characteristics which were governed by space charge limited conductivity, characterized by single and exponential trapping levels in both structures (SCLC). A model based upon TFE tunneling of carriers at reverse current was used to explain the non-saturation of reverse current of the structures. The high frequency C(V) characteristics of the structure reveal the presence of an anomalous behavior at the forward bias. Though the capacitance reaches a peak, it remarkably decreases with an increasing bias voltage suggested by the presence of interface states. Furthermore, the energy distribution of interface density in the structures was determined by the forward bias C(V) measurement as well as using ideality factor and barrier height potential values obtained from forward bias I(V) and reverse bias C −2 (V) characteristics, respectively. An estimated energy band diagram for the Au/n + –GaAs and Au/n-porous GaAs structures are presented

  16. Pondération de la base juridique du droit au logement au Zimbabwe ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    13 déc. 2016 ... La criminalité et la pauvreté au Ghana urbain. La manière dont la criminalité et la pauvreté interagissent a été étudiée et débattue dans la littérature de recherche occidentale, mais on sait pe. Voir davantageLa criminalité et la pauvreté au Ghana urbain ...

  17. CO oxidation on Alsbnd Au nano-composite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, C.; Majumder, C.

    2018-03-01

    Using first principles method we report the CO oxidation behaviour of Alsbnd Au nano-composites in three different size ranges: Al6Au8, Al13Au42 and a periodic slab of Alsbnd Au(1 1 1) surface. The clusters prefer enclosed structures with alternating arrangement of Al and Au atoms, maximising Auδ-sbnd Alδ+ bonds. Charge distribution analysis suggests the charge transfer from Al to Au atoms, corroborated by the red shift in the density of states spectrum. Further, CO oxidation on these nano-composite systems was investigated through both Eley - Rideal and Langmuir Hinshelwood mechanism. While, these clusters interact with O2 non-dissociatively with an elongation of the Osbnd O bond, further interaction with CO led to formation of CO2 spontaneously. On contrary, the CO2 evolution by co-adsorption of O2 and CO molecules has a transition state barrier. On the basis of the results it is inferred that nano-composite material of Alsbnd Au shows significant promise toward effective oxidative catalysis.

  18. Magnetic order of Au nanoparticle with clean surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Ryuju; Ishikawa, Soichiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Sato, Tetsuya, E-mail: satoh@appi.keio.ac.jp

    2015-11-01

    Au nanoparticles, which are kept in vacuum after the preparation by gas evaporation method, show ferromagnetism even in 1.7 nm in diameter. The intrinsic magnetism is examined by detecting the disappearance of spontaneous magnetization in Au bulk prepared by heating the nanoparticles without exposure to the air. The temperature dependence of spontaneous magnetization is not monotonic and the increase in magnetization is observed after Au nanoparticles are exposed to the air. The magnetic behavior can be interpreted by the ferrimagnetic-like core–shell structure with shell thickness of 0.16±0.01 nm and magnetic moment of (1.5±0.1)×10{sup −2} μ{sub B}/Au atom, respectively. - Highlights: • Au nanoparticles with clean surface were prepared by the gas evaporation method. • The spontaneous magnetization was observed in Au nanoparticles. • Temperature dependent spontaneous magnetization of smaller Au particles was not monotonic. • The magnetic behavior was interpreted by the ferrimagnetic-like core–shell model. • The shell thickness and the magnetic moment per Au atom were estimated.

  19. Electronic and photovoltaic properties of Au/pyronine G(Y)/p-GaAs/Au:Zn heterojunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, H.S.; Farag, A.A.M.; Khosifan, N.M.; Solami, T.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The electrical and photovoltaic properties of thermally evaporated pyronine PYR(G) films on GaAs single crystal have been investigated. ► The photovoltaic properties of Au/PYR/GaAs/Au:Zn were investigated under illumination (20 mW/cm 2 ) through the finger mesh gold electrode. - Abstract: The electrical and photovoltaic properties of thermally vacuum deposited pyronine G(Y), PYR(G), thin films on GaAs single crystal were investigated. The current–voltage (I–V) characteristic of Au/PYR(G)/GaAs/Au:Zn heterojunction diode under dark condition was measured at different temperatures in the range 298–373 K. The device exhibits a rectifying property. The current in the prepared heterojunction was found to obey the thermionic emission model assisted by tunneling in the voltage range (0 s , shunt resistance, R sh , ideality factor, n, and the barrier height, Φ b . The variation of 1/C 2 with voltage shows a straight line at high frequency that indicates the formation of barrier between PYR(G) and GaAs and the potential barrier height is found to be 0.82 eV at room temperature (298 K). The photovoltaic properties of Au/PYR(G)/GaAs/Au:Zn heterojunction were investigated under illumination by using light intensity of 20 mW/cm 2 through the finger mesh gold electrode. The short circuit current (I sc ), open circuit voltages (V oc ), fill factor (FF) and the power conversion efficiency (η) of the device were evaluated from the I–V characteristics under illumination.

  20. In-situ STM study of phosphate adsorption on Cu(111), Au(111) and Cu/Au(111) electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaup, Christian; Horch, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of Cu(111), Au(111) and Cu-covered Au(111) electrodes with a neutral phosphate buffer solution has been studied by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM). Under low potential conditions, both the Cu(111) and the Au(111......) surface appear apparently adsorbate free, indicated by the presence of a (4×4) structure and the herringbone surface reconstruction, respectively. Upon potential increase, phosphate anions adsorb on both surfaces and for Cu(111) the formation of a (√3×√3)R30° structure is found, whereas on Au(111) a "(√3......×√7)" structure is formed. For a Cu-submonolayer on Au(111), coadsorption of phosphate anions leads to the formation of a (2×2) vacancy structure within an assumed pseudomorphic structure of the Cu-submonolayer with the phosphate anions occupying the vacancies. When desorbing the phosphate anions at low...

  1. Evidence of significant covalent bonding in Au(CN)(2)(-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Yi-Lei; Yang, Jie; Xing, Xiao-Peng; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2009-11-18

    The Au(CN)(2)(-) ion is the most stable Au compound known for centuries, yet a detailed understanding of its chemical bonding is still lacking. Here we report direct experimental evidence of significant covalent bonding character in the Au-C bonds in Au(CN)(2)(-) using photoelectron spectroscopy and comparisons with its lighter congeners, Ag(CN)(2)(-) and Cu(CN)(2)(-). Vibrational progressions in the Au-C stretching mode were observed for all detachment transitions for Au(CN)(2)(-), in contrast to the atomic-like transitions for Cu(CN)(2)(-), revealing the Au-C covalent bonding character. In addition, rich electronic structural information was obtained for Au(CN)(2)(-) by employing 118 nm detachment photons. Density functional theory and high-level ab initio calculations were carried out to understand the photoelectron spectra and obtain insight into the nature of the chemical bonding in the M(CN)(2)(-) complexes. Significant covalent character in the Au-C bonding due to the strong relativistic effects was revealed in Au(CN)(2)(-), consistent with its high stability.

  2. Parton interactions and two particle transverse momentum correlations in Au + Au collisions at √SNN=130 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingjun; Guo Liqun; Piao Xingliang

    2006-01-01

    Partonic effects on two-particle transverse momentum correlations are studied for Au + Au collisions at √S NN =130 GeV in the Monte Carlo model, AMPT. This study demonstrates that in these collisions partonic interactions contribute significantly to the correlations. Additionally, model calculations are compared with data of the two-particle transverse momentum correlations measured by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and it is found that AMPT with string melting can well reproduce the measured centrality dependence of the two-particle transverse momentum correlations in Au + Au collisions at √S NN =130 GeV. (authors)

  3. Density of molten salt Mixtures of eutectic LiCl-KCl containing UCl{sub 3}, CeCl{sub 3}, or LaCl{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.; Simpson, M. F. [Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Densities of molten salt mixtures of eutectic LiCl-KCl with UCl{sub 3}, CeCl{sub 3}, or LaCl{sub 3} at various concentrations (up to 13 wt%) were measured using a liquid surface displacement probe. Linear relationships between the mixture density and the concentration of the added salt were observed. For LaCl{sub 3} and CeCl{sub 3}, the measured densities were signifcantly higher than those previously reported from Archimedes’ method. In the case of LiCl-KCl-UCl{sub 3}, the data ft the ideal mixture density model very well. For the other salts, the measured densities exceeded the ideal model prediction by about 2%.

  4. Electrodeposition of Al-Ta alloys in NaCl-KCl-AlCl{sub 3} molten salt containing TaCl{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Kazuki; Matsushima, Hisayoshi; Ueda, Mikito, E-mail: mikito@eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Electrodeposition of Al-Ta alloys in an AlCl{sub 3}-NaCl-KCl-TaCl{sub 5} melt was carried out. • We were obtained 72 at% Ta-Al alloy at 0.3 V. • Amorphous Ta-Al was formed in high Ta concentration. - Abstract: To form Al-Ta alloys for high temperature oxidation resistance components, molten salt electrolysis was carried out in an AlCl{sub 3}-NaCl-KCl melt containing TaCl{sub 5} at 423 K. The voltammogram showed two cathodic waves at 0.45 V and 0.7 V vs. Al/Al(III), which may correspond to reduction from Ta(V) to Ta(III) and from Ta(III) to tantalum metal, respectively. Electrodeposits of Al and Ta were obtained in the range from −0.05 to 0.3 V and the highest concentration of Ta in the electrodeposit was 72 at% at 0.3 V. With increasing Ta content in the alloy, the morphology of the electrodeposits became powdery and the particle size smaller.

  5. Synthesis and crystal structure of a new Cu3Au-type ternary phase in the Au-In-Pd system: distribution of atoms over crystallographic positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptashkina, Evgeniya A; Kabanova, Elizaveta G; Tursina, Anna I; Yatsenko, Alexandr V; Kuznetsov, Victor N

    2018-03-01

    A new Cu 3 Au-type ternary phase (τ phase) is found in the AuPd-rich part of the Au-In-Pd system. It has a broad homogeneity range based on extensive (Pd,Au) and (In,Au) replacement, with the composition varying between Au 17.7 In 25.3 Pd 57.0 and Au 50.8 In 16.2 Pd 33.0 . The occupancies of the crystallographic positions were studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction for three samples of different composition. The sites with m-3m symmetry are occupied by atoms with a smaller scattering power than the atoms located on 4/mmm sites. Two extreme structure models were refined. Within the first, the occupation type changes from (Au,In,Pd) 3 (Pd,In) to (Au,Pd) 3 (In,Pd,Au) with an increase in the Au gross content. For the second model, the occupation type (Au,In,Pd) 3 (Pd,Au) remains essentially unchanged for all Au concentrations. Although the diffraction data do not allow the choice of one of these models, the latter model, where Au substitutes In on 4/mmm sites, seems to be preferable, since it agrees with the fact that the homogeneity range of the τ phase is inclined to the Au corner and provides the same occupation type for all the studied samples of different compositions.

  6. The collectins CL-L1, CL-K1 and CL-P1, and their roles in complement and innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Soren W K; Ohtani, Katsuki; Roy, Nitai

    2016-01-01

    as CL-LK) and its activation of the lectin pathway via MASPs, drew new attention in the complement biology, which was further strengthened by the observed interactions between CL-P1 and CRP-C1q-factor H or properdin. Deficiency of either CL-K1 or MASP-3 has been demonstrated in 3MC syndrome patients...

  7. Interplanetary shock phenomena beyond 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to spatial dependences exhibited by spacecraft measurements obtained between 1 and 30 AU, together with temporal variations occurring between solar activity cycle maxima and minima. At 1-3 AU radial distances, shocks develop in association with the corotating solar wind streams characterizing solar minimum and accelerate solar wind evolution with distance while heating the solar wind and generating waves and turbulence. At solar maximum, shocks are observed more frequently at 1 AU but still in association with transient solar events; acceleration leading to energetic storm particles is observed both within and beyond 1 AU. The superimposed effect of large numbers of intense shocks may be responsible for the solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. 77 references

  8. NbCl 5 and CrCl 3 catalysts effect on synthesis and hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two kinds of novel materials, Mg–1.6 mol% Ni–0.4 mol% NiO–2 mol% MCl (MCl = NbCl5, CrCl3), along with Mg–1.6 mol% Ni–0.4 mol% NiO for comparison, were examined for their potential use in hydrogen storage applications, having been fabricated via cryomilling. The effects of NbCl5 and CrCl3 on hydrogen storage ...

  9. Conductive Au nanowires regulated by silk fibroin nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bo-Ju; Lu, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Conductive Au-biopolymer composites have promising applications in tissue engineering such as nerve tissue regeneration. In this study, silk fibroin nanofibers were formed in aqueous solution by regulating silk self-assembly process and then used as template for Au nanowire fabrication. We performed the synthesis of Au seeds by repeating the seeding cycles for several times in order to increase the density of Au seeds on the nanofibers. After electroless plating, densely decorated Au seeds grew into irregularly shaped particles following silk nanofiber to fill the gaps between particles and finally form uniform continuous nanowires. The conductive property of the Au-silk fibroin nanowires was studied with current-voltage ( I-V) measurement. A typical ohmic behavior was observed, which highlighted their potential applications in nerve tissue regeneration.

  10. Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d plus Au and Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV measured at the STAR detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D.R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M.J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielčík, Jaroslav; Bielčíková, Jana; Biritz, B.; Bland, L.C.; Bonner, B.E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A.V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M.C.D.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M.C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, Petr; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Chen, J.Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K.E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R.F.; Codrington, M.J.M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A.D.; De Silva, L.C.; Debbe, R.R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A.A.; de Souza, R.D.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J.L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J.C.; Mazumdar, M.R.D.; Efimov, L.G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R.G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangaharan, D.R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y.N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.X.; Harris, J.W.; Hays-Wehle, J.P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Hofman, D.J.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C.L.; Jones, P.G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitán, Jan; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D.P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.R.; Knospe, A.G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kushpil, Vasilij; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; LaPointe, S. (ed.); Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, Richard; Lee, Ch.; Lee, J.H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.M.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Ma, G.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O.I.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H.S.; Matulenko, Yu.A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T.S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N.G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M.K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M.M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D.A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B.K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J.M.; Netrakanti, P.K.; Ng, M.J.; Nogach, L.V.; Nurushev, S.B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E.W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B.S.; Pal, S.K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S.C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M.A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Potukuchi, B.V.K.S.; Powell, C.B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N.K.; Pujahari, P.R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R.L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H.G.; Roberts, J.B.; Rogachevskiy, O.V.; Romero, J.L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T.R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S.S.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R.N.; Skoby, M.J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H.M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J.R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M.C.; Subba, N.L.; Šumbera, Michal; Sun, X.M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D.N.; Symons, T.J.M.; de Toledo, A. S.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A.H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L.H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J.H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A.R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlustý, David; Tokarev, M. V.; Trainor, T.A.; Tram, V.N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O.D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D.G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J.A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G.M.S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S.A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Westfall, G.D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S.W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.F.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q.H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, J.B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, X.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhou, W.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y.H.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), 024912/1-024912/14 ISSN 0556-2813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : AU+AU COLLISIONS * RADIATION * PLASMA Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.416, year: 2010

  11. AU-EU “Strategic Partnership”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodt, Annemarie Peen; Okeke, Jide

    2013-01-01

    This article appraises strategic partnership between the African Union (AU) and European Union (EU). It examines the context and nature of AU and EU security relations and explores the conditions under which partnership has a positive impact in this regard. This includes an evaluation...... of convergence between the two organizations and its effect or lack thereof on African security. The article concludes that events leading up to and initiatives following the 2007 Joint Africa–European Union Strategy have produced a degree of AU and EU convergence, which has had limited impact on the efficacy...... of the African security regime, the level of which remains mediocre at best....

  12. Amperometric Immunosensor for Carbofuran Detection Based on MWCNTs/GS-PEI-Au and AuNPs-Antibody Conjugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyou Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an amperometric immunosensor for the detection of carbofuran was developed. Firstly, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and graphene sheets-ethyleneimine polymer-Au (GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites were modified onto the surface of a glass carbon electrode (GCE via self-assembly. The nanocomposites can increase the surface area of the GCE to capture a large amount of antibody, as well as produce a synergistic effect in the electrochemical performance. Then the modified electrode was coated with gold nanoparticles-antibody conjugate (AuNPs-Ab and blocked with BSA. The monoclonal antibody against carbofuran was covalently immobilized on the AuNPs with glutathione as a spacer arm. The morphologies of the GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the fabrication process of the immunosensor were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear range, from 0.5 to 500 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.03 ng/mL (S/N = 3. The as-constructed immunosensor exhibited notable performance features such as high specificity, good reproducibility, acceptable stability and regeneration performance. The results are mainly due to the excellent properties of MWCNTs, GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the covalent immobilization of Ab with free hapten binding sites for further immunoreaction. It provides a new avenue for amperometric immunosensor fabrication.

  13. Stabilizing ultrasmall Au clusters for enhanced photoredox catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Bo; Lu, Kang-Qiang; Tang, Zichao; Chen, Hao Ming; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2018-04-18

    Recently, loading ligand-protected gold (Au) clusters as visible light photosensitizers onto various supports for photoredox catalysis has attracted considerable attention. However, the efficient control of long-term photostability of Au clusters on the metal-support interface remains challenging. Herein, we report a simple and efficient method for enhancing the photostability of glutathione-protected Au clusters (Au GSH clusters) loaded on the surface of SiO 2 sphere by utilizing multifunctional branched poly-ethylenimine (BPEI) as a surface charge modifying, reducing and stabilizing agent. The sequential coating of thickness controlled TiO 2 shells can further significantly improve the photocatalytic efficiency, while such structurally designed core-shell SiO 2 -Au GSH clusters-BPEI@TiO 2 composites maintain high photostability during longtime light illumination conditions. This joint strategy via interfacial modification and composition engineering provides a facile guideline for stabilizing ultrasmall Au clusters and rational design of Au clusters-based composites with improved activity toward targeting applications in photoredox catalysis.

  14. Probing the electronic structure and Au—C chemical bonding in AuCn− and AuCnH− (n = 2, 4, and 6) using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, Iker; Ruipérez, Fernando; Ugalde, Jesus M.; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    We report a joint photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical study on AuC 4 − , AuC 6 − , and AuC n H − (n = 2, 4, and 6) using high-resolution photoelectron imaging and ab initio calculations. The ground state of AuC 2 H − , AuC 4 H − , and AuC 6 H − is found to be linear, while that of AuC 4 − and AuC 6 − is bent. All the species are found to be linear in their neutral ground states. The electron affinities (EAs) are measured to be 3.366(1) and 3.593(1) eV for AuC 4 and AuC 6 , respectively. Both bending and stretching frequencies are resolved in the spectra of AuC 4 − and AuC 6 − . High-resolution data of AuC n H − reveal major vibrational progressions in the Au—C stretching and bending modes. AuC 2 H − has a ground state stretching frequency of 445(10) cm −1 and a bending frequency of 260(10) cm −1 ; AuC 4 H − has a ground state stretching frequency of 340(10) cm −1 ; AuC 6 H − has a ground state stretching frequency of 260(10) cm −1 and a bending frequency of 55(10) cm −1 . The EAs are measured to be 1.475(1), 1.778(1), and 1.962(1) eV for AuC 2 H, AuC 4 H, and AuC 6 H, respectively. The strength of the Au—C bond decreases as the number of carbon atoms increases. The current study provides a wealth of electronic structure information about AuC 4 − , AuC 6 − , and AuC n H − (n = 2, 4, and 6) and their corresponding neutrals.

  15. Ac conductivity and dielectric properties of bulk tin phthalocyanine dichloride (SnPcCl 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nahass, M. M.; Farid, A. M.; Abd El-Rahman, K. F.; Ali, H. A. M.

    2008-07-01

    The ac conductivity, σac( ω), has been measured for bulk tin phthalocyanine dichloride (SnPcCl 2) in the form of compressed pellet with evaporated ohmic Au electrodes in a temperature range 303-403 K. Ac conductivity, σac( ω), is found to vary as ωs in the frequency range 42 Hz-5×10 6 Hz. At low range of frequency, s<1 and it decreases with the increase in temperature indicating a dominant hopping process. At high range of frequency, s is found to be equal to ≈1.09 and is temperature independent. The dielectric constant, ε1, and dialectic loss, ε2, have been determined for bulk SnPcCl 2. Both ε1 and ε2 decrease with the increase in frequency and increase with the increase in temperature. The Cole-Cole types have been used to determine some parameters such as; the macroscopic relaxation time ( τo), the molecular relaxation time ( τ), the activation energy for relaxation ( Eo) and the distribution parameter ( α). The temperature dependence of τ is expressed by a thermally activated process with the activation energy of 0.299 eV.

  16. Silica-covered star-shaped Au-Ag nanoparticles as new electromagnetic nanoresonators for Raman characterisation of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajczewski, Jan; Kołątaj, Karol; Pietrasik, Sylwia; Kudelski, Andrzej

    2018-03-15

    One of the tools used for determining the composition of surfaces of various materials is shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS). SHINERS is a modification of "standard" surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), in which, before Raman spectra are recorded, the surfaces analysed are covered with a layer of plasmonic nanoparticles protected by a very thin layer of a transparent dielectric. The plasmonic cores of the core-shell nanoparticles used in SHINERS measurements generate a local enhancement of the electric field of the incident electromagnetic radiation, whereas the transparent coatings prevent the metal cores from coming into direct contact with the material being analysed. In this contribution, we propose a new type of SHINERS nanoresonators that contain spiky, star-shaped metal cores (produced from a gold/silver alloy). These spiky, star-shaped Au-Ag nanoparticles have been covered by a layer of silica. The small radii of the ends of the tips of the spikes of these plasmonic nanostructures make it possible to generate a very large enhancement of the electromagnetic field there, with the result that such SHINERS nanoresonators are significantly more efficient than the standard semi-spherical nanostructures. The Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles were synthesised by the reduction of a solution containing silver nitrate and chloroauric acid by ascorbic acid. The final geometry of the nanostructures thus formed was controlled by changing the ratio between the concentrations of AuCl 4 - and Ag + ions. The shape of the synthesised star-shaped Au-Ag nanoparticles does not change significantly during the two standard procedures for depositing a layer of silica (by the decomposition of sodium silicate or the decomposition of tetraethyl orthosilicate). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel multifunctional graphene sheets with encased Au/Ag nanoparticles for advanced electrochemical analysis of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruneanu, Stela; Biris, Alexandru R; Pogacean, Florina; Lazar, Diana Mihaela; Ardelean, Stefania; Watanabe, Fumyia; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Biris, Alexandru S

    2012-11-12

    This work is the first presentation of the synthesis of few-layer graphene decorated with gold and silver nanoparticles (Gr-Au-Ag) by chemical vapor deposition over a catalytic system formed of bimetallic Au-Ag nanoclusters supported on MgO and with methane used as the source of carbon. The sheetlike morphology of the graphene nanostructures, with mean sizes in the range of hundreds of nanometers, was observed by high-resolution electron microscopy. The distinctive feature found in all the samples was the regular rectangular or square shapes. This multi-component organic-inorganic nanomaterial was used to modify a platinum substrate and subsequently employed for the detection of carbamazepine, an anti-convulsion drug. UV/Vis spectroscopy revealed that a strong hypochromism occurred over time, after mixing solutions of graphene-Au-Ag with carbamazepine. This can be attributed to π-π stacking between the aromatic groups of the two compounds. Linear sweep voltammetry (LCV) provided evidence that the modified platinum substrate presented a significant electrocatalytic reaction toward the oxidation of carbamazepine. The intensity of the current was found to increase by up to 2.5 times, and the oxidation potential shifted from +1.5 to +1.35 V(Ag/AgCl) in comparison with the unmodified electrode. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was further used to thoroughly assess the activity of the platinum electrode that was modified by the deposition of the Gr-Au-Ag composites in the presence of various concentrations of carbamazepine. The experimental EIS records were used for the generation of an equivalent electrical circuit, based on the charge-transfer resistance (R(ct)), Warburg impedance (Z(D)), solution resistance (R(s)), and a constant phase element (CPE) that characterizes the non-ideal interface capacitive responses. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Mechanical properties and grindability of experimental Ti-Au alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu

    2004-06-01

    Experimental Ti-Au alloys (5, 10, 20 and 40 mass% Au) were made. Mechanical properties and grindability of the castings of the Ti-Au alloys were examined. As the concentration of gold increased to 20%, the yield strength and the tensile strength of the Ti-Au alloys became higher without markedly deteriorating their ductility. This higher strength can be explained by the solid-solution strengthening of the a titanium. The Ti-40%Au alloy became brittle because the intermetallic compound Ti3Au precipitated intensively near the grain boundaries. There was no significant difference in the grinding rate and grinding ratio among all the Ti-Au alloys and the pure titanium at any speed.

  19. Transverse-momentum dependent modification of dynamic texture in central Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Moura, M.M. de; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.

    2005-01-01

    Correlations in the hadron distributions produced in relativistic Au+Au collisions are studied in the discrete wavelet expansion method. The analysis is performed in the space of pseudorapidity (|η| (le) 1) and azimuth (full 2π) in bins of transverse momentum (p t ) from 0.14 (le) p t (le) 2.1 GeV/c. In peripheral Au+Au collisions a correlation structure ascribed to minijet fragmentation is observed. It evolves with collision centrality and p t in a way not seen before which suggests strong dissipation of minijet fragmentation in the longitudinally-expanding medium

  20. Facile synthesis of highly active PdAu nanowire networks as self-supported electrocatalyst for ethanol electrooxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2014-06-25

    In recent years, direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) are attracting increasing attention owing to their wide applications. However, a significant challenge in the development of DEFC technology is the urgent need for highly active anode catalysts for the ethanol oxidation reaction. In this work, a facile and reproducible method for the high-yield synthesis of PdAu nanowire networks is demonstrated. The whole synthetic process is very simple, just mixing Na2PdCl4, HAuCl4, and KBr in an aqueous solution and using polyvinylpyrrolidone as a protective reagent while sodium borohydride as a reductant. The whole synthetic process can be simply performed at room temperature and completed in 30 min, which can greatly simplify the synthetic process and lower the preparation cost. Electrochemical catalytic measurement results prove that the as-prepared catalysts exhibit dramatically enhanced electrocatalytic activity for ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline solution. The facile synthetic process and excellent catalytic performance of the as-prepared catalysts demonstrate that they can be used as a promising catalyst for DEFCs.

  1. INDRA at GSI; INDRA au GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bougault, R.; Bocage, F.; Durand, D.; Lopez, O.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E. [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen Univ., 14 (France); Collaboration INDRA: IPN-Orsay, DAPNIA-Saclay, SUBATECH-Nantes, IPN- Lyon, GANIL-Caen

    1997-12-31

    In connection to the decision of installing the INDRA detector by the SIS synchrocyclotron at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) the report presents the tasks taken into account by the LPC-Caen. These refer to the detector displacement and (mechanical) installation at GSI, the tests before beam (i.e. electronics acquisition software, detectors, etc.) as well as the data acquisition and processing. The physical pro-arguments mention the possibility of disposing of heavy ion beams in a range from 50 MeV to several GeV/nucleon so extending the study of multifragmentation done at GANIL between 30 and 90 MeV/nucleon. More specific, the scientific program of INDRA at GSI inserts studies between those done at around Fermi energy, were the reaction mechanisms are of type of deep inelastic scattering/incomplete fusion, and the studies in the relativistic energy domain where the individual properties of nucleons and transparency of nuclear matter implies mechanisms of the participant-spectator type (fire-ball creation). Also mentioned as fields of extensive studies are: the multifragmentation and its fundamental relation with the nuclear matter equation of state, the role of reaction dynamics in the appearance of collective effects of the radial flow type and its relations with the nuclear compressibility and phase transitions and the thermodynamics of nuclear matter. It appeared that the heavy systems Xe + Sn and Au + Au are the best compromise for the different topics to be approached. The bombarding energies extend from 50 to 150 MeV/nucleon. The report ends with the table giving for six heavy systems (Xe + Sn, Au + Au, C + Au, Ar + Au and P + Au) the required bombarding energies 15 refs.

  2. Defect-induced Au precipitation in Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys studied by in situ small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Langelaan, G.; Brück, E.; Zwaag, S. van der; Dijk, N.H. van

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale Au precipitation in high-purity Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys has been studied by in situ small-angle neutron scattering during isothermal aging at 550 °C and complementary ex situ transmission electron microscopy. The high temperature precipitation behavior in samples having received different degrees of cold deformation has been studied to explore the potential self-healing of deformation-induced defects by Au precipitation. It is found that dislocations induced by prior plastic deformation strongly facilitate the formation of Au precipitates, as no significant precipitation is observed for undeformed samples. Defect-induced Au precipitates are formed both at dislocations and along grain boundaries where the defect density is high. The fact that the Au atoms only precipitate on deformation-induced defects demonstrates that solute gold atoms act as efficient self-healing agents in the ferrous matrix. The addition of B and N is found to retard the Au precipitation

  3. Preparation of Pt Au/C and Pt Au Bi/C electrocatalysts using electron beam irradiation for ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Dionisio F.; Geraldes, Adriana N.; Cardoso, Elisangela S.Z.; Gomes, Thiago B.; Linardi, Marcelo; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Spinace, Estevam V.

    2011-01-01

    Pt Au/C (50:50) and PtAuBi/C electrocatalysts with Pt:Au:Bi atomic ratios of 50:40:10, 50:30:20 and 50:10:40 were prepared in water/2-propanol using electron beam irradiation. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the electro-oxidation of ethanol was studied by chronoamperometry at room temperature. The X-ray diffraction measurements for all electrocatalysts prepared showed four peaks, which are associated with the planes of the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure characteristic of Pt and Pt alloys. For PtAuBi/C it was also observed the presence of a mixture of BiPt alloys and bismuth phases. The average crystallite sizes for Pt/C, PtAu/C, PtAuBi/C (50:40:10), PtAuBi/C (50:30:20) and PtAuBi/C (50:10:40) were in the range of 2.0 - 4.0 nm. The activity of the electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium showed that PtAuBi/C (50:40:10) had a higher performance for ethanol oxidation compared to others electrocatalysts prepared. (author)

  4. Preparation of Pt Au/C and Pt Au Bi/C electrocatalysts using electron beam irradiation for ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Dionisio F.; Geraldes, Adriana N.; Cardoso, Elisangela S.Z.; Gomes, Thiago B.; Linardi, Marcelo; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Spinace, Estevam V., E-mail: dfsilva@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Pt Au/C (50:50) and PtAuBi/C electrocatalysts with Pt:Au:Bi atomic ratios of 50:40:10, 50:30:20 and 50:10:40 were prepared in water/2-propanol using electron beam irradiation. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the electro-oxidation of ethanol was studied by chronoamperometry at room temperature. The X-ray diffraction measurements for all electrocatalysts prepared showed four peaks, which are associated with the planes of the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure characteristic of Pt and Pt alloys. For PtAuBi/C it was also observed the presence of a mixture of BiPt alloys and bismuth phases. The average crystallite sizes for Pt/C, PtAu/C, PtAuBi/C (50:40:10), PtAuBi/C (50:30:20) and PtAuBi/C (50:10:40) were in the range of 2.0 - 4.0 nm. The activity of the electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium showed that PtAuBi/C (50:40:10) had a higher performance for ethanol oxidation compared to others electrocatalysts prepared. (author)

  5. First results on d+Au collisions from PHOBOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Noell, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Teng, R.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-02-01

    We have measured transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in d+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV, in the range 0.25 < pT < 6.0 GeV/c. With increasing collision centrality, the yield at high transverse momenta increases more rapidly than the overall particle density, leading to a strong modification of the spectral shape. This change in spectral shape is qualitatively different from observations in Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The results provide important information for discriminating between different models for the suppression of high-pT hadrons observed in Au+Au collisions.

  6. Strangeness production in Au+Au collisions at the AGS: recent results from E917

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W.-C.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Britt, H.C.; Chang, W.C.; Gillitzer, A.; Henning, W.F.; Hofman, D.J.; Holzman, B.; Nanal, V.; Wuosmaa, A.H.

    1999-01-01

    Strangeness production in Au+Au collisions has been measured via the yields of K + , K - at 6, 8 AGeV and of bar Λ at 10.8 AGeV beam kinetic energy in experiment E917. By varying the collision centrally and beam energy, a systematic search for indications of new phenomena and in-medium effects under high baryon density is undertaken

  7. Deep sub-threshold ϕ production in Au+Au collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Arnold, O.; Behnke, C.; Belounnas, A.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Biernat, J.; Blanco, A.; Blume, C.; Böhmer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Chernenko, S.; Chlad, L.; Deveaux, C.; Dreyer, J.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Filip, P.; Fonte, P.; Franco, C.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Golubeva, M.; Greifenhagen, R.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Harabasz, S.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Hlavac, S.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Korcyl, G.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kunz, T.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Mahmoud, T.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Maurus, S.; Metag, V.; Michel, J.; Mihaylov, D. M.; Morozov, S.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Nowakowski, K. N.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Petukhov, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramos, S.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rodriguez-Ramos, P.; Rosier, P.; Rost, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Scheib, T.; Schuldes, H.; Schwab, E.; Scozzi, F.; Seck, F.; Sellheim, P.; Siebenson, J.; Silva, L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Strzempek, P.; Sturm, C.; Svoboda, O.; Szala, M.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Tsertos, H.; Usenko, E.; Wagner, V.; Wendisch, C.; Wiebusch, M. G.; Wirth, J.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zumbruch, P.; Hades Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    We present data on charged kaons (K±) and ϕ mesons in Au(1.23A GeV)+Au collisions. It is the first simultaneous measurement of K- and ϕ mesons in central heavy-ion collisions below a kinetic beam energy of 10A GeV. The ϕ /K- multiplicity ratio is found to be surprisingly high with a value of 0.52 ± 0.16 and shows no dependence on the centrality of the collision. Consequently, the different slopes of the K+ and K- transverse-mass spectra can be explained solely by feed-down, which substantially softens the spectra of K- mesons. Hence, in contrast to the commonly adapted argumentation in literature, the different slopes do not necessarily imply diverging freeze-out temperatures of K+ and K- mesons caused by different couplings to baryons.

  8. Surface structure and morphology of Cu-free and Cu-covered Au(100) and Au(111) electrodes in alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaup, Christian [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics, Fysikvey, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Friebel, Daniel [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Wandelt, Klaus [University of Bonn, Institute for Physical und Theoretical Chemistry, Wegelerstr. 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    For both Cu-free Au-electrodes three different phases were observed as a function of the applied electrode potential. While at low potentials the onset of surface reconstruction points towards an apparently adsorbate free surface and, thus, a weak interaction with species from the electrolyte, a Au-hydroxide and a Au-oxide phase are formed subsequently during potential increase. A similar phase behavior was also found for Cu-covered Au-electrodes, while at low potentials an apparently adsorbate free Cu layer is observed, a Cu-hydroxide coadsorbate phase and a Cu-oxide phase are formed under increased potential conditions. In addition the apparently adsorbate free Cu-film tends to form a Cu-Au alloy phase while keeping the electrode for a sufficient long time at low potential conditions.

  9. A simple approach for facile synthesis of Ag, anisotropic Au and bimetallic (Ag/Au) nanoparticles using cruciferous vegetable extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Jasmine; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir, E-mail: sudhirk@barc.gov.in

    2012-10-01

    We present a simple and straightforward approach for the synthesis and stabilization of relatively monodisperse Ag, Au and bimetallic (Ag/Au) nanoparticles by using cruciferous vegetable (green/red) extracts by simply adjusting the pH environment in the aqueous medium. The vegetable extracts act both as reducing and capping agents. The monometallic and bimetallic nanoparticles of Ag and Au so obtained were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is shown that red cabbage extract can be used for the preparation of anisotropic Au nanoparticles. The formation of Au anisotropic nanoparticles was found to depend on a number of environmental factors, such as the pH of the reaction medium, reaction time, and initial reactant concentrations. Additionally, it is shown that these extract-stabilized Au and Ag nanoparticles can be used as a seed for preparation of bimetallic Au/Ag nanoparticles. For bimetallic alloy nanoparticles the absorption peak was observed between the two maxima of the corresponding metallic particles. The surface plasmon absorption maxima for bimetallic nanoparticles changed linearly with increasing Au mole ratio content in various alloy compositions. It has been shown that the formation of hollow Au spheres depends on the experimental conditions. - Graphical abstract: TEM image of gold nanoparticles at pH 3.27 formed by red cabbage extract. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on the reactivity of the extracts toward metal ions using a spectrophotometric technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Red cabbage extract has better reducing properties than green cabbage extract. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Red cabbage extract can reduce metal ions at any pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduction of metal ions can have important consequences in the study of soil chemistry.

  10. A simple approach for facile synthesis of Ag, anisotropic Au and bimetallic (Ag/Au) nanoparticles using cruciferous vegetable extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Jasmine; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and straightforward approach for the synthesis and stabilization of relatively monodisperse Ag, Au and bimetallic (Ag/Au) nanoparticles by using cruciferous vegetable (green/red) extracts by simply adjusting the pH environment in the aqueous medium. The vegetable extracts act both as reducing and capping agents. The monometallic and bimetallic nanoparticles of Ag and Au so obtained were characterized by UV–visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is shown that red cabbage extract can be used for the preparation of anisotropic Au nanoparticles. The formation of Au anisotropic nanoparticles was found to depend on a number of environmental factors, such as the pH of the reaction medium, reaction time, and initial reactant concentrations. Additionally, it is shown that these extract-stabilized Au and Ag nanoparticles can be used as a seed for preparation of bimetallic Au/Ag nanoparticles. For bimetallic alloy nanoparticles the absorption peak was observed between the two maxima of the corresponding metallic particles. The surface plasmon absorption maxima for bimetallic nanoparticles changed linearly with increasing Au mole ratio content in various alloy compositions. It has been shown that the formation of hollow Au spheres depends on the experimental conditions. - Graphical abstract: TEM image of gold nanoparticles at pH 3.27 formed by red cabbage extract. Highlights: ► First report on the reactivity of the extracts toward metal ions using a spectrophotometric technique. ► Red cabbage extract has better reducing properties than green cabbage extract. ► Red cabbage extract can reduce metal ions at any pH. ► Reduction of metal ions can have important consequences in the study of soil chemistry.

  11. L’apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    En 1961, sur la base du constat que l’évolution du marché du travail nécessitait un besoin croissant de personnel qualifié, le 1er accord entre la République et canton de Genève et le CERN fut signé. Cet accord avait notamment pour objet la formation professionnelle de jeunes électroniciens et techniciens de laboratoires en physique. Le CERN, acteur local économique d’importance, soulignait par cet accord sa volonté de participer au développement économique et social local. Le 1er apprenti arriva au CERN en 1965. En 1971, le centre d’apprentissage fut créé ; il accueille aujourd’hui plus d’une vingtaine d’apprentis au total, à raison d’environ six nouveaux apprentis chaque année. Cet apprentissage est dédié aux jeunes âgés e...

  12. Bi-functional Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite for in situ SERS monitoring and degradation of organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Shuzhen; Cai, Qian; Lu, Kailing; Liao, Fan, E-mail: fliao@suda.edu.cn; Shao, Mingwang, E-mail: mwshao@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano & Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices & Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University (China)

    2016-01-15

    The bi-functional Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite was fabricated by in situ reducing Au nanoparticles onto the surface of FeS (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The as-prepared FeS possessed a multi-structure composed of plenty of nanoplates, which were coated by Au nanoparticles with an average size of ∼47.5 nm. While the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} showed a thin hexagonal sheet containing Au nanoparticles on its surface with an average size of ∼79.0 nm. Both the as-prepared Au/FeS and Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites exhibited excellent SERS performance, capable of enhancing the Raman signals of R6G molecules with the enhancement factor up to 1.81 × 10{sup 6} and 7.60 × 10{sup 4}, respectively. Moreover, Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite also has been verified to have intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, which could decompose H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into hydroxyl radicals and then degrade organic pollutants into small molecules. Therefore, SERS can be used to real-time and in situ monitoring the degradation process of R6G molecules, employing the Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite both as SERS substrate and catalyst. Graphical abstract: SERS was used to real-time and in situ monitoring the degradation of R6G, employing the Au/FeS and Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites both as SERS substrates and catalysts.

  13. Copper(I), silver(I) and gold(I) halide complexes with the dithioformamidinium dihalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronel, Giorgio; Malavasi, Wanda; Pignedoli, Anna

    Some copper(I), silver(I) and gold(I) halide complexes with the dithioformamidinium dihalides (Tu 2X 2) were prepared and studied by infrared spectroscopy and conductometry: 3CuX.2Tu 2X 2(XCl,I), CuBr.Tu 2Br 2, 4CuBr.3.5Tu 2Br 2.MeOH, 2CuBr.Tu 2Br 2.0.66EtOH, 3CuI.2Tu 2I 2, 2AgCl.2.5Tu 2Cl 2, 3AgCl.2Tu 2Cl 2.0.5EtOH, 3AgCl.Tu 2Cl 2, 2AgBr.2Tu 2Br 2.0.5Tu 2(NO 3) 2.H 2O, AgBr.Tu 2Br 2, 4AgBr.Tu 2Br 2, 4AgI.0.5Tu 2I 2.EtOH, AuCl.1.5Tu 2Cl 2, 4AuCl.3.5Tu 2Cl 2.2DMF, AuBr.4Tu 2Br 2, AuBr.2Tu 2Br 2.1.5DMF, AuI.5Tu 2I 2, AuI.Tu 2I 2. A decrease of the ν(NH), δ(NH 2) and ν(CN 2) frequencies and an increase of the ν(CS) frequencies indicate an N-coordination of the dithioformamidinium cation to the metal ions; ν(MN) and ν(MX) frequencies are tentatively assigned in the far-infrared spectra.

  14. Promotion of Phenol Photodecomposition over TiO2 Using Au, Pd, and AuPd Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Ren; Tiruvalam, Ramchandra; He, Qian

    2012-01-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Pd, AuPd alloys) with a narrow size distribution supported on nanocrystalline TiO2 (M/TiO2) have been synthesized via a sol-immobilization route. The effect of metal identity and size on the photocatalytic performance of M/TiO2 has been systematically investigated u...

  15. Electrical investigation of the Au/n{sup +}–GaAs and Au/n-porous GaAs structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghrouni, H.; Hannachi, R. [Université de Sousse. Laboratoire Energie-Matériaux. Equipe de recherche caractérisations optoélectronique et spectroscopique des matériaux et nanomatériaux pour les télécommunications et capteurs, ISITCOM, 4011 Hammam Sousse (Tunisia); Jomni, S. [Laboratoire Matériaux, Organization et Propriétés, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia); Beji, L., E-mail: lotbej_fr@yahoo.fr [Université de Sousse. Laboratoire Energie-Matériaux. Equipe de recherche caractérisations optoélectronique et spectroscopique des matériaux et nanomatériaux pour les télécommunications et capteurs, ISITCOM, 4011 Hammam Sousse (Tunisia)

    2013-08-01

    The electrical properties of Au/n{sup +}–GaAs and Au/n-porous GaAs metal–semiconductor structures were investigated using room temperature current–voltage I(V) and capacitance–voltage C(V) measurements. The electrical parameters of these structures such as ideality factor, barrier height potential, series resistance have been calculated. The obtained parameters of Au/n-porous GaAs structure were discussed and compared to those of Au/n{sup +}–GaAs structure. The series resistances and ideality factors of the two structures were seen to have approximately the same values. Furthermore, the shunt resistance and the barrier height potential values for the Au/n-porous GaAs structure were found to be different than the ones of Au/n{sup +}–GaAs structure. Furthermore the two structures showed a non-ideal I(V) behavior with an ideality factor greater than unity. Such non ideal behavior was suggested to be due to the existence of high density of trap and the forward I(V) characteristics which were governed by space charge limited conductivity, characterized by single and exponential trapping levels in both structures (SCLC). A model based upon TFE tunneling of carriers at reverse current was used to explain the non-saturation of reverse current of the structures. The high frequency C(V) characteristics of the structure reveal the presence of an anomalous behavior at the forward bias. Though the capacitance reaches a peak, it remarkably decreases with an increasing bias voltage suggested by the presence of interface states. Furthermore, the energy distribution of interface density in the structures was determined by the forward bias C(V) measurement as well as using ideality factor and barrier height potential values obtained from forward bias I(V) and reverse bias C{sup −2}(V) characteristics, respectively. An estimated energy band diagram for the Au/n{sup +}–GaAs and Au/n-porous GaAs structures are presented.

  16. Transformation of Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 to Au133(SPh-tBu)52 Nanomolecules: Theoretical and Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Theivendran, Shevanuja; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Kumara, Chanaka; Jupally, Vijay Reddy; Apra, Edoardo; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Dass, Amala

    2015-06-04

    Ultrastable gold nanomolecule Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 upon etching with excess tert-butylbenzenethiol undergoes a core-size conversion and compositional change to form an entirely new core of Au133(SPh-tBu)52. This conversion was studied using high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry which shows that the core size conversion is initiated after 22 ligand exchanges, suggesting a relatively high stability of the Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)38(SPh-tBu)22 intermediate. The Au144 → Au133 core size conversion is surprisingly different from the Au144 → Au99 core conversion reported in the case of thiophenol, -SPh. Theoretical analysis and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that rigid p-tBu groups play a crucial role by reducing the cluster structural freedom, and protecting the cluster from adsorption of exogenous and reactive species, thus rationalizing the kinetic factors that stabilize the Au133 core size. This 144-atom to 133-atom nanomolecule's compositional change is reflected in optical spectroscopy and electrochemistry.

  17. Les exportations marocaines de clémentine et de pomme de terre en Afrique de l’Ouest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Zine

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cette étude entreprend une analyse des exportations marocaines de la clémentine et de la pomme de terre vers les pays de l’Afrique de l’Ouest à travers : 1 le circuit formel contrôlé par l’Etablissement Autonome de Contrôle et de Coordination des Exportations, d’une part, et 2 le circuit informel, d’autre part. A travers la comparaison des chaines logistiques dans les deux cas, l’objectif final est de procéder à la comparaison des résultats financiers des exportateurs, sachant que c’est le circuit informel qui domine des exportations. Pour ce faire, l’analyse met l’accent dans un premier temps sur le positionnement du Maroc par rapport aux autres pays concurrents. Ensuite, grâce à une enquête au niveau de deux zones d’exportation (Souss Massa et Casablanca, nous évaluons la chaîne logistique (ou Supply chain d’exportation notamment vers le Sénégal et la Côte d’Ivoire. Les résultats de cette étude indiquent qu’étant animé en majorité par des circuits désorganisés du secteur informel, le marché ouest africain demeure très opaque, ce qui nécessite une intervention urgente de la part des pouvoirs publics et des professionnels pour sa régularisation. D’autre part, les opérateurs profitent d’une marge d’exportation au secteur informel supérieure de 1,5 dh/kg et 1 dh/kg respectivement pour la clémentine et la pomme de terre par rapport au secteur formel. Cette différence est essentiellement due aux charges de conditionnement plus élevées pour le secteur formel. En revanche, les opérateurs du secteur informel souffrent de problèmes d’accès aux crédits et aux instruments de risque à travers les assurances. Compte tenu de la nécessité d’uniformiser « l’origine Maroc » pour toutes les destinations afin de préserver l’image de marque des exportations marocaines de fruits et légumes, il est recommandé d’examiner les possibilités de soutien au conditionnement pour la

  18. On ternary intermetallic aurides. CaAu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}, SrAu{sub 2-x}Al{sub 2+x} and Ba{sub 3}Au{sub 5+x}Al{sub 6-x}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegemann, Frank [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Benndorf, Christopher [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Institut fuer Mineralogie, Kristallographie und Materialwissenschaften, Universitaet Leipzig (Germany); Zhang, Yuemei; Fokwa, Boniface P.T. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bartsch, Manfred; Zacharias, Helmut [Physikalisches Institut, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Eckert, Hellmut [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Janka, Oliver [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Institut fuer Chemie, Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet Oldenburg (Germany)

    2017-11-17

    The intermetallic compound CaAu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}, and the members of the solid solutions SrAu{sub 2-x}Al{sub 2+x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.33) and Ba{sub 3}Au{sub 5+x}Al{sub 6-x} (x = 0, 0.14, 0.49) were synthesized from the elements in sealed tantalum ampoules. The Ca compound crystallizes with the orthorhombic ThRu{sub 2}P{sub 2} type structure, whereas the targeted SrAu{sub 2}Al{sub 2} was found to form a solid solution according to SrAu{sub 2-x}Al{sub 2+x}. For the Ba system no ''BaAu{sub 2}Al{sub 2}'' was found, however, Ba{sub 3}Au{sub 5+x}Al{sub 6-x} was discovered to crystallize in the monoclinic space group C2/c with its own structure type. The samples were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction and their crystal structures were refined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. All compounds were characterized furthermore by susceptibility measurements. The crystallographic aluminum sites of CaAu{sub 2}Al{sub 2} and Ba{sub 3}Au{sub 5}Al{sub 6} can be differentiated by {sup 27}Al solid state NMR spectra on the basis of their different electric field gradients, in agreement with theoretical calculations. The electron transfer from the alkaline earth metals and the aluminum atoms onto the gold atoms was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) classifying these intermetallics as aurides, in full agreement with the calculated Bader charges. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Non-flow correlations and elliptic flow fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, W.; Lin, W. T.; Loizides, C.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Walters, P.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.

    2010-03-01

    This article presents results on event-by-event elliptic flow fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at sNN= 200 GeV, where the contribution from non-flow correlations has been subtracted. An analysis method is introduced to measure non-flow correlations, relying on the assumption that non-flow correlations are most prominent at short ranges (|Δη|2), relative elliptic flow fluctuations of approximately 30-40% are observed. These results are consistent with predictions based on spatial fluctuations of the participating nucleons in the initial nuclear overlap region. It is found that the long-range non-flow correlations in Au+Au collisions would have to be more than an order of magnitude stronger compared to the p+p data to lead to the observed azimuthal anisotropy fluctuations with no intrinsic elliptic flow fluctuations.

  20. Tuning SPT-3G Transition-Edge-Sensor Electrical Properties with a Four-Layer Ti-Au-Ti-Au Thin-Film Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, F. W.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Anderson, A. J.; Austermann, J. E.; Avva, J. S.; Thakur, R. Basu; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Cecil, T.; Chang, C. L.; Cliche, J. F.; Cukierman, A.; Denison, E. V.; de Haan, T.; Ding, J.; Divan, R.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dutcher, D.; Everett, W.; Foster, A.; Gannon, R. N.; Gilbert, A.; Groh, J. C.; Halverson, N. W.; Harke-Hosemann, A. H.; Harrington, N. L.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Huang, N.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeong, O. B.; Jonas, M.; Khaire, T.; Kofman, A. M.; Korman, M.; Kubik, D.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuo, C. L.; Kutepova, V.; Lee, A. T.; Lowitz, A. E.; Meyer, S. S.; Michalik, D.; Miller, C. S.; Montgomery, J.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nguyen, H.; Noble, G. I.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pan, Z.; Pearson, J.; Posada, C. M.; Rahlin, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saunders, L. J.; Sayre, J. T.; Shirley, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smecher, G.; Sobrin, J. A.; Stan, L.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Suzuki, A.; Tang, Q. Y.; Thompson, K. L.; Tucker, C.; Vale, L. R.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Yoon, K. W.; Young, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    We have developed superconducting Ti transition-edge sensors with Au protection layers on the top and bottom for the South Pole Telescope's third-generation receiver (a cosmic microwave background polarimeter, due to be upgraded this austral summer of 2017/2018). The base Au layer (deposited on a thin Ti glue layer) isolates the Ti from any substrate effects; the top Au layer protects the Ti from oxidation during processing and subsequent use of the sensors. We control the transition temperature and normal resistance of the sensors by varying the sensor width and the relative thicknesses of the Ti and Au layers. The transition temperature is roughly six times more sensitive to the thickness of the base Au layer than to that of the top Au layer. The normal resistance is inversely proportional to sensor width for any given film configuration. For widths greater than five micrometers, the critical temperature is independent of width.

  1. Centrality and collision system dependence of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions at AGS energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, H.; Ahle, L.; Akiba, Y.

    1997-12-01

    Antiproton production in heavy ion collisions reflects subtle interplay between initial production and absorption by nucleons. Because the AGS energies (10--20 A·GeV/c) are close to the antiproton production threshold, antiproton may be sensitive to cooperative processes such as QGP and hadronic multi-step processes. On the other hand, antiproton has been proposed as a probe of baryon density due to large N anti N annihilation cross sections. Cascade models predict the maximum baryon density reaches about 10 times the normal nucleus density in central Au+Au collisions, where the strong antiproton absorption is expected. In this paper, the authors show systematic studies of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions

  2. CHARGED PARTICLE MULTIPLICITIES IN ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC AU+AU AND CU+CU COLLISIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Chetluru, V.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harnarine, I.; Hauer, M.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, W.; Lin, W. T.; Loizides, C.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Reed, C.; Richardson, E.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Szostak, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; Vannieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Walters, P.; Wenger, E.; Willhelm, D.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wyngaardt, S.; Wyslouch, B.

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5° to 179.5° corresponding to |η| <5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  3. Alternating voltage-induced electrochemical synthesis of colloidal Au nanoicosahedra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, Kevin; Cloud, Jacqueline E.; Yang, Yongan, E-mail: yonyang@mines.edu [Colorado School of Mines, Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry (United States)

    2013-11-15

    A simple method of alternating voltage-induced electrochemical synthesis has been developed to synthesize highly dispersed colloidal Au nanoicosahedra of 14 ± 3 nm in size. This simple and effective method uses a common transformer to apply a zero-offset alternating voltage to a pair of identical Au electrodes that are immersed in an electrolyte solution containing ligands. The obtained Au nanoicosahedra in this work are among the smallest Au icosahedra synthesized in aqueous solutions. A series of experimental conditions have been studied, such as voltage, the electrolyte identity and concentration, stabilizer identity and concentration, and reaction temperature. The mechanistic study indicates that Au nanoicosahedra are produced on electrode surfaces through an intermediate state of AuO{sub x}. The kinetic rate constant of these Au icosahedra in catalyzing the reduction of 4-nitrophenol with sodium borohydride is found much larger than the literature values of similar Au nanocrystals. In addition, the synthesis of Au–Pd-alloyed NCs has also been attempted.Graphical Abstract.

  4. Au3+/Au0 Supported on Chromium(III Terephthalate Metal Organic Framework (MIL-101 as an Efficient Heterogeneous Catalystfor Three-Component Coupling Synthesis of Propargylamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-synthesis modification is a useful method for the functionalization of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs. A novel catalyst Au@MIL-101-ED-SA (ED = ethylenediamine, SA = salicylaldehyde, containing coexisting Au3+ ions and Au0 nanoparticles, was prepared successfully by post-synthesis modification with ethylenediamine, salicylaldehyde and gold. Gold nanoparticles supported on MIL-101 (Au@MIL-101 were prepared successfully by the impregnation method. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA and Au@MIL-101 were characterized by N2 adsorption–desorption, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA and Au@MIL-101 were applied as environmentally friendly catalysts in the three-component coupling reaction of aldehydes, amines, and alkynes for the preparation of diverse propargylamines. Au@MIL-101-ED-SA contained a fraction of cationic gold (Au3+/Au0 = 0.9 and showed higher catalytic activity than Au@MIL-101, which was prepared by the impregnation method. Furthermore, the reactions were performed under heterogeneous conditions and the novel catalyst was successfully recycled for four consecutive runs.

  5. Déconstruction-reconstruction identitaire et poétique de l’altérité dans Le procès-verbal de J-M G. Le Clézio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoulaye Diouf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available En partant du double mouvement rhizomatique de la « déterritorialisation » et de la « reterritorialisation », cet article se propose d’étudier la conception dynamique de l’identité dans Le procès-verbal de Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio (1963. Pour cela, il explore, d’une part, le processus graduel de déconstruction identitaire du héros du roman (marginalité, nudité, métamorphose par le biais de la médiation altéritaire – dans le sens d’un rapport au monde et à l’Autre – à partir de laquelle se reconstruit une nouvelle identité transcendante loin de tout essentialisme. D’autre part, il analyse les différentes stratégies de mise en altérité qui montrent au passage, avec sa théorie de l’« extase matérialiste » et le principe de l’identification qui la sous-tend, que l’être ne s’arrête pas à l’humain chez Le Clézio. Starting from the dual rhizome-like movement of the “deterritorialization” and “reterritorialization”, this article proposes to study the dynamic concept of identity in Le procès-verbal by Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio (1963. For this, it explores, firstly, the gradual process of identity deconstruction of the novel’s hero (marginality, nudity, metamorphosis through the othering mediation - in the sense of a relationship to the world and the Other - from which is rebuilt a new transcendent identity away from all essentialism. Furthermore, it analyzes the different otherness implementation strategies that show the way, with his theory of “materialistic ecstasy” and the principle of identification which underlies it, according to which being goes beyond humans for Le Clézio.

  6. 76 FR 41653 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-2A12 (CL-601) and CL-600-2B16 (CL-601-3A...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains the NPRM, the.... Model CL-600-2A12 (CL-601) airplanes, serial numbers 3001 through 3066 inclusive on which Bombardier... Variants) airplanes, serial numbers 5001 through 5194 inclusive on which Bombardier Service Bulletin 601...

  7. Distributions of charged hadrons associated with high transverse momentum particles in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Vandermolen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Vznuzdaev, M; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Yuting, B; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zhaomin, Z P; Zizong, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2005-10-07

    Charged hadrons in [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] associated with particles of [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] are reconstructed in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV. The associated multiplicity and p magnitude sum are found to increase from pp to central Au+Au collisions. The associated p distributions, while similar in shape on the nearside, are significantly softened on the awayside in central Au+Au relative to pp and not much harder than that of inclusive hadrons. The results, consistent with jet quenching, suggest that the awayside fragments approach equilibration with the medium traversed.

  8. Autopistas: AU-1 25 de Mayo y AU-6 Perito Moreno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1981-02-01

    Full Text Available Highways AU-1 and AU-6, approximately 17 km. long, were constructed for the purpose of solving the serious traffic problems in Buenos Aires, a city of nine million inhabitants and an evergrowing number of cars. A computer program was created for the design based on the geometric shape of the highway and the position of the supports. Using this, all elements composing the structure were calculated and the framework was sized. This programme made it possible to complete a stretch of 150 metres per week. The very rapid construction was carried out through self-supporting arches made of metallic beams held in place by brackets. The brackets were fitted in specially designed grooves in the major supports of the highway.

    Las autopistas AU-1 y AU-6, con una longitud aproximada de 17 km, se realizaron con objeto de resolver el grave problema de infraestructura vial del Municipio de Buenos Aires, ciudad de nueve millones de habitantes y con un parque de vehículos en rápido crecimiento. Para el proyecto se creó un programa de ordenador con el que, partiendo de la definición geométrica de la autopista y de la posición de las pilas, se calculan todos los elementos que componen la estructura y se dimensionan las armaduras. Este programa permitió proyectar un tramo (150 m por semana. La construcción, a un ritmo muy rápido, se llevó a cabo mediante cimbras autoportantes compuestas por vigas metálicas apoyadas sobre ménsulas, las cuales a su vez apoyan en unos nichos dejados en las pilas.

  9. Low-temperature Au/a-Si wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Errong; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yuelin

    2011-01-01

    The Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/a-Si/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, which can also be used for the bonding of non-silicon material, was investigated for the first time in this paper. The bond quality test showed that the bond yield, bond repeatability and average shear strength are higher for this bonding structure. The interfacial microstructure analysis indicated that the Au-induced crystallization of the amorphous silicon process leads to big Si grains extending across the bond interface and Au filling the other regions of the bond interface, which result into a strong and void-free bond interface. In addition, the Au-induced crystallization reaction leads to a change in the IR images of the bond interface. Therefore, the IR microscope can be used to evaluate and compare the different bond strengths qualitatively. Furthermore, in order to verify the superiority of the bonding structure, the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–a-Si/SiO 2 /Si (i.e. no Ti/Au layer on the a-Si surface) and Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/SiO 2 /Si bonding structures (i.e. Au thermocompression bonding) were also investigated. For the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–a-Si/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, the poor bond quality is due to the native oxide layer on the a-Si surface, and for the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, the poor bond quality is caused by the wafer surface roughness which prevents intimate contact and limits the interdiffusion at the bond interface.

  10. Thermal gravimetric analysis of the CsCuCl3, Cs2CuCl4 and Cs2CuCl4x2H2O crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soboleva, L.V.; Vasil'eva, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal characteristics of crystals of Cs 2 CuCl 4 , Cs 2 CuCl 4 x2H 2 O, and CsCuCl 3 were investigated thermogravimetrically. The derivatogram of the Cs 2 CuCl 4 crystal is characterized by the presence of a single endothermal effect at 505 deg C. The derivatogram of the Cs 2 CuCl 4 x2H 2 O crystal contains three endothermal effects: at 40, 135, and 480 deg C. The derivatogram of the CsCuCl 3 crystal shows the presence of two endothermal effects at 142 and 455 deg C. The thermogravimetric data on Cs 2 CuCl 4 and CsCuCl 3 crystals reveal crystal decomposition on melting; hence, these crystals cannot be grown from melts

  11. Appui au réseautage et au renforcement des télécentres ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    En Afrique de l'Ouest francophone, les télécentres luttent pour atteindre la viabilité financière tout en demeurant au diapason des collectivités, une situation qui tient au fait qu'ils ont accès à un moins grand nombre de ressources en ligne et à une communauté d'utilisateurs plus restreinte que les télécentres anglophones.

  12. Cross section of the 197Au(n,2n196Au reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalamara A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The 197Au(n,2n196Au reaction cross section has been measured at two energies, namely at 17.1 MeV and 20.9 MeV, by means of the activation technique, relative to the 27Al(n,α24Na reference reaction cross section. Quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were produced at the 5.5 MV Tandem T11/25 accelerator laboratory of NCSR “Demokritos”, by means of the 3H(d,n4He reaction, implementing a new Ti-tritiated target of ∼ 400 GBq activity. The induced γ-ray activity at the targets and reference foils has been measured with HPGe detectors. The cross section for the population of the second isomeric (12− state m2 of 196Au was independently determined. Auxiliary Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the MCNP code. The present results are in agreement with previous experimental data and with theoretical calculations of the measured reaction cross sections, which were carried out with the use of the EMPIRE code.

  13. High-performance polymeric photovoltaic cells with a gold chloride-treated polyacrylonitrile hole extraction interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ji-Ho; Noh, Yong-Jin; Kim, Seok-Soon; Kwon, Sung-Nam; Na, Seok-In

    2018-03-01

    We introduce a high efficiency polymeric photovoltaic cell (PPV) to be obtained by polyacrylonitrile (PAN) hole extraction layer (HEL) modification with gold chloride (AuCl3). The role of PAN HELs with AuCl3 and their effects on solar cell performances were studied with ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, internal resistances in PPVs, and current-voltage power curves. The resultant PPVs with AuCl3-treated PAN HELs showed improved cell efficiency compared to PSCs with no interlayer and PAN without AuCl3. Furthermore, with AuCl3-treated PAN, we finally achieved a high efficiency of 6.91%, and a desirable PPV-stability in poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b‧]dithiophe-ne-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-thylhexyl)carbonyl]-thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

  14. Study on antibacterial activity of chemically synthesized PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomi, Pandi [Department of Industrial Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003, Tamil Nadu (India); Prabu, Halliah Gurumallesh, E-mail: hgprabu2010@gmail.com [Department of Industrial Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003, Tamil Nadu (India); Manisankar, Paramasivam [Department of Industrial Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003, Tamil Nadu (India); Ravikumar, Sundaram [Department of Oceanography and Coastal Area Studies, School of Marine Sciences, Alagappa University, Thondi Campus 623 409, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • New method of synthesizing PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite. • Surface Plasmon resonance and formation of composite at nano level were analyzed. • HR-TEM study revealed uniform distribution of nanoparticles. • PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite exhibited good antibacterial activity. - Abstract: Pristine polyaniline (PANI), PANI-Ag, PANI-Au and PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposites have been successfully synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization method using aniline as monomer, ammonium persulphate as oxidant and metal (Ag, Au and Ag-Au) colloids. UV-Vis analysis exhibited surface Plasmon resonances of Ag, Au, Ag-Au nanoparticles. FT-IR spectra revealed the shift in peak position of N-H stretching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the presence of Ag, Au and Au-Ag nanoparticles. HR-TEM images show nanosizes of Ag, Au, Ag-Au and the incorporation of such nanoparticles into the PANI matrix. Pristine PANI, PANI-Ag, PANI-Au and PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposites were tested for antibacterial activity by agar well diffusion method. PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite exhibited higher antibacterial activity against both gram-positive [Streptococcus sp. (MTCC 890), Staphylococcus sp. (MTCC 96)] and gram-negative bacteria [Escherichia coli (MTCC 1671) and Klebsiella sp. (MTCC 7407)] when compared with PANI-Ag nanocomposite, PANI-Au nanocomposite and pristine PANI. The novelty of this study is the polymer-bimetal synthesis and its antibacterial potential.

  15. Kinetics of electron-induced decomposition of CF2Cl2 coadsorbed with water (ice): A comparison with CCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faradzhev, N.S.; Perry, C.C.; Kusmierek, D.O.; Fairbrother, D.H.; Madey, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of decomposition and subsequent chemistry of adsorbed CF 2 Cl 2 , activated by low-energy electron irradiation, have been examined and compared with CCl 4 . These molecules have been adsorbed alone and coadsorbed with water ice films of different thicknesses on metal surfaces (Ru; Au) at low temperatures (25 K; 100 K). The studies have been performed with temperature programmed desorption (TPD), reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). TPD data reveal the efficient decomposition of both halocarbon molecules under electron bombardment, which proceeds via dissociative electron attachment (DEA) of low-energy secondary electrons. The rates of CF 2 Cl 2 and CCl 4 dissociation increase in an H 2 O (D 2 O) environment (2-3x), but the increase is smaller than that reported in recent literature. The highest initial cross sections for halocarbon decomposition coadsorbed with H 2 O, using 180 eV incident electrons, are measured (using TPD) to be 1.0±0.2x10 -15 cm 2 for CF 2 Cl 2 and 2.5±0.2x10 -15 cm 2 for CCl 4 . RAIRS and XPS studies confirm the decomposition of halocarbon molecules codeposited with water molecules, and provide insights into the irradiation products. Electron-induced generation of Cl - and F - anions in the halocarbon/water films and production of H 3 O + , CO 2 , and intermediate compounds COF 2 (for CF 2 Cl 2 ) and COCl 2 , C 2 Cl 4 (for CCl 4 ) under electron irradiation have been detected using XPS, TPD, and RAIRS. The products and the decomposition kinetics are similar to those observed in our recent experiments involving x-ray photons as the source of ionizing irradiation

  16. Molecules on vicinal Au surfaces studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, J; Neel, N; Jensen, H; Berndt, R; Rurali, R; Lorente, N

    2006-01-01

    Using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy we investigated the adsorption characteristics of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride and fullerenes on Au(788), Au(433), and Au(778). On Au(788) and Au(778), 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride exhibits three coexisting superstructures, which do not reflect the periodicity of the hosting substrate. The adsorption on Au(433) leads to the formation of molecule chains along the step edges after annealing the sample. Fullerene molecules on Au(788) arrange in a mesh of islands, which extends over several hundreds of nanometres with an extraordinarily high periodicity. A combination of fullerene adsorption and annealing leads to facetting of Au(433) and the formation of extraordinarily long fullerene stripes

  17. Site-specific growth of Au-Pd alloy horns on Au nanorods: A platform for highly sensitive monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhancement raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2013-06-12

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive probe for molecular detection. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient platform for investigating the kinetics of catalytic reactions with SERS. To achieve this, we synthesized a novel Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructure (HIF-AuNR@AuPd) through site-specific epitaxial growth of Au-Pd alloy horns as catalytic sites at the ends of Au nanorods. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography, we successfully reconstructed the complex three-dimensional morphology of HIF-AuNR@AuPd and identified that the horns are bound with high-index {11l} (0.25 < l < 0.43) facets. With an electron beam probe, we visualized the distribution of surface plasmon over the HIF-AuNR@AuPd nanorods, finding that strong longitudinal surface plasmon resonance concentrated at the rod ends. This unique crystal morphology led to the coupling of high catalytic activity with a strong SERS effect at the rod ends, making HIF-AuNR@AuPd an excellent bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of surface catalytic reactions. Using the hydrogenation of 4-nitrothiophenol as a model reaction, we demonstrated that its first-order reaction kinetics could be accurately determined from this platform. Moreover, we clearly identified the superior catalytic activity of the rod ends relative to that of the rod bodies, owing to the different SERS activities at the two positions. In comparison with other reported Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructures, HIF-AuNR@AuPd offered both higher catalytic activity and greater detection sensitivity. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. Limits on the production of direct photons in 200 A GeV$^{32}$S + Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, R; Awes, T C; Barlag, C; Berger, F; Bloomer, M A; Blume, C; Bock, D L; Böck, R K; Bohne, E M; Bucher, D; Claesson, G; Claussen, A; Clewing, G; Debbe, R; Dragon, L; Dubovik, Yu; Eklund, A; Fokin, S L; Franz, A; Garpman, S I A; Glasow, R; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Gutbrod, H H; Hansen, O; Hölker, G; Idh, J; Ippolitov, M S; Jacobs, P; Kampert, K H; Karadzhev, K; Kolb, B W; Lebedev, A; Löhner, H; Lund, I; Man'ko, V I; Moskowitz, B E; Nikolaev, S; Nystrand, J; Obenshain, F E; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Peitzmann, Thomas; Plasil, F; Poskanzer, A M; Purschke, M L; Ritter, H G; Roters, B; Saini, S; Santo, R; Schlagheck, H; Schmidt, H R; Söderström, K; Sørensen, S P; Stankus, P; Steffens, K; Steinhäuser, P; Stenlund, E; Stüken, D; Vinogradov, A; Wegner, H; Young, G R

    1996-01-01

    A search for the production of direct photons in S+Au collisions at 200\\cdotA~GeV has been carried out in the CERN-WA80 experiment. For central collisions the measured photon excess at each p_T, averaged over the range 0.5~GeV/c~ \\leq p_T \\leq 2.5~GeV/c, corresponded to 5.0\\% of the total inclusive photon yield with a statistical error of \\sigma_{\\rm stat}=0.8\\% and a systematic error of \\sigma_{\\rm syst}=5.8\\%. Upper limits on the invariant yield for direct photon production at the 90\\%~C.L. are presented. Possible implications for the dynamics of high-energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed.

  19. Semiconducting La2AuP3, the metallic conductor Ce2AuP3, and other rare-earth gold phosphides Ln2AuP3 with two closely related crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschen, M.; Kotzyba, G.; Kuennen, B.; Jeitschko, W.

    2001-01-01

    The compounds Ln 2 AuP 3 were synthesized by reaction of the elemental components in evacuated silica tubes. Their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal diffractometer data. The compounds with Ln = La, Ce, and Pr crystallize with an orthorhombic U 2 NiC 3 type structure (Pnma, Z = 4). The structure refinement for Ce 2 AuP 3 resulted in a = 774.14(6) pm, b = 421.11(4) pm, c = 1612.3(1) pm, R = 0.019 for 1410 structure factors and 38 variable parameters. For Pr 2 AuP 3 a residual of R = 0.024 was obtained. Nd 2 AuP 3 crystallizes with a monoclinic distortion of this structure: P2 1 /c, Z = 4, a = 416.14(4) pm, b = 768.87(6) pm, c = 1647.1(2) pm, β = 104.06(1) , R = 0.022 for 1361 F values and 56 variables. The near-neighbor coordinations of the two structures are nearly the same. In both structures the gold and phosphorus atoms form two-dimensionally infinite nets, where the gold atoms are tetrahedrally coordinated by phosphorus atoms with Au-P distances varying between 245.8 and 284.2 pm. Two thirds of the phosphorus atoms form pairs with single-bond distances varying between 217.7 and 218.9 pm. Thus, using oxidation numbers the structures can be rationalized with the formulas (Ln +3 ) 2 [AuP 3 ] -6 and (Ln +3 ) 2 Au +1 (P 2 ) -4 P -3 . Accordingly, La 2 AuP 3 is a diamagnetic semiconductor. Pr 2 AuP 3 is semi-conducting with an antiferromagnetic ground state, showing metamagnetism with a critical field of B c = 0.5(±0.1) T. In contrast, the cerium compound is a metallic conductor, even though its cell volume indicates that the cerium atoms are essentially trivalent, as is also suggested by the ferro- or ferrimagnetic behavior of the compound. (orig.)

  20. Determination of 36Cl/Cl ratio in ground water using the accelerator mass spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Suman; Deodhar, A.S.; Saravana Kumar, U.; Surendran, P.; Shrivastava, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nair, J.P.; Yadav, M.L.; Hemalatha, M.; Sparrow, H.; Mahata, K.; Thomas, R.G.; Bhagwat, P.V.; Kailas, S.; Kale, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) programme using the 14 MV Pelletron Accelerator at Mumbai has been initiated with major emphasis on the determination of 36 Cl in water samples, of interest to hydrology and environment. In order to carry out the AMS measurement, a beam chopper to cut down beam intensity by a factor of 20 has been developed and commissioned. A multi-anode gas -si detector has been built to separate 36 Cl from the interfering 36 S. A new TPS system has been procured to operate the machine in the GVM mode. Standard and blank samples from Prime lab, Purdue have been employed in these measurements to standardise the technique for 36 Cl/Cl ratio determination. The detector was calibrated using the stable 35,37 Cl ions. The background 36 Cl in the system has been measured using the blank sample from Purdue and it was estimated that the ratio of 36 Cl/Cl was of the order of 10 -13 in the present setup. Ground water samples collected from South India were converted to AgCl and put in the SNICS ion source for the AMS measurements. These ground water samples, with 14 C content estimated to be in the range of 1 to 4 pMC indicate that the samples may be more than 35,000 years old. Using the AMS technique we have determined the 36 Cl/Cl ratio values for these ground water samples. They are found to range between 2 to 5 x 10 -12 . Additional measurements are planned to determine the age of the water samples and to understand the reasons for the observed high values of 36 Cl in these samples. (author)

  1. Charged particle multiplicity fluctuations in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Krzysztof; the PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the first PHOBOS results on charged particle multiplicity fluctuations measured for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy within a wide pseudorapidity range of |η| < 3. The dependence on collision geometry is removed in the analysis by using the normalized difference between the number of particles in separate η bins. We compare our data to HIJING model predictions.

  2. Wetting - Dewetting Transitions of Au/Ni Bilayer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Xi

    Thin films deposited at low temperatures are often kinetically constrained and will dewet the underlying substrate when annealed. Solid state dewetting is driven by the minimization of the total free energy of thin film-substrate interface and free surface, and mostly occurs through surface diffusion. Dewetting is a serious concern in microelectronics reliability. However, it can also be utilized for the self-assembly of nanostructures with potentials in storage, catalysis, or transistors. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the dewetting behavior of thin metal films is critical for improving the thermal stability of microelectronics and controlling the order of self-assembled nanostructures. Mechanisms for dewetting of single layer films have been studied extensively. However little work has been reported on multilayer or alloyed thin films. In the thesis, the solid state dewetting of Au/Ni bilayer films deposited on SiO2/Si substrates was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and aberration corrected scanning TEM (STEM). Ex-situ SEM and TEM studies were performed with in-situ TEM heating characterization to identify the mechanisms during the dewetting process of Au/Ni bilayer films. The solid state dewetting of Au/Ni bilayer films from SiO2/Si substrates exhibits both homogeneous and localized dewetting of Ni and long-edge retraction for Au under isothermal annealing condition. The top Au layer retracts up to 1 mm from the edge of the substrate wafer to reduce the energetically unfavored Au/Ni interface. In contrast, Ni dewets and agglomerates locally due to its limited diffusivity compared to Au. Film morphology and local chemical composition varies significantly across hundreds of microns along the direction normal to the retracting edge. Besides long range edge receding, localized dewetting shows significant changes in film morphology and chemical distribution. Both Au and Ni shows texturing. Despite

  3. ZnCl{sub 2}- and NH{sub 4}Cl-hydroponics gel electrolytes for zinc-carbon batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, N.H.; Ismail, Y.M. Baba; Mohamad, A.A. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2008-01-21

    Absorbency testing is used to determine the percentage of ZnCl{sub 2} or NH{sub 4}Cl solution absorbed by a hydroponics gel (HPG). It is found that the absorbency of ZnCl{sub 2} or NH{sub 4}Cl solution decreases with increasing solution concentration. The conductivity of ZnCl{sub 2}- and NH{sub 4}Cl-HPG electrolytes is dependent on the solution concentration. A mixture of salt solution with HPG yields excellent gel polymer electrolytes with conductivities of 0.026 and 0.104 S cm{sup -1} at 3 M ZnCl{sub 2} and 7 M NH{sub 4}Cl, respectively. These gel electrolytes are then used to produce zinc-carbon cells. The fabricated cells give capacities of 8.8 and 10.0 mAh, have an internal resistance of 25.4 and 19.8 {omega}, a maximum power density of 12.7 and 12.2 mW cm{sup -2}, and a short-circuit current density of 29.1 and 33.9 mA cm{sup -2} for ZnCl{sub 2}- and NH{sub 4}Cl-HPG electrolytes, respectively. (author)

  4. Au and AuCu Nanoparticles Supported on SBA-15 Ordered Mesoporous Titania-Silica as Catalysts for Methylene Blue Photodegradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Barroso-Martín

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB dye has been performed under UV irradiation in aqueous suspension, employing photocatalysts based on Au (1.5 wt % and AuCu (Au/Cu = 1, 2.0 wt %, and supported on SBA-15-ordered mesoporous silica, with and without titania (Si/Ti = 3, in order to evaluate the versatility of this mesoporous support in this type of reaction of great impact from the environmental point of view. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, N2 adsorption-desorption at −196 °C, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, so as to study their structural, optical, and chemical properties. All the prepared catalysts were found to be active in the test reaction. The bimetallic AuCu-based catalysts attained very high MB degradation values, in particular AuCu/SBA-15 titania-silica sample reached 100% of dye oxidation after the monitored reaction period (120 min.

  5. Novel condensation of Au-centered trigonal prisms in rare-earth-metal-rich tellurides: Er7Au2Te2 and Lu7Au2Te2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shalabh; Corbett, John D

    2010-07-14

    A new monoclinic structure occurs for Er(7)Au(2)Te(2) according to X-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals grown at 1200 degrees C: C2/m, Z = 4, a = 17.8310(9) A, b = 3.9819(5) A, c = 16.9089(9) A, beta = 104.361(4) degrees. The isostructural Lu(7)Au(2)Te(2) also exists according to X-ray powder pattern means, a = 17.536(4) A, b = 3.9719(4) A, c = 16.695(2) A, beta = 104.33(1) degrees. The structure contains zigzag chains of condensed, Au-centered tricapped trigonal prisms (TCTP) of Er along c that also share basal faces along b to generate puckered sheets. Further bi-face-capping Er atoms between these generate the three dimensional network along a, with tellurium in cavities outlined by augmented trigonal prismatic Er polyhedra. Bonding analysis via LMTO-DFT methods reveal very significant Er-Au bonding interactions, as quantified by their energy-weighted Hamilton overlap populations (-ICOHP), approximately 49% of the total for all interactions. These and similar Er-Te contributions sharply contrast with the small Er-Er population, only approximately 14% of the total in spite of the high proportion of Er-Er contacts. The strong polar bonding of Er to the electronegative Au and Te leaves Er relatively oxidized, with many of its 5d states falling above the Fermi level and empty. The contradiction with customary representations of structures that highlight rare-earth metal clusters is manifest. The large Er-Au Hamilton overlap population is in accord with the strong bonding between early and late transition metals first noted by Brewer in 1973. The relationship of this structure to the more distorted orthorhombic (Imm2) structure type of neighboring Dy(7)Ir(2)Te(2) is considered.

  6. Structure and Mobility of Metal Clusters in MOFs: Au, Pd, and AuPd Clusters in MOF-74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Lasse; Walton, Krista S.; Sholl, David S.

    2012-01-01

    is just as important for nanocluster adsorption as open Zn or Mg metal sites. Using the large number of clusters generated by the GA, we developed a systematic method for predicting the mobility of adsorbed clusters. Through the investigation of diffusion paths a relationship between the cluster......Understanding the adsorption and mobility of metal–organic framework (MOF)-supported metal nanoclusters is critical to the development of these catalytic materials. We present the first theoretical investigation of Au-, Pd-, and AuPd-supported clusters in a MOF, namely MOF-74. We combine density...... functional theory (DFT) calculations with a genetic algorithm (GA) to reliably predict the structure of the adsorbed clusters. This approach allows comparison of hundreds of adsorbed configurations for each cluster. From the investigation of Au8, Pd8, and Au4Pd4 we find that the organic part of the MOF...

  7. The centrifugal sudden distorted wave method for chemical reactions: Application to Cl+HCl → ClH+Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaee, B.; Connor, J.N.L.; Schatz, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe a method for calculating cross sections for atom plus diatom reactive collisions based on the centrifugal sudden distorted wave (CSDW) approximation. This method is nearly exact at low energies where reactive cross sections are small. Representative CPU times are given for applications of CSDW method to the Cl + HCl → ClH + Cl reaction using CDC 7600, Cyber 176, Cyber 205, Cray XMP and Cray 2 computers. Calculations show that the product HCl molecule is highly rotationally excited, (receiving 40-50% of the available energy) and that the shape of the product rotational distribution is nearly independent of reagent rotational state. The authors also calculated product differential cross sections and find them to be backward peaked at low energies

  8. Enhanced magneto-plasmonic effect in Au/Co/Au multilayers caused by exciton–plasmon strong coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamidi, S.M., E-mail: m_hamidi@sbu.ac.ir; Ghaebi, O.

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, we have investigated magneto optical Kerr rotation using the strong coupling of exciton–plasmon. For this purpose, we have demonstrated strong coupling phenomenon using reflectometry measurements. These measurements revealed the formation of two split polaritonic extrema in reflectometry as a function of wavelength. Then we have shown exciton–plasmon coupling in dispersion diagram which presented an anti-crossing between the polaritonic branches. To assure the readers of strong coupling, we have shown an enhanced magneto-optical Kerr rotation by comparing the reflectometry results of strong coupling of surface Plasmon polariton of Au/Co/Au multilayer and R6G excitons with surface Plasmon polariton magneto-optical kerr effect experimental setup. - Highlights: • The magneto optical Kerr rotation has been investigated by using the strong coupling of exciton–plasmon. • We have shown exciton–plasmon coupling in dispersion diagram which presented an anti-crossing between the polaritonic branches. • Strong coupling of surface plasmon polariton and exciton have been yielded to the enhanced magneto-optical Kerr effect. • Plasmons in Au/Co/Au multilayer and exciton in R6G have been coupled to enhance magneto-optical activity.

  9. Transverse-momentum and collision-energy dependence of high-pT hadron suppression in Au+Au collisions at ultrarelativistic energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Drees, K A; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-10-24

    We report high statistics measurements of inclusive charged hadron production in Au+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. A large, approximately constant hadron suppression is observed in central Au+Au collisions for 5

  10. Terahertz reflection spectroscopy of aqueous NaCl and LiCl solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Merbold, Hannes

    2010-01-01

    frequencies. Whereas both the real and imaginary part of the permittivity of NaCl increases with concentration,we see that the imaginary part of the permittivity of LiCl (related to the absorption)decreases with increasing salt concentration. We relate these changes to the behavior...

  11. Becoming independent through au pair migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    . This article argues that, despite this critique, au pairing does play an important formative role for young Filipinas because it opens up for experiences abroad that enable them to be recognised as independent adults in Philippine society. Rather than autonomy, however, au pairs define their independence...

  12. Theoretical studies of acrolein hydrogenation on Au20 nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Chen, Zhao-Xu; He, Xiang; Kang, Guo-Jun

    2010-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles play a key role in catalytic processes. We investigated the kinetics of stepwise hydrogenation of acrolein on Au20 cluster model and compared with that on Au(110) surface. The rate-limiting step barrier of CC reduction is about 0.5 eV higher than that of CO hydrogenation on Au(110) surface. On Au20 nanoparticle, however, the energy barrier of the rate-determining step for CC hydrogenation turns out to be slightly lower than the value for the CO reduction. The selectivity difference on the two substrate models are attributed to different adsorption modes of acrolein: via the CC on Au20, compared to through both CC and CO on Au(110). The preference switch implies that the predicted selectivity of competitive hydrogenation depends on substrate model sensitively, and particles with more low-coordinated Au atoms than flat surfaces are favorable for CC hydrogenation, which is in agreement with experimental result.

  13. Heterogeneous computing with OpenCL

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous Computing with OpenCL teaches OpenCL and parallel programming for complex systems that may include a variety of device architectures: multi-core CPUs, GPUs, and fully-integrated Accelerated Processing Units (APUs) such as AMD Fusion technology. Designed to work on multiple platforms and with wide industry support, OpenCL will help you more effectively program for a heterogeneous future. Written by leaders in the parallel computing and OpenCL communities, this book will give you hands-on OpenCL experience to address a range of fundamental parallel algorithms. The authors explore memory spaces, optimization techniques, graphics interoperability, extensions, and debugging and profiling. Intended to support a parallel programming course, Heterogeneous Computing with OpenCL includes detailed examples throughout, plus additional online exercises and other supporting materials.

  14. Ordered arrays of Au catalysts by FIB assisted heterogeneous dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkouider, A; Ronda, A; David, T; Favre, L; Abbarchi, M; Naffouti, M; Osmond, J; Delobbe, A; Sudraud, P; Berbezier, I

    2015-12-18

    Synthesizing Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts that are homogeneous in size and have controlled position is becoming a challenging and crucial prequisite for the fabrication of ordered semiconductor nanowires. In this study, Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts are synthesized via dewetting of Au layers on Si(111) during thermal annealing in an ultra-high vacuum. In the first part of the paper, the mechanism of homogeneous dewetting is analyzed as a function of the Au-deposited thickness (h Au). We distinguish three different dewetting regimes: (I) for a low thickness ([Formula: see text]), a submonolyer coverage of Au is stabilized and there is no dewetting. (II) For an intermediate thickness ([Formula: see text]), there is both dewetting and Au0.8Si0.2 phase formation. The size and density of the Au0.8Si0.2 clusters are directly related to h Au. When cooling down to room temperature, the clusters decompose and reject the Si at the Au/Si substrate interface. (III) For a large thickness ([Formula: see text]), only dewetting takes place, without forming AuSi clusters. In this regime, the dewetting is kinetically controlled by the self-diffusion of Au (activation energy ∼0.43 eV) without evidence of an Si-alloying effect. As a practical consequence, when relying solely on the homogeneous dewetting of Au/Si(111) to form the Au0.8Si0.2 catalysts (without a supply of Si atoms from vapor), regime II should be used to obtain good size and density control. In the second part of the paper, a process for ordering the catalysts using focused ion beam-(FIB) assisted dewetting (heterogeneous dewetting) is developed. We show that no matter what the FIB milling conditions and the Au nominal thickness are, dewetting is promoted by ion beam irradiation and is accompanied by the formation of Au0.8Si0.2 droplets. The droplets preferentially form on the patterned areas, while in similar annealing conditions, they do not form on the unpatterned areas. This behavior is attributed to the larger Au

  15. Contribution au développement d’une nouvelle technologie de séchage solaire. Application à la mangue.

    OpenAIRE

    Heilporn, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Le séchage de denrées alimentaires est une filière clé de la transformation des aliments, tant dans nos pays que dans les pays en voie de développement. Cette opération, largement utilisée dans l’industrie agro-alimentaire, permet d’augmenter significativement la durée et la diversité d’utilisation de nombreux aliments. Néanmoins, au cours d’une opération de séchage, l’élévation de la température et l’exposition à des débits d’air importants peuvent entraîner des altérations biologiques, chim...

  16. Effects of aging on the transformation temperature in a Au-49.5at%Cd alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroiwa, Y.; Liu, M.; Finlayson, T.R.; Smith, T. F.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, the aging effect in Au-49.5at%Cd has been investigated as a function of aging temperature, by observing the surface martensite-bands in an optical microscope equipped with a cryostat. A Au-49.5at%Cd alloy undergoes reverse-transformation from the trigonal, ζ martensite phase to the CsCl-type β 2 parent phase at around room temperature. The transformation temperature of our particular sample was typically 36 deg C. When the sample was aged at 20 deg C, there was no effect on either A s or A f (reverse-transformation temperatures) until 3 hours aging. After 3 hours aging, the effect suddenly appeared, and both A s and A f increased with aging time, reaching maximum values of 49 deg C and 51 degree C, respectively. However, in the case of aging at 33 degree C, the effect appeared for very short aging time, and in the case of aging at -50 deg C, there was no effect even after long aging time. On the other hand, no obvious effect was observed in the parent to martensite transformation, following aging in the parent phase. This phenomenon is discussed in relation to the 'pinning of martensite-plate boundaries and the reordering of the martensite'

  17. Viscoelastic nature of Au nanoparticle–PDMS nanocomposite gels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A stable gel of Au nanoparticles in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanocomposite is prepared by employing the curing agent of PDMS elastomer as a reducing agent for the formation of Au nanoparticles by an in-situ process. The viscoelastic nature of these gels is very sensitive to the Au nanoparticle loading and the ...

  18. The Cathodic Behavior of Ti(III) Ion in a NaCl-2CsCl Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Jiao, Shuqiang; Hu, Liwen; Guo, Zhancheng

    2016-02-01

    The cathodic behavior of Ti(III) ions in a NaCl-2CsCl melt was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and square wave voltammetry with a tungsten electrode being the working electrode at different temperatures. The results show that the cathodic behavior of Ti(III) ion consists of two irreversible steps: Ti3+ + e = Ti2+ and Ti2+ + 2 e = Ti. The diffusion coefficient for the Ti(III) ion in the NaCl-2CsCl eutectic is 1.26 × 10-5 cm2 s-1 at 873 K (600 °C), increases to be 5.57 × 10-5 cm2 s-1 at 948K (675°C), and further rises to 10.8 × 10-5 cm2 s-1 at 1023 (750 °C). Moreover, galvanostatic electrolysis performed on a titanium electrode further presents the feasibility of electrodepositing metallic titanium in the molten NaCl-2CsCl-TiCl3 system.

  19. Partially and fully de-alloyed glassy ribbons based on Au: Application in methanol electro-oxidation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschalidou, Eirini Maria, E-mail: epaschal@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Centro Interdipartimentale NIS (Nanostructured Surfaces and Interfaces), Università di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 7, 10125, Torino (Italy); Scaglione, Federico [Dipartimento di Chimica e Centro Interdipartimentale NIS (Nanostructured Surfaces and Interfaces), Università di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 7, 10125, Torino (Italy); Gebert, Annett; Oswald, Steffen [Leibniz Institut für Festkörper- und Werkstoffforschung IFW, Helmholtzstraße 20, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Rizzi, Paola; Battezzati, Livio [Dipartimento di Chimica e Centro Interdipartimentale NIS (Nanostructured Surfaces and Interfaces), Università di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 7, 10125, Torino (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    In this work, electrochemical de-alloying of an amorphous alloy, Au{sub 40}Cu{sub 28}Ag{sub 7}Pd{sub 5}Si{sub 20}, cast in ribbon form by melt spinning, has been performed, obtaining self standing nanoporous materials suitable for use as electrodes for electrocatalytic applications. The de-alloying encompasses removal of less noble elements and the crystallization of Au, resulting in interconnected ligaments whose size and morphology are described as a function of time. Depending on de-alloying time, the crystals may contain residual amounts of Cu, Ag and Pd, as shown by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) in a basic solution. Current density peaks in the 0.16–0.28 V range (vs Ag/AgCl) indicate that the porous ribbons are active for the electro-oxidation of methanol. The partially de-alloyed samples, which still partially contain the amorphous phase because of the shorter etching times, have finer ligaments and display peaks at lower potential. However, the current density decreases rapidly during repeated potential scans. This is attributed to the obstruction of Au sites, mainly by the Cu oxides formed during the scans. The fully de-alloyed ribbons display current peaks at about 0.20 V and remain active for hundreds of scans at more than 60% of the initial current density. They can be fully re-activated to achieve the same performance levels after a brief immersion in nitric acid. The good activity is due to trapped Ag and Pd atoms in combination with ligament morphology. - Graphical abstract: Fine ligaments and pores made by de-alloying a glassy ribbon of a Au-based alloy, homogeneously produced across the thickness (25 μm) for studying methanol's electro-oxidation behavior. - Highlights: • Size and composition of nanoporous layers tailored in de-alloying Au-based glassy ribbons. • From amorphous precursor fine crystals occur in ligaments with residual Pd and Ag. • Fully de

  20. Energy Lossand Flow of Heavy Quarks in Au+Au Collisions at root-s=200GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltz, R; Klay, J; Enokizono, A; Newby, J; Heffner, M; Hartouni, E

    2007-02-26

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured electrons with 0.3 < p{sub rmT} < 9 GeV/c at midrapidity (|y| < 0.35) from heavy flavor (charm and bottom) decays in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} relative to p+p collisions shows a strong suppression in central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial energy loss of heavy quarks in the medium produced at RHIC energies. A large azimuthal anisotropy, v{sub 2}, with respect to the reaction plane is observed for 0.5 < p{sub rmT} < 5 GeV/c indicating non-zero heavy flavor elliptic flow. A simultaneous description of R{sub AA}(p{sub rmT}) and v{sub 2}(p{sub rmT}) constrains the existing models of heavy-quark rescattering in strongly interacting matter and provides information on the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, a viscosity to entropy density ratio close to the conjectured quantum lower bound, i.e. near a perfect fluid, is suggested.

  1. Analysis of the intermediate stage in the heavy ion interactions of 208Pb+197Au and 197Au+197Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasir, Tabassum; Khan, E.U.; Baluch, J.J.; Qureshi, I.E.; Sajid, M.; Shahzad, M.I.

    2008-01-01

    Two different projectiles 208 Pb and 197 Au at the same energy (11.67MeV/u) have been bombarded on 197 Au target to study heavy ion interactions using mica as a passive detector. In this paper we present results on the study of energy damping and time scale of the existence of di-nuclear composite system in the intermediate reaction step. The plots of Q-values as well as reaction cross sections in various angular bins of scattering angles suggest that K.E. damping was complete and dynamic equilibrium was established between the first and second reaction steps. The time scale of this duration was also determined

  2. Efficient H2 production over Au/graphene/TiO2 induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Yu, Hongtao; Wang, Hua; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation were used for H 2 production. • Au/Gr/TiO 2 composite photocatalyst was synthesized. • Au/Gr/TiO 2 exhibited enhancement of light absorption and charge separation. • H 2 production rate of Au/Gr/TiO 2 was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO 2 . - Abstract: H 2 production over Au/Gr/TiO 2 composite photocatalyst induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO 2 using graphene (Gr) as an electron acceptor has been investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance study indicated that, in this composite, Gr collected electrons not only from Au with surface plasmon resonance but also from TiO 2 with band-gap excitation. Surface photovoltage and UV–vis absorption measurements revealed that compared with Au/TiO 2 , Au/Gr/TiO 2 displayed more effective photogenerated charge separation and higher optical absorption. Benefiting from these advantages, the H 2 production rate of Au/Gr/TiO 2 composite with Gr content of 1.0 wt% and Au content of 2.0 wt% was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO 2 . This work represents an important step toward the efficient application of both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation on the way to converting solar light into chemical energy

  3. Backward emission of protons in Au+Au collisions at 11.7 A.GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahle, L.; Akiba, Y.

    1993-08-01

    We present preliminary results for the emission of target rapidity protons in minimum bias and central 11.7 A.GeV/c Au+Au collisions. The data span the pseudo-rapidity range |η| ≤ 0.76 and proton kinetic energy range of 50 ≤ E ≤ 200 MeV. The slopes of the kinetic energy spectra and dN/dη values for central and minimum bias collisions are strikingly similar. Comparison of the results to results for Si+Au and p+A shows that the shape of the dN/dη distribution is independent of the reaction system or centrality suggesting that the spectator matter does not play a decisive role in determining the shape of the proton distributions at back angles for these systems at AGS energies

  4. Measurements of higher order flow harmonics in Au + Au collisions at √ sNN=200 GeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Mikeš, P.; Růžička, Pavel; Tomášek, Lukáš; Vrba, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 25 (2011), "252301-1"-"252301-7" ISSN 0031-9007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : PHENIX detector * Au + Au collisions * nuclear collisions * flow harmonics Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 7.370, year: 2011

  5. Chemical effects of (n, γ) nuclear reaction on (Mo6Cl8)Cl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fucugauchi, L.A.; Millan, S.; Mondragon, A.; Solache-Rios, M.

    1994-01-01

    The chemical effects of 98 Mo(n, γ) 99 Mo reaction on molybdenum(II) chloride [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 4 ] have been studied. Retention, thermal and radiolytical annealing were determined. It was found that this molybdenum compound has low retention, a negligible tendency to thermal annealing and a virtual insensitivity to hydrolysis. For practical applications in the enrichment of 99 Mo by the Shilard-Chalmers method, molybdenum(II) chloride [(Mo 6 Cl 8 )Cl 4 ] appears to offer good prospects. (author) 14 refs.; 2 figs

  6. Investigation of the exotic clusters production in Au-Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besliu, Calin

    2004-01-01

    Recently experimental signals on some exotic clusters (diquarks, pentaquarks and others) have been obtained. Taking into account the experimental results on some new phenomena observed in Au-Au collisions at RHIC-BNL energies, we propose here an analysis of the formation of the exotic clusters using the experimental data obtained in the BRAHMS Experiment from RHIC-BNL. The suppression of the hadronic resonances and the production of some exotic clusters or resonances (diquarks, dibaryons, pentaquarks) could be possible, taking into account the kaons and antiprotons abundances. The experimental results obtained in Au-Au collisions at √s NN = 200 GeV using the BRAHMS experimental setup indicate a very weak weight of the classical resonances (under 2% all). On the other hand, the analysis of the proton-proton, proton-antiproton, kaon-proton, proton-pion-pion combinations, in the final state, indicates the existence of some pentaquarks and meso-baryon states (I = 5/2). These very preliminary results are in agreement with the results mentioned previously. (author)

  7. Measurement of D0 Azimuthal Anisotropy at Midrapidity in Au +Au Collisions at √{sN N }=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, P.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    We report the first measurement of the elliptic anisotropy (v2) of the charm meson D0 at midrapidity (|y |<1 ) in Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV . The measurement was conducted by the STAR experiment at RHIC utilizing a new high-resolution silicon tracker. The measured D0 v2 in 0%-80% centrality Au +Au collisions can be described by a viscous hydrodynamic calculation for a transverse momentum (pT) of less than 4 GeV /c . The D0 v2 as a function of transverse kinetic energy (mT-m0, where mT=√{pT2+m02 }) is consistent with that of light mesons in 10%-40% centrality Au +Au collisions. These results suggest that charm quarks have achieved local thermal equilibrium with the medium created in such collisions. Several theoretical models, with the temperature-dependent, dimensionless charm spatial diffusion coefficient (2 π T Ds) in the range of ˜2 - 12 , are able to simultaneously reproduce our D0 v2 result and our previously published results for the D0 nuclear modification factor.

  8. Sputtering-growth of seeded Au nanoparticles for nanogap-assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chit Yaw; U. S., Dinish; Rautela, Shashi; Goh, Douglas Wenda; Olivo, Malini

    2011-12-01

    Gold-coated array patterned with tightly-packed nanospheres was developed as a substrate base for constructing SERSenriched nanogaps with Au-nanoparticles (GNPs). Using 1,2-ethanedithiol as a linker, Au-NPs (=17-40nm) were anchored covalently on the sphere-array. Thin Au layer was sputtered on the substrate to mask the citrate coating of GNPs that could demote the sensing mechanism. The negatively-charged GNP surface warrants the colloidal stability, but the resulting repulsive force keeps the immobilized NPs apart by about 40nm. The attained gap size is inadequately narrow to sustain any intense enhancement owing to the near-field nature of SERS. Minimal amount of NaCl was then added to slightly perturb the colloidal stability by reducing their surface charge. Notably, the interparticle-gap reduces at increasing amount of salt, giving rise to increased packing density of GNPs. The SERS enhancement is also found to exponentially increase at decreasing gap size. Nevertheless, the minimum gap achieved is limited to merely 7nm. Excessive addition of salt would eventually induce complete aggregation of particles, forming clustered NPs on the array. A simple sputtering-growth approach is therefore proposed to further minimize the interparticle gap by enlarging the seeded NPs based on mild sputtering. The SEM images confirm that the gap below 7nm is achievable. With advent of the colloidal chemistry, the combined salt-induced aggregation and sputtering-growth techniques can be applied to engineer interparticle gap that is crucial to realize an ultrasensitive SERS biosensor. The proposed two-step preparation can be potentially adopted to fabricate the SERS-enriched nanogaps on the microfluidics platform.

  9. C r C =

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    C r. C. = CTPPY: concentration of TPPY; CAuNPs: concentration of Au NPs. The concentration of the Au NPs is calculated as follows: (1) The weight of Au (WAu) produced from the complete reduction of HAuCl4 is calculated by multiplying the mole of added HAuCl4 (weight of added. HAuCl4·4H2O divided by molecular ...

  10. Electrochemical Properties of Alkanethiol Monolayers Adsorbed on Nanoporous Au Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Yeon Yi; Seo, Bora; Kim, Jong Won

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the electrochemical properties of alkanethiol monolayers adsorbed on NPG surfaces by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and the results are compared to those on flat Au surfaces. The reductive desorption of alkanethiols on NPG surfaces is observed in more negative potential regions than that on flat Au surfaces due the stronger S-Au interaction on NPG surfaces. While the electron transfer through alkanethiol monolayers on flat Au surfaces occurs via a tunneling process through the monolayer films, the redox species can permeate through the monolayers on NPG surfaces to transfer the electrons to the Au surfaces. The results presented here will help to elucidate the intrinsic electrochemical properties of alkanethiol monolayers adsorbed on curved Au surfaces, particularly on the surface of AuNPs. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiolate molecules on Au surfaces have been the subject of intensive research for the last few decades due to their unique physical and chemical properties. The well-organized surface structures of thiolate SAMs with various end-group functionalities can be further utilized for many applications in biology and nanotechnology. In addition to the practical applications, SAMs of thiolate molecules on Au surfaces also provide unique opportunities to address fundamental issues in surface chemistry such as self-organized surface structures, electron transfer behaviors, and moleculesubstrate interactions. Although there have been numerous reports on the fundamental physical and chemical properties of thiolate SAMs on Au surfaces, most of them were investigated on flat Au surfaces, typically on well-defined Au(111) surfaces

  11. Highly sensitive aptasensor based on synergetic catalysis activity of MoS2-Au-HE composite using cDNA-Au-GOD for signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hai-Yan; Kang, Tian-Fang; Lu, Li-Ping; Cheng, Shui-Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Single or few-layer nanosheets of MoS 2 (MoS 2 nanosheets) and a composite composed of MoS 2 nanosheets, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) and hemin (HE) (denoted as MoS 2 -Au-HE) were prepared. The composites possessed high synergetic catalysis activity towards the electroreduction of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, glucose oxidase (GOD) and AuNPs were used as marker of the complementary DNA (cDNA) strand of kanamycin aptamer to prepare a conjugate (reffered as cDNA-Au-GOD) that was designed as the signal probe. Both cDNA-Au-GOD and MoS 2 -Au-HE were applied to fabricate aptasensor for kanamycin. MoS 2 -Au-HE acted as solid platform for kanamycin aptamer and signal transmitters. AuNPs were employed as the supporter of cDNA and GOD which catalyze dissolved oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide in the presence of glucose. Then cathodic peak current of H 2 O 2 was recorded by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The electrochemical reduction of H 2 O 2 was catalyzed by MoS 2 -Au-HE that was modified onto the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The cathodic peak current of H 2 O 2 was highly linearly decreased with an increase of kanamycin concentrations from 1.0ng/L to 1.0×10 5 ng/L, with a detection limit of 0.8ng/L. This aptasensor can be used to detect kanamycin in milk with high specificity, sensitivity and selectivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Level lifetimes of Au52+ in Au plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bo; Zhu Zhiyan; Jiang Gang; Zhu Zhenghe

    2003-01-01

    Based on the extended relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock theory, the level lifetimes, level widths and wavelengths of Au 52+ have been calculated using the General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Program. The wavelengths obtained are in good agreement with the experimental data available. The relationship between the level lifetimes and the level widths satisfies the Heisenberg uncertainty principle

  13. Anomolous, intensity dependent losses in Au(32+) beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Ahrens, L.; Calvani, H.

    1997-01-01

    The AGS Booster is a rapid cycling proton and heavy ion synchrotron. Anomolous, intensity dependent losses in Au(32+) beams have been observed in the AGS Booster. No collective signal is expected, or observed, but increasing the number of injected ions decreases the beam lifetime. The loss rates for Au(32+) are compared with those for Au(15+)

  14. Magnetic Au Nanoparticles on Archaeal S-Layer Ghosts as Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Selenska-Pobell

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell‐ghosts representing empty cells of the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, consisting only of their highly ordered and unusually stable outermost proteinaceous surface layer (S‐layer, were used as templates for Au nanoparticles fabrication. The properties of these archaeal Au nanoparticles differ significantly from those produced earlier by us onto bacterial S‐layer sheets. The archaeal Au nanoparticles, with a size of about 2.5 nm, consist exclusively of metallic Au(0, while those produced on the bacterial S‐layer had a size of about 4 nm and represented a mixture of Au(0 and Au(III in the ratio of 40 to 60 %. The most impressive feature of the archaeal Au nanoparticles is that they are strongly paramagnetic, in contrast to the bacterial ones and also to bulk gold. SQUID magnetometry and XMCD measurements demonstrated that the archaeal Au nanoparticles possess a rather large magnetic moment of about 0.1 µB/atom. HR‐ TEM‐EDX analysis revealed that the archaeal Au nanoparticles are linked to the sulfur atoms of the thiol groups of the amino acid cysteine, characteristic only for archaeal S‐layers. This is the first study demonstrating the formation of such unusually strong magnetic Au nanoparticles on a non‐modified archaeal S‐layer.

  15. XPS/STM study of model bimetallic Pd–Au/HOPG catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukhtiyarov, Andrey V., E-mail: avb@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva Ave. 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Prosvirin, Igor P., E-mail: prosvirin@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva Ave. 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I., E-mail: vib@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Lavrentieva Ave. 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The model Pd–Au/HOPG catalysts preparation has been studied by XPS and STM. • Model “core–shell” type Pd–Au/HOPG catalysts with different Pd/Au ratios were prepared. • Heating of the “core–shell” Pd–Au/HOPG samples up to 400 °C leads to alloy formation. • Contribution of parameters controlling the properties of Pd–Au alloyed particles has been discussed. - Abstract: The preparation of model bimetallic Pd–Au/HOPG catalysts has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Initially, model “core–shell” type Pd–Au/HOPG catalysts with similar particle size distribution (5–8 nm), but with different densities of particle locations on the HOPG surface and Pd/Au atomic ratios are prepared. Further, their thermal stability is studied within a temperature range of 50–500 °C at UHV conditions. It has been shown that annealing the model catalysts at a temperature range of 300–400 °C leads to formation of Pd–Au alloyed particles. Enhancement of heating temperature up to 500 °C results in sintering of bimetallic nanoparticles. Contribution of different parameters controlling the properties of Pd–Au alloyed particles has been discussed.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of Au incorporated Alq3 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Bilal; Ahmad, Sultan; Parwaz, M.; Rahul, Khan, Zishan H.

    2018-05-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of pure and Au incorporated Alq3 nanowires. These nanowires are synthesized using thermal vapor transport method. The luminescence intensity of Au incorporated Alq3 nanowires are recorded to be higher than that of pure Alq3 nanowires, which is found to increase with the increase in Au concentration. Fluorescence quenching is also observed when Au concentration is increased beyond the certain limit.

  17. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-pT nonphotonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN]=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D; Hollis, R; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, N S; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg,