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Sample records for ckm-matrixelements vertical stroke

  1. Quark mixing renormalization effects in the determination of vertical stroke V{sub tq} vertical stroke

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    Almasy, Andrea A. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences; Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Sirlin, Alberto [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2011-01-15

    We study the numerical effects of several renormalization schemes of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi- Maskawa (CKM) quark mixing matrix on the top-quark decay widths. We then employ these results to infer the relative shifts in the CKM parameters vertical stroke V{sub tq} vertical stroke {sup 2} due to the quark mixing renormalization corrections, assuming that they are determined directly from the top-quark partial decay widths, without imposing unitarity constraints. We also discuss the implications of these effects on the ratio R = {gamma}(t {yields} Wb){gamma}{sub t} and the determination of vertical stroke V{sub tb} vertical stroke {sup 2}. (orig.)

  2. The WZNW model on PSU(1, 1 vertical stroke 2)

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    Goetz, G. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique; Quella, T. [King' s College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematics]|[Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). KdV Institute for Mathematics; Schomerus, V. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique]|[Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    According to the work of Berkovits, Vafa and Witten, the non-linear sigma model on the supergroup PSU(1,1 vertical stroke 2) is the essential building block for string theory on AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xT{sup 4}. Models associated with a non-vanishing value of the RR flux can be obtained through a psu(1,1 vertical stroke 2) invariant marginal deformation of the WZNW model on PSU(1,1 vertical stroke 2). We take this as a motivation to present a manifestly psu(1,1 vertical stroke 2) covariant construction of the model at the Wess-Zumino point, corresponding to a purely NSNS background 3-form flux. At this point the model possesses an enhanced psu(1,1 vertical stroke 2) current algebra symmetry whose representation theory, including explicit character formulas, is developed systematically in the first part of the paper. The space of vertex operators and a free fermion representation for their correlation functions is our main subject in the second part. Contrary to a widespread claim, bosonic and fermionic fields are necessarily coupled to each other. The interaction changes the supersymmetry transformations, with drastic consequences for the multiplets of localized normalizable states in the model. It is only this fact which allows us to decompose the full state space into multiplets of the global supersymmetry. We analyze these decompositions systematically as a preparation for a forthcoming study of the RR deformation. (orig.)

  3. On the SU(2 vertical stroke 1) WZNW model and its statistical mechanics applications

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    Saleur, H. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique]|[University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Schomerus, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Motivated by a careful analysis of the Laplacian on the supergroup SU(2 vertical stroke 1) we formulate a proposal for the state space of the SU(2 vertical stroke 1) WZNW model. We then use properties of sl(2 vertical stroke 1) characters to compute the partition function of the theory. In the special case of level k=1 the latter is found to agree with the properly regularized partition function for the continuum limit of the integrable sl(2 vertical stroke 1)3- anti 3 super-spin chain. Some general conclusions applicable to other WZNW models (in particular the case k=-1/2) are also drawn. (orig.)

  4. Measurement of Cabbibo-suppressed {tau} lepton decays and the determination of vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke

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    Schenk, Stefan

    2008-07-07

    This work presents simultaneous branching fraction measurements of the decay modes {tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}n{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} with n=0,1,2,3 and {tau}{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}n{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} with n=3,4. The analysis is based on a data sample of 427 x 10{sup 6}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 464.4 fb{sup -1}. The measured values are B({tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(6.57{+-}0.03{+-}0.11) x 10{sup -3}, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(4.61{+-}0.03{+-}0.11) x 10{sup -3}, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(5.05{+-}0.17{+-}0.44) x 10{sup -4}, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(1.31{+-}0.43{+-}0.40) x 10{sup -4}, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(1.263{+-}0.008{+-}0.078) x 10{sup -2} and B({tau}{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(9.6{+-}0.5{+-}1.2) x 10{sup -4}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. All measurements are compatible with the current world averages whereas the uncertainties are significantly smaller by a factor of up to five. The determination of B({tau}{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is the first measurement of this branching fraction. The measured branching fractions are combined with the current world averages. Using the new averages, an updated determination of vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke from hadronic {tau} decays yields vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke =0.2146{+-}0.0025, which improves previous measurements by 19%. Its uncertainty is comparable to the one of the current world average from semileptonic kaon decays. (orig.)

  5. An evaluation of vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke and precise tests of the standard model from world data on leptonic and semileptonic kaon decays

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    Antonelli, M.; Isidori, G.; Moulson, M.; Palutan, M.; Sciascia, B. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati, RM (Italy); Cirigliano, V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mescia, F. [Universitat de Barcelona, Dep. ECM and ICC, Barcelona (Spain); Neufeld, H. [Universitaet Wien, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Vienna (Austria); Passemar, E. [Universitat de Valencia - CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica, IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Sozzi, M. [Universita di Pisa e Sezione dell' INFN di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, Pisa (Italy); Wanke, R. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik, Mainz (Germany); Yushchenko, O.P. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    We present a global analysis of leptonic and semileptonic kaon decay data, including all recent results published by the BNL-E865, KLOE, KTeV, ISTRA+ and NA48 experiments. This analysis, in conjunction with precise lattice calculations of the hadronic matrix elements now available, leads to a very precise determination of vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke and allows us to perform several stringent tests of the standard model. (orig.)

  6. Structure constants of the OSP(1 vertical stroke 2) WZNW model

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    Hikida, Y.; Schomerus, V.

    2007-11-15

    We propose exact formulas for the 2- and 3-point functions of the WZNW model on the non-compact supergroup OSP(1 vertical stroke 2). Using the path integral approach that was recently developed in arXiv:0706.1030 we show how local correlation functions in the OSP(p vertical stroke 2) WZNW models can be obtained from those of N=p supersymmetric Liouville field theory for p=1,2. We then employ known results on correlators in N=1 Liouville theory to determine the structure constants of the OSP(1 vertical stroke 2) theory. (orig.)

  7. Branes in the GL(1 vertical stroke 1) WZNW-Model

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    Creutzig, T.; Schomerus, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Quella, T. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). KdV Inst. for Mathematics

    2007-08-15

    We initiate a systematic study of boundary conditions in conformal field theories with target space supersymmetry. The WZNW model on GL(1 vertical stroke 1) is used as a prototypical example for which we find the complete set of maximally symmetric branes. This includes a unique brane of maximal super-dimension 2 vertical stroke 2, a 2-parameter family of branes with super-dimension 0 vertical stroke 2 and an infinite set of fully localized branes possessing a single modulus. Members of the latter family can only exist along certain lines on the bosonic base, much like fractional branes at orbifold singularities. Our results establish that all essential algebraic features of Cardy-type boundary theories carry over to the non-rational logarithmic WZNW model on GL(1 vertical stroke 1). (orig.)

  8. Lateropulsion, pushing and verticality perception in hemisphere stroke: a causal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérennou, D A; Mazibrada, G; Chauvineau, V; Greenwood, R; Rothwell, J; Gresty, M A; Bronstein, A M

    2008-09-01

    The relationships between perception of verticality by different sensory modalities, lateropulsion and pushing behaviour and lesion location were investigated in 86 patients with a first stroke. Participants sat restrained in a drum-like framework facing along the axis of rotation. They gave estimates of their subjective postural vertical by signalling the point of feeling upright during slow drum rotation which tilted them rightwards-leftwards. The subjective visual vertical was indicated by setting a line to upright on a computer screen. The haptic vertical was assessed in darkness by manually setting a rod to the upright. Normal estimates ranged from -2.5 degrees to 2.5 degrees for visual vertical and postural vertical, and from -4.5 degrees to 4.5 degrees for haptic vertical. Of six patients with brainstem stroke and ipsilesional lateropulsion only one had an abnormal ipsilesional postural vertical tilt (6 degrees ); six had an ipsilesional visual vertical tilt (13 +/-.4 degrees ); two had ipsilesional haptic vertical tilts of 6 degrees . In 80 patients with a hemisphere stroke (35 with contralesional lateropulsion including 6 'pushers'), 34 had an abnormal contralesional postural vertical tilt (average -8.5 +/- 4.7 degrees ), 44 had contralesional visual vertical tilts (average -7 +/- 3.2 degrees ) and 26 patients had contralesional haptic vertical tilts (-7.8 +/- 2.8 degrees ); none had ipsilesional haptic vertical or postural vertical tilts. Twenty-one (26%) showed no tilt of any modality, 41 (52%) one or two abnormal modality(ies) and 18 (22%) a transmodal contralesional tilt (i.e. PV + VV + HV). Postural vertical was more tilted in right than in left hemisphere strokes and specifically biased by damage to neural circuits centred around the primary somatosensory cortex and thalamus. This shows that thalamo-parietal projections have a functional role in the processing of the somaesthetic graviceptive information. Tilts of the postural vertical were more

  9. Continuum limit of gl(M vertical stroke N) spin chains

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    Candu, Constantin [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Gruppe Theorie

    2011-03-15

    We study the spectrum of an integrable antiferromagnetic Hamiltonian of the gl(M vertical stroke N) spin chain of alternating fundamental and dual representations. After extensive numerical analysis, we identify the vacuum and low lying excitations and with this knowledge perform the continuum limit, while keeping a finite gap. All antiferromagnetic gl(n+N vertical stroke N) spin chains with n>0 and N{ne}0 are shown to possess in the continuum limit 2n-2 multiplets of massive particles which scatter with gl(n) Gross-Neveu like S-matrices, namely their eigenvalues do not depend on N. We argue that the continuum theory is the gl(M vertical stroke N) Gross-Neveu model, that is the massive deformation of the gl(M vertical stroke N){sub 1} Wess-Zumino-Witten model. As we can see ion the example of gl(2m vertical stroke 1) spin chains, the full particle spectrum is much richer. Our analysis suggests that for a complete characterization of the latter it is not enough to restrict to large volume calculations, as we do in this work. (orig.)

  10. Determination of the CKM matrix element vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke, the B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} decay rate, and the b-quark mass

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    Bernlochner, Florian Urs

    2011-09-15

    In this work, the preliminary measurements of two fundamental parameters of the Standard Model of particles physics are presented: the CKM matrix element vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke, and the b-quark mass. The measurement of the absolute value of the CKM matrix element V{sub cb} uses the full set of recorded data of 429.06 fb{sup -1} of B anti B mesons of the BABAR experiment. The CKM matrix element is obtained by measuring the branching fractions and non-perturbative shape parameters of the two transitions into the charmed 1S ground states, B {yields} Dl{nu}{sub l} and B {yields} D{sup *}l {nu}{sub l}, respectively. The kinematic of the produced lepton is measured and the kinematics of the short-lived charmed mesons is reconstructed from kaon and pion candidates. By combining the reconstructed three-momenta of both particles with the angular information of the decay, three independent variables can be obtained. The measured distributions in these variables are analyzed in a three-dimensional global fit, which simultaneously extracts the decay parameters and branching fractions of both charmed transitions. We find that B {yields} Dl {nu}{sub l}: vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke =(36.14{+-}0.57{sub stat.}{+-}1.30{sub sys.}{+-}0.80{sub theo.}) x 10{sup -3}, B {yields} D{sup *}l {nu}{sub l}: vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke =(39.71{+-}0.26{sub stat.}{+-}0.73{sub sys.}{+-}0.74{sub theo.}) x 10{sup -3}, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and theoretical, respectively. In the Standard Model, both measured values of vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke can be averaged to further minimize the uncertainties. We find Combined: vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke =(38.29{+-}0.26{sub stat.}{+-}0.64{sub sys.}{+-}0.52{sub theo.}) x 10{sup -3}. Furthermore, several scenarios are explored how possible future unquenched lattice QCD points can be incorporated into the measurement, to further reduce the uncertainty on

  11. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment for stroke. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  12. Reconstruction of B{sup -} {yields} D{sup *0}e{sup -} anti {nu}{sub e} decays and determination of vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke

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    Schubert, J.

    2006-12-01

    In this analysis the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sup *0}e{sup -} anti {nu}{sub e} is measured. The underlying data sample consists of about 226 million B anti B-pairs accumulated on the {upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR detector at the asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider PEP-II. The reconstruction of the decay uses the channels D{sup *0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. The neutrino is not reconstructed. Since the rest frame of the B meson is unknown, the boost w of the D{sup *0} meson in the B meson rest frame is estimated by w. The w spectrum of the data is described in terms of the partial decay width d{gamma}/dw given by theory and the detector simulation translating each spectrum d{gamma}/dw into an expectation of the measured w spectrum. d{gamma}/dw depends on a form factor F(w) parameterizing the strong interaction in the decay process. To find the best descriptive d{gamma}/dw a fit to the data determines the following two parameters of d{gamma}/dw: (i) F(1) vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke, the product between F at zero D{sup *0}-recoil and the CKM matrix element vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke; (ii) {rho}{sup 2}{sub A1}, a parameter of the form factor F(w). The former parameter scales the height of d{gamma}/dw and {rho}{sup 2}{sub A1} varies the shape of it. The determined values of F(1) vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke, {rho}{sup 2}{sub A1} and B(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup *0}e{sup -} anti {nu}{sub e}) are F(1) vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke =(35.8{+-}0.5{+-}1.5) x 10{sup -3}, {rho}{sup 2}{sub A1}=(1.08{+-}0.05{+-}0.09) and B(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup *0}e{sup -} anti {nu}{sub e})=(5.60{+-}0.08{+-}0.42)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The values of B(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup *0}e{sup -} anti {nu}{sub e}) has been determined by an integration of d{gamma}/dw over the allowed w range using the fitted values of

  13. Measurement of τ decays into a charged hadron accompanied by neutral π-mesons and determination of the CKM matrix element vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke

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    Adametz, Aleksandra

    2011-07-06

    This thesis presents the branching fraction measurement of the τ{sup -}→K{sup -}(nπ{sup 0})ν{sub τ} (n=0,1,2,3) and τ{sup -}→π{sup -}(nπ{sup 0})ν{sub τ} (n=3,4) decays. The measurement is based on a data sample of 435 million τ pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and collected with the BABAR detector in 1999-2008. The analysis is validated using precisely known τ decays as control modes. The measured branching fractions are B(τ{sup -}→K{sup -}ν{sub τ})=(7.100±0.033±0.156) x 10{sup -3}, B(τ{sup -}→K{sup -}π{sup 0}ν{sub τ})=(5.000±0.020±0.139) x 10{sup -3}, B(τ{sup -}→K{sup -}(2π{sup 0})ν{sub τ})=(5.654±0.144±0.323) x 10{sup -4}, B(τ{sup -}→K{sup -}(3π{sup 0})ν{sub τ})=(1.642±0.279±0.375) x 10{sup -4}, B(τ{sup -}→π{sup -}(3π{sup 0})ν{sub τ})=(1.216±0.010±0.047) x 10{sup -2}, B(τ{sup -}→π{sup -}(4π{sup 0})ν{sub τ})=(1.041±0.067±0.090) x 10{sup -3}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The branching fraction B(τ{sup -}→π{sup -}(4π{sup 0})ν{sub τ}) is measured for the first time. The precision of the results is comparable or significantly improved with respect to previous measurements. The branching fraction B(τ{sup -}→K{sup -}ν{sub τ}) is combined with a lattice QCD calculation of the kaon decay constant to obtain the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke =0.2224±0.0025(exp)±0.0029(theo). The branching fractions of the τ decays into a kaon are combined with the current world averages. The resulting averages are used in the determination of the total τ branching fraction, B{sub s}, into strangeness vertical stroke S vertical stroke =1 final states. B{sub s} is used in conjunction with vertical stroke V{sub ud} vertical stroke and a small SU(3)-symmetry breaking correction to compute vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke =0.2176±0.0025(exp)±0.0010(theo).

  14. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or reading Dizziness or abnormal feeling of movement (vertigo) Eyesight problems, such as decreased vision, double vision, ... symptoms or prevent more strokes Nutrients and fluids Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and swallowing therapy will ...

  15. The universal Racah-Wigner symbol for U{sub q}(osp(1 vertical stroke 2))

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    Pawelkiewicz, Michal; Schomerus, Volker [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Suchanek, Paulina [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Wroclaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-10-15

    We propose a new and elegant formula for the Racah-Wigner symbol of self-dual continuous series of representations of U{sub q}(osp(1 vertical stroke 2)). It describes the entire fusing matrix for both NS and R sector of N=1 supersymmetric Liouville field theory. In the NS sector, our formula is related to an expression derived in an earlier paper (L. Hadaz, M. Pawelkiewicz, and V. Schomerus, arXiv:1305.4596[hep-th]). Through analytic continuation in the spin variables, our universal expression reproduces known formulas for the Racah-Wigner coefficients of finite dimensional representations.

  16. [Early motor rehabilitation with the help of a software/hardware complex "Vertical" in acute period of stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedin, A I; Tikhonova, D Iu; Solopova, I A; Grishin, A A; Alekhin, A I

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of our study was the investigation of effectiveness of restoration of lost motor functions in acute period of stroke with the help of software/hardware complex "Vertical". This complex includes a functional bed-trainer for leg movements with phase-dependent functional electrical myostimulation (FES). Fifty-five subjects (mean age 64 +/-1.5 years) were assigned randomly to two groups receiving standard rehabilitation (a control group--27 subjects) and standard rehabilitation combined with the treatment by the "Vertical" complex (FES group--28 subjects). The treatment course was started on average 9 +/- 4 days after stroke and consisted of 30 min sessions 5 days per week during 2 weeks. Outcome was assessed by a battery of scales, everyday movement abilities and biomechanical parameters before and after treatment. No significant differences were found in baseline measurements. After the treatment, there was a positive dynamics in both groups with significant improvement in scores in the FES group. Most of patients of this group (67%) had hemiparesis of mild degree compared to the control group (7%, p < 0.05) to the end of treatment. Also 89% of subjects in the FES group were able to walk without assistance after treatment as compared to the control group (p < 0.05). There was a significant improvement in ankle flexors and extensors force of the paretic leg as well as in ankle joint movements of voluntary "walking" in the supine position in the FES group (p < 0.05).

  17. Eleven-dimensional gauge theory for the M-algebra as an Abelian semigroup expansion of osp (32 vertical stroke 1)

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    Izaurieta, F.; Rodriguez, E. [Universidad Catolica de la Santisima Concepcion, Departamento de Matematicas y Fisica Aplicadas, Concepcion (Chile); Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Fisica, Concepcion (Chile); Salgado, P. [Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Fisica, Concepcion (Chile)

    2008-04-15

    A new Lagrangian realizing the symmetry of the M-algebra in eleven-dimensional space-time is presented. By means of the novel technique of Abelian semigroup expansion, a link between the M-algebra and the orthosymplectic algebra osp(32 vertical stroke 1) is established, and an M-algebra-invariant symmetric tensor of rank six is computed. This symmetric invariant tensor is a key ingredient in the construction of the new Lagrangian. The gauge-invariant Lagrangian is displayed in an explicitly Lorentz-invariant way by means of a subspace separation method based on the extended Cartan homotopy formula. (orig.)

  18. Self-dual continuous series of representations for U{sub q}(sl(2)) and U{sub q}(osp(1 vertical stroke 2))

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    Hadasz, Leszek [Krakow Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Pawelkiewicz, Michal; Schomerus, Volker [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2013-05-15

    We determine the Clebsch-Gordan and Racah-Wigner coefficients for continuous series of representations of the quantum deformed algebras U{sub q}(sl(2)) and U{sub q}(osp(1 vertical stroke 2)). While our results for the former algebra reproduce formulas by Ponsot and Teschner, the expressions for the orthosymplectic algebra are new. Up to some normalization factors, the associated Racah-Wigner coefficients are shown to agree with the fusing matrix in the Neveu-Schwarz sector of N=1 supersymmetric Liouville field theory.

  19. Do post-stroke patients benefit from robotic verticalization? A pilot-study focusing on a novel neurophysiological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Naro, Antonino; Russo, Margherita; Leo, Antonino; Balletta, Tina; Saccá, Ileana; De Luca, Rosaria; Bramanti, Placido

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Tilt-table equipped with the dynamic foot-support (ERIGO) and the functional electric stimulation could be a safe and suitable device for stabilization of vital signs, increasing patient’s motivation for further recovery, decreasing the duration of hospitalization, and accelerating the adaptation to vertical posture in bedridden patients with brain-injury. Moreover, it is conceivable that verticalization may improve cognitive functions, and induce plastic changes at sensory motor and vestibular system level that may in turn facilitate motor functional recovery. Objective: To test the safety and effectiveness of ERIGO treatment on motor and cognitive functions, cortical plasticity within vestibular and sensory-motor systems in a bedridden post-stroke sample. Methods: 20 patients were randomly divided in two groups that performed ERIGO training (30 sessions) (G1) or physiotherapist-assisted verticalization training (same duration) (G2), beyond conventional neurorehabilitation treatment. Motor and cognitive functions as well as sensory-motor and vestibular system plasticity were investigated either before (T0) or after (T1) the rehabilitative protocols. Results: Both the verticalization treatments were well-tolerated. Notably, the G1 patients had a significant improvement in cognitive function (p = 0.03), global motor function (p = 0.006), sensory-motor (p <  0.001) and vestibular system plasticity (p = 0.02) as compared to G2. Conclusions: ERIGO training could be a valuable tool for the adaptation to the vertical position with a better global function improvement, as also suggested by the sensory-motor and vestibular system plasticity induction. PMID:26410207

  20. Measurement of the partial branching fraction for inclusive semileptonic B meson decays to light hadrons B {yields} X{sub u}lv and an improved determination of the quark-mixing matrix element vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volk, Alexei

    2009-07-01

    This thesis presents an analysis of inclusive semileptonic B{yields} X{sub u}e anti {nu}{sub e} decays using approximately 454 million {upsilon}(4S){yields}B anti B decays collected during the years 1999 to 2008 with the BABAR detector. The electron energy, E{sub e}, and the invariant mass squared of the electron-neutrino pair, q{sup 2}, are reconstructed, where the neutrino kinematics is deduced from the decay products of both B mesons. The final hadronic state, X{sub u}, consists of a sum of many hadronic channels, each of which contains at least one u quark. The variables q{sup 2} and E{sub e} are then combined to compute the maximum kinematically allowed invariant mass squared of the hadronic system, s{sub h}{sup max}. Using these kinematic quantities, the partial branching fraction, {delta}B(B {yields} X{sub u}lv), unfolded for detector effects, is measured to be {delta}B(E{sub e}>2.0 GeV, s{sub h}{sup max}<3.52 GeV{sup 2}) (3.33{+-}0.18{+-}0.21) x 10{sup -4} in the {upsilon}(4S) and {delta}B(E{sub e}>1.9 GeV, s{sub h}{sup max}<3.5 GeV{sup 2})= (4.57{+-}0.24{+-}0.32) x 10{sup -4} in the B meson rest frames. The quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The CKM matrix element vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke is determined from the measured {delta}B using theoretical calculation based on Heavy Quark Expansion. The result is vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke =(4.19{+-}0.18{sub -0.20-0.25}{sup +0.26+0.26}) x 10{sup -3}, where the errors represent experimental uncertainties, uncertainties from HQE parameters and theoretical uncertainties, respectively. (orig.)

  1. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... communicate with your child’s doctor. Symptoms of a Stroke Stroke is an injury to part of the ...

  2. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T. Quiz 5 Things to Know About Stroke Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  3. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  4. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; cerebral vascular accident - prevention; TIA - prevention, transient ischemic attack - prevention ... something that increases your chance of having a stroke. You cannot change some risk factors for stroke. ...

  5. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  6. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  7. On the fusion in SL(2)-WZNW models and 6j symbols of U{sub q}sl(2) x U{sub q'}osp(1 vertical stroke 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, Jens

    2010-06-15

    We introduce a novel method to determine 6j-symbols of quantum groups. This method is inspired by the methods used in the determination of fusing matrices of WZNW models. With this method we determine the 6j-symbols of the quantum group U{sub q}sl(2) and the super quantum group U{sub q}osp(1 vertical stroke 2). We present the 6j-symbols as a recurrence relation and its initial values. The 6j-symbols transform between the s-channel and the u-channel decomposition of the invariants of the four-fold tensor product of modules of a quantum group. These invariants fulfil certain difference equations. We set one of the representations in the invariant to the fundamental representation, and deduce a system of linear equations for the initial values of the recurrence relation determining the 6j-symbols. (orig.)

  8. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or other long-term facility 15% die shortly after the stroke Approximately 14% of stroke survivors experience a second stroke in the first year following a stroke. Successful rehabilitation depends on: Amount of damage to the brain Skill on the part of ...

  9. Stroke: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Stroke: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Stroke is a leading cause of disability and death ...

  10. Know Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Know Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... D. Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Photo courtesy of NIH/NINDS Welcome to this ...

  11. Stroke - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100218.htm Stroke - series—Part 1 To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ischemic Stroke A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  12. Recovering after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... WHERE TO LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke ... after they leave the hospital. Stroke rehab will help you ...

  13. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Stroke Inspirational Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Atherosclerosis and Stroke Updated:Oct 24,2016 Excerpted and ... cause difficulty walking and eventually gangrene. Stroke and atherosclerosis There are two types of ischemic stroke caused ...

  14. How a Stroke Is Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... Diagnosis » How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed Lab ...

  15. Do stroke models model stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Mergenthaler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and the biggest reason for long-term disability. Basic research has formed the modern understanding of stroke pathophysiology, and has revealed important molecular, cellular and systemic mechanisms. However, despite decades of research, most translational stroke trials that aim to introduce basic research findings into clinical treatment strategies – most notably in the field of neuroprotection – have failed. Among other obstacles, poor methodological and statistical standards, negative publication bias, and incomplete preclinical testing have been proposed as ‘translational roadblocks’. In this article, we introduce the models commonly used in preclinical stroke research, discuss some of the causes of failed translational success and review potential remedies. We further introduce the concept of modeling ‘care’ of stroke patients, because current preclinical research models the disorder but does not model care or state-of-the-art clinical testing. Stringent statistical methods and controlled preclinical trials have been suggested to counteract weaknesses in preclinical research. We conclude that preclinical stroke research requires (1 appropriate modeling of the disorder, (2 appropriate modeling of the care of stroke patients and (3 an approach to preclinical testing that is similar to clinical testing, including Phase 3 randomized controlled preclinical trials as necessary additional steps before new therapies enter clinical testing.

  16. Stroke (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Stroke KidsHealth > For Kids > Stroke A A A What's ... get help quickly. continue What Happens During a Stroke? A stroke usually happens suddenly, and a person ...

  17. Driving After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inspirational Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Driving After Stroke Updated:Jul 23,2015 Can I drive after ... more tips for daily living . Let's Talk About Stroke Fact Sheets Our stroke fact sheets cover treatments, ...

  18. Stroke (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Stroke KidsHealth > For Kids > Stroke Print A A A ... get help quickly. continue What Happens During a Stroke? A stroke usually happens suddenly, and a person ...

  19. Mixed Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄如训; 曾进胜

    2000-01-01

    Purpose To summarize the chnical, autoptic and animal experimental dala of stroke, propose the concept of mixed stroke (MS) and demonstrate the enoiogy, pathogenesis, clinical mainfestations, prophylaxis and treatment of MS Background At present. stroke still is classified in the national and international academic fields as two main groups: hemorrhage and ischema In fact, thc cerebral vascular disease with hemorrhage forus and ischema focus at the same time is not rare moreover, this type of stroke has special etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. But it is always made a main dagnosis and neglected the other nature of coexistent focus on either clinical or pathological diagnosis according to traditional classification of stroke Data sources and methods Mort of pablished originsl articles about MS in our department and laboralory wcre reviewed. Resulta The clinical autoptic and animal experimental dats all prcved that hemorrhage and infarction could occur in the course of a stroke simultaneously or in suecession during a short time, which demonstrated the existence of MS It was found clinically that MS patients all had the hustory of hypcrtension and in the autoptic data the MS patients dying of stroke all had typical hypertensive changes in the heart and kidney. and had hypertensive arteriosclerosis in the cerebral arteriole and small artery. MS was cas lily thdueed in stroke-prone renovascular hypertensivc rats This kind of rats are free from genetic deficiency and arc not affected by senile factor, so their cerebral vascular foci are mainly induced by the single factor -hypertension. TThese indicate definitely that hypertensive cerebral vascular lesion is the basis inducing MS. The main lesions of hypertensive cerebral arteriole and small artery were hyalinosis and fibrinoid of the walls, and the formation of microaneurysms or hyperplasla of iniernal and external layers The math lcsions of hypertensive cerebral capillaries were increasing vascular

  20. Mixed Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuangRuxun(黄如训); Zeng Jinsheng(曾进胜)

    2000-01-01

    Purpose To summarize the chnical, autoptic and animal experimental dala of stroke, propose the concept of mixed stroke (MS) and demonstrate the enoiogy, pathogenesis, clinical mainfestations, prophylaxis and treatment of MS Background At present. stroke still is classified in the national and international academic fields as two main groups: hemorrhage and ischema In fact, thc cerebral vascular disease with hemorrhage forus and ischema focus at the same time is not rare moreover, this type of stroke has special etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. But it is always made a main dagnosis and neglected the other nature of coexistent focus on either clinical or pathological diagnosis according to traditional classification of stroke Data sources and methods Mort of pablished originsl articles about MS in our department and laboralory wcre reviewed. Resulta The clinical autoptic and animal experimental dats all prcved that hemorrhage and infarction could occur in the course of a stroke simultaneously or in suecession during a short time, which demonstrated the existence of MS It was found clinically that MS patients all had the hustory of hypcrtension and in the autoptic data the MS patients dying of stroke all had typical hypertensive changes in the heart and kidney. and had hypertensive arteriosclerosis in the cerebral arteriole and small artery. MS was cas lily thdueed in stroke-prone renovascular hypertensivc rats This kind of rats are free from genetic deficiency and arc not affected by senile factor, so their cerebral vascular foci are mainly induced by the single factor -hypertension. TThese indicate definitely that hypertensive cerebral vascular lesion is the basis inducing MS. The main lesions of hypertensive cerebral arteriole and small artery were hyalinosis and fibrinoid of the walls, and the formation of microaneurysms or hyperplasla of iniernal and external layers The math lcsions of hypertensive cerebral capillaries were increasing vascular

  1. Stroke awareness in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the awareness of major stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors among the general population in Denmark. Early recognition of stroke warning signs and means of reducing stroke occurrence could improve the treatment and prevention of stroke....

  2. [Hippocampal stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollnik, J D; Traitel, B; Dietrich, B; Lenz, O

    2015-02-01

    Unilateral cerebral ischemia of the hippocampus is very rare. This paper reviews the literature and presents the case of a 59-year-old woman with an amnestic syndrome due to a left hippocampal stroke. The patient suffered from retrograde amnesia which was most severe over the 2 days prior to presenting and a slight anterograde amnesia. In addition, a verbal memory disorder was confirmed 1 week after admission by neurological tests. As risk factors, arterial hypertension and a relative hyper-beta lipoproteinemia were found. This case shows that unilateral amnestic stroke, e.g. in the hippocampus region, may be the cause of an amnestic syndrome and should be included in the differential diagnostics.

  3. Multiple Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obododimma Oha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This poem playfully addresses the slippery nature of linguistic signification, employing humour and sarcasm in presenting a wide range of human experience. It ironical twists -- and "strokes" (read ambiguously as both a giving a punishment and erotic pleasuring -- move from the naming of location through international discourse of capital to the crumbling relationships between nation states. It reading of the signs of language is tied to the unease and fracture in cultural and political experience.

  4. Stroke - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Association Stroke Council; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Clinical Cardiology; Council on Functional Genomics and Translational Biology; Council on Hypertension. Guidelines for the primary prevention of stroke: a ...

  5. National Stroke Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Go National Stroke Association Our mission is to reduce the incidence ... and support for all impacted by stroke. Understanding stroke and the recovery journey can be overwhelming, but ...

  6. Two Kinds of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Two Kinds of Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... are often a warning sign for future strokes. Stroke Can Affect Anyone Award-winning actress Julie Harris ...

  7. Healthy Living after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... look to maintain health and wellness. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  8. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents ... campaign for the U.S. Hispanic community. 1 Know Stroke A stroke occurs when the blood supply to ...

  9. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  10. Sex Disparities in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlendorff, Christian; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncertainty remains about whether stroke affects men and women similarly. We studied differences between men and women with regard to stroke severity and survival. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used the Danish Stroke Registry, with information on all hospital admissions for stroke in Denmark...... between 2003 and 2012 (N=79 617), and the Danish Register of Causes of Death. Information was available on age, sex, marital status, stroke severity, stroke subtype, socioeconomic status, and cardiovascular risk profile. We studied only deaths due to the index stroke, with the assumption that death...... reported on death certificates as due to stroke was related to the index stroke if death occurred within the first week or month after stroke. Multivariate Cox regression analysis and multiple imputation were applied. Stroke was the cause of death for 4373 and 5512 of the 79 617 patients within 1 week (5...

  11. Epilepsy after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...

  12. Stroke: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when normal blood flow to ... next several hours. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  13. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  14. Adapting the Home After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... after a Stroke Adapting the Home after a Stroke Caregiver Introduction What is Aphasia? Stroke Recovery Guides ...

  15. Neurogenesis in Stroke Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Seong-Ho; Park, Hyun-Hee

    2017-02-01

    Stroke, resulting from limited blood flow to the brain, is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Stroke is classified as ischemic, due to lack of blood flow, or hemorrhagic, due to bleeding. Because 87 % of strokes are classified as ischemic, this type will be the predominant focus of this review. Except for thrombolytic therapy, there is no established treatment to reduce the neurological deficits caused by ischemic stroke. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new therapeutic strategies designed to improve neurological functions after ischemic stroke. Recently, therapies to enhance neurogenesis after ischemic stroke have been investigated. However, these approaches have not led to successful clinical outcomes. This review addresses the pathophysiology of stroke, neurogenesis after stroke, and how to stimulate these processes based on the current literature. Finally, ongoing clinical trials to improve neurological functions after stroke by enhancing neurogenesis are discussed in this review.

  16. Functional recovery in aging mice after experimental stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwani, Bharti; Liu, Fudong; Xu, Yan; Persky, Rebecca; Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D

    2011-11-01

    Aging is a non-modifiable risk factor for stroke. Since not all strokes can be prevented, a major emerging area of research is the development of effective strategies to enhance functional recovery after stroke. However, in the vast majority of pre-clinical stroke studies, the behavioral tests used to assess functional recovery have only been validated for use in young animals, or are designed for rats. Mice are increasingly utilized in stroke models but well validated behavioral tests designed for rats are not necessarily reproducible in mice. We examined a battery of behavioral tests to evaluate functional recovery in an aging murine model of stroke. We found that the vertical pole, hanging wire and open field can accurately assess acute behavioral impairments after stroke in both young and aging male mice, but animals recover rapidly on these tasks. The corner test can accurately and repeatedly differentiate stroke from sham animals up to 30 days post stroke and can be performed reliably in aging mice. Aging male mice had significantly worse behavioral impairment compared to young male mice in the first two weeks after stroke but eventually recovered to the same degree as young mice. In contrast, chronic infarct size, as measured by ipsilateral cerebral atrophy, was significantly lower in aging male mice compared to young male mice. Reactive gliosis, formation of glial scar, and an enhanced innate immune response was seen in the aging brain and may contribute to the delayed behavioral recovery seen in the aging animals.

  17. Stroke and High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to Stroke Updated:Dec 2,2016 Stroke and high blood ... Changes That Matter • Find Tools & Resources Show Your Stroke Support! Show your stroke support with our new ...

  18. [Stroke and aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, J; Maquet, P

    2014-01-01

    Stroke risk increases with aging and one third of ischemic strokes occurs in very elderly (> or = 80 years). These are responsible of two thirds of the overall stroke-related morbi-mortality. Stroke in very elderly differs from younger individuals by sex ratio (more women), risk factors (more atrial fibrillation and hypertension) and usually a worse functional outcome. Very elderly are likely to benefit from stroke unit care and early revascularisation treatments although they have historically been excluded from this urgent management. These issues are likely to worsen in the future with the increasing impact of stroke on our aging societies.

  19. Stroke Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tells you to. Return to top Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for stroke? Taking birth ... your vagina Return to top Does using the birth control patch increase my risk for stroke? The patch ...

  20. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a ... dozens of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. ...

  1. Stroke Trials Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  2. Perinatal and Childhood Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology, risk factors, outcome and prognosis of perinatal and childhood stroke were reviewed at a workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, MD, on Sept 18 and 19, 2000.

  3. Dizziness in stroke

    OpenAIRE

    M V Zamergrad

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of new-onset acute vestibular vertigo is chiefly made between vestibular neuronitis and stroke. Dizziness in stroke is usually accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms of brainstem and cerebellar involvement. However, stroke may appear as isolated vestibular vertigo in some cases. An analysis of history data and the results of neurovestibular examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging allows stroke to be diagnosed in patients with acute isolated dizziness....

  4. Epigenetics in Stroke Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Haifa; Shehadah, Amjad; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: While the death rate from stroke has continually decreased due to interventions in the hyperacute stage of the disease, long-term disability and institutionalization have become common sequelae in the aftermath of stroke. Therefore, identification of new molecular pathways that could be targeted to improve neurological recovery among survivors of stroke is crucial. Epigenetic mechanisms such as post-translational modifications of histone proteins and microRNAs have recently emerged as key regulators of the enhanced plasticity observed during repair processes after stroke. In this review, we highlight the recent advancements in the evolving field of epigenetics in stroke recovery. PMID:28264471

  5. Psychoneuroimmunology of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Robert; Georgiou, Rachel; Thornton, Peter; Rothwell, Nancy

    2009-05-01

    Stroke is the major cause of disability in the Western world and is the third greatest cause of death, but there are no widely effective treatments to prevent the devastating effects of stroke. Extensive and growing evidence implicates inflammatory and immune processes in the occurrence of stroke and particularly in the subsequent injury. Several inflammatory mediators have been identified in the pathogenesis of stroke including specific cytokines, adhesion molecules, matrix metalloproteinases, and eicosanoids. An early clinical trial suggests that inhibiting interleukin-1 may be of benefit in the treatment of acute stroke.

  6. Clinical Epidemiology Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a huge public health problem because of its high morbidity and disability. The epidemiology of stroke is of relevance to construct practical paradigms to tackle this major health issue in the community. Recent data have shown that about 72-86% of strokes are ischemic, 9-18% are due to hemorrhage (intracerebral of subarachnoid and the rest are undefined. The risk factors for stroke are multiple and combined. At present, stroke is no more considered as unavoidable and untreatable. It is an emergency and specialized units and teams improve outcome and lower costs. Death related to stroke is declining in many countries and in both sexes. This decrease in multifactorial. The detection and more effective treatment of hypertension may play an important factor, as well as the improved medical care and improvement in diagnostic procedures. While stroke incidence appears stable and stroke mortality is slowly declining, the absolute magnitude of stroke is likely to grow over the next 30 years. as the population ages, the absolute number of stroke victims and demands on healthcare and other support systems is likely to increase substantially in the future. Keeping this in perspective, this chapter shall focus on the epidemiology of stroke in the world and in Indian, in particular.

  7. Sleep and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Padma Srivastav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian variations in conjunction with sleep-related heart rhythm changes and sleepdisordered breathing (SDB are contributing risk factors for stroke. Strong scientificevidence now exists indicating that SDB contributes to systemic hypertension, aprominent risk factor for stroke, and compelling circumstantial evidence is presentsuggesting that SDB raises the risk for development of stroke through other circulatorymechanisms as well. Preliminary evidence indicates that post-stroke patients have ahigher prevalence of SDB, which is likely to compromise their rehabilitation outcomes.Since SDB is modifiable with the application of CPAP and other treatment modalities,there is practical value in investigating patients at risk of stroke or post stroke forpresence of SDB. Successful application of CPAP or BiPAP therapy may improve theoutcome in both instances.Key words : Sleep, Stroke, SDB, CPAP

  8. Registration of acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Cathrine; Mehnert, Frank; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The validity of the registration of patients in stroke-specific registries has seldom been investigated, nor compared with administrative hospital discharge registries. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the registration of patients in a stroke-specific registry...... (The Danish Stroke Registry [DSR]) and a hospital discharge registry (The Danish National Patient Registry [DNRP]). METHODS: Assuming that all patients with stroke were registered in either the DSR, DNRP or both, we first identified a sample of 75 patients registered with stroke in 2009; 25 patients...... in the DSR, 25 patients in the DNRP, and 25 patients registered in both data sources. Using the medical record as a gold standard, we then estimated the sensitivity and positive predictive value of a stroke diagnosis in the DSR and the DNRP. Secondly, we reviewed 160 medical records for all potential stroke...

  9. Sequential strokes in a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; Buddha, Sandeep; Carlton-Jones, Anoma L; Nicholas, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Vasculitis is a rare, but treatable condition that can present to hyperacute stroke units. Thrombolysis does not treat the underlying pathology, and a rapidly evolving clinical picture drives clinical decision often before all the investigation results are available.

  10. Blood Pressure Control: Stroke and Stroke Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Christoph Diener

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for primary and secondary stroke prevention.All antihypertensive drugs are effective in primary prevention: the risk reduction for stroke is 30—42%. However, not all classes of drugs have the same effects: there is some indication that angiotensin receptor blockers may be superior to other classes of antihypertensive drugs in stroke prevention.Seventy-five percent of patients who present to hospital with acute stroke have elevated blood pressure within the first 24—48 hours. Extremes of systolic blood pressure (SBP increase the risk of death or dependency. The aim of treatment should be to achieve and maintain the SBP in the range 140—160 mmHg. However, fast and drastic blood pressure lowering can have adverse consequences.The PROGRESS trial of secondary prevention with perindopril + indapamide versus placebo + placebo showed a decrease in numbers of stroke recurrences in patients given both active antihypertensive agents, more impressive for cerebral haemorrhage.There were also indications that active treatment might decrease the development of post-stroke dementia.

  11. Mortality after hemorrhagic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Pérez, Antonio; Gaist, David; Wallander, Mari-Ann

    2013-01-01

    , 54.6% for 80-89 years; SAH: 20.3% for 20-49 years, 56.7% for 80-89 years; both p-trend stroke patients...... = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: More than one-third of individuals die in the first month after hemorrhagic stroke, and patients younger than 50 years are more likely to die after ICH than SAH. Short-term case fatality has decreased over time. Patients who survive hemorrhagic stroke have a continuing elevated...

  12. STROKE PREVENTION IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance of the stroke as one of the main reason of population mortality and invalidity is considered. Stroke risk factors including arterial hypertension are described. The main pharmacotherapy ways of primary and secondary stroke prevention are discussed.

  13. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease and stroke prevention Related information Learn more about healthy eating and ... top More information on Heart disease and stroke prevention Read more from womenshealth.gov A Lifetime of ...

  14. Acute stroke imaging research roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Koehrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Warach, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The recent "Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment" meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (

  15. Results from NA36 experiment on the production of strangeness vertical stroke Svertical stroke =1 and vertical stroke Svertical stroke =2 particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, D.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (LBL), CA (United States); Andersen, E.; Blaes, R.; Cherney, M.; Cruz, B. de la; Fernandez, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garzon, J.A.; Geist, W.M.; Gruhn, C.R.; Hafidouni, M.; Hrubec, J.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kuipers, J.P.M.; Ladrem, M.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Loevhoeiden, G.; MacNaughton, J.; Mosquera, J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nelson, J.M.; Neuhofer, G.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Plo, M.; Porth, P.; Powell, B.; Ramil, A.; Rohringer, H.; Sakrejda, I.; Thorsteinsen, T.F.; Traxler, J.; Voltolini, C.; Wozniak, K.; Yanez, A.; Zybert, R. [Dept. of Physics, Bergen Univ. (Norway)]|[Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, IN2P3-CNRS/Univ. L. Pasteur, Strasbourg (France)]|[Creighton Univ., Dept. of Physics, Omaha, NE (United States)]|[CIEMAT, Div. de Fisica de Particulas, Madrid (Spain)]|[Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. Fisica de Particulas]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab. (LBL), CA (United States)]|[Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik (HEPHY), Vienna (Austria)]|[Birmingham Univ., School of Physics and Space Research (United Kingdom)]|[European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)]|[Instytut Fizyki Jadrowej, Krakow (Poland)

    1994-01-03

    Measurements of the production of singly and doubly strange particles in S+Pb collisions at a beam momentum of 200 GeV/c per nucleon are presented. The yield of single strange particles as a function of negative particle multiplicity has been measured. Rapidity and transverse momentum distributions from events consistent with a maximum impact parameter of 9 fm are compared with the predictions of Fritiof 7.02, Venus 4.10 and RQMD 1.08. The comparison illustrates the importance of re-interactions of secondaries and suggests that additional physical processes are required to be incorporated into the event generators. The analysis of strange particle ratios indicates that strangeness phase space is not saturated in these collisions. (orig.)

  16. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  17. Body Mass Index and Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with excess mortality and morbidity, mortality is lower in obese than in normal weight stroke patients (the obesity paradox). Studies now indicate that obesity is not associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke in the years after first stroke. We studied...... the association between body mass index (BMI) and stroke patient's risk of having a history of previous stroke (recurrent stroke)....

  18. Preventable Pediatric Stroke via Vaccination?

    OpenAIRE

    Press, Craig A.; Wainwright, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Investigators from the Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS) group studied the risk of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) associated with minor infection and routine childhood vaccinations.

  19. GANGGUAN MOOD PADA STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Tantular

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stroke adalah salah satu sindrom neurologi yang dapat menimbulkan kecacatan dalam kehidupanmanusia. Salah  satu gejala yang dapat  timbul  setelah  seseorang  terkena  stroke adalah gangguanmood. Gangguan mood berhubungan dengan disabilitas fisik, beratnya stroke dan gangguan kognitif.Gangguan mood yang ditemukan pada stroke adalah depresi, gangguan afektif bipolar dan mania.Gambaran  gejala  berhubungan dengan  lesi  anatomis  stroke. Terapi  yang diberikan dapat  berupafarmakologis, psikoterapi, dan rehabilitasi. [MEDICINA 2015;46:33-36].Stroke is one of neurology syndrome that cause disability in human life. One of the symptoms thatappear after stroke was mood disorder. Mood disorder were related to physical disability, severity ofstroke  and  cognitive  dysfunction. Mood  disorder  found  in  stroke was  depression,  affective  bipolardisorder, and mania. Symptoms were associated with anatomical lesion. Treatment for this disorderare pharmacologic treatment, psychotherapy, and rehabilitation. [MEDICINA 2015;46:33-36].

  20. Strokes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain that's affected and the amount of damage the stroke causes. More likely, a parent first notices changes ... rehabilitation and therapy. previous continue Complications The brain damage that occurs during a stroke can cause a number of other problems that ...

  1. The Optimal Golf Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchinger, Mikael; Durigen, Susan; Dahl, Johan Rambech

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a preliminary investigation into aspects of the game of golf. A series of models is proposed for the golf stroke, the momentum transfer between club and ball and the flight of the ball.Numerical and asymptotic solutions are presented reproducing many of the features observed...... in the golf stroke of a professional golfer....

  2. Relational Processing Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Glenda; Halford, Graeme S.; Shum, David; Maujean, Annick; Chappell, Mark; Birney, Damian

    2013-01-01

    The research examined relational processing following stroke. Stroke patients (14 with frontal, 30 with non-frontal lesions) and 41 matched controls completed four relational processing tasks: sentence comprehension, Latin square matrix completion, modified Dimensional Change Card Sorting, and n-back. Each task included items at two or three…

  3. The Danish Stroke Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. STUDY POPULATION: All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated...... at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. MAIN VARIABLES: The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes...... of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients...

  4. Stroke and Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülçin Benbir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the differences in vascular risk factor and etiology of stroke in two sexes. METHODS: We reviewed the medical files of 2798 patients being followed-up in our Stroke Clinic between the years 1996-2011. The stroke subtypes and risk factors were recorded on the basis of clinical data, physical and neurological examinations, and neuroimaging findings. Data were collected in SPSS 11.5 system and Pearson chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Of a total of 2798 patients, 2564 patients (91,6% had ischemic stroke, and 234 of them (8,4% had hemorrhagic stroke. The mean follow-up duration was 50.2+42.7 months. Of whole study population, 1289 patients were women (46%, 1509 of them were men (54%. The analysis of stroke subtypes showed that the most common subtype was stroke of unknown etiology in both sexes. Following this, the most common subtype was atherothrombotic stroke in men, and cardioembolic stroke in women. Coronary heart disease was more common in men, while atrial fibrillation and other rhythm anomalies were more common in women. Smoking and alcohol consumption were more common in men. CONCLUSION: Our study showed that there are major differences in stroke subtypes and vascular risk factors. Better knowledge of these differences, as well as influencing factors, is of crucial value – in addition to the need of hormonal changes, pregnancy and depression to be better identified in women – for both primary and secondary prevention.

  5. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes happen every year in the United States. You ... some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of your risks ...

  6. Dizziness in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of new-onset acute vestibular vertigo is chiefly made between vestibular neuronitis and stroke. Dizziness in stroke is usually accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms of brainstem and cerebellar involvement. However, stroke may appear as isolated vestibular vertigo in some cases. An analysis of history data and the results of neurovestibular examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging allows stroke to be diagnosed in patients with acute isolated dizziness. The treatment of patients with stroke-induced dizziness involves a wide range of medications for the reduction of the degree of dizziness and unsteadiness and for the secondary prevention of stroke. Vestibular rehabilitation is an important component of treatment. The paper describes an observation of a patient with poorly controlled hypertension, who developed new-onset acute systemic dizziness. Vestibular neuronitis might be presumed to be a peripheral cause of vestibular disorders, by taking into account the absence of additional obvious neurological symptoms (such as pareses, defective sensation, diplopia, etc. and the nature of nystagmus. However, intention tremor in fingernose and heel-knee tests on the left side, a negative Halmagyi test, and results of Romberg’s test could suggest that stroke was a cause ofdizziness.

  7. Hyponatremia in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder encountered in patients of neurological disorders which is usually either due to inappropriate secretion of Antidiuretic hormone (SIADH or cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS. We conducted this study in a tertiary care hospital to determine the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia in patients of stroke admitted in the hospital. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective study done over a period of two years that included established cases of stroke diagnosed on the basis of clinical history, examination and neuroimaging. 1000 stoke patients were evaluated for hyponatremia (serum sodium <130 meq/l. The data was analysed using Chi-square test using SPSS (Statistical package for social science software. Results: Out of 1000 patients, 353 patients had hyponatremia. Out of this 353 patients, 238 (67% had SIADH and 115 (33% had CSWS. SIADH was seen in 83 patients who had ischemic stroke and 155 patients of hemorrhagic stroke. CSWS was found in 38 patients with ischemic stroke and 77 patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Statistical analysis revealed that hyponatremia significantly affects the outcome of stroke especially when it is due to CSWS rather than SIADH. Conclusion: Incidence of hyponatremia in our study population was 35%. In patients of hyponatremia 67% were having SIADH and 33% were having CSWS. Overall hyponatremia affected the outcome of stroke especially when caused by CSWS. Therefore close monitoring of serum sodium must be done in all patients who are admitted with stroke and efforts must be made to determine the cause of hyponatremia, in order to properly manage such patients thereby decreasing the mortality rate.

  8. Hyponatremia in stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Sheikh; Yousuf, Irfan; Gul, Azhara; Gupta, Satish; Verma, Sawan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder encountered in patients of neurological disorders which is usually either due to inappropriate secretion of Antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) or cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS). We conducted this study in a tertiary care hospital to determine the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia in patients of stroke admitted in the hospital. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective study done over a period of two years that included established cases of stroke diagnosed on the basis of clinical history, examination and neuroimaging. 1000 stoke patients were evaluated for hyponatremia (serum sodium <130 meq/l). The data was analysed using Chi-square test using SPSS (Statistical package for social science) software. Results: Out of 1000 patients, 353 patients had hyponatremia. Out of this 353 patients, 238 (67%) had SIADH and 115 (33%) had CSWS. SIADH was seen in 83 patients who had ischemic stroke and 155 patients of hemorrhagic stroke. CSWS was found in 38 patients with ischemic stroke and 77 patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Statistical analysis revealed that hyponatremia significantly affects the outcome of stroke especially when it is due to CSWS rather than SIADH. Conclusion: Incidence of hyponatremia in our study population was 35%. In patients of hyponatremia 67% were having SIADH and 33% were having CSWS. Overall hyponatremia affected the outcome of stroke especially when caused by CSWS. Therefore close monitoring of serum sodium must be done in all patients who are admitted with stroke and efforts must be made to determine the cause of hyponatremia, in order to properly manage such patients thereby decreasing the mortality rate. PMID:24753660

  9. Strokes in mitochondrial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Pizova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that mitochondrial diseases might be identified in 22—33% of cryptogenic stroke cases in young subjects. The incidence of mitochondrial disorders in patients with stroke is unknown; it is 0.8 to 7.2% according to the data of some authors. The paper gives data on the prevalence, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of mitochondrial diseases, such as mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like syndrome (MELAS and insulin-like episodes; myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF syndrome, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (sporadic multisystem mitochondrial pathology.

  10. Sleep and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, Kimberly Nicole; Kirsch, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    Evidence increasingly suggests sleep disorders are associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke. Strong data correlate untreated sleep apnea with poorer stroke outcomes and more recent evidence implicates sleep disruption as a possible etiology for increased cerebrovascular events. Also, sleep duration may affect incidence of cardiovascular events. In addition, sleep-disordered breathing, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, and parasomnias can occur as a result of cerebrovascular events. Treatment of sleep disorders improve sleep-related symptoms and may also improve stroke recovery and risk of future events.

  11. [Obesity Paradox and Stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Ralf; Oesch, Lisa; Sarikaya, Hakan

    2016-07-06

    The obesity paradox suggests that overweight and obese patients of older age may have higher survival rates after stroke as compared to normalweight patients. However, the results need a cautious interpretation due to selection bias, treatment bias and different patients’ characteristics. Moreover, randomized studies that prove a benefit of weight reduction are still lacking. As obesity is an independet risk factor for stroke, weight reduction should still be recommended in overweight patients. Randomized-controlled studies are needed to prove the effect of weight reduction on morbidity and mortality after stroke.

  12. Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are associated with hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. Waist circumference to hip circumference ratio equal to or above the mid-value for the population increases the risk of ischemic stroke three-fold. Do You Know ...

  13. Cost of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Iversen, Helle K; Ibsen, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To estimate the direct and indirect costs of stroke in patients and their partners. DESCRIPTION: Direct and indirect costs were calculated using records from the Danish National Patient Registry from 93,047 ischemic, 26,012 hemorrhagic and 128,824 unspecified stroke patients...... and compared with 364,433, 103,741 and 500,490 matched controls, respectively. RESULTS: Independent of age and gender, stroke patients had significantly higher rates of mortality, health-related contacts, medication use and lower employment, lower income and higher social-transfer payments than controls....... The attributable cost of direct net health care costs after the stroke (general practitioner services, hospital services, and medication) and indirect costs (loss of labor market income) were €10,720, €8,205 and €7,377 for patients, and €989, €1,544 and €1.645 for their partners, over and above that of controls...

  14. A Stroke of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Bob

    2011-01-01

    The author reflects on foreign-language learning by his EFL students as well as his own foreign-language learning. He concludes by musing on the possible and fantastical devastation on language-ability wrought by strokes.

  15. Endocarditis and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Nicolae; Tiu, Cristina; Terecoasa, Elena; Bajenaru, Ovidiu

    2014-12-01

    Endocarditis is an important, although less common, cause of cerebral embolism. All forms of endocarditis share an initial common pathophysiologic pathway, best illustrated by the non-bacterial thrombotic form, but also a final potential for embolization. Stroke associated with endocarditis has signifficant mortality and morbidity rates, especially due to the frequent concomitant multiple sites of brain embolization. In this article we aim to briefly review endocarditis with a focus on stroke as a complication, while also presenting case correlates from our department.

  16. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  17. Stroke risk perception among participants of a stroke awareness campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuschmann Peter U

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subjective risk factor perception is an important component of the motivation to change unhealthy life styles. While prior studies assessed cardiovascular risk factor knowledge, little is known about determinants of the individual perception of stroke risk. Methods Survey by mailed questionnaire among 1483 participants of a prior public stroke campaign in Germany. Participants had been informed about their individual stroke risk based on the Framingham stroke risk score. Stroke risk factor knowledge, perception of lifetime stroke risk and risk factor status were included in the questionnaire, and the determinants of good risk factor knowledge and high stroke risk perception were identified using logistic regression models. Results Overall stroke risk factor knowledge was good with 67–96% of the participants recognizing established risk factors. The two exceptions were diabetes (recognized by 49% and myocardial infarction (57%. Knowledge of a specific factor was superior among those affected by it. 13% of all participants considered themselves of having a high stroke risk, 55% indicated a moderate risk. All major risk factors contributed significantly to the perception of being at high stroke risk, but the effects of age, sex and education were non-significant. Poor self-rated health was additionally associated with high individual stroke risk perception. Conclusion Stroke risk factor knowledge was high in this study. The self perception of an increased stroke risk was associated with established risk factors as well as low perception of general health.

  18. Vertical axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  19. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freedman, Ben; Potpara, Tatjana S; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is found in a third of all ischaemic strokes, even more after post-stroke atrial fibrillation monitoring. Data from stroke registries show that both unknown and untreated or under treated atrial fibrillation is responsible for most of these strokes, which are often fatal...... or debilitating. Most could be prevented if efforts were directed towards detection of atrial fibrillation before stroke occurs, through screening or case finding, and treatment of all patients with atrial fibrillation at increased risk of stroke with well-controlled vitamin K antagonists or non-vitamin K...

  20. Progressive Micrographia Shown in Horizontal, but not Vertical, Writing in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ing Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available All published studies on micrographia, a diminution of letter size, examine handwriting in the horizontal direction. Writing horizontally typically requires increased wrist extension as handwriting progresses from left to right. Chinese characters, however, can be written not only horizontally from left to right, but also vertically from top to bottom. We examined the effect of handwriting direction on character size and stroke length. Fifteen participants with Parkinson’s disease (PD and 15 age-matched controls wrote the same Chinese characters both horizontally and vertically. Handwriting performance was recorded with a digitizing tablet, and a custom-written computer program was used to provide objective data about character size and stroke length. The PD group had a linear decrease in overall character size and horizontal strokes along the writing sequence in the horizontal direction, but not in the vertical direction. The controls had shorter horizontal strokes in the horizontal than the vertical direction, but there was no progressive shortening of stroke length along the writing sequence. The results suggest that traditionally reported progressive micrographia in horizontal writing may not be generalizable to vertical writing. The observed decrease of handwriting size in the horizontal direction suggests that micrographia in PD may be associated with wrist extension. For clinical implications, patients may mitigate their micrographia by changing handwriting direction.

  1. Mini-Stroke vs. Regular Stroke: What's the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is a ministroke different from a regular stroke? Answers from Jerry W. Swanson, M.D. When ... brain, spinal cord or retina, which may cause stroke-like symptoms but does not damage brain cells ...

  2. Stroke risk perception among participants of a stroke awareness campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Heuschmann Peter U; Heidrich Jan; Kraywinkel Klaus; Wagner Markus; Berger Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Subjective risk factor perception is an important component of the motivation to change unhealthy life styles. While prior studies assessed cardiovascular risk factor knowledge, little is known about determinants of the individual perception of stroke risk. Methods Survey by mailed questionnaire among 1483 participants of a prior public stroke campaign in Germany. Participants had been informed about their individual stroke risk based on the Framingham stroke risk score. S...

  3. From stroke unit care to stroke care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    1999-01-01

    In some stroke units continuous monitoring of blood pressure, electrocardiogram, body temperature, and oxygen saturation has become an integral part of the management of acute stroke. In addition, regular measurements of blood glucose are performed. Stroke units equipped with such monitoring facilit

  4. An Economic Evaluation Comparing Stroke Telemedicine to Conventional Stroke Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhram, Stanley Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is not only a serious medical problem, but it also poses an enormous economic burden on society. Stroke ranks the third as the leading cause of death in the United States behind heart disease and cancer. The survivors of stroke suffer from various degrees of long-term disability which create a severe financial burden on society. University…

  5. Stroke rehabilitation and discharge planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Peter

    Nurses play a pivotal role in the rehabilitation and discharge planning process of patients who have had a stroke. The nurse's role in the wider stroke multidisciplinary team is complex and diverse and, as such, stroke nurses may find it hard to describe their role and how it fits into the rehabilitation and discharge planning process. A definition of the stroke nurse role in prominent publications such as those of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and the Royal College of Physicians is lacking. This article emphasises the role of the stroke nurse in the rehabilitation and discharge planning process in the stroke unit, while highlighting the complexity, diversity and importance of this role in providing holistic care and support for patients who have survived a stroke. The author draws on his clinical experience of stroke nursing practice in primary, secondary and tertiary care in west central Scotland.

  6. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  7. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... busting” drug. The drug must be given soon after a stroke to be effective. Subsequent treatment for stroke includes medications and physical therapy, as well as surgery to repair the damage. Meal planning and physical activity may be part ...

  8. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media for Heart.org Heart and Stroke Association Statistics Banner 1 - Stats white banner Each year, the ... health and disease in the population. Heart & Stroke Statistics FAQs What is Prevalence? Prevalence is an estimate ...

  9. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dysphagia often occurs as a result of stroke. Dysphagia may occur in up to 65 percent of stroke patients. If not identified and managed, it can lead to poor nutrition, pneumonia and increased disability. Aspiration Aspiration (inhaling food ...

  10. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 Heart disease is the No. 1 killer for all Americans and stroke is the fifth leading cause of death. Hispanics ...

  11. The obesity paradox in stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although associated with excess mortality and morbidity, obesity is associated with lower mortality after stroke. The association between obesity and risk of recurrent stroke is unclear. AIMS: The study aims to investigate the association in stroke patients between body mass index...... and risk of death and readmission for recurrent stroke. METHODS: An administrative Danish quality-control registry designed to collect a predefined dataset on all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark 2000–2010 includes 45 615 acute first-ever stroke patients with information on body mass index in 29 326....... Data include age, gender, civil status, stroke severity, computed tomography, and cardiovascular risk factors. Patients were followed up to 9·8 years (median 2·6 years). We used Cox regression models to compare risk of death and readmission for recurrent stroke in the four body mass index groups...

  12. Educational approach on stroke training in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, F; Gunther, A; Kwan, J; Petzold, A; Debette, S; Sessa, M; Silvestrelli, G; Parnetti, L; Tambasco, N

    2006-01-01

    According to the European Stroke Initiative (EUSI), stroke care is best delivered within a stroke unit by a specialized multidisciplinary stroke team led by stroke specialists. At present, there is no guideline or consensus regarding training requirements or clinical standards that stroke specialists should achieve. It is envisaged that stroke specialists in training would need to acquire adequate knowledge and competency across three major areas of stroke care: acute stroke, stroke rehabilitation, and stroke prevention. With an EUSI document, the European Association of Young Neurologists and Trainees Stroke Subspeciality Group aims to promote discussion on the many aspects of stroke training and the requirements to be a stroke specialist in the European community. The ultimate purpose is to agree on common standards to promote good clinical care and effective stroke prevention across Europe. In the future, this may be translated into better patient outcome and a reduction in the global burden of this condition.

  13. Signatures of Currency Vertices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Petter

    2009-03-01

    Many real-world networks have broad degree distributions. For some systems, this means that the functional significance of the vertices is also broadly distributed, in other cases the vertices are equally significant, but in different ways. One example of the latter case is metabolic networks, where the high-degree vertices — the currency metabolites — supply the molecular groups to the low-degree metabolites, and the latter are responsible for the higher-order biological function, of vital importance to the organism. In this paper, we propose a generalization of currency metabolites to currency vertices. We investigate the network structural characteristics of such systems, both in model networks and in some empirical systems. In addition to metabolic networks, we find that a network of music collaborations and a network of e-mail exchange could be described by a division of the vertices into currency vertices and others.

  14. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR\\'s ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Space, composition, vertical wall ...

    OpenAIRE

    Despot, Katerina; Sandeva, Vaska

    2016-01-01

    The space in which it is an integral segment of our life is nourished with many functional and decorative elements. One aspect for consideration of vertical walls or The vertical gardens and their aesthetic impact in space called function. Vertical gardens bordering the decoration to totally functional garden in areas where there is little oxygen and space, ideal for residential buildings and public spaces where missing greenery, special place occupies in interior design where their expres...

  16. Recovery of gait after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollen, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands annually about 30,000 people suffer a stroke for the first time. One third of these stroke patients die within the first year, while 41% experience long term disabilities. This makes stroke a major disease in medical and in socio-economic terms. Not just on society but also, and f

  17. Recovery of gait after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollen, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    Revised edition of the digital PhD thesis, 14-03-2006 In the Netherlands annually about 30,000 people suffer a stroke for the first time. One third of these stroke patients die within the first year, while 41% experience long term disabilities. This makes stroke a major disease in medical and in soc

  18. Personal accounts of stroke experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachters-Kaufmann, CSM

    2000-01-01

    As there appeared to be a need for personal accounts of stroke experiences, a book called "Speaking about Stroke" was written for stroke patients and their caregivers. For the past two years, a questionnaire was sent to the people who had ordered the book, to gain an insight into the characteristics

  19. Stroke and Episodic Memory Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there…

  20. Mathematical Simulation of Transient Parameters of Vertical Grounding Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dziaruhina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a mathematical simulation of transient parameters of vertical grounding electrodes for the first and subsequent short strokes of a lightning current. Results of the research show that transient resistances of grounding electrodes change appreciably in time. The transient resistances are always higher in the moment of voltage maximum then in the moment of current maximum. The dependences of transient resistances on grounding electrode length at different ground conductivity and lightning current parameters (first and subsequent short strokes are obtained in the paper. The paper proposes an approximate criterion for estimation of grounding electrode equivalent length at transient condition that considers short stroke parameters of the lightning current and ground conductivity.

  1. Endocarditis and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    GRECU, Nicolae; TIU, Cristina; TERECOASA, Elena; BAJENARU, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    Endocarditis is an important, although less common, cause of cerebral embolism. All forms of endocarditis share an initial common pathophysiologic pathway, best illustrated by the non-bacterial thrombotic form, but also a final potential for embolization. Stroke associated with endocarditis has signifficant mortality and morbidity rates, especially due to the frequent concomitant multiple sites of brain embolization. In this article we aim to briefly review endocarditis with a focus on stroke as a complication, while also presenting case correlates from our department. PMID:25705308

  2. Stroke while jogging.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, W F; Roussak, J.

    1980-01-01

    Jogging is a form of physical exercise that has stimulated the imagination of the public as shown by recent appearance of its own journal (Jogging Magazine, Editor J. Bryant). We wish to report the unusual complication of an acute stroke sustained during jogging.

  3. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    In this podcast, Dr. Tom Frieden, CDC Director, discusses the number one killer in the United States - heart disease and stroke.  Created: 9/3/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/6/2014.

  4. Stroke? Localized, otogenic meningitis!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingolfsdottir, Harpa Maria; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a patient admitted with aphasia, treated for a stroke. Subsequently, it was revealed that the symptoms were caused by complicated otitis media with localized meningitis. This case draws attention to the possible intracranial spread of infection when neurological symptoms occur...

  5. Ischemic strokes and migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousser, M.G.; Baron, J.C.; Chiras, J.

    1985-11-01

    Lasting neurological deficits, though most infrequent, do occur in migrainous subjects and are well documented by clinical angiographic computed tomographic (CT scan) and even pathological studies. However the mechanism of cerebral ischemia in migraine remains widely unknown and the precise role of migraine in the pathogenesis of ischemic strokes is still debated. (orig./MG).

  6. Neurorehabilitation after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger J. Seitz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recovery from ischaemic stroke is determined in the acute phase by the lesion impact of ischaemia and subsequently, by functional and structural network changes in the spared brain tissue. Neurorehabilitation supports the restitution of function using repetitive, learning-based and, more recently, technology-based training strategies.

  7. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature...... is directly related to stroke severity and outcome, and fever after stroke is associated with substantial increases in morbidity and mortality. Normalisation of temperature in acute stroke by antipyretics is generally recommended, although there is no direct evidence to support this treatment. Despite its...... obvious therapeutic potential, hypothermia as a form of neuroprotection for stroke has been investigated in only a few very small studies. Therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in acute stroke but owing to serious side-effects--such as hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, and pneumonia--it is still thought...

  8. Rehabilitating the Stroke Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Grimmond

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this project was to complete an analysis of monograph and audiovisual items held in the Central Coast Health Service (CCHS Libraries and containing information relevant to the treatment of acute stroke. Acute stroke is treated by multidisciplinary teams of clinicians based at two hospitals within the CCHS. The adequacy of the library collection was measured by subject coverage and age. Methods The methodology used consisted of three main steps: a literature review; design, administration, and analysis of a questionnaire to members of the CCHS Acute Stroke Team; and an analysis of the libraries’ collections. The research project utilised project management methodology and an evidence based librarianship framework. Results The questionnaire revealed that electronic resources were by far the most frequently used by participants, followed in order by print journals, books, interlibrary loan articles, and audiovisual items. Collection analysis demonstrated that the monograph and audiovisual collections were adequate in both scope and currency to support the information needs of Acute Stroke Team members, with the exception of resources to support patient education. Conclusion The researchers developed recommendations for future collection development in the area of acute stroke resources. Conducting this project within the evidence based librarianship framework helped to develop library staff members’ confidence in their ability to make future collection development decisions, informed by the target group’s information needs and preferences. The collection analysis methodology was designed to be replicated, and new specialist groups within the client base of the library will be targeted to repeat the collection analysis process.

  9. Outcome Determinants of Stroke in a Brazilian Primary Stroke Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo W. Kuster

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stroke mortality in Brazil is one of the highest among Western countries. Nonetheless, stroke outcome determinants are still poorly known in this country. In this study we evaluate outcome determinants of stroke in a primary stroke center in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods. We evaluated demographic, clinical, and outcome data of patients with ischemic stroke (IS, transient ischemic attack (TIA, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH admitted at “Hospital Paulistano,” São Paulo, Brazil. In-hospital mortality and functional outcome determinants were assessed. Univariate and binary logistic regression analysis were performed. Results. Three hundred forty-one patients were included in the study, 52.2% being male with 66.8±15.7 years. The stroke type distribution was IS: 59.2%, TIA: 29.6%, and ICH: 11.1%. ICH was associated with greater severity and poorer functional outcome. The determinants of poorer functional outcome were higher NIHSS, lower Glasgow score, and lower oxygen saturation level. The most important mortality determinant was the presence of visual symptoms. Conclusions. The stroke mortality and stroke outcome determinants found in the present study do not remarkably differ from studies carried out in developed countries. Stroke prognosis studies are crucial to better understand the high burden of stroke in Brazil.

  10. Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors among Stroke Survivors in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Vincent-Onabajo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Knowledge of stroke risk factors is expected to reduce the incidence of stroke—whether first-ever or recurrent. This study examined knowledge of stroke risk factors and its determinants among stroke survivors. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of consenting stroke survivors at two physiotherapy facilities in Nigeria was carried out. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained and knowledge of stroke risk factors (defined as the ability to mention at least one correct risk factor was assessed using open-ended questionnaire. Data were treated with descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. Results. Sixty-nine stroke survivors (male = 72.5%; mean ± SD age = 49.7±10.6 years participated in the study. Thirty-four (49.4% participants had knowledge of stroke risk factors. Only educational level was significantly associated with knowledge and participants with tertiary educational qualification were about 48 times (odds ratio = 48.5; CI = 7.6–309.8; P<0.0001 more likely to be knowledgeable than those with no education. Conclusion. Less than half of the participants had knowledge of stroke risk factors. Participants with tertiary education were significantly more knowledgeable than those with lower educational qualifications. Effective means of educating stroke survivors on stroke risk factors should be identified and adopted.

  11. Understanding Stroke - Know Stroke • Know the Signs • Act in Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Understanding Stroke Know Stroke • Know the Signs • Act in Time Past Issues / ... Julie Harris, and motivational speaker David Layton. Preventing Stroke "Until I had my stroke, I didn't ...

  12. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  13. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 and 25. A BMI of 35 or more and a serious medical condition that might improve with weight loss. Some of these conditions are obstructive sleep apnea , type 2 diabetes , and heart disease . Vertical ...

  14. Hemichorea after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadullah Saglam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the balance between direct and indirect ways in the basal ganglia causes chorea. The lesions of contralateral basal ganglia, thalamus or the connection of them all together are responsible for this. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Hyperkinetic movement disorders after acute ischemic stroke are reported as rare; however, hemichorea is the most frequent developing disorder of hyperkinetic movement as a result of cerebrovascular disease. In this case report, we presented two case who applied us with choreiform movements in his left half of the body after acute thalamic stroke. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 29-32

  15. Language-specific dysgraphia in Korean patients with right brain stroke: influence of unilateral spatial neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Min-Wook; Park, Kyoung Ha; Lee, Jae Woo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Korean language-specific dysgraphia and unilateral spatial neglect in 31 right brain stroke patients. All patients were tested for writing errors in spontaneous writing, dictation, and copying tests. The dysgraphia was classified into visuospatial omission, visuospatial destruction, syllabic tilting, stroke omission, stroke addition, and stroke tilting. Twenty-three (77.4%) of the 31 patients made dysgraphia and 18 (58.1%) demonstrated unilateral spatial neglect. The visuospatial omission was the most common dysgraphia followed by stroke addition and omission errors. The highest number of errors was made in the copying and the least was in the spontaneous writing test. Patients with unilateral spatial neglect made a significantly higher number of dysgraphia in the copying test than those without. We identified specific dysgraphia features such as a right side space omission and a vertical stroke addition in Korean right brain stroke patients. In conclusion, unilateral spatial neglect influences copy writing system of Korean language in patients with right brain stroke.

  16. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  17. Composition of vertical gardens

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeva, Vaska; Despot, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Vertical gardens are fully functional gardens in areas where there is less oxygen and space, ideal for residential and urban cities where there is no vegetation; occupy a special place in interiors furniture. The gardens occupy an important aesthetic problem. Aesthetic task in vertical gardens can be achieved by forming sectors of identification in the urban landscape through the choice of a particular plant spatial composition and composition, to create comfort and representation in commu...

  18. Chloride channels in stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-ping ZHANG; Hao ZHANG; Dayue Darrel DUAN

    2013-01-01

    Vascular remodeling of cerebral arterioles,including proliferation,migration,and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs),is the major cause of changes in the cross-sectional area and diameter of the arteries and sudden interruption of blood flow or hemorrhage in the brain,ie,stroke.Accumulating evidence strongly supports an important role for chloride (Clˉ) channels in vascular remodeling and stroke.At least three Clˉ channel genes are expressed in VSMCs:1) the TMEM16A (or Ano1),which may encode the calcium-activated Clˉ channels (CACCs); 2) the CLC-3 Clˉ channel and Clˉ/H+ antiporter,which is closely related to the volume-regulated Clˉ channels (VRCCs); and 3) the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR),which encodes the PKA-and PKC-activated Clˉ channels.Activation of the CACCs by agonist-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ causes membrane depolarization,vasoconstriction,and inhibition of VSMC proliferation.Activation of VRCCs by cell volume increase or membrane stretch promotes the production of reactive oxygen species,induces proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of VSMCs.Activation of CFTR inhibits oxidative stress and may prevent the development of hypertension.In addition,Clˉ current mediated by gammaaminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor has also been implicated a role in ischemic neuron death.This review focuses on the functional roles of Clˉ channels in the development of stroke and provides a perspective on the future directions for research and the potential to develop Clˉ channels as new targets for the prevention and treatment of stroke.

  19. Danger signals in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Sobey, Christopher G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Magnus, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Danger molecules are the first signals released from dying tissue after stroke. These danger signals bind to receptors on immune cells that will result in their activation and the release of inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators, resulting in amplification of the immune response and subsequent enlargement of the damaged brain volume. The release of danger signals is a central event that leads to a multitude of signals and cascades in the affected and neighbouring tissue, therefore providing a potential target for therapy.

  20. [Mitochondrial diseases and stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, P; Oliveros-Cid, A; Martínez-Vila, E

    1998-04-01

    We review the mitochondrial diseases in which cerebrovascular changes are seen, such as the MERRF syndrome (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers) or the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (progressive external ophthalmoplegia, retinitis pigmentaria, cerebellar disorders and disorders of cardiac conduction), focusing on the syndrome involving mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). We consider the different clinical aspects, diagnostic methods, pathophysiological mechanisms of the cerebrovascular involvement as well as therapeutic approaches.

  1. Plasma cytokines in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Krarup; Boysen, Gudrun; Christensen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    GOALS: The aim of this study was to test the relations between plasma cytokines and the clinical characteristics, course, and risk factors in acute stroke. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The analysis was based on 179 patients with acute stroke included within 24 hours of stroke onset. On inclusion and 3...... measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). FINDINGS: The levels of most cytokines were significantly different in acute stroke from the levels 3 months later; but only IL-10 was positively associated with stroke severity. C-reactive protein and white blood cell count were positively associated...... with the cytokine response. CONCLUSIONS: We found a substantial overall cytokine reaction that reflected the stroke incident. However, these results do not, at present, suggest a potential for clinical use, as they do not seem to add to the information obtained from the clinical workup of the individual patient....

  2. Calorie restriction and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzanero Silvia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stroke, a major cause of disability and mortality in the elderly, occurs when a cerebral blood vessel is occluded or ruptured, resulting in ischemic damage and death of brain cells. The injury mechanism involves metabolic and oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis and inflammatory processes, including activation of glial cells and infiltration of leukocytes. In animal models, dietary energy restriction, by daily calorie reduction (CR or intermittent fasting (IF, extends lifespan and decreases the development of age-related diseases. Dietary energy restriction may also benefit neurons, as suggested by experimental evidence showing that CR and IF protect neurons against degeneration in animal models. Recent findings by our group and others suggest the possibility that dietary energy restriction may protect against stroke induced brain injury, in part by inducing the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; protein chaperones, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78; antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases (SOD and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1, uncoupling proteins and anti-inflammatory cytokines. This article discusses the protective mechanisms activated by dietary energy restriction in ischemic stroke.

  3. Khat and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay V Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Khat chewing, though a tradition followed majorly in African countries, has of late spread widely across the globe due to faster transport systems and advanced preservation techniques. Many complications such as psychosis, arterial hypertension, angina pectoris, and myocardial infarction have been reported in connection to khat abuse. We present a case of a young man who presented with acute onset left-sided weakness. He was a known khat addict for over three decades. A diagnosis of left hemiplegia due to right middle cerebral artery infarction was established. Detailed evaluation revealed no significant underlying cause for stroke. Since the main central nervous system effects of khat are comparable with those of amphetamines and there are established reports of stroke in amphetamine abuse, the former was assumed to be the etiological factor. The patient was discontinued from taking khat and was managed conservatively. The subject showed significant recovery with no further complications or similar episodes during follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of stroke associated with khat. Since the management is essentially conservative, a vigilant history eliciting of khat abuse in prevalent countries would cut down unnecessary healthcare costs.

  4. Guide to Choosing Stroke Rehabilitation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about stroke recovery, contact National Stroke Association by calling 1-800-STROKES (1-800-787-6537) or ... A N/A Will my insurance plan or government funding   (Medicare, Medicaid, state health plans) cover all ...

  5. Cost and Outcome in Pediatric Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, William; Huang, Haijuan; Seiber, Eric; Lo, Warren

    2015-10-01

    The cost of childhood stroke receives little notice. The authors examined potential drivers of cost and outcome to test whether (1) neonatal strokes cost less than childhood strokes, (2) associated diseases influence cost, (3) arterial ischemic stroke is more costly than sinovenous thrombosis, and (4) cost correlates with outcome. The authors reviewed records of 111 children who sustained arterial ischemic stroke or sinovenous thrombosis between 2005 and 2010 to identify costs for the following year. They assessed outcomes in 46 with the Recovery and Recurrence Questionnaire and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Neonatal strokes cost less than childhood stroke. Strokes associated with congenital heart disease or vasculopathy cost the most, while perinatal or idiopathic strokes cost the least. Higher costs are correlated with worse impairment and poorer quality of life. Stroke etiology significantly influences the cost of pediatric stroke. Future cost-benefit studies must consider etiology when estimating the incremental costs associated with stroke.

  6. Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Stroke Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... non-Hispanic white adults to die from a stroke in 2010. In general, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander ...

  7. What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiovascular Conditions What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke? Brain tissue affected by blockage Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in ... over 55 years old have more chance of stroke, and the risk gets greater as you get ...

  8. [Pregnancy and acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereczki, Dániel

    2016-05-15

    Pregnancy-related ischemic strokes play an important role in both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Changes in hemostaseology and hemodynamics as well as risk factors related to or independent from pregnancy contribute to the increased stroke-risk during gestation and the puerperium. Potential teratogenic effects make diagnostics, acute therapy and prevention challenging. Because randomized, controlled trials are not available, a multicenter registry of patients with gestational stroke would be desirable. Until definite guidelines emerge, management of acute ischemic stroke during pregnancy remains individual, involving experts and weighing the risks and benefits.

  9. Cerebrogenic tachyarrhythmia in acute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Praveen Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiac abnormalities following acute stroke are frequent and seen in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. The changes seen in electrocardiogram (ECG consist of repolarization abnormalities such as ST elevation, ST depression, negative T waves, and QT prolongation. Among tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation is the most common and occurrence of focal atrial tachycardia is very rare though any cardiac arrhythmias can follow acute stroke. We report a case of focal atrial tachycardia following acute ischemic stroke in 50-year-old female without structural heart disease, and their mechanisms and clinical implications.

  10. Stroke: advances in medical therapy and acute stroke intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kevin M; Lal, Brajesh K; Meschia, James F

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic options for stroke continue to emerge based on results from well-designed clinical studies. Ischemic stroke far exceeds hemorrhagic stroke in terms of prevalence and incidence, both in the USA and worldwide. The public health effect of reducing death and disability related to ischemic stroke justifies the resources that have been invested in identifying safe and effective treatments. The emergence of novel oral anticoagulants for ischemic stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has introduced complexity to clinical decision making for patients with this common cardiac arrhythmia. Some accepted ischemic stroke preventative strategies, such as carotid revascularization for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, require reassessment, given advances in risk factor management, antithrombotic therapy, and surgical techniques. Intra-arterial therapy, particularly with stent retrievers after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, has recently been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and will require investment in system-based care models to ensure that effective treatments are received by patients in a timely fashion. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in medical and surgical approaches to ischemic stroke prevention and acute treatment. Results from recently published clinical trials will be highlighted along with ongoing clinical trials addressing key questions in ischemic stroke management and prevention where equipoise remains.

  11. Musculoskeletal problems in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Musculoskeletal problems in stoke survivors are common reasons for disability and pain. Shoulder pain is present in 24% of stroke survivors among all complications, second only to depression in 26%. Diagnosis and treatment of the various shoulder pain etiologies can significantly improve quality of life in these patients. This article reviews the common etiologies and treatments of shoulder and hip pain in stroke survivors.

  12. One Stroke at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollibaugh, Molly

    2012-01-01

    At first glance, a Zentangle creation can seem intricate and complicated. But, when you learn how it is done, you realize how simple it is. Zentangles are patterns, or "tangles," that have been reduced to a simple sequence of elemental strokes. When you learn to focus on each stroke you find yourself capable of things that you may have once…

  13. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature i...

  14. Auditory Hallucinations in Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Lampl

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory hallucinations are uncommon phenomena which can be directly caused by acute stroke, mostly described after lesions of the brain stem, very rarely reported after cortical strokes. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of this phenomenon. In a cross sectional study, 641 stroke patients were followed in the period between 1996–2000. Each patient underwent comprehensive investigation and follow-up. Four patients were found to have post cortical stroke auditory hallucinations. All of them occurred after an ischemic lesion of the right temporal lobe. After no more than four months, all patients were symptom-free and without therapy. The fact the auditory hallucinations may be of cortical origin must be taken into consideration in the treatment of stroke patients. The phenomenon may be completely reversible after a couple of months.

  15. Circadian Variation Of Stroke Onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamath vasantha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal variations in various physiological and biochemical functions and certain pathological events like myocardial infarction and stroke have been documented. We studied prospectively one hundred and seven patients of acute onset stroke confirmed by computed tomography for the exact time of onset, risk factors and type of stroke. Patients who were unclear of time of onset and with a diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis or sub-arachnoid hemorrhage were excluded. Infarction was detected in 71 patients and hemorrhage in 33 patients. Men out numbered women (1:6:1. Hypertension was more frequent in hemorrhage in the morning time (5 AM-12 noon and more infarction between 12-6 pm. However there was no relation between the time of onset of stroke and various risk-factors of stroke.

  16. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Köhrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wu, Ona; Warach, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced neuroimaging in acute stroke treatment. The goals of the meeting were to assess state-of-the-art practice in terms of acute stroke imaging research and to propose specific recommendations regarding: (1) the standardization of perfusion and penumbral imaging techniques, (2) the validation of the accuracy and clinical utility of imaging markers of the ischemic penumbra, (3) the validation of imaging biomarkers relevant to clinical outcomes, and (4) the creation of a central repository to achieve these goals. The present article summarizes these recommendations and examines practical steps to achieve them. PMID:18477656

  17. Rehabilitative Games for Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pyae

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the major problems in medical and healthcare that can cause severe disability and death of patients especially for older population. Rehabilitation plays an important role in stroke therapy. However, most of the rehabilitative exercises are monotonous and tiring for the patients. For a particular time, they can easily get bored in doing these exercises. The role of patient’s motivation in rehabilitation is vital. Motivation and rehabilitative outcomes are strongly related. Digital games promise to help stroke patients to feel motivated and more engaged in rehabilitative training through motivational gameplay. Most of the commercial games available in the market are not well-designed for stroke patients and their motivational needs in rehabilitation. This study aims at understanding the motivational requirements of stroke patients in doing rehabilitative exercises and living in a post-stroke life. Based on the findings from the literature review, we report factors that can influence the stroke patients’ level of motivation such as social functioning, patient-therapist relationship, goal-setting, and music. These findings are insightful and useful for ideating and designing interactive motivation-driven games for stroke patients. The motivational factors of stroke patients in rehabilitation may help the game designers to design motivation-driven game contexts, contents, and gameplay. Moreover, these findings may also help healthcare professionals who concern stroke patient’s motivation in rehabilitative context. In this paper, we reported our Virtual Nursing Home (VNH concept and the games that we are currently developing and re-designing. Based on this literature review, we will present and test out the ideas how we can integrate these motivational factors in our future game design, development, and enhancement.

  18. Vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides a vertical cavity laser comprising a grating layer comprising an in-plane grating, the grating layer having a first side and having a second side opposite the first side and comprising a contiguous core grating region having a grating structure, wherein an index...

  19. Vertical market participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrader, Alexander; Martin, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    Firms that operate at both levels of vertically related Cournot oligopolies will purchase some input supplies from independent rivals, even though they can produce the good at a lower cost, driving up input price for nonintegrated firms at the final good level. Foreclosure, which avoids this stra...... this strategic behavior, yields better market performance than Cournot beliefs...

  20. [Neurorehabilitation after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimüller, Manfred; Fheodoroff, Klemens

    2003-01-01

    After stroke most patients need to undergo extensive neurological and neuropsychological rehabilitation (neurorehabilitation). It is important to have an individual treatment programme that takes into account that the stroke patient is impaired in terms of his receptive skills, his capacity to act and his personal integrity. Based on the "phase model" of the Austrian Society for Neurological Rehabilitation (OGNR) individual goals have to be agreed and measures have to be taken. After maintaining the vital functions and a stable vegetative state, the remaining abilities have to be stimulated, functions have to be regained and deficits have to be compensated. An interdisciplinary neurological rehabilitation team has, for example, the following responsibilities: treatment of impaired motor skills and balance, treatment of swallowing and breathing impairments, training of activities of daily living, and special concepts for the treatment of cognitive deficits and impaired behaviour. A decisive factor for rehabilitation success is the relationship between therapists and patients and their relatives/carers. Preparation for independent or care-managed life after inpatient rehabilitation is of paramount importance, this means organization of continuing out-patient treatment, out-patient care management, as well as measurement and documentation of rehabilitation success. Regaining quality of life is an active process of analysing and working on the remaining activity limitations and participation restrictions in society. The work of the interdisciplinary neurological rehabilitation team contributes decisively to this process.

  1. Pre-stroke use of beta-blockers does not affect ischaemic stroke severity and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, S.; Haentjens, P.; De Smedt, A.; Brouns, R.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Luijckx, G. J.; De Keyser, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: It is unclear whether pre-stroke beta-blockers use may influence stroke outcome. This study evaluates the independent effect of pre-stroke use of beta-blockers on ischaemic stroke severity and 3 months functional outcome. Methods: Pre-stroke use of beta-blockers was investiga

  2. Early infection and prognosis after acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Reith, J;

    2001-01-01

    Infection is a frequent complication in the early course of acute stroke and may adversely affect stroke outcome. In the present study, we investigate early infection developing in patients within 3 days of admission to the hospital and its independent relation to recovery and stroke outcome....... In addition, we identify predictors for early infections, infection subtypes, and their relation to initial stroke severity....

  3. Recovery After Stroke: Dealing with Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stroke, that is not always the case. Sometimes stroke damage to the brain can make even normal touch feel painful. In other cases, pain is felt as a result of muscle tightness ... of Pain After Stroke Pain after stroke can be:  mild, moderate or ...

  4. Stroke rehabilitation: recent advances and future therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brewer, L

    2012-09-27

    Despite advances in the acute management of stroke, a large proportion of stroke patients are left with significant impairments. Over the coming decades the prevalence of stroke-related disability is expected to increase worldwide and this will impact greatly on families, healthcare systems and economies. Effective neuro-rehabilitation is a key factor in reducing disability after stroke. In this review, we discuss the effects of stroke, principles of stroke rehabilitative care and predictors of recovery. We also discuss novel therapies in stroke rehabilitation, including non-invasive brain stimulation, robotics and pharmacological augmentation. Many trials are currently underway, which, in time, may impact on future rehabilitative practice.

  5. Stroke rehabilitation: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasell, Robert; Meyer, Matthew J; McClure, Andrew; Pan, Cheng; Murie-Fernandez, Manuel; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    There is a revolution underway in stroke rehabilitation. International comparative studies coupled with an impressive evidence base have provided a platform from which an ideal system for stroke rehabilitation can be envisioned. Using the concepts of structure and process of care, different systems of stroke rehabilitation can be compared and evaluated against best evidence. Two structures of care are examined: specialized interdisciplinary stroke rehabilitation units and outpatient programs. Although specialized interdisciplinary stroke rehabilitation units remain the "gold standard" of care, access to them is often limited. Outpatient programs are essential to stroke rehabilitation systems of care; however, while some countries are investing in outpatient programs, others are scaling back. Even though structures of care have been shown to affect processes of care, it is the processes of care that have proven to be more influential in altering patient outcomes. Four key processes of care are examined: time to admission, intensity of therapy, task-specific therapy, and discharge planning. Within international stroke rehabilitation systems, differences in these processes have resulted in significant differences in outcomes. This allows for "real-world" comparisons of how differing processes affect patient outcomes. Those systems whose structures and processes of care best reflect current best evidence appear to achieve better outcomes.

  6. Cognitive performance after ischaemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriela R. Ferreira

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment after stroke affects the patient recovery process. Therefore, the identification of factors associated with cognitive outcomes is important since it allows risk profiles of stroke survivors to be determined. OBJECTIVE: To assess cognitive outcome of stroke outpatients and investigate associations among clinical and demographic variables, vascular risk factors, depression symptoms and functional ability; and to describe the neuropsychological profile of these patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional design study was conducted. Subjects who suffered a first-ever ischaemic stroke 6 to 10 months prior to data collection underwent neuropsychological assessment and screening for depressive symptoms and functional ability. The outcome "cognitive performance" was analyzed considering two groups: "cognitive impairment" and "no cognitive impairment". RESULTS: There was a statistically significant association between cognitive impairment and female gender, age, stroke severity and functional ability. Regarding neuropsychological profile, the cognitive impairment group exhibited more generalized deficits in attention, visuospatial organization, verbal functions and verbal memory domains compared to the community control group. CONCLUSION: The occurrence of cognitive impairment among patients was high, especially in women, older participants, individuals with more severe stroke, and greater impairment in functional ability. Multiple cognitive domains are affected and this may hamper recovery and negatively impact independence and quality of life after stroke.

  7. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  8. Specific antismoking advice after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Brink-Kjær, Tove

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many stroke survivors would benefit from modification of their lifestyle in order to reduce their risk of recurrent stroke. We investigated if tailored smoking cessation advice would yield a higher smoking cessation rate and a higher rate with sustained abstinence in ex......-smokers in the intervention group than among controls. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients admitted with an acute stroke or a transient ischaemic attack were included in a randomised controlled trial focusing on control of lifestyle risk factors and hypertension. Here, we report the intervention focused on smoking cessation. We...

  9. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajlović D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dževdet Smajlović Department of Neurology, University Clinical Centre Tuzla, School of Medicine, University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina Abstract: Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more

  10. Vertical orbital dystopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S T; Ashworth, G; Czypionka, S; Poole, M D; Briggs, M

    1996-06-01

    Many pathologic processes may lead to vertical orbital dystopia. We reviewed 47 consecutive cases seen over a 13-year period. Twenty-nine patients underwent eye leveling procedures to improve cosmesis, 2 of these by camouflage procedures and 27 by orbital translocation. Ten patients had 16 secondary operations. There was one death, serious complications occurred in 3 patients, and nuisance complications occurred in 20 others. Seven patients developed diplopia postoperatively, and in 6 patients it was troublesome. In these, it resolved fully in 2 patients, improved to be of no consequence in 2, and in the remaining 2 troublesome symptoms persisted requiring inferior oblique muscle recession in 1. Binocular vision was never restored when not present preoperatively, and in 3 patients temporary loss occurred. There was an overall modest but significant improvement in appearance after surgery. It is concluded that vertical orbital translocation is rewarding and worthwhile.

  11. Post-stroke seizures in consecutive elderly stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Chen; Lufang Chen; Yiqing Tao; Maomao Han; Chunlan Cui; Shichao Liu

    2011-01-01

    This prospective study sought to investigate the clinical, radiological and electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics of seizures in elderly stroke patients, and their outcomes. Over a 2-year study period, 158 consecutive eldedy patients with stroke were examined and followed up. Of these patients, 32 (20%) developed seizures, primarily related to stroke, within a follow up period between 5 months and 2 years. Of these 32 cases, 20 experienced infarctions, and 12 experienced hemorrhages. Involvement of cortical regions was detected in most of the patients exhibiting seizures. In these patients, 44% of the lesions involved cortical areas exclusively or in addition to subcortical areas observed on computed tomography (CT) images. Twenty-five patients (78%)developed early seizures (within 2 weeks after stroke), and half exhibited immediate post-stroke seizures. None of the patients exhibiting early onset seizures developed recurrent seizures or epilepsy, while 57% of late onset seizures (four cases) developed epilepsy. No specific EEG patterns were apparent in those who later developed epilepsy. Overall, early onset seizures after stroke were found to be relatively common, and did not affect outcome. Late onset seizures were less common, but were associated with chronic epilepsy.

  12. RODENT STROKE MODEL GUIDELINES FOR PRECLINICAL STROKE TRIALS (1ST EDITION)

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shimin; Zhen, Gehua; Meloni, Bruno P.; Campbell, Kym; Winn, H. Richard

    2009-01-01

    Translational stroke research is a challenging task that needs long term team work of the stroke research community. Highly reproducible stroke models with excellent outcome consistence are essential for obtaining useful data from preclinical stroke trials as well as for improving inter-lab comparability. However, our review of literature shows that the infarct variation coefficient of commonly performed stroke models ranges from 5% to 200%. An overall improvement of the commonly used stroke ...

  13. The relation between oxidative stress parameters, ischemic stroke,and hemorrhagic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    İçme, Ferhat; Erel, Özcan; AVCİ, AKKAN; SATAR, SALİM; Gülen, Müge; Acehan, Selen

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim: The aims of this study were to investigate the significance of oxidative stress parameters in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke and to investigate their effects on stroke severity using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Materials and methods: A total of 92 patients, including 74 with ischemic stroke and 18 with hemorrhagic stroke, and 75 volunteers were enrolled in the study. Total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (...

  14. Relationship between plasma glutamate levels and post-stroke depression in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱方媛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the association between the plasma glutamate levels during acute ischemic stroke andpost-stroke depression(PSD)initially.Methods Seventy-four ischemic stroke patients admitted to the hospital within the first day of stroke onset were evaluated at a follow-up of 2 weeks.The Beck Depression Inventory(BDI,21-item)and DSM-Ⅳcriteria was used to diagnose post-stroke depression(PSD)at 2 weeks after stroke.

  15. Stroke: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure High Blood Pressure Managing Multiple Health Problems Osteoporosis Urinary Incontinence Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Stroke Unique to Older Adults This section provides information to help older adults ...

  16. Children's Hemiplegia and Stroke Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here for you. Read More > Helping Kids With Hemiplegia – Orthotic Grants We’re helping kids walk! Kids ... alone. Join us! Learn more > Helping Kids With Hemiplegia The Children’s Hemiplegia and Stroke Association (CHASA) is ...

  17. Blood glucose in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose is often elevated in acute stroke, and higher admission glucose levels are associated with larger lesions, greater mortality and poorer functional outcome. In patients treated with thrombolysis, hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation...... of infarcts. For a number of years, tight glycemic control has been regarded as beneficial in critically illness, but recent research has been unable to support this notion. The only completed randomized study on glucose-lowering therapy in stroke has failed to demonstrate effect, and concerns relating...... to the risk of inducing potentially harmful hypoglycemia has been raised. Still, basic and observational research is overwhelmingly in support of a causal relationship between blood glucose and stroke outcome and further research on glucose-lowering therapy in acute stroke is highly warranted....

  18. Fatigue after Stroke: The Patient's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Louise Barbour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fatigue after stroke is common and distressing to patients. Aims. Our aims were to explore patients' perceptions of post-stroke fatigue, including the causes of fatigue and the factors that alleviate fatigue, in a mixed methods study. Results. We interviewed 15 patients who had had a stroke and were inpatients on stroke rehabilitation wards. A substantial proportion of patients reported that their fatigue started at the time of their stroke. Various different factors were reported to improve fatigue, including exercise, good sleep, rehabilitation and rest. Fatigue influences patients' sense of “control” after their stroke. Conclusion. Our results are consistent with the possibility that poststroke fatigue might be triggered by factors that occur at the time of the stroke (e.g., the stroke lesion itself, or admission to hospital and then exacerbated by poor sleep and boredom. These factors should be considered when developing complex interventions to improve post-stroke fatigue.

  19. GPS, su datum vertical.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Dörries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available La introducción de la metodología GPS en aplicaciones topográficas y geodésicas pone en notoria evidencia la clásica separación de sistemas de referencia en horizontal y vertical. Con GPS el posicionamiento es tridimensional, pero el concepto de altura difiere del clásico. Si se desea utilizar la información altimétrica debe contemplarse la ondulación del geoide.

  20. Sonification as a possible stroke rehabilitation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Daniel S; Wu, Liming; Pirzer, Jonas; Schneider, Johann; Rollnik, Jens D; Großbach, Michael; Altenmüller, Eckart O

    2014-01-01

    Despite cerebral stroke being one of the main causes of acquired impairments of motor skills worldwide, well-established therapies to improve motor functions are sparse. Recently, attempts have been made to improve gross motor rehabilitation by mapping patient movements to sound, termed sonification. Sonification provides additional sensory input, supplementing impaired proprioception. However, to date no established sonification-supported rehabilitation protocol strategy exists. In order to examine and validate the effectiveness of sonification in stroke rehabilitation, we developed a computer program, termed "SonicPointer": Participants' computer mouse movements were sonified in real-time with complex tones. Tone characteristics were derived from an invisible parameter mapping, overlaid on the computer screen. The parameters were: tone pitch and tone brightness. One parameter varied along the x, the other along the y axis. The order of parameter assignment to axes was balanced in two blocks between subjects so that each participant performed under both conditions. Subjects were naive to the overlaid parameter mappings and its change between blocks. In each trial a target tone was presented and subjects were instructed to indicate its origin with respect to the overlaid parameter mappings on the screen as quickly and accurately as possible with a mouse click. Twenty-six elderly healthy participants were tested. Required time and two-dimensional accuracy were recorded. Trial duration times and learning curves were derived. We hypothesized that subjects performed in one of the two parameter-to-axis-mappings better, indicating the most natural sonification. Generally, subjects' localizing performance was better on the pitch axis as compared to the brightness axis. Furthermore, the learning curves were steepest when pitch was mapped onto the vertical and brightness onto the horizontal axis. This seems to be the optimal constellation for this two

  1. Cryptogenic Stroke And Role Of Loop Recorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodon Md, Jordi; Francisco-Pascual Md, Jaume; Rivas-Gándara Md, Nuria; Roca-Luque Md, Ivo; Bellera Md PhD, Neus; Moya-Mitjans Md PhD, Àngel

    2014-12-01

    Ischemic stroke is an important cause of morbidity and mortality when untreated. Identifying atrial fibrillation is important because atrial fibrillation ischemic related strokes are associated with an increased risk of disability and death compared with strokes of other etiologies and tend to recur without anticoagulation. However, atrial fibrillation detection can be difficult when it is asymptomatic and paroxistic and may be the underlying cause of some cryptogenic strokes or strokes of unknown origin. In this review, the different methods of cardiac monitoring to detect atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke are summarized, with a focus on loop recorder monitoring.

  2. Dynamic Flight Stability of a Model Hoverfly in Inclined-Stroke-Plane Hovering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolei Mou; Mao Sun

    2012-01-01

    Most hovering insects flap their wings in a horizontal plane,called ‘normal hovering'.But some of the best hoverers,e.g.true hoverflies,hover with an inclined stroke plane.In the present paper,the longitudinal dynamic flight stability of a model hoverfly in inclined-stroke-plane hovering was studied.Computational fluid dynamics was used to compute the aerodynamic derivatives and the eigenvalue and eigenvector analysis was used to solve the equations of motion.The primary findings are as follows.(1) For inclined-stroke-plane hovering,the same three natural modes of motion as those for normal hovering were identified:one unstable oscillatory mode,one stable fast subsidence mode,and one stable slow subsidence mode.The unstable oscillatory mode and the fast subsidence mode mainly have horizontal translation and pitch rotation,and the slow subsidence mode mainly has vertical translation.(2) Because of the existence of the unstable oscillatory mode,inclined-stroke-plane hovering flight is not stable.(3) Although there are large differences in stroke plane and body orientations between the inclined-stroke-plane hovering and normal hovering,the relative position between the mean center of pressure and center of mass for these two cases is not very different,resulting in similar stability derivatives,hence similar dynamic stability properties for these two types of hovering.

  3. [MR investigations in stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenéz, József; Barsi, Péter

    2002-03-20

    In the article digital imaging methods are presented with special emphasis on the use on diagnostics of cerebral circulation studies. Recently, fundamental changes have happened in this field, concerning especially the MR investigations. These changes have influenced the therapeutic strategies of ischaemic stroke. Authors give the theoretical background on the diffusion and perfusion MR imaging, emphasising the importance of their "mismatch" and its impact in the estimation of the outcome of ischaemic events. More recently, new, controversial facts arose, regarding the reasons of the introduction of the theory of so called "negative" and "positive" mismatches. As a consequence, a level of uncertainty took place in the judgement of prognostics. The leading institutions are searching the way to solve the problem which seems to be the quantitative evaluation of the diffusion, perfusion and mismatch data. The advent of the multislice spiral CT with very fast imaging and the importance of CT investigations increased. With this new kind of equipment, even perfusion studies can be performed using iodinated contrast medium.

  4. Akinetic mutism following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaratnam, Nages; Nagaratnam, Kujan; Ng, Kevin; Diu, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This is an appraisal of the varied clinical presentation and the neural substrate for akinetic mutism following stroke. The diagnosis is important as akinetic mutism is often misdiagnosed as depression, delirium and locked-in-syndrome. This is a descriptive study of eight selected patients with akinetic mutism following infarction/haemorrhage in different regions of the brain with characteristic syndromes. They involved the critical areas namely, the frontal (cingulate gyrus, supplementary motor area and dorso-lateral border zone), basal ganglia (caudate, putamen), the mesencephalon and thalamus. The disorders of speech and communication took different forms. The speech disorder included verbal inertia, hypophonia, perseveration, softened and at times slurred. The linguistic disturbances were fluent, non-fluent, anomia and transcortical (motor, mixed) aphasias. The findings were related to what is known about the neuroanatomic location of the lesions and the role of the frontal-subcortical circuitry in relation to behaviour. Akinetic mutism could be explained by damage to the frontal lobe and or interruption of the complex frontal subcortical circuits.

  5. Role of prediabetes in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Milija D Mijajlović,1,* Vuk M Aleksić,2,* Nadežda M Šternić,1 Mihailo M Mirković,3 Natan M Bornstein4,5 1Neurology Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, School of Medicine University of Belgrade, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Hospital Center Zemun, Belgrade, 3Department of Neurology, General Hospital Valjevo, Valjevo, Serbia; 4Department of Neurology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 5Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and probably the greatest cause of adult disability worldwide. Diabetes mellitus (DM is a state of accelerated aging of blood vessels. Patients with diabetes have increased risk of stroke. Hyperglycemia represents a risk factor for poor outcome following stroke, and probably is just a marker of poor outcome rather than a cause. Lowering of blood glucose levels has not been shown to improve prognosis. Also, prevention of stroke risk among patients with DM is not improved with therapy for reduction of glucose levels. On the other hand, prediabetes, a metabolic state between normal glucose metabolism and diabetes, is a risk factor for the development of DM type 2 and subsequently for stroke. Several methods are known to identify prediabetes patients, including fasting plasma glucose levels, 2-hour post load glucose levels, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. In this text, we tried to summarize known data about diagnosis, epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and prevention of prediabetes in relation to DM and stroke. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, insulin, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, risk factors, stroke

  6. Lift vs. drag based mechanisms for vertical force production in the smallest flying insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S K; Laurenza, R; Hedrick, T L; Griffith, B E; Miller, L A

    2015-11-01

    We used computational fluid dynamics to determine whether lift- or drag-based mechanisms generate the most vertical force in the flight of the smallest insects. These insects fly at Re on the order of 4-60 where viscous effects are significant. Detailed quantitative data on the wing kinematics of the smallest insects is not available, and as a result both drag- and lift-based strategies have been suggested as the mechanisms by which these insects stay aloft. We used the immersed boundary method to solve the fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction problem of a flexible wing immersed in a two-dimensional viscous fluid to compare three idealized hovering kinematics: a drag-based stroke in the vertical plane, a lift-based stroke in the horizontal plane, and a hybrid stroke on a tilted plane. Our results suggest that at higher Re, a lift-based strategy produces more vertical force than a drag-based strategy. At the Re pertinent to small insect hovering, however, there is little difference in performance between the two strategies. A drag-based mechanism of flight could produce more vertical force than a lift-based mechanism for insects at Re<5; however, we are unaware of active fliers at this scale.

  7. Study and Analysis of Six Stroke Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ramya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Six Stroke engine, the name itself indicates a cycle of six strokes out of which two are useful power strokes. According to its mechanical design, the six-stroke engine with external and internal combustion and double flow is similar to the actual internal reciprocating combustion engine. However, it differentiates itself entirely, due to its thermodynamic cycle and a modified cylinder head with two supplementary chambers: combustion and an air heating chamber, both independent from the cylinder. In this the cylinder and the combustion chamber are separated which gives more freedom for design analysis. In addition to the two valves in the four stroke engine two more valves are incorporated which are operated by a piston arrangement. The Six Stroke is thermodynamically more efficient because the change in volume of the power stroke is greater than the intake stroke and the compression stroke. The main advantages of six stroke engine includes reduction in fuel consumption by 40%, two power strokes in the six stroke cycle, dramatic reduction in pollution, adaptability to multi fuel operation. Six stroke engine’s adoption by the automobile industry would have a tremendous impact on the environment and world economy .

  8. Sensory syndromes in parietal stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, C; Bogousslavsky, J; Regli, F

    1993-10-01

    We studied 20 patients with an acute parietal stroke with hemisensory disturbances but no visual field deficit and no or only slight motor weakness, without thalamic involvement on CT or MRI and found three main sensory syndromes. (1) The pseudothalamic sensory syndrome consists of a faciobrachiocrural impairment of elementary sensation (touch, pain, temperature, vibration). All patients have an inferior-anterior parietal stroke involving the parietal operculum, posterior insula, and, in all but one patient, underlying white matter. (2) The cortical sensory syndrome consists of an isolated loss of discriminative sensation (stereognosis, graphesthesia, position sense) involving one or two parts of the body. These patients show a superior-posterior parietal stroke. (3) The atypical sensory syndrome consists of a sensory loss involving all modalities of sensation in a partial distribution. Parietal lesions of different topography are responsible for this clinical picture, which probably represents a minor variant of the two previous sensory syndromes. Neuropsychological dysfunction was present in 17 patients. The only constant association was between conduction aphasia and right-sided pseudothalamic sensory deficit. We conclude that parietal stroke can cause different sensory syndromes depending on the topography of the underlying lesion. Sensory deficits can be monosymptomatic but never present as a "pure sensory stroke" involving face, arm, leg, and trunk together.

  9. Stroke Survivors Often Struggle with Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_160835.html Stroke Survivors Often Struggle With Depression Risk was 8 times higher for those who ... Stroke survivors face an increased risk of developing depression, a new study suggests. In the first three ...

  10. Professionals' views on interprofessional stroke team functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstractIntroduction: The quality of integrated stroke care depends on smooth team functioning but professionals may not always work well together. Professionals’ perspectives on the factors that influence stroke team functioning remain largely unexamined. Understanding their e

  11. Stroke Recurrence in Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada identified 135 patients with congenital heart disease diagnosed with arterial ischemic stroke during 1992-2008 and registered in the Canadian Pediatric Stroke Registry-Toronto site.

  12. Prevention and management of stroke in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Matthew D; McCullough, Louise D

    2015-04-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of acquired disability and the third leading cause of death in women worldwide. Sex differences in risk factors, treatment response and quality of life after stroke complicate stroke management in women. Women have an increased lifetime incidence of stroke compared to men, largely due to a sharp increase in stroke risk in older postmenopausal women. Women also have an increased lifetime prevalence of stroke risk factors, including hypertension and atrial fibrillation in postmenopausal women, as well as abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome in middle-aged women. Controversy continues over the risks of oral contraceptives, hormone therapy and surgical intervention for carotid stenosis in women. Pregnancy and the postpartum period represent a time of increased risk, presenting challenges to stroke management. Recognition of these issues is critical to improving acute care and functional recovery after stroke in women.

  13. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Mar 14,2017 Plain old snoring can ... and is associated with high blood pressure , arrhythmia , stroke and heart failure . Heart disease is the leading ...

  14. Stroke Rehabilitation: What Research is Being Done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation What Research is Being Done? Past Issues / ... Table of Contents To Find Out More MedlinePlus: Stroke Rehabilitation medlineplus.gov/strokerehabilitation.html National Institute of ...

  15. Could Parkinson's Disease Raise Stroke Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_163751.html Could Parkinson's Disease Raise Stroke Risk? Or is the link the other way ... link between Parkinson's disease and the risk for stroke. However, the study can't prove that one ...

  16. FastStats: Cerebrovascular Disease or Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button NCHS Home Cerebrovascular Disease or Stroke Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Morbidity Number of adults who ever had a stroke: 6.5 million Percent of adults who ever ...

  17. What Are Heart Disease and Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More What Are Heart Disease and Stroke? Updated:Dec 8,2015 There are many types ... build-up in the lungs, called “pulmonary congestion”. STROKE and TIA happen when a blood vessel that ...

  18. Study Links Psychiatric Disorders to Stroke Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_163750.html Study Links Psychiatric Disorders to Stroke Risk Mental health woes may trigger chronic fight- ... may be linked to a higher risk of stroke in the following weeks and months, new research ...

  19. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Past Newsletters Flu and Heart Disease & Stroke Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Heart Disease* and Those Who Have Had a Stroke Are at High Risk of Developing Complications from ...

  20. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 ± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  1. Multimodal CT in stroke imaging: new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, Carlos J; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    A multimodal CT protocol provides a comprehensive noninvasive survey of acute stroke patients with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic tissue status. It combines widespread availability with the ability to provide functional characterization of cerebral ischemia, and could potentially allow more accurate selection of candidates for acute stroke reperfusion therapy. This article discusses the individual components of multimodal CT and addresses the potential role of a combined multimodal CT stroke protocol in acute stroke therapy.

  2. Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    OpenAIRE

    Staykov, Dimitre; Schwab, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This short review focuses on recent practically relevant studies in stroke treatment and prevention and discusses their implications on clinical practice and future research, including 3 shortly published randomized controlled trials investigating interventional treatment in acute ischemic stroke (The Interventional Management of Stroke phase III trial [IMS III], Synthesis Expansion: A Randomized Controlled Trial on Intra-Arterial Versus Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke, and ...

  3. Stroke and Hypertension in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Kupferman, J. C.; Zafeiriou, D. I.; Lande, M B; Kirkham, F J; Pavlakis, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is the single most important modifiable risk factor for adult stroke. Stroke mortality has significantly decreased over the last 5 decades; this decline has been mainly associated to improved blood pressure control. Though much less prevalent than in adults, stroke is an increasingly recognized cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Although hypertension has not been strongly identified as a risk factor in childhood stroke yet, there is preliminary evidence that suggests t...

  4. The Great Lakes Regional Stroke Network Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Bray Hedworth, Angela; Smith, Cassidy S

    2006-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death among adults in the United States and in the Great Lakes states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The Great Lakes Regional Stroke Network was created to enhance collaboration and coordination among the Great Lakes states to reduce the burden of stroke and stroke-related disparities associated with race, sex, and geography. Three priorities were identified for reducing the effects of stro...

  5. The Brine Shrimp's Butterfly Stroke

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Brennan; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the fluid dynamics of brine shrimp larvae swimming in this gallery of fluid motion video. Time resolved particle image velocimetry was performed using nano-particles as seeding material to measure the time dependent velocity and vorticity fields. The Reynolds number of the flow was roughly 8 and the Womerseley number (ratio of periodic forcing to viscous forcing) was about 5. Vorticity dynamics reveals the formation of a vortex ring structure at the tip of each arm at the beginning of the power stroke. This two vortex system evolves dramatically with time as the stroke progresses. The outer circulation is noted to weaken while the inner circulation strengthens over the power stroke. The gaining strength of the inner vortex correlates with the acceleration and forward movement of the larvae.

  6. Multisensory stimulation in stroke rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbro Birgitta Johansson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, or various kinds of music therapy. Several studies have shown positive effects been reported but to give general recommendation more studies are needed. Patient heterogeneity and the interactions of age, gender, genes and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation.

  7. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes...... in the third to fifth decade of life. Some female heterozygotes are asymptomatic, some as severely affected as males. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial...... accumulation of GL-3. White matter lesions on MRI occur. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. The analyses...

  8. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes...... in the third to fifth decade of life. Some female heterozygotes are asymptomatic, some as severely affected as males. The natural history of Fabry patients includes transitory cerebral ischaemia and strokes, even in very young persons of both genders. The mechanism is partly due to vascular endothelial...... accumulation of GL-3. White matter lesions on MRI occur. Both males and females can be safely treated with enzyme replacement; and thus screening for Fabry disease of young stroke populations should be considered. There are, however, no hard data of treatment effect on mortality and morbidity. The analyses...

  9. Stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Satink, Ton; Steultjens, Esther

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to obtain the best available knowledge on stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation. The increase in demands for accountability in health care and acknowledgement of the importance of client participation in health decisions calls for systematic ways of integrating...... this perspective. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A systematic review of qualitative studies was performed. A literature search in MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and EMBASE was conducted. Suitability for inclusion was based on selected criteria: published qualitative studies written in English from 1990 to 2008 on stroke...... needs, 3) Physical and non-physical needs, 4) Being personally valued and treated with respect, 5) Collaboration with health care professionals and 6) Assuming responsibility and seizing control. DISCUSSION: The synthesis showed that stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation reflected individual...

  10. Stroke Prevention Trials in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available As part of an International Pediatric Stroke Study launched in 2002, the Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP reports a reduction in the number of overt clinical strokes in children with critically high transcranial Doppler velocities (>200 cm/sec who were regularly transfused.

  11. Diagnostic Uncertainties in Post-stroke Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosink, M.; Renzenbrink, G.J.; Dongen, van R.T.M.; Buitenweg, J.R.; Geurts, A.C.H.; IJzerman, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aim of Investigation Pain is a common complication after stroke. The etiology of post-stroke pain is largely unknown and classification of post-stroke pain subtypes is primarily based on neurological examination and pain assessment. Classification could probably be improved by a better understanding

  12. Suicide after a stroke: a population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To establish whether there are increased rates of suicide after a stroke and the degree to which any increase is related to gender, age at stroke, diagnosis, duration of hospitalisation, and time since stroke. DESIGN: Cross linkage of national registers for hospitalisations and c...

  13. Stroke in a Patient With HIV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buse Rahime Hasırcı

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke which is a common complication in Human immumodeficiency virus type 1 positive patients is seen between 1% and 5% in clinical series. Vasculopathy and atherogenesis in HIV are the main pathologic mechanisms of stroke. We report a 63 year old man with sudden onset of a right hemiplegia and who was diagnosed as HIV-related stroke.

  14. Iconic and multi-stroke gesture recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, D.J.M.; Niels, R.M.J.; Gerven, M.A.J. van; Vuurpijl, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    Many handwritten gestures, characters, and symbols comprise multiple pendown strokes separated by penup strokes. In this paper, a large number of features known from the literature are explored for the recognition of such multi-stroke gestures. Features are computed from a global gesture shape. From

  15. Epidemiology of childhood stroke in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugesaar, Rael; Kolk, Anneli; Uustalu, Ulle; Ilves, Pilvi; Tomberg, Tiiu; Talvik, Inga; Köbas, Kristel; Sander, Valentin; Talvik, Tiina

    2010-02-01

    We investigated the incidence and 30-day case-fatality of childhood stroke in Estonia, and clinical signs and risk factors of childhood stroke. A retrospective (1995-2003) and prospective study (2004-2006) of childhood stroke (arterial ischemic, hemorrhagic, and sinovenous thrombosis) and transient ischemic attack was conducted. Stroke-incidence calculation was based on the prospective study. Clinical diagnoses of stroke were confirmed by neuroradiology. The incidence rate of childhood stroke in Estonia was 2.73/100,000 person-years for children aged 30 days to 18 years: 1.61/100,000 for arterial ischemic stroke, 0.87/100,000 for hemorrhagic stroke, 0.25/100,000 for sinovenous thrombosis, and 0.37/100,000 for transient ischemic attack. No arterial ischemic stroke patients died within 30 days, but case-fatality for intracerebral hemorrhage was 46%. Focal signs occurred in 100% of arterial ischemic strokes and 64% of intracerebral hemorrhage cases. Risk factors were identified in 35/48 (73%) children with cerebrovascular attacks. Six children with arterial ischemic stroke (6/24, 25%) manifested more than one risk factor. The incidence rate of childhood stroke in Estonia is similar to that in earlier data.

  16. Genetic and Hemostatic Risk Factors for Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. van den Herik (Evita)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiovascular disorders are the main causes of death worldwide, with stroke accounting for 9-10% of all deaths1,2. Moreover, stroke is the most frequent cause of disability in the western world3. In the Netherlands alone, over 39,000 persons are admitted to hospitals with stroke each ye

  17. Let's Talk about Emotional Changes After Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aneurysm More Let's Talk About Emotional Changes After Stroke Updated:Dec 9,2015 Right after a stroke, a survivor may respond one way, yet weeks ... because of biological or psychological causes due to stroke. These changes may vary with time and can ...

  18. Social Participation after Stroke: One-Year Follow-Up of Stroke Survivors in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Grace O. Vincent-Onabajo

    2013-01-01

    Background. Stroke may negatively affect social participation in survivors. Aims. This study assessed the pattern of social participation in a sample of Nigerian stroke survivors across the first 12 months after stroke. Methods. Stroke survivors were consecutively recruited while on admission at a tertiary health institution. The London handicap scale was used to assess social participation at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months at the homes of the stroke survivors. Overall and domain-specific patterns...

  19. Family history and stroke outcome in a bi-ethnic, population-based stroke surveillance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchino Ken

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The genetic epidemiology of ischemic stroke remains relatively unstudied, and information about the genetic epidemiology of ischemic stroke in populations with significant minority representation is currently unavailable. Methods The Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi project (BASIC is a population-based stroke surveillance study conducted in the bi-ethnic community of Nueces County, Texas, USA. Completed ischemic strokes were identified among patients 45 years or older seen at hospitals in the county between January 1, 2000 – December 31, 2002. A random sample of ischemic stroke patients underwent an in-person interview and detailed medical record abstraction (n = 400. Outcomes, including initial stroke severity (NIH stroke scale, age at stroke onset, 90-day mortality and functional outcome (modified Rankin scale ≥2, were studied for their association with family history of stroke among a first degree relative using multivariable logistic and linear regression. A chi-square test was used to test the association between family history of stroke and ischemic stroke subtype. Results The study population was 53.0% Mexican American and 58.4% female. Median age was 73.2 years. Forty percent reported a family history of stroke among a first degree relative. Family history of stroke was borderline significantly associated with stroke subtype (p = 0.0563. Family history was associated with poor functional outcome in the multivariable model (OR = 1.87; 95% CI: 1.14–3.09. Family history was not significantly related to initial stroke severity, age at stroke onset, or 90-day mortality. Conclusion Family history of stroke was related to ischemic stroke subtype and to functional status at discharge. More research is needed to understand whether stroke subtype would be a useful selection criterion for genetic association studies and to hypothesize about a possible genetic link to recovery following ischemic stroke.

  20. Sociodemographic differences in return to work after stroke - the South London Stroke Register (SLSR)

    OpenAIRE

    Busch, Markus; Coshall, C.; Heuschmann, P. U.; McKevitt, C; Wolfe, C.D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: Loss of employment contributes significantly to the burden of stroke on individuals and society. There is limited information on factors influencing return to work after stroke. Objectives: To investigate frequency and determinants of return to paid work after stroke in a multiethnic urban population. Methods: Patterns of return to work were examined among people with first-ever stroke registered in the population-based South London Stroke...

  1. Road traffic noise and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Hvidberg, Martin; Andersen, Zorana J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to road traffic noise increases the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between exposure to road traffic noise and risk for stroke, which has not been studied before.......Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to road traffic noise increases the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between exposure to road traffic noise and risk for stroke, which has not been studied before....

  2. Trade Liberalisation and Vertical Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Peter Arendorf; Laugesen, Anders

    -good producers face decisions on exporting, vertical integration of intermediate-input production, and whether the intermediate-input production should be offshored to a low-wage country. We find that the fractions of final-good producers that pursue either vertical integration, offshoring, or exporting are all...... increasing when intermediate-input or final-goods trade is liberalised and when the fixed cost of vertical integration is reduced. At the same time, one observes firms that shift away from either vertical integration, offshoring, or exporting. Further, we provide guidance for testing the open...

  3. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  4. Post-emergency department management of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Devin L; Haley, E Clarke

    2002-08-01

    All stroke patients ideally should be admitted to a stroke unit in which personnel are familiar with strategies for taking care of stroke patients. Prevention of worsening cerebral ischemia by appropriate blood pressure and serum glucose management, fever control, and supplemental oxygen for hypoxemic patients is recommended. Recognition of common complications, such as aspiration pneumonia and deep venous thrombosis, highlights the need for swallowing evaluation and the use of pneumatic compression devices or subcutaneous heparin. Patients should be monitored closely for deterioration in their neurologic status and should have complications appropriately addressed. After evaluation of stroke etiology, appropriate secondary stroke prophylaxis should be selected and initiated before hospital discharge.

  5. On the electromagnetic fields, Poynting vector, and peak power radiated by lightning return strokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krider, E. P.

    1992-01-01

    The initial radiation fields, Poynting vector, and total electromagnetic power that a vertical return stroke radiates into the upper half space have been computed when the speed of the stroke, nu, is a significant fraction of the speed of light, c, assuming that at large distances and early times the source is an infinitesimal dipole. The initial current is also assumed to satisfy the transmission-line model with a constant nu and to be perpendicular to an infinite, perfectly conducting ground. The effect of a large nu is to increase the radiation fields by a factor of (1-beta-sq cos-sq theta) exp -1, where beta = nu/c and theta is measured from the vertical, and the Poynting vector by a factor of (1-beta-sq cos-sq theta) exp -2.

  6. Neuroprotection in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, Jacques; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus W; Elting, Jan Willem; Sulter, Geert; Vroomen, Patrick C; Luijckx, Gert Jan

    2005-01-01

    Neuroprotection of patients with acute ischemic stroke should start at the scene and continue in the ambulance with the assessment and treatment of the airway, breathing, circulation, body temperature, and blood glucose. The key goal in eligible patients should be fast vessel recanalization with int

  7. Acupuncture therapy for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most important parts of Traditional Chinese Medicine, has been used for more than 3000 years as prevention and treatment for various diseases in China as well as in adjacent regions, and is widely accepted in western countries in recent years. More and more clinical trials revealed that acupuncture shows positive effect in stroke, not only as a complementary and alternative medicine for poststroke rehabilitation but also as a preventive strategy which could induce cerebral ischemic tolerance, especially when combined with modern electrotherapy. Acupuncture has some unique characteristics, which include acupoint specificity and parameter-dependent effect. It also involves complicated mechanism to exert the beneficial effect on stroke. Series of clinical trials have shown that acupuncture primarily regulates the release of neurochemicals, hemorheology, cerebral microcirculation, metabolism, neuronal activity, and the function of specific brain region. Animal studies showed that the effects of acupuncture therapy on stroke were possibly via inhibition of postischemic inflammatory reaction, stimulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and influence on neural plasticity. Mechanisms for its preconditioning effect include activity enhancement of antioxidant, regulation of the endocannabinoid system, and inhibition of apoptosis. Although being controversial, acupuncture is a promising preventive and treatment strategy for stroke, but further high-quality clinical trials would be needed to provide more confirmative evidence.

  8. Sex Hormones and Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm B

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Whether endogenous sex hormones are associated with ischemic stroke (IS) is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that extreme concentrations of endogenous sex hormones are associated with risk of IS in the general population. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Adult men (n...

  9. Visual attention in posterior stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Charlotte; Petersen, Anders; Iversen, Helle K

    Objective: Impaired visual attention is common following strokes in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, particularly in the right hemisphere. However, attentional effects of more posterior lesions are less clear. The aim of this study was to characterize visual processing speed and appre......Objective: Impaired visual attention is common following strokes in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, particularly in the right hemisphere. However, attentional effects of more posterior lesions are less clear. The aim of this study was to characterize visual processing speed...... and apprehension span following posterior cerebral artery (PCA) stroke. We also relate these attentional parameters to visual word recognition, as previous studies have suggested that reduced visual speed and span may explain pure alexia. Methods: Nine patients with MR-verified focal lesions in the PCA......-territory (four left PCA; four right PCA; one bilateral, all >1 year post stroke) were compared to 25 controls using single case statistics. Visual attention was characterized by a whole report paradigm allowing for hemifield-specific speed and span measurements. We also characterized visual field defects...

  10. Sequelae and rehabilitation of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, S

    1991-10-01

    During rehabilitation after stroke, evaluation and treatment are carried out for sensorimotor impairments such as hemiplegia or dysphagia, perceptual-cognitive impairments such as unilateral spatial neglect, disabilities such as dependence in activities of daily living, as well as various types of handicaps. Research into these problems is reviewed.

  11. The School Library Vertical File.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Carol

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the maintenance of vertical files in the school library. Topics covered include circulation, weeding, using materials for special displays, acquiring materials, policies on advertising and controversial issues, cross-references, subject headings, introducing students to vertical files, beginning a collection, and preservation. (MES)

  12. Cortical swallowing processing in early subacute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Maren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia is a major complication in hemispheric as well as brainstem stroke patients causing aspiration pneumonia and increased mortality. Little is known about the recovery from dysphagia after stroke. The aim of the present study was to determine the different patterns of cortical swallowing processing in patients with hemispheric and brainstem stroke with and without dysphagia in the early subacute phase. Methods We measured brain activity by mean of whole-head MEG in 37 patients with different stroke localisation 8.2 +/- 4.8 days after stroke to study changes in cortical activation during self-paced swallowing. An age matched group of healthy subjects served as controls. Data were analyzed by means of synthetic aperture magnetometry and group analyses were performed using a permutation test. Results Our results demonstrate strong bilateral reduction of cortical swallowing activation in dysphagic patients with hemispheric stroke. In hemispheric stroke without dysphagia, bilateral activation was found. In the small group of patients with brainstem stroke we observed a reduction of cortical activation and a right hemispheric lateralization. Conclusion Bulbar central pattern generators coordinate the pharyngeal swallowing phase. The observed right hemispheric lateralization in brainstem stroke can therefore be interpreted as acute cortical compensation of subcortically caused dysphagia. The reduction of activation in brainstem stroke patients and dysphagic patients with cortical stroke could be explained in terms of diaschisis.

  13. Clinical interpretation and use of stroke scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasner, Scott E

    2006-07-01

    No single outcome measure can describe or predict all dimensions of recovery and disability after acute stroke. Several scales have proven reliability and validity in stroke trials, including the National Institutes of Health stroke scale (NIHSS), the modified Rankin scale (mRS), the Barthel index (BI), the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS), and the stroke impact scale (SIS). Several scales have been combined in stroke trials to derive a global statistic to better define the effect of acute interventions, although this composite statistic is not clinically tenable. In practice, the NIHSS is useful for early prognostication and serial assessment, whereas the BI is useful for planning rehabilitative strategies. The mRS and GOS provide summary measures of outcome and might be most relevant to clinicians and patients considering early intervention. The SIS was designed to measure the patient's perspective on the effect of stroke. Familiarity with these scales could improve clinicians' interpretation of stroke research and their clinical decision-making.

  14. Sleep-disordered breathing and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Latisha K; Avidan, Alon Y

    2008-01-01

    Sleep and stroke have an important and fascinating interaction. Patients with sleep-disordered breathing present with cardiovascular heart disease, cognitive decline, and increased risk of stroke. Stroke adversely affects sleep and factors such as prolonged immobilization, chronic pain, nocturnal hypoxia, and depression, which can also adversely impact sleep quality. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), one of the most common and serious sleep disturbances, manifests itself in almost 50% of all stroke patients. Sleep apnea patients who experience a stroke may be at a greater impairment in their rehabilitation potential and have increased risk of secondary stroke and mortality. Given these factors, the practicing neurologist should possess the skills to appropriately recognize, rapidly diagnose, and properly manage stroke patients with OSA.

  15. A new configuration of the solid-state battery: magnesium vertical stroke polymer proton conductor vertical stroke gold, based on the use of poly(o-methoxyaniline)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazotti, W.A. Jr.; De Paoli, M.-A. [UNICAMP, Campinas (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Camaioni, N.; Casalbore-Miceli, G. [Istituto di Fotochimica e Radiazioni d`Alta Energia del CNR, via Gobetti 101, 40129, Bologna (Italy); Fichera, A.M. [Centro per lo Studio della Fisica delle Macromolecole del CNR, via Selmi 2, 40126, Bologna (Italy)

    1997-10-15

    A solid-state battery was constructed by interfacing a pressed pellet of poly(o-methoxyaniline), in the emeraldine form with p-toluene sulfonic acid as doping agent, to a magnesium electrode covered with a film of magnesium perchlorate; the contact on the poly(o-methoxyaniline) was done by means of a gold electrode. The so-obtained cell, Mg-magnesium perchlorate-poly(o-methoxyaniline)-gold, was able to supply energy with a power depending on discharge current and on environmental humidity. Values of power up to 2.5 mW cm{sup -2} at discharge currents of about 2 mA cm{sup -2} were reached. (orig.) 13 refs.

  16. [Nutritional support in stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos Peláez, Rosa; Segurola Gurrutxaga, Hegoi; Bretón Lesmes, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a public health problem of the first order. In developed countries is one of the leading causes of death, along with cardiovascular disease and cancer. In addition, stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in adulthood. Many of the patients who survive do so with significant sequelae that limit them in their activities of daily living. Most strokes (80-85%) are due to ischemia, while the rest are hemorrhagic. We have identified many modifiable risk factors, some with an important relationship with dietary factors or comorbidities in wich the diet has a significant impact. The incidence of malnutrition in stroke patients is not well known, but most likely impacts on patient prognosis. Furthermore, the nutritional status of patients admitted for stroke often deteriorates during hospitalization. It is necessary to perform a nutritional assessment of the patient in the early hours of admission, to determine both the nutritional status and the presence of dysphagia. Dysphagia, through alteration of the safety and efficacy of swallowing, is a complication that has an implication for nutritional support, and must be treated to prevent aspiration pneumonia, which is the leading cause of mortality in the stroke patient. Nutritional support should begin in the early hours. In patients with no or mild dysphagia that can be controlled by modifying the texture of the diet, they will start oral diet and oral nutritional supplementation will be used if the patient does not meet their nutritional requirements. There is no evidence to support the use of nutritional supplements routinely. Patients with severe dysphagia, or decreased level of consciousness will require enteral nutrition. Current evidence indicates that early nutrition should be initiated through a nasogastric tube, with any advantages of early feeding gastrostomy. Gastrostomy will be planned when the enteral nutrition support will be expected for long-term (4 weeks). Much evidence points to the

  17. Quality of stroke care at an Irish Regional General Hospital and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, T

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Robust international data support the effectiveness of stroke unit (SU) care. Despite this, most stroke care in Ireland are provided outside of this setting. Limited data currently exist on the quality of care provided. AIM: The aim of this study is to examine the quality of care for patients with stroke in two care settings-Regional General Hospital (RGH) and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit (SRU). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the stroke records of consecutive patients admitted to the SRU between May-November 2002 and April-November 2004 was performed applying the UK National Sentinel Audit of Stroke (NSAS) tool. RESULTS: The results of the study reveal that while SRU processes of care was 74% compliant with standards; compliance with stroke service organisational standards was only 15 and 43% in the RGH and SRU, respectively. CONCLUSION: The quality of stroke care in our area is deficient. Comprehensive reorganisation of stroke services is imperative.

  18. Results of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial by stroke subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Benavente, Oscar; Goldstein, Larry B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The SPARCL trial showed that atorvastatin 80 mg/d reduces the risk of stroke and other cardiovascular events in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). We tested the hypothesis that the benefit of treatment varies according to index event stroke...... subtype. METHODS: Subjects with stroke or TIA without known coronary heart disease were randomized to atorvastatin 80 mg/d or placebo. The SPARCL primary end point was fatal or nonfatal stroke. Secondary end points included major cardiovascular events (MCVE; stroke plus major coronary events). Cox...

  19. Faktor Risiko Dominan Penderita Stroke di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannywati Ghani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke tends to increase and becomes the first leading cause of death as well as disability in Indonesia that impact in socioeconomy. Stroke is preventable through early detection and control of risk factors. This study aimed to assess the dominant risk factors of stroke in Indonesia. Analysis was done using secondary data of a cross sectional study called Indonesian Basic Health Research (Riskesdas 2013. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17 software by complex samples. A total of 722,329 subjects aged 15 years and over were included. Stroke prevalence was 1.21%, no difference by sex but increased along with the age. People aged 55 years and over were at higher risk of stroke with adjusted OR of 5.8 (5.32; 6.32, p 0.0001 compared to aged 15-44 years old. The other risk factors were coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart failure. Those were 3.13, 2.96, 2.87, and 2.74 times respectively compared to people without related conditions. Stroke occurred since younger age. The dominant risk factors of stroke in Indonesia were older age, coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart failure. Healthy behavior and early detection of risk factors should be encouraged to prevent stroke.Keywords : stroke, risk factor, Basic Health Research (RiskesdasAbstrakStroke semakin meningkat dan merupakan penyebab kematian serta kecacatan tertinggi di Indonesia yang berdampak secara sosioekonomi. Penyakit stroke dapat dicegah dengan deteksi dini dan pengendalian faktor risiko. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk memperoleh faktor risiko dominan penderita stroke di Indonesia. Penelitian ini menggunakan data sekunder dari Survei Riset Kesehatan Dasar Indonesia tahun 2013. Analisis data menggunakan SPSS 17 dengan complex sample. Dari 722,329 responden usia ≥ 15 tahun, didapat prevalensi penderita stroke sebesar 1,21%, proporsi tidak berbeda antara laki-laki dan perempuan. Risiko stroke meningkat seiring meningkatnya usia. Responden

  20. Vertical Collective Action: Addressing Vertical Asymmetries in Watershed Management

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Watersheds and irrigation systems have the characteristic of connecting people vertically by water flows. The location of users along these systems defines their role in the provision and appropriation of water which adds complexity to the potential for cooperation. Verticality thus imposes a challenge to collective action. This paper presents the results of field experiments conducted in four watersheds of Colombia (South America) and Kenya (East Africa) to study the role that location plays...

  1. Characteristics of delayed admission to stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Parnetti, Lucilla; Tambasco, Nicola; Corea, Francesco; Capocchi, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Early admission to stroke unit (SU) and factors that may cause admission delay represent relevant issues to obtain an optimal management of acute stroke. This study was aimed at recording timing from clinical onset to admission to our SU and to identify the reasons for delay. We prospectively examined acute stroke patients consecutively admitted to the Perugia SU. Baseline characteristics of stroke patients, stroke type and etiology, time from symptom onset to arrival in the SU were obtained from the Hospital-Based Perugia Stroke Registry. 60.8% of 2,213 consecutive stroke patients admitted to the SU arrived within 6 hrs and 39.2% after 6 hrs. Underestimation of symptoms was the cause of delay in 48.7% of cases. Younger age, especially for females, ischemic stroke, mild and/or unspecific symptoms and the underestimation of symptoms seem to be the main reasons for delayed arrival in the SU. To increase the proportion of stroke patients arriving in the SU within 3 hr of symptom onset, it is necessary to improve public and general practitioner awareness of stroke through educational programs.

  2. [Vertical control and orthopedic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardinet, E; Bazert, C; Boileau, M J; Carat, T; Darqué, F; de Brondeau, F; Dorignac, D; Duhart, A M; El Amrani Darqué, K; Pujol, A; Rzadkiewicz, A; Sampeur, M

    2003-09-01

    Control of the vertical development of the face is a key element in assuring the success of orthopedic treatment, as much for its effects on anterior vertical dimension as for its influence on correction of the sagittal discrepancy between the jaws. An effective management of this control demands respect for the equilibrium between posterior and anterior face, as described by Schudy. The authors review the details of the application of orthopedic therapy on the different elements of this equilibrium and then, present the modalities of vertical control appropriate to each appliance.

  3. Vertical Beam Polarization at MAMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlimme, B. S.; Achenbach, P.; Aulenbacher, K.; Baunack, S.; Bender, D.; Beričič, J.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; Dehn, M.; Distler, M. O.; Esser, A.; Fonvieille, H.; Friščić, I.; Gutheil, B.; Herrmann, P.; Hoek, M.; Kegel, S.; Kohl, Y.; Kolar, T.; Kreidel, H.-J.; Maas, F.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, J.; Müller, U.; Nillius, F.; Nuck, A.; Pochodzalla, J.; Schoth, M.; Schulz, F.; Sfienti, C.; Širca, S.; Spruck, B.; Štajner, S.; Thiel, M.; Tioukine, V.; Tyukin, A.; Weber, A.

    2017-04-01

    For the first time a vertically polarized electron beam has been used for physics experiments at MAMI in the energy range between 180 and 855 MeV. The beam-normal single-spin asymmetry An, which is a direct probe of higher-order photon exchange beyond the first Born approximation, has been measured in the reaction 12C (e → , e ‧)12C . Vertical polarization orientation was necessary to measure this asymmetry with the existing experimental setup. In this paper we describe the procedure to orient the electron polarization vector vertically, and the concept of determining both its magnitude and orientation with the available setup. A sophisticated method has been developed to overcome the lack of a polarimeter setup sensitive to the vertical polarization component.

  4. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  5. Horizontal and Vertical Line Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Pat

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students learn about the artist Piet Mondrian and create their own abstract artworks. Focuses on geometric shapes using horizontal and vertical lines. Includes background information about the artist. (CMK)

  6. Post-stroke language disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinanović, Osman; Mrkonjić, Zamir; Zukić, Sanela; Vidović, Mirjana; Imamović, Kata

    2011-03-01

    Post-stroke language disorders are frequent and include aphasia, alexia, agraphia and acalculia. There are different definitions of aphasias, but the most widely accepted neurologic and/or neuropsychological definition is that aphasia is a loss or impairment of verbal communication, which occurs as a consequence of brain dysfunction. It manifests as impairment of almost all verbal abilities, e.g., abnormal verbal expression, difficulties in understanding spoken or written language, repetition, naming, reading and writing. During the history, many classifications of aphasia syndromes were established. For practical use, classification of aphasias according to fluency, comprehension and abilities of naming it seems to be most suitable (nonfluent aphasias: Broca's, transcortical motor, global and mixed transcortical aphasia; fluent aphasias: anomic, conduction, Wernicke's, transcortical sensory, subcortical aphasia). Aphasia is a common consequence of left hemispheric lesion and most common neuropsychological consequence of stroke, with a prevalence of one-third of all stroke patients in acute phase, although there are reports on even higher figures. Many speech impairments have a tendency of spontaneous recovery. Spontaneous recovery is most remarkable in the first three months after stroke onset. Recovery of aphasias caused by ischemic stroke occurs earlier and it is most intensive in the first two weeks. In aphasias caused by hemorrhagic stroke, spontaneous recovery is slower and occurs from the fourth to the eighth week after stroke. The course and outcome of aphasia depend greatly on the type of aphasia. Regardless of the fact that a significant number of aphasias spontaneously improve, it is necessary to start treatment as soon as possible. The writing and reading disorders in stroke patients (alexias and agraphias) are more frequent than verified on routine examination, not only in less developed but also in large neurologic departments. Alexia is an acquired

  7. Risk of Stroke in Migraineurs Using Triptans. Associations with Age, Sex, Stroke Severity and Subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albieri, Vanna; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identifying migraineurs by triptan utilization we studied risk for stroke in migraineurs compared to the general population. METHODS: A cohort study including all citizens 25-80years of age in Denmark 2003-2011 was conducted. All persons prescribed triptans, and all those hospitalized...... for a first stroke were identified in the Danish Registries. Information on stroke severity/subtype and cardiovascular risk factors was available for stroke patients. FINDINGS: Of the 49,711 patients hospitalized for a first stroke, 1084 were migraineurs using triptans. Adjusting for age, sex, income...... for severe strokes was lower among migraineurs (RR 0.77; CI 0.65-0.91). Risk was age-related; highest among women 25-45years (RR≈1.7). Risk was unrelated to numbers of dispensations. INTERPRETATION: Migraineurs identified by triptan utilization had higher risk for stroke. Strokes were minor...

  8. Stroke units: research and reality. Results from the National Sentinel Audit of Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To use data from the 2001–2 National Stroke Audit to describe the organisation of stroke units in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and to see if key characteristics deemed effective from the research literature were present.

  9. STROKE PREVENTION IN INTERNIST PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Napalkov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke secondary prevention in internist practice is discussed in accordance with up to date guidelines. Modern pharmacotherapy includes antiaggregants or anticoagulants, statins, and antihypertensive drugs. The choice of drugs is mostly founded on the rules of evidence based medicine, which allow adjusting individual treatment depending on clinical conditions. The composition of perindopril and indapamide is a preferred nowadays combination of antihypertensive drugs.

  10. Dysphagia after Stroke: an Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Marlís; Ottenstein, Lauren; Atanelov, Levan; Christian, Asare B

    2013-09-01

    Dysphagia affects the vast majority of acute stroke patients. Although it improves within 2 weeks for most, some face longstanding swallowing problems that place them at risk for pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration, and significantly affect quality of life. This paper discusses the scope, the disease burden, and the tools available for screening and formal evaluation of dysphagia. The most common and recently developed treatment interventions that might be useful in the treatment of this population are discussed.

  11. Dysphagia after Stroke: an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia affects the vast majority of acute stroke patients. Although it improves within 2 weeks for most, some face longstanding swallowing problems that place them at risk for pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration, and significantly affect quality of life. This paper discusses the scope, the disease burden, and the tools available for screening and formal evaluation of dysphagia. The most common and recently developed treatment interventions that might be useful in the treatment of this pop...

  12. Ischemic stroke and incomplete infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Javier; Lassen, N A; Weiller, C

    1996-01-01

    The concept of selective vulnerability or selective loss o f individual neurons, with survival of glial and vascular elements as one of the consequences of a systemic ischemic-hypoxic insult (eg, transient cardiac arrest or severe hypotension), has been recognized for decades. In contrast, select......, selective neuronal death as one of the lesions that may develop in the brain after occluding an intracranial artery is an idea not readily acknowledged in the current medical literature dealing with human stroke....

  13. Polysomnographic indicators of mortality in stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponsaing, Laura B; Iversen, Helle K; Jennum, Poul

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to assess polysomnographic indicators of increased mortality risk in patients with stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: We performed polysomnographies in 63 acute stroke/TIA patients. Mortality data were collected from a national database after...... a 19-37-month follow-up period. RESULTS: Of the 57 stroke and 6 TIA patients, 9 stroke patients died during follow-up. All nine had moderate or severe sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs). Binarily divided, the group with the highest apnea hypopnea index (AHI) had an almost 10-fold higher.......92; 95 % CI 2.00-49.23; p = 0.005), and there was a trend toward a higher mortality risk with atrial fibrillation/flutter (HR 3.63; 95 % CI 0.97-13.51; p = 0.055). CONCLUSIONS: In stroke patients, the AHI and nocturnal wake time are indicators of increased mortality risk. SRBDs in stroke patients should...

  14. Endovascular therapy for acute stroke: Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh S Madhugiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular therapy (EVT has gained vogue in the management of patients with acute stroke. Newer stent-retriever devices have led to better recanalization rates. In many centers, EVT is slowly being used as an add on to or in some instances, even as an alternative to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA. The publication of the results of the SYNTHESIS expansion, Interventional Management of Stroke III and Mechanical Retrieval Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy trials in 2013 has questioned the enthusiastic use of EVT in acute stroke. They demonstrate that EVT (using a variety of devices is no superior to IV tPA in the management of acute stroke. In the light of these controversial findings, we review the current status of EVT in the management of acute stroke.

  15. Dysphagia in the elderly stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugger, K E

    1994-04-01

    Of all strokes 75% occur in people over age 65, and the incidence of stroke rises with age. Because swallowing problems often result, the elderly stroke patient is at risk for dysphagia and its complications. Acute and chronic swallowing problems are associated with many complications including dehydration, malnutrition, aspiration, pneumonitis, depression and even death. These complications make swallowing problems in the aged stroke patient an important focus for nursing attention. Nurses must be aware of the complexity of normal swallowing mechanisms, knowledgeable about the aged stroke patient's risk for dysphagia, aware of the importance of early detection and treatment of dysphagia and confident about their role in dysphagia assessment and treatment regimen. This information can be used in the assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of the elderly dysphagic stroke patient.

  16. Rethinking the continuum of stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasell, Robert W; Murie Fernandez, Manuel; McIntyre, Amanda; Mehta, Swati

    2014-04-01

    Suffering a stroke can be a devastating and life-changing event. Although there is a large evidence base for stroke rehabilitation in the acute and subacute stages, it has been long accepted that patients with stroke reach a plateau in their rehabilitation recovery relatively early. We have recently published the results of a systematic review designed to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where a rehabilitation intervention was initiated more than 6 months after the onset of the stroke. Of the trials identified, 339 RCTs met inclusion criteria, demonstrating an evidence base for stroke rehabilitation in the chronic phase as well. This seems at odds with the assumption that further recovery is unlikely and the subsequent lack of resources devoted to chronic stroke rehabilitation and management.

  17. Stroke in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders Møller; Dalsgaard, Morten; Bang, Casper N

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There are limited data on risk stratification of stroke in aortic stenosis. This study examined predictors of stroke in aortic stenosis, the prognostic implications of stroke, and how aortic valve replacement (AVR) with or without concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting...... influenced the predicted outcomes. METHODS: Patients with mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis enrolled in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Diabetes mellitus, known atherosclerotic disease, and oral anticoagulation were exclusion criteria. Ischemic stroke was the primary end point...... death (HR, 8.1; 95% CI, 4.7-14.0; Paortic stenosis not prescribed oral anticoagulation, atrial fibrillation, AVR with concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, and CHA2DS2-VASc score were the major predictors of stroke. Incident stroke was strongly associated...

  18. Cause-specific mortality after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Ulla Brasch; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2013-01-01

    We investigated cause-specific mortality in relation to age, sex, stroke severity, and cardiovascular risk factor profile in the Copenhagen Stroke Study cohort with 10 years of follow-up. In a Copenhagen community, all patients admitted to the hospital with stroke during 1992-1993 (n = 988) were...... registered on admission. Evaluation included stroke severity, computed tomography scan, and a cardiovascular risk profile. Cause of death within 10 years according to death certificate information was classified as stroke, heart/arterial disease, or nonvascular disease. Competing-risks analyses were...... performed by cause-specific Cox regression after multiple imputation of missing data, assuming that values were missing at random. Death was due to stroke in 310 patients (31%), to heart/arterial disease in 209 patients (21%), and to nonvascular diseases in 289 patients (29%); 180 patients were still alive...

  19. Stroke Care in Young Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tancredi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were (i to evaluate the clinical features of a consecutive series of young patients with ischemic stroke and (ii to assess the changes in the clinical management of these patients over the study period. All consecutive cases of young adults aged 16 to 44 years, with ischemic stroke, that were admitted between 2000 and 2005 in 10 Italian hospitals were included. We retrospectively identified 324 patients. One or more vascular risk factors were present in 71.5% of the patients. With respect to the diagnostic process, an increase in the frequency of cerebral noninvasive angiographic studies and a decrease in the use of digital subtraction angiography were observed ( and , resp.. Undetermined causes decreased over 5-year period of study (. The diagnosis of cardioembolism increased. Thrombolysis was performed for 7.7% of the patients. PFO closure (8% was the most frequently employed surgical procedure. In conclusion, the clinical care that is given to young patients with ischemic stroke changed over the study period. In particular, we detected an evolution in the diagnostic process and a reduction in the number of undetermined cases.

  20. Stroke in the Eye of the Beholder

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Hiroto; Caputo, Mathew; Franzese, Nicholas; Weinbren, Nathan L.; Slakter, Adam; Patel, Milan; Stahl, Christine E.; Jacotte, Maria Alejandra; Acosta, Sandra; Franyuti, Giorgio; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; van Loveren, Harry; Kaneko, Yuji; Cesar V Borlongan

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiological changes that occur during ischemic stroke can have a profound effect on the surrounding nerve tissue. To this end, we advance the hypothesis that retinal damage can occur as a consequence of ischemic stroke in animal models. We discuss the preclinical evidence over the last 3 decades supporting this hypothesis of retinal damage following ischemic stroke. In our evaluation of the hypothesis, we highlight the animal models providing evidence of pathological and mechanisti...

  1. The Stroke RiskometerTM App: Validation of a data collection tool and stroke risk predictor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Parmar (Priya); R. Krishnamurthi (Rita); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); A. Hofman (Albert); S.S. Mirza (Saira); Y. Varakin (Yury); M. Kravchenko (Michael); M. Piradov (Michael); A.G. Thrift (Amanda G.); B. Norrving (Bo); W. Wang (Wenzhi); D.K. Mandal (Dipes Kumar); S. Barker-Collo (Suzanne); R. Sahathevan (Ramesh); S.M. Davis (Stephen); G. Saposnik (Gustavo); M. Kivipelto (Miia); S. Sindi (Shireen); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); M. Giroud (Maurice); Y. Béjot (Yannick); M. Brainin (Michael); R. Poulton (Richie); K.M.V. Narayan (K. M. Venkat); M. Correia (Manuel); A. Freire (António); Y. Kokubo (Yoshihiro); D. Wiebers (David); F.K.F. Mensah (Fane ); N.F. Bindhim (Nasser F.); P.A. Barber (P. Alan); N.G. Pandian (Natesa); G.J. Hankey (Graeme); M.M. Mehndiratta (Man Mohan); S. Azhagammal (Shobhana); N.M. Ibrahim (Norlinah Mohd); M. Abbott (Max); E. Rush (Elaine); P. Hume (Patria); T. Hussein (Tasleem); R. Bhattacharjee (Rohit); M. Purohit (Mitali); V.L. Feigin (V.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The greatest potential to reduce the burden of stroke is by primary prevention of first-ever stroke, which constitutes three quarters of all stroke. In addition to population-wide prevention strategies (the 'mass' approach), the 'high risk' approach aims to identify individua

  2. Returning to Paid Employment after Stroke: The Psychosocial Outcomes In StrokE (POISE) Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Maree L. Hackett; Nick Glozier; Stephen Jan; Richard Lindley

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine which early modifiable factors are associated with younger stroke survivors' ability to return to paid work in a cohort study with 12-months of follow-up conducted in 20 stroke units in the Stroke Services NSW clinical network. PARTICIPANTS: Were aged >17 and

  3. Sex Differences in Stroke Survival: 10-Year Follow-up of the Copenhagen Stroke Study Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nonboe; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2005-01-01

    the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (0-58); computed tomography determined stroke type. A risk factor profile was obtained for all including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Date of death was obtained within a 10-year follow-up...

  4. Sex differences in stroke survival: 10-year follow-up of the Copenhagen stroke study cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nonboe; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2005-01-01

    the Scandinavian Stroke Scale (0-58); computed tomography determined stroke type. A risk factor profile was obtained for all including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Date of death was obtained within a 10-year follow-up...

  5. Studies on the emergency care of acute stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Nolte, Christian Hans

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on factors contributing to pre- and intrahospital delay in the emergency management of acute stroke patients. Further, data on level of knowledge on stroke risk factors, stroke signs and appropriate behaviour is reported.

  6. Stroke Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation Stroke Stories Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents ... these well-known personalities suffered one or more strokes. In each case, he or she has returned ...

  7. Questions and Answers about Treating Arterial Stenosis and Preventing Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Answers About Treating Arterial Stenosis and Preventing Stroke A stroke is any sudden event affecting the ... and high cholesterol. How does stenosis contribute to stroke? Atherosclerosis can activate cells involved in blood clotting. ...

  8. "To All Stroke Survivors - Never, Ever Give Up"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation "To All Stroke Survivors – Never, Ever Give Up." Past Issues / Spring ... have for other Americans who are recovering from strokes and other serious health challenges? What about their ...

  9. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Facts Heart Disease is the first and stroke ...

  10. A CLINICAL STUDY OF STROKE IN YOUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumbha Thulasi Ram

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRIDUCTION : Stroke is one of the important causes of morbidity and mortality all over the world. Incidence of stroke steadily increases with age. Experts are concerned of the emerging stroke epidemic in India. Stroke affecting the young has potentially devastating consequence son the individual and his family. Certain risk factors are unique to the young. I t needs more studies for identification and modification of risk factors. The study aims to evaluate clinical features, risk factors, etiology and mortality of stroke in young patients. METHODS : 74 young patients satisfying the inclusion criteria were included in this study. A detailed history was taken from young stroke patients, systemic examination and required investigations were done. Data was collected in standardized proforma and analysed. RESULTS: Stroke in young accounts for 7.95% of stroke cases of all age groups. The mean age of the patients was 34.66 ± 7.48 years. Among 74 patients, 47(63.51% were male and 27(36.49% were female. Seizures, decreased consciousness, speech involvement and motor deficit were observed in 33.78%, 44.59%, 22.97% and 100% of cases respectively. 82.43% patients had ischemic and 17.57% patients had hemorrhagic stroke. Among ischemic stroke, large artery atherosclerosis was 16.21%, tuberculous meningoencephalitis with vasculitis was 16.21%, lacunar stroke was 10.81%, CVT was 10.81% and cardio embolic stroke was 6.76%. Smoking (59.45%, alcoholism (58.10%, hypertension (43.24%, coronary artery disease (8.10%, diabetes mellitus (10.81%, elevated total cholesterol (25.67%, elevated low density lipo proteins (22.97%, elevated triglycerides (27.02% and low HDL (22.97% were important risk factors. Carotid doppler was abnormal in 9.45% of patients. 6.76% patients had mitral stenosis in echocardiogram. Low protein C and protein S were found in 1.35% of patients. Eight (10.81% patients died during the hospital stay. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: The major risk

  11. The Christchurch earthquake stroke incidence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teddy Y; Cheung, Jeanette; Cole, David; Fink, John N

    2014-03-01

    We examined the impact of major earthquakes on acute stroke admissions by a retrospective review of stroke admissions in the 6 weeks following the 4 September 2010 and 22 February 2011 earthquakes. The control period was the corresponding 6 weeks in the previous year. In the 6 weeks following the September 2010 earthquake there were 97 acute stroke admissions, with 79 (81.4%) ischaemic infarctions. This was similar to the 2009 control period which had 104 acute stroke admissions, of whom 80 (76.9%) had ischaemic infarction. In the 6 weeks following the February 2011 earthquake, there were 71 stroke admissions, and 61 (79.2%) were ischaemic infarction. This was less than the 96 strokes (72 [75%] ischaemic infarction) in the corresponding control period. None of the comparisons were statistically significant. There was also no difference in the rate of cardioembolic infarction from atrial fibrillation between the study periods. Patients admitted during the February 2011 earthquake period were less likely to be discharged directly home when compared to the control period (31.2% versus 46.9%, p=0.036). There was no observable trend in the number of weekly stroke admissions between the 2 weeks leading to and 6 weeks following the earthquakes. Our results suggest that severe psychological stress from earthquakes did not influence the subsequent short term risk of acute stroke, but the severity of the earthquake in February 2011 and associated civil structural damages may have influenced the pattern of discharge for stroke patients.

  12. Determining Optimal Post-Stroke Exercise (DOSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Cerebrovascular Accident; Stroke; Cerebral Infarction; Brain Infarction; Brain Ischemia; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Brain Diseases; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Vascular Diseases

  13. Acute MRI Changes in Progressive Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, Elizabeth; Rostrup, Egill; Rosenbaum, S

    2008-01-01

    aimed to assess if acute MRI findings could be used for the prediction of stroke in progression (SIP). Methods: Prospectively 41 patients, 13 with lacunar infarcts and 28 with territorial infarcts, were admitted to an acute stroke unit within 24 h of stroke onset (median 11 h, range 3- 22). Diffusion...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. Results: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  14. Acute MRI changes in progressive ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, E.; Rostrup, E.; Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    aimed to assess if acute MRI findings could be used for the prediction of stroke in progression (SIP). METHODS: Prospectively 41 patients, 13 with lacunar infarcts and 28 with territorial infarcts, were admitted to an acute stroke unit within 24 h of stroke onset (median 11 h, range 3- 22). Diffusion...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  15. Prediction of Major Vascular Events after Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovbiagele, Bruce; Goldstein, Larry B.; Amarenco, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identifying patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) at high risk of major vascular events (MVEs; stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death) may help optimize the intensity of secondary preventive interventions. We evaluated the relationships between...... the baseline Framingham Coronary Risk Score (FCRS) and a novel risk prediction model and with the occurrence of MVEs after stroke or TIA in subjects enrolled in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Level (SPARCL) trial. METHODS: Data from the 4731 subjects enrolled in the SPARCL study...

  16. In-hospital stroke: characteristics and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Briggs, R

    2015-01-01

    In-hospital stroke (IS) made up 6.5% of strokes recorded in the Irish National Stroke Register in 2012. International research has demonstrated poorer outcomes post IS compared to out of hospital stroke (OS). We aimed to profile all IS and OS over a 22 month period and compare the two groups by gathering data from the HIPE portal stroke register. The study site is a primary stroke centre. IS represented 11% (50\\/458) of total strokes with over half (27\\/50, 54%) admitted initially with medical complaints. IS patients had a significantly longer length of stay (79.2 +\\/- 87.4 days vs. 21.9 +\\/- 45.9 days, p < 0.01) and higher mortality (13\\/50 vs. 39\\/408, p < 0.01). Patients in the IS group were also less likely to receive stroke unit care (1\\/50 vs. 136\\/408, p < 0.01). This study demonstrates the significant morbidity and mortality associated with IS and highlights the need for efforts to be made to optimize identification and management of acute stroke in this cohort.

  17. Optical flow based finger stroke detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongdi; Li, Bin; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-07-01

    Finger stroke detection is an important topic in hand based Human Computer Interaction (HCI) system. Few research studies have carried out effective solutions to this problem. In this paper, we present a novel approach for stroke detection based on mono vision. Via analyzing the optical flow field within the finger area, our method is able to detect finger stroke under various camera position and visual angles. We present a thorough evaluation for each component of the algorithm, and show its efficiency and effectiveness on solving difficult stroke detection problems.

  18. Men’s health – the impact of stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Josephine; Dickinson, Hazel; Holden, Fae; Jones, Stephanie; Leathley, Michael John; Mcadam, Joanna; Radford, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of adult death and the most common cause of complex disability in the UK. This article discusses the incidence and impact of stroke, focusing on a range of issues from a male perspective, including stroke prevention, psychological needs, sexuality and return to work. There are some gender differences in modifiable risk factors for stroke, and women have better knowledge of stroke symptomatology. For men, the development of post-stroke depression is associated with gr...

  19. Association between acute statin therapy, survival, and improved functional outcome after ischemic stroke: the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-04-01

    Statins improve infarct volume and neurological outcome in animal stroke models. We investigated the relationship between statin therapy and ischemic stroke outcome in the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

  20. Canadian stroke best practice recommendations: Stroke rehabilitation practice guidelines, update 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Debbie; Lindsay, M Patrice; McIntyre, Amanda; Kirton, Adam; Rumney, Peter G; Bagg, Stephen; Bayley, Mark; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Dukelow, Sean; Garnhum, Maridee; Glasser, Ev; Halabi, Mary-Lou; Kang, Ester; MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn; Martino, Rosemary; Rochette, Annie; Rowe, Sarah; Salbach, Nancy; Semenko, Brenda; Stack, Bridget; Swinton, Luchie; Weber, Valentine; Mayer, Matthew; Verrilli, Sue; DeVeber, Gabrielle; Andersen, John; Barlow, Karen; Cassidy, Caitlin; Dilenge, Marie-Emmanuelle; Fehlings, Darcy; Hung, Ryan; Iruthayarajah, Jerome; Lenz, Laura; Majnemer, Annette; Purtzki, Jacqueline; Rafay, Mubeen; Sonnenberg, Lyn K; Townley, Ashleigh; Janzen, Shannon; Foley, Norine; Teasell, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Stroke rehabilitation is a progressive, dynamic, goal-orientated process aimed at enabling a person with impairment to reach their optimal physical, cognitive, emotional, communicative, social and/or functional activity level. After a stroke, patients often continue to require rehabilitation for persistent deficits related to spasticity, upper and lower extremity dysfunction, shoulder and central pain, mobility/gait, dysphagia, vision, and communication. Each year in Canada 62,000 people experience a stroke. Among stroke survivors, over 6500 individuals access in-patient stroke rehabilitation and stay a median of 30 days (inter-quartile range 19 to 45 days). The 2015 update of the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: Stroke Rehabilitation Practice Guidelines is a comprehensive summary of current evidence-based recommendations for all members of multidisciplinary teams working in a range of settings, who provide care to patients following stroke. These recommendations have been developed to address both the organization of stroke rehabilitation within a system of care (i.e., Initial Rehabilitation Assessment; Stroke Rehabilitation Units; Stroke Rehabilitation Teams; Delivery; Outpatient and Community-Based Rehabilitation), and specific interventions and management in stroke recovery and direct clinical care (i.e., Upper Extremity Dysfunction; Lower Extremity Dysfunction; Dysphagia and Malnutrition; Visual-Perceptual Deficits; Central Pain; Communication; Life Roles). In addition, stroke happens at any age, and therefore a new section has been added to the 2015 update to highlight components of stroke rehabilitation for children who have experienced a stroke, either prenatally, as a newborn, or during childhood. All recommendations have been assigned a level of evidence which reflects the strength and quality of current research evidence available to support the recommendation. The updated Rehabilitation Clinical Practice Guidelines feature several

  1. Stroke in Asia: a global disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong S

    2014-10-01

    Although stroke is a world-wide problem, the burden of stroke is particularly serious in Asia; its mortality is higher than in Europe or North America. The situation in Asia is dichotomized. Stroke mortality and case fatality has been declining in northern-eastern countries such as Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and urbanized areas of China. This is attributed to both the risk factor control and stroke care improvement. However, declining stroke incidence is rarely observed, which is in part due to rapidly aging population. As a result, there is an increase in the number of stroke survivors who require long-term, costly care. The extremely low birth rate and relatively insecure social health system markedly increases the caregiver burden. The problem in southern Asian countries, such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Indonesia is more fundamental. With the improving control of infectious diseases, life expectancy is prolonged. However, risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity and cigarette smoking become prevalent, and are poorly controlled. Stroke neurologists, organized stroke centers, and diagnostic tools are insufficient, which has resulted in high stroke fatality and mortality. Throughout Asia, the most urgent priority should be the primary stroke prevention through promoting a healthy lifestyle, e.g. low salt intake, regular physical exercise, stopping smoking, government sectors should take a stronger initiative to accomplish this. The rapidly aging populations and stroke burden will shrink the economy and destabilize the society, not only in Asia but also globally unless appropriate efforts are promptly initiated, this may result in a global disaster.

  2. Little change of modifiable risk factors 1 year after stroke: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units.......Recurrent stroke accounts for about 25% of admissions for acute stroke. For the prevention of recurrent cerebro and cardiovascular disease, stroke patients are advised to change modifiable stroke risk factors before discharge from stroke units....

  3. Individual limb mechanical analysis of gait following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Caitlin E; Farris, Dominic J; Sawicki, Gregory S; Lewek, Michael D

    2015-04-13

    The step-to-step transition of walking requires significant mechanical and metabolic energy to redirect the center of mass. Inter-limb mechanical asymmetries during the step-to-step transition may increase overall energy demands and require compensation during single-support. The purpose of this study was to compare individual limb mechanical gait asymmetries during the step-to-step transitions, single-support and over a complete stride between two groups of individuals following stroke stratified by gait speed (≥0.8 m/s or phases of a stride, as well as over a complete stride. Robust inter-limb asymmetries in mechanical power existed during walking after stroke; for both groups, the non-paretic limb produced significantly more positive net mechanical power than the paretic limb during all phases of a stride and over a complete stride. Interestingly, no differences in inter-limb mechanical power asymmetry were noted between groups based on walking speed, during any phase or over a complete stride. Paretic propulsion, however, was different between speed-based groups. The fact that paretic propulsion (calculated from anterior-posterior forces) is different between groups, but our measure of mechanical work (calculated from all three directions) is not, suggests that limb power output may be dominated by vertical components, which are required for upright support.

  4. Physical Activity Patterns of Acute Stroke Patients Managed in a Rehabilitation Focused Stroke Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya West

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Comprehensive stroke unit care, incorporating acute care and rehabilitation, may promote early physical activity after stroke. However, previous information regarding physical activity specific to the acute phase of stroke and the comprehensive stroke unit setting is limited to one stroke unit. This study describes the physical activity undertaken by patients within 14 days after stroke admitted to a comprehensive stroke unit. Methods. This study was a prospective observational study. Behavioural mapping was used to determine the proportion of the day spent in different activities. Therapist reports were used to determine the amount of formal therapy received on the day of observation. The timing of commencement of activity out of bed was obtained from the medical records. Results. On average, patients spent 45% (SD 25 of the day in some form of physical activity and received 58 (SD 34 minutes per day of physiotherapy and occupational therapy combined. Mean time to first mobilisation out of bed was 46 (SD 32 hours post-stroke. Conclusions. This study suggests that commencement of physical activity occurs earlier and physical activity is at a higher level early after stroke in this comprehensive stroke unit, when compared to studies of other acute stroke models of care.

  5. The association between stroke location and return to work after first stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Satoru; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    Although various factors, including age, race, job category, disability, and cortical function, have been associated with return to work (RTW) after stroke, few studies have examined the influence of stroke location on RTW. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on the association between stroke location and RTW after first stroke. The patients were all younger than age 65 years and were working at the time of their stroke (n = 126). A follow-up questionnaire evaluated RTW. Data were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model for hazard ratios (HRs) of successful RTW, taking potential confounding factors into consideration. The Cox model revealed that maximum weakness (HR 3.74, normal vs severe), apraxia (10.7, no vs yes), and occupation (2.11, white collar vs blue collar) were significant predictors, but stroke location was not a significant predictor. We conclude that stroke location is less important than other easily measured factors in predicting RTW.

  6. Thrombolysis outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients with prior stroke and diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, N K; Ahmed, N; Davalos, A;

    2011-01-01

    in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Register) compared to nonthrombolyzed controls (C; data from Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive). METHODS: We selected ischemic stroke patients on whom we held data on age, baseline NIH Stroke Scale score (NIHSS), and 90-day modified Rankin Scale score (m......BACKGROUND: Patients with concomitant diabetes mellitus (DM) and prior stroke (PS) were excluded from European approval of alteplase in stroke. We examined the influence of DM and PS on the outcomes of patients who received thrombolytic therapy (T; data from Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis......RS). We compared the distribution of mRS between T and C by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel (CMH) test and proportional odds logistic regression, after adjustment for age and baseline NIHSS, in patients with and without DM, PS, or the combination. We report odds ratios (OR) for improved distribution of m...

  7. Hemorrhagic stroke in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, L.B.; Amarenco, P.; Szarek, M.;

    2008-01-01

    risk was higher in those having a hemorrhagic stroke as the entry event (HR 5.65, 95% CI 2.82 to 11.30, p age (10 y increments, HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.74, p = 0.001). There were no statistical interactions between these factors......: Hemorrhagic stroke was more frequent in those treated with atorvastatin, in those with a hemorrhagic stroke as an entry event, in men, and increased with age. Those with Stage 2 hypertension at the last visit prior to the hemorrhagic stroke were also at increased risk. Treatment did not disproportionately......BACKGROUND: In the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) study, atorvastatin 80 mg/day reduced the risk of stroke in patients with recent stroke or TIA. Post hoc analysis found this overall benefit included an increase in the numbers of treated patients having...

  8. Verticality Perception During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vingerhoets, R.A.A.; Gisbergen, J.A.M. van; Medendorp, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    During prolonged rotation about a tilted yaw axis, often referred to as off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), a percept of being translated along a conical path slowly emerges as the sense of rotation subsides. Recently, we found that these perceptual changes are consistent with a canal-otolith interac

  9. Verticality perception during off-vertical axis rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vingerhoets, R.A.A.; Gisbergen, J.A.M. van; Medendorp, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    During prolonged rotation about a tilted yaw axis, often referred to as off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), a percept of being translated along a conical path slowly emerges as the sense of rotation subsides. Recently, we found that these perceptual changes are consistent with a canal-otolith interac

  10. A Case of Stroke in a Toddler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustubh Deshmukh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A 2 year male child, case of stroke on right side with associated anemia and thrombocytosis has been presented and discussed. Stroke is one of the rare neurological manifestation in children with multipleaetiological factors. Child was investigated to rule out various etiological conditions and was treated supportively for anemia to which he responded uneventfully.

  11. Unassisted Assessment of Stroke Severity Using Telemedicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; De Smedt, Ann; De Raedt, Sylvie; Moens, Maarten; Marien, Peter; Paquier, Philippe; De Keyser, Jacques; Brouns, Raf

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Quantification of stroke severity through telemedicine consultation is challenging and relies on professional support at the patient's bedside. We aimed to develop a novel scale for assessing stroke severity through telemedicine without assistance from a third party (Unassiste

  12. Stroke and nutrition: A review of studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Foroughi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions : Adherence to Mediterranean diet or DASH diet and increasing the consumption of antioxidant, vitamins, potassium, calcium food sources, vegetables, fruits, and whole grains intake can lower the risk of stroke. Healthy diet is effective in reducing risk of stroke, however, more studies need to be carried out in this area.

  13. Invariant properties between stroke features in handwriting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teulings, H L; Schomaker, L R

    1993-01-01

    A handwriting pattern is considered as a sequence of ballistic strokes. Replications of a pattern may be generated from a single, higher-level memory representation, acting as a motor program. Therefore, those stroke features which show the most invariant pattern are probably related to the paramete

  14. Psychological factors determine depressive symptomatology after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mierlo, Maria L.; Van Heugten, Caroline M.; Post, Marcel W.; De Kort, Paul L.; Visser-Meily, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify psychological factors related to poststroke depressive symptoms. Design Cross-sectional study, with patients assessed at 2 months poststroke. Setting Patients with stroke from 6 general hospitals. Participants Stroke patients (N=344; mean age ± SD, 66.9±12.3y). Interventions No

  15. Stroke Prevention: Managing Modifiable Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Di Legge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention plays a crucial role in counteracting morbidity and mortality related to ischemic stroke. It has been estimated that 50% of stroke are preventable through control of modifiable risk factors and lifestyle changes. Antihypertensive treatment is recommended for both prevention of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. The use of antiplatelets and statins has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs are indicated in stroke prevention because they also promote vascular health. Effective secondary-prevention strategies for selected patients include carotid revascularization for high-grade carotid stenosis and vitamin K antagonist treatment for atrial fibrillation. The results of recent clinical trials investigating new anticoagulants (factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors clearly indicate alternative strategies in stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation. This paper describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention with special reference to medical treatment in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke.

  16. Genetically determined coagulation disorders in ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.J. van Goor (Marie-Louise)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the research described in this thesis was to investigate the role of genetically determined coagulation disorders in ischemic stroke. We therefore performed several retrospective studies and one prospective case-control study of patients with recent ischemic stroke (the COCOS

  17. Stroke. Risks, recognition, and return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwic, Julie Johnson; Ennen, Kathy; DeVon, Holli A

    2002-08-01

    1. The two major classifications of stroke are ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic strokes account for 75% of all strokes and result from the complete occlusion of an artery. Hemorrhagic strokes, often caused by aneurysm or hypertension, are caused by the rupture of a cerebral blood vessel and bleeding into the surrounding tissue. 2. The signs and symptoms of stroke may include unilateral weakness or paralysis, a sagging of one side of the face, double or blurred vision, vertigo, numbness or tingling, and language disturbances. 3. Management of ischemic stroke may include thrombolytic agents (e.g., heparin, warfarin) if the individual is treated within 6 hours after the onset of symptoms. Diagnostic tests may include, computed tomography scan, transesophageal echocardiagraphy, Doppler ultrasonography, and electrocordiography. 4. Occupational health nurses can be actively involved in helping workers modify their risks for stroke, developing and implementing an action plan if an individual is experiencing a stroke, and facilitating the individual's reentry into the worksite after rehabilitation is completed.

  18. Clinimetrics & determinants of outcome after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, V.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is based on findings of the Functional Prognostication and disability study on stroke, which had two main objectives: (1) to examine which outcome measures are most appropriate, and especially most responsive, for the assessment of functional outcome in stroke patients and (2) to study p

  19. Defining post-stroke pain: diagnostic challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosink, Meyke; Geurts, Alexander C.H.; IJzerman, Maarten J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, a new grading system for central post-stroke pain (CPSP) was proposed, which might be used to distinguish patients with stroke who have central neuropathic pain from patients who have peripheral pain. Accordingly, for a CPSP diagnosis, all other causes of pain have to be excluded. Although

  20. Sleep apnea in stroke: Diagnosis, consequences & treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder in stroke, but is often left unrecognized and untreated. When left untreated, OSA is thought to contribute to decreased recovery from stroke. The main objectives of this thesis were 1) to improve early recognition of sleep apnea in stro

  1. Atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christine Benn; Gerds, Thomas A.; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Although the relation between stroke risk factors and stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) has been extensively examined, only few studies have explored the association of AF and the risk of ischaemic stroke/systemic thromboembolism/transient ischaemic attack (stroke....../TE/TIA) in the presence of concomitant stroke risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: From nationwide registries, all persons who turned 50, 60, 70, or 80 from 1997 to 2011 were identified. Persons receiving warfarin were excluded. The absolute risk of stroke/TE/TIA was reported for a 5-year period, as was the absolute risk...... ratios for AF vs. no AF according to prior stroke and the number of additional risk factors. The study cohort comprised of 3 076 355 persons without AF and 48 189 with AF. For men aged 50 years, with no risk factors, the 5-year risk of stroke was 1.1% (95% confidence interval 1.1-1.1); with AF alone 2...

  2. Obstruction of cerebral arteries in childhood stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velkey, I.; Lombay, B. (County Teaching Hospital, Miskolc (Hungary). Child Health Center); Panczel, G. (Semmelweis Medical Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Psychiatry)

    1992-09-01

    Middle cerebral artery obstruction in children is reviewed by our two cases. Ischemic childhood stroke was caused by moyamoya disease in the first, and by fibromuscular dysplasia in the second patient. In both cases transcranial Doppler sonography and cranial CT were performed, but the final diagnosis was made by angiography. The importance of angiography in childhood stroke is emphasized. (orig.).

  3. The Utility of the Faces Pain Scale in the Assessment of Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Its Relation with Quality of Life and Psychologic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Sebnem Koldas; Ay, Saime; Oztuna, Derya; Aytur, Yesim Kurtais; Evcik, Deniz

    2010-01-01

    This study was planned to investigate the utility of the vertical Faces Pain Scale (FPS) in the assessment of pain in stroke patients using the shoulder pain model and to assess its utility in the Turkish patient population. The secondary aim was to analyze the association of FPS with the quality of life and depression in the study population.…

  4. Alligning vertical collection relevance with user intent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Ke; Demeester, Thomas; Nguyen, Dong; Hiemstra, Djoerd; Trieschnigg, Dolf

    2014-01-01

    Selecting and aggregating different types of content from multiple vertical search engines is becoming popular in web search. The user vertical intent, the verticals the user expects to be relevant for a particular information need, might not correspond to the vertical collection relevance, the vert

  5. Job strain and the risk of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransson, Eleonor I; Nyberg, Solja T; Heikkilä, Katriina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Psychosocial stress at work has been proposed to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, its role as a risk factor for stroke is uncertain. METHODS: We conducted an individual-participant-data meta-analysis of 196 380 males and females from 14 European cohort...... studies to investigate the association between job strain, a measure of work-related stress, and incident stroke. RESULTS: In 1.8 million person-years at risk (mean follow-up 9.2 years), 2023 first-time stroke events were recorded. The age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio for job strain relative to no job....... CONCLUSION: Job strain may be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, but further research is needed to determine whether interventions targeting job strain would reduce stroke risk beyond existing preventive strategies....

  6. Gene therapy for stroke: 2006 overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yi; Miller, Jordan D; Heistad, Donald D

    2007-03-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases, although it may take many years to realize. Gene therapy could occur prior to a stroke (eg, to stabilize atherosclerotic plaques) and/or following a stroke (eg, to prevent vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage or reduce injury to neurons by ischemic insult). We have transferred the gene coding for vasoactive calcitonin gene-related peptide via cerebrospinal fluid, and demonstrated attenuation of vasospasm after SAH. Transfer of neuroprotective genes or small interfering RNA for neurotoxic genes has good potential for ischemic stroke. In this brief report, we review recent developments in experimental gene therapy for stroke. Fundamental advances, including development of safer, more specific gene transfer vectors, are discussed.

  7. [Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism after severe stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabinkina, Iu V; Gnedovskaia, E V; Piradov, M A; Kuntsevich, G I

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), a deep and superficial thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a very important problem of severe stroke. Pulmonary embolism (PE) significantly influences the course and outcome of severe stroke. The cause of this effect lies not only in severe patient's condition, high risk of VTE and difficulties in diagnosis of VTE but in still common limits in prophylaxis and treatment of PE in severe stroke, first of all, in brain hemorrhages and large brain infarctions with secondary hemorrhage. The paper presents the main principles and methods of prophylaxis of VTE in severe stroke. The suggested approach allows to decrease the frequency of VTE and fatal outcomes in severe stroke in the modern neuro-intensive care units.

  8. Advances in stroke treatment are within reach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Allan; Le Feuvre, David; Mngomezulu, Victor; Royston, Duncan; Harrichandparsard, Rohen; De Vries, Coert; Winter, Arthur; Potgieter, Francois

    2016-03-30

    Five recent trials have shown that mechanical removal of clot from cerebral arteries after a stroke can achieve a functional independent outcome in up to 60% of patients. This was an absolute benefit of between 13.5% and 31% for patients who had clot removal initiated within 6 hours of symptoms over those who had best medical treatment. Coupled with this, there is a strong drive to develop stroke units internationally and in South Africa. As a starting point, more primary stroke care centres that can administer intravenous thrombolysis are needed. Comprehensive stroke centres that can offer mechanical thrombectomy are available, but more will be required as referral of patients increases. Collaboration of all roleplayers will ensure that we can deliver training and care at the best level for stroke patients.

  9. The effects of estrogen in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koellhoffer, Edward C; McCullough, Louise D

    2013-08-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and the most common cause of long-term disability in the USA. Women have a lower incidence of stroke compared with men throughout most of the lifespan which has been ascribed to protective effects of gonadal steroids, most notably estrogen. Due to the lower stroke incidence observed in pre-menopausal women and robust preclinical evidence of neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of estrogen, researchers have focused on the potential benefits of hormones to reduce ischemic brain injury. However, as women age, they are disproportionately affected by stroke, coincident with the loss of estrogen with menopause. The risk of stroke in elderly women exceeds that of men and it is clear that in some settings estrogen can have pro-inflammatory effects. This review will focus on estrogen and inflammation and its interaction with aging.

  10. Atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Sandra Kruchov; Frost, Lars; Eagle, Kim A;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, the prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation among patients with stroke is not fully clarified. We compared patient characteristics, including severity of stroke and comorbidity, quality of in-hospital care...... and outcomes in a cohort of first-time ischemic stroke patients with and without atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Based on linkage of public medical databases, we did a population-based follow-up study among 3,849 stroke patients from the County of Aarhus, Denmark admitted in the period of 2003......-2007 and prospectively registered in the Danish National Indicator Project. RESULTS: Atrial fibrillation was associated with an adverse prognostic profile but not with an overall poorer quality of in-hospital care. Patients with atrial fibrillation had a longer total length of stay (median: 15 vs 9 days), and were...

  11. Hybrid Vertical-Cavity Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source (2) for light circuits on a silicon platform (3). A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region (101) arranged between a top mirror (4) and a bottom grating-mirror (12) in a grating region (11) in a silicon layer (10) on a substrate. A waveguide...

  12. Trade Liberalisation and Vertical Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Peter Arendorf; Laugesen, Anders Rosenstand

    We build a three-country model of international trade in final goods and intermediate inputs and study the relation between four different types of trade liberalisation and vertical integration. Firms are heterogeneous with respect to both productivity and factor (headquarter) intensity. Final-go...

  13. Multiservice Vertical Handoff Decision Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Fang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Future wireless networks must be able to coordinate services within a diverse-network environment. One of the challenging problems for coordination is vertical handoff, which is the decision for a mobile node to handoff between different types of networks. While traditional handoff is based on received signal strength comparisons, vertical handoff must evaluate additional factors, such as monetary cost, offered services, network conditions, and user preferences. In this paper, several optimizations are proposed for the execution of vertical handoff decision algorithms, with the goal of maximizing the quality of service experienced by each user. First, the concept of policy-based handoffs is discussed. Then, a multiservice vertical handoff decision algorithm (MUSE-VDA and cost function are introduced to judge target networks based on a variety of user- and network-valued metrics. Finally, a performance analysis demonstrates that significant gains in the ability to satisfy user requests for multiple simultaneous services and a more efficient use of resources can be achieved from the MUSE-VDA optimizations.

  14. Autonomous vertical profiler data management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Afzulpurkar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.S.; Madhan, R.; Dabholkar, N; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A

    The Autonomous Vertical Profiler (AVP), developed at NIO [1] [2], collects position and water column data over a period of 3 days and transmits through a satellite modem which is collated and stored on a PC. Data includes GPS positions, water column...

  15. Overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus protects against post-stroke depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao-Hao; Zhang, Ning; Li, Wei-Yun; Fang, Ma-Rong; Zhang, Hui; Fang, Yuan-Shu; Ding, Ming-Xing; Fu, Xiao-Yan

    2015-09-01

    Post-stroke depression is associated with reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In this study, we evaluated whether BDNF overexpression affects depression-like behavior in a rat model of post-stroke depression. The middle cerebral artery was occluded to produce a model of focal cerebral ischemia. These rats were then subjected to isolation-housing combined with chronic unpredictable mild stress to generate a model of post-stroke depression. A BDNF gene lentiviral vector was injected into the hippocampus. At 7 days after injection, western blot assay and real-time quantitative PCR revealed that BDNF expression in the hippocampus was increased in depressive rats injected with BDNF lentivirus compared with depressive rats injected with control vector. Furthermore, sucrose solution consumption was higher, and horizontal and vertical movement scores were increased in the open field test in these rats as well. These findings suggest that BDNF overexpression in the hippocampus of post-stroke depressive rats alleviates depression-like behaviors.

  16. Overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus protects against post-stroke depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-hao Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-stroke depression is associated with reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. In this study, we evaluated whether BDNF overexpression affects depression-like behavior in a rat model of post-stroke depression. The middle cerebral artery was occluded to produce a model of focal cerebral ischemia. These rats were then subjected to isolation-housing combined with chronic unpredictable mild stress to generate a model of post-stroke depression. A BDNF gene lentiviral vector was injected into the hippocampus. At 7 days after injection, western blot assay and real-time quantitative PCR revealed that BDNF expression in the hippocampus was increased in depressive rats injected with BDNF lentivirus compared with depressive rats injected with control vector. Furthermore, sucrose solution consumption was higher, and horizontal and vertical movement scores were increased in the open field test in these rats as well. These findings suggest that BDNF overexpression in the hippocampus of post-stroke depressive rats alleviates depression-like behaviors.

  17. Overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus protects against post-stroke depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao-hao Chen; Ning Zhang; Wei-yun Li; Ma-rong Fang; Hui Zhang; Yuan-shu Fang; Ming-xing Ding; Xiao-yan Fu

    2015-01-01

    Post-stroke depression is associated with reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In this study, we evaluated whether BDNF overexpression affects depression-like behavior in a rat model of post-stroke depression. The middle cerebral artery was occluded to produce a model of focal cerebral ischemia. These rats were then subjected to isolation-housing combined with chronic unpredictable mild stress to generate a model of post-stroke depression. ABDNF gene lentiviral vector was injected into the hippocampus. At 7 days after injection, western blot assay and real-time quantitative PCR revealed that BDNF expression in the hippo-campus was increased in depressive rats injected with BDNF lentivirus compared with depressive rats injected with control vector. Furthermore, sucrose solution consumption was higher, and horizontal and vertical movement scores were increased in the open ifeld test in these rats as well. These ifndings suggest that BDNF overexpression in the hippocampus of post-stroke depressive rats alleviates depression-like behaviors.

  18. Scapulohumeral kinematic assessment of the forward kayak stroke in experienced whitewater kayakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassinger, Craig A; Myers, Joseph B; Sell, Timothy C; Oyama, Sakiko; Rubenstein, Elaine N; Lephart, Scott M

    2011-06-01

    By understanding the normal humeral and scapular kinematics during the kayak stroke, inferences about the relationship of kayaking technique and shoulder injury may be established. The purpose of this study was to describe scapular and humeral kinematics and to compare dominant versus nondominant symmetry in healthy whitewater kayakers performing the forward stroke. Twenty-five competent whitewater kayakers (mean age: 34.1 +/- 9.4 years, mean height: 1.768 +/- 0.093m, mean mass: 78.2 +/- 13.0 kg) underwent humeral and scapular kinematic assessment, using an electromagnetic tracking device, while kayaking on a kayak ergometer. Paired t-tests were used to determine symmetry. Scapular and humeral kinematic means and standard deviations at six time points during the kayak stroke were described. Scapular and humeral kinematics were shown to be similar upon bilateral comparison. The greatest potential for injury during the forward stroke may be at thrust paddle shaft vertical when the humerus is maximally elevated in internal rotation and adduction as subacromial structures may be mechanically impinged. The relationship between scapulohumeral kinematics related to injury at other time points are also described.

  19. A biomechanical analysis of the Olympic-style flatwater kayak stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, R V; Kearney, J T

    1980-01-01

    To investigate the biomechanics of flatwater kayaking, the technique of nine Olympic caliber K-1 paddlers was analyzed using cinematographic and computer procedures. Results indicated that, during paddle-water contact, the horizontal arm action was one of push-then-pull with the push coming from the arm farthest from the water (thrust segments) followed by the pull coming from the arm closest to the water (draw segments). During this action, the center of paddle rotation shifted up the paddle shaft as the stroke progressed, which increased the time the paddle was in the power phase of the stroke. The horizontal movement patterns of the individual segments indicated that the push was accomplished by an integrated movement of the thrust wrist and elbow, with minimal shoulder involvement. Subsequently, the pull was accomplished by an integrated movement of the draw wrist, elbow, shoulder, as well as the thrust shoulder. During the latter stages of water contact, since the performers were unable to generate additional useful power, the paddle was rapidly withdrawn to avoid dragging. Subject stability in the frontal plane was maintained by shifting the body mass toward the water contact side at paddle entry and away from it at exit. This action opposed the vertical forces produced as a by-product of the stroke. The final outcome of this stroke technique was the maintenance of the body center of gravity velocity while the boat oscillated under the performer.

  20. Ground reaction force analysed with correlation coefficient matrix in group of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerbik, Ewa; Krawczyk, Maciej; Syczewska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the third cause of death in contemporary society and causes many disorders. Clinical scales, ground reaction force (GRF) and objective gait analysis are used for assessment of patient's rehabilitation progress during treatment. The goal of this paper is to assess whether signal correlation coefficient matrix applied to GRF can be used for evaluation of the status of post-stroke patients. A group of patients underwent clinical assessment and instrumented gait analysis simultaneously three times. The difference between components of patient's GRF (vertical, fore/aft, med/lat) and normal ones (reference GRF of healthy subjects) was calculated as correlation coefficient. Patients were divided into two groups ("worse" and "better") based on the clinical functional scale tests done at the beginning of rehabilitation process. The results obtained by these two groups were compared using statistical analysis. An increase of median value of correlation coefficient is observed in all components of GRF, but only in non-paretic leg. Analysis of GRF signal can be helpful in assessment of post-stroke patients during rehabilitation. Improvement in stroke patients was observed in non-paretic leg of the "worse" group. GRF analysis should not be the only tool for objective validation of patient's improvement, but could be used as additional source of information.

  1. A pilot study on transient ischemic stroke induced with endothelin-1 in the rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, PeiMin; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Lin; He, Jing; Zhao, XuDong; Yang, FuHan; Zhao, Ning; Yang, JianZhen; Ge, LongJiao; Lin, Yu; Yu, HuaLin; Wang, JianHong

    2017-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a vasoconstrictor, has recently been used to induce focal ischemia in rodents and marmoset monkeys. The rhesus monkey, however, has numerous advantages to the rodent and marmoset that make it a superior and irreplaceable animal model for studying stroke in the brain. In the present study, after mapping the preferred hand representation in two healthy male monkeys with intracortical micro-stimulation, ET-1 was microinjected into the contralateral motor cortex (M1) to its preferred hand. The monkeys had been trained in three manual dexterity tasks before the microinjection and were tested for these tasks following the ET-1 injection. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans were performed 1, 7, 14 and 28 days post ischemia. It was found that ET-1 impaired the manual dexterity of the monkeys in the vertical slot and rotating Brinkman board tasks 3–8 days after the injection. Brain imaging found that severe edema was present 7 days after the focal ischemia. This data suggest that ET-1 can induce transient ischemic stroke in rhesus monkey and that ET-1 induced focal ischemia in non-human primates is a potential model to study the mechanism of stroke and brain repair after stroke. PMID:28358140

  2. The comparison of two physiotherapeutic approaches for gait improvement in sub-acute stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Maciej; Szczerbik, Ewa; Syczewska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The functional gait problems encountered by stroke patients include impaired balance, abnormal gait pattern with marked asymmetry, pathological trunk and spinal motion. Many different methods of physiotherapy are used to improve functional ability (especially gait) in stroke patients, but their efficacy and outcome are often not objectively assessed. The goal of this paper is to compare two therapeutic programs: one that is traditionally used in our rehabilitation facilities (exercises in lying position, "open chain" exercises, isolated movements of extremities with trunk stabilization) and the new one (exercises in vertical position, sitting or standing, "closed chain" exercises involving whole paretic side of the body). Fifty one stroke patients, aged 34 to 79 years, participated in the study. Patients were randomly allocated to one of the two groups. Patients underwent clinical assessment (Fugl-Meyer, Rivermead Motor Assessment, Berg Balance Scale) and instrumented gait analysis (using six-camera VICON 460 system) simultaneously three times: prior to the beginning of the rehabilitation program, after 6 weeks of the program, and after another 6 weeks of physiotherapy, at the end of rehabilitation program. Results demonstrated that both rehabilitation programs improved the gait function and clinical status in patients suffering from stroke. Despite the differences between the two programs the progress achieved by the patients in locomotor function is similar. Two equivalent physiotherapy programs could be applied during rehabilitation process depending on the patient's individual preferences and needs, as the amount of functional improvement provided by them is comparable.

  3. Vitamin D deficiency and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D comprises a group of fat-soluble pro-hormones, obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements, and it must undergo two hydroxylation reactions to be activated in the body. Several studies have shown the role of vitamin D in mineral metabolism regulation, especially calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Some factors such as inadequate vitamin intake and liver or kidney disorders can lead to vitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, vitamin D malnutrition may also be linked to susceptibility to chronic diseases such as heart failure, peripheral artery disease, high blood pressure, cognitive impairment including foggy brain and memory loss, and autoimmune diseases including diabetes type I. Recent research has revealed that low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of cardiovascular-related morbidity (Sato et al., 2004 and mortality (Pilz et al., 2008. Also, hypertension contributes to a reduction in bone mineral density and increase in the incidence of stroke and death. This article reviews the function and physiology of vitamin D and examines the effects of vitamin D deficiency on susceptibility to stroke, as a cardiovascular event, and its morbidity and subsequent mortality.

  4. Swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke

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    Gabriela Camargo Remesso

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate occurrences of swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke. METHOD: This was a retrospective study on 596 medical files. The inclusion criterion was that the patients needed to have been hospitalized with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke; the exclusion criteria were the presence of associated cardiac problems and hospital stay already more than 14 days. RESULTS: 50.5% were men and 49.5% women; mean age 65.3 years (SD=±11.7 (p<0.001. Among the risk factors, 79.4% had hypertension, 36.7% had diabetes (p<0.001 and 42.7% were smokers. 13.3% of the patients died. Swallowing disorders occurred in 19.6%, among whom 91.5% had mild difficulty and 8.5% had severe difficulty. 87.1% had spontaneous recovery after a mean of 2.4 months. A lesion in the brainstem region occurred in 6.8% (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Swallowing disorders occurred in almost 20% of the population and most of the difficulty in swallowing found was mild. The predictors for swallowing disorders were older age, diabetes mellitus and lesions in the brainstem region.

  5. The CHAT classification of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, E F; Browse, N L

    1989-02-01

    Current terminology for clinical episodes relating to stroke is inconsistent and unclear, does not permit inclusion of data regarding the location and magnitude of extracranial and intracerebral arterial disease, does not coincide with existing classifications in Europe, and characterizes a hemispheric entity only, as opposed to a global description including prior symptoms in both hemispheres. A new classification system (CHAT) has been designed to deal with these problems, including the current clinical presentation, historical clinical episodes, the site and pathologic type of arterial disease, and information regarding abnormalities of the brain. Using this system, a retrospective review of 480 consecutive carotid endarterectomies is presented, demonstrating the advantages of the CHAT classification. Data include a significant difference in the probability of survival after carotid endarterectomy for asymptomatic stenosis in patients with prior symptoms on the opposite side, as well as a significant difference in the probability of stroke-free survival between patients with amaurosis fugax and those with prior carotid cortical symptoms (TIAs) as the presenting clinical condition. The CHAT classification is suggested as a significant advance in the reporting of all surgical cerebrovascular disease experience, and has particular implications for the current randomized trials between medical and surgical therapy for carotid artery disease.

  6. Role of sleep-disordered breathing and sleep-wake disturbances for stroke and stroke recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and sleep-wake disturbances (SWD) are highly prevalent in stroke patients. Recent studies suggest that they represent both a risk factor and a consequence of stroke and affect stroke recovery, outcome, and recurrence. Methods: Review of literature. Results: Several studies have proven SDB to represent an independent risk factor for stroke. Sleep studies in TIA and stroke patients are recommended in view of the very high prevalence (>50%) of SDB (Class IIb, level of evidence B). Treatment of obstructive SDB with continuous positive airway pressure is recommended given the strength of the increasing evidence in support of a positive effect on outcome (Class IIb, level of evidence B). Oxygen, biphasic positive airway pressure, and adaptive servoventilation may be considered in patients with central SDB. Recently, both reduced and increased sleep duration, as well as hypersomnia, insomnia, and restless legs syndrome (RLS), were also suggested to increase stroke risk. Mainly experimental studies found that SWD may in addition impair neuroplasticity processes and functional stroke recovery. Treatment of SWD with hypnotics and sedative antidepressants (insomnia), activating antidepressants or stimulants (hypersomnia), dopaminergic drugs (RLS), and clonazepam (parasomnias) are based on single case observations and should be used with caution. Conclusions: SDB and SWD increase the risk of stroke in the general population and affect short- and long-term stroke recovery and outcome. Current knowledge supports the systematic implementation of clinical procedures for the diagnosis and treatment of poststroke SDB and SWD on stroke units. PMID:27488603

  7. Returning to paid employment after stroke: the Psychosocial Outcomes In StrokE (POISE cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maree L Hackett

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine which early modifiable factors are associated with younger stroke survivors' ability to return to paid work in a cohort study with 12-months of follow-up conducted in 20 stroke units in the Stroke Services NSW clinical network. PARTICIPANTS: Were aged >17 and <65 years, recent (within 28 days stroke, able to speak English sufficiently to respond to study questions, and able to provide written informed consent. Participants with language or cognitive impairment were eligible to participate if their proxy provided consent and completed assessments on the participants' behalf. The main outcome measure was return to paid work during the 12 months following stroke. RESULTS: Of 441 consented participants (average age 52 years, 68% male, 83% with ischemic stroke, 218 were in paid full-time and 53 in paid part-time work immediately before their stroke, of whom 202 (75% returned to paid part- or full-time work within 12 months. Being male, female without a prior activity restricting illness, younger, independent in activities of daily living (ADL at 28 days after stroke, and having private health insurance was associated with return to paid work, following adjustment for other illnesses and a history of depression before stroke (C statistic 0·81. Work stress and post stroke depression showed no such independent association. CONCLUSIONS: Given that independence in ADL is the strongest predictor of return to paid work within 12 months of stroke, these data reinforce the importance of reducing stroke-related disability and increasing independence for younger stroke survivors. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ANZCTRN 12608000459325.

  8. Stroke Risk After Non-Stroke ED Dizziness Presentations: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Kevin A.; Zahuranec, Darin B.; Brown, Devin L.; Meurer, William J.; Burke, James F.; Smith, Melinda A.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Fendrick, A. Mark; McLaughlin, Thomas; Morgenstern, Lewis B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acute stroke is a serious concern in Emergency Department (ED) dizziness presentations. Prior studies, however, suggest that stroke is actually an unlikely cause of these presentations. Lacking are data on short- and long-term follow-up from population-based studies to establish stroke risk after presumed non-stroke ED dizziness presentations. Methods From 5/8/2011 to 5/7/2012, patients ≥ 45 years of age presenting to EDs in Nueces County, Texas, with dizziness, vertigo, or imbalance were identified, excluding those with stroke as the initial diagnosis. Stroke events after the ED presentation up to 10/2/2012 were determined using the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) study, which uses rigorous surveillance and neurologist validation. Cumulative stroke risk was calculated using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results 1,245 patients were followed for a median of 347 days (IQR 230- 436 days). Median age was 61.9 years (IQR, 53.8-74.0 years). After the ED visit, fifteen patients (1.2%) had a stroke. Stroke risk was 0.48% (95% CI, 0.22%-1.07%) at 2 days; 0.48% (95% CI, 0.22%-1.07%) at 7 days; 0.56% (95% CI, 0.27%-1.18%) at 30 days; 0.56% (95% CI, 0.27%-1.18%) at 90 days; and 1.42% (95% CI, 0.85%-2.36%) at 12 months. Interpretation Using rigorous case ascertainment and outcome assessment in a population-based design, we found that the risk of stroke after presumed non-stroke ED dizziness presentations is very low, supporting a non-stroke etiology to the overwhelming majority of original events. High-risk subgroups likely exist, however, because most of the 90-day stroke risk occurred within 2-days. Vascular risk stratification was insufficient to identify these cases. PMID:24788511

  9. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: findings from Tuscan FADOI Stroke Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite vitamin K antagonists (VKAs are considered the first choice treatment for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF, literature shows their underuse in this context. Since data about VKAs use prior and after acute stroke lack, the aim of this study was to focus on management of anticoagulation with VKAs in this context. Data were retrieved from Tuscan FADOI Stroke Registry, an online data bank aimed to report on characteristics of stroke patients consecutively admitted in Internal Medicine wards in 2010 and 2011. In this period 819 patients with mean age 76.5±12.3 years were enrolled. Data on etiology were available for 715 of them (88.1%, 87% being ischemic and 13% hemorrhagic strokes. AF was present in 238 patients (33%, 165 (69.3% having a known AF before hospitalization, whereas 73 patients (31.7% received a new diagnosis of AF. A percentage of 89% of strokes in patients with known AF were ischemic and 11% hemorrhagic. A percentage of 86.7% of patients with known AF had a CHADS2 ≥2, but only 28.3% were on VKAs before hospitalization. A percentage of 78.8% of patients treated with VKAs before stroke had an international normalized ratio (INR ≤2.0; 68.7% of patients with VKAs-related hemorrhagic strokes had INR ≤3.0. Combined endpoint mortality or severe disability in patients with ischemic stroke associated with AF was present in 47%, while it was present in 19.30% and 19.20% of atherothrombotic and lacunar strokes, respectively. At hospital discharge, VKAs were prescribed in 25.9% of AF related ischemic stroke patients. AF related strokes are burdened by severe outcome but VKAs are dramatically underused in patients with AF, even in higher risk patients. Efforts to improve anticoagulation in this stroke subtype are warranted.

  10. CT Angiography in Ischemic Stroke: Optimization and Accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Monyé (Cécile)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractStroke is the third leading cause of death after coronary heart disease and cancer. The clinical burden of stroke now exceeds that of coronary heart disease.1 Especially in the aging population stroke is a major disease. By the year 2020 the incidence of stroke in the Netherlands is expe

  11. Acoustic Analysis of Voice in Dysarthria following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Tsai; Kent, Ray D.; Kent, Jane Finley; Duffy, Joseph R.; Thomas, Jack E.

    2009-01-01

    Although perceptual studies indicate the likelihood of voice disorders in persons with stroke, there have been few objective instrumental studies of voice dysfunction in dysarthria following stroke. This study reports automatic analysis of sustained vowel phonation for 61 speakers with stroke. The results show: (1) men with stroke and healthy…

  12. Current status of endovascular stroke treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Philip M; Schumacher, H Christian; Connolly, E Sander; Heyer, Eric J; Gray, William A; Higashida, Randall T

    2011-06-07

    The management of acute ischemic stroke is rapidly developing.Although acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of adult disability and death, the number of patients requiring emergency endovascular intervention remains unknown, but is a fraction of the overall stroke population. Public health initiatives endeavor to raise public awareness about acute stroke to improve triage for emergency treatment, and the medical community is working to develop stroke services at community and academic medical centers throughout the United States. There is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–approved pathway for training in endovascular surgical neuroradiology, the specialty designed to train physicians specifically to treat cerebrovascular diseases. Primary and comprehensive stroke center designations have been defined, yet questions remain about the best delivery model. Telemedicine is available to help community medical centers cope with the complexity of stroke triage and treatment. Should comprehensive care be provided at every community center, or should patients with complex medical needs be triaged to major stroke centers with high-level surgical,intensive care, and endovascular capabilities? Although the answers to these and other questions about stroke care delivery remain unanswered owing to the paucity of empirical data, we are convinced that stroke care regionalization is crucial for delivery of high-quality comprehensive ischemic stroke treatment. A stroke team available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week requires specialty skills in stroke neurology, endovascular surgical neuroradiology, neurosurgery, neurointensive care, anesthesiology, nursing, and technical support for optimal success. Several physician groups with divergent training backgrounds (i.e., interventional neuroradiology, neurosurgery,neurology, peripheral interventional radiology, and cardiology) lay claim to the treatment of stroke patients,particularly the endovascular or

  13. Diagnostic imaging in neonatal stroke; Bildgebende Diagnostik des Neonatal stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhle, S.; Ipsiroglu, O.; Weninger, M. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendheilkunde, Wien (Austria). Abt. fuer Neonatologie, angeborene Stoerungen und Intensivmedizin; Puig, S.; Prayer, D. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2000-01-01

    A cerebral artery infarction is an important differential diagnosis in the newborn with neurological abnormalities. Based on clinical data, its incidence is estimated to be 1 in 4000 newborns. Since the course is often subclinical, the true incidence is probably higher. Diagnosis: Cerebral ultrasound and Doppler sonography as readily available screening tools play a central role in the initial diagnosis of neonatal cerebral infarction. Definitive diagnosis is made by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Beside symptomatic anticonvulsive therapy, treatment aims at the prevention of secondary ischemic injury. Discussion: Three term infants with different clinical courses of neonatal stroke are presented to sensitize the clinician and the radiologist for this probably underdiagnosed entity. The role of imaging modalities in the diagnosis and follow-up of neonatal cerebral infarction is discussed. (orig.) [German] Ein Infarkt im Stromgebiet der Zerebralarterien stellt eine wichtige Differentialdiagnose bei neurologischen Auffaelligkeiten in der Neonatalperiode dar. Die Inzidenz wird anhand von klinischer Daten auf 1:4000 Lebendgeborene geschaetzt. Da der Verlauf oft subklinisch ist, liegt die wahre Inzidenz wahrscheinlich hoeher. Diagnose: Bei der Diagnosestellung kommen dem Schaedelultraschall und der Doppelsonographie als leicht verfuegbaren Screening-Methoden eine zentrale Rolle zu. Die definitive Diagnose wird, je nach Verfuegbarkeit, mittels Computertomographie oder Kernspintomographie gestellt. Die Behandlung ist neben der symptomatischen (antikonvulsiven) Therapie auf die Vermeidung von ischaemischen Sekundaerschaeden gerichtet. Diskussion: Wir wollen mit der vorliegenden Arbeit anhand von 3 Kindern mit verschiedenen klinischen Verlaeufen eines sog. Neonatal stroke den Stellenwert der bildgebenden Verfahren bei der Diagnostik und Verlaufskontrolle aufzeigen und die Sensibilitaet fuer dieses vermutlich unterdiagnostizierte Krankheitsbild erhoehen

  14. Stroke in young women: An interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Dorothy M; Desmond, Deirdre; Coughlan, Tara; O'Neill, Des; Collins, D Rónán

    2016-05-01

    Stroke among adults of working age is increasing. We aimed to explore the experience of stroke among young women in Ireland. In total, 12 women (aged between 18 and 50 years) participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four super-ordinate themes were identified: stroke as an illness of later life ('obviously it's for older people'), post-stroke selves, a desire for peer support and the impact of stroke on relationships. Findings indicate the importance of addressing the specific needs of younger stroke patients from admission to recovery through provision of inclusive all-age acute stroke services with tailored rehabilitation.

  15. Temporal trends in stroke admissions in Denmark 1997–2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Malene Nøhr; Andersson, Charlotte; Ahlehoff, Ole;

    2013-01-01

    The Stroke burden is increasing in many populations where health institutions may experience more patients. We wanted to examine whether incidence rates and absolute number of hospitalized stroke patients remained stable in Denmark during a 13 years period where exposure to major stroke risk fact...... factors decreased, changes in stroke treatment was implemented, and the age of the population increased.......The Stroke burden is increasing in many populations where health institutions may experience more patients. We wanted to examine whether incidence rates and absolute number of hospitalized stroke patients remained stable in Denmark during a 13 years period where exposure to major stroke risk...

  16. Perceived neighborhood social cohesion and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S; Park, Nansook; Peterson, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    Research in the last three decades has shown that negative neighborhood factors such as neighborhood violence, noise, traffic, litter, low neighborhood socioeconomic status, and poor air quality increase the risk of poor health. Fewer studies have examined the potential protective effect that neighborhood factors can have on health, particularly stroke. We examined whether higher perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with lower stroke incidence after adjusting for traditional risk and psychological factors that have been linked with stroke risk. Prospective data from the Health and Retirement Study--a nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50--were used. Analyses were conducted on a subset of 6740 adults who were stroke-free at baseline. Analyses adjusted for chronic illnesses and relevant sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychosocial factors. Over a four-year follow-up, higher perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with a lower risk of stroke. Each standard deviation increase in perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with a multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (O.R.) of 0.85 for stroke incidence (95% CI, 0.75-0.97, p social cohesion remained significant after adjusting for a comprehensive set of risk factors. Therefore, perceived neighborhood social cohesion plays an important role in protecting against stroke.

  17. Simulation training for hyperacute stroke unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roots, Angela; Thomas, Libby; Jaye, Peter; Birns, Jonathan

    National clinical guidelines have emphasized the need to identify acute stroke as a clinical priority for early assessment and treatment of patients on hyperacute stroke units. Nurses working on hyperacute stroke units require stroke specialist training and development of competencies in dealing with neurological emergencies and working in multidisciplinary teams. Educational theory suggests that experiential learning with colleagues in real-life settings may provide transferable results to the workplace with improved performance. Simulation training has been shown to deliver situational training without compromising patient safety and has been shown to improve both technical and non-technical skills (McGaghie et al, 2010). This article describes the role that simulation training may play for nurses working on hyperacute stroke units explaining the modalities available and the educational potential. The article also outlines the development of a pilot course involving directly relevant clinical scenarios for hyperacute stroke unit patient care and assesses the benefits of simulation training for hyperacute stroke unit nurses, in terms of clinical performance and non-clinical abilities including leadership and communication.

  18. Nut consumption and risk of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhizhong; Xu, Gelin; Wei, Yongyue; Zhu, Wusheng; Liu, Xinfeng

    2015-03-01

    Nut consumption has been inconsistently associated with risk of stroke. Our aim was to carry out a meta-analysis of prospective studies to assess the relation between nut consumption and stroke risk and mortality. Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed and Embase through June 2014 and by reviewing the references of retrieved articles. Prospective cohort studies that reported relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between nut consumption and risk of stroke were included. Six articles including nine independent prospective cohorts with 476,181 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RR of stroke was 0.90 (95% CI 0.83-0.98) comparing the highest with the lowest nut consumption. Stratifying by gender, significant inverse association was observed for females (RR 0.88; 95% CI 0.78-0.98). Sensitivity analysis restricted to studies with adjustment for common confounding factors showed similar results, strengthening the association between nut consumption and stroke risk. Moreover, we observed a trend toward an inverse association between higher nut consumption and stroke mortality (RR 0.86; 95% CI 0.69-1.06), although it is not significant. Current evidence indicated that nut consumption is inversely associated with risk of stroke.

  19. Stroke genetics: prospects for personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Hugh S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epidemiologic evidence supports a genetic predisposition to stroke. Recent advances, primarily using the genome-wide association study approach, are transforming what we know about the genetics of multifactorial stroke, and are identifying novel stroke genes. The current findings are consistent with different stroke subtypes having different genetic architecture. These discoveries may identify novel pathways involved in stroke pathogenesis, and suggest new treatment approaches. However, the already identified genetic variants explain only a small proportion of overall stroke risk, and therefore are not currently useful in predicting risk for the individual patient. Such risk prediction may become a reality as identification of a greater number of stroke risk variants that explain the majority of genetic risk proceeds, and perhaps when information on rare variants, identified by whole-genome sequencing, is also incorporated into risk algorithms. Pharmacogenomics may offer the potential for earlier implementation of 'personalized genetic' medicine. Genetic variants affecting clopidogrel and warfarin metabolism may identify non-responders and reduce side-effects, but these approaches have not yet been widely adopted in clinical practice.

  20. Returning to work after stroke: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Barbara; Grace, Marty

    2009-06-01

    This review focuses on the experiences and rehabilitation needs of working age, higher functioning stroke survivors in relation to their 'return to work'. It grew out of the poststroke experience of one of the authors and her realization of the inadequacy of services to facilitate return to work and optimal recovery from stroke. The authors' aim is to present a practice-oriented review that can provide information for future practice and research. Returning to work and sustaining employment are considered key aspects of rehabilitation and recovery by younger stroke survivors. From a psychosocial perspective, successful return to work can enhance recovery and life satisfaction by consolidating self-esteem, confidence and social identity. However, even higher functioning stroke survivors with minimal or no obvious physical disability may experience workplace challenges relating to their neurological condition. Appropriate rehabilitation would include specific preparation for return to work, education within the workplace to facilitate return to work, participation by the stroke survivor in all aspects of the management of their return to work, and an ongoing role for a stroke educator/workplace advocate. In conclusion, further research is required in this area to support stroke survivors in returning to and maintaining employment to achieve their poststroke potential. Thirteen recommendations arising from the existing literature and the lived experience of one of the authors are presented at the end of the review.

  1. Professionals’ views on interprofessional stroke team functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Murray Cramm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The quality of integrated stroke care depends on smooth team functioning but professionals may not always work well together. Professionals' perspectives on the factors that influence stroke team functioning remain largely unexamined. Understanding their experiences is critical to indentifying measures to improve team functioning. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that contributed to the success of interprofessional stroke teams as perceived by team members.  Methods: We distributed questionnaires to professionals within 34 integrated stroke care teams at various health care facilities in 9 Dutch regions. 558 respondents (response rate: 39% completed the questionnaire. To account for the hierarchical structure of the study design we fitted a hierarchical random-effects model. The hierarchical structure comprised 558 stroke team members (level 1 nested in 34 teams (level 2.  Results: Analyses showed that personal development, social well-being, interprofessional education, communication, and role understanding significantly contributed to stroke team functioning. Team-level constructs affecting interprofessional stroke team functioning were communication and role understanding. No significant relationships were found with individual-level personal autonomy and team-level cohesion.  Discussion and conclusion: Our findings suggest that interventions to improve team members' social well-being, communication, and role understanding will improve teams' performance. To further advance interprofessional team functioning, healthcare organizations should pay attention to developing professionals' interpersonal skills and interprofessional education.        

  2. Professionals’ views on interprofessional stroke team functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Murray Cramm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The quality of integrated stroke care depends on smooth team functioning but professionals may not always work well together. Professionals' perspectives on the factors that influence stroke team functioning remain largely unexamined. Understanding their experiences is critical to indentifying measures to improve team functioning. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that contributed to the success of interprofessional stroke teams as perceived by team members. Methods: We distributed questionnaires to professionals within 34 integrated stroke care teams at various health care facilities in 9 Dutch regions. 558 respondents (response rate: 39% completed the questionnaire. To account for the hierarchical structure of the study design we fitted a hierarchical random-effects model. The hierarchical structure comprised 558 stroke team members (level 1 nested in 34 teams (level 2. Results: Analyses showed that personal development, social well-being, interprofessional education, communication, and role understanding significantly contributed to stroke team functioning. Team-level constructs affecting interprofessional stroke team functioning were communication and role understanding. No significant relationships were found with individual-level personal autonomy and team-level cohesion. Discussion and conclusion: Our findings suggest that interventions to improve team members' social well-being, communication, and role understanding will improve teams' performance. To further advance interprofessional team functioning, healthcare organizations should pay attention to developing professionals' interpersonal skills and interprofessional education.       

  3. Rehabilitation of a patient with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurba Barman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a significant cause of long-term disability world-wide. The post-stroke disabilities are due to loss of locomotion, activity of daily living, cognition and communication skills. Rehabilitation is an integral part of medical management and continues longitudinally through acute care, post-acute care and community reintegration. The objectives of stroke rehabilitation are to maximize the functional independence, minimize the disabilities, reintegrate back into the home and community and improve the self-esteem of patient. A comprehensive stroke rehabilitation service should provide early assessment of impairments and disabilities, management and prevention of complications and well-organized rehabilitation program in both in-patient and out-patient settings. A multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary team approach is necessary to reduce the post-stroke disabilities. It has many members, including physicians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, orthotist, psychotherapists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation therapists, rehabilitation nurse, patients, families and other caregivers. Physicians caring for patients with stroke during rehabilitation must be aware of potential medical complications, as well as a number of special problems that may complicate recovery, including cognitive deficits, aphasia, dysphagia, urinary incontinence, shoulder pain, spasticity, falls and depression. Involvement of patient and caregivers in the rehabilitation process is essential. This article outlines the salient features of the early comprehensive rehabilitation after stroke.

  4. Physical Activity in Hospitalised Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya West

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to examine the amount and type of physical activity engaged in by people hospitalised after stroke. Method. We systematically reviewed the literature for observational studies describing the physical activity of stroke patients. Results. Behavioural mapping, video recording and therapist report are used to monitor activity levels in hospitalised stroke patients in the 24 included studies. Most of the patient day is spent inactive (median 48.1%, IQR 39.6%–69.3%, alone (median 53.7%, IQR 44.2%–60.6% and in their bedroom (median 56.5%, IQR 45.2%–72.5%. Approximately one hour per day is spent in physiotherapy (median 63.2 minutes, IQR 36.0–79.5 and occupational therapy (median 57.0 minutes, IQR 25.1–58.5. Even in formal therapy sessions limited time is spent in moderate to high level physical activity. Low levels of physical activity appear more common in patients within 14 days post-stroke and those admitted to conventional care. Conclusions. Physical activity levels are low in hospitalised stroke patients. Improving the description and classification of post stroke physical activity would enhance our ability to pool data across observational studies. The importance of increasing activity levels and the effectiveness of interventions to increase physical activity after stroke need to be tested further.

  5. Ischaemic strokes : management in first six hours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal P

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular disease (CVD or stroke is one of the foremost causes of high morbidity and mortality for many nations of the world, posing a major socio-economic challenge in the occupational and neuro-rehabilitational programmes of the ′stroke-survivors′. For example, in USA alone it has been estimated that a sum of 3261 million dollars is spent as direct cost for treatment, in addition to 4104 million dollars as indirect costs, consequent on economic losses of ′stroke victims′. Thus, the new concept in stroke pathophysiology and strategies for stroke prevention have assumed global importance. Among all risk factors for strokes, hypertension is one of the most important and treatable factor. Community screening surveys, by well defined WHO protocol, have shown that nearly 15% of urban population is hypertensive (160/95 mm Hg or more. Though high blood pressure has the highest attributable risk for stroke, there are many other reasons such as patient′s compliance in taking medicine and poor followup in clinical practice that may lead to failure in reducing stroke mortality. In subjects, who have transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs, regular use of antiplatelet agents like aspirin is well established in prevention of stroke. It is also mandatory to prohibit tobacco use and adjust dietary habits to control body weight. Associated conditions like diabetes mellitus etc. should also be treated. It is advisable to initiate community screening surveys on well defined populations for early detection of hypertension and TIAs. Primary health care centres should be the base stations for these surveys, because data gathered from urban hospitals will not truly reflect the crude prevalence rates for the community to design practical prevention programmes.

  6. Lacunar strokes: a single institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objective: Lacunar ischemic strokes comprise approximately 25% of all ischemic strokes. We compared the risk factors and clinical pattern of this type of stroke between males and females. Methods: This observational study involved 50 consecutive patients with their first-ever lacunar stroke and was conducted at the department of neurology of Sulaimaniya general teaching hospital, Iraq from December 1, 2010 to March 1, 2013. Patients’ risk factors, clinical presentation, and strokes’ patterns were noted and a comparison was made between males and females. Results: Males (64% outnumbered females (36% with a male to female ration of 1.7. The mean age of males was 63 years while it was 61 years in females. Although hypertension was more common in females than in males, diabetes and smoking were more common in the latter group; however, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 genders in terms of hypertension (P-value <0.3 and diabetes (P-value < 0.07 while smoking was strongly associated with male gender (P-value<0.0001. Pure motor hemiparesis, ataxic hemiparesis, pure sensory stroke, and dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome were more common in males; only senori-motor stroke revealed a statistically significant difference in favor males (P-value<0.0001; 95% CI -1.7 to 19.2. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of which side of the brain was infarcted between males and females (P-value<0.4. Conclusion: Males around the age of 63 years were the main target for these lacunar strokes. Cigarette smoking and sensorimotor strokes were significantly associated with male gender. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 659-666

  7. Improving stroke care: Quality of care and health education in patients with a stroke or transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Maasland (Lisette)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the applicability of results of clinical trials of stroke and TIA patients in everyday practice and on measurement of quality of stroke care. A third aim is to further expand an underexposed aspect of stroke care, namely health education in stroke patients. Chapter

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging to visualize stroke and characterize stroke recovery: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J MacIntosh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The global burden of stroke continues to grow. Although stroke prevention strategies (eg. medications, diet and exercise can contribute to risk reduction, options for acute interventions (eg. thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke are limited to the minority of patients. The remaining patients are often left with profound neurological disabilities that substantially impact quality of life, economic productivity, and increase caregiver burden. In the last decade, however, the future outlook for such patients has been tempered by movement away from the view that the brain is incapable of reorganizing after injury. Many now view brain recovery after stroke as an area of scientific research with large potential for therapeutic advances, far into the future [1]. As a probe of brain anatomy, function and physiology, magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and highly versatile modality that promises to play a particularly important role in such research, towards improving stroke rehabilitation methods and stroke recovery.

  9. Modifiable risk factors for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Gianoulakis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death after cardiac disease and cancer in the developed countries. In patients older than 65 years old, ischemic stroke is one of the main causes of disability. They are also responsible for approximately 4.5 million deaths each year globally.The aim of the present study was to review the literature about the modifiable risk factors related to the development of ischemic stroke.The method οf this study included bibliographic research from both reviews and researches from literature, mainly of the last 8 years. The words used in pub med data base, referred to the modifiable risk factors related to the development of ischemic stroke.Results: In the majority of research studies, responsible risk factors for ischemic stroke are classified according to their ability of modification, in modifiable and non–modifiable risk factors. Some of the modifiable risk factors have been fully documented whereas some others need further research. The main modifiable risk factor is hypertension because on the one hand it promotes atherosclerosis and, on the other hand, leads to deteriorative changes and constrictions of small brain vessels. Atrial fibrillation is the most significant risk factor for ischemic stroke, since it is responsible for more than 50% of thromboembolic cases. Also, patients with diabetes mellitus are in higher risk for developing ischemic stroke compared to healthy population, whereas the danger is increasing in insuline-depented individuals. Increase of lipids in blood and disorders of cholesterol are responsible for atherosclerosis in coronary vessels and carotid. More in detail, carotid stenosis >50% in individuals over than 65 years old consist a significant risk factor for ischemic stroke. Though, the relation of smoking to ischemic stroke is still not fully understood, however smokers are in high risk for developing ischemic stroke for the reason that smoking is significantly related to

  10. Positron CT imaging of an impending stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, M.; Hatazawa, J.; Watanuki, S.; Pozzilli, C.; Matsuzawa, T.; Abe, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Satoh, T.; Fukuda, H.; Wada, T.

    1988-06-01

    We present PET findings of a case of a transient ischemic attack which later progressed to cerebral infarction. Cerebral blood flow at the stroke focus in the right parietal cortex measured after a TIA attack and before stroke was as low as 24 ml/100 g/min with some increase in oxygen extraction fraction and blood volume. The condition was compatible with 'misery perfusion'. This case may be an example suggestive that the 'misery perfusion sign' is a warning of impending stroke and its poor prognosis if left without appropriate treatments.

  11. The real stroke burden in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Jose C; Baroque, Alejandro C; Lokin, Johnny K; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    Stroke is the Philippines' second leading cause of death. It has a prevalence of 0·9%; ischemic stroke comprises 70% while hemorrhagic stroke comprises 30%. Age-adjusted hypertension prevalence is 20·6%, diabetes 6·0%, dyslipidemia 72·0%, smoking 31%, and obesity 4·9%. The neurologist-to-patient ratio is 1:330·000, with 67% of neurologists practicing in urban centers. Health care is largely private and the cost is borne out-of-pocket by patients and their families. Challenges include delivering adequate support to the rural communities and to the underprivileged sectors.

  12. Heart diseases and strokes in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the relevance of the problem associated with the diagnosis and treatment of stroke in young patients aged 15-45 years. It considers the major causes of acute cerebrovascular accidents in young people, including pregnant women. Diseases, such patent foramen ovale, mitral valve prolapse, infective endocarditis, and postpartum cardiomyopathy, are described in detail. The basic principles of the diagnosis and therapy of ischemic stroke at a young age are given. The mainstay of therapy for acute ischemic stroke is stated to include two procedures: reperfusion and neuronal protection.

  13. Early home-supported discharge after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhorne, P.; Jepsen, Birgitte G.; Larsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    This report is a brief practical problem-based guide to support clinical management in the implementation of early home-supported discharge as an integrated part of stroke care. However, it is clear that skilled members of a multidisciplinary team are needed and they need to work in a coordinated...... benefit most are likely to have moderate stroke severity and may be able to cooperate with rehabilitation in the home setting. Staffing requirements will vary according to several factors. These will include (a) the severity and complexity of stroke impairments, (b) the current level of community support...

  14. A Stroke Mimic: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annia Martínez Rivas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diseases mimicking a stroke are a major health problem for a large number of hospitals. This paper aims at presenting a disease that has a stroke-like presentation. The case of a 46-year-old man admitted to the stroke unit with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral infarction is presented. The patient developed fever and a serious deterioration of consciousness. Changes on computed tomography consistent with a brain abscess were observed. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered and a follow-up tomography was performed. Once the treatment was completed, the clinical and radiological suspicion of a brain abscess was confirmed.

  15. Stroke Awareness in Luxemburg: Deficit Concerning Symptoms and Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Droste, Dirk W.; Jacqueline Safo; Metz, René J; Nani Osada

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Awareness of stroke risk factors is important for stroke prevention. Knowledge of stroke symptoms and awareness regarding the necessity of seeking urgent stroke treatment are vital to provide rapid admission to a stroke unit. Data on this specific knowledge in Luxemburg are lacking. METHODS We investigated 420 patients from the Department of Neurology and their relatives using a questionnaire. There were 44% men and 56% women; 25% were immigrants and 75% Luxemburgish nationals; 13%...

  16. Acute ischemic stroke treatment: State of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajan Ag; White, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is among the leading causes of death and serious disability in the United States. Treatment of the acute ischemic stroke patient requires a multidisciplinary approach involving first-responders, emergency department personnel, neurologists, advanced imaging experts and endovascular specialists with neurosurgical support. Contemporary stroke treatment is a rapidly advancing field. New developments in pharmacologic and endovascular stroke therapy require thoughtful trial design and expeditious trial implementation to assess clinical outcomes. This manuscript reviews the state of the art in acute stroke therapy.

  17. INTERNATIONAL SPECIALIZATION AND VERTICAL DIFFERENTIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furia Donatella

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, market segmentation and intra-industry trade have become increasingly relevant. The underlying hypothesis of our work is that distinct articles have heterogeneous potential for vertical differentiation, implying that different patterns of international specialization should be identifiable. We carry out an analysis on revealed comparative advantage (through the Lafay Index in specific sectors of interest. Then we highlight the emergence of diverse degrees of product quality differentiation among sectors (through the Relative Quality Index. Results confirm our hypothesis. Indeed it appears that only certain goods, for which the pace of either creative or technological innovation (or both is particularly fast, present a high degree of vertical differentiation and market segmentation. This allows countries to specialize in a particular product variety and gain market power position for that variety. These findings should be taken in due consideration when designing trade policies.

  18. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattione, Paul [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  19. Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The exploration of the vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. The consortium has submitted over 25 different designs for the Fermilab organized MPW run organized for the first time.

  20. Admitting acute ischemic stroke patients to a stroke care monitoring unit versus a conventional stroke unit : a randomized pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, Geert; Elting, Jan Willem; Langedijk, Marc; Maurits, Natasha M; De Keyser, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pathophysiological considerations and observational studies indicate that elevated body temperature, hypoxia, hypotension, and cardiac arrhythmias in the acute phase of ischemic stroke may aggravate brain damage and worsen outcome. METHODS: Both units were organized with the

  1. Airborne pollutants and lacunar stroke. A case cross-over analysis on stroke unit admissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Murgia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Particulate air pollution is known to be associated with cardiovascular disease. The relation of particulate air pollution with cerebrovascular disease (CVD has not been extensively studied, particularly in relation to different subtypes of stroke. A time-series study was conducted to evaluate the association between daily air pollution and acute stroke unit hospitalizations in Mantua county (Italy. We analyzed 781 CVD consecutive patients living in Mantua county admitted between 2006-08. Data on stroke types, demographic variables, risk factors were available from the Lombardia Stroke Registry. Daily mean value of particulate matter with a diameter < 10 μm (PM10, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, benzene and ozone were used in the analysis. The association between CVD, ischemic strokes subtypes and pollutants was investigated with a casecrossover design, using conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusting for temperature, humidity, barometric pressure and holidays. Among the 781 subjects admitted 75.7% had ischemic stroke, 11.7% haemorrhagic stroke 12.6% transient ischemic attack. In men admission for stroke was associated with PM10 (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.02, p<0.05 . According to the clinical classification, LACI stroke type was related to PM10 level registered on the day of admission for both genders (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.02, p<0.05 while for TACI stroke only in men (OR: 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07, p<0.05. Our study confirms that air pollution peaks may contribute to increase the risk of hospitalization for stroke and particulate matter seems to be a significant risk factor, especially for lacunar stroke.

  2. Airborne pollutants and lacunar stroke: a case cross-over analysis on stroke unit admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Francesco; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Baccarelli, Andrea; Giua, Alessandra; Previdi, Paolo; Siliprandi, Giorgio; Murgia, Nicola

    2012-06-14

    Particulate air pollution is known to be associated with cardiovascular disease. The relation of particulate air pollution with cerebrovascular disease (CVD) has not been extensively studied, particularly in relation to different subtypes of stroke. A time-series study was conducted to evaluate the association between daily air pollution and acute stroke unit hospitalizations in Mantua, Italy. We analyzed 781 CVD consecutive patients living in Mantua county admitted between 2006-08. Data on stroke types, demographic variables, risk factors were available from the Lombardia Stroke Registry. Daily mean value of particulate matter with a diameter <10 µm (PM(10)), carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, benzene and ozone were used in the analysis. The association between CVD, ischemic strokes subtypes and pollutants was investigated with a case-crossover design, using conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusting for temperature, humidity, barometric pressure and holidays. Among the 781 subjects admitted 75.7% had ischemic stroke, 11.7% haemorrhagic stroke 12.6% transient ischemic attack. In men admission for stroke was associated with PM(10) [odds ratio (OR) 1.01, 95%; confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.02; P<0.05]. According to the clinical classification, lacunar anterior circulation syndrome stroke type was related to PM(10) level registered on the day of admission for both genders (OR: 1.01, 95%; CI: 1.00-1.02; P<0.05) while for total anterior circulation syndrome stroke only in men (OR: 1.04, 95%; CI 1.01-1.07; P<0.05).In conclusion, our study confirms that air pollution peaks may contribute to increase the risk of hospitalization for stroke and particulate matter seems to be a significant risk factor, especially for lacunar stroke.

  3. Film boiling on vertical surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayana, N. V.; Merte, H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Film boiling of a saturated liquid on a vertical surface is analyzed to determine the local heat-transfer rates as a function of height and heater-surface superheat. Experiments show that the laminar-flow model is inadequate. A turbulent-vapor-flow model is used, and the influence of the interfacial oscillations is incorporated on a semiempirical basis. Measurements of local film boiling were obtained with a transient technique using saturated liquid nitrogen.

  4. Poligonación Vertical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Dörries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available La poligonación vertical es un método de medición de diferencias de altura que aprovecha las posibilidades de las estaciones totales. Se presta fundamentalmente para líneas de nivelación entre nodos formando red. El nombre se debe a que las visuales sucesivas se proyectan sobre aristas verticales en lugar de un plano horizontal, como ocurre en la poligonación convencional.

  5. Industrial Chain: Industrial Vertical Definition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YifeiDu; GuojunJiang; ShimingLi

    2004-01-01

    Like value chain and supply chain, “industrial chain” becomes the focus of attention. The implication of “industrial chain” has gained a large range of extension. It not only expresses the industrial “chain” structure and relationship of “back and forward”in order or “up and down” in direction, but also it represents a cluster of large scale of firms in an area or colony. It is a network, or a community. Consequently, we conclude that “industrial chain” is a synthesis of industrial chain, industrial cluster, or industrial network.In this article, firstly we will distinguish industry chain from industry. An industry is the collection of firms that have the same attribute, so an industry can be defined by firm collection of certain attribute. We indicate that industrial chain is a kind of vertical and orderly industrial link. It is defined according to a series of specific product or service created. Secondly we analyze the vertical orderly defiinition process from the aspects of social division of labor and requirement division, self-organization system, and value analysis.Non-symmetry and depending on system or community of large scale of industrial units lead to entire industry to “orderly” structure. On the other hand, the draught of diversity and complexity of requirement simultaneously lead to entire industry to be more “orderly”. Along with processes of self-organization, industrial will appi'oach the state of more orderly and steady, and constantly make industrial chain upgrade. Each firm or unit, who will gain the value, has to establish channels of value, which we called “industrial value chain”. Lastly,we discuss the consequence of vertical and orderly definition, which is exhibited by a certain relationship body. The typical forms of industrial chain include industrial cluster, strategy alliance and vertical integration etc.

  6. Stroke due to Hematologic Aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2004-01-01

    @@ Stroke due to ‘cerebral vein thrombosis' (CVT) is commonly used to refer to thrombosis of the cerebral venous system, including either dural venous sinuses, or deep and superficial (cortical) cerebral veins. CVT are frightening events due to the severity of their clinical manifestations and their high mortality rate (up to 30% in some casereports).The clinical signs and symptoms of CVT are relatively nonspecific: they include headache, papilledema, vomiting,seizures, focal neurological deficits (motor or sensory) and impaired consciousness. CVT has long been considered as rare and mostly infection-related event; moreover, due to its nonspecific clinical manifestations, the diagnosis has been difficult, delayed and could often be made only post mortem.

  7. Management of acute stroke: impact of registration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Harold P

    2010-09-01

    Stroke is a life-threatening or life-changing disease that is expensive in health care costs and lost productivity. Stroke also is a leading cause of human suffering. While the risk of stroke may be reduced with advances in prevention, recent advances in acute care can limit the consequences of stroke. In particular, the success of reperfusion therapies including intra-arterial interventions and intravenous administration of thrombolytic agents means that some patients with stroke may be cured. Still, the time window for effective treatment of stroke is relatively short. As a result, modern stroke management requires the close collaboration of the public, health care providers, administrators, insurance companies, and the government. Potential strategies to extend modern stroke care to as many patients as possible include 1) educational programs to train community emergency medical service personnel and physicians, 2) development of stroke care plans at community hospitals, 3) an integrated community-comprehensive stroke center program based on consultation, and telemedicine. The goal is to have a highly integrated approach to provide emergency treatment of the stroke that provides key emergency treatment, including intravenous administration of thrombolytic medications, at a community hospital (primary stroke center) with evacuation to a comprehensive stroke center that has resources and expertise that are not available in the primary stroke center. Taiwan is an ideal location for the development of such regional stroke programs.

  8. Short- and long-term prognosis for very old stroke patients. The Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Jørgensen, H S; Reith, J

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The very old are expected to become a growing part of the stroke population in the industrialised part of the world. The aims of this study were to evaluate clinical characteristics of patients aged 85 years or more at stroke onset and to investigate very old age...... stroke onset. By way of multiple logistic regression and survival analyses very old age was independently related to short- and long-term mortality and nursing home placement independent of other clinical characteristics. RESULTS: 16% of patients were 85 years or older at the time of stroke onset. More...... of the very old were women (75% versus 50%, P

  9. Innovation in Stroke Care Quality: NIH Stroke Scale Change and Shewhart Charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Michael R; Krishnamohan, Prashanth; Jicha, Gregory; Cohen, Amy P

    2015-01-01

    Stroke care, admission through discharge, is a process that should lead to symptomatic improvement. Improvement or decline in conditions of patients with acute stroke during hospitalization can be measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIH Stroke Scale or NIHSS) at both admission and discharge and may indicate the overall quality of acute stroke care for a patient and the stability of care in the system. Shewhart control charts were analyzed for 98 patients with stroke admissions in a random sample at a tertiary care stroke center to determine the feasibility of examining the NIHSS score change to detect statistical control or identify excess variance in outcomes. The study sample showed a mean improvement of 1.33 points from admission to discharge on the NIHSS. Three statistical outliers were found. Excess statistical variation clustered within a specific stroke team's tenure suggested a need for targeted education and examination for process redesign. Using the NIHSS and the Shewhart control charts identified a systematic process flaw that could be targeted to improve stroke outcomes and move the delivery system toward statistical control.

  10. The Stroke Riskometer™ App: Validation of a data collection tool and stroke risk predictor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Priya; Krishnamurthi, Rita; Ikram, M Arfan; Hofman, Albert; Mirza, Saira S; Varakin, Yury; Kravchenko, Michael; Piradov, Michael; Thrift, Amanda G; Norrving, Bo; Wang, Wenzhi; Mandal, Dipes Kumar; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Sahathevan, Ramesh; Davis, Stephen; Saposnik, Gustavo; Kivipelto, Miia; Sindi, Shireen; Bornstein, Natan M; Giroud, Maurice; Béjot, Yannick; Brainin, Michael; Poulton, Richie; Narayan, K M Venkat; Correia, Manuel; Freire, António; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Wiebers, David; Mensah, George; BinDhim, Nasser F; Barber, P Alan; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai; Hankey, Graeme J; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Azhagammal, Shobhana; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohd; Abbott, Max; Rush, Elaine; Hume, Patria; Hussein, Tasleem; Bhattacharjee, Rohit; Purohit, Mitali; Feigin, Valery L

    2015-01-01

    Background The greatest potential to reduce the burden of stroke is by primary prevention of first-ever stroke, which constitutes three quarters of all stroke. In addition to population-wide prevention strategies (the ‘mass’ approach), the ‘high risk’ approach aims to identify individuals at risk of stroke and to modify their risk factors, and risk, accordingly. Current methods of assessing and modifying stroke risk are difficult to access and implement by the general population, amongst whom most future strokes will arise. To help reduce the burden of stroke on individuals and the population a new app, the Stroke Riskometer™, has been developed. We aim to explore the validity of the app for predicting the risk of stroke compared with current best methods. Methods 752 stroke outcomes from a sample of 9501 individuals across three countries (New Zealand, Russia and the Netherlands) were utilized to investigate the performance of a novel stroke risk prediction tool algorithm (Stroke Riskometer™) compared with two established stroke risk score prediction algorithms (Framingham Stroke Risk Score [FSRS] and QStroke). We calculated the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curve (AUROC) with 95% confidence intervals, Harrels C-statistic and D-statistics for measure of discrimination, R2 statistics to indicate level of variability accounted for by each prediction algorithm, the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic for calibration, and the sensitivity and specificity of each algorithm. Results The Stroke Riskometer™ performed well against the FSRS five-year AUROC for both males (FSRS = 75·0% (95% CI 72·3%–77·6%), Stroke Riskometer™ = 74·0(95% CI 71·3%–76·7%) and females [FSRS = 70·3% (95% CI 67·9%–72·8%, Stroke Riskometer™ = 71·5% (95% CI 69·0%–73·9%)], and better than QStroke [males – 59·7% (95% CI 57·3%–62·0%) and comparable to females = 71·1% (95% CI 69·0%–73·1%)]. Discriminative

  11. tDCS and Robotics on Upper Limb Stroke Rehabilitation: Effect Modification by Stroke Duration and Type of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Straudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this exploratory pilot study is to test the effects of bilateral tDCS combined with upper extremity robot-assisted therapy (RAT on stroke survivors. Methods. We enrolled 23 subjects who were allocated to 2 groups: RAT + real tDCS and RAT + sham-tDCS. Each patient underwent 10 sessions (5 sessions/week over two weeks. Outcome measures were collected before and after treatment: (i Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity (FMA-UE, (ii Box and Block Test (BBT, and (iii Motor Activity Log (MAL. Results. Both groups reported a significant improvement in FMA-UE score after treatment (p<0.01. No significant between-groups differences were found in motor function. However, when the analysis was adjusted for stroke type and duration, a significant interaction effect (p<0.05 was detected, showing that stroke duration (acute versus chronic and type (cortical versus subcortical modify the effect of tDCS and robotics on motor function. Patients with chronic and subcortical stroke benefited more from the treatments than patients with acute and cortical stroke, who presented very small changes. Conclusion. The additional use of bilateral tDCS to RAT seems to have a significant beneficial effect depending on the duration and type of stroke. These results should be verified by additional confirmatory studies.

  12. EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS IN ACUTE STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebrovascular disease is the third most common cause of death in the developed world after cancer and ischemic heart disease. In India, community surveys have shown a crude prevalence rate of 200 per 100000 population for hemiplegia. Aims and objectives: Identification of risk factors for c erebrovascular disease. Materials and Methods: Inclusion Criteria: Cases of acute stroke admitted in S.V.R.R.G.G.H, Tirupati were taken for the study. Exclusion Criteria: Head injury cases, neoplasm cases producing cerebrovascular disease were excluded. Re sults: Stroke was more common in male, 54% patients were male 46% were female. It was more common in 6 th and 7 th decade. More common risk factors were hypertension followed by smoking, diabetes mellitus. More common pathology was infarction. Conclusion: Com mon risk factors for acute stroke are hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, obesity, cardiac disease. Stroke was confirmed by CT scan of brain.

  13. Genetics of ischemic stroke: Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Kaul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A stroke is still a major cause of long-term disability and the third largest killer in the world after heart attack and cancer. Inherited genetic variation has been shown to play a role in its pathogenesis and therefore, there is a need to identify the culprit genetic variants. They may provide novel targets for preventive therapeutics. The most intensively investigated candidate gene is PDE4D. There are several positive replication studies of PDE4D gene with stroke. The genetic contribution to ischemic stroke risk in India has not been explored adequately. Reports on few candidate genes are available but we are still lagging behind in this aspect. Most of the reports are from Andhra Pradesh, a province in south India and a few parts of north India. PDE4D has been identified as a predisposition gene for ischemic stroke in Southern as well as the Northern population of India.

  14. Early supported discharge following mild stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Stina; Carstensen, Kathrine; Møldrup, Marie;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early supported discharge (ESD) allows mild-to-moderate stroke patients to return home as soon as possible and continue rehabilitation at their own pace in familiar surroundings. Thus, the main responsibility for continued rehabilitation is in the hands of patients and their partners......, who must collaborate to adjust to poststroke everyday life. However, couples' joint experiences of stroke, early discharge and rehabilitation at home remain minimally investigated. AIM: To investigate how mild stroke patients' and their partners' experience and manage everyday life in a context of ESD....... METHODS: We conducted qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of 22 ESD patients and 18 partners. Interviews were conducted 3-6 weeks after stroke, and we used thematic analysis to analyse the data. FINDINGS: The analysis identified three themes. First, 'Home as a healing place' involved...

  15. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  16. A feminist perspective on Stroke Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvigne, Kari; Kirkevold, M.

    2002-01-01

    The dominant view of women has changed radically during the last century. These changes have had an important impact on the way of life of women in general and, undoubtedly, on women as patients. So far, gender differences have received little attention when developing healthcare services. Stroke...... hits a great number of elderly women. Wyller et al. found that women seemed to be harder hit by stroke than men; they achieved lower scores in tests of motor, cognitive and ADL functions, both in the acute phase and 1 year after stroke. It is reasonable to expect that differences in outcome among male...... to alienation and oppression through life. This has led women to develop a life in immanence. This we feel can be of significance in connection with rehabilitation after a stroke, particularly for elderly women. In this article we will discuss how de Beauvoir's theory can throw new light on the experiences...

  17. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and symptomatic ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Jacobsen, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Schnohr, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that low plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with increased risk of symptomatic ischemic stroke in the general population. METHODS: We measured plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10,170 individuals from the general population, the Copenhagen...... City Heart Study. During 21 years of follow-up, 1,256 and 164 persons developed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. In a meta-analysis of ischemic stroke, we included 10 studies, 58,384 participants, and 2,644 events. RESULTS: Stepwise decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations...... were associated with stepwise increasing risk of ischemic stroke both as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories and as a function of clinical categories of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p for trend ≤ 2 × 10(-3) ). In a Cox regression model comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia and Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in young children at the time of stroke and in age-matched healthy controls was compared in a case-control study conducted at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

  19. Malnutrition in Patients with Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella D. Bouziana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a devastating event that carries a potential for long-term disability. Malnutrition is frequently observed in patients with stroke, and dysphagia contributes to malnutrition risk. During both the acute phase of stroke and rehabilitation, specific nutritional interventions in the context of a multidisciplinary team effort can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function. Early identification and management of malnutrition with dietary modifications or specific therapeutic strategies to ensure adequate nutritional intake should receive more attention, since poor nutritional status appears to exacerbate brain damage and to contribute to adverse outcome. The main purpose of nutritional intervention should be the prevention or treatment of complications resulting from energy-protein deficit. This paper reviews the evaluation and management of malnutrition and the use of specialized nutrition support in patients with stroke. Emphasis is given to enteral tube and oral feeding and to strategies to wean from tube feeding.

  20. National stroke audit: a tool for change?

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To describe the standards of care for stroke patients in England, Wales and Northern Ireland and to determine the power of national audit, coupled with an active dissemination strategy to effect change.

  1. Recovery of Gait After Stroke: What Changes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurke, Jaap H.; Nene, Anand V.; Kwakkel, Gert; Erren-Wolters, Victorien; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Hermens, Hermie J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Little is known about whether changes in coordination patterns of muscle activation after stroke are related to functional recovery of walking. Objective . The present study investigated the longitudinal relationship between changes in neuromuscular activation patterns of paretic muscles

  2. Recovery After Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... easier for you to use the toilet.  Social workers can help with financial issues. They can with ... your doctor, “Where am I on my stroke recovery journey?” Note: This fact sheet is compiled from ...

  3. Let's Talk about Stroke and Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help the stroke survivor cope with feelings of frustration and depression. • Be patient with the person with ... provider. For example: How long will I need therapy? Will my aphasia go away? How can I ...

  4. Achieving a holistic perspective in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Lund, Hans; Jones, Dorrie

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Holistic, multidisciplinary rehabilitation is often the most appropriate for stroke patients. The World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides a comprehensive conceptual framework and systematic terminology used...... by health professionals worldwide. The purpose of this study was to explore how the components of the ICF were addressed by physiotherapists and occupational therapists in stroke rehabilitation. Methods: A prospective cohort study, including all service levels within Danish stroke rehabilitation......, was carried out. Consecutive patients with a diagnosis of stroke (n=131; 70 males and 61 females; mean age: 72 years) admitted to a university hospital between May and December 2012 were enrolled by 13 physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Physiotherapist and occupational therapist documentation...

  5. Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 ... or Longer-Term Acute short-term effects of air pollution tend to strike people who are elderly or ...

  6. Functional disability of ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Kapadohos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the first cause of disability, in the developed countries and it is frequently described by the literature as a major global health problem. It is estimated that stroke is responsible for approximately 4.5 million deaths per year and over 9 million stroke survivors, globally. Aim: The aim of the present study was to review the literature about the consequences of functional disability that stroke imposes on the survivors’ life and to shortly describe functional instruments used in evaluation of stroke patients.The method οf this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature, mainly in the pub med data base which referred to the functional disability of stroke patients, as well as to the scales used for the evaluation of functional state. Results: Despite the accurate diagnosis and the recent therapeutic advances, stroke can still cause long-term disability in the majority of patients which induces significant changes between the patient and his environment. The results of recent studies indicate that the loss of independence that experience stroke survivals has significant consequences on their quality of life and it is likely to lead to family-crisis and social isolation. It is also widely accepted that the economic impact of stroke is considerable, worldwide. Recovery of functional disability after stroke is influenced by many variables, of which the main are the initial severity of stroke, the level of deficit and the level of social and family support. Ιn clinical practise many measurement instruments are applied and capable of providing assessments of functional ability and other related concepts since it is well documented that evaluation of functional state is a matter of great importance for the assessment of patients’ outcome. Conclusions: As it is supported by published evidence, rehabilitation of neurological deficit in conjunction with

  7. Variables That Best Differentiate In-Patient Acute Stroke from Stroke-Mimics with Acute Neurological Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Natteru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Strokes and stroke-mimics have been extensively studied in the emergency department setting. Although in-hospital strokes are less studied in comparison to strokes in the emergency department, they are a source of significant direct and indirect costs. Differentiating in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics is important. Thus, our study aimed to identify variables that can differentiate in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics. Methods. We present here a retrospective analysis of 93 patients over a one-year period (2009 to 2010, who were evaluated for a concern of in-hospital strokes. Results. About two-thirds (57 of these patients were determined to have a stroke, and the remaining (36 were stroke-mimics. Patients with in-hospital strokes were more likely to be obese (p=0.03, have been admitted to the cardiology service (p=0.01, have atrial fibrillation (p=0.03, have a weak hand or hemiparesis (p=0.03, and have a prior history of stroke (p=0.05, whereas, when the consults were called for “altered mental status” but no other deficits (p<0.0001, it is likely a stroke-mimic. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that in-hospital strokes are a common occurrence, and knowing the variables can aid in their timely diagnosis and treatment.

  8. [Vertical fractures: apropos of 2 clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix Mañes Ferrer, J; Micò Muñoz, P; Sánchez Cortés, J L; Paricio Martín, J J; Miñana Laliga, R

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a clinical review of the vertical root fractures. Two clinical cases are presented to demonstrates the criteria for obtaining a correct diagnosis of vertical root fractures.

  9. Dietary fiber consumption and risk of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhizhong; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Dezhi; Zhu, Wusheng; Fan, Xinying; Liu, Xinfeng

    2013-02-01

    Observational studies suggest an association between dietary fiber consumption and risk of stroke, but the results are inconclusive. The authors conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to evaluate the relation between dietary fiber consumption and stroke risk and mortality. Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Science through February 2013. We included prospective studies that reported relative risks (RRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between dietary fiber consumption and stroke risk and mortality. Both fixed- and random-effects models were used to calculate the summary risk estimates. Eleven prospective studies involving 325,627 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RR of stroke for the highest compared with the lowest dietary fiber consumption was 0.83 (95 % CI 0.74, 0.93). In addition, the increment in dietary fiber consumption was associated with decreased stroke risk in a dose-response manner. Sensitivity analysis restricted to studies with control for conventional risk factors yielded similar results, and omission of any single study had little effect on the combined risk estimate. Moreover, there was a trend toward an inverse association between higher fiber consumption and stroke mortality (RR 0.85; 95 % CI 0.60, 1.20), although it is not significant. This meta-analysis indicated that dietary fiber consumption is inversely associated with stroke risk, and the effect is probably independent of conventional risk factors. Our results support recommendations for higher consumption of fiber-rich foods to prevent stroke.

  10. Anticoagulant Therapy In Ischemic Stroke Or TIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Mehrvar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death  . Anticoagulants   have been used to treat patients with acute ischemic stroke for many years. Despite their widespread use, the usefulness of emergency anticoagulation is a subject of debate. Disagreements exist about the best agent to administer, the route of administration, the use of a bolus dose to start treatment, the level of anticoagulation required, and the duration of treatment. There are 2 types of anticoagulants: Parenteral and oral. Heparin is an anticoagulant that used parenteral. Oral anticoagulants are including Warfarin and new anticoagulants such as Dabigatrn,Rivaroxaban ,Apixaban and other newer drugs. In patients with noncardioembolic  ischemic stroke or TIA antiplatelet agents are treatment of choice and preferred to anticoagulants. In cardioembolic  ischemic stroke or TIA with high risk of reembolization  anticoagulants  are considered as preferred treatment.  Warfarin, apixaban10mg/d ,Rivaroxaban20mg/d, and dabigatran 150 mg/d are all indicated for the prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with nonvalvular AF, whether paroxysmal or permanent.Also anticoagulant therapy is recommended for ischemic stroke or TIA patients in the setting of acute MI, atrial or ventricular thrombosis or dilated and restricted cardiomyopathy. Some valvular heart diseases are other indication for anticoagulant therapy in ischemic stroke or TIA patients. Ischemic  Stroke or TIA in patients with Cerebral vein thrombosis and  known hypercoagulable state specially anti phospholipid antibody syndrome are other indications for anticoagulant treatment.

  11. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Stroke Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Schlaug, Gottfried; Renga, Vijay; Nair, Dinesh

    2008-01-01

    TDCS - Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation - is an emerging technique of non-invasive brain stimulation that has been found useful in examining cortical function in normal subjects and in facilitating treatments of various neurological disorders. A better understanding of adaptive as well as maladaptive post-stroke neuroplasticity and its modulation through non-invasive brain stimulation has opened up experimental treatment options using TDCS for patients recovering from stroke. We will r...

  12. Age trajectories of stroke case fatality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2011-01-01

    Mortality rates level off at older ages. Age trajectories of stroke case-fatality rates were studied with the aim of investigating prevalence of this phenomenon, specifically in case-fatality rates at older ages.......Mortality rates level off at older ages. Age trajectories of stroke case-fatality rates were studied with the aim of investigating prevalence of this phenomenon, specifically in case-fatality rates at older ages....

  13. Clinicoanatomical correlation in stroke related aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Bohra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: With advances in neuroimaging, traditional views regarding the clinicoanatomic correlation in stroke patients with aphasia are being challenged and it has been observed that lesions at a given cortical or subcortical site may manifest with different aphasia profiles. Aims: To study as to whether there is a strict clinicoanatomical correlation between the type of aphasia and lesion site in patients with first ever stroke. Settings and Design: Observational study, based in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Stroke patient′s ≥18 years of age were screened and those with first ever stroke and aphasia were subjected to a detailed stroke workup and language assessment using the Hindi version of Western Aphasia Battery (WAB. Statistical analysis was done with χ2 test with Yates correction and Kruskal-Wallis test. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Overall aphasia was detected in 27.9% of the 260 screened cases with stroke. Amongst 60 cases with first ever stroke and aphasia, the aphasia type was: Global (33.33%, Broca′s (28.3%, transcortical motor (13.33%, transcortical sensory (10%, Wernicke′s (8.33%, anomic (5%, and conduction (1.67% aphasia. A definite correlation between the lesion site and the type of aphasia as per the traditional classification was observed in 35% cases only. Conclusions: No absolute correlation exists between the lesion site and the type of clinical aphasia syndrome in majority of the patients with cortical and subcortical stroke.

  14. Stroke in central nervous system infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carod-Artal Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke subtypes and etiology may differ between developing and developed countries. Infections are a relatively common cause of stroke in tropical regions. Objective: To review the main infectious diseases associated with stroke. Discussion: Prevalence of stroke in HIV patients is around 1%. Pathogenic mechanisms include HIV vasculopathy, vasculitis, cardioembolism, acquired hypercoagulability, and the effect of opportunistic infections. Treatment with protease inhibitors has been associated with premature atherosclerotic vascular disease. Emerging viral infections that are associated with stroke include viral hemorrhagic fevers, Japanese encephalitis, dengue, and West Nile virus. Vasculitis involving perforating vessels of the brain is a cerebrovascular complication of tuberculous meningitis. Small, medium, and large arteries of the anterior circulation can be involved. A progressive intracranial arteriopathy after Leptospira interrogans infection has been described, which involves the large intracranial arteries. Cerebrovascular complications of mycosis are associated with large vessel vasculitis, direct vessel damage by invasion or embolization, and subarachnoid hemorrhage due to mycotic aneurysm rupture. Pathological findings of cerebral malaria include diffuse cerebral edema, perivascular ring hemorrhages, white matter necrosis, parenchyma petechial hemorrhages, occlusion of brain vessels, and sequestration of infected erythrocytes in cortical and perforating arteries. Stroke can occur in subarachnoid neurocysticercosis and the lesions in such cases consist mostly of deep lacunar infarctions resulting from endarteritis of small penetrating arteries. Cardiac arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, apical aneurysm, and mural thrombus are the conditions that predispose patients with American trypanosomiasis to cardioembolism. Gnathostoma spinigerum infestation is a cause of hemorrhagic stroke in Asia. Conclusion: Infectious and

  15. Walking through Apertures in Individuals with Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    Objective Walking through a narrow aperture requires unique postural configurations, i.e., body rotation in the yaw dimension. Stroke individuals may have difficulty performing the body rotations due to motor paralysis on one side of their body. The present study was therefore designed to investigate how successfully such individuals walk through apertures and how they perform body rotation behavior. Method Stroke fallers (n = 10), stroke non-fallers (n = 13), and healthy controls (n = 23) participated. In the main task, participants walked for 4 m and passed through apertures of various widths (0.9–1.3 times the participant’s shoulder width). Accidental contact with the frame of an aperture and kinematic characteristics at the moment of aperture crossing were measured. Participants also performed a perceptual judgment task to measure the accuracy of their perceived aperture passability. Results and Discussion Stroke fallers made frequent contacts on their paretic side; however, the contacts were not frequent when they penetrated apertures from their paretic side. Stroke fallers and non-fallers rotated their body with multiple steps, rather than a single step, to deal with their motor paralysis. Although the minimum passable width was greater for stroke fallers, the body rotation angle was comparable among groups. This suggests that frequent contact in stroke fallers was due to insufficient body rotation. The fact that there was no significant group difference in the perceived aperture passability suggested that contact occurred mainly due to locomotor factors rather than perceptual factors. Two possible explanations (availability of vision and/or attention) were provided as to why accidental contact on the paretic side did not occur frequently when stroke fallers penetrated the apertures from their paretic side. PMID:28103299

  16. Post-stroke disposition from a geriatric-rehabilitative stroke care area: an Italian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Masina

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A large number of stroke patients cannot be discharged at home. Studies on post stroke disposition have low validity outside the country in which they are carried out because healthcare systems offer different rehabilitative and long-term facilities. Moreover absolute selection criteria for admission to rehabilitation are not available yet. Few studies on post-stroke disposition from Italian stroke units are available. Authors evaluated data of a 18-month period from a geriatric managed stroke care area where comprehensive multi-professional assessment and discharge planning are routinely carried out. Only patients discharged with diagnosis related to acute stroke were considered. Baseline characteristics, clinical, neurological and functional conditions according to the structured multidimensional assessment were prospectively collected in the stroke unit registry. Univariate and multinomial logistic regression were performed to identify independent variables associated with three discharge settings: home, rehabilitation and skilled long-term ward. Out of 188 patients evaluated, 56.4% were discharged home, 18.6% to rehabilitation and 25.0% to long-term ward. Data showed an efficient disposition to intermediate settings with a shorter length of stay compared to other international studies. Factors associated with post-stroke disposition were age, dysphagia, neurological impairment on admission (NIH-SS≥6, after stroke functional status (mRankin≥3, poor pre-stroke functional level (mRankin≥3 and hemorrhagic stroke. Dysphagia, severe neurological impairment and post-stroke disability were associated with discharge to rehabilitation and long term ward. These two settings differed in age and pre-stroke functional condition. Patients discharged to long-term wards were about 10 years older than those admitted to rehabilitative ward. Only 5% of patients discharged to rehabilitation had a pre-stroke mRankin score ≥3. Disposition to a skilled

  17. [Strokes and hemoglobinopathies in Burkina Faso].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napon, C; Kaboré, A; Ouédraogo, M; Dravé, A; Lompo, L; Kaboré, J

    2012-01-01

    S and C hemoglobinopathies are a group of inherited blood disorders including sickle cell disease, characterized by the presence of abnormal S and C hemoglobins. They are common in tropical Africa. Stroke is a common complication of sickle cell disease. Studies of the relation between these two diseases are virtually nonexistent in sub-saharan Africa. Our work aimed to study the influence of these hemoglobinopathies on the onset of strokes in adults. This cross-sectional study took place from 1st December 2009 to 31st May 2010 at University Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo. Out of 142 patients admitted to our neurology department during this period, 74 patients had had strokes. Their mean age was 55.9 years and their sex ratio 1.53. Ischemic strokes accounted for 57% of the total, followed by cerebral hemorrhage (39%). Forty-six patients (62%) were AA genotype, 27 (36%) patients had sickle cell trait (16 AC and 11 AS) and three patients were homozygous CC. This study showed a higher prevalence of hemoglobinopathies in patients with stroke than in the general population. Unlike heterozygous SC and homozygous SS forms, the existence of sickle cell trait in this population does not appear to increase the risk of onset of ischemic stroke but may reduce the age at onset of cerebral hemorrhage.

  18. Genetic basis of stroke: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munshi Anjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke or "brain attack" is a complex disease caused by a combination of multiple risk factors. It has major social and economic consequences. Various epidemiological studies in families and twins have revealed that there is a genetic component to stroke risk. Stroke may be the outcome of single gene disorders or more commonly, a polygenic multifactorial disease. Mutations in several candidate genes have been found to be associated with stroke. However, association studies in population-based samples have failed to identify reliable disease markers. The publication of the "Human Genome Project" has indeed improved our knowledge about the potential role of genetics in complex disorders including stroke. Rapidly expanding field of genetics is in a state of transforming medicine into a new kind in future, the individualized medicine, using tailor made drugs according to the genetic makeup of the individuals. However, this involves integrating genome wide genetic information with medical information. The first genome wide association study on ischemic stroke has been published recently. Further studies will hopefully tell us how far the genetic information will assist us to tailor clinical and therapeutic decisions to an individual′s genotype.

  19. Age-specific transcriptional response to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Matthias W; Guenther, Madlen; Jaenisch, Nadine; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Kohl, Matthias; Witte, Otto W; Frahm, Christiane

    2014-07-01

    Increased age is a major risk factor for stroke incidence and post-ischemic mortality. To develop age-adjusted therapeutic interventions, a clear understanding of the complexity of age-related post-ischemic mechanisms is essential. Transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery--a model that closely resembles human stroke--was used to induce cerebral infarction in mice of 4 different ages (2, 9, 15, 24 months). By using Illumina cDNA microarrays and quantitative PCR we detected a distinct age-dependent response to stroke involving 350 differentially expressed genes. Our analyses also identified 327 differentially expressed genes that responded to stroke in an age-independent manner. These genes are involved in different aspects of the inflammatory and immune response, oxidative stress, cell cycle activation and/or DNA repair, apoptosis, cytoskeleton reorganization and/or astrogliosis, synaptic plasticity and/or neurotransmission, and depressive disorders and/or dopamine-, serotonin-, GABA-signaling. In agreement with our earlier work, aged brains displayed an attenuated inflammatory and immune response (Sieber et al., 2011) and a reduced impairment of post-stroke synaptic plasticity. Our data also revealed a distinct age-related susceptibility for post-ischemic depression, the most common neuropsychiatric consequence of stroke, which has a major influence on functional outcome.

  20. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ye Zhang, Hong Deng, Chao Pan, Yang Hu, Qian Wu, Na Liu, Zhouping Tang Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Stroke is a clinical disease with high incidence, high disability rate, and high mortality. But effective and safe therapy for stroke remains limited. Adult mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs perform a variety of therapeutic functions. MSC delivery improves neurological outcomes in ischemic stroke models via neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects such as angiogenic effects, promoting endogenous proliferation, and reducing apoptosis and inflammation. MSC secretome also showed powerful therapeutic effects as a cell-based therapy in animal experiments. Several clinical trials on MSC implantation via different routes have now been completed in patients with stroke. Although challenges such as immunogenicity of allo-MSCs and large-scale production strategies need to be overcome, MSCs can be considered as a promising potential therapy for ischemic stroke. Keywords: mesenchymal stromal cell, stroke, therapy, transplantation, exosomes

  1. Is it important to classify ischaemic stroke?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iqbal, M

    2012-02-01

    Thirty-five percent of all ischemic events remain classified as cryptogenic. This study was conducted to ascertain the accuracy of diagnosis of ischaemic stroke based on information given in the medical notes. It was tested by applying the clinical information to the (TOAST) criteria. Hundred and five patients presented with acute stroke between Jan-Jun 2007. Data was collected on 90 patients. Male to female ratio was 39:51 with age range of 47-93 years. Sixty (67%) patients had total\\/partial anterior circulation stroke; 5 (5.6%) had a lacunar stroke and in 25 (28%) the mechanism of stroke could not be identified. Four (4.4%) patients with small vessel disease were anticoagulated; 5 (5.6%) with atrial fibrillation received antiplatelet therapy and 2 (2.2%) patients with atrial fibrillation underwent CEA. This study revealed deficiencies in the clinical assessment of patients and treatment was not tailored to the mechanism of stroke in some patients.

  2. Relation of Stroke Risk Factors with Specific Stroke Subtypes and Territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad ASSARZADEGAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the risk factors of ischemic strokes are well defined, there is slight information about their relations with the etiologies of ischemic strokes. This study investigated the distribution of ischemic stroke risk factors and their connections to diverse etiologies of cerebrovascular attack (CVA and specific ischemic regions of brain.Methods: In this cross sectional study, we analyzed the data of patients with definite diagnosis of CVA, excluding hemorrhagic strokes, registered in Imam Hossein Medical Center in Tehran, Iran. The data were collected from entire archived medical records from March 2010 until September 2012, retrospectively. Results: Out of 1696 cases a total of 1011 subjects, 487 (48.2% males and 524 (51.8% females with mean age of 68.91±13.54 yr were included in the study. Patients suffering from atrial fibrillation (AF, valvular heart disease (VHD, and dilated cardiomyopathy were more prone to develop cardioembolic stroke. Those with diabetes mellitus (DM, carotid artery stenosis and dyslipidemia (DLP had a higher prevalence of macroangiopathic stroke. Ischemic heart disease (IHD, AF, and VHD were associated with stroke in the brain territory supplied by middle cerebral artery (MCA while DM and carotid artery stenosis were correspondent with posterior cerebral artery (PCA stroke.Conclusion: The diagnosis of the weight of each risk factor of ischemic strokes on different etiologies and territories of ischemia can assist care providers for a more efficient prevention of strokes. The results of this study can also be a basis for further investigations to corroborate the pathophysiology of such relations. Keywords: Stroke, Cerebral arteries, Risk factors, Iran

  3. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  4. Post-stroke depression therapy: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Turner, Alyna; Dean, Olivia; Sureda, Antoni; Mohammad, Seyed

    2014-01-01

    Post-stroke depression is an important psychological consequence of ischemic stroke, and affects around one third of stroke patients at any time post-stroke. It has a negative impact on patient morbidity and mortality, and as such development of effective post-stroke recognition and treatment strategies are very important. There are several therapeutic strategies for post-stroke depression, including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. In this review, we present evidence regarding the underlying biology of post-stroke depression, commonalities between post-stroke depression and Major Depressive Disorder and explore several treatment approaches, including antidepressant therapy, psychotherapy, surgical therapy, electroconvulsive therapy, acupuncture, music therapy and natural products. Further experimental and clinical studies are required, particularly in emerging fields such as the role of nutraceuticals in the treatment of stroke.

  5. Strokes attributable to underuse of warfarin and antiplatelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Rasmussen, Berit Hammershaimb; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter;

    2007-01-01

    atrial fibrillation, prior myocardial infarction, angina, or prior stroke transient ischemic attack (TIA). Sufficient information on cardiovascular risk factors before stroke was available in 404 patients. A total of 54 patients had atrial fibrillation known before the stroke. Of these, 16 had......Despite their proven efficacy in stroke prevention, warfarin and antiplatelets remain underused. We determined the frequency of ischemic strokes attributable to underuse of warfarin and antiplatelets for stroke prevention in a Danish community. We included all patients with ischemic stroke...... of these strokes could have been prevented. Our findings indicate that underuse of warfarin and antiplatelets is still of considerable magnitude and attributable to 4% to 5% (16 to 22 out of 404) of the ischemic strokes in a Danish urban community....

  6. Costs of stroke and stroke services: Determinants of patient costs and a comparison of costs of regular care and care organised in stroke services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J.A. van Exel (Job); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); J.D.H. van Wijngaarden (Jeroen); W.J.M. Scholte op Reimer (Wilma)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability in Western societies and constitutes a major claim on health care budgets. Organising stroke care in a stroke service has recently been demonstrated to result in better health effects for patients. This paper discusses

  7. Costs of stroke and stroke services: Determinants of patient costs and a comparison of costs of regular care and care organised in stroke services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); W.J.M. Scholte op Reimer (Wilma); J.D.H. van Wijngaarden (Jeroen); N.J.A. van Exel (Job)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability in Western societies and constitutes a major claim on health care budgets. Organising stroke care in a stroke service has recently been demonstrated to result in better health effects for patients. Th

  8. Binocular responses and vertical strabismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risović Dušica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Elevation in adduction is the most common pattern of vertical strabismus, and it is mostly treated with surgery. The results of weaking of inferior oblique muscle are very changeable. The aim of this study was to evaluate binocular vision using sensory tests before and one and six months after the surgery. Methods. A total of 79 children were divided in two groups: the first, with inferior oblique muscle of overaction (n = 52, and the second with dissociated vertical deviation (DVD, and primary inferior oblique muscle overaction (n = 27. We tested them by polaroid mirror test (PMT, Worth test at distance and near, fusion amplitudes on sinoptofore, Lang I stereo test and Wirt-Titmus stereo test. We examined our patients before and two times after the surgery for vertical strabismus. Results. Foveal suppression in the group I was found in 60.5% of the patients before, and in 56.4% after the surgery. In group II Foveal suppression was detected in 64.7% of the patients before, but in 55.6% 6 months after the surgery with PMT. Worth test revealed suppression in 23.5% of the patients before, and in 40.7% after the vertical muscle surgery. Parafoveal fussion persisted in about 1/3 of the patients before the surgery, and their amplitudes were a little larger after the surgery in the group I patients. Lang I stereo test was negative in 53.9% before and 51.9% after the surgery in the group I, and in 48.2% of the patients before and after the surgery in the group II patients. Wirt-Titmus stereo test was negative in 74.5% of the patients before and in 72.9% after the surgery in the group I, but in the group II it was negative in 70.8% before and in 68.0% of the patients 6 months after the surgery. Conclusion. Binocular responses were found after surgery in 65.7% of the patients the group I and in 55.6% patients the group II. There was no significant difference between these two groups, but binocular responses were more often in the patients

  9. Generation of Vertically Incident Seismograms,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    p. 106, equation 3.38.) %lPHASE Flag: If set, Minimum- phase filter required; otherwise, Zero phase %ILNR Counter of model file input lines, used in... PHASE ) FILTER -TYPE DB SLOPE CUT-OFF FREQUENCY 1 72 70 2 72 30 4’ 4 GENERATION OF VERTICALLY INCIDENT SEISMOGRAMS VISP; PLOTS OF PARAMETERS TEST I...FILTER PHASE 1 (MINIMUM PHASE ) FILTER -TYPE DB SLOPE CUT-OFF FREQUENCY 1 96 50 2 96 10 Table 6. Input data used to test a high-cult filter with zero phase

  10. Evaluation of stroke services in Anglia stroke clinical network to examine the variation in acute services and stroke outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Abraham

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed countries and the leading cause of long-term disability worldwide. A series of national stroke audits in the UK highlighted the differences in stroke care between hospitals. The study aims to describe variation in outcomes following stroke and to identify the characteristics of services that are associated with better outcomes, after accounting for case mix differences and individual prognostic factors. Methods/Design We will conduct a cohort study in eight acute NHS trusts within East of England, with at least one year of follow-up after stroke. The study population will be a systematically selected representative sample of patients admitted with stroke during the study period, recruited within each hospital. We will collect individual patient data on prognostic characteristics, health care received, outcomes and costs of care and we will also record relevant characteristics of each provider organisation. The determinants of one year outcome including patient reported outcome will be assessed statistically with proportional hazards regression models. Self (or proxy completed EuroQol (EQ-5D questionnaires will measure quality of life at baseline and follow-up for cost utility analyses. Discussion This study will provide observational data about health service factors associated with variations in patient outcomes and health care costs following hospital admission for acute stroke. This will form the basis for future RCTs by identifying promising health service interventions, assessing the feasibility of recruiting and following up trial patients, and provide evidence about frequency and variances in outcomes, and intra-cluster correlation of outcomes, for sample size calculations. The results will inform clinicians, public, service providers, commissioners and policy makers to drive further improvement in health services which will bring direct benefit to the patients.

  11. Clues to occult cancer in patients with ischemic stroke.

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    Suk Jae Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that hidden malignancy could be detected in patients with cryptogenic stroke without active cancer when they showed the distinctive characteristics of cancer-related stroke. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Among 2,562 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, patients with cryptogenic stroke were analyzed and categorized into two groups according to the presence of active cancer: cryptogenic stroke with active cancer (cancer-related stroke, CA-stroke group and without active cancer (CR-stroke group. Patients with active lung cancer without stroke were also recruited for comparison purposes (CA-control. Clinical factors, lesion patterns on diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI, and laboratory findings were analyzed among groups. A total of 348 patients with cryptogenic stroke were enrolled in this study. Among them, 71 (20.4% patients had active cancer at the time of stroke. The D-dimer levels were significantly higher in patients with CA-stroke than those with CR-stroke or CA-control (both p<0.001. Regarding lesion patterns, patients with CA-stroke mostly had multiple lesions in multiple vascular territories, while more than 80% of patients with CR-stroke had single/multiple lesions in a single vascular territory (P<0.001. D-dimer levels (OR 1.11 per 1 µg/mL increase; 95% CI 1.06-1.15; P<0.001 and DWI lesion patterns (OR 7.13; 95% CI 3.42-14.87; P<0.001 were independently associated with CA-stroke. Workup for hidden malignancy was performed during hospitalization in 10 patients who showed elevated D-dimer levels and multiple infarcts involving multiple vascular territories but had no known cancer, and it revealed hidden malignancies in all the patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with CA-stroke have distinctive D-dimer levels and lesion patterns. These characteristics can serve as clues to occult cancer in patients with cryptogenic stroke.

  12. Acute stroke unit improves stroke management-four years on from INASC.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, E

    2015-02-01

    The Irish Heart Foundation carried out the Irish National Audit of Stroke Care (INASC) in 2008. Management practices were significantly poorer than those in the UK Sentinel audits. Since then an acute stroke unit has been established in University Hospital Limerick. A stroke database was established. 12 key indicators of stroke management audited by INASC were identified. Results were compared to those in INASC. 89 stroke patients were admitted. 8 of the 12 key indicators scored significantly better than in INASC. 92.5% had a brain scan within 24hrs (INASC-40%, p = < 0.001). 100% of ischaemic strokes received anti-thrombotics (INASC-85%, p = 0.001). 94% had rehab goals agreed by MDT (22% in INASC p = 0.0000). 55% were treated in stroke unit (2% in INASC, p = 0.0000). MDT input improved with regard to physiotherapy (87% vs 43% in INASC, p = < 0.02) and SALT (74% vs 26%, p = < 0.02). Stroke management has significantly improved from 2008, however some deficiencies remain.

  13. Home after stroke : A qualitative study of Dutch older stroke survivors making themselves at home again

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijering, Louise; Klaassens, Mirjam; Nanninga, Christa; Lettinga, Ant T.

    2014-01-01

    Older adults who have survived a stroke may suffer from physical effects such as paralysis, fatigue, and pain, as well as cognitive/emotional effects such as loss of cognitive function, aphasia, depression, and memory loss. After experiencing a stroke, most survivors work on their recovery in a reha

  14. Future costs of stroke in the Netherlands: The impact of stroke services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N. Struijs; M.L.L. van Genugten; S.M.A.A. Evers; A.J.H. Ament; C.A. Baan; G.A.M. van den Bos

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: In the next decades, the number of stroke patients is expected to increase. Furthermore, organizational changes, such as stroke services, are expected to be implemented on a large scale. The purpose of this study is to estimate the future healthcare costs by taking into account the expec

  15. Neuroserpin polymorphisms and stroke risk in a biracial population: the stroke prevention in young women study

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    Stern Barney J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroserpin, primarily localized to CNS neurons, inhibits the adverse effects of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA on the neurovascular unit and has neuroprotective effects in animal models of ischemic stroke. We sought to evaluate the association of neuroserpin polymorphisms with risk for ischemic stroke among young women. Methods A population-based case-control study of stroke among women aged 15–49 identified 224 cases of first ischemic stroke (47.3% African-American and 211 age-matched control subjects (43.1% African-American. Neuroserpin single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs chosen through HapMap were genotyped in the study population and assessed for association with stroke. Results Of the five SNPs analyzed, the A allele (frequency; Caucasian = 0.56, African-American = 0.42 of SNP rs6797312 located in intron 1 was associated with stroke in an age-adjusted dominant model (AA and AT vs. TT among Caucasians (OR = 2.05, p = 0.023 but not African-Americans (OR = 0.71, p = 0.387. Models adjusting for other risk factors strengthened the association. Race-specific haplotype analyses, inclusive of SNP rs6797312, again demonstrated significant associations with stroke among Caucasians only. Conclusion This study provides the first evidence that neuroserpin is associated with early-onset ischemic stroke among Caucasian women.

  16. Hemorrhagic and Ischemic Strokes Compared Stroke Severity, Mortality, and Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, T. S.; Dehlendorff, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    information for 39 484 patients. The patients underwent an evaluation including stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale), CT, and cardiovascular risk factors. They were followed-up from admission until death or censoring in 2007. Independent predictors of death were identified by means of a survival model...

  17. Stroke-prone renovascular hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾进胜; 贷如训; 苏镇培

    2000-01-01

    Purpose To summarized the methods for establishment, characteristics of vascular lesions in brain and heart and thc application of stroke-pronc renovascular hypertensive rats (RHRSP). Background Spontaneously hypcrtensivc rats (STR) and subtypes of SH R, especially stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) are considered as most important animal models at present for the studies of hypertension and its complications in heart and brain, evcn SHRSP arc considered as thc unique animal model in which prcvention of stroke can be studied cxperimentally Howcver, the applications of SHR and SHRSP are limited because of the effects of genetic deficits and thc difficulties with breeding Theretore, most of the researches on experimental stroke have been performed on the animal models with normotcnsion and normal structure of cerebral vessels. In fact, there are great differences in structure of cerebrovesscls, autoregulation of cerebral blood flow and extent of lesions in brain tissue, even the reaction to the medication after ischemia between the animals with extcnsive arteriosclerosis and with normal cerebral blood vessels. Obviously, thc relevancc of experimental stroke on normal animals to the stroke on cerebral arteriosclerotic patients clinically remains dubious. Data sources and methods Most published original articles about RHRSP in our laboratory were reviewed Results After the renal arteries were constricted bilaterally with ring-shape silver clips, the stroke-prone rcnovascular hypertensive rats were established. Hypertension was produced in all RHRSP(100%).The peak of blood pressure in RHRSP reached 29.1 ±3.0kPa. The lesions of cerebral arteries and arterioles and the damage of cerebral capillary structure by hypertension were observed in the RHRSP. The incidence of spontaneous stroke was 56.4% with in 40 weeks after the renal artery constriction. Left ventricular hypertrophy and small coronary arterial lesions in myocardium were discovered in all

  18. Biometeorological phases influence on stroke morbidity

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    Dragan Milojević

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine influence of biometeorological phases on strokeincidence according to age and gender of patients, place of residence, days in a week, months in a year, type of stroke, additional diagnosis. Methodology Comparative analysis of the data on stroke patients (according to age, months, days, place of residence, age, sex, stroke type, additional diagnosis and number of hospitalization days obtained by examining the records of discharge and admission of patients in the Department of Neurology of Kragujevac and everyday biometeorological phases obtained from the Republic Hydrometeorological Service of Serbia (RHMS of Serbia, for the following years: 2003, 2004, 2007, 2008 and 2009 in Kragujevac.Results 4,700 patients diagnosed with stroke were hospitalized in the observed period. The highest number of strokes was noted in 2003 (1,030, the lowest in 2008 (851. The highest number of strokes was in March (444 and the lowest in February (351.The most frequent days were Mondays (805, and the least frequent Sundays (495. Three fifths of patients were from urban areas and the rest of them were from rural areas. Out of this number 2,382 (50.7% were males and 2.318 (49.3% were females, of which 1.847 (77.6% males and 1,894 (81.7% females were over 70 years old. The average number of hospitalization days was 12.29 days, and most patients were in hospital for less than 10 days (2101 patients. 4,130 (87.9% patients were diagnosed with thromboembolism, 422 (9.0% with intracerebral hemorrhage and 148 (3.2% with subarachnoid hemorrhage. As an additional diagnosis 1,946 (41.4% patients had hypertension, 867(18.6% had heart insufficiency and 15.40% had diabetes. Most strokes with significant correlation were in biometheorological phases 9 and 4 (1,227 and 1,010 strokes and the least were in phase 10 (29. As a daily average, the highest number of strokes was in phase 8 (2.76/ day, the lowest in phase 2 (2.33/day. Conclusion Biometeorological phases have a

  19. Association between pneumonia in acute stroke stage and 3-year mortality in patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Jing; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Su, Feng-Chieh; Peng, Tsung-I; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Wei, Yi-Chia; Lin, Shun-Wen; Zhu, Jun-Xiao; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2016-11-01

    The influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the clinical presentation and long-term outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. We investigate the influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the 3-year outcomes of patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. Nine-hundred and thirty-four patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke were enrolled and had been followed for 3years. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether pneumonia occurred during acute stroke stage or not. Clinical presentations, risk factors for stroke, laboratory data, co-morbidities, and outcomes were recorded. The result showed that a total of 100 patients (10.7%) had pneumonia in acute stroke stage. The prevalence of older age, atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage. Total anterior circulation syndrome and posterior circulation syndrome occurred more frequently among patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage (Ppneumonia in acute stroke stage is a significant predictor of 3-year mortality (hazard ratio=6.39, 95% confidence interval=4.03-10.11, Ppneumonia during the acute stroke stage is associated with increased risk of 3-year mortality. Interventions to prevent pneumonia in acute stroke stage might improve ischemic stroke outcome.

  20. Stroke outreach in an inner city market: A platform for identifying African American males for stroke prevention interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjail Zarinah Sharrief

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: There are significant racial disparities in stroke incidence and mortality. Health fairs and outreach programs can be used to increase stroke literacy, but they often fail to reach those at highest risk, including African American males. Methods: We conducted a stroke outreach and screening program at an inner city market in order to attract a high-risk group for a stroke education intervention. A modified Framingham risk tool was used to estimate stroke risk and a 10-item quiz was developed to assess stroke literacy among 80 participants. We report results of the demographic and stroke risk analyses and stroke knowledge assessment. Results: The program attracted a majority male (70% and African American (95% group of participants. Self-reported hypertension (57.5%, tobacco use (40%, and diabetes (23.8% were prevalent. Knowledge of stroke warning signs, risk factors, and appropriate action to take for stroke symptoms was not poor when compared to the literature. Conclusions: Stroke outreach and screening in an inner city public market may be an effective way to target a high-risk population for stroke prevention interventions. Stroke risk among participants was high despite adequate stroke knowledge.

  1. Clinical Neuroprotective Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichiro Tanaka

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an enormous public health problem with an imperative need for more effective therapies. In therapies for ischemic stroke, tissue plasminogen activators, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants are used mainly for their antithrombotic effects. However, free radical scavengers, minocycline and growth factors have shown neuroprotective effects in the treatment of stroke, while antihypertensive drugs, lipid-lowering drugs and hypoglycemic drugs have shown beneficial effects for the prevention of stroke. In the present review, we evaluate the treatment and prevention of stroke in light of clinical studies and discuss new anti-stroke effects other than the main effects of drugs, focusing on optimal pharmacotherapy.

  2. Effect of pre-stroke use of ACE inhibitors on ischemic stroke severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caplan Louis

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent trials suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI are effective in prevention of ischemic stroke, as measured by reduced stroke incidence. We aimed to compare stroke severity between stroke patients who were taking ACEI before their stroke onset and those who were not, to examine the effects of pretreatment with ACEI on ischemic stroke severity. Methods We retrospectively studied 126 consecutive patients presenting within 24 hours of ischemic stroke onset, as confirmed by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI. We calculated the NIHSS score at presentation, as the primary measure of clinical stroke severity, and categorized stroke severity as mild (NIHSS [less than or equal to] 7, moderate (NIHSS 8–13 or severe (NIHSS [greater than or equal to] 14. We analyzed demographic data, risk-factor profile, blood pressure (BP and medications on admissions, and determined stroke mechanism according to TOAST criteria. We also measured the volumes of admission diffusion- and perfusion-weighted (DWI /PWI magnetic resonance imaging lesions, as a secondary measure of ischemic tissue volume. We compared these variables among patients on ACEI and those who were not. Results Thirty- three patients (26% were on ACE-inhibitors. The overall median baseline NIHSS score was 5.5 (range 2–21 among ACEI-treated patients vs. 9 (range 1–36 in non-ACEI patients (p = 0.036. Patients on ACEI prior to their stroke had more mild and less severe strokes, and smaller DWI and PWI lesion volumes compared to non-ACEI treated patients. However, none of these differences were significant. Predictably, a higher percentage of patients on ACEI had a history of heart failure (p = 0.03. Age, time-to-imaging or neurological evaluation, risk-factor profile, concomitant therapy with lipid lowering, other antihypertensives or antithrombotic agents, or admission BP were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion Our results

  3. Convection in a vertical channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisserand, J-C; Creyssels, M; Gibert, M; Castaing, B; Chilla, F, E-mail: Francesca.Chilla@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, ENS Lyon, UMR 5672 CNRS, 46 Allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 7 (France)

    2010-07-15

    The flow generated by heat convection in a long, vertical channel is studied by means of particle imagery velocimetry techniques, with the help of the thermal measurements from a previous paper (Gibert et al 2009 Phys. Fluids 21 035109). We analyse the mean velocity profiles and the Reynolds stresses, and compare the present results with the previous ones obtained in a larger cell and at a larger Reynolds number. We calculate the horizontal temperature profile and the related horizontal heat flux. The pertinence of effective turbulent diffusivity and viscosity is confirmed by the low value of the associated mixing length. We study the one-point and two-point statistics of both velocity components. We show how the concept of turbulent viscosity explains the relations between the local probability density functions (pdf) of fluctuations for temperature, vertical and horizontal velocity components. Despite the low Reynolds number values explored, some conclusions can be drawn about the small scale velocity differences and the related energy cascade.

  4. Morbidity predictors in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panicker J

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although ischemic CVA is one of the leading causes for death and disability, parameters for predicting long-term outcome in such patients have not been clearly delineated, especially in the Indian context. Methods: A prospective hospital-based study of 105 patients of ischemic stroke, focal neurological deficits and functional score was assessed and the C-reactive protein level (CRP was measured. A follow-up was done at 5 days and at 6 months and outcome variable was the functional status at 6 months using Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. Accordingly, patients were grouped into 3 - Barthel Index < 41: Severely disabled, Barthel Index 41-60: Moderately disabled and Barthel Index > 60: Mildly disabled. Results: At admission, if upper limb power was less than Medical Research Council (MRC grade 4, or aphasia was present or CRP assay was positive, then at 6 months, these patients most likely belonged to the severely disabled group. If upper limb or lower limb power was greater than MRC grade 3 or there was no aphasia or conjugate gaze deviation or CRP assay was negative, these patients most likely belonged to the mildly disabled group at 6 months. Follow-up rate was 86%. Conclusion: Patients can be stratified according to the predicted prognosis. The treatment and rehabilitation can be properly planned and strictly adhered to in patients predicted to have worse prognosis.

  5. Developing the Stroke Exercise Preference Inventory (SEPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Nicholas S.; O’Halloran, Paul D.; Bernhardt, Julie; Cumming, Toby B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is highly prevalent after stroke, increasing the risk of poor health outcomes including recurrent stroke. Tailoring of exercise programs to individual preferences can improve adherence, but no tools exist for this purpose in stroke. Methods We identified potential questionnaire items for establishing exercise preferences via: (i) our preliminary Exercise Preference Questionnaire in stroke, (ii) similar tools used in other conditions, and (iii) expert panel consultations. The resulting 35-item questionnaire (SEPI-35) was administered to stroke survivors, along with measures of disability, depression, anxiety, fatigue and self-reported physical activity. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify a factor structure in exercise preferences, providing a framework for item reduction. Associations between exercise preferences and personal characteristics were analysed using multivariable regression. Results A group of 134 community-dwelling stroke survivors (mean age 64.0, SD 13.3) participated. Analysis of the SEPI-35 identified 7 exercise preference factors (Supervision-support, Confidence-challenge, Health-wellbeing, Exercise context, Home-alone, Similar others, Music-TV). Item reduction processes yielded a 13-item version (SEPI-13); in analysis of this version, the original factor structure was maintained. Lower scores on Confidence-challenge were significantly associated with disability (p = 0.002), depression (p = 0.001) and fatigue (p = 0.001). Self-reported barriers to exercise were particularly prevalent in those experiencing fatigue and anxiety. Conclusions The SEPI-13 is a brief instrument that allows assessment of exercise preferences and barriers in the stroke population. This new tool can be employed by health professionals to inform the development of individually tailored exercise interventions. PMID:27711242

  6. Approaches to economic evaluations of stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Louise E; Wu, Olivia; Bernhardt, Julie; Langhorne, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Many stroke rehabilitation services and interventions are complex in that they involve a number of components, interactions, and outcomes. Much of the onus of stroke care lies with rehabilitation services and because stroke rehabilitation is highly resource intensive, it is important for policy makers to consider the potential trade-offs between all relevant costs and benefits. The primary aim of this systematic review was to assess the methods used to conduct economic evaluations of stroke rehabilitation. Studies that compared two or more alternative stroke rehabilitation interventions or services with the costs and outcomes being examined for each alternative were included. EMBASE, MEDLINE In-Process, and National Health Service's Economic Evaluation Database were searched using search strategies. The methodological quality of the included studies was appraised using a checklist for the conduct and reporting of economic evaluations. Twenty-one studies met the selection criteria. The economic evaluations in the majority of these studies were inadequate based on their ability to identify, measure, and value all resources and benefits pertinent to the complexity of stroke rehabilitation. This study highlights that complex interventions such as stroke rehabilitation have widespread effects, which may not be represented by the changes on a single outcome. This study recommends the adoption of a wider cost and benefit perspective in the economic evaluations of complex interventions. It supports a move away from conventional economic evaluation and decision making, based purely on cost-effectiveness, toward multicriteria decision analysis frameworks for complex interventions, where a broader range of criteria may be assessed by policy makers.

  7. Post-stroke depression: Prevalence and relationship with disability in chronic stroke survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate (1 the prevalence of operationally defined depressive disorder (ICD-10 in chronic stroke subjects and (2 the relationship of post-stroke depression (PSD with disability. Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Setting: Neurological rehabilitation unit of a tertiary care university research center. Materials and Methods: Participants were those with first episode of supratentorial stroke of more than 3 months′ duration with impaired balance and gait who had been referred for rehabilitation. Data were collected on demographic data, stroke data (side and type of lesion and post-stroke duration, cognition (mini mental state examination, depressive ideation (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale - HRDS, impairment (Scandinavian Stroke Scale, balance (Berg Balance Scale, ambulatory status (Functional Ambulation Category, walking ability (speed, and independence in activities of daily living (Barthel Index. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 13.0. We carried out the chi-square test for ordinal variables and the independent t test for continuous variables. Results: Fifty-one patients (M:F: 41:10 of mean age 46.06 ± 11.19 years and mean post-stroke duration of 467.33 ± 436.39 days were included in the study. Eighteen of the 51 participants (35.29% met the criteria for depression. Demographic variables like male gender, being married, living in a nuclear family, urban background, and higher HRDS score were significantly correlated with PSD (P < 0.05. Depression was related to functional disability after stroke but to a statistically insignificant level (P > 0.05 and was unrelated to lesion-related parameters. Conclusion: Depression occurs in one-third of chronic stroke survivors and is prevalent in subjects referred for rehabilitation. PSD is related primarily to demographic variables and only to a lesser extent to functional disability following stroke.

  8. Stroke in Southern Europe: A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo V. Vasiliadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is a leading cause of death and acquired disability worldwide. In Europe, strokes account for almost 1.1 million death per year. In particular, countries in Southern Europe constitute populations with a different lifestyle and dietary habits from those in Northern Europe and that may influence stroke incidence, type and risk factors.Aim: The objective of this study was to review and summarise the trends of the incidence of stroke in Southern Europe, as well as,to mention stroke subtypes and recognise the risk factors for stroke.Methods: A systematic review in PubMed was conducted.Results: Therefore, twenty-three articles, representing seven countries, related to incidence, type and risk factors of stroke in this specific geographical area of Europe were identified. The annual stroke incidence varied from approximately 1.41 to 3.73 per 1000 population per year. Currently, in all the countries studied, ischemic stroke was the commonest stroke type in all series. Hypertension remains the main risk factor for both ischemic andhemorrhagic strokes, followed by diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia and other factors.Conclusions: A wide range of stroke incidence may be due to the different lifestyle and behavioural factors among countries. Further research that uses the best possible methods to study the incidence, type and risk factors of stroke are urgently needed in Balkan Peninsula.

  9. Stroke rehabilitation in Canada: a work in progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasell, Robert; Meyer, Matthew J; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; Willems, Deb

    2009-01-01

    Stroke rehabilitation in Canada continues to function under models and practices that have changed little in the last four decades and struggles to implement new evidence-based or best practices. Ontario, Canada's largest province, has had a coordinated stroke strategy since 2000. The Ontario Stroke System has developed an extensive infrastructure of research syntheses, consensus panel recommendations, practice guidelines, standards of care, and centralized data collection across the continuum of stroke care. This has produced a solid foundation upon which an evidence-based stroke rehabilitation system can be developed. However, failure to invest in stroke rehabilitation or provide incentives to implement change has resulted in the stroke rehabilitation system and critical outcomes remaining largely unchanged. Improvements in time to admission have been countered by rising admission FIM scores such that severe stroke patients often cannot access the stroke rehabilitation system. Many stroke patients are still rehabilitated on general rehabilitation units, therapy intensities remain unacceptably low, and many outpatient programs are being reduced or even closed. Although there are pockets of innovation, the stroke rehabilitation system continues to function more according to traditional ways of practicing. The hope is that with appropriate investments and incentives, Canadians and Ontarians can build upon the existing infrastructure to ensure stroke patients receive optimal rehabilitative care based on best evidence. In the meantime, stroke rehabilitation in Canada remains a work in progress.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea in ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Tosun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ischemic stroke and to evaluate the effectiveness of nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment. METHODS: Overnight polysomnography was performed by a computerized system in 19 subjects with ischemic stroke. Patients with an apnea-hypopnea index > 5 were considered to have obstructive sleep apnea. The appropriate level of continuous positive airway pressure for each patient was determined during an all-night continuous positive airway pressure determination study. Attended continuous positive airway pressure titration was performed with a continuous positive airway pressure auto-titrating device. RESULTS: Obstructive sleep apnea prevalence among patients with ischemic stroke was 73.7%. The minimum SaO2 was significantly lower, and the percent of total sleep time in the wake stage and stage 1 sleep was significantly longer in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. In two patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea, we observed a decrease in the apnea-hypopnea index, an increase in mean wake time, mean SaO2, and minimum SaO2, and alterations in sleep structures with continuous positive airway pressure treatment. CONCLUSION: As the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea is of particular importance in secondary stroke prevention, we suggest that the clinical assessment of obstructive sleep apnea be part of the evaluation of stroke patients in rehabilitation units, and early treatment should be started.

  11. Antithrombotic Medication for Cardioembolic Stroke Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Àngels Font

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Embolism of cardiac origin accounts for about 20% of ischemic strokes. Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation is the most frequent cause of cardioembolic stroke. Approximately 1% of population is affected by atrial fibrillation, and its prevalence is growing with ageing in the modern world. Strokes due to cardioembolism are in general severe and prone to early recurrence and have a higher long-term risk of recurrence and mortality. Despite its enormous preventive potential, continuous oral anticoagulation is prescribed for less than half of patients with atrial fibrillation who have risk factors for cardioembolism and no contraindications for anticoagulation. Available evidence does not support routine immediate anticoagulation of acute cardioembolic stroke. Anticoagulation therapy's associated risk of hemorrhage and monitoring requirements have encouraged the investigation of alternative therapies for individuals with atrial fibrillation. New anticoagulants being tested for prevention of stroke are low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH, unfractionated heparin, factor Xa inhibitors, or direct thrombin inhibitors like dabigatran etexilate and rivaroxaban. The later exhibit stable pharmacokinetics obviating the need for coagulation monitoring or dose titration, and they lack clinically significant food or drug interaction. Moreover, they offer another potential that includes fixed dosing, oral administration, and rapid onset of action. There are several concerns regarding potential harm, including an increased risk for hepatotoxicity, clinically significant bleeding, and acute coronary events. Therefore, additional trials and postmarketing surveillance will be needed.

  12. Real-time optoacoustic monitoring of stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Hambauer, Sebastian; Krieg, Sandro M.; Lehmberg, Jens; Lindauer, Ute; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Characterizing disease progression and identifying possible therapeutic interventions in stroke is greatly aided by the use of longitudinal function imaging studies. In this study, we investigate the applicability of real-time multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) as a tool for non-invasive monitoring of the progression of stroke in the whole brain. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) method was used to induce stroke. Mice were imaged under isoflurane anesthesia preoperatively and at several time points during and after the 60-minute occlusion. The animals were sacrificed after 24 hours and their excised brains frozen at -80°C for sectioning. The cryosection were stained using H&E staining to identify the ischemic lesion. Major vessels are readily identifiable in the whole mouse head in the in vivo optoacoustic scans. During ischemia, a reduction in cerebral blood volume is detectable in the cortex. Post ischemia, spectral unmixing of the optoacoustic signals shows an asymmetry of the deoxygenated hemoglobin in the hemisphere affected by MCAO. This hypoxic area was mainly located around the boundary of the ischemic lesion and was therefore identified as the ischemic penumbra. Non-invasive functional MSOT imaging is able to visualize the hypoxic penumbra in brains affected by stroke. Stopping the spread of the infarct area and revitalizing the penumbra is central in stroke research, this new imaging technique may therefore prove to be a valuable tool in the monitoring and developing new treatments.

  13. Medical phenomenology and stroke rehabilitation: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gary

    2011-01-01

    This issue of Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation explores the theme of medical phenomenology and stroke rehabilitation through open peer commentary format. The theme is introduced by a brief summary and overview of phenomenology as a branch of philosophy whose focus is the development of methodology for describing and ordering human experience. The application of this philosophical approach to medicine in general and stroke rehabilitation in particular is then considered. An approach to patients informed by both phenomenology and science provides a more complete, holistic, and humanistic framework than science alone. Phenomenology helps the clinician to understand the importance of narrative, the process of adaptation at the level of the integrated whole person, and the important role of context in determining how recovery unfolds. Embodiment is presented as an organizing principle that links the nature of conscious experience in the lived body and the basic transformation in experience and function associated with an acquired pathology such as stroke. Finally, the nature of open peer commentary is considered and introduced in terms of how it has been specifically implemented in this issue of Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation.

  14. Human Data Supporting Glyburide in Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kevin N.; Simard, J. Marc; Elm, Jordan; Kronenberg, Golo; Kunte, Hagen; Kimberly, W. Taylor

    2016-01-01

    The SUR1-TRPM4 channel is a critical determinant of edema and hemorrhagic transformation after focal ischemia. Blockade of this channel by the small molecule glyburide results in improved survival and neurological outcome in multiple preclinical models of ischemic stroke. A robust, compelling body of evidence suggests that an intravenous (IV) formulation of glyburide, RP-1127, can prevent swelling and improve outcome in patients with stroke. Retrospective studies of diabetic stroke patients show improved outcomes in patients who are continued on sulfonylureas after stroke onset. Early phase II study of MRI and plasma biomarkers support the conclusion that RP-1127 may decrease swelling and hemorrhagic transformation. Finally, the ongoing phase II RP-1127 development program has demonstrated continued safety as well as feasibility of enrollment and tolerability of the intervention. Continued efforts to complete the ongoing phase IIb study and definitive efficacy studies are urgently needed to bring a candidate pharmacotherapy to a population of severe stroke patients that currently have no alternative. PMID:26463916

  15. Rehabilitation Outcomes: Ischemic versus Hemorrhagic Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Perna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes have different pathophysiologies and possibly different long-term cerebral and functional implications. Hemorrhagic strokes expose the brain to irritating effects of blood and ischemic strokes reflect localized or diffuse cerebral vascular pathology. Methods. Participants were individuals who suffered either an ischemic (n=172 or hemorrhagic stroke (n=112 within the past six months and were involved in a postacute neurorehabilitation program. Participants completed three months of postacute neurorehabilitation and the Mayo Portland Adaptability Inventory-4 (MPAI-4 at admission and discharge. Admission MPAI-4 scores and level of functioning were comparable. Results. Group ANOVA comparisons show no significant group differences at admission or discharge or difference in change scores. Both groups showed considerably reduced levels of productivity/employment after discharge as compared to preinjury levels. Conclusions. Though the pathophysiology of these types of strokes is different, both ultimately result in ischemic injuries, possibly accounting for lack of findings of differences between groups. In the present study, participants in both groups experienced similar functional levels across all three MPAI-4 domains both at admission and discharge. Limitations of this study include a highly educated sample and few outcome measures.

  16. 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1932-01-01

    The researcher is sitting above the exit cone of the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel and is examining the new 6-component spinning balance. This balance was developed between 1930 and 1933. It was an important advance in the technology of rotating or rolling balances. As M.J. Bamber and C.H. Zimmerman wrote in NACA TR 456: 'Data upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a spinning airplane may be obtained in several ways; namely, flight tests with full-scale airplanes, flight tests with balanced models, strip-method analysis of wind-tunnel force and moment tests, and wind-tunnel tests of rotating models.' Further, they note: 'Rolling-balance data have been of limited value because it has not been possible to measure all six force and moment components or to reproduce a true spinning condition. The spinning balance used in this investigation is a 6-component rotating balance from which it is possible to obtain wind-tunnel data for any of a wide range of possible spinning conditions.' Bamber and Zimmerman described the balance as follows: 'The spinning balance consists of a balance head that supports the model and contains the force-measuring units, a horizontal turntable supported by streamline struts in the center of the jet and, outside the tunnel, a direct-current driving motor, a liquid tachometer, an air compressor, a mercury manometer, a pair of indicating lamps, and the necessary controls. The balance head is mounted on the turntable and it may be set to give any radius of spin between 0 and 8 inches.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual

  17. Vertical distribution of sediment concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sai-hua HUANG; Zhi-lin SUN; Dan XU; Shan-shan XIA

    2008-01-01

    A simple formula is proposed to predict the vertical distribution of a suspended load concentration in a 2D steady turbulent flow.The proposed formula significantly improves the well-known Rouse formula where sediment concentration has an infinitely large value at the channel bottom and a zero value at the water surface.Based on this formula and the logarithmic ve-locity profile,a theoretical elementary function for the transport rate of a suspended load is developed.This equation improves the Einstein equation in which the unit-width suspended sediment discharge must be solved by numerical integration and a contra-diction between the lower limit of the integral and that of velocity distribution exists.

  18. Capillary holdup between vertical spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zeinali Heris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The maximum volume of liquid bridge left between two vertically mounted spherical particles has been theoretically determined and experimentally measured. As the gravitational effect has not been neglected in the theoretical model, the liquid interface profile is nonsymmetrical around the X-axis. Symmetry in the interface profile only occurs when either the particle size ratio or the gravitational force becomes zero. In this paper, some equations are derived as a function of the spheres' sizes, gap width, liquid density, surface tension and body force (gravity/centrifugal to estimate the maximum amount of liquid that can be held between the two solid spheres. Then a comparison is made between the result based on these equations and several experimental results.

  19. Poststroke epilepsy in the Copenhagen stroke study: incidence and predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2005-01-01

    Poststroke epilepsy (PSE) is a feared complication after stroke and is reported in 3% to 5% of stroke survivors. In this study we sought to identify incidence and predictors of PSE in an unselected stroke population with a follow-up period of 7 years. The study was community-based and comprises...... a cohort of 1197 consecutively and prospectively admitted patients with stroke. Patients were followed up for 7 years. We defined PSE as recurrent epileptic seizures with onset after stroke and requiring antiepileptic prophylaxis. PSE was related to clinical factors (age, sex, onset stroke severity, lesion...... size on computed tomography scans, stroke subtype, localization, stroke risk factor profile, and early seizures) in univariate analyses. Independent predictors of PSE were identified through multiple logistic regression analyses. Overall, 38 patients (3.2%) developed PSE. Univariately, PSE...

  20. New Guidelines for Reducing Stroke Risks Unique to Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Making News on Heart.org Learn More New guidelines for reducing stroke risks unique to women American ... Cheryl Bushnell, M.D. on women and stroke guidelines Cheryl Bushnell, M.D., M.H.S., author of ...

  1. Nonfasting triglycerides, cholesterol, and ischemic stroke in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Current guidelines on stroke prevention have recommendations on desirable cholesterol levels, but not on nonfasting triglycerides. We compared stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol for their association with risk of ischemic stroke in the general population....

  2. High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke Updated:Sep ... have a stroke for the first time have high blood pressure . And an irregular atrial heart rhythm — a condition ...

  3. Let's Talk about High Blood Pressure and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Are Heart Disease and Stroke? What is Metabolic Syndrome? What is Peripheral Vascular Disease? Stroke, Recovery and ... Blood Pressure Readings 4 Heart Attack Symptoms in Women 5 How to Eat Healthy 6 All About ...

  4. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  5. Pneumonia in acute stroke patients fed by nasogastric tube

    OpenAIRE

    Dziewas, R. (Rainer); Ritter, M.; Schilling, M; Konrad, C.; Oelenberg, S; Nabavi, D; Stogbauer, F; Ringelstein, E; Ludemann, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: Aspiration pneumonia is the most important acute complication of stroke related dysphagia. Tube feeding is usually recommended as an effective and safe way to supply nutrition in dysphagic stroke patients.

  6. [Epidemiology of stroke in Japan and comparison with the world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Yoshihiko; Ninomiya, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    Stroke was the leading cause of death in Japan until 1980s. The results from the Hisayama study, which is a population-based study in Japan, showed that incidence and mortality of stroke decreased with time owing to the improved management of hypertension. Although the incidence of hemorrhagic stroke decreased markedly, the proportion of hemorrhagic stroke among the incident cases of stroke in Japan is higher than in European countries. Among the incident cases of ischemic stroke, the proportion of lacunar infarction decreased significantly, whereas the proportion of atherothrombotic and cardioembolic stroke increased. These changes may be caused by elevating prevalence of metabolic disorders-namely, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. Effective prevention and management of the metabolic disorder are necessary for further prevention of stroke.

  7. For Stroke Survivors, Exercise Is Good for The Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163721.html For Stroke Survivors, Exercise Is Good for the Brain: Review ... HealthDay News) -- A structured exercise program can help stroke survivors recover not only physically but mentally as ...

  8. Improving stroke care for patients at Cavan hospital [poster

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murugasu, G Dr.

    2013-07-01

    Under the Quality and Continuing Care Directorate (QCCD) in stroke care Cavan General Hospital was identified as a hospital that received a large number of stroke and TIA patients. A programme was established to improve services to this population.

  9. More Evidence Ties Gum Health to Stroke Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 163755.html More Evidence Ties Gum Health to Stroke Risk Study shows increasing risk of brain blockage ... as people with healthy gums to suffer a stroke, new research suggests. It's not the first study ...

  10. Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke Also known as aspirin primary prevention. Aspirin is ... taking aspirin to prevent another heart attack or stroke? The information discussed in Who may benefit? only ...

  11. After Stroke, 'Blue' Light May Help Beat the Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163731.html After Stroke, 'Blue' Light May Help Beat the Blues Akin ... a danger for people recovering from a debilitating stroke. But new research suggests that tweaking a rehabilitation ...

  12. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: ... with heart disease and those who have suffered stroke are at higher risk for serious problems from ...

  13. Presumed Perinatal Stroke: Risk Factors, Clinical and Radiological Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilves, Pilvi; Laugesaar, Rael; Loorits, Dagmar; Kolk, Anneli; Tomberg, Tiiu; Lõo, Silva; Talvik, Inga; Kahre, Tiina; Talvik, Tiina

    2016-04-01

    It is unknown why some infants with perinatal stroke present clinical symptoms late during infancy and will be identified as infants with presumed perinatal stroke. The risk factors and clinical and radiological data of 42 infants with presumed perinatal stroke (69% with periventricular venous infarction and 31% with arterial ischemic stroke) from the Estonian Pediatric Stroke Database were reviewed. Children with presumed perinatal stroke were born at term in 95% of the cases and had had no risk factors during pregnancy in 43% of the cases. Children with periventricular venous infarction were born significantly more often (82%) vaginally (P = .0213) compared to children with arterial stroke (42%); nor did they require resuscitation (P = .0212) or had any neurological symptoms after birth (P = .0249). Periventricular venous infarction is the most common type of lesion among infants with the presumed perinatal stroke. Data suggest that the disease is of prenatal origin.

  14. Facilities of Early Rehabilitation post Stroke in Poland 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opara, Jozef; Langhorne, Peter; Larsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    -stroke, i.e. within 3 months of stroke. Comment - Taking into account that about half of stroke survivors will need rehabilitation (30 days after stroke onset), the current facilities of early post-stroke rehabilitation in Poland cannot meet this need. We should do our best to introduce rehabilitation......? Aims - Growing costs of health care are encouraging healthcare planners to look for new organizational solutions of services which could enable rehabilitation as early as possible after disease onset. Early post-stroke rehabilitation consists of many elements that provide for early onset rehabilitation...... services such as Early Home Supported Discharge after stroke, which is currently not available in Poland. Conclusions - A relatively small number of patients in Poland were moved after stroke from neurological wards to rehabilitation departments as was the number treated in rehabilitation departments early...

  15. Ischemic Stroke:Therapy of Risk and Benefit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2005-01-01

    @@ Therapeutic thrombolysis is an immense opportunity in acute stroke care. For the first time, there is a treatment that has a high probability of being effective if given early enough to patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  16. Air pollution and stroke - an overview of the evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswaran, Ravi

    2016-08-01

    Air pollution is being increasingly recognized as a significant risk factor for stroke. There are numerous sources of air pollution including industry, road transport and domestic use of biomass and solid fuels. Early reports of the association between air pollution and stroke come from studies investigating health effects of severe pollution episodes. Several daily time series and case-crossover studies have reported associations with stroke. There is also evidence linking chronic air pollution exposure with stroke and with reduced survival after stroke. A conceptual framework linking air pollution exposure and stroke is proposed. It links acute and chronic exposure to air pollution with pathways to acute and chronic effects on stroke risk. Current evidence regarding potential mechanisms mainly relate to particulate air pollution. Whilst further evidence would be useful, there is already sufficient evidence to support consideration of reduction in air pollution as a preventative measure to reduce the stroke burden globally.

  17. Complex neurological symptoms in bilateral thalamic stroke due to Percheron artery occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Paola; Manganotti, Paolo; Moretti, Rita

    2017-01-01

    The artery of Percheron is a rare anatomical variant where a single thalamic perforating artery arises from the proximal posterior cerebral artery (P1 segment) between the basilar artery and the posterior communicating artery and supplies the rostral mesencephalon and both paramedian territories of the thalami. Almost one-third of human brains present this variant. Occlusion of the artery of Percheron mostly results in a bilateral medial thalamic infarction, which usually manifests with altered consciousness (including coma), vertical gaze paresis, and cognitive disturbance. The presentation is similar to the “top of the basilar syndrome”, and early recognition should be prompted. We describe the case of a young female with this vessel variant who experienced a bilateral thalamic stroke. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated bilateral thalamic infarcts and a truncated artery of Percheron. Occlusion of the vessel was presumably due to embolism from a patent foramen ovale. Thrombolysis was performed, with incomplete symptom remission, cognitive impairment, and persistence of speech disorders. Early recognition and treatment of posterior circulation strokes is mandatory, and further investigation for underlying stroke etiologies is needed. PMID:28053539

  18. Regulation of stroke and glide in a foot-propelled avian diver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Akinori; Daunt, Francis; Wanless, Sarah; Harris, Mike; Sato, Katsufumi; Naito, Yasuhiko

    2005-06-01

    Bottom-feeding, breath-hold divers would be expected to minimize transit time between the surface and foraging depth, thus maximizing the opportunities for prey capture during the bottom phase of the dive. To achieve this they can potentially adjust a variety of dive parameters, including dive angle and swim speed. However, because of predictable changes in buoyancy with depth, individuals would also be expected to adjust dive behavior according to dive depth. To test these predictions we deployed miniature, dorsally attached data-loggers that recorded surge and heave accelerations at 64 Hz to obtain the first detailed measurements of a foot-propelled diving bird, the European shag Phalacrocorax aristotelis, in the wild. The results were used to investigate biomechanical changes during the descent, ascent and bottom phases for dives varying between 7 m and 43 m deep. Shags descended and ascended almost vertically (60-90 degrees relative to the sea surface). During descent, swim speed varied between 1.2-1.8 m s(-1) and the frequency of the foot stroke used for propulsion decreased significantly with depth, mainly due to a fivefold increase in the duration of the glide between strokes. Birds appeared to maintain the duration and the maximum strength of power stroke and thus optimize muscle contraction efficiency.

  19. Thrombophilia And Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Abrishamizadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS is a common cause of morbidity and mortality with significant socioeconomic impact especially when it affects young patients. Compared to the older adults, the incidence, risk factors, and etiology are distinctly different in younger IS. Hypercoagulable states are relatively more commonly detected in younger IS patients. Thrombophilic states are disorders of hemostatic mechanisms that result in a predisposition to thrombosis .Thrombophilia is an established cause of venous thrombosis. Therefore, it is tempting to assume that these disorders might have a similar relationship with arterial thrombosis. Despite this fact that 1-4 % of ischemic strokes are attributed to Thrombophillia, this   alone rarely causes arterial occlusions .Even in individuals with a positive thrombophilia screen and arterial thrombosis, the former might not be the primary etiological factor. Thrombophilic   disorders can be broadly divided into inherited or acquired conditions. Inherited thrombophilic states include deficiencies of natural anticoagulants such as protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III (AT III deficiency, polymorphisms causing resistance to activated protein C(Factor V Leiden mutation, and disturbance in the clotting balance (prothrombin gene 20210G/A variant. Of all the inherited  thrombophilic disorders, Factor V Leiden mutation is perhaps the commonest cause. On the contrary, acquired thrombophilic disorders are more common and include conditions such as the antiphospholipid syndrome, associated with lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. The more useful and practical approach of ordering various diagnostic tests for the uncommon thrombophilic states tests should be determined by a detailed clinical history, physical examination, imaging studies and evaluating whether an underlying hypercoagulable state appears more likely. The laboratory thrombophilia   screening should be comprehensive and avoid missing the

  20. Reasons for exclusion from intravenous thrombolysis in stroke patients admitted to the Stroke Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellari, Manuel; Bosco, Mariachiara; Forlivesi, Stefano; Tomelleri, Giampaolo; Micheletti, Nicola; Carletti, Monica; Bovi, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Intravenous (IV) thrombolysis is the treatment in ischemic stroke, but only the minority of patients receive this medication. The primary objective of this study was to explore the reasons associated with the decision not to offer IV thrombolysis to stroke patients admitted to the Stroke Unit (SU). We conducted a retrospective analysis based on data collected from 876 consecutive stroke patients admitted to the SU 4.5 h (p = 0.001) and unknown time of onset (or stroke present on awakening) (p = 0.004) were reasons listed in the current SPC of Actilyse reasons for exclusion even they occurred singly, whereas mild deficit (or rapidly improving symptoms) (p exclusion even when it occurred singly, whereas early CT hypodensity (p exclusion, early CT hypodensity was associated with decision not offer IV thrombolysis in patients with mild deficit (p 80 years (p 4.5 h (p = 0.005), and unknown time of onset (p = 0.037), while severe pre-stroke disability (p = 0.025) and admission under non-stroke specialist neurologist assessment (p = 0.018) in patients with age >80 years. There are often unjustified reasons for exclusion from IV thrombolysis in SU.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging to visualize stroke and characterize stroke recovery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintosh, Bradley J; Graham, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    The global burden of stroke continues to grow. Although stroke prevention strategies (e.g., medications, diet, and exercise) can contribute to risk reduction, options for acute interventions (e.g., thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke) are limited to the minority of patients. The remaining patients are often left with profound neurological disabilities that substantially impact quality of life, economic productivity, and increase caregiver burden. In the last decade, however, the future outlook for such patients has been tempered by movement toward the view that the brain is capable of reorganizing after injury. Many now view brain recovery after stroke as an area of scientific research with large potential for therapeutic advances, far into the future (Broderick and William, 2004). As a probe of brain anatomy, function and physiology, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive and highly versatile modality that promises to play a particularly important role in such research. Here we provide a basic review of MRI physical principles and applications for assessing stroke, looking toward the future role MRI may play in improving stroke rehabilitation methods and stroke recovery.

  2. Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: Managing transitions of care following Stroke, Guidelines Update 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jill I; O'Connell, Colleen; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; Booth, Rhonda; Boyle, Rosemary; Cheung, Donna; Cooper, Nancy; Corriveau, Helene; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Dulude, Annie; Flaherty, Patti; Glasser, Ev; Gubitz, Gord; Hebert, Debbie; Holzmann, Jacquie; Hurteau, Patrick; Lamy, Elise; LeClaire, Suzanne; McMillan, Taylor; Murray, Judy; Scarfone, David; Smith, Eric E; Shum, Vivian; Taylor, Kim; Taylor, Trudy; Yanchula, Catherine; Teasell, Robert; Lindsay, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Every year, approximately 62,000 people with stroke and transient ischemic attack are treated in Canadian hospitals. For patients, families and caregivers, this can be a difficult time of adjustment. The 2016 update of the Canadian Managing Transitions of Care following Stroke guideline is a comprehensive summary of current evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations appropriate for use by clinicians who provide care to patients following stroke across a broad range of settings. The focus of these recommendations is on support, education and skills training for patients, families and caregivers; effective discharge planning; interprofessional communication; adaptation in resuming activities of daily living; and transition to long-term care for patients who are unable to return to or remain at home. Unlike other modules contained in the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations (such as acute inpatient care), many of these recommendations are based on consensus opinion, or evidence level C, highlighting the absence of conventional evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials) in this area of stroke care. The quality of care transitions between stages and settings may have a direct impact on patient and family outcomes such as coping, readmissions and functional recovery. While many qualitative and non-controlled studies were reviewed, this gap in evidence combined with the fact that mortality from stoke is decreasing and more people are living with the effects of stroke, underscores the need to channel a portion of available research funds to recovery and adaptation following the acute phase of stroke.

  3. Reliability and validity of the Korean standard pattern identification for stroke (K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Byoung-Kab

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was conducted to examine the reliability and validity of the ‘Korean Standard Pattern Identification for Stroke (K-SPI-Stroke’, which was developed and evaluated within the context of traditional Korean medicine (TKM. Methods Between September 2006 and December 2010, 2,905 patients from 11 Korean medical hospitals were asked to complete the K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire as a part of project ' Fundamental study for the standardization and objectification of pattern identification in traditional Korean medicine for stroke (SOPI-Stroke. Each patient was independently diagnosed by two TKM physicians from the same site according to one of four patterns, as suggested by the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine: 1 a Qi deficiency pattern, 2 a Dampness-phlegm pattern, 3 a Yin deficiency pattern, or 4 a Fire-heat pattern. We estimated the internal consistency using Cronbach’s α coefficient, the discriminant validity using the means score of patterns, and the predictive validity using the classification accuracy of the K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire. Results The K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire had satisfactory internal consistency (α = 0.700 and validity, with significant differences in the mean of scores among the four patterns. The overall classification accuracy of this questionnaire was 65.2 %. Conclusion These results suggest that the K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for estimating the severity of the four patterns.

  4. [Nonfasting triglycerides and risk of ischemic stroke--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiberg, J.J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.;

    2009-01-01

    The role of triglycerides in the risk of ischemic stroke remains controversial. We tested the hypothesis that increased levels of nonfasting triglycerides are associated with ischemic stroke in the general population. Men with a nonfasting triglyceride level 5 mmol/l had a multivariable, adjusted...... hazard ratio for ischemic stroke of 2.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.3-4.8) compared with men with a nonfasting triglyceride level triglycerides is associated with risk of ischemic stroke Udgivelsesdato...

  5. Polymorphisms in apolipoprotein B and risk of ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Jan Skov;

    2007-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B levels associate with risk of ischemic stroke. APOB polymorphisms may influence levels of apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but whether they associate with risk of ischemic stroke is unknown.......Apolipoprotein B levels associate with risk of ischemic stroke. APOB polymorphisms may influence levels of apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but whether they associate with risk of ischemic stroke is unknown....

  6. Pediatric Stroke: The Importance of Cerebral Arteriopathy and Vascular Malformations

    OpenAIRE

    Beslow, Lauren A.; Jordan, Lori C

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of neurologic morbidity in childhood. Population-based estimates of the annual incidence of childhood stroke range from 2 to 13 per 100,000 children. This article will review recent literature on both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke in children with a focus on cerebral arteriopathy and vascular malformations as stroke risk factors. Additional risk factors include congenital heart disease, sickle cell disease, and hematologic abnormalities among others. Outcomes ar...

  7. Difficulties in post-stroke gait improvement caused by post-stroke depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanislaw Kijowski

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is a common problem impeding post-stroke rehabilitation.Up to 70% of patients show depression symptoms during the first twelve months after stroke onset.However,the depression and its effect on functional recovery can be difficult to diagnose.The purpose of this study was to use gait analysis as a tool to compare the recovery after stroke in patients with and without depression and to assess the impact of the initiation time of rehabilitation after stroke onset.Methods One hundred and forty five consecutive patients after first ever stroke admitted for designed rehabilitation program within 2 to 31 months after stroke onset participated.All patients received 4 weeks treatment program included comprehensive rehabilitation consisted of multipurpose activities 5 days a week.These included individual and group exercises,physiotherapy,occupational therapy and gait training.Gait analysis with Kistler force plates was employed to assess gait pattern symmetry before and after the treatment.Gait symmetry was evaluated based on seven gait parameters.Regaining of gait pattern symmetry was assumed as a measure of rehabilitation outcome.Results After rehabilitation program gait symmetry w()ined in patients without depression.Gait asymmetry remained unchanged in patients diagnosed with depression.No major differences in outcome from rehabilitation were noted in regards to the initiation time of rehabilitation after the stroke onset.Conclusions Depression limits gait recovery after stroke.The time of initiation of rehabilitation after stroke onset does not limit the motor recovery after rehabilitation program.

  8. Stroke awareness decreases prehospital delay after acute ischemic stroke in korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed arrival at hospital is one of the major obstacles in enhancing the rate of thrombolysis therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Our study aimed to investigate factors associated with prehospital delay after acute ischemic stroke in Korea. Methods A prospective, multicenter study was conducted at 14 tertiary hospitals in Korea from March 2009 to July 2009. We interviewed 500 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrived within 48 hours. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors influencing prehospital delay. Results Among the 500 patients (median 67 years, 62% men, the median time interval from symptom onset to arrival was 474 minutes (interquartile range, 170-1313. Early arrival within 3 hours of symptom onset was significantly associated with the following factors: high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, previous stroke, atrial fibrillation, use of ambulance, knowledge about thrombolysis and awareness of the patient/bystander that the initial symptom was a stroke. Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that awareness of the patient/bystander that the initial symptom was a stroke (OR 4.438, 95% CI 2.669-7.381, knowledge about thrombolysis (OR 2.002, 95% CI 1.104-3.633 and use of ambulance (OR 1.961, 95% CI 1.176-3.270 were significantly associated with early arrival. Conclusions In Korea, stroke awareness not only on the part of patients, but also of bystanders, had a great impact on early arrival at hospital. To increase the rate of thrombolysis therapy and the incidence of favorable outcomes, extensive general public education including how to recognize stroke symptoms would be important.

  9. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Servico de Neurorradiologia, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  10. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke in Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Dang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of stroke, with an estimated annual cost of $71.5 billion, has made it a major health problem that increases disability and death, particularly in patients with atrial fibrillation. Although advanced age and atrial fibrillation are recognized as strong risk factors for stroke, the basis for this susceptibility are not well defined. Aging or associated diseases are accompanied by changes in rheostatic, humoral, metabolic and hemodynamic factors that may contribute more to stroke predisposition than rhythm abnormality alone. Several thromboembolism-predisposing clinical characteristics and serum biomarkers with prognostic significance have been identified in patients with atrial fibrillation. Although anticoagulation decreases the risk of thromboembolism, management in the elderly remains complex due to major concerns about bleeding. New anticoagulants and nonpharmacologic strategies are helpful to reduce the risk of bleeding, particularly in older-elderly patients. Herein, we review the pathogenesis and management of select issues of thromboembolism in the elderly with atrial fibrillation.

  11. Migraine and risk of hemorrhagic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; González-Pérez, Antonio; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the association between hemorrhagic stroke and migraine using data from The Health Improvement Network database. FINDINGS: We ascertained 1,797 incident cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and 1,340 of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Density-based sampling was used...... to select 10,000 controls free from hemorrhagic stroke. Using unconditional logistic regression models, we calculated the risk of hemorrhagic stroke associated with migraine, adjusting for age, sex, calendar year, alcohol, body mass index, hypertension, previous cerebrovascular disease, oral contraceptive...... use, and health services utilization.The risk (odds ratio [OR]) of ICH among migraineurs was 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9-1.5), and of SAH was (1.2, 95% CI 0.9-1.5). The association with ICH was stronger for migraine diagnosed ≥20 years prior to ICH (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.0-2.4), but not with SAH...

  12. Stroke Symbol Generation Software for Fighter Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.K. Tripathi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an overview of the stroke symbol generation software developed by Hindustan Aeronautics Limited for fighter aircraft. This paper covers the working principle of head-up-display, overview of target hardware on which the developed software has been integrated and tested, software architecture, hardware software interfaces and design details of stroke symbol generation software. The paper also covers the issues related to stroke symbol quality which were encountered by the design team and the details about how the issues were resolved during integration and test phase.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(2, pp.153-156, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.4257

  13. Cerebrovascular arteriopathy (arteriosclerosis) and ischemic childhood stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, S R; Bates, S; Lukin, R R; Benton, C; Third, J; Glueck, C J

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the intracranial cerebrovascular abnormalities and clinical status of 8 children who had familial lipoprotein disorders and evidence of thromboembolic cerebrovascular disease. Six of the 8 children had low levels of plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol, two had high triglyceride levels, and all came from kindreds characterized by familial lipoprotein abnormalities and premature cardio- and/or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis. Vascular occlusion, irregularities of the arterial lumen, beading, tortuosity, and evidence of collateralization were consistently noted. We speculate that cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis in pediatric ischemic stroke victims who have familial lipoprotein abnormalities may be related to lipoprotein-mediated endothelial damage and thrombosis formation, or to the failure to restore endothelial cells' integrity following damage. The apparent association of lipoproteins and strokes in children and their families merits further exploration, particularly when assessing cerebral angiograms in pediatric ischemic stroke victims. In children with unexplained ischemic cerebrovascular accidents, the diagnostic possibility of occlusive arteriosclerosis with thrombosis must be entertained.

  14. [Stroke in HIV-infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino, Ireneia; Sousa, António; Correia, José

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) is changing. New drug treatments have reduced morbidity and mortality of this disease, therefore it is necessary to start treating the HIV infection as a chronical disease. The association of the stroke with the HIV infection was inicially thought to be a result of other opportunistic infeccions and tumors. However, the vascular disease associated with HIV infection has been a subject of research and debate. New evidence shows that the vascular diseases could be a threat for the pacients doing highly active antirretroviral therapy (HAART). In this paper, we review the association between the HIV infection and stroke. Furthermore, we have done an analysis of the risk for the stroke on pacients with HIV infection considering the changes of the infection spectrum by the introduction of HAART.

  15. Role of occupational therapy after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowland Tennille

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Internationally recognized best practice care in the early management and rehabilitation of individuals following stroke includes multidisciplinary assessment and treatment by a coordinated team of health care professionals that includes occupational therapists. Occupational therapists assess the impact of changes in motor function, sensation, coordination, visual perception, and cognition on a person′s capacity to manage daily life tasks. Intervention improves participation in meaningful roles, tasks, and activities; remediates deficits; minimizes secondary complications; and provides education and support to the patient and caregivers. Occupational therapists′ focus on independence and function, individual goal-setting, and their specialist skills in task adaptation and environmental modification underpin the profession′s contribution to the multidisciplinary stroke rehabilitation team. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of occupational therapy practice in stroke patients.

  16. Suicide after a stroke: a population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2001-01-01

    cases of suicide were identified. MAIN RESULTS: Annual incidence rates, both observed and expected, together with standardised mortality ratios (SMR) were computed based on annual population and suicide statistics, stratified by age and gender. The overall annual incidence rate of suicide in the cohort.......19) and highest for those hospitalised for less than two weeks (2.32; 1.92, 2.80). Survival analysis suggested that the risk for suicide is greatest up to about five years after a stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke patients are at an approximately doubled risk for suicide. This risk is greater among younger patients...... and causes of death. SETTING: The population of Denmark, 1979-1993. PATIENTS: A study cohort was defined comprising all 114 098 stroke patients discharged alive from hospital during the period 1979-1993. These patients were then screened in a register of causes of death over the same time period, and 359...

  17. [Occlusal vertical dimension in removable complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, R; Witter, D J

    2011-12-01

    In removable complete dentures, the occlusal vertical dimension is an important factor for patients' satisfaction with aesthetics. An excessively reduced occlusal vertical dimension is especially likely to lead to complaints about aesthetics, whereas an increased occlusal vertical dimension may lead to discomfort and a decision not to wear the complete dentures. There are various methods for determining the occlusal vertical dimension in complete dentures, based on the vertical dimension in the rest position of the mandible or on phonetics. However, none of the methods have proven to be clearly superior, in terms of reliability, than the others. The assessment of the occlusal vertical dimension will become more reliable if several methods are used simultaneously. Moreover, knowledge of the characteristics of the ageing face is essential.

  18. White matter changes in stroke patients. Relationship with stroke subtype and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leys, D; Englund, E; Del Ser, T;

    1999-01-01

    or white matter lesions or leukoencephalopathy or leukoaraiosis' and 'stroke or cerebral infarct or cerebral hemorrhage or cerebrovascular disease or transient ischemic attack (TIA)'. WMC, as defined radiologically, are present in up to 44% of patients with stroke or TIA and in 50% of patients...... with vascular dementia. WMC are more frequent in patients with lacunar infarcts, deep intracerebral hemorrhages, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. After an acute ischemic stroke, WMC are associated with a higher risk...

  19. Lower Your Stroke Risk (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-05

    Stroke is among the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. In the U.S., strokes are more common among women. In this podcast, Dr. Erika Odom discusses ways to decrease your chances of having a stroke.  Created: 11/5/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/5/2015.

  20. Pivotal Roles of Monocytes/Macrophages in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Chiba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important issue in public health due to its high rates both of morbidity and mortality, and high rate of disability. Hypertension, cardiovascular disease, arterial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and alcohol abuse are all risk factors for stroke. Clinical observations suggest that inflammation is also a direct risk factor for stroke. Patients with stroke have high levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma, and immune cells, such as macrophages and T-lymphocytes, are noted within stroke lesions. These inflammatory events are considered as a result of stroke. However, recent studies show that plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines or soluble adhesion molecules are high in patients without stroke, and anti-inflammatory therapy is effective at reducing stroke incidence in not only animal models, but in humans as well. Statins have been shown to decrease the stroke incidence via anti-inflammatory effects that are both dependent and independent of their cholesterol-lowering effects. These reports suggest that inflammation might directly affect the onset of stroke. Microglial cells and blood-derived monocytes/macrophages play important roles in inflammation in both onset and aggravation of stroke lesions. We review the recent findings regarding the role of monocytes/macrophages in stroke.

  1. Radiologic manifestations of focal cerebral hyperemia in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Skriver, E B; Herning, M

    1991-01-01

    In 16 acute stroke patients with focal cerebral hyperemia angiography and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were studied 1 to 4 days post stroke. CT was performed twice with and without contrast enhancement 3 +/- 1 days and 16 +/- 4 days post stroke. Angiographic evidence of focal cerebral hype...

  2. The European Stroke Organisation Guidelines : a standard operating procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ntaios, George; Bornstein, Natan M.; Caso, Valeria; Christensen, Hanne; De Keyser, Jacques; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Diez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Ferro, Jose M.; Ford, Gary A.; Grau, Armin; Keller, Emanuella; Leys, Didier; Russell, David; Toni, Danilo; Turc, Guillaume; Van der Worp, Bart; Wahlgren, Nils; Steiner, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the recently founded European Stroke Organisation published its guidelines for the management of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. This highly cited document was translated in several languages and was updated in 2009. Since then, the European Stroke Organisation has published

  3. Low dose aspirin after ischemic stroke associated with antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, RHWM; de Groot, PG; Kappelle, LJ

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe course and outcome of eight patients with ischemic stroke as the first thrombotic manifestation of antiphospholipid syndrome who received low-dose aspirin as prophylactic treatment. During 8.9 years of follow-up, two patients had a recurrent stroke. Recurrent stroke rate per 100

  4. Determinants of depression in chronic stroke : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Port, Ingrid G. L.; Kwakkel, Gert; Bruin, Margje; Lindeman, Eline

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the study was to identify factors that are significantly related to depression in chronic stroke patients. Methods. Prospective cohort study of stroke patients admitted for rehabilitation. A total of 165 first ever stroke patients over 18 years of age were assessed at one and thr

  5. The process flow and structure of an integrated stroke strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussel, Emma F. Van; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Schrijvers, A.J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In the Canadian province of Alberta access and quality of stroke care were suboptimal, especially in remote areas. The government introduced the Alberta Provincial Stroke Strategy (APSS) in 2005, an integrated strategy to improve access to stroke care, quality and efficiency which util

  6. Occupational Therapy Evaluation for Stroke Adults in the United States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shan-li

    2010-01-01

    @@ Of the 700,000 people in the United States who experience a new or recurrent stroke each year, more than 500,000 survive(American Stroke Association, 2007)[1]. Occupational therapy practitioners are critical rehabilitation professionals for stroke survivors.

  7. [Epidemiology of stroke in the Ukrainian and Slovak Carpathian Mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buletsa, B A; Aĭben, E

    1988-01-01

    Different aspects of epidemiology of stroke were studied in residents of 2 adjacent geographic zones: USSR and Eastern Slovak Carpathian. A total of 385 cerebral stroke patients were studied in the USSR and 345 in Eastern Slovakia. Risk factors were determined. Cerebral serial angiography revealed that carotid and subclavian arteries pathology are major causes of stroke.

  8. The Neuropsychology of Acute Stroke : Characterisation and Prognostic Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, G.M.S.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, a longitudinal study was performed in a large cohort of patients with a first symptomatic stroke who had no neurological, psychiatric, and/or cognitive history prior to the stroke. The patient cohort was examined in a very early phase (mean interval eight days post-stroke) with a neu

  9. Changes in chronotype after stroke : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Fitzthum, Katharina; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo; Ulm, Lena

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate associations between stroke onset and severity as well as chronotype (phase of entrainment) and internal time of stroke. Fifty-six first-ever ischemic stroke patients participated in a cross-sectional study assessing chronotype (mid-sleep on work-free days corrected for

  10. Cognitive recovery after stroke : A 2-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hochstenbach, JB; Mulder, TW; Den Otter, R.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine (1) whether long-term improvement of cognitive function takes place after stroke and (2) which clinical factors influence cognitive recovery. Design: Cohort study with patients who were assessed at 2.3 and 27.7 months after stroke. Setting: Home-based stroke patients. Partic

  11. Clinical profile and prognosis of patients with posterior circulation stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita J. Rawat

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Posterior circulation stroke present with a wide variety of symptoms. Episodes are often staggering and more protracted than those of anterior circulation stroke. Further studies are needed to determine the safest and most effective treatment modalities for the various types of posterior circulation stroke. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(12.000: 5159-5164

  12. Rehabilitation of stroke patients needs a family-centred approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Visser-Meily; M. Post; J.W. Gorter; S.B.V. Berlekom; T. van den Bos; E. Lindeman

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To highlight the importance of the spouse in stroke rehabilitation. Stroke not only affects the patients, but also their families, but rehabilitation practice is still primarily focused on the patient only. Method. Analysis of the position of the spouse and possible consequences of stroke f

  13. Task-oriented training in rehabilitation after stroke : systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Marijke; Schuurmans, Marieke; Lindeman, Eline; Hafsteinsdottir, Thora

    2009-01-01

    Task-oriented training in rehabilitation after stroke: systematic review. This paper is a report of a review conducted to provide an overview of the evidence in the literature on task-oriented training of stroke survivors and its relevance in daily nursing practice. Stroke is the second leading caus

  14. Strokes attributable to underuse of warfarin and antiplatelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Rasmussen, Berit Hammershaimb; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter;

    2007-01-01

    atrial fibrillation, prior myocardial infarction, angina, or prior stroke transient ischemic attack (TIA). Sufficient information on cardiovascular risk factors before stroke was available in 404 patients. A total of 54 patients had atrial fibrillation known before the stroke. Of these, 16 had...

  15. Speech and Language Therapy for Aphasia following Subacute Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koyuncu, E.; Çam, P.; Altinok, N.; Çalli, D.E.; Yarbay Duman, T.; Özgirgin, N.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time window, duration and intensity of optimal speech and language therapy applied to aphasic patients with subacute stroke in our hospital. The study consisted of 33 patients being hospitalized for stroke rehabilitation in our hospital with first stroke

  16. Therapy Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Xinchun Ye; Jinxia Hu; Guiyun Cui

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to improve functional outcome after stroke. In this review, we will focus on the protective effects of BMSCs on ischemic brain and the relative molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of BMSCs on stroke.

  17. A review of standing balance recovery from stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, A.C.H.; Haart, M. de; Nes, I.J.W. van; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, interest in the mechanisms underlying balance recovery following stroke has grown, because insight into these mechanisms is necessary to develop effective rehabilitation strategies for different types of stroke. Studies dealing with the recovery of standing balance from stroke are, however

  18. Telmisartan to prevent recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prolonged lowering of blood pressure after a stroke reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. In addition, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system in high-risk patients reduces the rate of subsequent cardiovascular events, including stroke. However, the effect of lowering of blood pres...

  19. Telmisartan to prevent recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L.; Cotton, Daniel; Ounpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Renee H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P. L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlof, Bjorn; de Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2008-01-01

    Background: Prolonged lowering of blood pressure after a stroke reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. In addition, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system in high-risk patients reduces the rate of subsequent cardiovascular events, including stroke. However, the effect of lowering of blood pressur

  20. A Review of Stroke Order in "Hanzi" Handwriting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiwei

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the current research on stroke order of "hanzi" (as used to write the Chinese, Japanese and Korean languages) in teaching Chinese as a second language (CSL). Based on an extensive review of current research on stroke order, it first discusses the importance and difficulty of stroke order in "hanzi"…