WorldWideScience

Sample records for civilian nuclear energy

  1. Potential nuclear material safeguards applied to the Department of Energy's Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the U.S. Department of Energy is charged with the responsibility of safe and efficient disposal of this Nation's civilian high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. Part of this responsibility includes providing for the application of both domestic and international safeguards on nuclear material at facilities of the Civilian Waste Management System. While detailed safeguards requirements for these disposal facilities have yet to be established, once established, they could impact facility design. Accordingly, OCRWM has participated in efforts to develop safeguards approaches for geologic repositories and will continue to participate actively with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), as well as other Department of Energy (DOE) Offices in efforts to resolve safeguards issues related to spent fuel disposal, to minimize any potential design impacts and to support effective nuclear material safeguards. The following paper discusses current plants and issues related to the application of safeguards to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS)

  2. Civilian nuclear ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a review of the information available on nuclear powered ships, built for civilian purposes. In the introduction a short discussion is given of the reasons for the limited use of nuclear ships for these purposes. In the second section a brief review is presented of data for the three experimental/merchant ships build by the United States, Germany and Japan, i.e. NS Savannah, NS Otto Hahn and NS Mutsu. In the third section the Soviet/Russian icebreaker NS Lenin is considered. Its design, operational experience and the introduction of a new nuclear propulsion plant is reviewed. In the fourth section the newer Soviet/Russian icebreakers with nuclear propulsion are considered. Finally design of the Soviet/Russian icebreaker transport/container ship NS Sevmorput is reviewed in the fifth section. The future Russian plans for nuclear vessels for the arctic waters are briefly discussed. (au)

  3. Energy Research Advisory Board, Civilian Nuclear Power Panel: Subpanel 3 report, Institutional challenges: Volume IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institutional Challenges Subpanel of the Energy Research Advisory Board's Civilian Nuclear Power Panel was charged with the task of addressing the institutional issues that affect the future of nuclear power in the United States. Barriers created by non-technical issues are generally considered to be primary obstacles to revitalizing the nuclear fission option as part of a robust supply for future electrical generation. The Subpanel examined the following categories of institutional issues: (1) Administration Policy and Leadership, (2) Licensing Reform, (3) Standardized Designs, (4) Shared Financial Risk, (5) State and Economic Regulation, (6) Waste Disposal, and (7) Public Perception. The Subpanel concluded that the Administration and Congress have the opportunity and responsibility to provide leadership in resolving these difficulties. The main report provides information on the background and current situation for each institutional issue and concludes with the set of recommendations for action

  4. The French civilian nuclear: connections and stakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document (18 power point slides) gives an overview of the French civilian nuclear industry and research and development: importance of the nuclear power generation in France, excellence of the education in nuclear sciences, organization of the nuclear connection (CEA, Areva, EDF, IRSN), the role of the French International Nuclear Agency (AFNI), the requirements for a renewal of human resources (French and foreign engineers) in the field of nuclear energy, the degree course for a diploma, examples of engineer and university diplomas, the educational networks in various regions of France, presentation of the Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (Nuclear Sciences and Techniques National Institute) and its master degrees, organization of the French education system in nuclear sciences with strong relations with the research and development programs

  5. Energies and media nr 25. Conditions for the nuclear sector. The Grenelle de l'Environnement. As well as: The civilian nuclear. Nuclear reactors and earthquakes. The Professor Pellerin's scientific rigour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue comments the conditions of the nuclear sector in a context of high oil prices and of high increase of CO2 content in the atmosphere, of oil reserve shortage, and of China's demand on electricity. Thus, it comments the opportunities of development for AREVA and EDF in China and also in the United States, as well as the development of an international cooperation within the frame of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Then, it comments the content of the Grenelle de l'Environnement and of some interventions of the French president regarding the nuclear energy, alternative energies and energy savings. Other topics are briefly addressed: the civilian nuclear and its relationship with the Non proliferation Treaty (NPT), the consequences of an earthquake in Japan in July 2007 and some observations made on a Japanese nuclear power plant (incidents, earthquake amplitude greater than that used for the plant design, dangerous location), and the rigorous attitude of Professor Pellerin

  6. Nonproliferation criteria for assessing civilian nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two trends are affecting the spread of nuclear weapons. One is the growing access to readily fissionable materials as a by-product of the spread of civilian nuclear technology. The second is the fact that many countries acquiring easier access also have an increased incentive to acquire nuclear explosives, or at least to shorten the lead time to them. Nonproliferation strategies might seek to influence the demand for nuclear explosives through improved alliance ties, regional security associations, and nuclear free zones, as well as the ease of access to explosives through agreement on increasing the difficulty of each access through changes in international agreements on technologies, or through a mix of such measures. The discussion focuses on a supply-oriented strategy, not because such a strategy by itself is likely to be optimal, but because it would be a significant component of a broad strategy, and it is the one that has been central to the nonproliferation efforts of the United States in the past several years. A supply-oriented strategy could have two components: 1. A set of incentives for choosing less dangerous nuclear systems instead of more dangerous ones (and in some cases the choosing of non-nuclear rather than nuclear technologies); 2. A set of political agreements restricting especially dangerous systems or components of systems. For such a strategy to have a prospect of being effective, it should encompass all the paths to a bomb from a legitimate safeguarded state. Specifically, it should include: 1. Paths starting from large plutonium reactors, including those labeled research reactors; 2. Isotope separation technologies; 3. Power-reactors-related paths, based on using either a. Material available at the front end, or b. Material available at the back end; and 4 Various possible future technologies, such as accelerator breeders or fusion-fission technology. Some illustrative cases are discussed

  7. Guarding the guardians: Civilian control of nuclear weapons in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book has three separate complementary goals. First, it develops a model to explain how the command and control of nuclear weapons evolves over time. Second, it tells the story of the evolution of one critical aspect of the nuclear command system, the custody of nuclear weapons. Finally, it assesses the general problem of ensuring civilian control over nuclear operations. The focus is on the formation of operational policy. Where to deploy a weapon and at what state of alertness is an operational decision. Part I, The Theory of Civilian Control is divided into three chapters: Civilian control: Principles and problems; Civilian Control: From alerts to war termination; and Explaining changes in civilian control. Part II, The Evolution of Custody Policy has seven chapters: The Atomic Energy Act and the origin of assertive control, 1945-1947; The first test of assertive civilian control, 1948-1949; The breach in assertive control, 1950-1952; Assertive control becomes delegative control, 1953-1958; The resurgence of assertive control, 1959-1962; The cycle continues, 1963-1990; and Conclusion: The future of civilian control

  8. Code on the safety of civilian nuclear fuel cycle installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Code' was promulgated by the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NSSA) on June 17, 1993, which is applicable to civilian nuclear fuel fabrication, processing, storage and reprocessing installations, not including the safety requirements for the use of nuclear fuel in reactors. The contents of the 'Code' involve siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of fuel cycle installation. The NNSA shall be responsible for the interpretation of this 'Code'

  9. Civilian and military applications of space nuclear power: a congressional perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I would like to talk about how space nuclear power fits into space programs in general. You are aware that NASA identified a civilian use that would require nuclear power on the order of 100 kilowatts - that is planetary exploration - before the military indicated their interest. Actually there are many possible civilian and military uses for space nuclear power. I would like to briefly review them because it provides insight into the future direction of the US space program. I would also like to discuss the baseline directed energy weapons program that appears to be emerging

  10. Review of the proposed Strategic National Plan for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Development: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On August 9, 1985, the Secretary of Energy requested that the Chairman of the Energy Research Advisory Board establish an ad-hoc Panel to review a draft ''Strategic National Plan for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Development.'' The resulting report, approved by the Board, contains suggestions for improving the draft plan and also contains major recommendations for alleviating the several institutional barriers that appear to preclude the construction of any new nuclear power plants in this country

  11. Strengthening the nuclear nonproliferation regime: focus on the civilian nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaders around the world and across the ideological spectrum agree that the global nonproliferation regime is facing a serious test. The emergence of sophisticated terrorist networks, black markets in nuclear technology, and technological leaps associated with globalization have conspired to threaten one of the most successful examples of international cooperation in history. The rampant proliferation of nuclear weapons that was predicted at the start of the nuclear age has been largely held in check and the use of those weapons avoided. Nonetheless, with the thirty-fifth anniversary of the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the threat of nuclear proliferation seems more serious than ever. Although experts readily concede that there exist many pathways to proliferation, the threat posed by the misuse of the civilian nuclear fuel cycle has received considerable recent attention. While the connection between nuclear energy and nonproliferation has been a topic of discussion since the dawn of the nuclear age, world events have brought the issue to the forefront once again. United States President George W. Bush and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Mohammad ElBaradei are among those who have highlighted proliferation risks associated with civilian nuclear power programs and called for revitalizing the nuclear nonproliferation regime to address new threats. From the possibility of diversion or theft of nuclear material or technology, to the use of national civilian programs as a cover for weapons programs - what some have called latent proliferation - the fuel cycle appears to many to represent a glaring proliferation vulnerability. Just as recognition of these risks is not new, neither is recognition of the many positive benefits of nuclear energy. In fact, a renewed interest in exploiting these benefits has increased the urgency of addressing the risks. Global energy demand is expected to at least double by the middle of

  12. Ideology in science and technology: the case of civilian nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation traces the complicated interrelationships between ideology and interest within the civilian nuclear power controversy. The first chapter introduces the topic. The second chapter provides a social-political-economic overview of the context in which the conflicting ideologies arose. Factors looked at are the ascendancy of the physical sciences, the development of nuclear energy, the disenchantment with science and technology and the consequent rise of an anti-nuclear ideology. Chapter III uses the theories of Alvin Gouldner to understand the structure of ideology. The chapter defines ideology's similarities to and differences from scientific discourse. Chapter IV examines the ideological discourse of a selected sample of scientists who have spoken for and against civilian nuclear power. In parallel to chapter IV, chapter V examines a scientific controversy among the sample of experts. It shows how scientific disagreement can be produced and how ideology is most closely linked to science. Chapter VI examines the social interests of the scientists and experts to discover ways that interests have shaped the ideological and scientific positions for and against civilian nuclear energy. Based on the foregoing, chapter VII concludes that the introduction of science and experts into a controversy cannot be expected to end disagreement over policy because of the link between science and ideology

  13. Agreement Between the Government of India and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards to Civilian Nuclear Facilities. Addition to the List of Facilities Subject to Safeguards Under the Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with Paragraph 14(a) of the Agreement between the Government of India and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards to Civilian Nuclear Facilities (hereinafter “the Agreement”), India shall notify the Agency in writing of its decision to offer any facility identified by India for Agency safeguards under the Agreement. Any facility so notified by India becomes subject to the Agreement as of the date of receipt by the Agency of such written notification from India, and is to be included in the Annex to the Agreement. On 11 March 2014, the Agency received from India written notification, pursuant to Paragraph 14(a) of the Agreement, of its decision to bring one additional facility under safeguards in accordance with the provisions of the Agreement. Pursuant to Paragraph 14 4(a) of the Agreement, the Annex to the Agreement has been updated and is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency

  14. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VII. International perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this volume is to assess the proliferation vulnerabilities of the present deployment of civilian nuclear-power systems within the current nonproliferation regime and, in light of their prospective deployment, to consider technical and institutional measures and alternatives which may contribute to an improved regime in which nuclear power could play a significant part. An assessment of these measures must include consideration of their nonproliferation effectiveness as well as their bearing upon energy security, and their operational, economic, and political implications. The nature of these considerations can provide some measure of their likely acceptability to various nations

  15. Federal interim storage fee study for civilian spent nuclear fuel: a technical and economical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the study conducted by the Department of Energy (the Department) regarding payment charges for the federal interim storage (FIS) of spent fuel and presents the details of the study results. It describes the selection of a methodology for calculating a FIS fee schedule, sets forth the estimates of cost for construction and operation of FIS facilities, provides a range of estimates for the fee for FIS services, and identifies special contractual considerations associated with providing FIS services to authorized users. The fee is structured for a range of spent fuel capacities because of uncertainties regarding the schedule of availability and amount of spent fuel that may require and qualify for FIS. The results set forth in the report were used as a basis for development of the report entitled Payment Charges for Federal Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Civilian Nuclear Power Plants in the United States, dated July 1983

  16. Regulations on the safety regulation for civilian nuclear installations of the People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Regulations on the Safety Regulation for Cirilian Nuclear Installations of the People's Republic of China' were promulgated by the State Council on October 29, 1986. The Regulations are applicable to safety regulation of the following civilian nuclear installations: 1. Nuclear power plant; 2. Other reactors apart from that of nuclear power plant; 3. Installations for nuclear fuel production, processing, storage and reprocessing; 4. Installations for radioactive waste treatment and disposal; 5. Other nuclear installations requiring shrift regulation. The present Regulations are enacted to ensure safety for civilian nuclear installations in construction and operation to protect the site personnel, the public and the environment from possible adverse effects arising from nuclear installations and to facilitate the development of nuclear undertakings

  17. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VIII. Advanced concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program has been to provide recommendations for the development and deployment of more proliferation-resistant civilian nuclear-power systems without jeopardizing the development of nuclear energy. In principle, new concepts for nuclear-power systems could be designed so that materials and facilities would be inherently more proliferation-resistant. Such advanced, i.e., less-developed systems, are the subject of this volume. Accordingly, from a number of advanced concepts that were proposed for evaluation, six representative concepts were selected: the fast mixed-spectrum reactor; the denatured molten-salt reactor; the mixed-flow gaseous-core reactor; the linear-accelerator fuel-regenerator reactor; the ternary metal-fueled electronuclear fuel-producer reactor; and the tokamak fusion-fission hybrid reactor

  18. Safety supervision and control on units engaged in activities of civilian nuclear pressure retaining components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA organized to review and approved the granting of qualification licenses in manufactures ad installation of nuclear pressure retaining components with 5 organizations such as the Wuhan Boiler Corporation, No.1 installation company of Gansu Province etc, according to the Code on the Safety Regulation for Civilian Nuclear Pressure Retaining Components (HAF 0900) and its implementing rules

  19. Spanish regulatory perspective for the decommissioning of an old civilian nuclear research centre (CIEMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Energy-related, Environmental and Technical Research (CIEMAT) is the main Spanish energy research center. CIEMAT is the heir of the former Nuclear Energy Board (Junta de Energia Nuclear - JEN), which was created in 1951 with a view to promoting the development and use of nuclear energy in Spain. Most of the centres for civilian nuclear research created in the fifties, like the JEN, had among their basic objectives to carry out investigations guided to the industrial development of the nuclear fuel cycle. The majority of them were endowed with experimental facilities that reproduced in a pilot scale the different stages of the full nuclear cycle facilities. The JEN main experimental facilities were: Plants for the treatment of uranium ores and for the concentration process; The manufacturing of fuel elements for research reactors; The JEN-1 thermal neutron experimental reactor, and CORAL fast reactor; The pilot plant for the treatment of irradiated fuel (M-1); The metallurgical hot cells for research relating to irradiated fuel; and Plants for the treatment and storage of liquid radioactive wastes. It should be pointed out that most of these installations were designed, built, operated, and even definitively shut down, prior a regulatory system as currently conceived is in force. The Science Act was passed in 1986, transforming the JEN into CIEMAT, and assigning to the latter a series of new functions, while making it the direct heir of the assets and strategic functions of its predecessor. The CIEMAT continued the process of 'denuclearization' of the installations inherited from the JEN, and used certain of them for the performance of research projects oriented towards the development of decontamination and dismantling techniques. (author)

  20. The Economics of Nuclear Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Kazutomo Irie

    2009-01-01

    The economics of the civilian uses of nuclear energy, that is to say the economics of nuclear power generation in which its civilian uses has been virtually limited to power generation---has been the focus of much public discussion both internationally and domestically here in Japan. The reasons are that there are many underlying factors which determine the economics of power generation methods and that various assumptions can be made concerning these factors. In addition, the value of these ...

  1. Constraining potential nuclear-weapons proliferation from civilian reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cessation of the Cold War and renewed international attention to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction are leading to national policies aimed at restraining nuclear-weapons proliferation that could occur through the nuclear-fuel cycle. Argonne, which has unique experience, technology, and capabilities, is one of the US national laboratories contributing to this nonproliferation effort

  2. Licensing and safety regulation on units engaged in civilian nuclear pressure retaining component's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA convened a meeting for granting the first batch of 25 units engaged in the activities of civilian nuclear pressure retaining components with 45 qualificatory licenses in 1995, and will conduct surveillance and inspection pursuant to requirements of regulations on the associated implementing activities by units that had obtained a qualificatory license. At present, the NNSA has prepared part of inspection procedures of nuclear pressure retaining components

  3. Safety supervision and control on units engaged in civilian nuclear pressure retaining component's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA organized the SNSC, Safety and Reliability Center of the Mechanical Institute, NSC-SSTC and its regional office's staff to verify the qualification of 55 items in 33 units for the activities in civilian nuclear pressure retaining components. That was conducted by bringing questions to the site and going to the site in company with staff from the competent department, so, the check time was shortened and pace was quickened. After documents checking, on site checking and discussed by the SC meeting on mechanical equipment of NSAC, the NNSA granted the second batch of 27 items qualification licenses in 14 units engaging in the activities of civilian nuclear pressure retaining components on May 27, 1996. So far, there are 39 units that have obtained an associate qualification license for the activities of nuclear pressure retaining components

  4. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Volume II assesses proliferation resistance. Chapters are devoted to: assessment of civilian nuclear systems (once-through fuel-cycle systems, closed fuel cycle systems, research reactors and critical facilities); assessment of associated sensitive materials and facilities (enrichment, problems with storage of spent fuel and plutonium content, and reprocessing and refabrication facilities); and safeguards for alternative fuel cycles.

  5. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume II assesses proliferation resistance. Chapters are devoted to: assessment of civilian nuclear systems (once-through fuel-cycle systems, closed fuel cycle systems, research reactors and critical facilities); assessment of associated sensitive materials and facilities (enrichment, problems with storage of spent fuel and plutonium content, and reprocessing and refabrication facilities); and safeguards for alternative fuel cycles

  6. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VII. International perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this volume is to assess the proliferation vulnerabilities of the present deployment of civilian nuclear-power systems within the current nonproliferation regime and, in light of their prospective deployment, to consider technical and institutional measures and alternatives which may contribute to an improved regime in which nuclear power could play a significant part. An assessment of these measures must include consideration of their nonproliferation effectiveness as well as their bearing upon energy security, and their operational, economic, and political implications. The nature of these considerations can provide some measure of their likely acceptability to various nations. While any final assessment of such measures and alternatives would have to examine the circumstances particular to each nation, it is hoped that the more generic assessments conducted here will be useful in suggesting guidelines for developing an improved nonproliferation regime which also helps to meet nuclear-energy needs. One chapter outlines the existing nonproliferation regime, including the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards, bilateral and multilateral requirements for agreements of cooperation and transfers of technology, and existing provisons for sanctions for violation of nonproliferation commitments. The chapter then proceeds to an assessment of various alternatives for providing assurance of fuel supply in light of this current regime. Another chapter examines a set of technical and institutional measures and alternatives for various components of once-through and closed fuel cycles. The components of the once-through fuel cycle assessed are enrichment services and spent-fuel management; the components of closed fuel cycles assessed are reprocessing and plutonium management and fast-breeder reactor (FBR) deployment

  7. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities.

  8. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities

  9. Safety regulation on emergency response and radiation protection in civilian nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA organized the review of emergency plan for the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant. The China Institute of Atomic Energy, the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University and the Nuclear Power Institute of China in 1995, and organized a surveillance and inspection at site on the preparedness of emergency response and control of radiation protection for nuclear power plants and research reactors

  10. Nuclear science. U.S. electricity needs and DOE's civilian reactor development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electricity projections developed by the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) appear to be the best available estimates of future U.S. electricity needs. NERC, which represents all segments of the utility industry, forecasts that before 1998 certain regions of the country, particularly in the more heavily populated eastern half of the United States, may experience shortfalls during summer peak demand periods. These forecasts considered the utility companies' plans, as of 1989, to meet electricity needs during the period; these plans include such measures as constructing additional generators and conducting demand management programs. Working closely with the nuclear industry, DOE is supporting the development of several reactor technologies to ensure that nuclear power remains a viable electricity supply option. In fiscal year 1990, DOE's Civilian Reactor Development Program was funded at $253 million. DOE is using these funds to support industry-led efforts to develop light water reactors (LWR), advanced liquid-metal reactors (LMR), and modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGR) that are safe, environmentally acceptable, and economically competitive. The utility company officials we spoke with, all of whom were in the Southeast, generally supported DOE's efforts in developing these technologies. However, most of the officials do not plan to purchase nuclear reactors until after 2000 because of the high costs of constructing nuclear reactors and current public opposition to nuclear power

  11. A programmatic response to the Secretary of Energy's review of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On January 19, 1993, in response to a question during her confirmation hearing, Secretary of Energy Hazel R. O'Leary stated that she believed that a comprehensive review of nuclear waste disposal programs and policies was needed. Her preferred approach to such a review would be to engage in a consensus-seeking effort in which all involved parties would be brought to the table to deal with contentious issues. This paper describes both the process and the separate elements of the review of the civilian radioactive waste management program conducted in 1993 and 1994 by Secretary O'Leary. The paper will trace the review beginning with the Secretary's statement at her confirmation hearing, through her interim guidance redirecting certain aspects of the program. It describes some initiatives and changes that are already underway as a result of this review. Throughout the year, stakeholders expressed their concerns, opinions, and recommendations regarding the program. These communications reflected the diversity of perspective that has become a hallmark of the radioactive waste program

  12. Secretary of Energy review of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On January 19, 1993, in response to a question during her confirmation hearing, Secretary of Energy Hazel R. O'Leary stated that she believed that a comprehensive review of nuclear waste disposal programs and policies was needed. Her preferred approach to such a review would be to engage in a consensus-seeking effort in which all involved parties would be brought to the table to deal with contentious issues. This paper describes both the process and the separate elements of the review of the civilian radioactive waste management program conducted in 1993 and 1994 by Secretary O'Leary. The paper will trace the review beginning with the Secretary's statement at her confirmation hearing, through her interim guidance redirecting certain aspects of the program. It describes some initiatives and changes that are already underway as a result of this review. Throughout the year, stakeholders expressed their concerns, opinions, and recommendations regarding the program. These communications reflected the diversity of perspective that has become a hallmark of the radioactive waste program

  13. Safety supervision and control on units engaged in the activities in relating to civilian nuclear pressure retaining components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the Code on the Safety Regulation for Civilian Nuclear Pressure Retaining Components (HAF 0900) and its implementation rules, the NNSA verified and issued 26 qualification licenses to 19 organizations, and 11 qualification licenses out of 26 were just for the extension activities of 8 organizations, and permitted 3 organizations to extend the activities under the same license requirements in 1998

  14. Working Group 7.1 on environmental transport, US-USSR Joint Coordinating Committee on Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief summaries of the status of projects of the Environmental Transport Group of the US-USSR Joint Coordinating Committee of Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety. Projects reported on include: Management and Administration; Atmospheric Transport; Resuspension; External Dose; Terrestrial Food Chains; Aquatic Food Chains; Hydrological Transport; and Intercalibration

  15. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview about the evolution of nuclear energy for the next 25 years is presented. Several types of nuclear power reactors are described and the power installed up to year 2000 are discussed. Some processes of nuclear fuel enrichment used in the world are shown. (E.G.)

  16. Project on standards on good behaviour for the civilian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy has provoked complex and sometimes heated debates involving politic, economic, scientific and moral issues, objective data alongside irrational feelings, short-term calculations as well as concerns touching on the far-reaching of humanity and the earth. These debates go beyond national borders as it is obvious that even though each country may hold divergent positions regarding the development of nuclear energy, their effects have an international scope, and, therefore, must be taken into account by all nations, even those who do not operate nuclear installations. Whatever conclusion may be drawn from these debates, decisions on nuclear energy are always taken by the political authorities, almost always at the highest level, be it national or international. These political decisions then become the body of legal standards, particularly the regulations which govern how nuclear energy is used. The main standards are for technical and scientific quality, applying to energy resource needs, to the reasons why the nuclear industry should be developed, to radioprotection and nuclear security, to protection of the environment, to radioactive waste management, to information and consulting to the public, to international cooperation, to non-proliferation of atomic weapons and to physical protection of nuclear materials. (author)

  17. Is nuclear power suitable Some lessons from 35 years of making civilian nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Paoli, L. (Univ. Commerciale L. Bocconi, Milan (Italy). Ist. di Economia delle Fonti di Energia)

    1990-01-01

    How to assess if nuclear power is worthwhile for society The author holds that, although the economics of nuclear power is a good synthetic tool to answer this question, economics, in this case, is not simply a result of techniques and costs, but includes the pressures that society exerts to make nuclear reactors safer. Therefore, the more the balance of forces in society goes against nuclear power, the more it will be difficult and expensive to build and operate nuclear reactors. Institutions also weigh heavily on the result. Apart from politics, the other category which counts more in the choice and in the economic competitiveness of nuclear power is electric utility management. Private industry is much less willing to accept the risks of nuclear power on economic grounds, as the privatization of the CEGB has shown. Obviously, technical and organizational aspects are important too. Past experience has made it possible to establish some general lessons such as the need for standardization, more in-factory construction, cooperation between utilities, constructors and regulatory agencies. International economic comparisons continue to show a good margin in favour of nuclear reactors, but only where public acceptance is quite good is this advantage real.

  18. Proliferation and the Civilian Nuclear Fuel Cycle. Towards a Simplified Recipe to Measure Proliferation Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of this study is to frame the problem of nuclear proliferation in the context of protection and risks associated with nuclear materials flowing in the civilian nuclear fuel cycle. The perspective adopted for this study is that of a nuclear utility and the flow of fresh and spent nuclear fuel with which that utility must deal in the course of providing economic, safe, and ecologically acceptable electrical power to the public. Within this framework quantitative approaches to a material-dependent, simplified proliferation-risk metric are identified and explored. The driving force behind this search for such a proliferation metric derives from the need to quantify the proliferation risk in the context of evaluating various commercial nuclear fuel cycle options (e.g., plutonium recycle versus once-through). While the formulation of the algebra needed to describe the desired, simplified metric(s) should be straight forward once a modus operandi is defined, considerable interaction with the user of any final product that results is essential. Additionally, a broad contextual review of the proliferation problem and past efforts in the quantification of associated risks was developed as part of this study. This extensive review was essential to setting perspectives and establishing (feasibility) limits to the search for a proliferation metric(s) that meets the goals of this study. Past analyses of proliferation risks associated with the commercial nuclear fuel cycle have generally been based on a range of decision-analysis, operations-research tools. Within the time and budget constraints, as well as the self-enforced (utility) customer focus, the more subjective and data-intensive decision-analysis methodologies where not pursued. Three simplified, less-subjective approaches were investigated instead: a) a simplified 'four-factor' formula expressing as a normalized product political, material-quantity, material-quality, and material-protection metrics; b

  19. Proliferation and the Civilian Nuclear Fuel Cycle. Towards a Simplified Recipe to Measure Proliferation Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogli, R.; Krakowski, R.A

    2001-08-01

    The primary goal of this study is to frame the problem of nuclear proliferation in the context of protection and risks associated with nuclear materials flowing in the civilian nuclear fuel cycle. The perspective adopted for this study is that of a nuclear utility and the flow of fresh and spent nuclear fuel with which that utility must deal in the course of providing economic, safe, and ecologically acceptable electrical power to the public. Within this framework quantitative approaches to a material-dependent, simplified proliferation-risk metric are identified and explored. The driving force behind this search for such a proliferation metric derives from the need to quantify the proliferation risk in the context of evaluating various commercial nuclear fuel cycle options (e.g., plutonium recycle versus once-through). While the formulation of the algebra needed to describe the desired, simplified metric(s) should be straight forward once a modus operandi is defined, considerable interaction with the user of any final product that results is essential. Additionally, a broad contextual review of the proliferation problem and past efforts in the quantification of associated risks was developed as part of this study. This extensive review was essential to setting perspectives and establishing (feasibility) limits to the search for a proliferation metric(s) that meets the goals of this study. Past analyses of proliferation risks associated with the commercial nuclear fuel cycle have generally been based on a range of decision-analysis, operations-research tools. Within the time and budget constraints, as well as the self-enforced (utility) customer focus, the more subjective and data-intensive decision-analysis methodologies where not pursued. Three simplified, less-subjective approaches were investigated instead: a) a simplified 'four-factor' formula expressing as a normalized product political, material-quantity, material-quality, and material

  20. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book provides the man in the street with a fair presentation of nuclear energy and can help him to build his own opinion about this much debated question. The first chapter defines what is involved in the hazy term of energy. The second chapter explains how a nuclear power plant operates. The chapters 3 to 6 give a good grounding in basic physics to understand radioactivity and the different processes that occur in a nuclear reactor. The chapters 7 and 8 present the different reactor types and the complete fuel cycle from uranium ore extraction to radioactive waste storage. The last chapter is dedicated to the pros and cons of nuclear energy, this chapter includes a presentation of the organization of nuclear safety in France. (A.C.)

  1. Nuclear energy

    OpenAIRE

    Bucaille, Alain; Shihab-Eldin, Adnan; Bauquis, Pierre-René

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow’s energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more ma...

  2. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) assessed alternative nuclear systems to find those with the lowest proliferation risk. The findings of the NASAP studies are: current and future nuclear-power systems can be made more proliferation-resistant. As long as doubts about security and fuel supply remain, more resource-efficient (and potentially less proliferation-resistant) systems will be attractive to some nations. Under some scenarios, domestic uranium supply/demand imbalances are possible beyond the year 2010. The worldwide uranium supply/demand balance is even less certain than the domestic picture. Other nuclear resources are less of a problem than uranium. Doubts about fuel supply can be alleviated in several ways. The approaches available to provide security of supply fall into three categories: resource extenders; supply improvements; and institutional and technical measures. Resource extension options include improvements to once-through cycles, advanced converters, recycle, and breeder reactors. The most promising resource extension options are light water reactor improvements (including reduced enrichment tails assay) and continued development of the plutonium-fueled breeder reactors. Uranium-supply initiatives include measures to reduce uncertainty in the estimated size of the resource base, to exploit it efficiently, and to ensure equitable access. An international nonproliferation regime will require institutional measures and technical approaches

  3. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With simple and accessible explanations, this book presents the physical principles, the history and industrial developments of nuclear energy. More than 25 years after the Chernobyl accidents and few months only after the Fukushima one, it discusses the pros and cons of this energy source with its assets and its risks. (J.S.)

  4. H.R.2041: a bill to authorize appropriations to the Department of Energy for civilian energy programs for fiscal year 1986 and fiscal year 1987, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, April 15, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Civilian Energy Programs Authorization for Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 (H.R.2041) authorizes DOE spending of $8.87 billion for civilian research and development; $206 million for specified conservation, regulation, and information programs; $276.8 million for power marketing administration; and $2.98 billion for activities in uranium supply and enrichment, nuclear waste management, and community energy programs. The bill indicates where revenues from fees and other revenues will apply

  5. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume V. Economics and systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This NASAP assessment considers the economics of alternative nuclear reactor and fuel-cycle systems in the light of possible patterns of uranium supply and energy demand, as well as the economic implications of improvng the proliferation resistance of the various systems. The assessment focuses on the costs of alternative nuclear technologies and the possible timing of their implementation, based on their economic attractiveness

  6. Education activities of the US Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that science education has long been a critical element in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. OCRWM has developed educational programs aimed at improving the science literacy of students from kindergarten through college and post-graduate levels, enhancing the skills of teachers, encouraging careers in science and engineering, and developing a keener awareness of science issues among the general population. Activities include interaction with educators in the development of curricula material; workshops for elementary and secondary students; cooperative agreements and projects with universities; OCRWM exhibit showings at technical and non-technical meetings and at national and regional teacher/educator conferences; the OCRWM Fellowship Program; and support for Historically Black Colleges and Universities

  7. Energy: nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Convinced that the nuclear energy will be the cleaner, safer, more economical and more respectful of the environment energy of the future, the author preconizes to study the way it can be implemented, to continue to improve its production, to understand its virtues and to better inform the public. He develops this opinion in the presentation of the principal characteristics of the nuclear energy: technology, radioactive wastes, radiation protection, the plutonium, the nuclear accidents, the proliferation risks, the economics and nuclear energy and competitiveness, development and sustainability. (A.L.B.)

  8. DOE reassesses civilian radioactive waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports on the announcement by the Department of Energy (DOE) that the opening of a high-level radioactive nuclear waste repository site will be delayed for seven years. The article discusses DOE's reassessment plan, the restructuring of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, site access and evaluation, the Monitored Retrievable Storage Commission proposal, and the industry's response

  9. Civilian nuclear power on the drawing board: the development of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On September 28, 2001 a symposium was held at Argonne National Laboratory as part of the festivities to mark the 100th birthday of Enrico Fermi. The symposium celebrated Fermi's ''contribution to the development of nuclear power'' and focused on one particular ''line of development'' resulting from Fermi's interest in power reactors: Argonne's fast reactor program. Symposium participants made many references to the ways in which the program was linked to Fermi, who led the team which created the world's first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction. For example, one presentation featured an April, 1944 memo that described a meeting attended by Fermi and others. The memo came from the time when research on plutonium and the nuclear chain reaction at Chicago's WWII Metallurgical Laboratory was nearing its end. Even as other parts of the Manhattan Engineering Project were building on this effort to create the bombs that would end the war, Fermi and his colleagues were taking the first steps to plan the use of nuclear energy in the postwar era. After noting that Fermi ''viewed the use of [nuclear] power for the heating of cities with sympathy,'' the group outlined several power reactor designs. In the course of discussion, Fermi and his colleagues took the first steps in conjuring the vision that would later be brought to life with Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), the celebrated achievements of the Argonne fast reactor program. Group members considered various schemes for a breeder reactor in which the relatively abundant U-238 would be placed near a core of fissionable material. The reactor would be a fast reactor; that is, neutrons would not be moderated, as were most wartime reactors. Thus, the large number of neutrons emitted in fast neutron fission would hit the U-238 and create ''extra'' fissionable material, that is, more than ''invested,'' and at the same time produce power. The group identified the problem of

  10. Civilian nuclear power on the drawing board: the development of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C.

    2003-02-20

    On September 28, 2001 a symposium was held at Argonne National Laboratory as part of the festivities to mark the 100th birthday of Enrico Fermi. The symposium celebrated Fermi's ''contribution to the development of nuclear power'' and focused on one particular ''line of development'' resulting from Fermi's interest in power reactors: Argonne's fast reactor program. Symposium participants made many references to the ways in which the program was linked to Fermi, who led the team which created the world's first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction. For example, one presentation featured an April, 1944 memo that described a meeting attended by Fermi and others. The memo came from the time when research on plutonium and the nuclear chain reaction at Chicago's WWII Metallurgical Laboratory was nearing its end. Even as other parts of the Manhattan Engineering Project were building on this effort to create the bombs that would end the war, Fermi and his colleagues were taking the first steps to plan the use of nuclear energy in the postwar era. After noting that Fermi ''viewed the use of [nuclear] power for the heating of cities with sympathy,'' the group outlined several power reactor designs. In the course of discussion, Fermi and his colleagues took the first steps in conjuring the vision that would later be brought to life with Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), the celebrated achievements of the Argonne fast reactor program. Group members considered various schemes for a breeder reactor in which the relatively abundant U-238 would be placed near a core of fissionable material. The reactor would be a fast reactor; that is, neutrons would not be moderated, as were most wartime reactors. Thus, the large number of neutrons emitted in fast neutron fission would hit the U-238 and create ''extra'' fissionable material

  11. Proceedings of the nuclear Inter Jura`93. Nuclear energy and sustainable development: the role of law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The importance of the law for the future of the nuclear energy within the context of the sustainable development is discussed in this Nuclear Inter Jura - Rio`93, which contains the individual papers, reports of working groups and a proposal of standards of good behavior for the civilian nuclear industry. This congress is divided in five sections: licensing and decommissioning; nuclear liability cover; international nuclear trade; radiological protection and radioactive waste management.

  12. Proceedings of the nuclear Inter Jura'93. Nuclear energy and sustainable development: the role of law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the law for the future of the nuclear energy within the context of the sustainable development is discussed in this Nuclear Inter Jura - Rio'93, which contains the individual papers, reports of working groups and a proposal of standards of good behavior for the civilian nuclear industry. This congress is divided in five sections: licensing and decommissioning; nuclear liability cover; international nuclear trade; radiological protection and radioactive waste management

  13. White paper on nuclear energy in Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a global persecutive, many countries are increasingly turning to nuclear power as a safe, reliable and economically proven energy generation technology. Jordan is one of 65 countries currently expressing interest in nuclear power. The development of a peaceful, civilian nuclear energy programme is based on an in-depth evaluation and understanding of Jordan's future energy needs. The government has decided that nuclear energy is the only way to meet the energy, water and economic challenges the country is facing. Unless Jordan adds substantial electricity production cap city, the Kingdom faces major difficulties in supporting the growth of its population, satisfying water needs and improving living standards. A pre-feasibility study has demonstrated that the most affordable future generation mix includes nuclear power, and there is range of additional benefits provided by nuclear power

  14. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume V. Economics and systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This assessment considers the economics of alternative nuclear reactor and fuel-cycle systems in the light of possible patterns of uranium supply and energy demand, as well as the economic implications of improving the proliferation resistance of the various systems. The assessment focuses on the costs of alternative nuclear technologies and the possible timing of their implementation, based on their economic attractiveness. The objectives of this assessment are to identify when economic incentives to deploy advanced nuclear power systems might exist, to estimate the costs of using technologies that would reduce the risk of proliferation, to assess the impact of major economic uncertainties on the transition to new technologies, and to compare the investments required for alternative systems. This information can then be used to assess the potential economic benefits of alternative research, development, and demonstration programs and the timing of those programs

  15. The analysis of the program to develop the Nuclear Waste Management System: Allocated requirements for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is volume 3, part B, of the program to satisfy the allocated requirements of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, in the development of the nuclear waste management system. The report is divided into the following sections: regulatory compliance; external relations; international programs; strategic and contingency planning; contract business management; and administrative services. (CS)

  16. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  17. People's Republic of China: problems and progress in the civilian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of the nuclear program in the People's Republic of China is presented with discussion of plans for design and construction of nuclear power plants, clashing regulation authorities, status and description of the Qishan reactor, and reactor component fabrication. Other observations of the American Nuclear Society members who visited China are noted in the report: the Chinese consideration of both PWR and BWR type reactors, international cooperation, and the lack of understanding on the part of the Chinese work force of the importance of cleanliness in nuclear fabrication

  18. Quantitative Analysis of the Civilian Bilateral Cooperation in Front-End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A substantial part of such cooperation is related to the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which encompasses the processes that help manufacturing nuclear fuel, including mining and milling of natural uranium, refining and chemical conversion, enrichment (in case of fuels for Pressurized Water Reactor PWR), and fuel fabrication. Traditionally, the supply of natural uranium was dominated by Canada and Australia, whereas enrichment services have been mostly provided by companies from Western states or Russia, which are also the main customers of such services. However, Kazakhstan and African countries like Niger, Namibia, and Malawi have emerged as important suppliers in the international uranium market and recent forecasts show that China will soon become a major player in the front-end market as both consumer and service provider. In this paper, the correlation between bilateral civil nuclear cooperation in front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle and the political and economic relationship among countries was examined through a dataset of bilateral nuclear cooperation in the post-Cold War era, from 1990 to 2011. Such finding has implication on not only the nonproliferation research but also the necessary reinforcement of export control regimes like such as the Nuclear Suppliers Group. Further improvement of this dataset and the regression method are also needed in order to increase the robustness of the findings as well as to cover the whole scope of the nuclear fuel cycle, including both front-end and back-end activities

  19. Quantitative Analysis of the Civilian Bilateral Cooperation in Front-End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Viet Phuong; Yim, Man-Sung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A substantial part of such cooperation is related to the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which encompasses the processes that help manufacturing nuclear fuel, including mining and milling of natural uranium, refining and chemical conversion, enrichment (in case of fuels for Pressurized Water Reactor PWR), and fuel fabrication. Traditionally, the supply of natural uranium was dominated by Canada and Australia, whereas enrichment services have been mostly provided by companies from Western states or Russia, which are also the main customers of such services. However, Kazakhstan and African countries like Niger, Namibia, and Malawi have emerged as important suppliers in the international uranium market and recent forecasts show that China will soon become a major player in the front-end market as both consumer and service provider. In this paper, the correlation between bilateral civil nuclear cooperation in front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle and the political and economic relationship among countries was examined through a dataset of bilateral nuclear cooperation in the post-Cold War era, from 1990 to 2011. Such finding has implication on not only the nonproliferation research but also the necessary reinforcement of export control regimes like such as the Nuclear Suppliers Group. Further improvement of this dataset and the regression method are also needed in order to increase the robustness of the findings as well as to cover the whole scope of the nuclear fuel cycle, including both front-end and back-end activities.

  20. Glossary of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives descriptions of explanations of terminologies concerning to nuclear energy such as analysis of financial safety of nuclear energy, radwaste disposal, fast breeder reactor, nuclear reactor and device, nuclear fuel and technique for concentration, using of nuclear energy radiation and measurement, plan for development of nuclear energy and international institution. This book includes 160 terms on nuclear energy and arranges in Korean alphabetical order.

  1. Areas for US-India civilian nuclear cooperation to prevent/mitigate radiological events.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balachandran, Gopalan; Forden, Geoffrey Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Over the decades, India and the United States have had very little formal collaboration on nuclear issues. Partly this was because neither country needed collaboration to make progress in the nuclear field. But it was also due, in part, to the concerns both countries had about the other's intentions. Now that the U.S.-India Deal on nuclear collaboration has been signed and the Hyde Act passed in the United States, it is possible to recognize that both countries can benefit from such nuclear collaboration, especially if it starts with issues important to both countries that do not touch on strategic systems. Fortunately, there are many noncontroversial areas for collaboration. This study, funded by the U.S. State Department, has identified a number of areas in the prevention of and response to radiological incidents where such collaboration could take place.

  2. ENGAGEMENT OF THE SERBIAN ARMY IN HELPING CIVILIANS IN THE EVENT OF NUCLEAR AND CHEMICAL ACCIDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    INDJIC DEJAN R.; TERZIC MIROSLAV R.; ZIGIC STEVAN V.; RUTIC SRDJAN Z.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear and chemical accidents in modern society often cause devastating consequences to people, material resources and the environment. This kind of accident requires special procedures and activities during the elimination of the consequences, because of the specific characteristics of highly toxic substances used in nuclear and chemical plants. The Serbian Army with its units and organizations can contribute significantly to the implementation of tasks of eliminating the consequences of su...

  3. Opposition to civilian nuclear power and the role of the public inquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account is presented of the anti-nuclear movement. The subject is covered in sections. National variations in opposition are summarized for France, Spain, West Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, and conclusions are drawn in the light of the two questions - (1) should the opposition be taken seriously, and (2) are any institutions good enough for an adequate 'decision advice procedure'. The Windscale Public Inquiry, in the UK, is discussed, and the structure of the anti-nuclear lobby in Britain is analyzed in detail. (U.K.)

  4. Safety regulation on emergency response and radiation protection in civilian nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA organized continuously a review on the emergency planning of the nuclear installations for the operating organizations GNPS, INET/TU and NPIC, and the regulatory inspection on site emergency response and radiation protection for YNFP, INET/TU: Especially a site inspection on site emergency preparedness including an exercise for the Mingjiang Experimental Reactor of NPIC were implemented in 1996

  5. Safety regulation on emergency response and radiation protection in civilian nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To enhance the outer coordination on emergency response for nuclear accidents, the NNSA laid stress in 1999 on the control of radiation environment and re-evaluate the monitoring ability for Chinese radioactive environment, to establish a technical supporting organization, i.e., the Monitoring Center on Radioactive Environment, SEPA

  6. Safety regulation on emergency response and radiation protection in civilian nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1998, the NNSA promulgated the >, and organized to compile and translate the Draw-up Methods on NPP Emergency Action Level, the Evaluation Program on Health Physics, the Dose Control at NPP and related technical documents in order to strengthen the basis work about the nuclear accident emergency inspection

  7. Nuclear energy after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper on fundamental questions by a representative of the Federal German Government focuses on the following subjects: Nuclear energy as a part of the energy policy of the Federal German Government, the justifiability of nuclear energy, lessons from Chernobyl, nuclear phase-out, safety concepts for the future, supply of nuclear power plants, and nuclear waste disposal. (UA)

  8. Dismantling of civilian nuclear powered fleet technical support vessels. engineering solutions - 59386

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time six nuclear technical support vessels are operated and maintained by Atomflot. Two of them (Volodarsky FTB (floating technical base) and Lepse FTB) were taken out of service for decommissioning and are stored afloat. One more vessel Lotta FTB should be decommissioned during next two years. The nuclear technological support ships carrying spent nuclear fuel (SNF), liquid and solid radioactive wastes (LRW and SRW) appear to be a possible radiation contamination of Murmansk region and Kola Bay because the Ship long-term storage afloat has the negative effect on hull's structures technical condition. As a result of this in the context of the Federal Program 'Nuclear and Radiation Safety' (2008-2015) NIPTB Onega OAO was engaged by state corporation Rosatom to develop the dismantling procedure for Volodarsky FTB and Lotta FTB. Before developing of nuclear technological support ships decommissioning projects the technical and economic assessment of decommissioning/dismantling was carried out. The following options were examined: - formation of module as one-piece Ship's hull for long-term storage at Saida Bay; - formation of separated modules for long-term storage at Saida Bay; - complete dismantling of hull's structures, systems and equipment with packing all generated SRW into certified long-term storage containers. This paper contains description of options, research procedure, comparative analysis of options of decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) of nuclear technological support ships and its difference with dismantling of nuclear submarine. On the basis of the technical and economic assessment of FTB D and D options the least expensive on the first D and D stage and the least duration option is the option 1 (Formation of module as one-piece Ship's hull for long-term storage at Saida Bay). By the implementation of the given option there will be the need of large areas for modules storage at Saida Bay. It was not considered while working out

  9. Nuclear energy and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We all want to prevent the use of nuclear weapons. The issue before us is how best to achieve this objective; more specifically, whether the peaceful applications of nuclear energy help or hinder, and to what extent. Many of us in the nuclear industry are working on these applications from a conviction that without peaceful nuclear energy the risk of nuclear war would be appreciably greater. Others, however, hold the opposite view. In discussing the subject, a necessary step in allaying fears is understanding some facts, and indeed facing up to some unpalatable facts. When the facts are assessed, and a balance struck, the conclusion is that peaceful nuclear energy is much more part of the solution to preventing nuclear war than it is part of the problem

  10. Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief indication is given of the United Kingdom nuclear power programme including descriptions of the fission process, the Magnox, AGR and PWR type reactors, the recycling process, waste management and decommissioning, safety precautions, the prototype fast reactor at Dounreay, and the JET fusion experiment. (U.K.)

  11. Communication received from the Governor of Norway to the Agency concerning the International Symposium of Minimisation of Highly Enriched Uranium in the Civilian Nuclear Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Director General has received a communication from the Governor of Norway, attaching the Chair's Summary of the discussions held during the International Symposium of Minimisation of Highly Enriched Uranium in the Civilian Nuclear Sector which was held in Oslo from 17 to 20 June 2006 as well as the summary from the technical workshop of the Symposium. The communication and, as requested therein, the attached two summaries, are herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  12. Nuclear energy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of basic statistics on electricity generation and nuclear power in OECD countries. The reader will find quick and easy reference to the present status of and projected trends in total electricity generating capacity, nuclear generating capacity, and actual electricity production as well as on supply and demand for nuclear fuel cycle services

  13. Nuclear energy data 2010

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    This 2010 edition of Nuclear Energy Data , the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of official statistics and country reports on nuclear energy, provides key information on plans for new nuclear plant construction, nuclear fuel cycle developments as well as current and projected nuclear generating capacity to 2035 in OECD member countries. This comprehensive overview provides authoritative information for policy makers, experts and other interested stakeholders.

  14. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Administrative Court of Braunschweig judges the Ordinance on Advance Funding of Repositories (EndlagervorausleistungsVO) to be void. The Hannover Regional Court passes a basic judgment concerning the Gorleben salt mine (repository) and an action for damages. The Federal Administrative Court dismisses actions against part-permits for the Hanau fuel element fabrication plant. The Koblenz Higher Administrative Court dismisses actions against a part-permit for the Muelheim-Kaerlich reactor. 31st Amendment of the German Criminal Code passed, involving amendments in environmental criminal code, defined in the 2nd amendment to the Act on Unlowful Practices Causing Damage to the Environment (UKG); here: Amendments to the law relating to the criminal code and penal provisions governing unlawful conduct in the operation of nuclear installations. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear energy and energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do Georgia needs nuclear energy? Nuclear energy is high technology and application of such technology needs definite level of industry, science and society development. Nuclear energy is not only source of electricity production - application of nuclear energy increases year-by-year for medical, science and industrial use. As an energy source Georgia has priority to extend hydro-power capacity by reasonable use of all available water resources. In parallel regime the application of energy efficiency and energy conservation measures should be considered but currently this is not prioritized by Government. Meanwhile this should be taken into consideration that attempts to reduce energy consumption by increasing energy efficiency would simply raise demand for energy in the economy as a whole. The Nuclear energy application needs routine calculation and investigation. For this reason Government Commission is already established. But it seems in advance that regional nuclear power plant for South-Caucasus region would be much more attractive for future

  16. Experience and activities in the field of plutonium recycling in civilian nuclear power plants in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Union industry has established a world-wide leadership position in manufacturing and exploiting plutonium bearing fuel (MOX). About 15 to 20 tons of plutonium have been manufactured in the MOX fuel fabrication plants of E.U. companies. The current capacity of about 60 tons of MOX fuel per year is being upgraded to reach 400 tons/year by the year 2000. As a result, the excess amounts of separated plutonium, presently stored in the European Union, should no longer raise but should steadily decrease to converge to zero. Studies by the European Commission have indicated that the best use at present of weapons-grade and reactor-grade plutonium is to burn it in operating and future planned nuclear reactors. Disposing of plutonium by blending it with fission products or immobilising it into synthetic matrices appears to be far from being an industrially viable option. Following this path would mean to continue storing the excess plutonium of both military and civilian origin for an unknown, but very long period of time. For these and other reasons, the European Commission is striving to foster international cooperation between the European Union companies, having a long industrial experience accumulated in the field of recycling plutonium, and, so far, the Russian Federation and the Newly Independent States. This cooperation is aiming at supporting projects that could be mutually beneficial to all parties involved. To meet this objective, several programmes have been established either bilaterally or multilaterally, in particular within the framework of the International Science and Technology Centre (I.S.T.C.) in Moscow. Some examples of such collaborations will be described. (author)

  17. Prospects of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad overviews presented on the future prospects and conditions of nuclear power. Several graphs and diagrams are shown on energy consumption, energy demand, energy sources, pollution by power plants, mineral fuel inventories, fissionable material inventories, renewable energy sources. The conditions of future utilization of nuclear power and nuclear power plants are discussed. (R.P.)

  18. Nuclear energy data 2011

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

     . Nuclear Energy Data, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports on nuclear energy, contains official information provided by OECD member country governments on plans for new nuclear plant construction, nuclear fuel cycle developments as well as current and projected nuclear generating capacity to 2035. For the first time, it includes data for Chile, Estonia, Israel and Slovenia, which recently became OECD members. Key elements of this edition show a 2% increase in nuclear and total electricity production and a 0.5% increase in nuclear generating ca

  19. Nuclear energy data 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Publishing, OECD

    2005-01-01

    This 2005 edition of Nuclear Energy Data, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of essential statistics on nuclear energy in OECD countries, offers a projection horizon lengthened to 2025 for the first time.  It presents the reader with a comprehensive overview on the status and trends in nuclear electricity generation in OECD countries and in the various sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  20. Nuclear energy - some aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a brief history of research and development concerning to nuclear technology worldwide and in Brazil, also information about radiations and radioactive elements as well; the nuclear technology applications; nuclear reactor types and functioning of thermonuclear power plants; the number of existing nuclear power plants; the nuclear hazards occurred; the national fiscalization of nuclear sector; the Brazilian legislation in effect and the propositions under proceduring at House of Representatives related to the nuclear energy

  1. Technology Roadmaps: Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This nuclear energy roadmap has been prepared jointly by the IEA and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). Unlike most other low-carbon energy sources, nuclear energy is a mature technology that has been in use for more than 50 years. The latest designs for nuclear power plants build on this experience to offer enhanced safety and performance, and are ready for wider deployment over the next few years. Several countries are reactivating dormant nuclear programmes, while others are considering nuclear for the first time. China in particular is already embarking on a rapid nuclear expansion. In the longer term, there is great potential for new developments in nuclear energy technology to enhance nuclear's role in a sustainable energy future.

  2. Sustainable nuclear energy dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Afgan Naim H.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable energy development implies the need for the emerging potential energy sources which are not producing adverse effect to the environment. In this respect nuclear energy has gained the complimentary favor to be considered as the potential energy source without degradation of the environment. The sustainability evaluation of the nuclear energy systems has required the special attention to the criteria for the assessment of nuclear energy system before we can make firm justifica...

  3. Sustainable nuclear energy dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afgan Naim H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable energy development implies the need for the emerging potential energy sources which are not producing adverse effect to the environment. In this respect nuclear energy has gained the complimentary favor to be considered as the potential energy source without degradation of the environment. The sustainability evaluation of the nuclear energy systems has required the special attention to the criteria for the assessment of nuclear energy system before we can make firm justification of the sustainability of nuclear energy systems. In order to demonstrate the sustainability assessment of nuclear energy system this exercise has been devoted to the potential options of nuclear energy development, namely: short term option, medium term option, long term option and classical thermal system option. Criteria with following indicators are introduced in this analysis: nuclear indicator, economic indicator, environment indicator, social indicator... The Sustainability Index is used as the merit for the priority assessment among options under consideration.

  4. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume IV provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest

  5. Comment response document for the Secretary of Energy's ''Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On November 29, 1989, the Secretary of Energy published his ''Report to Congress on the Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program'' (Report), and sent copies to numerous interested parties for their review and comment. This document summarizes comments received on the Report and presents the DOE's current responses to those comments as a basis for further discussions. Included as appendixes are a list of commenters, a crosswalk showing where each comment is addressed, the comment letters themselves with specific comments delineated, and the DOE's response to those letters. Twenty-five individuals or organizations submitted comments on the Report. The DOE identified 130 individual comments and classified them into the following seven categories: Management, Institutional, Regulatory, Transportation, Monitored Retrievable Storage, Scheduling, and Yucca Mountain. For the responses, comments were than grouped into more specific topics under each of the major headings. The DOE attempted to respond to all comments

  6. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest

  7. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume I. Program summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP): its background, its studies, and its results. The introductory chapter traces the growth of the issue of nuclear weapons proliferation and the organization and objectives of NASAP. Chapter 2 summarizes the program's assessments, findings, and recommendations. Each of Volumes II-VII reports on an individual assessment (Volumn II: Proliferation Resistance; Volume III: Resources and Fuel Cycle Facilities; Volume IV: Commercial Potential; Volume V: Economics and Systems Analysis; Volume VI: Safety and Environmental Considerations for Licensing; Volume VII: International Perspectives). Volume VIII (Advanced Concepts) presents a combined assessment of several less fully developed concepts, and Volume IX (Reactor and Fuel Cycle Descriptions) provides detailed descriptions of the reactor and fuel-cycle systems studied by NASAP

  8. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume 1. Program summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP): its background, its studies, and its results. This introductory chapter traces the growth of the issue of nuclear weapons proliferation and the organization and objectives of NASAP. Chapter 2 summarizes the program's assessments, findings and recommendations. Each of Volumes II-VII reports on an individual assessment (Volume II: Proliferation Resistance; Volume III: Resources and Fuel Cycle Facilities; Volume IV: Commercial Potential; Volume V: Economics and Systems Analysis; Volume VI: Safety and Environmental Considerations for Licensing; Volume VII: International Perspectives). Volume VIII (Advanced Concepts) presents a combined assessment of several less fully developed concepts, and Volume IX (Reactor and Fuel Cycle Descriptions) provides detailed descriptions of the reactor and fuel-cycle systems studied by NASAP

  9. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume I. Program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This report summarizes the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP): its background, its studies, and its results. The introductory chapter traces the growth of the issue of nuclear weapons proliferation and the organization and objectives of NASAP. Chapter 2 summarizes the program's assessments, findings, and recommendations. Each of Volumes II-VII reports on an individual assessment (Volumn II: Proliferation Resistance; Volume III: Resources and Fuel Cycle Facilities; Volume IV: Commercial Potential; Volume V: Economics and Systems Analysis; Volume VI: Safety and Environmental Considerations for Licensing; Volume VII: International Perspectives). Volume VIII (Advanced Concepts) presents a combined assessment of several less fully developed concepts, and Volume IX (Reactor and Fuel Cycle Descriptions) provides detailed descriptions of the reactor and fuel-cycle systems studied by NASAP.

  10. Nuclear energy and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general view about the use of energy for brazilian development is presented. The international situation of the nuclear field and the pacific utilization of nuclear energy in Brazil are commented. The safety concepts used for reactor and nuclear facilities licensing, the environmental monitoring program and radiation protection program used in Brazil are described. (E.G.)

  11. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VIII. Advanced concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The six advanced concepts for nuclear power systems that were selected for evaluation are: the fast mixed-spectrum reactor; the denatured molten-salt reactor; the mixed-flow gaseous-core reactor; the linear-accelerator fuel-regenerator reactor; the ternary metal-fueled electronuclear fuel-producer reactor; and the tokamak fusion-fission hybrid reactor. The design assessment was performed by identifying needs in six specific areas: conceptual plant design; reactor-physics considerations; fuel cycle alternatives; mechanical and thermal-hydraulic considerations; selection, development, and availability of materials; and engineering and operability. While none of the six concepts appears to be a credible commercial alternative to the liquid-metal fast-breeder within the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program horizon of 2025, there are a number of reasons for continued interest in the fast mixed-spectrum reactor: it is a once-through cycle fast reactor with proliferation risk characteristics similar to those of the light-water reactor; only about one-third as much uranium is required as for the once-through light-water reactor; the system will benefit directly from fast-breeder development programs; and, finally, the research and development required to develop the high-burnup metal fuel could benefit the on-going liquid-metal fast-breeder reactor program. Accordingly, a limited research and development effort on the high-burnup fuel seems justified, at present

  12. Nuclear energy and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of nuclear energy on medicine, as well as the basic principles of these applications, are presented. The radiological diagnosis, the radiotherapy, the nuclear medicine, the radiological protection and the production of radioisotopes are studied. (M.A.C.)

  13. The Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Baldo, M.; Burgio, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy characterizes the variation of the binding energy as the neutron to proton ratio of a nuclear system is varied. This is one of the most important features of nuclear physics in general, since it is just related to the two component nature of the nuclear systems. As such it is one of the most relevant physical parameters that affect the physics of many phenomena and nuclear processes. This review paper presents a survey of the role and relevance of the nuclear symme...

  14. Payment charges for federal interim storage of spent nuclear fuel from civilian nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the study conducted by the Department of Energy (the Department) regarding payment charges for the federal interim storage (FIS) of spent fuel and presents the study results. It describes the methodology proposed for calculating the FIS fee schedule, provides a range of estimates for the fee, and describes a proposed method of payment. The fee is structured for a range of spent fuel capacities because of uncertainties regarding the schedule of availability and amount of spent fuel that may require and qualify for FIS. The Department is currently determining how best to provide FIS for commercial spent fuel, and it expects to publish in the Federal Register a fee schedule to be effective on or before January 1, 1984. An additional report to Congress describing specific plans for deploying FIS facilities will be provided by January 7, 1984, in accordance with the requirements of the Act. 3 references, 3 tables

  15. Nuclear Energy General Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world'. One way it achieves this objective is to issue publications in various series. Two of these series are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III, paragraph A.6, of the IAEA Statute, the IAEA safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are primarily written in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own activities. The principal users are Member State regulatory bodies and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series consists of reports designed to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia and politicians, among others. The information is presented in guides, reports on the status of technology and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The series complements the IAEA's safety standards, and provides detailed guidance, experience, good practices and examples on the five areas covered in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. The Nuclear Energy Basic Principles is the highest level publication in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and describes the rationale and vision for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It presents eight Basic Principles on which nuclear energy systems should be based to fulfil nuclear energy's potential to help meet growing global energy needs. The Nuclear Energy Series Objectives are the second level publications. They describe what needs to be

  16. Nuclear energy and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy has a strong relation to a society. However, due to accidents and scandals having occurred in recent years, people's reliability to nuclear energy has significantly swayed and is becoming existence of a worry. Analyzing such a situation and grasping the problem contained are serious problems for people engaging in nuclear field. In order that nuclear energy is properly used in society, communication with general public and in nuclear power plant site area are increasingly getting important as well as grasping the situation and surveying measures for overcoming the problems. On the basis of such an analysis, various activities for betterment of public acceptance of nuclear energy by nuclear industry workers, researchers and the government are proposed. (J.P.N.)

  17. Nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  18. Introduction to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After some descriptions about atoms, fission and fusion, explanations are given about the functioning of a nuclear power plant. The safety with the different plans of emergency and factors that lead to a better nuclear safety are exposed, then comes a part for the environmental protection; the fuel cycle is tackled. Some historical aspects of nuclear energy finish this file. (N.C.)

  19. Nuclear energy and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity

  20. Nuclear energy class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces general conception and principle on nuclear energy. It comprised of twelve units, which are atom and an atom nucleus, a radioisotope and radioactivity, interaction on radiation and substance, nuclear reaction, nuclear reactor, making of a radioisotope, nuclear fuel cycle, utilization of radioisotope and radiation, natural radioactivity, radiation hazard, limitation of exposure and safety supervision on radiation. It has a chart on the symbol of element.

  1. Nuclear Energy Data 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting the status of nuclear power in the OECD area. Information provided by member country governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projected generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants declined in 2012 as a result of operational issues at some facilities and suspended operation at all but two reactors in Japan. Nuclear safety was further strengthened in 2012 following safety reviews prompted by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. Governments committed to maintaining nuclear power in the energy mix pursued initiatives to increase nuclear generating capacity. In Turkey, plans were finalised for the construction of the first four reactors for commercial electricity production. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'Statlinks'. For each StatLink, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link

  2. Nuclear energy in view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This leaflet advertises the availability of the following from UKAEA: film and video titles (nuclear fuel cycle; energy for all; power from the atom; using radioactivity; fast reactor; energy - the nuclear option; principles of fission; radiation); slide-tape packs (16 titles); other information services. (U.K.)

  3. Nuclear energy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution discusses the energy policy in Japan. In contrast to Germany nuclear power is not a bridging technology for Japan, the construction of new nuclear power plants is planned. The credibility of the Japanese nuclear power industry should have been discussed in the public even before the catastrophic reactor accidents in Fukushima-Daiichi. Safety, reliability, credibility and transparency are basic for public acceptance of high risk technologies. Up to 2011 Japan has not promoted the use of renewable energies.

  4. Nuclear energy education and training in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its continuing use of nuclear power, France faces numerous challenges, including the operation and maintenance of its existing array of reactors, waste management, the decommissioning of obsolete reactors, and research and development for future nuclear systems. All of these efforts must recognize and conform to international requirements. These activities mean that all participants in the French nuclear industry must continually update their approaches and skills, with respect to both domestic and worldwide nuclear power development. This requirement calls for the hiring and training of thousands of scientists and engineers each year in France and its partner or customer countries. Over the next ten years, domestic and international nuclear power activities in France will call for the recruitment of about 13,000 engineers with Master of Science or Ph.D. degrees, and 10,000 science technicians and operators with Bachelor of Science degrees. The chief employers will be EDF, AREVA, GDF-Suez, national agencies such as the Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs (ANDRA), sub-contractors, and R and D agencies such as the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), and the technical safety organization, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN). France has made a commitment to support countries that are ready to create the human, institutional, and technical conditions required to establish a civilian nuclear energy programme that meets all the requirements of safety, security, non-proliferation and environmental protection for present and future generations. These efforts are conducted through the France International Nuclear Agency (AFNI). In response to the need for competence-building in nuclear energy production, France now offers training opportunities in both French and English education programmes. Partnerships created by French nuclear energy participants and by AFNI can provide dedicated programmes

  5. The Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Baldo, M

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy characterizes the variation of the binding energy as the neutron to proton ratio of a nuclear system is varied. This is one of the most important features of nuclear physics in general, since it is just related to the two component nature of the nuclear systems. As such it is one of the most relevant physical parameters that affect the physics of many phenomena and nuclear processes. This review paper presents a survey of the role and relevance of the nuclear symmetry energy in different fields of research and of the accuracy of its determination from the phenomenology and from the microscopic many-body theory. In recent years, a great interest was devoted not only to the Nuclear Matter symmetry energy at saturation density but also to its whole density dependence, which is an essential ingredient for our understanding of many phenomena. We analyze the nuclear symmetry energy in different realms of nuclear physics and astrophysics. In particular we consider the nuclear symmetry ene...

  6. Nuclear energy inquiries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our choice of energy sources has important consequences for the economy and the environment. Nuclear energy is a controversial energy source, subject to much public debate. Most individuals find it difficult to decide between conflicting claims and allegations in a variety of technical subjects. Under these circumstances, knowledge of various relevant inquiries can be helpful. This publication summarizes the composition and major findings of more than thirty nuclear energy inquiries. Most of the these are Canadian, but others are included where they have relevance. The survey shows that, contrary to some claims, virtually every aspect of nuclear energy has been subject to detailed scrutiny. The inquiries' reports include many recommendations on how nuclear energy can be exploited safely, but none rejects it as an acceptable energy source when needed. (Author) 38 refs

  7. Nuclear power energy mixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains the papers presented at the conference held on 23/24 February 1994 at the RWTH in Aachen. The goal of this conference was to analyse key issues of future energy management from different viewpoints and to attempt to achieve objective estimations. This VDI Report treats the following main themes: - is the climate question relevant? - chances and limits of renewable energy sources - does nuclear power have a future? - are the nuclear and non-nuclear waste problems solvable? - external costs in energy management -company and energy management decision criteria. (orig.)

  8. Nuclear Energy Data - 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting the status of nuclear power in the OECD area. Information provided by member country governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projected generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants remained steady in 2013 despite the progressive shutdown of all reactors in Japan leading up to September and the permanent closure of six reactors in the OECD area. Governments committed to maintaining nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for increasing nuclear generating capacity, and progress was made in the development of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel, with Finland expected to have the first such facility in operation in the early 2020's. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'StatLinks'. For each StatLink, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link. (authors)

  9. Perspectives for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Belgium, approximately 60 percent of the produced electricity is generated by nuclear power. At present, nuclear power production tends to stagnate in Europe and North America but is still growing in Asia. The document gives an overview of the present status and the future energy demand with emphasis on electric power. Different evaluation criteria including factors hindering and factors promoting the expansion of nuclear power as well as requirements of new nuclear power plants are discussed. The extension of the lifetime of existing facilities as well as fuel supply are taken into consideration. A comparative assesment of nuclear power with other energy sources is made. The report concludes with estimating the contribution and the role of nuclear power in future energy demand as well as with an overview of future reactors and research and development programmes

  10. Nuclear energy today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy is the power of the world's economies, whose appetite for this commodity is increasing as the leading economies expand and developing economies grow. How to provide the energy demanded while protecting our environment and conserving natural resources is a vital question facing us today. Many parts of our society are debating how to power the future and whether nuclear energy should play a role. Nuclear energy is a complex technology with serious issues and a controversial past. Yet it also has the potential to provide considerable benefits. In pondering the future of this imposing technology, people want to know. - How safe is nuclear energy? - Is nuclear energy economically competitive? - What role can nuclear energy play in meeting greenhouse gas reduction targets? - What can be done with the radioactive waste it generates? - Does its use increase the risk of proliferation of nuclear weapons? - Are there sufficient and secure resources to permit its prolonged exploitation? - Can tomorrow's nuclear energy be better than today's? This publication provides authoritative and factual replies to these questions. Written primarily to inform policy makers, it will also serve interested members of the public, academics, journalists and industry leaders. (author)

  11. The nuclear energy debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have not been able to obtain closure in the nuclear energy debate because the public perception of nuclear energy is out of sync with reality. The industry has not been about to deal with the concerns of those opposed to nuclear energy because its reaction has been to generate and disseminate more facts rather than dealing with the serious moral and ethical questions that are being asked. Nuclear proponents and opponents appeal to different moral communities, and those outside each community cannot concede that the other might be right. The Interfaith Program for Public Awareness of Nuclear Issues (IPPANI) has been formed, sponsored by members of the Jewish, Baha'i, Roman Catholic, United, and Anglican faiths, to provide for a balanced discussion of the ethical aspects of energy. (L.L.)

  12. Nuclear energy pack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pack contains teaching material to supply factual information about nuclear energy for those teaching physics or chemistry or general science for GCE examinations. It is intended for use either in class teaching or in some forms of resource-based learning systems. The material comprises: illustrated booklets and accompanying filmstrips on (1) energy from atoms, (2) ionising radiation and its detection, (3) nuclear reactors, and (4) the uses of radioisotopes; wallcharts on (1) nuclear fuel cycle, (2) radioactivity at work, and (3) nuclear reactors for producing electricity; glossary of atomic terms; and teachers' guide. (U.K.)

  13. Commonsense in nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: the ultimate price of an energy collapse; desecration of the environment (by activities other than nuclear power); nuclear reactors cannot explode, but other things can (examples of chemical explosions); death sentences (coal mine explosions); radioactivity (activity from all sources compared); how damaging is radioactivity (effects of radiation in various doses); nuclear accidents; the day the dam broke; how stands solar; natural gas; coal; storing one's own nuclear waste; [was there] a nuclear accident in the U.S.S.R.; breeder reactors and the U.S. Non-proliferation Act; who is doing the proliferating; it has all happened before. (U.K.)

  14. An Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy's Civilian R & D Budget

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald J. Sutherland

    1989-01-01

    The Department of Energy's R&D budget has experienced major changes in funding during the last two administrations. These changes are explained by administration policies that are based on perceived conditions of market failure. Government funding of R&D can be supported on grounds of externalities, public goods and the absence of national contingency markets. Such funding cannot be justified on grounds of being long-term or high-risk. A portfolio model offers insights as to the appropriate d...

  15. Nuclear energy and jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mr. Goldfinger, Research Director of AFL-CIO, examines the problem of energy in general, nuclear in particular, and the employment relationship. The energy shortages in the U.S. and its dependence on oil are cited. Directly connected with this serious problem relating to energy are jobs, income, and living standards. If energy is not available, industries will be unable to expand to meet the needs of the growing population; and prices of goods will rise. From an evaluation of what experts have said, Mr. Goldfinger concludes that increased coal production and better coal technology cannot meet energy demands; so the sharp increase both in volume and as a percentage of total energy needed in the future will have to come from nuclear power. Development of alternative sources is necessary, he feels, and intense research on these is needed now. The employment impact in the nuclear energy scenario is analyzed according to the trades involved. It is estimated that 1.5 million jobs in the nuclear industry would be open by the year 2000 if nuclear is to provide one-fourth of energy supplies. The employment picture, assuming abandonment of nuclear energy, is then discussed

  16. Nuclear Energy and the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    "Nuclear Energy and the Environment" is a pocket folder of removable leaflets concerned with two major topics: Nuclear energy and Nuclear Techniques. Under Nuclear Energy, leaflets concerning the topics of "Radiation--A Fact of Life,""The Impact of a Fact: 1963 Test Ban Treaty,""Energy Needs and Nuclear Power,""Power Reactor Safety,""Transport,"…

  17. Statement of Ben C. Rusche, Director, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author appreciate the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) proposal for Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS). In our proposal, we recommend that Congress: Approve the construction of an MRS facility at Clinch River near Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Limit the storage capacity at the MRS facility to 15,000 metric tons of spent fuel; Preclude waste acceptance by the MRS facility until a construction authorization for the first repository is received from the NRC; Direct DOE to implement measures responsive to the concerns and recommendations of the State and local governments; and Direct DOE to implement the program plan accompanying the proposal. Before addressing several of the salient issues surrounding this proposal, I would like to provide relevant background information

  18. Axiology of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy was born in World War II and it has grown within the regime of Cold War. When the Cold War came to the end around early 1990 s, we who have benefited by the development of nuclear energy must have been challenged with a new tide of civilization change. Although it has not been so much closely questioned since then, such a new movement, that was submerging, abruptly manifested on September 11, 2001. Then, many of us realized that global circumstances, especially concerned with security, must have actually changed with the reordering of the world basic structures. This paper describes on the thoughts to reveal the cause and background of the event on September 11 with the linkage to nuclear energy development, or nuclear civilization in pursuit of the future regime of nuclear in harmonization with the global society in 21st century. (author)

  19. Civilian applications of MTP technology and integrated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several potential civilian applications of defense energy systems. The multimegawatt terrestrial power plant is an example of a military facility of great potential value in certain civilian settings. Such plants would almost certainly be installed primarily for the production of electricity, but they could also have other important uses. One advantage of such a close-in facility could be its ability to provide cogenerated heat for industrial processing or space heating. In all cases, the use of nuclear power to replace fossil fuels - especially coal - will provide a source of energy that is far superior in terms of environmental protection and human health and safety. Another major benefit to society associated with the use of small nuclear plants will be the familiarization more citizens experience with the use of nuclear power. Finally, the development and use of 10-MW(d) nuclear power facilities will provide experience for the design and construction of larger commercial plants with similar characteristics for civilian use in the near future

  20. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1992. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities and industry also contribute to many projects

  1. Nuclear energy related research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1992-05-01

    The annual Research Program Plan describes publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT) in 1992. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Center for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities, and industry also contribute to many projects.

  2. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes the publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1991. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities and industry also contribute to many projects

  3. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes the publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1990. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Utilities and industry also contribute to some projects

  4. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual Research Programme Plan covers the publicly funded nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1988. The research will be financed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT itself

  5. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual Research Programme Plan covers the publicly funded nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1989. The research will be financed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT itself

  6. Desalting and Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, Calvin C.

    1971-01-01

    Future use of nuclear energy to produce electricity and desalted water is outlined. Possible desalting processes are analyzed to show economic feasibility and the place in planning in world's economic growth. (DS)

  7. Nuclear energy in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This summary represents an overview of the energy situation in Armenia and, in particular, the nuclear energy development during the last period of time. the energy sector of Armenia is one of the most developed economy branches of the country. The main sources of energy are oil products, natural gas, nuclear energy, hydropower, and coal. In the period of 1985-1988 the consumption of these energy resources varied between 12-13 million tons per year of oil equivalent. Imported energy sources accounted for 96% of the consumption. During the period 1993-1995 the consumption dropped to 3 million tons per year. Electricity in Armenia is produced by three thermal, one nuclear, and two major hydroelectric cascades together with a number small hydro units. The total installed capacity is 3558 MW. Nuclear energy in Armenia began its development during the late 1960's. Since the republic was not rich in natural reserves of primary energy sources and the only domestic source of energy was hydro resource, it was decided to build a nuclear power plant in Armenia. The Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) Unit 1 was commissioned in 1996 and Unit 2 in 1980. The design of the ANPP was developed in 1968-1969 and was based on the project of Units 3 and 4 of the Novovoronezh NPP. Both units of the plant are equipped with reactors WWER-440 (V -270) type, which are also in use in some power stations in Russian Federation, Bulgaria, and Slovakia. Currently in Armenia, 36% of the total electricity production is nuclear power electricity. (authors)

  8. Risk communication: Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emphasis is put on communication processes, here in particular with regard to nuclear energy. Not so much dealt with are questions concerning political regulation, the constellation of power between those becoming active and risk perception by the population. Presented are individual arguments, political positions and decision-making processes. Dealt with in particular are safety philosophies, risk debates, and attempts to 'channel' all sides to the subject of nuclear energy. (DG)

  9. Deliberations about nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a discussion of points raised in three safety studies dealing with nuclear energy. It reviews the problems that must be faced in order to form a safe and practical energy policy with regard to health and the environment (potential hazards, biological effects and radiation dose norms), the proliferation of nuclear weapons, reactor accidents (including their causes, consequences and evacuation problems that arise), the fallout and contamination problems, and security (both reactor security and national security)

  10. Nuclear energy outlook 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the launch today of its first Nuclear Energy Outlook, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) makes an important contribution to ongoing discussions of nuclear energy's potential role in the energy mixes of its member countries. As world energy demand continues to grow unabated, many countries face serious concerns about the security of energy supplies, rising energy prices and climate change stemming from fossil fuel consumption. In his presentation, the NEA Director-General Luis Echavarri is emphasizing the role that nuclear power could play in delivering cost-competitive and stable supplies of energy, while also helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In one Outlook scenario, existing nuclear power technologies could provide almost four times the current supply of nuclear-generated electricity by 2050. Under this scenario, 1400 reactors of the size commonly in use today would be in operation by 2050. But in order to accomplish such an expansion, securing political and societal support for the choice of nuclear energy is vital. An ongoing relationship between policy makers, the nuclear industry and society to develop knowledge building and public involvement will become increasingly important, the publication notes. Moreover, governments have a clear responsibility to maintain continued effective safety regulation, advance efforts to develop radioactive waste disposal solutions and uphold and reinforce the international non-proliferation regime. The authors find that the security of energy from nuclear power is more reliable than that for oil or gas. Additionally, uranium's high energy density means that transport is less vulnerable to disruption, and storing a large energy reserve is easier than for fossil fuels. One tonne of uranium produces the same energy as 10 000 to 16 000 tonnes of oil using current technology. Ongoing technological developments are likely to improve that performance even more. Until the middle of the century the dominant reactor

  11. The nuclear energy outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, nuclear power has witnessed a remarkable revival, driven by a number of concerns about the current global energy mix. In a situation where use of fossil fuels predominates, energy security has become a priority for many countries, as prices remain volatile and the long-term prospect of their exhaustion looms large. Worries about climate change are also fostering interest in nuclear power given that this energy source is virtually free of CO2 emissions. The NEO concludes that nuclear energy is a mature technology that could play a large part in resolving the world's energy issues. Not only can nuclear power provide very large quantities of energy, largely CO2-free and for very long periods of time, but it can also be used to provide heat, to supply potable water and to produce hydrogen for transport. Nuclear energy is not necessarily the answer in all situations and in all societies. The NEO nevertheless aims to provide a lasting, quality resource to inform decision makers' and citizens' debates on potential energy options

  12. Nuclear Energy's Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadak, Andrew C.

    2006-10-01

    Nuclear energy is about to enter its renaissance. After almost 30 years of new plant construction dormancy, utilities are seriously preparing for ordering new plants in the next two years. This resurgence in interest is based on improved plant performance, new Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing processes, significant incentives introduced by Congress in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to encourage new orders, and new technologies that are competitive, simpler to operate and safer. These new evolutionary light water reactors will pave the way to more advanced high temperature gas reactors such as the pebble bed or prismatic reactors that will provide improved efficiency and safety leading to more process heat applications in oil extraction or hydrogen production. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) also authorized by the Energy Policy act will provide the fundamental technical basis for the future of these technologies. Progress continues on the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste disposal site enabling this expansion. When coupled with the long term strategy of waste minimization through reprocessing and actinide destruction as proposed in the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, the future of nuclear energy as part of this nation's energy mix appears to be assured.

  13. Nuclear energy debate

    CERN Document Server

    Healey, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The debate over the introduction of nuclear power in Australia has recently become more heated in light of safety concerns over the nuclear reactor meltdown emergency in Japan. Australia has also just committed to a carbon trading scheme to address its reliance on coal-fired energy and reduce greenhouse emissions. With 40% of the world's uranium located in Australia, the economic, environmental and health considerations are significant. This book contains an overview of global nuclear energy use and production, and presents a range of current opinions debating the pros and cons of Australia's

  14. High energy nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear field theory has been applied to study nuclear matter as well as finite nuclei. Within the mean field approximation the known bulk properties of nuclei such as binding energy, density, and compressibility are well reproduced. Charge and matter distributions of closed shell nuclei are in good agreement with experimental results, so are rms radii and single-particle energy levels. In addition to the description of known nuclear structure the field theoretical approach may reveal entirely new nuclear phenomena, based on the explicite treatment of mesonic degrees of freedom. The existence of such abnormal nuclear states was proposed by Lee and Wick employing the sigma-model Lagrangian. There the non-linearity of the meson field equations allows for soliton solutions in the presence of nucleons, in particular the sigma-field may exhibit a kink. Some of these solutions are considered

  15. Nuclear energy and environment: abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this meeting on nuclear energy and environment, abstracts on the following subjects were presented: nuclear fuels; materials; radioisotopes and its applications; reactors and nuclear power plants; regulations, energy and environment; radioactive wastes; and analytical techniques

  16. Parliament and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper provides a historical review of the behaviour of Parliament in the discussion about utilizing nuclear energy. An analysis of the positions taken and reasons advanced so far is necessary, because it is only from its results that promising strategies appropriate to bring about a consensus can be derived. There is no doubt that it is a genuine task of the democratically legitimated bodies to strive for a consensus in energy policy, in particular nuclear energy, in the interest of the whole State, with the legislative, executive and economic bodies combining their efforts. The reservedness of Parliament is regrettable. At the moment, however, there is the positive effect of the discussion being revived. It should be conducted rationally in the joint interest of reaching a political consensus and, on that basis, a broad acceptance of nuclear energy utilization. (orig./HSCH)

  17. Nuclear Energy in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new energy approach towards nuclear, due to the growing political support at the beginning of this century, is the result of a complexity of economical, social, political and technological factors. The history of peaceful use of nuclear energy in Romania goes back 45 years. Considering the strategic importance of the energy sector in developing the national economy on sustainable basis, the sector evolution should be outlined through prognosis and strategies on different horizons of time, so that the development perspectives and the energy supply to be correctly estimated. This necessity is emphasized in the Governmental Program of the present administration, which takes into consideration Romanian Economic Strategy on medium term and also The Government Action Plan on 2000-2004, agreed with the European Commission. In order to implement the Governmental Program, the Ministry of Industries and Resources elaborates the National Energy Strategy. The Government Action Plan draw up the conclusion that Unit 2 from Cernavoda NPP must be finalized. This solution fits the least-cost energy development planning and answers to environment requirements. Romania became a Member State of the Agency in 1957. From the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s its technical co-operation program with the Agency covered mainly research in nuclear physics and some medical and other applications of radiation and isotopes. Since 1976, when the Romanian nuclear power program was embarking to use CANDU-type reactors, the Agency has supported mainly the activities related to the Cernavoda NPP. In the framework of the Romanian accession process to the European structures, CNCAN co-operates with European Commission for transposition of the communautaire acquis in the field of nuclear activities. Romania has had laws in place governing the regulation of nuclear activities since 1974. They were remained in force throughout and subsequent to the national constitutional changes started in 1989 until 1996

  18. The development of an operations system for the transport of spent nuclear fuel in the United States Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to support the development of a Transportation Operations System for the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS) by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, the United States Department of Energy formed the Transportation Project Office at its field office in Chicago. Planning and development activities are being performed in a number of areas including a major effort in operations support, providing the planning and assessment necessary for developing the future transportation operations capability needed by the FWMS. The purpose of this paper is to review significant planning and development accomplishments, and outline expected future efforts for the continued development, acquisition, test, and startup of the transportation operations component of the FWMS. 2 refs

  19. Nuclear energy and insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It examines the technical, scientific and legal issues relating to the peaceful use of atomic energy in Turkey. The first fifteen chapters give a general overview of the atom and radioactivity; the chapters which follow this section are more technical and deal with the causes of nuclear accidents in reactors.A number of chapters cover legal issues, for example the conditions and procedures involved in the insurance market and the risks linked to operation of a nuclear power plant.The following subjects are examined in relation to nuclear insurance: risks during construction; fire during operation of the plants and other causes of accidents; risks due to the transport of radioactive materials and waste etc. The final chapters reproduce the principle legislative texts in force in Turkey in the field of nuclear energy, and also certain regulations which establish competent regulatory bodies

  20. Comment response document for the Secretary of Energy`s ``Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-11-01

    On November 29, 1989, the Secretary of Energy published his ``Report to Congress on the Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program`` (Report), and sent copies to numerous interested parties for their review and comment. This document summarizes comments received on the Report and presents the DOE`s current responses to those comments as a basis for further discussions. Included as appendixes are a list of commenters, a crosswalk showing where each comment is addressed, the comment letters themselves with specific comments delineated, and the DOE`s response to those letters. Twenty-five individuals or organizations submitted comments on the Report. The DOE identified 130 individual comments and classified them into the following seven categories: Management, Institutional, Regulatory, Transportation, Monitored Retrievable Storage, Scheduling, and Yucca Mountain. For the responses, comments were than grouped into more specific topics under each of the major headings. The DOE attempted to respond to all comments.

  1. Teachers and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of the seminar were: to exchange national experience in informing and assisting teachers in the nuclear field, and to determine the conditions for improving the effectiveness of these programmes; to develop an international understanding on the basic training and information requirements to assist secondary-school teachers in discussing nuclear energy in an appropriately wide and balanced context at school; to study the respective contributions of national authorities, industry and relevant institutes in this endeavour

  2. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  3. International nuclear energy guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this French-English bilingual Guide is to present a synthesis embracing all the aspects and all the implications of the development of nuclear energy by situating it both within the French administrative and professional framework and in the world context. Special attention has been paid to the protection of man and the environment and to safety and security problems; most of the other questions -technological, economic, industrial- which arise at all points in the nuclear cycle. Teaching and research are outlined and a special appendix is devoted to nuclear information

  4. Nuclear energy in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finland currently generates about 40% of its electricity from nuclear power. This achievement of worldwide record magnitude is based on long-lasting efforts to build and maintain the competent infrastructure and close international cooperation required by this demanding technology. This booklet published by the Finnish Atomic Energy Commission gives an overview of nuclear energy and related organizations in Finland. It describes the utility companies and nuclear power production, the manufacturing industry and its export potential, research and educational activities and the legal framework and authorities for nuclear safety and administration. International cooperation has been essential for Finland in developing its nuclear energy capacity and appreciation is espressed to many countries and international organizations which have contributed to this. At the same time Finnish organizations are willing to share the experiences and know-how they have gained in building nuclear power in a small country. This is a road which will be followed by many other countries in the decades to come. It is hoped that this booklet will also help to open new channels of cooperation in such efforts

  5. Nuclear energy and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, about 80 developing countries are using nuclear techniques in various sectors of their national economies. In the sector of industry, the radiation processing using gamma rays of high energy electrons has grown. While in the sector of health care, an estimated 10000 gamma cameras-imaging instruments are used in combination with radioisotopes in medical diagnosis. In the field of agriculture there is, nearly, 1000 crop varieties derived from radiaton-induced mutations which are grown worldwide. Furthermore and concerning the energy sector there is 417 nuclear power plants operating in 26 countries, accounting for just 16% of the world's total electricity production; the nuclear energy helped in developing and supporting a variety of sciences. 2 tabs

  6. Information and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive information on the safety aspects in the field of nuclear energy is supplied by the documents established by international and national bodies. As compared with chemical or biological hazards, the detection of radiations is especially simple and sensitive. The biological effects of ionizing radiation are well known thanks to epidemiological surveys and biological experiments. The dose-effect relationships have been determined allowing an assessment of the risks associated with any radiation exposure: natural exposure, X-ray in medical diagnosis, nuclear energy production,... A comparative study shows that the overall risks associated with the production of electric energy of nuclear origin are lower than those linked to fossil-fueled power plants, the latter being much lower than the risks from smoking

  7. Alternatives to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses several possibilities as alternatives to nuclear energy and their relevance to the Philippine case. The major present and future fuel alternatives to petroleum and nuclear energy are coal, geothermal heat, solar energy and hydrogen, the first two of which are being used. Different conversion technologies are also discussed for large scale electricity production namely solar thermal electric conversion (STC), photovoltaic electric power system (PEPS) and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Major environmental considerations affect the choice of energy sources and technologies. We have the problem of long term accumulation of radioactive waste in the case of nuclear energy; in geothermal and fossil-fuels carbon dioxide uranium and accumulation may cause disastrous consequences. With regard to Philippine option, the greatest considerations in selecting alternative energy options would be resources availability - both energy and financial and technology status. For the country's energy plan, coal and geothermal energy are expected to play a significant role. The country's coal resources are 1.4 billion metric tons. For geothermal energy, 25 volcanic centers were identified and has a potential equivalent to 2.5 x 106 million barrels of oil. Solar energy if harnessed, being in the sunbelt, averaging some 2000 hours a year could be an energy source. The present dilemma of the policy maker is whether national resources are better spent on large scale urban-based energy projects or whether those should be focused on small scale, rural oriented installations which produced benefits to the more numerous and poorer members of the population. (RTD)

  8. Nuclear energy and civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of energy is indeed very important since without it there will be no living-things in this world. A country's ability to cultivate energy determines the levels of her civilization and wealth. Sufficient energy supply is needed for economic growth, industrialization, and modernization. In a modern civilization, the prosperity and security of a country depends more on the capability of her people rather than the wealth of her natural resources. Energy supplies the wealth, prosperity and security, and sufficient reliable continuous supply of energy secures the sustainable development. The energy supply to sustain the development has to improve the quality of life covering also the quality of environment to support the ever increasing demand of human race civilization. Energy has a closer relationship with civilization in a modern society and will have to become even closer in the future more civilized and more modern society. The utilization of nuclear energy has, however, some problems and challenges, e.g. misleading information and understanding which need serious efforts for public information, public relation, and public acceptance, and possible deviation of nuclear materials for non-peaceful uses which needs serious efforts for technological and administrative barriers, precaution, prevention, safety, physical protection, safeguard, and transparency. These require cooperation among nuclear community. The cooperation should be more pronounced by heterogeneous growing Asian countries to reach harmony for mutual benefits toward better civilization. (J.P.N.)

  9. Nuclear energy and nuclear weapons proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the report dispatched in the middle of 1978 by the Atlantic Council of United States, organized by North American citizens, is presented. The report considers the relation between the production of nucleoelectric energy and the capacity of proliferation of nuclear weapons. The factors which affect the grade of proliferation risk represented by the use of nuclear energy in the world comparing this risk with the proliferation risks independently of nuclear energy, are examined. (M.C.K.)

  10. Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) was established on 1 February 1958 under the name of the OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency. It received its present designation on 20 April 1972, when Japan became its first non-European full Member. Now, NEA membership consists of 28 OECD Member countries, i.e. Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The NEA is the only intergovernmental nuclear energy organization which brings together developed countries of North America, Europe and the Asia-Pacific region in a small, non-political forum with a relatively narrow, technical focus. - NEA membership represents much of the world's best nuclear expertise; - By pooling this expertise, the NEA provides each Member access to the substantial experience of others and an opportunity to substantially leverage its resources in this field; - Homogeneity of NEA membership makes possible a like-minded approach to problems, a climate of mutual trust and collaboration, the full exchange of experience, and a frank assessment of issues; - The NEA is relatively unfettered by political and bureaucratic constraints, and is able to focus effectively on the specific needs of its Members; - NEA scientific and technical work is in the forefront of knowledge and is known for its depth; - The NEA publishes consensus positions on key issues, providing Member countries with credible references; - The NEA is cost effective. It operates with a small staff, relying on Member country experts, and provides significant added value; - The NEA's system of standing technical committees enables the Agency to be flexible and responsive; - NEA joint projects and information exchange programmes enable interested Members and non-members to join forces in carrying

  11. Perspectives of nuclear energy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederle, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2007), s. 59-65. ISSN N. [Promises of Science. Prague, 13.01.2006-15.01.2006] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 839 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : perspectives of nuclear energy, carbon dioxide emissions, climate changes, generation IV reactors system * carbon dioxide emissions * climate changes Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics

  12. Nuclear energy and communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article contains information related to the support that the Latin-American countries have counted, from the International Atomic Energy Agency, for the development and application of the nuclear energy in different fields. In the particular case of Costa Rica, it mentions some projects included in the program ARCAL. The achievements reached in the year 1998 and the goals proposed for 1999-2000. (S. Grainger)

  13. Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences is the leading Bulgarian Institute for scientific investigations and applications of nuclear science. The main Institute's activities in the field of elementary particles and nuclear physics, high energy physics and nuclear energy, radiochemistry, radioecology, radioactive wastes treatment, monitoring of the environment, nuclear instruments development ect. are briefly described. Several examples for: environmental radiation monitoring; monitoring of the radioactivity and heavy metals in aerosols, 99mTc clinical use, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application of IRT-2000 Research Reactor, neutron fluence for reactor vessel embrittlement, NPP safety analysis, nuclear fuel modelling are also presented

  14. Drive for Nuclear Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    New Delhi warms to the United States in a bid to acquire nuclear technologies for energy independence and strategic influence on July 21, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton completed her five-day trip to India. The two sides reached several agree-ments during the visit. The most important

  15. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research programme plan for 1985 covers the nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and funded by the Ministry of Trade and Industry in Finland, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT

  16. Proceedings of the 1983 civilian radioactive waste management information meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proceedings document from the 1983 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Information Meeting serves to highlight developments since the passage of the Nuclear Policy Act of 1982 and reviews program activities necessary to provide for the permanent disposal and storage of commercially generated high-level radioactive waste. Presentations included in this program cover topics concerning interim spent fuel, monitored retrievable storage, geologic repository deployment as well as management of the Nuclear Waste Fund. Individual papers were abstracted for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  17. Energy supply and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author emphasizes the necessity and importance of nuclear energy for the energy supply and stresses the point that it is extremely important to return to objective arguments instead of having emotional disputes. In this connection, it would be necessary for the ministries in question to have clear-cut political responsibility from which, under no circumstances, they may escape, and which they cannot pass on to the courts either. Within the framework of listing present problems, the author is concerned with the possibility of improved site planning, the introduction of a plan approval procedure and questions concerning immediately enforceable nuclear licences. He also deals with a proposal, repeatedly made, to improve nuclear licensing procedures on the one hand by introducing a project-free site-appointment procedure, and on the other hand by introducing a simplified licensing procedure for facilities of the same kind. Splitting the procedure into site and facility would make sense solely for the reason that in many cases the objections are, above all, directed against the site. (HP)

  18. Intermediate energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fission has been investigated with the double-kinetic-energy method using silicon surface barrier detectors. Fragment energy correlation measurements have been made for U, Th and Bi with bremsstrahlung of 600 MeV maximum energy. Distributions of kinetic energy as a function of fragment mass are presented. The results are compared with earlier photofission data and in the case of bismuth, with calculations based on the liquid drop model. The binary fission process in U, Yb, Tb, Ce, La, Sb, Ag and Y induced by 600 MeV protons has been investigated yielding fission cross sections, fragment kinetic energies, angular correlations and mass distributions. Fission-spallation competition calculations are used to deduce values of macroscopic fission barrier heights and nuclear level density parameter values at deformations corresponding to the saddle point shapes. We find macroscopic fission barriers lower than those predicted by macroscopic theories. No indication is found of the Businaro Gallone limit expected to occur somewhere in the mass range A = 100 to A = 140. For Ce and La asymmetric mass distributions similar to those in the actinide region are found. A method is described for the analysis of angular correlations between complementary fission products. The description is mainly concerned with fission induced by medium-energy protons but is applicable also to other projectiles and energies. It is shown that the momentum and excitation energy distributions of cascade residuals leading to fission can be extracted. (Author)

  19. Nuclear energy and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for energy is very high in developed countries and is rapidly increasing in the developing countries. The supply of fossil fuels is limited and their use causes greenhouse effect and acid rain. Nuclear energy is an attractive option, as it does not cause these adverse effects. Very large amounts of oil, coal and gas have been saved in countries that have gone in for large scale nuclear energy. Releases of carbon dioxide which is a greenhouse gas and the oxides of nitrogen, which contribute to acid rain have been avoided in the process. However, the public is concerned about its other impacts on the environment, particularly of radioactive waste. The experts have shown that technology is available for safe disposal of radioactive wastes. Decommissioning has also been shown to be feasible. The radiological impact due to the release of radioactive materials from nuclear power plants is minimal. The dose due to these to the members of the public is too small to be measured. The estimated value of the radiation dose is a small fraction of the radiation dose due to natural background radiation present at all locations. The environment-friendly nature of nuclear power plants is getting due attention. (author)

  20. Nuclear energy research initiative (NERI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives of the nuclear energy research initiative are: to address and help to overcome the principal technical and scientific obstacles to expand the use of nuclear energy in the US; advance the state of nuclear technology to maintain a competitive position in the overseas markets and a future domestic market; promote and maintain nuclear science and engineering; and to improve the performance, efficiency, reliability, economics and other attributes to enhance nuclear energy application

  1. Non-nuclear energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different meanings of the word 'energy', as understood by economists, are reviewed and explained. Present rates of consumption of fossil and nuclear fuels are given as well as corresponding reserves and resources. The time left before exhaustion of these reserves is calculated for different energy consumption scenarios. On finds that coal and nuclear only allow to reach the end of this century. Without specific dispositions, the predicted massive use of coal is not compatible with any admissible value of global heating. Thus, we discuss the clean coal techniques, including carbon dioxide capture and storage. One proceeds with the discussion of availability and feasibility of renewable energies, with special attention to electricity production. One distinguishes controllable renewable energies from those which are intermittent. Among the first we find hydroelectricity, biomass, and geothermal and among the second, wind and solar. At world level, hydroelectricity will, most probably, remain the main renewable contributor to electricity production. Photovoltaic is extremely promising for providing villages remote deprived from access to a centralized network. Biomass should be an important source of bio-fuels. Geothermal energy should be an interesting source of low temperature heat. Development of wind energy will be inhibited by the lack of cheap and massive electricity storage; its contribution should not exceed 10% of electricity production. Its present development is totally dependent upon massive public support. A large part of this paper follows chapters of the monograph 'L'energie de demain: technique, environnement, economie', EDP Sciences, 2005. (author)

  2. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is initially of the international-and national situation regarding energetic resources. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Policy and the Brazilian Nuclear Program are dealt with, as well as the Nuclear Cooperation agreement signed with the Federal Republic of Germany. The situation of Brazil regarding Uranium and the main activities of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission are also discussed

  3. A century of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author proposes a history of the French nuclear industry and nuclear energy since the Nobel prizes of 1903 and 1911. He describes and comments the context of the energy production sector before the development of the nuclear energy, the development of the institutional context, the successive and different nuclear technologies, the main characteristics of the French program at its beginning, the relationship between the nuclear energy and the public, the main accidents and lessons learned from them, the perspectives of evolution of nuclear energy

  4. Project on standards on good behaviour for the civilian nuclear industry; Projet de normes de bonne counduite pour l`industrie nculeaire civile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohl, Pierre; Derche, Bernard [Association Internationale du Droit Nucleaire, Paris (France). Section Francaise

    1995-12-31

    Nuclear energy has provoked complex and sometimes heated debates involving politic, economic, scientific and moral issues, objective data alongside irrational feelings, short-term calculations as well as concerns touching on the far-reaching of humanity and the earth. These debates go beyond national borders as it is obvious that even though each country may hold divergent positions regarding the development of nuclear energy, their effects have an international scope, and, therefore, must be taken into account by all nations, even those who do not operate nuclear installations. Whatever conclusion may be drawn from these debates, decisions on nuclear energy are always taken by the political authorities, almost always at the highest level, be it national or international. These political decisions then become the body of legal standards, particularly the regulations which govern how nuclear energy is used. The main standards are for technical and scientific quality, applying to energy resource needs, to the reasons why the nuclear industry should be developed, to radioprotection and nuclear security, to protection of the environment, to radioactive waste management, to information and consulting to the public, to international cooperation, to non-proliferation of atomic weapons and to physical protection of nuclear materials. (author).

  5. French nuclear energy development strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear energy development in France is based on the spirit of democracy. Through the discussions in various groups and so on, an energy independent policy has been decided. That is, the energy independence of 50% is aimed at by 1990, by reducing the energy import. In order to lower the current petroleum reliance from 48.5% to 32% (by 1990), the development of new energy sources, including nuclear power, is essential. Nuclear energy is particularly important for French energy independence. The nuclear energy development program is on a very large scale; the share of nuclear energy in the total primary energy will be from 26% to 28% by 1990. Nuclear power generation features its low cost, and its remarkably high safety. For the nuclear power development, the consensus by all people is necessary. For the purpose, the network of both local and central organs is set up. (Mori, K.)

  6. Nuclear energy and insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was the risk of contamination of ships from the Pacific atmospheric atomic bomb tests in the 1940's that seems first to have set insurers thinking that a limited amount of cover would be a practical possibility if not a commercially-attractive proposition. One Chapter of this book traces the early, hesitant steps towards the evolution of ''nuclear insurance'', as it is usually called; a term of convenience rather than exactitude because it seems to suggest an entirely new branch of insurance with a status of its own like that of Marine, Life or Motor insurance. Insurance in the field of nuclear energy is more correctly regarded as the application of the usual, well-established forms of cover to unusual kinds of industrial plant, materials and liabilities, characterised by the peculiar dangers of radioactivity which have no parallel among the common hazards of industry and commerce. It had, and still has, the feature that individual insurance underwriters are none too keen to look upon nuclear risks as a potential source of good business and profit. Only by joining together in Syndicates or Pools have the members of the national insurance markets been able to make proper provision for nuclear risks; only by close international collaboration among the national Pools have the insurers of the world been able to assemble adequate capacity - though still, even after thirty years, not sufficient to provide complete coverage for a large nuclear installation. (author)

  7. Glossary of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TNC 90 focuses on nuclear energy technology. Some more basic or less central terms which were included in the previous glossary, TNC 55, have not been included in this version. About 1200 definitions in swedish included together with translations to english, german and french. The terms have been listed in alphabetical order. To make it easier to look up a certain term or terms that stand for related concepts the terms have been systematically arranged in a special index. (L.E.)

  8. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been well recognized that securing economic viabilities along with technologies are very important elements in the successful implementation of nuclear R and D projects. The objective of the Project is to help nuclear energy to be utilized in an efficient way by analyzing major issues related with nuclear economics. The study covers following subjects: the role of nuclear in the future electric supply system, economic analysis of nuclear R and D project, contribution to the regional economy from nuclear power. In addition, the study introduces the international cooperation in the methodological area of efficient use of nuclear energy by surveying the international activities related with nuclear economics

  9. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Man Ki; Moon, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lim, C. Y.; Oh, K. B

    2006-12-15

    It has been well recognized that securing economic viabilities along with technologies are very important elements in the successful implementation of nuclear R and D projects. The objective of the Project is to help nuclear energy to be utilized in an efficient way by analyzing major issues related with nuclear economics. The study covers following subjects: the role of nuclear in the future electric supply system, economic analysis of nuclear R and D project, contribution to the regional economy from nuclear power. In addition, the study introduces the international cooperation in the methodological area of efficient use of nuclear energy by surveying the international activities related with nuclear economics.

  10. Rules for the implementation of regulations on the safety regulation for civilian nuclear installations of the People's Republic of China. Pt.2: Safety surveillance of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Rules were promulgated by the National Nuclear Safety Administration on June 14, 1995, which are applicable to the nuclear safety surveillance of all safety-related items and activities during all stages of siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of nuclear installations. The purpose of the nuclear safety surveillance is to inspect the implementation of the nuclear safety control requirements and the licence conditions, to inspect and urge the correction of items that do not conform with the nuclear safety control requirements and the licence conditions and to take enforcement measures if necessary, in order to ensure the safety of nuclear installations

  11. Nuclear Energy Economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A criterion of profitability for large capital expenditure is defined first. The methods for calculating depreciation are recalled and the discounted value system is described, so that the difference existing between estimated costs and present worth average costs, is correctly understood. Although the numerical values of costs are soon out of date, the numerical applications have been given in detail. All this provides a glimpse of the complex field of equipment programme selections as used with respect to electricity and nuclear electricity in particular. The economics of fissile substances are dealt with next: enriched uranium, plutonium about which it is shown that a market price does not make much sense at present. Finally the need to utilise nuclear and all other forms of energy in order to meet the requirements of mankind is highlighted. To do so, it is shown that in world terms and particularly in French terms, the energy requirements being what they are, how essential it is, in the short and medium term, to make use of nuclear energy and, within its framework, to have recourse to fast breeder reactors

  12. Nuclear energy in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Malaysian Vision 2020 envisages doubling of the its economy every ten years for the next three decades. The Second Outline Perspective plan 1991-2000 (OPP2), also known as the National Development Policy (NDP) will set the pace to enable Malaysia to become a fully developed nation by the year 2020. The Malaysian economy is targeted to grow at 7 percent per annum in the decade of OPP2. In view of the targets set under Vision 2020, it is important to ensure that energy does not become a constraint to growth, and this sector develops in a least cost basis. Energy is crucial for industrialization and no modern industrial state can function without it. The paper presents a description of the main utilities in the country. Their installed capacities, maximum demand, generation mix and customers served are discussed. The electricity demand forecast till the year 2020 is presented. The paper presents this for 4 scenarios - a low growth, business as usual scenario, a moderate growth, business as usual scenario, a moderate growth, energy efficient scenario and a targeted growth, energy efficient scenario. The energy resources in the country is described together with its energy policy. The country's four-fuel policy is elaborated with the various options discussed. The environmental and pricing policies with regards to energy is also briefly given. Finally the nuclear option is presented in this context of the country's energy policy. The country had undertaken various studies for the nuclear option. These studies are given in the paper. The purpose of these studies and what the government decided is also discussed. Finally the prospects for the nuclear option in the future for the country is discussed. It is concluded that while, for the present, the nuclear option is not considered by the government, this may not be so in the future. The various reasons for this is given and the paper concludes that it may be prudent to keep this option under constant review. (J.P.N.)

  13. Space flight requires nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To be able to solve its future tasks, space flight needs nuclear energy: manned space flight to the Mars is almost unthinkable without nuclear propulsion, and orbital nuclear power plants will be required for the power supply of high-capacity satellites or large space stations. Nuclear energy needs space flight: a nuclear power plant on the moon does not bother man because of the high natural radiation exposure existing there, and could contribute to terrestrial power supply. (orig./HSCH)

  14. Symposium on Nuclear Energy. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy problem poses a big challenge to a developing country like the Philippines. The development of renewable energy sources is not enough. Aware then of the limitations of these energy sources, in spite of arguments against nuclear energy we have no other recourse but to go nuclear. This symposium emphasizes the importance of energy development to attain the country's progress and discusses the pros and economics of nuclear power. (RTD)

  15. Nuclear energy supports sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article is aimed at acceptability, compatibility and sustainability of nuclear energy as non-dispensable part of energy sources with vast innovation potential. The safety of nuclear energy , radioactive waste deposition, and prevention of risk from misuse of nuclear material have to be very seriously abjudged and solved. Nuclear energy is one of the ways how to decrease the contamination of atmosphere with carbon dioxide and it solves partially also the problem of global increase of temperature and climate changes. Given are the main factors responsible for the renaissance of nuclear energy. (author)

  16. Finnish energy outlook - role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New nuclear power partly covers additional electricity demand and replaces retiring power plants in coming decades after 2010. Nuclear energy secures stable, economical and predictable electricity price as well as operation environment for the electricity intensive industry for coming decades. Nuclear energy also reduces the dependence on electricity import of Finland. Nuclear energy partly enables, together with renewable, fulfilment of Finland's Kyoto commitments. Solutions for nuclear waste management are a condition sine qua non for sound nuclear programmes. Funding has been arranged. All this is carried out in Finland in a transparent way and in accordance with any democratic requirements. (author)

  17. Nuclear energy and independence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pro-nuclear lobby in the United Kingdom won its battle. The Report on the Windscale Inquiry strongly endorsed the application by British Nuclear Fuels (a company owned by the government) to set up a plant to reprocess spent oxide fuels from thermal reactors; a motion in Parliament to postpone a decision was heavily defeated. The Windscale Inquiry was an attempt to settle in a civilized manner what has been tried in other countries by demonstrations and violence. In this exercise, a High Court Judge was given the task of assessing an enormous mass of highly complex technical and medical material, as well as economic, social, and political arguments. The outcome is bitterly disappointing to the objectors, all of whose arguments were rejected. Although the question of whether Britain should embark on a fast breeder reactor program was specifically excluded from the Inquiry, it clearly had a bearing on it. A decision not to proceed with the reprocessing plant would have made a fast breeder program impossible; indeed, the Report argues that such a decision would involve throwing away large indigenous energy resources, a manifest advocacy of the fast breeder. Other arguments for the decision to go ahead with the reprocessing plant included the need to keep the nuclear industry alive, and the profit which Britain will make in processing fuels from other countries, particularly Japan. The author comments further on present UK policy, taking a dissenting view, and then comments on the paper, Nuclear Energy and the Freedom of the West, by A.D. Sakharov

  18. Inevitability of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian atomic energy programme that has been launched in the late 1940s, with the courageous vision of Homi Bhabha, had made remarkable progress during the fifties, sixties and till the mid-seventies, leading to the establishment of a comprehensive base of nuclear science, technology and engineering, and the setting up of nuclear power stations. After the Pokharan experiment in 1974, the programme had to face a hostile attitude from the Western powers, with the stoppage of flow of technology and equipment from the West. The programme had shown the resilience to face the challenge, and march ahead, developing a range of indigenous capabilities both within the Department and in the Indian industry, though with a certain loss in the momentum. The successful design, construction and operation of the 100 Mw(t) research reactor Dhruva in Trombay, and the successful commissioning of the Fast Breeder Test Reactor in Kalpakkam, with a unique plutonium-uranium carbide fuel of Indian design, are significant capability demonstrations in the latter phase. On the power front, the twin-unit power stations at Narora (UP) and Kakrapar (Gujarat) have shown excellent performance, with respect to plant availability and capacity factor. This article presents an assessment of the progress achieved so far, amidst the difficulties encountered. Factors accounting for the apparently slow pace of growth are discussed, and the public concerns regarding nuclear safety and safety regulations are also addressed. In a situation where acute power shortages have become a fact of life, and difficulties can be foreseen in the development of coal and hydel resources (which are also limited in extent), the importance of pursuing the nuclear energy option is re-iterated. The need for unstinted government support to the program at this stage is also emphasized. (author)

  19. Civilian PTSD Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapinsky, Alicia C.; Rapport, Lisa J.; Henderson, Melinda J.; Axelrod, Bradley N.

    2005-01-01

    Strong associations between civilian posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) scales and measures of general psychological distress suggest that the scales are nonspecific to PTSD. Three common PTSD scales were administered to 122 undergraduates who had experienced an emotionally salient, nontraumatic event: a college examination. Results indicated…

  20. Present Status of Nuclear Energy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagner, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, SI (2013), s. 89-94. ISSN 0375-8842. [European Nuclear Forum. Praha, 12.05.2013-13.05.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : nuclear energy * nuclear reactors * electricity production Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  1. Communication techniques and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents some thoughts on several factors related to nuclear energy and the way they are presented by the mass media, usually provoking controversy to the Spanish society and thus, undermining public acceptance. Some possibilities for boosting nuclear energy among public opinion are suggested, emphasizing the fact that nuclear power is essential because it is both ecologically and economically sound. (Author)

  2. Topical subjects of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report supplements and extends basic information contained in the seminar report 'Use and risk of nuclear energy' (Juel-Conf-17). The contributions deal with nuclear waste management, measures to avoid the misuse of nuclear fuels, and the properties and use of plutonium. As against the last edition, the subject 'Energy and environment' has been added. (orig.)

  3. Nuclear energy: a sensible alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents information on energy futures; energy demand, energy supplies; exclusive paths and difficult choices--hard, soft, and moderate energy paths; an energy-deficient society; energy shortages; economics of light-water reactors; fast breeder reactor economics; international cooperation in the nuclear field; nuclear recycling; alternative fuels, fuel cycles, and reactors; the nuclear weapons proliferation issue; paths to a world with more reliable nuclear safeguards; the homemade bomb issue; LWR risk assessment; accident analysis and risk assessment; the waste disposal risk; radon problems; risks in our society; health effects of low-level radiation; routine releases of radioactivity from the nuclear industry; low-level radioactivity and infant mortality; the myth of plutonium toxicity; myths about high-level radioactive waste; the aging reactor myth; the police state myth; insurance and nuclear power--the Price-Anderson Act; and solar and nuclear power as partners

  4. Ethics and Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Should the scientist be a morally unbiased person? This is the eternal question asked by many great thinkers interested in science. The answer is hard to find. Scientists are expected to take into consideration the consequences of their actions before they actually start ot act. Sometimes they have to make certain sacrifices in order to help mankind. Unfortunately, we are witnesses of some intelligent, but inhuman and selfish people carrying out their even most destructive ideas. In this paper the relation between scientists and experts in the field of nuclear energy and the public will be discussed. (author)

  5. Nuclear energy and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the opening speech from a national seminar on the uses for nuclear energy in everyday life. The speaker, the public information director for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), stresses the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. He points out that used for peaceful purposes, and prudently, nuclear energy applications have, tremendous benefits to offer mankind in both the industrial world and developing nations

  6. Present market for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present market for nuclear energy is present since nuclear production and electric power generation to the utilization of radioisotopes in medicine and biology. Some data about the main world suppliers to this market are shown. (E.G.)

  7. Speaking of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the 1989 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conference, the Japanese Government pledged an extra-budgetary contribution for a three-year enhanced public information programme. On this basis the programme was developed centering on a series of two-day regional media seminars. It was determined that these seminars were to be informative and educational, and provide balanced, honest background material on the subject of nuclear energy. The speakers chosen were a mix of IAEA and outside experts from around the world. About 500 participants from 20 countries took part over the initial three years of the programme. This document contains a selection of speeches and topics that, is believed, captured the essence of the information presented during the regional seminars

  8. High energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the High Energy Nuclear Physics laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The Laboratory research program is focused on the fundamental physics of interactions, on the new techniques for the acceleration of charged particles and on the nuclei double beta decay. The experiments are performed on the following topics: the measurement of the π0 inclusive production and the photons production in very high energy nuclei-nuclei interactions and the nucleon stability. Concerning the experiments under construction, a new detector for LEP, the study and simulation of the hadronic showers in a calorimeter and the H1 experiment (HERA), are described. The future research programs and the published papers are listed

  9. Development of nuclear energy and nuclear policy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Status of nuclear power development in China, nuclear policy and nuclear power programme are described. Issues regarding nuclear fuel cycle system, radioactive waste management and international cooperation in the field of peaceful use of nuclear energy are discussed

  10. Energy: nuclear energy; Energies: l'energie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lung, M. [Societe Generale pour les Techniques Nouvelles (SGN), 78 - Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2000-11-01

    Convinced that the nuclear energy will be the cleaner, safer, more economical and more respectful of the environment energy of the future, the author preconizes to study the way it can be implemented, to continue to improve its production, to understand its virtues and to better inform the public. He develops this opinion in the presentation of the principal characteristics of the nuclear energy: technology, radioactive wastes, radiation protection, the plutonium, the nuclear accidents, the proliferation risks, the economics and nuclear energy and competitiveness, development and sustainability. (A.L.B.)

  11. Nuclear energy. Risk or advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is controversial. But what's all about really in the controversy? It's about more than safty or electricity prices. Nuclear energy is not only a technical or political question, but also a moral, a human. The discussion enter various rational and irrational arguments, beside straightforward arguments various misleading and mendacious exist. The present publication is comprehensively dedicated to the thema of nuclear energy - its pro and contra - and considers its risks and advantages. Thereby the sources of energy, the processes in the nuclear reactor, and the risk potentials (Harrisburg, Chernobyl, Fukushima) are illustratively and reproducibly presented. Extensively the text explains the forms of the radiation, its doses, and the tolerance of it. Also to the theme waste and final disposal an explaining chapter is dedicated and the question for the exit from nuclear energy elucidated. Finally the author appoints with the question ''How considers mankind nuclear energy world-wide'' the international comparison.

  12. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Myung; Lee, M.K.; Moon, K.H.; Kim, S.S.; Lim, C.Y.; Song, K.D.; Kim, H

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the contribution of nuclear energy to the energy use in the economical way, based on the factor survey performed on the internal and external environmental changes occurred recent years. Internal and external environmental changes are being occurred recent years involving with using nuclear energy. This study summarizes the recent environmental changes in nuclear energy such as sustainable development issues, climate change talks, Doha round and newly created electricity fund. This study also carried out the case studies on nuclear energy, based on the environmental analysis performed above. The case studies cover following topics: role of nuclear power in energy/environment/economy, estimation of environmental external cost in electric generation sector, economic comparison of hydrogen production, and inter-industrial analysis of nuclear power generation.

  13. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the contribution of nuclear energy to the energy use in the economical way, based on the factor survey performed on the internal and external environmental changes occurred recent years. Internal and external environmental changes are being occurred recent years involving with using nuclear energy. This study summarizes the recent environmental changes in nuclear energy such as sustainable development issues, climate change talks, Doha round and newly created electricity fund. This study also carried out the case studies on nuclear energy, based on the environmental analysis performed above. The case studies cover following topics: role of nuclear power in energy/environment/economy, estimation of environmental external cost in electric generation sector, economic comparison of hydrogen production, and inter-industrial analysis of nuclear power generation

  14. Nuclear energy in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy plays a major role in the French economy because of the lack of fossil fuels on the French territory. About 75% of the French electric power is of nuclear origin. This paper gives an analysis of the French public attitude about nuclear energy and the methods used by the nuclear industrialists to better the electro-nuclear image. Communication, advertising and transparency are the best attitudes for a suitable public information and are necessary to reduce the public anxiety after the Chernobyl accident. Television advertising, magazines and organized visits of nuclear installations have allowed to explain the interest of nuclear energy in the environmental reduction of pollutants. However, public information must include the topic about nuclear wastes to remain credible. (J.S.)

  15. Nuclear energy: considerations about nuclear trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general view of historical aspects of nuclear energy and the arrangements to assure its use for peaceful purposes are presented. Then the internal character of nuclear energy in a juride context is demonstrated; some consideration about the international organizations and conventions and the Brazilian Legislation in the nuclear area are examined. It also deals with the political aspects of nuclear trade and the function of IAEA in this are. Furthermore the restrictions imposed by Non-Proliferation Treaty-NPT, the objectures of the Tlatelolco Treaty and ''London Club'' guidelines. Afterwards the bilateral cooperation under taken by countries and its agreements are discussed. Besides some aspects of agreements made between United States, France Germany and Brazil are discussed

  16. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VI. Safety and environmental considerations for licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program report addresses safety and environmental considerations in licensing the principal alternative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles in the United States for large-scale commercial nuclear power plants. In addition, this volume examines the safety and environmental considerations for licensing fuel service centers. These centers, which have been proposed for controlling sensitive fuel-cycle facilities and special nuclear materials, would contain a combination of such facilities as reprocessing plants, fabrication plants, and reactors. For this analysis, two fuel service center concepts were selected - one with power - generating capability and one without

  17. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VI. Safety and environmental considerations for licensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program report addresses safety and environmental considerations in licensing the principal alternative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles in the United States for large-scale commercial nuclear power plants. In addition, this volume examines the safety and environmental considerations for licensing fuel service centers. These centers, which have been proposed for controlling sensitive fuel-cycle facilities and special nuclear materials, would contain a combination of such facilities as reprocessing plants, fabrication plants, and reactors. For this analysis, two fuel service center concepts were selected - one with power - generating capability and one without.

  18. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume III. Resources and fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of uranium supply and the rest of the nuclear fuel cycle to meet the demand for nuclear power is an important consideration in future domestic and international planning. Accordingly, the purpose of this assessment is to evaluate the adequacy of potential supply for various nuclear resources and fuel cycle facilities in the United States and in the world outside centrally planned economy areas (WOCA). Although major emphasis was placed on uranium supply and demand, material resources (thorium and heavy water) and facility resources (separative work, spent fuel storage, and reprocessing) were also considered

  19. Climatic change and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data presented in the different chapters lead to show that nuclear energy ids not a sustainable energy sources for the following reasons: investments in nuclear energy account financing that lacks to energy efficiency programmes. The nuclear programmes have negative effects such the need of great electric network, the need of highly qualified personnel, the freezing of innovation in the fields of supply and demand, development of small performing units. The countries resort to nuclear energy are among the biggest carbon dioxide emitters, because big size nuclear power plants lead to stimulate electric power consumption instead of inducing its rational use. Nuclear energy produces only electric power then a part of needs concerns heat (or cold) and when it is taken into account nuclear energy loses its advantages to the profit of cogeneration installations. Finally nuclear energy is a dangerous energy source, difficult to control as the accident occurring at Tokai MURA showed it in 1998. The problem of radioactive wastes is not still solved and the nuclear proliferation constitutes one of the most important threat at the international level. (N.C.)

  20. Nuclear power vs. solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What should a long-term energy policy strategy look like. Nuclear power is still a controversial issue. Can solar energy be a realistic alternative. The book presents a detailed comparison of the two energy sources, showing that a combined strategy of solar energy and energy conservation is better suited to the future ecological, social and economic needs than nuclear energy. Bauerschmidt's detailed investigation, in which the advantages and drawbacks of the two alternatives are carefully weighed against each other, makes it impossible for anybody to consider nuclear power as the only feasible alternative. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VI. Safety and environmental considerations for licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 6 of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program report addresses safety and environmental considerations in licensing the principal alternative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles in the United States for large-scale commercial nuclear power plants. In addition, this volume examines the safety and environmental considerations for licensing fuel service centers. These centers, which have been proposed for controlling sensitive fuel-cycle facilities and special nuclear materials, would contain a combination of such facilities as reprocessing plants, fabrication plants, and reactors. For this analysis, two fuel service center concepts were selected - one with power-generating capability and one without. This volume also provides estimates of the time required for development of large-scale commercial reactor systems to reach the construction permit application stage and for fuel-cycle facilities to reach the operating license application stage, which is a measure of the relative technical status of alternative nuclear systems

  2. Nuclear Energy: Rise, Fall and Resurrection

    OpenAIRE

    Twena, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This paper charts the rise, fall and potential resurrection of the civilian nuclear power industry over the past fifty years in the UK. The role of actors, interests, institutions and ideas are explored using Baumgartner and Jones’s punctuated equilibrium model of agenda-setting. The study provides some validation of their theory, which posits that the interaction between policy image (how a policy is portrayed) and policy venue (the institutions with jurisdiction over the issue) serves as ...

  3. Energy from nuclear fission(*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripani M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.

  4. Innovative nuclear energy systems roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing nuclear energy that is sustainable, safe, has little waste by-product, and cannot be proliferated is an extremely vital and pressing issue. To resolve the four issues through free thinking and overall vision, research activities of 'innovative nuclear energy systems' and 'innovative separation and transmutation' started as a unique 21st Century COE Program for nuclear energy called the Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainable Development of the World, COE-INES. 'Innovative nuclear energy systems' include research on CANDLE burn-up reactors, lead-cooled fast reactors and using nuclear energy in heat energy. 'Innovative separation and transmutation' include research on using chemical microchips to efficiently separate TRU waste to MA, burning or destroying waste products, or transmuting plutonium and other nuclear materials. Research on 'nuclear technology and society' and 'education' was also added in order for nuclear energy to be accepted into society. COE-INES was a five-year program ending in 2007. But some activities should be continued and this roadmap detailed them as a rough guide focusing inventions and discoveries. This technology roadmap was created for social acceptance and should be flexible to respond to changing times and conditions. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Nuclear energy and a novel energy culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of nuclear energy within the entire system of energy sources is explained. Aspects addressed in this context are siting problems, hostile attitudes towards technological progress, low acceptance by the general public, reactor safety, waste management, and costs. (UA)

  6. Nuclear energy: a sensible alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents in-depth articles on the main issues affecting the use and usefulness of nuclear energy for peaceful domestic purposes. Topics considered include energy futures (a world study), energy demand-energy supplies, an energy-deficient society, energy shortages, the economics of light water reactors (LWRs), fast breeder reactor economics, international cooperation in the nuclear field, nuclear recycling (costs, savings, safeguards), alternative fuels, alternative fuel cycles, alternative reactors, the nuclear weapons proliferation issue, paths to a world with more reliable nuclear safeguards, the homemade bomb issue, LWR risk assessment, accident analysis and risk assessment, the waste disposal risk, radon problems, health effects of low-level radiation, routine releases of radioactivity, plutonium toxicity, and the Price-Anderson Act

  7. Nuclear energy promise or peril?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy will inevitably become an important worldwide issue in the 21. century. The authors are authorities in their own fields and their contributions have been read, discussed and criticized by a wide, international group of experts. The today status of nuclear power is exposed, the authors weigh the pros and cons of nuclear energy. In a near future nuclear energy could play a major role in preventing climate change and atmospheric pollution. The main challenges that put at risk nuclear energy are: nuclear safety, radiation protection, the management of radioactive wastes, the problem of plutonium stocks and the risk of proliferation. For each of these open questions, a specialist makes a precise survey of the situation

  8. Uranium and nuclear energy: 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fourteenth symposium of the Uranium Institute marked the bicentenary of the discovery of uranium, with papers on the history of uranium and its mining, nuclear energy's peaceful applications and its future place. Symposium papers also dealt with the background to the 1990 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, the evidence for global warming, environmental regulations affecting energy supply in the USA, radiation effects, nuclear safety in the USSR, the Indian and Brazilian nuclear programmes, the enrichment fuel fabrication and MOX fuel industries, uranium supply and demand and uranium resources, the implications for nuclear energy of deregulation of electricity supply in the USA, EC and UK, fusion and new fission reactors. (author)

  9. Avoiding dual regulation of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) has successfully negotiated the issuance of a Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters Order that provides for exemption of RW from certain DOE directives. This exemption assures precedence of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in radiation protection, nuclear safety (including quality assurance), and safeguards and security of nuclear materials. This Order is necessary to avoid the unwarranted cost and potential confusion resulting from dual regulation of RW facilities and activities by DOE and NRC. Development of this Order involved a systematic review of applicable DOE directives and NRC requirements to identify potential overlaps and duplication when applied to the RW program. Following this review and extensive negotiations with appropriate DOE organizations responsible for directives development, this Order was issued as HQ 1321.1 on December 22, 1993

  10. Nuclear energy and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual reports are given by CNA subcommittees on codes, standards and practices, economic development, education and manpower, international affairs, nuclear insurance, nuclear safety and environment, public affairs, and technology. (E.C.B.)

  11. Nuclear Energy and Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Méritet, Sophie; Zaleski, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The paper will discuss the possibilities of the development of nuclear energy in the world in the midterm and long term. It will correlate the prospects with the emissions of CO2 and the effects on climate change. In particular it will discuss the problems nuclear energy face to make a large contribution of climate change issue.

  12. Nuclear energy: basics, present, future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricotti M. E

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is conceived for non-nuclear experts, intended as a synthetic and simplified overview of the technology related to energy by nuclear fission. At the end of the paper, the Reader will find a minimal set of references, several of them on internet, useful to start deepening the knowledge on this challenging, complex, debated albeit engaging energy source.

  13. Social Institutions and Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Alvin M.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear technologists can offer an all but infinite source of relatively cheap and clean energy" but society must decide whether the price of eternal vigilance needed to ensure proper and safe operation of its nuclear energy system" is worth the benefits. (Author/AL)

  14. Nuclear Energy in Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the interested non-specialist reader with insights on five major issues associated with nuclear power generation: nuclear development and economics, protection of man and the environment, power plant safety, radioactive waste management and compensation for damage from a nuclear accident

  15. Nuclear energy and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: To date, 370 GW of nuclear power capacity in operation around the world currently produce 16% of world's electricity, which represents the largest share provided by any non-greenhouse gas-emitting source. This results in a significant reduction of the environmental impact of today's electricity generation, and is set to continue doing so in the future. World Energy Outlook 2008 projections indicate an additional 250 GW of nuclear capacity by 2030, a scenario that would stabilise the atmosphere at 450 ppm CO2, thereby limiting global warming to 2 deg C above pre-industrial levels. However the road to long-term deployment of nuclear energy is still paved with numerous obstacles. The first one concerns fuel resources and fuel cycle backend: nuclear energy must become more sustainable in its utilisation of uranium ores, as well as in the management/disposal of nuclear waste. The second one is related to economics and safety issues: nuclear plants must be economically competitive, yet their safety levels must remain of key importance. Additionally, deployment of plants must be undertaken in a manner that can guarantee worldwide non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. Finally, they should help meet anticipated future needs for a broad range of products beyond electricity, such as high-quality process heat for industrial purposes. Generation IV nuclear energy systems are aimed at meeting these challenges by delivering unprecedented performance, thus ensuring nuclear energy's long-term expansion and sustained contribution to world's energy security

  16. Open discussions on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part, economic prospects in the world and in the European Community and their repercussions on energy demand are examined. Supply structure and growth scenari are outlined. Present and potential contribution of nuclear energy to energy supply is developed. The pros and cons are given. In the second part is examined how the production and use of various form of energy including nuclear energy, can affect health and the environment, with special reference to waste of all kinds. Safety problems and risk of accidents are examined in both non nuclear and nuclear sectors. Prospects for a low energy society and economic and social implications of the use of new forms of energy are also discussed

  17. Finnish energy outlook - role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation author deals with production a consumption of electricity in the Finland. New nuclear power partly covers additional electricity demand and replaces retiring power plants in coming decades after 2010. Nuclear energy secures stable, economical and predictable electricity price as well as operation environment for the electricity intensive industry for coming decades. Nuclear energy also reduces the dependence on electricity import of Finland. Nuclear energy partly enables, together with renewable, fulfilment of Finland's Kyoto commitments. Solutions for nuclear waste management are a condition sine qua non for sound nuclear programmes. Funding has been arranged. All this is carried out in Finland in a transparent way and in accordance with any democratic requirements. (author)

  18. Nuclear energy; Le nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  19. Changing Into Civilian Clothes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Two thirds of China’s military industrial research and production capacity has been transferred to civilian use Without a transformation 42 years ago,would there be a brand named"Changhong"in the world? It might be impossible to answer this question. When people use Changhong electric appliances,they might only be aware that these products are from a large internation- al company located in Sichuan Province, southwest China.Many people,including young Changhong employees,know noth- ing about the transformation of the compa- ny four decades ago.

  20. Beyond prometheus and Bakasura: Elements of an alternative to nuclear power in India's response to the energy-environment crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Manu Verghese

    In India, as elsewhere, modern energy-society relations and economic development, metaphorically, Prometheus and the insatiable demon Bakasura, respectively, have produced unprecedented economic growth even as they have ushered in the "energy-environment crisis." Government efforts interpret the crisis as insufficiently advanced modernity. Resulting efforts to redress this crisis reaffirm more economic growth through modern energy-society relations and economic development. The civilian nuclear power renaissance in India, amidst rapidly accelerating economic growth and global climate change, is indicative. It presents the prospect of producing "abundant energy" and being "green" at the same time. This confidence in civilian nuclear power is questioned. It is investigated as proceeding from the modern discourse of "Cornucopianism" and its institutionalization as "modern megamachine organization of society." It is found that civilian nuclear power as energy policy is based on a presumption of overabundance as imperative for viable social and economic development; is predisposed to centralization and secrecy; its institutionalization limits deliberation on energy-society relations to technocratic terms; such deliberation is restrained to venues accessible only to the highest political office and technocratic elite; it fails to redress entrenched "energy injustice;" it embodies "modern technique" fostering the "displaced person" while eclipsing the "complete human personality." Overall, despite its green rhetoric, civilian nuclear power reaffirms the "politics of commodification" and refutes social and political arrangements for sustainability and equity. Alternatives are surveyed as strategies for resistance. They include the DEFENDUS approach for energy planning, the "Human Development and Capability Approach" and the "Sustainable Energy Utility." These alternatives and the synergy between them are offered as avenues to resist nuclear power as a response to the

  1. Nuclear energy: a vital energy choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speaking from the platform of the XIIIth annual session of the International Atomic Energy Agency, at New Delhi, AEC managing director Michel Pecqueur made a solemn appeal to the world community for the decisions which are needed on energy. The present energy crisis can lead the world to a recession and be a factor in grave troubles for peace and balance in the world. The crisis cannot be resolved without accrued recourse to the use of nuclear energy. Two essential themes were outlined: the development of nuclear energy in the world, and the increased reduction of proliferation risks. In concluding, he expressed the hop that with a greater effort in information media, the nuclear fact-of-life would be better accepted by the general public in future, for it is there that lies a brake which may hinder nuclear energy development

  2. The future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Europe is one of the world leaders in nuclear technology advancement. The development of spent fuel reprocessing is but one example of this. This process continues today with the development by France and Germany of the European Pressurised-Water Reactor. Nuclear research and development work is continuing in Europe, and must be continued in the future, if Europe is to retain its world leadership position in the technological field and on the commercial front. If we look at the benefits, which nuclear energy has to offer, in economic and environmental terms, 1 support the view that nuclear is an energy source whose time has come again. This is not some fanciful notion or wishful thinking. There is clear evidence of greater long-term reliance on nuclear energy. Perhaps we do not see new nuclear plants springing up in Europe, but we do see ambitious nuclear power development programmes underway in places like China, Japan and Korea. Closer to home, Finland is seriously considering the construction of a new nuclear unit. Elsewhere, in Europe and the US, we see a growing trend towards nuclear plant life extension and plant upgrades geared towards higher production capacity. These are all signs that nuclear will be around for a long time to come and that nuclear will indeed have a future

  3. Informing parliamentarians on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication contains a selection of the papers presented at an international seminar on informing parliamentarians in the nuclear field. This seminar has been organized by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to respond to important information needs. As a matter of fact, providing clear and accurate information to decision-makers is a key element that contributes to the quality of work for legislation for a safe use of nuclear energy. The sessions dealt with : meeting the information needs of parliamentarians and other elected representatives on nuclear energy questions, actors and their respective roles in the information process, means and tools for communicating information on nuclear energy, case studies in communication with elected officials. Abstracts have been prepared for all of the papers in this volume. (TEC)

  4. Topical questions of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discussion with the general public on reactor safety, environmental protection, and the relevance of nuclear energy for the energy supply - including the increasingly political character of the nuclear energy debate - was a central issue at this meeting of reactor experts which recurred even more often than in recent years and also found its way into the opening and closing speeches. This first report on the reactor meeting, therefore, contains three excerpts from papers read on this issue. (orig./AK)

  5. Nuclear energy: meeting the challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Nuclear Energy - Meeting the Challenges' was the theme of the 25th Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, held in Toronto, Ontario on June 6-9, 2004. The theme has the implication of optimism - that we WILL meet the many challenges needed to overcome if nuclear power is to play a significant role in our energy future. The organizers succeeded in presenting a thorough discussion of the challenges facing the nuclear power industry in Canada with close to 300 delegates attending the three-day event

  6. Beyond the civilian power debate

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Karen E.

    2005-01-01

    This article argues that the European Union is no longer a civilian power; instead it finds itself, like almost every other international actor on the planet, somewhere along a spectrum between two ideal-types of civilian and military power. But instead of debating what the European Union is (civilian power or not), we should move beyond this to analyse and debate what the EU does in international relations. The article suggests a few lines of enquiry to open that debate.

  7. Nuclear Energy and European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest shown by the European Institutions in the energy debates, in which the nuclear energy is included as a key component within the energy mix, is obvious. Climate change and energy supply have pushed some countries to publicly express their interest for developing the nuclear energy. These positions are however in contradiction with some others within the European Union which are a lot more critical towards this type of energy and where face-out policies still prevail. Despite the fact that the use of the nuclear energy will remain within the competence of each Member State, the European Union will continue to play a prominent role in the development of an energy strategy based on a low carbon economy. (Author)

  8. Future of nuclear energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of the easing of worldwide energy supply and demand situation in these years, we believe that research efforts towards the next generation nuclear energy are indispensably necessary. Firstly, the nuclear colleagues believe that nuclear energy is the best major energy source from many points of view including the global environmental viewpoint. Secondly, in the medium- and long-range view, there will once again be a high possibility of a tight supply and demand situation for oil. Thirdly, nuclear energy is the key energy source to overcome the vulnerability of the energy supply structure in industrialized countries like Japan where virtually no fossil energy source exists. In this situation, nuclear energy is a sort of quasi-domestic energy as a technology-intensive energy. Fourthly, the intensive efforts to develop the nuclear technology in the next generation will give rise to a further evolution in science and technology in the future. A few examples of medium- and long-range goals of the nuclear energy research are development of new types of reactors which can meet various needs of energy more flexibly and reliably than the existing reactors, fundamental and ultimate solution of the radioactive waste problems, creation and development of new types of energy production systems which are to come beyond the fusion, new development in the biological risk assessment of the radiation effects and so on. In order to accomplish those goals it is quite important to introduce innovations in such underlying technologies as materials control in more microscopic manners, photon and particle beam techniques, accelerator engineering, artificial intelligence, and so on. 32 refs, 2 figs

  9. Establishment of nuclear prototype testing in the Torrey Pines TRIGA Mark F to verify civilian nuclear submarine power plant reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ECS-Power Systems, Inc. is in the advanced stages of the design and development of a small nuclear reactor-based electrical power generating plant, designated the Autonomous Marine Power Source (AMPS). This power source will be used initially in the SAGA-N a nuclear-powered submarine which can support operations to depths of 600m. The AMPS power supply consists of a 1500 kW low-pressure water-cooled reactor heat source utilizing TRIGA-type U-Zr-H fuel, coupled to a low temperature organic Rankine cycle power conversion system delivering 100 kW(e) to the ship's electrical bus. Verification of the AMPS reactor design parameters will be supported by the assembly and operation of a Nuclear Prototype Test (NPT), to be carried out in the Torrey Pines TRIGA Mark F reactor pool, using many of the components and support facilities of this 1500 kW reactor. The objectives of the NPT test program are to verify the reactor neutronic design and to study the behavior of the reactor under closely approximated neutronic and thermal- hydraulic operating conditions. A key feature of the AMPS reactor, in addition to the inherent safety characteristics of the TRIGA-type fuel, is a passive auxiliary cooling system. One of the objectives of the NPT is to demonstrate operation of the passive cooling system when driven by the TRIGA-fueled nuclear heat source over a wide range of conditions. The NPT will be assembled in the TRIGA Mark F pool, using the existing primary loop, water purification system, instrumentation and control system, and radiation detection instrumentation. AMPS specification core support structures, reactor vessel, headers, reflector, grid plates, and pool cooling unit and decay tank will be provided. Additional instrumentation specific to demonstrating the inherent safety features of the unique AMPS cooling system configuration will be installed. Also, SAGA-N fuel elements and control rods will be used in the NPT. The basic tests to be performed will include: Zero

  10. Economics of nuclear energy

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    While few people now believe that nuclear power would provide ‘power too cheap to meter’, there is still a common perception that nuclear power is a cheap source of electricity. The fact that nuclear power has not come to dominate electricity generation is seen as being due to a combination of public opposition and dealing with the safety issues raised by accidents such as those at Three Mile Island (1978), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The reality is that nuclear power has seldom be...

  11. Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database Fitness and Suitability Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, Brenden [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In 2014, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Science and Technology Innovation (NE-4) initiated the Nuclear Energy-Infrastructure Management Project by tasking the Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) to create a searchable and interactive database of all pertinent NE supported or related infrastructure. This database will be used for analyses to establish needs, redundancies, efficiencies, distributions, etc. in order to best understand the utility of NE’s infrastructure and inform the content of the infrastructure calls. The NSUF developed the database by utilizing data and policy direction from a wide variety of reports from the Department of Energy, the National Research Council, the International Atomic Energy Agency and various other federal and civilian resources. The NEID contains data on 802 R&D instruments housed in 377 facilities at 84 institutions in the US and abroad. A Database Review Panel (DRP) was formed to review and provide advice on the development, implementation and utilization of the NEID. The panel is comprised of five members with expertise in nuclear energy-associated research. It was intended that they represent the major constituencies associated with nuclear energy research: academia, industry, research reactor, national laboratory, and Department of Energy program management. The Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database Review Panel concludes that the NSUF has succeeded in creating a capability and infrastructure database that identifies and documents the major nuclear energy research and development capabilities across the DOE complex. The effort to maintain and expand the database will be ongoing. Detailed information on many facilities must be gathered from associated institutions added to complete the database. The data must be validated and kept current to capture facility and instrumentation status as well as to cover new acquisitions and retirements.

  12. Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database Description and User’s Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, Brenden [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    In 2014, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Science and Technology Innovation initiated the Nuclear Energy (NE)–Infrastructure Management Project by tasking the Nuclear Science User Facilities, formerly the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility, to create a searchable and interactive database of all pertinent NE-supported and -related infrastructure. This database, known as the Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database (NEID), is used for analyses to establish needs, redundancies, efficiencies, distributions, etc., to best understand the utility of NE’s infrastructure and inform the content of infrastructure calls. The Nuclear Science User Facilities developed the database by utilizing data and policy direction from a variety of reports from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Research Council, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and various other federal and civilian resources. The NEID currently contains data on 802 research and development instruments housed in 377 facilities at 84 institutions in the United States and abroad. The effort to maintain and expand the database is ongoing. Detailed information on many facilities must be gathered from associated institutions and added to complete the database. The data must be validated and kept current to capture facility and instrumentation status as well as to cover new acquisitions and retirements. This document provides a short tutorial on the navigation of the NEID web portal at NSUF-Infrastructure.INL.gov.

  13. Nuclear energy and democracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the nuclear controversy in the US and in France shows out the economic consequences of US opponents' action, the economic and social consequences that could result from renunciation to the French nuclear program, and the complexity of technology assessment

  14. An international education agenda in nuclear energy and radioactive waste management for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As many countries have turned to scientific and technological advancements for human well being and national security, there has emerged a pressing need to promote scientific and technological literacy in national work forces. One benefit of this literacy is scientifically informed decision making on issues related to energy conservation in general and nuclear energy in particular. Realizing the need for increased literacy relative to nuclear energy, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the Department of Energy, U.S.A., the Organization of Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) sponsored an international conference on education in the field of radioactive waste management. This paper discusses recommendations made at the conference for developing education materials. Also described is a three-phase international plan for developing school curriculum materials relative to nuclear waste management

  15. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, Julio Cezar; Fonseca, Renato Alves da, E-mail: jrausch@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: rfonseca@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  16. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  17. Nuclear energy - status and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogner, Hans-Holger; MacDonald, Alan

    2007-07-01

    Rising expectations best characterize the current prospects of nuclear power in a world that is confronted with a burgeoning demand for energy, higher energy prices, energy supply security concerns and growing environmental pressures. It appears that the inherent economic and environmental benefits of the technology and its excellent performance record over the last twenty years are beginning to tilt the balance of political opinion and public acceptance in favour of nuclear power. Nuclear power is a cost-effective supply-side technology for mitigating climate change and can make a substantial contribution to climate protection. This paper reviews the current status of nuclear power and its fuel cycle and provides an outlook on where nuclear power may be headed in the short-to-medium run (20 to 40 years from now). (auth)

  18. Report made on behalf of the Foreign Affairs, Defence, and Armed Forces Commission of the law project authorizing the cooperation agreement between the French Republic Government and the Indian Republic Government for the development of nuclear energy peaceful uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report of the French National Assembly first describes the objectives of the development of the civilian nuclear energy in India as a response to energy challenges faced by this country, and the India's need of an international cooperation to enable the development of such an electronuclear program. Then, it comments the relationship between India's access to civilian nuclear cooperation and the evolution of India's position with respect to the non-proliferation international regime, describing the current framework of nuclear cooperation with India, recalling Indian commitments and the decisions taken by international institutions, the decisions of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), and the current non-proliferation international regime. The report then describes the contents of the French-Indian agreement, and the general characteristics of the French civilian nuclear cooperation policy. A synthesis of the discussion of the Commission is given, followed by the bill text, and the texts of several official French and Indian statements

  19. Nuclear energy and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy is one of the essential motives for social and economic development of the humanity. Nuclear energy is a feasible option to stand up to a larger demand of energy, and it is playing, and will continue playing in the future, a decisive role in the debate about climate change and sustainable development, and in the efforts to reduce the CO2 emissions. (Author)

  20. Which nuclear energy for tomorrow?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facing the constant increase of electric power consumption, the authors wonder about the energy sources possibilities. After a synthesis of the fossil fuels and the renewable energies they present the nuclear energy and more specially the new hybrid reactor project (Carlo Rubbia), or ADS (Accelerator Driven System). (A.L.B.)

  1. Nuclear Power on Energy Agenda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The big debate on whether or not to use nuclear power as an energy option has raged among countries like the U.S., Britain, and Germany for decades, with not even the advent and threat of global warming forcing a conclusion. China, however, has always stressed energy diversity and been determined to develop and use this alternative energy source.

  2. Can we fix nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Weinberg discusses some of the history of various aspects of the nuclear industry in light of the accident at Three Mile Island. The siting of commercial nuclear power plants near population centers is a result of opening up nuclear operations at the private sector. Early reactors established as a part of the Manhattan Project were all remote from unknowledgeable populations. When the utilities began to construct nuclear plants, their siting tended to conform to the practices already established for generation plants. With the nearness of nuclear power plants to people, and with media coverage of accidents so widespread, the public perception of risk associated with nuclear energy deserves attention. The primary issue concerning nuclear power plants is, according to Dr. Weinberg, the 15 billion curies in an operating reactor and the possibility of their release. He identifies six characteristics necessary for an acceptable nuclear energy system: technical fixes; physical isolation; separation of generation and distribution; professionalization of the nuclear cadre; heightened security; and, perhaps most difficult, public education about the hazards of radiation. The major alternatives to fission - geothermal, fusion, fossil, and the various forms of solar energy - are discussed briefly

  3. Nuclear energy and sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blix, H. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

    1991-04-01

    After a brief discussion of some of the applications of nuclear techniques in agriculture, medicine, hydrology, and industry, the role of nuclear power in meeting world energy demands within a framework of sustainable development is considered. Special emphasis is given to environmental and safety questions. (Author).

  4. Nuclear energy for environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1990 nuclear energy supplied about 17% of the total electric power produced in the world, what makes it the third most used power source after coal and hydropower. In this paper the advantages of using nuclear power for generating large quantities of electric power are presented

  5. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates. Volume IX is divided into three sections: Chapter 1, Reactor Systems; Chapter 2, Fuel-Cycle Systems; and the Appendixes. Chapter 1 contains the characterizations of the following 12 reactor types: light-water reactor; heavy-water reactor; water-cooled breeder reactor; high-temperature gas-cooled reactor; gas-cooled fast reactor; liquid-metal fast breeder reactor; spectral-shift-controlled reactor; accelerator-driven reactor; molten-salt reactor; gaseous-core reactor; tokamak fusion-fisson hybrid reactor; and fast mixed-spectrum reactor. Chapter 2 contains similar information developed for fuel-cycle facilities in the following categories: mining and milling; conversion and enrichment; fuel fabrication; spent fuel reprocessing; waste handling and disposal; and transportation of nuclear materials.

  6. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates. Volume IX is divided into three sections: Chapter 1, Reactor Systems; Chapter 2, Fuel-Cycle Systems; and the Appendixes. Chapter 1 contains the characterizations of the following 12 reactor types: light-water reactor; heavy-water reactor; water-cooled breeder reactor; high-temperature gas-cooled reactor; gas-cooled fast reactor; liquid-metal fast breeder reactor; spectral-shift-controlled reactor; accelerator-driven reactor; molten-salt reactor; gaseous-core reactor; tokamak fusion-fisson hybrid reactor; and fast mixed-spectrum reactor. Chapter 2 contains similar information developed for fuel-cycle facilities in the following categories: mining and milling; conversion and enrichment; fuel fabrication; spent fuel reprocessing; waste handling and disposal; and transportation of nuclear materials

  7. Living with nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is argued that with the possible exception of hydroelectric power the nuclear option is, on the record to date, the cheapest, the safest and the least environmentally harmful of any existing source of electricity generation. (U.K.)

  8. Benefits of using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to present, especially for high school students, the benefits of the use of nuclear energy, promoting a deeper knowledge of this technology, encouraging critical thinking of students and society around them

  9. Nuclear energy demon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German nuclear power plants (here Grafenrheinfeld, Isar) dispose of large-scale provisions echeloned in depth against release of activity due to incidents. According to human judgement environmental risks can be excluded. The direct risk is explained in the Rasmussen-study and in the German Risk Study Nuclear Power Plants. The Inhaber-study represents an important contribution to the risk assessment. (DG)

  10. Nuclear energy and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over two thirds of the population (68%) believe that nuclear energy is necessary to secure the supply of power. This is one of the results of a representative poll conducted by the Demoscopic Institute Allensbach on behalf of the Nuclear Energy Information Circle of the German Atom Forum. 78% of the population are of the opinion that the power supply is secure for the next 20 years. The significance of nuclear power in today's power supply is, however, grossly underestimated. For example 30% of respondents put the number of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic at four at the most. Many more people than one year ago are now convinced of the environmental compatibility of nuclear power plants. The public debate on nuclear energy is generally judged critically by politicians, journalists and experts: factual and emotional. 54% of the population and 71% of politicians interviewed regard the question of nuclear energy utilisation as a predominantly political decision. Questioned was a representative sample of the population which included politicians, journalists, scientists and energy economists. The results, which were presented at a press conference in Bonn by the economist Renate Koecher, are reviewed. (orig.)

  11. Religious organizations debate nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the history of the religious debate on nuclear energy over the last thirty years. In the 1950s, religious statements recognized the peaceful uses of atomic energy as a blessing from God and called upon world leaders to promote its use. Nuclear energy programmes were launched in this decade. In the 1960s, there was still religious approval of nuclear energy, but questions about ethics arose. It was not until the 1970s, after the oil crisis, that serious questioning and criticism of nuclear energy emerged. This was particularly true in the United States, where the majority of statements originated - especially in 1979, the year of the Three Mile Island accident. Around this time, the World Council of Churches developed the concept of the just, participatory and sustainable society. The meaning and use of these terms in the nuclear energy debate is examined. This paper also compares the balanced debate of the World Council with the case against the plutonium economy prepared by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Three religious statements from the 1980s are examined. A United Church of Canada resolution, critical of nuclear energy, is compared with a favourable report from the Methodist Church in England. Both use similar values: in one case, justice, participation and sustainability; in the other case, concern for others, participation and stewardship. There are not many Catholic statements on nuclear energy. One which is cautious and favourable is examined in detail. It is concluded that the use of concepts of justice, participation and sustainability (or their equivalents) has not clarified the nuclear debate

  12. Nuclear energy: obstacles and promises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy has distinctive merits (sustainable resources, low costs, no greenhouse gases) but its development must overcome serious hurdles (fear of accidents, radio-phobia, waste management). The large unit size of present-day reactors is compatible only with large electrical grids, and involves a high capital cost. Taking into account these different factors, the paper outlines how nuclear energy may contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gases, and which are the most promising developments. (author)

  13. Transmutation and the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the January 2006 State of the Union address, President Bush announced a new Advanced Energy Initiative, a significant part of which is the Global Nuclear Energy Initiative. Its details were described on February 6, 2006 by the U.S. Secretary of Energy. In summary, it has three parts: (1) a program to expand nuclear energy use domestically and in foreign countries to support economic growth while reducing the release of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. (2) an expansion of the U.S. nuclear infrastructure that will lead to the recycling of spent fuel and a closed fuel cycle and, through transmutation, a reduction in the quantity and radiotoxicity of nuclear waste and its proliferation concerns, and (3) a partnership with other fuel cycle nations to support nuclear power in additional nations by providing small nuclear power plants and leased fuel with the provision that the resulting spent fuel would be returned by the lessee to the lessor. The final part would have the effect of stabilizing the number of fuel cycle countries with attendant non-proliferation value. Details will be given later in the paper. Commercial spent fuel recycling, pioneered in the U.S., has not been carried out since the nineteen seventies following a decision by President Carter to forego fuel reprocessing and to recommend similar practices by other countries. However, many nations have continued spent fuel reprocessing, generally using the U.S.-developed PUREX process. The latest to do so are Japan, which began operations of an 800 metric tons (tonnes) per year PUREX reprocessing plant at Rokkasho-mura in northern Honshu in 2006 and China, which recently began operations of a separations pilot plant, also using PUREX. Countries using the PUREX process, recycle the separated plutonium to light water reactors (LWRs) in a mixed plutonium/uranium oxide fuel called MOX. Plutonium recycling in LWRs, which are used for electricity production in all nuclear power nations, reduces

  14. Nuclear Energy, Long Term Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are serious warnings about depletion of oil and gas and even more serious warnings about dangers of climate change caused by emission of carbon dioxide. Should developed countries be called to replace CO2 emitting energy sources as soon as possible, and the time available may not be longer then few decades, can nuclear energy answer the call and what are the requirements? Assuming optimistic contribution of renewable energy sources, can nuclear energy expand to several times present level in order to replace large part of fossil fuels use? Paper considers intermediate and long-term requirements. Future of nuclear power depends on satisfactory answers on several questions. First group of questions are those important for near and intermediate future. They deal with economics and safety of nuclear power stations in the first place. On the same time scale a generally accepted concept for radioactive waste disposal is also required. All these issues are in the focus of present research and development. Safer and more economical reactors are targets of international efforts in Generation IV and INPRO projects, but aiming further ahead these innovative projects are also addressing issues such as waste reduction and proliferation resistance. However, even assuming successful technical development of these projects, and there is no reason to doubt it, long term and large-scale nuclear power use is thereby not yet secured. If nuclear power is to play an essential role in the long-term future energy production and in reduction of CO2 emission, than several additional questions must be replied. These questions will deal with long-term nuclear fuel sufficiency, with necessary contribution of nuclear power in sectors of transport and industrial processes and with nuclear proliferation safety. This last issue is more political then technical, thus sometimes neglected by nuclear engineers, yet it will have essential role for the long-term prospects of nuclear power. The

  15. Nuclear energy, environmental protection and international conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some general and some critical remarks on: nuclear energy as an image for politics; nuclear energy as a model for research planning; nuclear controversy; the principle of precaution in nuclear and radiation protection law; reactor safety on probation; advantages and economy of nuclear energy; communication difficulties; the special role of nuclear energy; the need for European site planning; supervision of fissionable materials; the world's energy household in danger; global structure politics and nuclear energy; nuclear energy with a capacity for social innovations. (HP/LN)

  16. Density content of nuclear symmetry energy from nuclear observables

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Agrawal

    2014-11-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy at a given density measures the energy transferred in converting symmetric nuclear matter into the pure neutron matter. The density content of nuclear symmetry energy remains poorly constrained. Our recent results for the density content of the nuclear symmetry energy, around the saturation density, extracted using experimental data for accurately known nuclear masses, giant resonances and neutron-skin thickness in heavy nuclei are summarized.

  17. Argentine nuclear energy standardization activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has more than 200 Technical Committees that develop technical standards. During April 2004 took place in Buenos Aires the 14th Plenary of the ISO/TC 85 Nuclear Energy Committee. During this Plenary issues as Nuclear Terminology, Radiation Protection, Nuclear Fuels, Nuclear Reactors and Irradiation Dosimetry was dealt with. 105 International delegates and 45 National delegates (belonging to CNEA, ARN, NASA, INVAP, CONUAR, IONICS and other organizations) attended the meetings. During this meeting ISO/TC 85 changed its scope; the new scope of the Committee is 'Standardization in the fields of peaceful applications of nuclear energy and of the protection of individuals against all sources of ionizing radiations'. This work summarizes the most important advances and resolutions about the development of standards taken during this meeting as well as the main conclusions. (author)

  18. Energy Outlook and Nuclear Energy in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mooneon; Kang, Jun-young; Song, Kiwon; Park, Hyun Sun; Park, Chang Kue [Pohang university of science and technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    China receives attention from the whole world as not only have they become a country spending the most energy in the world, but also the amount of energy they need is still increasing. Consequently, many problems related to environmental pollution have occurred in China. Recently, China agreed to reduce carbon emission in order to deal with this issue. Therefore, they need to find energy sources other than fossil fuel; the nuclear energy could be an alternative. In addition, it is considered to be a base load owing to its low fuel cost and continuation of electricity generation. In reality, the Chinese government is planning to build about 400 Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) up to 2050. Therefore, it is expected that China will become a giant market in the nuclear industry. It could give us either chances to join the huge market or challenges to meet not merely nuclear fuel price crisis but competitors from China in the world nuclear power plant market. In any case, it is obvious that the energy policy of China would influence us significantly. Accordingly, we need appropriate prediction of the Chinese nuclear industry to cope with the challenges.

  19. Energy Outlook and Nuclear Energy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    China receives attention from the whole world as not only have they become a country spending the most energy in the world, but also the amount of energy they need is still increasing. Consequently, many problems related to environmental pollution have occurred in China. Recently, China agreed to reduce carbon emission in order to deal with this issue. Therefore, they need to find energy sources other than fossil fuel; the nuclear energy could be an alternative. In addition, it is considered to be a base load owing to its low fuel cost and continuation of electricity generation. In reality, the Chinese government is planning to build about 400 Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) up to 2050. Therefore, it is expected that China will become a giant market in the nuclear industry. It could give us either chances to join the huge market or challenges to meet not merely nuclear fuel price crisis but competitors from China in the world nuclear power plant market. In any case, it is obvious that the energy policy of China would influence us significantly. Accordingly, we need appropriate prediction of the Chinese nuclear industry to cope with the challenges

  20. Sustainable development and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has four chapters .In the first chapter world energy statute and future plans;in the second chapter Turkey's energy statute and future plans; in the third chapter world energy outlook and in the last chapter sustainable development and nuclear energy has discussed in respect of environmental effects, harmony between generations, harmony in demand, harmony in sociapolitic and in geopolitic. Additional multimedia CD-ROM has included

  1. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with current energy issues, environmental aspects of energy, project feasibility evaluation, and activities of international organizations. Current energy issues including activities related with UNFCCC, sustainable development, and global concern on energy issues were surveyed with focusing on nuclear related activities. Environmental aspects of energy includes various topics such as, inter- industrial analysis of nuclear sector, the role of nuclear power in mitigating GHG emission, carbon capture and sequestration technology, hydrogen production by using nuclear energy, Life Cycle Analysis as a method of evaluating environmental impacts of a technology, and spent fuel management in the case of introducing fast reactor and/or accelerator driven system. Project feasibility evaluation includes nuclear desalination using SMART reactor, and introduction of COMFAR computer model, developed by UNIDO to carry out feasibility analysis in terms of business attitude. Activities of international organizations includes energy planning activities of IAEA and OECD/NEA, introduction of the activities of FNCA, one of the cooperation mechanism among Asian countries. In addition, MESSAGE computer model was also introduced. The model is being developed by IAEA to effectively handle liberalization of electricity market combined with environmental constraints

  2. Britain's nuclear energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the mid 1980s the Labour Party's position and clear intention was to phase out nuclear generated power in the UK. BNFL's reprocessing business was singled out for particular criticism. Many argued that this sounded the death knell for an industry with a legacy of negative public opinion and no commercial future. How against this background then was the Rt. Hon Tony Blair able, on 9 June 1999, to state that 'If we were to question the continued operation of Thorp, I think that would not be right. Thorp is an operation with orders now valued at some 12 billion pounds, it provides 6000 skilled jobs, it indirectly supports many more... I do not support the case of those who would like us to abandon Thorp?' Furthermore, in June 1999 the Royal Society stated that, 'it is vital to keep the nuclear option open' and in October of the same year the House of Commons Trade Industry Select Committee went further and advised, 'a formal presumption be made now for the purposes of long-term planning that new nuclear plant may be required in the course of the next two decades'. On 13 July 1999, the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, Rt. Hon Stephen Byers, announced a possible sale of up to 49% of BNFL by a Public Private Partnership. Dare we view this as the genesis of a nuclear renaissance for the United Kingdom? This clear change in political attitude towards the nuclear option has come about as a result of a concerted public and government relations effort over the past ten years. That said, many barriers remain if we are to meet the challenge of delivering new nuclear build in the UK. Public opinion may allow new build but only if the industry demonstrates a track record of safety and environmental stewardship. There will always be the 'not in my back yard' argument so we must be a good neighbour and, most importantly of all, a long-term solution must be found for the disposal of nuclear waste. If the stage is set for the nuclear renaissance, the industry

  3. Nuclear energy: A female technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amongst the important scientific and technological revolutions of history there is none in which women have played such a substantial and many-sided role as in the development of nuclear energy. The birth of nuclear energy is not only due to Marie Curie and Lise Meitner but also to a large number of courageous 'nuclear women' who decided against all sorts of prejudices and resistances in favour of a life in research. Therefore the revolution of the atom has also become the greatest breakthrough of women in natural sciences. This double revolution is the subject of this book. Here the history of nuclear energy itself is dealt with documented with the original work and personal memories of different persons - mainly women - who have been substantially involved in this development. (orig./HP)

  4. High education and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Faculty of Energy of the University 'Politecnica' in Bucharest is the only faculty in Romania in the field of nuclear energy education. With an experience of more than 29 years, the Faculty of Energy offers the major 'Nuclear Power Plants', which students graduate after a 5-year education as engineers in the Nuclear Power Plant major. Among the principal objectives of the development and reshape of the Romanian education system was mentioned the upgrading of organizational forms by introducing the transfer credit system, and starting in the fall '97 by accrediting Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Master education. As a result of co-operation and assistance offered by TEMPUS-SENECA program, the new major is shaped and endowed with a modern curriculum harmonized with UE and IAEA requirements and a modern and performing laboratory. This way the Romanian higher education offers a fully correct and concordant structure with UE countries education. (authors)

  5. Nuclear power: tomorrow's energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France, 76% of electricity is produced by nuclear power. The industry's pricing levels are among the most competitive in Europe. Thanks to its 58 nuclear reactors France enjoys almost 50% energy autonomy thus ensuring a highly stable supply. Equally, as a non-producer of greenhouse gases, the nuclear sector can rightfully claim to have an environmentally friendly impact. Against a background to increasing global demand with predictions that fossil fuels will run out and global warming a central issue, it is important to use production methods which face up to problems of this nature. There is no question that nuclear energy has a vital role to play alongside other energy sources. (authors)

  6. Nuclear energy. Sources and global perspective (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a review of the global nuclear energy. The development of the new generation of the nuclear reactors as well as the advanced nuclear power plants is analysed. The perspectives of the nuclear power development are also analysed

  7. Nuclear energy. Sources and global perspective (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a review of the global nuclear energy. The development of the new generation nuclear reactors as well as the advanced nuclear power plants is analysed. The perspectives of the nuclear power development are also analysed

  8. The nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the lesson provided by the author at the physics summer school. After a recall on the atoms nuclei properties, he explains the nuclear reactor principle, their stability and safety. The fuel cycle is also detailed as the different reactors technologies. The last part deals with the thermonuclear fusion. (A.L.B.)

  9. From nuclear power to fusion nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of thermonuclear fusion, which is over 50 years long, now has come to a stage expected to pave the way to the industrial implementation of fusion energy. The euphoria, which has spread in the society after the success of thermonuclear arms' tests and first fission reactors, has also influenced plasma physicists, which then promised to launch fusion power plants within the next 20 years. However, the science development has shown once again, how cautiously such projections should be treated. Specialists have clearly underestimated the complexity of the task to create a fusion energy source for the Earth conditions. It took several decades of fundamental plasma process research to give birth to a new area of science-the hot plasma physics. Only thanks to the development of this discipline, parameters of fusion installations have gradually approached the diapason, which was of interest for a fusion power reactor. Today the plasma physics has enough theoretical and experimental achievements to transfer, from theory to practice, the issue of constructing the first fusion reactor, with power yielded from fusion reactions exceeding by an order of magnitude the energy spent for supporting the reactor plasma. Physicist have reasons to believe that the prospects of nuclear fusion energy (thermonuclear energy), which is called to eliminate the problem of limited energy resources, could become a reality in the second half of the XXI century

  10. September 11 and Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The terrible September 11 attacks have demonstrated the ability of international terrorists to carry out well-planned and complex operations that can kill thousands of citizens. The potential for biological, chemical and nuclear terrorism has increased and will remain as long as their underlying causes. Nuclear installations could be the targets, or the sources of materials usable for terrorism. Whilst thick containment buildings around nuclear reactors are unlikely to be breached, some installations, such as spent fuel pond are more vulnerable. The safety of nuclear installations must be reconsidered taking into account some new initiating events hitherto considered of very low probability. A resistance against nuclear power plant sabotage by terrorist group penetrating into reactor building, is a controversial topic. Measures against diversion of nuclear materials, which could be used in nuclear terrorism, must be reviewed. The danger of diversion from giant military stocks of highly enriched uranium and plutonium by far exceeds that from peaceful use of nuclear energy. Measures to neutralize these stocks, such as dilution of highly enriched uranium, should be speeded up and have a priority in public concern. As for the nuclear power stations, public should be informed about the recommendations of IAEA for better physical protection of nuclear materials prepared in 1999 (INFCIRC 225/Rev.4) and about Additional protocol to inadequate Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials from 1980, which is in a process of ratification. For acceptable nuclear future public must be aware that all required measures to eliminate unacceptable risks resulting from terrorist activity against nuclear installations will be undertaken. (author)

  11. Invisible nuclear; converting nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book consists of 14 chapters which are CNN era and big science, from East and West to North and South, illusory nuclear strategy, UN and nuclear arms reduction, management of armaments, advent of petroleum period, the track of nuclear power generation, view of energy, internationalization of environment, the war over water in the Middle East, influence of radiation and an isotope technology transfer and transfer armament into civilian industry, the end of nuclear period and the nuclear Nonproliferation, national scientific and technological power and political organ and executive organ.

  12. Energy supply without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a first phase of work (1979-1980), the four energy paths were developed as an attempt to describe on a technical basis in quantitative terms, and combine in a consistent picture, the variety of opinions then prevailing in the Federal Republic with respect to future energy supply structures. The social compatibility of energy supply systems was the subject of investigation in the early eighties by two groups of scientists working on behalf, and following a suggestion, respectively, of the German Federal Ministry for Research and Technology, i.e., one group headed by K.M. Meyer-Abich and B. Schefold, and another group at the Juelich Nuclear Research Center. The final report by the Meyer-Abich/Schefold group, which was written for public release, is a book entitled 'Die Grenzen der Atomwirtschaft' (The Limits to the Nuclear Economy). This latter book came out in spring of 1986 and soon played a major role in the energy policy debate after the Chernobyl disaster. In their conclusions the authors clearly express themselves against using nuclear power on the grounds that it was a socially incompatible source of energy. This article compairs the energy scenarios K and S described in the book with the energy paths 2 and 3 of the Fact Finding Committee on Future Nuclear Energy Policy. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear energy in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography was prepared by the Scientific Library, Nuclear Training Department of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission for scientists and researchers interested in nuclear energy in the Philippines. This sixth supplement consists of eighty-six (86) entries, mostly research reports of the scientists of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission. The entries are arranged alphabetically by titles under their respective subject headings together with their bibliographic data consisting of author, title of publication, volume, data and pages. A brief annotation or a summary of the article follows. An author index is provided to facilitate prompt retrieval of the particular research information

  14. The Future of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current nuclear energy represents 23.5% of the total electrical power available within the OECD countries. This is the energy offering the lowest costs to generate, it does not emit greenhouse-effect fumes nor does it contribute to global warming, however, it does generate radioactive and toxic waste which society perceives as an unacceptable risk. For this reason the development of new nuclear installation in Europe is at a stand still or moving backward. Truthful information and social participation in decisions is the best way to achieve the eradication of the social phobia produced by this energy source. (Author)

  15. CYBER HOSTILITIES: CIVILIAN DIRECT PARTICIPATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Iulian VOITAȘEC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The manner in which hostilities are being conducted has changed in recent years. The battle field has transpired beyond the physical realm and now has a virtual component. Because of this, it is now easier than ever for civilians to get involved in hostilities. International Humanitarian Law applies to all situations of armed conflict and according to the principle of distinction, the parties to the conflict must, at all times, distinguish between civilians and combatants. The problem arises when the line between combatants and civilians starts to get blurry. Direct civilian participation in hostilities has been addressed in both Additional Protocols to the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and in 2009 the International Committee of the Red Cross published the Interpretive guidance on the notion of Direct Participation in Hostilities under international humanitarian law. Another document that addresses the problem of civilian direct participation is the Tallinn Manual on the International Law Applicable to Cyber Warfare prepared by an international group of experts at the invitation of the NATO Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence in 2013. The guide prepared by the ICRC addresses the problem of civilian direct participation during conventional situations of armed conflict, while the Tallinn Manual addresses direct participation in situations of cyber warfare. The purpose of this paper is to study the application of civilian direct participation to situations of cyber warfare.

  16. Hydrogen Production Using Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. Nuclear generated hydrogen has important potential advantages over other sources that will be considered for a growing hydrogen share in a future world energy economy. Still, there are technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes that need to be addressed through a vigorous research and development effort. Safety issues as well as hydrogen storage and distribution are important areas of research to be undertaken to support a successful hydrogen economy in the future. The hydrogen economy is gaining higher visibility and stronger political support in several parts of the

  17. Nuclear power and energy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the rapid depletion of conventional energy sources such as coal and oil and the growing world demand for energy the question of how to provide the extra energy needed in the future is addressed. Relevant facts and figures are presented. Coal and oil have disadvantages as their burning contributes to the greenhouse gases and they will become scarcer and more expensive. Renewable sources such as wind and wave power can supply some but not all future energy requirements. The case made for nuclear power is that it is the only source which offers the long term prospect of meeting the growing world energy demand whilst keeping energy costs close to present levels and which does not add to atmospheric pollution. Reassurance as to the safety of nuclear power plants and the safe disposal of radioactive wastes is given. (UK)

  18. The nuclear energy: a future energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beginning of civil use of nuclear energy is resumed and the different steps of nuclear power utilization to produce electricity are given. The accelerations, the petroleum crisis in 1973, and the brakes such Chernobyl accident or Three Mile Island accident are explained. The competitiveness of nuclear power plants in front of fossil fuels power plants explains the stability of their utilization as well as the energy independence that they bring. The disadvantages remain the public opinion against a possible accident, the problem of nuclear waste storage and the privatization of electricity companies in a lot of countries where the investments favour the natural gas power plants because of the less expansive costs and the shorter payback period. In developing countries, nuclear power meets others obstacles. The financial difficulties and the debts of these countries reduce or declare void the advantages of nuclear electricity production and they do not always satisfy to the required technological competences. To fight against these obstacles, nuclear industry has to improve again the economic performances and to increase the safety and the environment protection to make the public reticence fall. (N.C.). 8 refs

  19. Nuclear Energy. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy (see note) developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas. The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  20. The public and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explain why an individual or public opinion is for or against the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, one should not consider only the dimension of the risk involved, as experts on radiation protection and safety will often do. Many other dimensions should be considered, all the more as the nuclear problem is gaining importance on a national level, becoming the topic of the day in the press and other media and the subject of definite standpoints on the part of political parties and social groups. An investigation carried out by the Protection Division of the French Atomic Energy Commission has made it possible to specify the socio-cultural dimensions at the origin of the attitudes taken on the nuclear problem in France. The nuclear topic was therefore compared with other current topics of interest to public opinion; this comparison was made possible by means of an attitude survey covering various social groups. A model of social perception was thus developed. (author)

  1. Nuclear energy activities in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description of the nuclear energy activities in Mexico is presented. The most important of these are related to the operation of Unit-1 of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant and the construction of Unit-2, both 654MWe (net) boiling water reactors (GE, Mark II). The research and development activities as well as the local specialized technical services capacity are described. Participation in the design of simplified light water reactors and the activities related to siting studies for future nuclear power plants and engineering for installation of low and medium level radioactive waste are also presented. Application of radioisotopes in industry and medicine is described the research and development activities related to them as well as the future plans for the utilization of nuclear energy in power generation are briefly discussed. 1 tab., 2 figs

  2. Nuclear energy - some aspects; Energia nuclear - alguns aspectos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandeira, Fausto de Paula Menezes

    2005-05-15

    This work presents a brief history of research and development concerning to nuclear technology worldwide and in Brazil, also information about radiations and radioactive elements as well; the nuclear technology applications; nuclear reactor types and functioning of thermonuclear power plants; the number of existing nuclear power plants; the nuclear hazards occurred; the national fiscalization of nuclear sector; the Brazilian legislation in effect and the propositions under proceduring at House of Representatives related to the nuclear energy.

  3. Society response to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy demand in the world is growing increasingly, among other factors due to economic development. Every way of producing electricity has got their own drawbacks and has implicit environmental impact. Among all the energy sources, nuclear energy is the most polemic because of the way it is presented by the mass media. This aspect provokes controversy to occidental societies which reject this kind of energy with arguments normally based on a wrong and insufficient knowledge of the matter. The antinuclear discourse, promoted late in the seventies, has gone deeply into the collective social unconscious and has undermined public acceptance of nuclear energy due to the fact, deeply exploited by antinuclear groups, of linking nuclear energy with the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In this sense, it is important to mention that in Japan there was a profound resentment and opposition to nuclear energy, because the memory of the nuclear bombings was permanently alive. However when the Japanese government told its people that this energy was necessary to boost their industrial development, Japanese citizens in an unprecedented attitude of patriotism overcame their most antagonist feelings, in order to contribute to the industrial development of their country. The result was that most of them voted in favour. Presently Japan gets 30% of its energy by means of 56 nuclear power plants and 1 more is under construction. Antinuclear groups took as their best emblem the accident of Chernobyl to justify their opposition to the nuclear power plants. The manipulation of this accident has been one of the most shameful in the nuclear history. It is widely known among the experts that the reactor used in Chernobyl was a type of military plutonium converter with a positive temperature reactivity coefficient, which made very dangerous its functioning. Any nuclear regulatory commission in democratic and responsible countries would have never authorized the use of this reactor

  4. NUCLEAR ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Nataša TOMIC

    2010-01-01

    In this paper are analyzed prospects for nuclear energy utilization in the future paying special attention to the protection of environment. Shadow of global crisis appeared over all of us during these days. The most important story in media in 2009. in all countries of the world was economic crisis, with fight against terorism, as well as the protection of the Planet Earth. More and more energy is needed, but as the branch of economy, energy is the greatest pollutant of environment. Environm...

  5. Nuclear energy and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis of this paper is that the world will need more energy and not less in the coming decades but that this enormous energy consumption entails dangers to the environment not only locally but regionally and internationally through the emissions from the burning of fossil fuels which now provide 85% of the world's commercial energy supply. The solution to this problem is nuclear power. It does not contribute to global warming. 12 figs

  6. Nuclear and solar energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this chapter are restricted to a synopsis of the major uses of molten salts in direct energy production processes, nuclear and solar. Topics discussed include nuclear technologies, fission reactors, molten salts, fuels, process operations and support studies, fuel reprocessing and nonreactor molten salt processes, molten salts for fusion reactors, solar applications, semiconductor electrodeposition and anodization with molten salts, photoelectrochemical cell studies, and thermally regenerative electrochemical systems

  7. Nuclear energy for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It composed of 15 parts, which are energy resource, knowledge on nuclear energy, nuclear fuel cycle, present condition of nuclear power generation, the necessity of nuclear power generation, safety of nuclear power generation, current situation of major foreign countries, generation and disposal of waste of radiation, management of waste of radiation, commentary on insistence related waste of radiation, management of waste of radiation in major foreign countries, radiation and daily life, international organization on nuclear energy, diplomacy cooperation of nuclear energy and extra major interesting of nuclear energy and waste of radiation.

  8. How competitive is nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic competitiveness of nuclear energy will be crucial for determining its future share in world electricity production. In addition, the widespread liberalization of power markets, in particular in OECD countries, reinforces the role of commercial criteria in technology selection . The recently published IEA/NEA study on Projected Costs of Generating Electricity: 2010 Edition (IEA/NEA, 2010) provides important indications regarding the relative competitiveness of nuclear energy in OECD member countries as well as in four non-OECD countries (Brazil, China, Russia and South Africa). The results highlight the paramount importance of discount rates and, to a lesser extent, carbon and fuel prices when comparing different technologies. Going beyond this general finding, the study also shows that the relative competitiveness of nuclear energy varies widely from one major region to another, and even from country to country. While the study provides a useful snapshot of the costs of generating electricity with different technologies, it does not provide an absolute picture of the competitiveness of nuclear energy. Like any study, Projected Costs of Generating Electricity makes a number of common assumptions about discount rates as well as carbon and fuel prices. In addition, its calculations are based on a methodology that is referred to as the levelised cost of electricity (LCOE), which assumes that all risks are included in the interest or discount rate, which determines the cost of capital. In other words, neither the electricity price risk for nuclear and renewables, nor the carbon and fuel price risk for fossil fuels such as coal and gas, receive specific consideration. The decisions of private investors, however, will depend to a large extent on their individual appreciations of these risks. The competitiveness of nuclear energy thus depends on three different factors which may vary greatly from market to market: interest rates, carbon and fuel prices, and

  9. Marketing nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown how the nuclear industry can present itself to the American public in a more favorable light. Two pieces of writing concerning the same event, the reactor accident at the Enrico Fermi reactor near Detroit, Michigan in 1966, is analyzed for clarity and readability. Seven principles of persuasive communication, as outlined by R.H.S. Crossman who was in charge of Allied psychological warfare in Europe during World War II, are quoted along with examples of their violation, and suggestions given how they might be improved. 10 refs

  10. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to analyze how the economics of nuclear power generation are affected by the change in nuclear environmental factors and then, to suggest desirable policy directions to improve the efficiency of the use of nuclear energy resources in korea. This study focused to analyze the impact of the change in 3 major nuclear environmental factors in Korea on the economics of nuclear power generation. To do this, environmental external cost, nuclear R and fund, and carbon emission control according to UNFCCC were selected as the major factors. First of all, this study evaluated the impacts on the health and the environment of air pollutants emitted from coal power plant and nuclear power plant, two major electric power generating options in Korea. Then, the environmental external costs of those two options were estimated by transforming the health and environmental impact in to monetary values. To do this, AIRPACTS and 'Impacts of atmospheric release' model developed by IAEA were used. Secondly, the impact of nuclear R and D fund raised by the utility on the increment of nuclear power generating cost was evaluated. Then, the desirable size of the fund in Korea was suggested by taking into consideration the case of Japan. This study also analyzed the influences of the fund on the economics of nuclear power generation. Finally, the role of nuclear power under the carbon emission regulation was analyzed. To do this, the econometric model was developed and the impact of the regulation on the national economy was estimated. Further efforts were made to estimate the role by developing CGE model in order to improve the reliability of the results from the econometric model

  11. Medium energy nuclear data for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The types of medium energy nuclear data required for applications are discussed. Features of analysis tools, consisting of both detailed nuclear model codes and simple formulas based on nuclear systematics are presented. The activities of the Medium Energy Nuclear Data Working Group (MENDWG) are described including the recent benchmark comparison of nuclear model codes. 40 refs., 7 figs

  12. Nuclear energy from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global energy demand is increasing. Sound forecasts indicate that by the year 2020 almost eight thousand million people will be living on our planet, and generating their demand for energy will require conversion of about 20 thousand million tonnes of coal equivalents a year. Against this background scenario, a new concept for energy generation elaborated by nuclear scientists at CERN attracts particular interest. The concept describing a new nuclear energy source and technology intends to meet the following principal requirements: create a new energy source that can be exploited in compliance with extremely stringent safety requirements; reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive waste; substantially reduce the size of required radwaste repositories; use easily available natural fuels that will not need isotopic separation; prevent the risk of proliferation of radioactive materials; process and reduce unwanted actinides as are generated by the operation of current breeder reactors; achieve high efficiency both in terms of technology and economics. (orig./CB)

  13. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Cheng; Tsang, M B; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy released by splitting Uranium and Thorium isotopes into two, three, four, up to eight fragments with nearly equal size are studied. We found that the energy released come from equally splitting the $^{235,238}$U and $^{230,232}$Th nuclei into to three fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model is employed to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for the excited nuclei. Weighing the the probability distributions of fragments multiplicity at different excitation energies for the $^{238}$U nucleus, we found that an excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u is optimal for the $^{235}$U, $^{238}$U, $^{230}$Th and $^{232}$Th nuclei to release nuclear energy of about 0.7-0.75 MeV/u.

  14. Potential strategic consequences of the nuclear energy revival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    politically as nuclear energy. New nuclear power entrant states have heard the message from major suppliers that nuclear power is prestigious. This received wisdom has been a strong motivator. The major supplier states also have powerful economic and alliance motivations to pursue peaceful nuclear cooperation agreements. Large nuclear reactors cost several billion dollars or euros and thus mean big business. These sales may be a relatively small fraction of other lucrative commercial and military transactions. For instance, the chamber of commerce or the equivalent business group tries to leverage major government-to-government nuclear agreements to promote non-nuclear sales to recipient states. Increased military sales or stronger military alliances can be associated with nuclear deals. More acquisition of conventional arms by nuclear recipient states may stimulate such sales to neighboring states, thereby potentially spurring or exacerbating regional arms races. As a result, developing states would channel more scarce resources from productive pursuits in the civilian economy to the military. Major suppliers may want to connect nuclear deals to construction of military bases in and joint military exercises with recipient states. Nuclear deals might come as a first step, or sometimes as a second or third one. Neighbors will tend to look for protection from major powers to counter perceived security threats from states that develop a nuclear infrastructure that has a latent nuclear weapons capability. Some states under threat may ask for formal nuclear extended deterrence and other security assurances from nuclear-armed states. As the world becomes more globalized and more multi-polar, it is urgent to examine seriously what risk reduction measures are needed as the world appears on the verge of a nuclear energy revival. (author)

  15. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author compares the per capita power consumption of Kenya with that of some more developed countries and makes a plea for the greater utilization of nuclear power to augment natural resources in the developing world. He considers nuclear energy first for its educational uses and then for its commercial and industrial uses. With reference to the requirements of Kenya, the questions of costs and economic reactor size are discussed. The author insists that unless Africa makes use of the immense resources offered by atomic energy, the continent will be limited to an extremely slow development, incompatible with the needs of present-day man. (author)

  16. 77 FR 67809 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC)....

  17. 75 FR 13269 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC)....

  18. 78 FR 70932 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC)....

  19. 78 FR 76599 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of... that the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC) will be renewed for a two-year period beginning...

  20. 75 FR 67351 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC)....

  1. 78 FR 29125 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC)....

  2. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, J. R. [ed.

    1977-01-01

    The topics considered in the seven sessions were nuclear methods in atmospheric research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in tracer applications; energy exploration, production, and utilization; nuclear methods in environmental monitoring; nuclear methods in water research; and nuclear methods in biological research. Individual abstracts were prepared for each paper. (JSR)

  3. Nuclear energy in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Plan Energetico Nacional de 1983' (1983 National Energy Program)(PEN-83) was approved recently by the Spanish Government and presented to the 'Cortes Espanolas' (Spanish Parliament) in May 1984. The PEN-83 is being discussed at present in the Parliament and it is possible that some modifications be introduced, but expectedly will be rather limited and minor. PEN-83 covers the period 1983-1992. It includes a comparative analysis of the evolution and situation in OECD countries and in Spain. In Spain the offer, supply and consumption of primary energy and of the interrelation with other economic indicators, such as the gross domestic product, inflation rate and unemployment compared with that of the industrialized OECD countries, has shown a much lower capability to adapt its structure to the energy price increases

  4. Utility and risk of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report contains lectures of a seminar that was arranged by the programme group nuclear power and environment of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich . The items were: 1) Do we need nuclear energy. An attempt at a system analytic answer. 2) Energy production by means of nuclear fission. 3) The nuclear power plants. 4) Nuclear energy and radiation hazard. 5) Safety of nuclear power plants. (RW)

  5. Nuclear energy. Kernenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1994-10-01

    The Administrative Court of Braunschweig judges the Ordinance on Advance Funding of Repositories (EndlagervorausleistungsVO) to be void. The Hannover Regional Court passes a basic judgment concerning the Gorleben salt mine (repository) and an action for damages. The Federal Administrative Court dismisses actions against part-permits for the Hanau fuel element fabrication plant. The Koblenz Higher Administrative Court dismisses actions against a part-permit for the Muelheim-Kaerlich reactor. 31st Amendment of the German Criminal Code passed, involving amendments in environmental criminal code, defined in the 2nd amendment to the Act on Unlowful Practices Causing Damage to the Environment (UKG); here: Amendments to the law relating to the criminal code and penal provisions governing unlawful conduct in the operation of nuclear installations. (orig.)

  6. CYBER HOSTILITIES: CIVILIAN DIRECT PARTICIPATION

    OpenAIRE

    Dan-Iulian VOITAȘEC

    2016-01-01

    The manner in which hostilities are being conducted has changed in recent years. The battle field has transpired beyond the physical realm and now has a virtual component. Because of this, it is now easier than ever for civilians to get involved in hostilities. International Humanitarian Law applies to all situations of armed conflict and according to the principle of distinction, the parties to the conflict must, at all times, distinguish between civilians and combatants. The problem arises ...

  7. Nuclear Energy Today - Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeting the growing demand for energy, and electricity in particular, while addressing the need to curb greenhouse gas emissions and to ensure security of energy supply, is one of the most difficult challenges facing the world's economies. No single technology can respond to this challenge, and the solution which policy-makers are seeking lies in the diversification of energy sources. Although nuclear energy currently provides over 20% of electricity in the OECD area and does not emit any carbon dioxide during production, it continues to be seen by many as a controversial technology. Public concern remains over its safety and the management of radioactive waste, and financing such a capital-intensive technology is a complex issue. The role that nuclear power will play in the future depends on the answers to these questions, several of which are provided in this up-to-date review of the status of nuclear energy, as well as on the outcome of research and development on the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor technologies

  8. Nuclear energy and the media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author believes that it is very important for the public to understand the scientific and engineering realities of nuclear energy systems, so that their support for or their opposition to energy policy decisions will not be based on false premises. While there do exist widespread misconceptions about the safety of nuclear energy, these misconceptions spring from the high degree of emphasis placed on engineered safety by the nuclear energy community in their communications with the public. That this situation continues to exist is largely the result of either a failure of the technocrats to require their professional communicators to learn the elements of the subject or a refusal of these communicators to do so, combined with an underestimation on the part of both groups of public capacity for understanding. The nuclear energy community's concern about public acceptance of its product is to a certain extent misplaced at the present time. Its communication efforts have been image-oriented and generalized and have eschewed technical rigour. The important issue of scientific and engineering illiteracy, especially among those groups with significant input to policy decisions, is being neglected

  9. Nuclear energy and ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In his speech on the occasion of the ''25th Jubilee Beznau'' celebrations of the NOK, the Bishop of Sitten discussed the connection between ethics and atomic energy within the larger framework of power generation and use, its risks and possibilities of conflicts

  10. Nuclear energy and process heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy generated in fission reactors is a versatile commodity that can, in principle, satisfy any and all of mankind's energy needs through direct or indirect means. In addition to its dominant current use for electricity generation and, to a lesser degree, marine propulsion, nuclear energy can and has been used for process heat applications, such as space heating, industrial process heating, and seawater desalination. Moreover, a wide variety of reactor designs has been employed to this end in a range of countries. From this spectrum of experience, two design approaches emerge for nuclear process heating, (NPH): extracting a portion of the thermal energy from a nuclear power plant (NPP) (i.e., creating a combined heat and power, or CHP, plant) and transporting it to the user, or deploying dedicated nuclear heating plants (NHPs) in generally closer proximity to the thermal load. While the former approach is the basis for much of the current NPH experience, considerable recent interest exists for the latter, typically involving small, innovative reactor plants with enhanced and passive safety features. The high emphasis on inherent nuclear safety characteristics in these reactor designs reflects the need to avoid any requirement for evacuation of the public in the event of an accident, and the desire for sustained operation and investment protection at minimum cost. Since roughly 67% of mankind's primary energy usage is not in the form of electricity, a vast potential market for NPH systems exists, particularly at the low-to-moderate end-use temperatures required for residential space heating, and several industrial applications. Although only about 0.5% of global nuclear energy production is presently used for NPH applications, an expanded role in the 21st century seems inevitable, in part, as a measure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality. While the technical aspects of many NPH applications are considered to be well proven, a

  11. Civilian radioactive waste management program plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This revision of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan describes the objectives of the Civilian Radioactive Waste management Program (Program) as prescribed by legislative mandate, and the technical achievements, schedule, and costs planned to complete these objectives. The Plan provides Program participants and stakeholders with an updated description of Program activities and milestones for fiscal years (FY) 1998 to 2003. It describes the steps the Program will undertake to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site in 1998; prepare the Secretary of Energy`s site recommendation to the President in 2001, if the site is found to be suitable for development as a repository; and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2002 for authorization to construct a repository. The Program`s ultimate challenge is to provide adequate assurance to society that an operating geologic repository at a specific site meets the required standards of safety. Chapter 1 describes the Program`s mission and vision, and summarizes the Program`s broad strategic objectives. Chapter 2 describes the Program`s approach to transform strategic objectives, strategies, and success measures to specific Program activities and milestones. Chapter 3 describes the activities and milestones currently projected by the Program for the next five years for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; the Waste Acceptance, Storage and Transportation Project; ad the Program Management Center. The appendices present information on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the history of the Program; the Program`s organization chart; the Commission`s regulations, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in geologic Repositories; and a glossary of terms.

  12. Nuclear energy by way of 110 questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of this updated edition is to provide the general public with information on the civil nuclear policy in France. Twelve chapters deal with following topics: nuclear economy, nuclear industry, nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear waste, nuclear safety, radioactivity and health, nuclear accidents in the world, nuclear energy and environment, inspection planning, information, nuclear proliferation prevention, nuclear energy in the world and in the future. At the end of each chapter the authors answer a set of questions corresponding to the general pubic queries. (N.T.)

  13. Public communication and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article tries to explain why on occasion the public's perception of nuclear is more negative than of any other form of electricity generation or issue related to this field, when in reality public opinion has been gradually losing interest in nuclear in recent years. In fact, we could say that as nuclear loses its interest, its presence in the media grows in relation to the environmental aspects of electricity generation, of which nuclear form a part. Of the accusations directed at the nuclear industry, probably the most frequent one concerns the lack of transparency and lack of information on its activities. This article shows how the nuclear sector is probably one that generates more and better information on its own business. However, the lack of social acceptance of this activity, and of the energy business in general, is recognized. To solve this, mention is made of the example of France and Finland, where a well planned communication policy, implemented on a sustained basis over time, and the invitation to society to take part in these issues have favored a substantial improvement of public acceptance of electric generation sources, and specifically the nuclear option. The article ends with some recommendations that could be applied to Spain. (Author)

  14. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki Dong; Lee, M. K.; Moon, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lim, C. Y.; Kim, H. S

    2000-12-01

    This study identified the role of nuclear energy in the following three major aspects. First of all, this study carried out cost effectiveness of nuclear as a CDM technology, which is one of means of GHG emission reduction in UNFCCC. Secondly, environmental externalities caused by air pollutants emitted by power options were estimated. The 'observed market behaviour' method and 'responses to hypothetical market' method were used to estimate objectively the environmental external costs by electric source, respectively. Finally, the role of nuclear power in securing electricity supply in a liberalized electricity market was analyzed. This study made efforts to investigate whether nuclear power generation with high investment cost could be favored in a liberalized market by using 'option value' analysis of investments.

  15. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study identified the role of nuclear energy in the following three major aspects. First of all, this study carried out cost effectiveness of nuclear as a CDM technology, which is one of means of GHG emission reduction in UNFCCC. Secondly, environmental externalities caused by air pollutants emitted by power options were estimated. The 'observed market behaviour' method and 'responses to hypothetical market' method were used to estimate objectively the environmental external costs by electric source, respectively. Finally, the role of nuclear power in securing electricity supply in a liberalized electricity market was analyzed. This study made efforts to investigate whether nuclear power generation with high investment cost could be favored in a liberalized market by using 'option value' analysis of investments

  16. Bibliography of studies for the Salt Repository Project Office of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, April 1978-July 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE/CH/10140-5 is an annotated bibliography of approved reports that have been produced for the US Department of Energy Salt Repository Project Office of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program since April 1978. This document is intended for use by the US Department of Energy, state and local officials, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, contractors to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, concerned citizens, and others who need a comprehensive listing of reports related to a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document consists of a main report listing, appendixes with Work Breakdown Structure listings, and a topical report

  17. Bibliography of studies for the Salt Repository Project Office of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, April 1978-May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE/CH/10140-05 is an annotated bibliography of approved reports that have been produced for the US Department of Energy Salt Repository Project Office of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program since April 1978. This document is intended for use by the US Department of Energy, State and local officials, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, contractors to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, concerned citizens, and others who need a comprehensive listing of reports related to a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document consists of a main report listing, appendixes with Work Breakdown Structure lists, and a topical index

  18. Bibliography of studies for the Salt Repository Project Office of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, April 1978-December 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is an annotated bibliography of approved reports that have been produced for the US Department of Energy Salt Repository Project Office of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program since April 1978. This document is intended for use by the US Department of Energy, State and local officials, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, contractors to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, concerned citizens, and others who need a comprehensive listing of reports related to a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document consists of a main report listing, appendixes with Work Breakdown Structure lists, and a topical index

  19. Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) provided a brief presentation on the state of energy demand in the United States and discussed the improving economics for new nuclear power plants. He discussed the consolidation of companies under deregulation and the ability of these larger companies to undertake large capital projects such as nuclear power plant construction. He discussed efforts under way to support a new generation of plants but noted that there needs to be greater certainty in the licensing process. He discussed infrastructure challenges in terms of people, hardware, and services to support new and current plants. He stated that there needs to be fair and equitable licensing fees and decommissioning funding assurance for innovative modular designs such as the PBMR. He concluded that NRC challenges will include resolving 10 CFR Part 52 implementation issues, establishing an efficient and predictable process for siting, COL permits and inspection, and an increasing regulatory workload

  20. Nuclear Energy Has To Communicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bararu, Corina [Nuclearelectrica, 65 Polona St., Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    The silence has been kept too long. Nuclear energy has to implement some strong communication strategies in order to firstly attract the most valuable employees, and secondly to develop on the long term. The paper presents arguments and means for the nuclear energy companies to communicate on the inside and the outside of their organizations. Firstly, the internal communication of a nuclear power plant organization is as important as completing it's object of activity, it is a basic element for a strong image of the company and of the industry on the outside. If (executive) employees acknowledge the importance of the company and industry they work for, surely this message will be supported by external parties as well. Employees do not simply work in an office like theirs, but for a nuclear plant and they should become the first exponents of the industry, with respect to the theory that every employee is a marketer of their business. In order to accomplish this, a strong organization has to be built and healthy work environment has to be put into place. The most time and cost efficient methods, in order to attain high group adherence of the employees are group-ware applications, developed on an intranet platform, inside the company. Another means of motivation of the present and future employees are interactive exchange programs between companies from different countries. An issue that stands in the way of opening the way to communicate with the public is the degree of technicality implied by the energy industry, in particular the nuclear sector. Secondly, the external communication of such a company may solve - on the long term - the current personnel crisis in the Nuclear Energy sector, if targeted toward this direction. An external communication strategy would raise the level of public acceptance regarding the nuclear energy. One of the means of putting it into practice would have to be: internships for students, in order to allow young people to test being

  1. Nuclear Energy Has To Communicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The silence has been kept too long. Nuclear energy has to implement some strong communication strategies in order to firstly attract the most valuable employees, and secondly to develop on the long term. The paper presents arguments and means for the nuclear energy companies to communicate on the inside and the outside of their organizations. Firstly, the internal communication of a nuclear power plant organization is as important as completing it's object of activity, it is a basic element for a strong image of the company and of the industry on the outside. If (executive) employees acknowledge the importance of the company and industry they work for, surely this message will be supported by external parties as well. Employees do not simply work in an office like theirs, but for a nuclear plant and they should become the first exponents of the industry, with respect to the theory that every employee is a marketer of their business. In order to accomplish this, a strong organization has to be built and healthy work environment has to be put into place. The most time and cost efficient methods, in order to attain high group adherence of the employees are group-ware applications, developed on an intranet platform, inside the company. Another means of motivation of the present and future employees are interactive exchange programs between companies from different countries. An issue that stands in the way of opening the way to communicate with the public is the degree of technicality implied by the energy industry, in particular the nuclear sector. Secondly, the external communication of such a company may solve - on the long term - the current personnel crisis in the Nuclear Energy sector, if targeted toward this direction. An external communication strategy would raise the level of public acceptance regarding the nuclear energy. One of the means of putting it into practice would have to be: internships for students, in order to allow young people to test being a

  2. Nuclear energy. Unmasking the mystery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standing Committee on Energy, Mines and Resources of the House of Commons of Canada undertook a study of the economics of nuclear power in Canada. This is its report on the evidence it heard. It found that maintaining the nuclear power option is vital to Canada's interests. The Committee recommended that: the schedule for establishing a commercial high-level radioactive waste repository be advanced; the basic insurance coverage on nuclear facilities be raised; the federal government increase its financial support of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL); AECL expand its research and development activities, including non-nuclear R and D; AECL be allowed to hold a minority interest in any component of AECL that is privatized; any new entity created by privatization from AECL be required to remain under Canadian control; the Atomic Energy Control Act be altered to allow the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) to recover costs through licensing fees and user charges, while the AECB's parliamentary appropriation is increased to offset remaining costs of operations; membership on the AECB be increased from one to five full-time members, retaining the present four part-time members; the AECB hold its hearings in public; the name of the AECB be changed so it is more readily distinguishable from AECL; the AECB establish an office of public information; and that federal and provincial governments cooperate more closely to identify opportunities where more efficient use of electricity could be achieved and to promote those measures that can attain the greatest economic efficiency

  3. Answers to Questions: Nuclear Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    Electricity is an increasingly important part of our everyday lives. Its versatility allows one to heat, cool, and light homes; cook meals; watch television; listen to music; power computers; make medical diagnosis and treatment; explore the vastness of space; and study the tiniest molecules. Nuclear energy, second to coal, surpasses natural gas,…

  4. Public awareness of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many countries in the world are in the process of getting acquainted with nuclear power nowadays. As in all structural changes nuclear power option leads to various discussions with a reason or not. The public has certain reasonable worries related to problem brought by the TMI and Chernobyl Nuclear Power Accidents. The disasters caused by atomic bombs and these three accidents affected the people in a very adverse manner. Meeting energy demand is of high importance in Turkey because, the country has dynamic economic development and rapid population growth. And the World Energy Council has concluded that growth based only fossil fuels and hydroelectric generation would not be sustainable and an expanded role of nuclear energy must be considered. The future of nuclear power utilization in all countries in the world will depend mainly on how the general public perceives it. This makes the public information a very sensitive and an important issue and it should be taken very seriously. Experts should consider the socio-economic structure of the country before taking the appropriate steps. The way the message is given, is, as important as the message itself. This should be done in the following manner. 1) Be friendly, talk friendly; 2) Don't forget, the target need to be informed; 3) Don't describe, but explain using healthy discussion; 4) Don't simplify, but clarify; 5) Don't try to use statistics, but tell the truth; 6) Don't use confused numbers but give examples; 7) Don't hesitate, be stable; 8) Don't use details, decide on a central message. In this manner, current activities in the area of nuclear energy and civil society should be pursued and their results carefully evaluated. Participation of public representatives, from primary school students to universities and decision makers should remain in current activities

  5. Nuclear Energy: Combating Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global electricity demand is expected to increase strongly over the coming decades, even assuming much improved end-use efficiency. Meeting this demand while drastically reducing CO2 emissions from the electricity sector will be a major challenge. Given that the once-significant expectations placed on carbon capture and storage are rapidly diminishing, and given that hydropower resources are in limited supply, there are essentially only two options to de-carbonise an ever increasing electricity sector: nuclear power and renewable energy sources such as wind and solar PV. Of these two options, only nuclear provides firmly dispatchable base-load electricity, since the variability of wind and solar PV requires flexible back-up that is frequently provided by carbon-intensive peak-load plants. The declining marginal value of electricity production and the security of electricity supply are additional issues that must be taken into account. Nuclear power plants do, however, face challenges due to their large up-front capital costs, complex project management requirements and difficulties in siting. As technologies with high fixed costs, both nuclear power and renewables must respond to the challenge of acquiring long-term financing, since investments in capital-intensive low-carbon technologies are unlikely to be forthcoming in liberalised wholesale markets. In order to substantially de-carbonise the electricity systems of OECD countries, policy-makers must understand the similarities, differences and complementarities between nuclear and renewables in the design of future low-carbon electricity systems. The value of dispatchable low-carbon technologies, such as hydro and nuclear, for the safe and reliable functioning of electricity systems must also be recognised. Should the de-carbonisation of electricity sectors in the wake of COP 21 become a reality, nuclear power might well be the single most important source of electricity by 2050, thanks mainly to the contribution

  6. Nuclear energy significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is devoted to nuclear energy, to its acceptability, compatibility and sustainability. Nuclear energy is non-dispensable part of energy sources with vast innovation potential. The safety of nuclear energy, radioactive waste deposition, and prevention of risk from misuse of nuclear material have to be very seriously adjudged and solved. Nuclear energy is one of the ways how to decrease the contamination of atmosphere with carbon dioxide and it solves partially also the problem of global increase of temperature and climate changes. Given are the main factors responsible for the renaissance of nuclear energy. (author)

  7. Nuclear energy, radiation and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few decades, energy has been the subject of much debate. Energy is the backbone of technology and economic development. Today, most machines run on electricity and they are needed to make anything and everything. Hence, our energy requirements have spiraled in the years following the industrial revolution. This rapid increase in use of energy has created problems of demand and supply in addition to the environmental consciousness which picked momentum in last decades of 20th century. The impending crisis the world over due to overuse of nonrenewable energy sources to reduce this gap shall soon lead to a situation for all concerned to take a prudent decision to tap other sources of energy, including relatively new renewable sources. Future economic growth crucially depends on the long-term availability of energy from sources that are affordable, accessible and environmentally friendly. The drive for more energy has had the happy consequences of spawning new technologies and improving earlier ones. Emphasis on renewable sources has resulted in viable harnessing of solar, wind and tidal energies. Even though these sources offer relatively clean energy, their potential to supply reliable energy in large scale in an economically viable way is limited. Nuclear energy offers a major source of commercial energy, which is economic, reliable and environmentally benign

  8. Christianity and nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaemann, R.

    1980-01-01

    The author is of the opinion that the ethical aspect suffers no rival points of view. From that he concludes the necessity of a fair public discussion about the rank and urgency of the goods, values, and interests in hand. He calls for a moratorium: before the final option on the future way of energy supply, the scientific and economic competitional advantage of the strict course of large-scale technologies must be balanced. In order to render medium-scale technologies comparable at all from the economic and technical point of view, alternative technology research ought to be promoted for a couple of years under the same financial conditions and with the same expenditure of personnel.

  9. Can Slovakia to survive without nuclear energy? State and perspectives of nuclear energetics. Attitudes of public to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation authors deals with the review of the state of nuclear energetics in the Slovak Republic. Perspectives of nuclear energy and renewable sources of energy as well as attitudes of public to nuclear energy are discussed

  10. Nuclear Energy: Pros and Cons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early this year the Government of the Republic of Lithuania has basically approved and submitted to the Parliament (Seimas) for their approval the new draft of the National Energy Strategy. It still envisages two scenarios for the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. In accordance with one of them, the nuclear plant is to be shut down fairly soon. The greatest advantage of any commercial nuclear plant is that the share of fuel in the production cost is low. That is why efforts are being made to operate nuclear power plants to their full capacity all over the world. At the meantime a system of legal regulation and organisational management has been created and is functioning in Lithuania; Lithuania has joined the key international agreements that regulate the use of nuclear energy; a lot has been done to upgrade safety and reliability of the Ignalina NPP. Lithuania is going to stick to the policy of openness and co-operation with international organisations concerned, at the same time defends the interests of country's population

  11. Civilian radioactive waste management program plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This revision of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan describes the objectives of the Civilian Radioactive Waste management Program (Program) as prescribed by legislative mandate, and the technical achievements, schedule, and costs planned to complete these objectives. The Plan provides Program participants and stakeholders with an updated description of Program activities and milestones for fiscal years (FY) 1998 to 2003. It describes the steps the Program will undertake to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site in 1998; prepare the Secretary of Energy's site recommendation to the President in 2001, if the site is found to be suitable for development as a repository; and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2002 for authorization to construct a repository. The Program's ultimate challenge is to provide adequate assurance to society that an operating geologic repository at a specific site meets the required standards of safety. Chapter 1 describes the Program's mission and vision, and summarizes the Program's broad strategic objectives. Chapter 2 describes the Program's approach to transform strategic objectives, strategies, and success measures to specific Program activities and milestones. Chapter 3 describes the activities and milestones currently projected by the Program for the next five years for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; the Waste Acceptance, Storage and Transportation Project; ad the Program Management Center. The appendices present information on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the history of the Program; the Program's organization chart; the Commission's regulations, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in geologic Repositories; and a glossary of terms

  12. Theological reflections on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is for a long time that, in this journal also, nuclear energy has been discussed in great detail with respect to its scientific, technical and engineering aspects. In connection with the public controversy about electricity generation being performed on an nuclear basis, the political, sociological and ethical aspects of nuclear energy have been discussed, too. As a third category, also theology plays an important role in this controversy. A theological discussion must include an explicit presentation of the relationship between mankind, nature and God, and must cover the insights and necessities of this relationship. On the basis of assumed rules, the referency system for this is not subject to scientific debate since the points of view as well as the methodology and the presuppositions forming part of theology generally appear strange to ordinary science. The controversy about nuclear energy has become a matter about which also the World Council of Churches as well as the National Council of Churches, and many other religious groups are concerned. For this reason, the editorial department of this journal would like to inform its scientific readers about how this controversy appears from theological standpoints. The author's considerations are based on the understanding of nature, mankind and God as it has been handed down in the Hebrew bible an in the Septuagint; it is confined to categories which are derived from our religious heritage. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 KSCH

  13. (Nuclear) energy policy in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With this report the German Federal Diet submits the final results of the opinion-forming and decision-making process concerning the recommendations made by the investigation committee 'Future Nuclear Energy Policy' in June 1980. By means of this report it is intended to point out to an interested public the difficult and time-consuming process of parliamentary decision-making. This report is also to be seen as the final opinion delivered on the recommendations made by the investigation committee. The recommendations were to continue to pursue the peaceful use of nuclear energy, the necessity and technical justifiability of which had basically been approved by all parliamentary groups. In view of the import of the subject and in recognition of the work done by the investigation committee, the German Parliament has thoroughly discussed the report and has reviewed the analyses and recommendations in conjunction with other political fields to be considered. One part of the recommendations was taken up almost unanimously. As far as the safety of nuclear installations is concerned, the investigation committee could not submit any new findings which would give reasons for modifying the hitherto positive assessment of the safety of nuclear installations. The recommendations of the investigation committee mainly referred to the decision-making process in the field of energy policy which will effect the next decade. What fundamental decisions are to be made until when was pointed out as well as the findings and experience to be made until then. (orig./HP)

  14. Hydrogen economy and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global energy outlooks based on present trends, such as WETO study, give little optimism about fulfilling Kyoto commitments in controlling CO2 emissions and avoiding unwanted climate consequences. Whilst the problem of radioactive waste has a prominence in public, in spite of already adequate technical solutions of safe storage for future hundreds and thousands of years, there s generally much less concern with influence of fossil fuels on global climate. In addition to electricity production, process heat and transportation are approximately equal contributors to CO2 emission. Fossil fuels in transportation present also a local pollution problem in congested regions. Backed by extensive R and D, hydrogen economy is seen as the solution, however, often without much thought where from the hydrogen in required very large quantities may come. With welcome contributions from alternative sources, nuclear energy is the only source of energy capable of producing hydrogen in very large amounts, without parallel production of CO2. Future high temperature reactors could do this most efficiently. In view of the fact that nuclear weapon proliferation is not under control, extrapolation from the present level of nuclear power to the future level required by serious attempts to reduce global CO2 emission is a matter of justified concern. Finding the sites for many hundreds of new reactors would, alone, be a formidable problem in developed regions with high population density. What is generally less well understood and not validated is that the production of nuclear hydrogen allows the required large increases of nuclear power without the accompanied increase of proliferation risks. Unlike electricity, hydrogen can be economically shipped or transported by pipelines to places very far from the place of production. Thus, nuclear production of hydrogen can be located and concentrated at few remote, controllable sites, far from the population centers and consumption regions. At such

  15. Risk analysis in nuclear energy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear energy like other energy sources risk is present. The risk assessment and comparison with proposed risk criteria in nuclear energy user country, need to be measured for nuclear power plant site selection, construction, operation and maintenance. Experience of long-term nuclear energy user countries need to be used in the risk assesment and criteria creation. In article are shown results of risk assessment in many human activities. Nuclear power plants accidents categorization is given. There are accidents shown which occurred at nuclear power plants. Basic information about probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear power plant site evaluation are given. (author)

  16. Nuclear energy - a spiritual perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: the search for energy (historical); from uranium to the bomb (radioactivity); the principle of fission (atomic structure; isotopes); fear of nuclear reactors (types of reactor; antinuclear groups; economic argument; socio-political argument; psychological argument); Capra and the dance of life; elements and ethers (life ethers and subtle elements); origins of matter (etheric forces; the primal matrix); the balance of gold and silver (etheric forces, which can only be directly perceived in the spirit); Lucifer, Ahriman and nuclear accident; Christ's resurrection and the essence of matter; the opening of the abyss; the divine mother. (U.K.)

  17. Nuclear energy - myth and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation remains one of the least understood or accepted forms of energy in society as far as the general population is concerned. People are jubilant when radiation is successful in detecting or destroying cancer cells, but protest loudly when a shipment of radioactive waste moves through their community. The public fears nuclear technology because the information they hear only relates to the risk. To dispel public anxiety and allow the nuclear industry to move forward, clear and rational information, which paints a more balanced picture of the benefits of radiation and the risks involved, is needed. (author)

  18. Energy and the need for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the headings: fuel and mankind (world population estimates); fuel supply and demand (world nuclear and total primary energy demand forecasts); oil dependence; oil, gas and coal (world oil production and consumption; world coal reserves); nuclear option (consumption of nuclear energy in Western Europe; nuclear plant worldwide at December 1981; uranium reserves 1981); renewable resources; price of energy; Britain's need for nuclear power. (U.K.)

  19. US Department of Energy nuclear energy research initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) that has been established to address and help overcome the principal technical and scientific issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy in the United States. (author)

  20. Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses

    OpenAIRE

    Min LIU; Wang, Ning; Li, Zhuxia; Zhang, Fengshou

    2010-01-01

    The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

  1. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 75 papers were presented on nuclear methods for analysis of environmental and biological samples. Sessions were devoted to software and mathematical methods; nuclear methods in atmospheric and water research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in biology and medicine; and nuclear methods in energy research

  2. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, J R [ed.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 75 papers were presented on nuclear methods for analysis of environmental and biological samples. Sessions were devoted to software and mathematical methods; nuclear methods in atmospheric and water research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in biology and medicine; and nuclear methods in energy research.

  3. Nuclear energy propulsion in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy can be used under two different ways in spatial applications, first the most common is the production of electricity that is used to supply an electrical propulsion system. The second way is the thermal propulsion where the nuclear reactor is considered as a heat exchanger whose purpose is to heat a gas that will expand in a nozzle. The thermal propulsion implies that the nuclear fuel and some reactor components will have to sustain very high temperatures ( > 2000 K) and important temperature gradients over short time intervals. Because of size and mass constraints propulsion reactors require highly enriched uranium fuels, in such cases power densities reach 1 to 10 MW / liter of core, which is by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude bigger than in a PWR-type power reactor, this represents a true technological challenge. In this article 2 projects: ERATO concerning spatial power generation and MAPS concerning thermal propulsion are presented. (A.C.)

  4. Suppose we renounce nuclear energy.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the highlights of the report by the 'Commission on Consequences' set up by the Swedish Government. The study is based on the reference alternative with the aim to complete as many as twelve nuclear power plants by 1990, whereas the abolition alternative provides the abolition of nuclear energy within the next ten years. To renounce nuclear power plants means to abolish electric power. The consequences of the abolition for society, economy, and environment are discussed by three forecasts of the electric power demand. Coal has increasingly to bear the main burden of supply, more heating plants have to be built, houses being heated nowadays by means of electric power have to be converted to oil and the dependency on oil imports would rather be increased than reduced. (UA)

  5. Antineutrino monitoring of spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Huber, Patrick; Kopp, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Military and civilian applications of nuclear energy have left a significant amount of spent nuclear fuel over the past 70 years. Currently, in many countries world wide, the use of nuclear energy is on the rise. Therefore, the management of highly radioactive nuclear waste is a pressing issue. In this letter, we explore antineutrino detectors as a tool for monitoring and safeguarding nuclear waste material. We compute the flux and spectrum of antineutrinos emitted by spent nuclear fuel eleme...

  6. Nuclear energy and environment of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper included following contents: China needs to develop nuclear energy; China pays attention to the radiation environment management; the role of China National Environmental Protection Agency in nuclear energy and the environment

  7. The sustainable development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wide use of nuclear energy has promoted the development of China's economy and the improvement of people's living standards. To some extent, the exploitation of nuclear power plants will solve the energy crisis faced with human society. Before the utilization of nuclear fusion energy, nuclear fission energy will be greatly needed for the purpose of alleviating energy crisis for a long period of time. Compared with fossil fuel, on the one hand, nuclear fission energy is more cost-efficient and cleaner, but on the other hand it will bring about many problems hard to deal with, such as the reprocessing and disposal of nuclear spent fuel, the contradiction between nuclear deficiency and nuclear development. This paper will illustrate the future and prospect of nuclear energy from the perspective of the difficulty of nuclear development, the present reprocessing way of spent fuel, and the measures taken to ensure the sustainable development of nuclear energy. By the means of data quoting and comparison, the feasibility of sustainable development of nuclear energy will be analyzed and the conclusion that as long as the nuclear fuel cycling system is established the sustainable development of nuclear energy could be a reality will be drawn. (author)

  8. Nuclear re-think [The case for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1970s, Patrick Moore, a co-founder of Greenpeace, believed that nuclear energy was synonymous with nuclear holocaust. Thirty years on, his views have changed because nuclear energy is the only non-greenhouse-gas-emitting power source that can effectively replace fossil fuels while satisfying the world's increasing demand for energy. Today, 441 nuclear plants operating globally avoid the release of nearly 3 billion tonnes of CO2 emissions annually-the equivalent of the exhaust from more than 428 million cars. Concerns associated with nuclear energy are discussed including costs of nuclear energy, safety of nuclear plants, radioactive waste management, vulnerability of nuclear plants to terrorist attacks and diversion of nuclear fuel for weaponization. It is concluded that nuclear energy is the best way to produce safe, clean, reliable baseload electricity, and will play a key role in achieving global energy security. With climate change at the top of the international agenda, we must all do our part to encourage a nuclear energy renaissance

  9. Man, environment and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acceptability of nuclear fission as energy source is governed by three factors, economic, ecological and sociological. It is necessary to account first for the economic context and for the state of natural resources: gradual exhaustion of fossil fuels as a result of ever-increasing demands. The biological risk concept which determines the acceptable industrial application level is the second factor to be considered. The danger of radioactive contamination is almost inexistent except in the accident hypothesis, and power stations are built with excessive safeguards against hypothetical accidents. The idea of systematic processing of all working effluent to reduce radioactive waste discharge by several orders of magnitude (zero release principle) is being examined. At present, the waste discharge levels are always well below the limits set by the CIPR and present no danger to the population. The only serious problems seem to be the disposal of radioactive wastes and the plutonium non-proliferation question bound up with breeder reactors. Whereas vitrification, the new 'Synroc' process, offer some solution to the radioactive waste conditioning problem, responsibility for the proliferation of nuclear weapons rests with the human conscience alone. The development of nuclear power stations over several decades seems to present no inacceptable danger and offers the best compromise between growth and minimum risk requirements. The third factor to be accounted for is the opposition displayed by a fraction of the population to the development of nuclear energy for peaceful applications

  10. Nuclear energy risks and benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report was prepared as part of the Ohio River Basin Energy Study (ORBES), a multidisciplinary policy research program. The study region consists of all of Kentucky, most of West Virginia, and substantial portions of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. By 1988, coal-fired electrical generating capacity in the region is expected to total over 100,000 MWe, versus about 11,000 MWe projected for nuclear-fueled capacity by that year. Thus, the ORBES emphasis was on coal-fired generation. This report attempts to fill in some of the gaps in the relative lack of emphasis on the risks and benefits of nuclear electricity production in the study region. It covers the following topics: (1) basic facts about radiation, (2) an overview of the current regulatory framework of the nuclear industry, (3) health risks associated with electricity production by LWRs, (4) the risks of nuclear proliferation, terrorism, and sabotage, (5) comparative economics and healthy risks of coal versus nuclear, and (6) the March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island

  11. Nuclear energy - some regulatory aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industry is often perceived by the public as being uniquely hazardous. As a consequence, the demands placed upon a nuclear regulatory agency invariably include sorting out the valid from the invalid. As the public becomes better informed, more time should become available for regulating the industry. The Canadian nuclear safety philosophy relies upon fundamental principle and basic criteria which licensees must show they are meeting at all stages in the development of a nuclear facility. In reactors, the concept of defence in depth involves the use of well-qualified personnel, compliance with national and international engineering codes and standards, the separation of process and safety systems, frequent testing of safety systems, redundancy in monitoring, control and initiation systems, multiple barriers against fission product release, and strict enforcement of compliance measurements. The Atomic Energy Control Board is writing a set of licensing guides to cover the whole nuclear fuel cycle; however, these will not lead to the impsition of a 'design by regulation' approach in Canada. (LL)

  12. The nuclear energy, future of ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the author, nuclear energy is the energy of future, because it's the only one which allows to satisfy energy needs increases in the 21st century with a pollution reduction. This book presents the nuclear paradox which is: nuclear electricity is the most contested energy source by ecologists, while in reality, it is the cleanest energy, the most surveyed and the most respectful of environment among the massively available energies. (A.B.)

  13. Nuclear energy - the way ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed, after a general introduction, under the headings: current situation; losses and accidents; safety factors; mistaken estimates (risks over-stated); licensing; transport and storage (of spent fuel and radioactive wastes); performance considerations; plant size; costs; developing countries; political considerations; OECD policy (energy policy, government policies, public relations); nuclear proliferation; media role; conclusions (mainly political, safety and public relations considerations). (U.K.)

  14. What can nuclear energy do for society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    The utilization of nuclear energy and the predicted impact of future uses of nuclear energy are discussed. Areas of application in electric power production and transportation methods are described. It is concluded that the need for many forms of nuclear energy will become critical as the requirements for power to supply an increasing population are met.

  15. Nuclear power in the World Energy Outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, I shall discuss nuclear power in the context of the International Energy Agency's World Energy Outlook. I shall also draw on the implications for nuclear power of three major energy policy issues: sustainability, climate change and electricity market competition. Those issues were addressed in detail in a recent IEA publication, entitled Nuclear Power. (author)

  16. Nuclear Reactions at Intermediate Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Shyam, Radhey

    2015-01-01

    In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ is large enough ($\\sim$ 0.3 - 0.5) to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss applications of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  17. Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. Volume I. Part I. Overview and current program plans; Part II. Information required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Misson Plan is divided into two parts. Part I describes the overall goals, objectives, and strategy for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. It explains that, to meet the directives of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the DOE intends to site, design, construct, and start operating a mined geologic repository by January 31, 1998. The Act specifies that the costs of these activities will be borne by the owners and generators of the waste received at the repository. Part I further describes the other components of the waste-management program - monitored retrievable storage, Federal interim storage, and transportation - as well as systems integration activities. Also discussed are institutional plans and activities as well as the program-management system being implemented by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. Part II of the Mission Plan presents the detailed information required by Section 301(a) of the Act - key issues and information needs; plans for obtaining the necessary information; potential financial, institutional, and legal issues; plans for the test and evaluation facility; the principal results obtained to date from site investigations; information on the site-characterization programs; information on the waste package; schedules; costs; and socioeconomic impacts. In accordance with Section 301(a) of the Act, Part II is concerned primarily with the repository program

  18. Nuclear energy prevents ecological disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The booklet containing 6 pages brings forth 10 arguments and facts called upon to convince the reader that the nuclear energy is the main if not the only means to avoid catastrophic ecological consequences caused by the increasing non-usage of the organic fuel. By the middle of the 2lst century the triple growth of the worldwide energy consumption will inevitably cause a significant increase Of CO2, NO2, SO2 emission and reduction of oxygen content in the Earth atmosphere if it is satisfied as before due to the combustion of coal, petrol and gas. Significant changes of the environment are turning out to be a serious threat to the existence of mankind. Such dispiriting fact and some other negative factors inherent in the so-called 'fire' energy oppose to the remarkable advantages already demonstrated by the nuclear energy supposed to become the energy of the 21st century. The text will contain the tables and color pictures to further the perception of the material set forth in the booklet. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy and social impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic development and population increase are boosting a new process of energy demand all around the world which implies also a protection of the environment and, consequently, the reduction of emissions of CO2, a challenge that has to be solved. Fossil fuels represent the cheapest costs in capital and have as common features that their exploitation is based on largely known technologies, having developed a big experience in construction, operation and maintenance. However they are big environment polluters. Nuclear energy fulfils three of the main objectives that should be pursued for a steady development: 1. It does not emit Greenhouse gases. 2. It is the cheapest produced energy. 3. It guarantees a security in its supply due to the fact, among others, that it is not conditioned by external factors. However, as any other energy source, nuclear power has its own drawbacks. Some are real and some are fictitious. For this reason it becomes necessary to improve the social image of this source of energy, so as to counteract the negative consequences of the antinuclear discourse, promoted late in the seventies that has permanently undermined public acceptance

  20. Energy from nuclear fission an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    De Sanctis, Enzo; Ripani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview on nuclear physics and energy production from nuclear fission. It serves as a readable and reliable source of information for anyone who wants to have a well-balanced opinion about exploitation of nuclear fission in power plants. The text is divided into two parts; the first covers the basics of nuclear forces and properties of nuclei, nuclear collisions, nuclear stability, radioactivity, and provides a detailed discussion of nuclear fission and relevant topics in its application to energy production. The second part covers the basic technical aspects of nuclear fission reactors, nuclear fuel cycle and resources, safety, safeguards, and radioactive waste management. The book also contains a discussion of the biological effects of nuclear radiation and of radiation protection, and a summary of the ten most relevant nuclear accidents. The book is suitable for undergraduates in physics, nuclear engineering and other science subjects. However, the mathematics is kept at a level that...

  1. Energy policy and challenges: which part for the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides many data and charts on the energy domain: energy consumption, energy demand, the reserves, the climatic changes, the renewable energies, the energy cost, the radioactive wastes management, the new nuclear technology. (A.L.B.)

  2. Nuclear energy - perception, policy and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arguments in favour of nuclear power are presented. It is argued that the impact of nuclear energy on the world is already substantial and that the risks have been overstated. The public perception of nuclear technology in general is often shaped by poor education, a hostile, sensation-seeking media and confusion between the peaceful nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear weapons. Nuclear policy in Australia is reviewed

  3. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study consists of various issues as follows; electricity price regulation in the liberalized electricity market, establishment of carbon emission limit in national electricity sector, the role of nuclear power as an future energy supply option, the future prospect of CO2 capture and sequestration and current research status of that area in Korea, and Preliminary economic feasibility study of MIP(Medical Isotopes Producer). In the price regulation in the liberalized electricity market, the characteristic of liberalized electricity market in terms of regulation was discussed. The current status and future projection of GHG emission in Korean electricity sector was also investigated. After that, how to set the GHG emission limit in the national electricity sector was discussed. The characteristic of nuclear technology and the research in progress were summarized with the suggestion of the possible new application of nuclear power. The current status and future prospect of the CO2 capture and sequestration research was introduced and current research status of that area in Korea was investigated. Preliminary economic feasibility study of MIP(Medical Isotopes Producer), using liquid nuclear fuel to produce medical isotopes of Mo-99 and Sr-89, was performed

  4. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is now a quarter of a century since nuclear energy was introduced to the public. Its introduction was made in the most dramatic, but unfortunately in the most destructive way - through the use of a nuclear weapon. Since that introduction enormous strides have been made in developing the peaceful applications of this great and versatile force. Because these strides have always been overshadowed by the focusing of public attention on the military side of the atom, the public has never fully understood or appreciated the gains and status of the peaceful atom. This booklet is an attempt to correct, in some measure, this imbalance in public information and attitude. It is a compilation of remarks, and excerpts of remarks, that I have made in recent years in an effort to bring to the public the story of the remarkable benefits the peaceful atom has to offer man. This is a story that grows with the development and progress of the peaceful atom. It must be told so that we can learn to use the power of nuclear energy wisely and through this use help to build a world in which the military applications of the atom will never again be a threat to mankind

  5. Innovation in nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innovation has been a driving force for the success of nuclear energy and remains essential for its sustainable future. Many research and development programmes focus on enhancing the performance of power plants in operation, current fuel design and characteristics, and fuel cycle processes used in existing facilities. Generally performed under the leadership of the industry. Some innovation programmes focus on evolutionary reactors and fuel cycles, derived from systems of the current generation. Such programmes aim at achieving significant improvements, in the field of economics or resource management for example, in the medium term. Often, they are undertaken by the industry with some governmental support as they require basic research together with technological development and adaptation. Finally, large programmes, often undertaken in an international, intergovernmental framework are devoted to design and development of a new generation of systems meeting the goals of sustainable development in the long term. Driving forces for nuclear innovation vary depending on the target technology, the national framework and the international context surrounding the research programme. However, all driving factors can be grouped in three categories: market drivers, political drivers and technology drivers. Globally, innovation in the nuclear energy sector is a success story but is a lengthy process that requires careful planning and adequate funding to produce successful outcomes

  6. Nuclear energy for oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1980, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, working with a number of Alberta-based companies, assessed the technical and economic feasibility of using a CANDU nuclear reactor to raise the production steam for the recovery of bitumen. The study followed several years of analysis which identified oil sands projects as the most appropriate single users of thermal energy of the amount and quality available from reactors. Over the life of an oil sands project a steam supply system based on a nuclear reactor is expected to offer a substantial cost advantage (25 - 50%) over the alternative system based on coal as the make-up fuel. Steam from natural gas is marginally more expensive than that from coal because the cost of natural gas is expected to escalate at a rate higher than inflation. For shallow deposits (150 - 250 metres) using intermediate pressure steam, the commercially proven Pressurized Heavy Water (PHW) reactor is most suitable. For deeper deposits (250 - 650 metres), the PHW reactor can provide the higher pressure steam using a compressor, but only with a reduction in thermal efficiency that substantially reduces its cost advantage. The CANDU Organic Cooled Reactor (OCR), however, can provide the high presure steam required with the large cost advantage. The economic benefit of nuclear steam supply systems, a saving of $2-4 per barrel of product, is large enough to justify a more detailed study

  7. Nuclear Energy. Communicating with the Public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information and communication with the public often appear to be the Achilles heel of nuclear energy, despite the considerable effort devoted to them. This report is based on the conclusions of several workshops organised by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency for public information specialists. It discusses the principles and practices leading to better communication with the public in four nuclear energy fields: radiation protection, radiological emergencies, routine operation of nuclear plants and radioactive waste management

  8. Communication on the risk of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution takes it that the assumption, acceptance problems of nuclear energy are based on information deficit, is groundless in the end. It is true that there is a big knowledge gap between the nuclear energy experts and the broad public, empirical investigations, however, point out that increased knowledge would by no means go along with increased nuclear energy acceptance in the population. Also, the interpretation pattern 'Science and technology hostility' is not good enough to explain the nuclear energy controversy, because nuclear energy opponents oppose nuclear energy in an increasingly professional manner, and as an alternative they do not propagate renunciation of technology but another kind of energy technology. The degree of intensity and the long duration of the nuclear energy controversy in the Federal Republic of Germany in international comparison is defined by 1. little willingness in the 'interest block' in state, industry and nuclear research in favour of speeding up nuclear energy expansion, to yield to the requirements of the anti-nuclear-energy movement, and 2. factual possibilities of the ecological movement, also without parliamentary majority, to hinder the nuclear energy program and, consequently, to influence political decisions. In addition, social peripheral conditions play a role. (orig./HSCH)

  9. Information report nuclear energy in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report takes stock on the nuclear energy situation in Europe. The European Union with more than 40% of the nuclear power capacity in the world, is already confronted with the nuclear energy place and stakes in the future energy policy. The report si presented in two main parts. The first part, ''the assets and the weaknesses of the nuclear energy'', deals with the economical aspects which historically based the choice of the nuclear energy and the induced impacts on the environment. The competitiveness of the nuclear energy but also the wastes management problem are discussed. The second part, ''the diplomatic and juridical framework of the nuclear energy development'', details and presents the limits of the EURATOM treaty. (A.L.B.)

  10. Nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the long term, H2 production technologies will be strongly focusing on CO2-neutral or CO2-free methods. Nuclear with its virtually no air-borne pollutants emissions appears to be an ideal option for large-scale centralized H2 production. It will be driven by major factors such as production rates of fossil fuels, political decisions on greenhouse gas emissions, energy security and independence of foreign oil uncertainties, or the economics of large-scale hydrogen production and transmission. A nuclear reactor operated in the heat and power cogeneration mode must be located in close vicinity to the consumer's site, i.e., it must have a convincing safety concept of the combined nuclear/ chemical production plant. A near-term option of nuclear hydrogen production which is readily available is conventional low temperature electrolysis using cheap off-peak electricity from present nuclear power plants. This, however, is available only if the share of nuclear in power production is large. But as fossil fuel prices will increase, the use of nuclear outside base-load becomes more attractive. Nuclear steam reforming is another important near-term option for both the industrial and the transportation sector, since principal technologies were developed, with a saving potential of some 35 % of methane feedstock. Competitiveness will benefit from increasing cost level of natural gas. The HTGR heated steam reforming process which was simulated in pilot plants both in Germany and Japan, appears to be feasible for industrial application around 2015. A CO2 emission free option is high temperature electrolysis which reduces the electricity needs up to about 30 % and could make use of high temperature heat and steam from an HTGR. With respect to thermochemical water splitting cycles, the processes which are receiving presently most attention are the sulfur-iodine, the Westinghouse hybrid, and the calcium-bromine (UT-3) cycles. Efficiencies of the S-I process are in the range of 33

  11. Whither the legal control of nuclear energy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Peter [Leicester School of Law (United Kingdom). Environmental Law Unit

    1995-12-31

    International nuclear trade is governed by the regime of legal control of nuclear energy, nuclear materials, knowledge of nuclear processes and weapons. Nuclear trade is under pinned by international agreements concerning physical protection and safeguards, the control of nuclear weapons, the protection of nuclear materials from terrorist action and third part liability. The political and geographical boundary changes of the past two years have significantly altered the background against which this regime has developed. Such changes have affected nuclear trade. The paper summarised the legal control of nuclear energy between States, identifies the areas of change which may affect this regime and the consequences for international trade. Conclusions are drawn as to the development of the international legal control of nuclear energy. (author). 21 refs.

  12. Whither the legal control of nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International nuclear trade is governed by the regime of legal control of nuclear energy, nuclear materials, knowledge of nuclear processes and weapons. Nuclear trade is under pinned by international agreements concerning physical protection and safeguards, the control of nuclear weapons, the protection of nuclear materials from terrorist action and third part liability. The political and geographical boundary changes of the past two years have significantly altered the background against which this regime has developed. Such changes have affected nuclear trade. The paper summarised the legal control of nuclear energy between States, identifies the areas of change which may affect this regime and the consequences for international trade. Conclusions are drawn as to the development of the international legal control of nuclear energy. (author). 21 refs

  13. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joseph; Furnstahl, Richard; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out.

  14. Nuclear energy and electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal scientific aspects of some technical problems posed by the nuclear energy utilization and its transformation into electric power. Two types of reactors are envisaged in the framework of the present French programs: pressurized water and enriched uranium reactors, and the sodium cooled, fast neutron breeder reactors. After having introduced the concepts of cross sections and radioactive equilibrium, some important questions are outlined: the concept of reactor criticality, the role of delayed neutrons in reactor control, the enrichment of uranium in the 235 isotope. The scientific bases of radioprotection are given: definition of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent; examples of dose determination during an irradiation, of external origin or due to a radioactive contamination. Some aspects including the economy of nuclear power production have been voluntarily rejected, emphasis being put on the bases allowing a fruitful consultation of a more specialized technical and scientific litterature in the field

  15. Refugee scientists and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coming together of many of the world's experts in nuclear physics in the 1930's was largely the result of the persecution of Jews in Germany and later in Italy. Initially this meant there were no jobs for young physicists to go into as the senior scientists had been sacked. Later, it resulted in the assembly of many of the world's foremost physicists in the United States, specifically at the Los Alamos Laboratory to work on the Manhattan Project. The rise of antisemitism in Italy (to where many physicists had fled at first) provoked the emigration of Fermi, the leading expert on neutrons at that time. The politics, physics and personalities in the 1930's, relevant to the development of nuclear energy, are discussed. (UK)

  16. Nuclear Energy in Central Europe 98, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional Meeting for Nuclear Energy in Central Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. The proceedings contain 63 articles from Slovenia, sorounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region. Topics are: Research Reactors, Nuclear Methods, Reactor Physics, Thermal Hydraulics, Structural Analysis, Probabilistic Safety Assessment, Severe Accidents, NPP Operation and Nuclear Waste disposal

  17. Nuclear energy: Sources and global perspective (7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a review of the global nuclear energy. The development of the new generation of the nuclear reactors AR 600 is analysed. The advanced nuclear power plants as well as the perspectives of the nuclear power development are also analysed

  18. Energy development and nuclear program in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the current situation of energy consumption in China is provided. Coal-burn as a dominant sector of energy consumption causes heavy burden on transportation and serious environmental pollution. The roles of nuclear energy in the future energy supply are discussed. The situation of nuclear development, especially heating reactor is introduced. (author)

  19. Status of nuclear energy and nuclear safety in Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grlicarev, I. [Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (Slovenia)

    2002-07-01

    Although in Slovenia there is only one nuclear power plant in operation, it represents a substantial share in the production of electrical power in the country. Nuclear fuel cycle in Slovenia comprises the nuclear power plant, a research reactor, a storage for low and intermediate level radioactive waste and uranium mine in decommissioning. The Krsko NPP operation meets the standards of the high level of nuclear safety. Considerable effort has been put into the negotiations in the field of nuclear energy and nuclear safety with the European Commission within the pre-accession activities of Slovenia to European Union. (orig.)

  20. Educational support programs: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) currently sponsors two educationally related programs: the Radioactive Waste Management Fellowship Program and the Radioactive Waste Management Research Program for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU). The graduate fellowship program was implemented in 1985 to meet the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) expected manpower needs for trained scientists and engineers to assist in carrying out the activities of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. It is recognized that a shortage of master's and doctoral level scientists and engineers in disciplines supportive of the nation's high-level radioactive waste management (RWM) program may impede the DOE's ability to properly carry out its mission under the act. The fellowship program encourages talented undergraduate students to enter graduate programs designed to educate and train them in fields directly related to RWM. The program supports graduate students in various disciplines, including nuclear science and engineering, health physics, and certain area of geology and chemical engineering. It also encourages universities to support and improve research activities and academic programs related to the management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

  1. Nuclear energy: the opinion of future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article described the international programs for development of nuclear systems of new generation for energy production with which many countries have started the development of new concepts of nuclear reactors to put in production in the next decades in order to protect the environment. At last it comes made the aspects of economy of nuclear energy

  2. The nuclear energy: law and fear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document mentions the feeling of fear which goes along the idea of nuclear energy, as well as ethics and law. Technological aspects, political choices and financial matters are responsible for the nuclear energy development. Then it is shown that the consequences of this development is the continuous feeling of fear and risk which goes with every nuclear activities. (TEC)

  3. Canada's Nuclear Crossroads: Steps to a Viable Nuclear Energy Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Doern; Robert Morrison

    2009-01-01

    Canada is at an energy and environmental crossroad. Fossil fuels cause environmental damage and the growth potential of large-scale hydroelectricity is limited. Policymakers are reconsidering the merits of nuclear power as both a low-carbon emitting and low-cost base load electricity source. While nuclear power may look like an attractive option, nuclear power must overcome problems such as the high and uncertain cost of construction, dealing with nuclear waste, reactor licensing and regulati...

  4. Nuclear energy in Malaysia - closing the gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    >Malaysian Nuclear Society (Mns,

    2013-06-01

    This article is prepared by the Malaysian Nuclear Society (MNS) to present the views of the Malaysian scientific community on the need for Malaysia to urgently upgrade its technical know-how and expertise to support the nuclear energy industry for future sustainable economic development of the country. It also present scientific views that nuclear energy will bring economic growth as well as technically sound industry, capable of supporting nuclear energy industry needs in the country, and recommend action items for timely technical upgrading of Malaysian expertise related to nuclear energy industry.

  5. Nuclear energy for the 21. century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers 5 introductory papers to this conference about nuclear energy for the 21. century: the French energy policy during the last 30 years (situation of France with respect to the energy supply and demand, main trends of the French energy policy, future of the French nuclear policy); presentation of IAEA (technology transfer, nuclear safety, non-proliferation policy, structure and financial resources, council of governors, general conference, secretariat); nuclear power and sustainable development; promoting safety at nuclear facilities (promoting safety, basics of safety, safety at the design stage, risk management, regulatory control and efficiency of the regulation organization, role of IAEA); nuclear energy today (contribution to sustainable development, safety, best solution for the management of radioactive wastes, future of nuclear energy). (J.S.)

  6. Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) provided a brief discussion on the benefits of establishing a new regulatory framework. He suggested that a new paradigm in regulatory thinking is needed and stated that the reactor oversight process (ROP) serves as the appropriate basis for starting these discussions. He suggested that the ROP cornerstones of safety be used as the starting point for developing a new set of General Design Criteria (10 CFR Part 50, Appendix A). It is suggested that new operating criteria, generic risk- informed and performance-based regulations be developed with associated design-specific and regulation-specific regulatory guides

  7. Nuclear energy in a sustainable development perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of nuclear energy are reviewed and assessed from a sustainable development perspective highlighting key economic, environmental and social issues, challenges and opportunities relevant for energy policy making.. The analysis covers the potential role of nuclear energy in increasing the human and man-made capital assets of the world while preserving its natural and environmental resource assets as well as issues to be addressed in order to enhance the contribution of nuclear energy to sustainable development goals. (author)

  8. Role of nuclear energy in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy in Thailand can be highlighted when the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established since 1961 for taking role of nuclear safety regulation, conducting research and promotion for peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Its main facilities were the 1 megawatt Thai Research Reactor-1 (TRR-1) and the Cobalt-60 Gamma Irradiator. Since then there have been substantial progress made on utilization of nuclear energy in various institutions and in private sectors. Nowaday, there are around 500 units of nuclear energy users in Thailand, i.e. 100 units in medicine, 150 units in education and 250 units in industry. In terms of nuclear power for electricity generation, the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) has conducted the activities to support the nuclear power plant project since 1972 however, because there is widespread public concerned about nuclear safety, waste disposal and recently economic problems in Thailand, nuclear energy option is not put in immediate plan for alternative energy resource. Within the short future, increased in economical, demand fir electricity and safe operation of nuclear plants will likely be demonstrated and recognized. Nuclear energy should remain as an option in the long-term energy strategies for Thailand. (author)

  9. French opinion on Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrary to what many think or say, most French people do not have a clear-cut opinion about nuclear power. And until public opinion can be accurately assessed, we should be worried of speaking on its behalf. More than half the population of France believes that nuclear power is the cheapest option, but 40% of them have no idea what the situation really is. The French are keenly aware of the what is at stake at the international level, and the fact that energy is becoming a worldwide issue. What they are most concerned about is nuclear waste and the possibility of a catastrophe of the Chernobyl type occurring. Disquiet about the first is now dissipating, after having increased. But attitudes about the second are ambivalent. A quarter of the French are very ignorant about radioactivity. 20% of the population complain that not enough information is forthcoming, particularly as concerns advances in technology. As can be anticipated, awareness of the question of climate change is growing year by year, with increased reporting of storms, floods and heat waves

  10. Nuclear energy for oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In working partnership with a number of Alberta-based companies an AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) study team assessed the technical and economic feasibility of using a nuclear reactor to raise the production steam for the recovery of bitumen. Technically sound concepts have been identified for using CANDU reactors for the in-situ recovery of bitumen from oil sands. Over the life of an oil sands project a steam supply system based on a nuclear reactor is expected to offer a substantial cost advantage (25 - 50 %) over the alternative system based on coal as the make-up fuel. Steam from natural gas is marginally more expensive than that from coal because the cost of natural gas is expected to escalate at a rate higher than inflation. For shallow deposits (150 -250 metres) using intermediate pressure steam, the commercially proven Pressurized Heavy Water (PHW) reactor is most suitable. For deeper deposits (250 - 650 metres), the PHW reactor can provide the higher pressure steam using a compressor, but only with a reduction in thermal efficiency that substantially reduces its cost advantage. The CANDU Organic Cooled Reactor (OCR), however, can provide a high pressure steam required with the large cost advantage. The economic benefit offered by nuclear steam supply systems, a saving of $2-4 per barrel of product, is large enough to justify the commitment of a more detailed study

  11. The new economics of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With 15% of the world's population and an economic growth rate that increases the aspiration of its people to better quality of life, India has a voracious appetite for energy. Nuclear power is one of the options of providing safe, environmentally benign, reliable and economically competitive energy services. Nuclear power world over provides about 16% of electricity through 440 nuclear power plants with a total installed capacity of 361.582 GW (as of January 2004, IAEA PRIS data). Nuclear energy has traditionally played a small role in meeting India's energy requirements. Nuclear power makes up only 4,120 MW, constituting 2.6%, of the total electricity generation capacity. India is a power hungry nation and needs to switch over from its tremendous dependence on fossil fuels to alternative sources of energy like solar energy, bio energy and nuclear energy. Indian nuclear power plants have progressively attained excellent operation performances. However, the changing economic and geopolitical situation in the energy sector has made it imperative to emphasize the significance of nuclear energy in the future energy landscape of the country. The present paper discuss the importance, demand and supply pattern of nuclear energy and its economics. (author)

  12. Environmental issues (Global safety and nuclear energy?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendergast, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    This paper gives an overview nuclear environmental issues. In particular it addresses the issue of sustainable energy development and climate change, environmental assessment and operation of individual nuclear power plants, waste disposal and decommissioning.

  13. Legal aspects of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The legal basis for the use of nuclear energy is generally given by an Atomic Energy Act. Additionally, however, a system of regulations and standards has to be set up to lay down more detailed requirements. The fundamental philosophy and strategy has to be specified by governmental organizations. For the specification and implementation of the requirements some minimum organizational arrangements are necessary, which are not only restricted to governmental organizations. Furthermore procedural regulations have to be laid down before the implementation phase. This includes aspects like public participation in the licensing procedure. In practice, however, the implementation of the legal requirements always shows some weakness of the basic legal requirements. To learn from this experience some examples are presented, which gave rise to difficulties in the implementation procedure. (orig./RW)

  14. Technical Session: Germany. Legal Issues Associated with Preparing for a Nuclear Energy Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing and implementing a national programme for the civilian use of nuclear energy means embarking on the use of a Janus-faced form of energy. We all know that nuclear energy implies both extraordinary benefits and extraordinary risks. This fact requires a legal framework appropriate to cope with both elements of nuclear power. Legislators and State authorities have to establish a sound balance between risks and benefits. That is not at all an easy task. While excluding or limiting risks requires severe legal control mechanisms, the benefits can only fully be enjoyed if the legal framework ensures freedom of research and of economic and industrial development including the guarantee of property ownership and of investments. Combining both opposite poles seems like trying to square the circle. In case of a conflict between promotion and protection, there is no doubt that the protection against nuclear risks has to prevail. Therefore this aspect of nuclear law will be mainly dealt with in this presentation. Establishing a legal framework to tame the hazards of nuclear energy is a much more challenging task for law-makers than providing a legal basis for promoting the use of nuclear energy. With regard to the promotion of nuclear energy, States enjoy a broad range of discretion and may use a great number of legal and non-legal instruments to support the development of a nuclear programme. From a legal point of view, promoting nuclear energy does not require a specific regime. However, it does require a specific regime to control the risks of nuclear energy. States preparing for a nuclear energy programme have to be aware that the use of nuclear energy is not an exclusively national matter. In particular the risk associated with nuclear energy extends beyond national borders. Using the benefits also needs international cooperation in many fields including, e.g., research or fuel supply. Today a network of multilateral and bilateral international treaties exists

  15. Nuclear energy and the greenhouse problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last November - almost in parallel with the Hague Meeting on Climate Change - more than 1,500 of the world's top nuclear scientists and energy technologists met in Washington DC, at the Joint Conference of the American Nuclear Society, the European Nuclear Society, the Nuclear Energy Institute and the International Nuclear Energy Academy. Unlike the United Nations follow up to the Kyoto protocol, which ended in disarray, a note of high optimism and informed realism pervaded the nuclear conference which, among its multiple streams of subject material and papers by international experts, carried the two main themes of Long Term Globally Sustainable Energy Options and Nuclear Energy and the Greenhouse Problem. This paper considers the immense contribution to Greenhouse gas emission minimisation made by nuclear energy in 1999. In that year the global electricity production by the world's 435 nuclear power stations was 2,398 TWh or 16% of total electricity generation or 5% of total primary energy production. The amount of avoided carbon dioxide emission because of the use of nuclear energy in 1999 was 2.4 billion tonnes. This is 10% of total emissions. Japan's 54 nuclear power stations alone save the equivalent of Australia's total Greenhouse emissions. The secret of this success is Australia's uranium fuel

  16. Nuclear Powerplant Safety: Source Terms. Nuclear Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    There has been increased public interest in the potential effects of nuclear powerplant accidents since the Soviet reactor accident at Chernobyl. People have begun to look for more information about the amount of radioactivity that might be released into the environment as a result of such an accident. When this issue is discussed by people…

  17. Overview of literature on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) attempts to deliver an objective review of various topics connected with nuclear energy. These include the risks posed by the use of nuclear energy, its relevance to the environment, social acceptance, ethical aspects and effects on health. Ten controversial topics are discussed concerning the use of nuclear energy and its acceptance or non-acceptance. The study concentrates on safety, accident and risk analysis, environmental relevance with respect to climate protection and nuclear wastes. Comparisons are made with other forms of energy generation. The methods used to compile the overview are discussed

  18. Issues on accepting nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power has been promoted so far as a national project to be an energy source sharing a large weight in the future and is also expected recently to be a means to suppress the global warming affected by the use of fossil fuels. From a stand point opposing to or cautious of the promotion of its extensive use, various issues on its incompatibility to the society such as technical problems pointed out that radioactivity miss-control may cause hazards, energy problems, political problems, cultural life problems, etc. are raised. Also in site areas, pros and cons on the evaluation of its contribution are spreading. However, the area of the issues is wide-spread and sometime too difficult to understand because of its specialty or barriers such as conviction and fixed distrust and so it is often seen that the controversies are lead to be governed by irritation or abandonment that ones argument is not understood by the party. In the social situation in which common interests for various stand points are hard to find, it looks only way for finding the direction of any decision in a political issue to mutually know the arguments through discussion as much as possible, correct erroneous understandings and expand the area of agreement. Hear, various issues on accepting nuclear power from a variety of stand points and view angles are summarized so as to be referred by various engineers and non-engineers to let the uselessly continuing deadlock proceed toward meaningful agreement. (author)

  19. The nuclear energy in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With challenges like the climatic change, the hydrocarbons prices increase and the energy supply security, the nuclear park is becoming a decisive and an urgent question in the United Kingdom. The author proposes an historical aspect of the nuclear energy in UK, the actors of the today nuclear industry and the technologies used in 2006, the radioactive wastes management, the programs of the future and the british opinion on the nuclear. (A.L.B.)

  20. Emerging nuclear energy systems and nuclear weapon proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generally when considering problems of proliferation of nuclear weapons, discussions are focused on horizontal proliferation. However, the emerging nuclear energy systems currently have an impact mainly on vertical proliferation. The paper indicates that technologies connected with emerging nuclear energy systems, such as fusion reactors and accelerators, enhance the knowledge of thermonuclear weapon physics and will enable production of military useful nuclear materials (including some rare elements). At present such technologies are enhancing the arsenal of the nuclear weapon states. But one should not forget the future implications for horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons as some of the techniques will in the near future be within the technological and economic capabilities of non-nuclear weapon states. Some of these systems are not under any international control. (orig.)

  1. What can nuclear energy do for society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    It is pointed out that the earth's crust holds 30,000 times as much energy in the form of fissionable atoms as fossil fuel. Moreover, nuclear fuel costs less per unit of energy than fossil fuel. Capital equipment used to release nuclear energy, on the other hand, is expensive. For commercial electric-power production and marine propulsion, advantages of nuclear power have outweighed disadvantages. As to nuclear submarines, applications other than military may prove feasible. The industry has proposed cargo submarines to haul oil from the Alaskan North Slope beneath the Arctic ice. Other possible applications for nuclear power are in air-cushion-vehicles, aircraft, and rockets.-

  2. Evaluation of nuclear energy in the context of energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyzes the view expressed by the Japanese government on the role of nuclear energy for energy security through scrutiny of Japan's policy documents. The analysis revealed that the contribution by nuclear energy to Japan's energy security has been defined in two ways. Nuclear energy improves short-term energy security with its characteristics such as political stability in exporting countries of uranium, easiness of stockpiling of nuclear fuels, stability in power generation cost, and reproduction of plutonium and other fissile material for use by reprocessing of spent fuel. Nuclear energy also contributes to medium- and long-term energy security through its characteristics that fissile material can be reproduced (multiplied in the case of breeder reactor) from spent fuels. Further contribution can be expected by nuclear fusion. Japan's energy security can be strengthened not only by expanding the share of nuclear energy in total energy supply, but also by improving nuclear energy's characteristics which are related to energy security. Policy measures to be considered for such improvement will include (a) policy dialogue with exporting countries of uranium, (b) government assistance to development of uranium mines, (c) nuclear fuel stockpiling, (d) reprocessing and recycling of spent fuels, (e) development of fast breeder reactor, and (f) research of nuclear fusion. (author)

  3. Managing proliferation risks from civilian and weapon-grade plutonium and enriched uranium: A comprehensive cut-off convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of weapon-grade fissile materials is closely related to the aim of achieving a nuclear-weapon-free world. Huge amounts of highly enriched uranium have been produced for nuclear weapons. More than 1000 tonnes of plutonium emerged as a by-product of civilian nuclear industry. Separated from spent fuel it is readily usable for nuclear weapons. The worldwide civilian tritium inventory may reach the same size as military stocks about the year 2010. This poses an increasing danger of horizontal nuclear proliferation. Production, stockpiling, trade, processing and uses of weapon-grade materials like Highly enriched uranium, plutonium and tritium promote its geographical spread, enlarge the group of people with the relate know-how and create the danger of diversion of material and the proliferation of knowledge for the purpose of weapons production. Therefore, a fundamental turn away from using weapon-grade materials in scientific and economic applications of nuclear energy is desirable in all countries. Priority should be given to using nuclear fuel cycles which are as proliferation resistant as possible. Without this, the continuation of civil nuclear programs seems to be irresponsible and unjustifiable. The role of the IAEA in export control safeguards related to the above problems is indispensable

  4. The attitude to nuclear energy in Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgia, as a new independent state, is facing new problems regarding energy sources in the conditions of market economy. Great attention is given by the Government to search for various ways and versions to overcome the energy crisis. While nuclear energy may be an option for some reasons detailed in the paper, a nuclear power plant is not officially considered as an alternative. (author)

  5. Considerations affecting nuclear energy in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is stated that 75% of Swiss energy consumption is based on oil and 17% on electricity. Three quarters of the electricity is hydro-power, the balance nuclear energy. The advantages of nuclear energy are noted. (G.M.E.)

  6. Nuclear energy: beliefs, values and acceptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last decade has seen a dramatic increase in public concern about nuclear energy. As a consequence, it has become recognised that the future of nuclear energy will not only depend on technical and economic factors, but that public acceptability of this technology will play a crucial role in the long-term future of nuclear energy. Research has shown a considerable divergence in public and expert assessment of the risks associated with nuclear energy. Qualitative aspects of risks play a dominant role in the public's perception of risks, and it seems necessary for experts to recognise this in order to improve relations with the general public. It is also clear, however, that differences in the perception of risks do not embrace all the relevant aspects of the public's assessment of nuclear energy. Public reaction is also related to more general beliefs and values, and the issue of nuclear energy is embedded in a much wider moral and political domain. (author)

  7. What makes nuclear energy (not) acceptable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higher knowledge has long been hypothesized as leading to better acceptance of nuclear energy, but in the last years other factors such as risk perception and trust in nuclear risk governance were also recognized as key elements. While stakeholder involvement is now fully recognized as a key element for nuclear energy acceptance, there are still questions about the impact of higher knowledge. This paper investigates the relation between knowledge about the nuclear domain, risk perception of nuclear risks, confidence in the management of nuclear technologies, on the one hand, and the attitude towards nuclear energy and opinion about nuclear energy, on the other hand. It also studies the factors that are pleading in favour or against nuclear energy and their relation with the forementioned variables. The study is based on empirical data from a large scale opinion survey in Belgium between 25/05/2011 and 24/06/2011, i.e. the third month after the accident in Fukushima. The sample consisted of 1020 respondents and is representative for the Belgian adult population (18+) with respect to gender, age, region, province, habitat and social class. Our results show that confidence in the safe management of nuclear technologies as well as the perceived strength of the arguments pro/against nuclear are driving factors for people's attitude towards nuclear energy. Higher confidence and stronger adherence to the arguments in favour of nuclear energy lead to higher acceptance. The correlation between knowledge and attitude/opinion towards nuclear energy is statistically significant, but rather low, showing only a weak effect of knowledge on attitudes or opinions about nuclear energy. A weak effect is also observed for risk perception of nuclear risks, lower risk perception leading to a somewhat more positive attitude/opinion about nuclear energy. In the study we also highlight that the main factors seen as pleading in favour or against nuclear energy are the same, both for people

  8. History on establishment of Korea nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with the history on establishment of Korea nuclear energy from 1955 to 1980 with 8.15 emancipation and Korea economy, declaration on using nuclear for peace, public opinion on making on contract for Korea-U.S.A nuclear agreement, building of reactor and departure of research center, plan for economic development for five years and propel for industrialization, establishment of the Ministry of Science-Technology and retreat of nuclear administration, plan for the development for nuclear power, issues on safety supervision in Korea atomic energy law, building for Yonggwang reactor 3.4, building of nuclear power plant and commission, nuclear reprocessing facilities and frustration on development of nuclear weapon, process on KEDO and academic society and social organization related nuclear power.

  9. Human and positive aspects of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the beginning of the exploitation of nuclear energy by over fifty years experience, a new kind of human disasters which were not known by all world languages were included as new terms not audible before such as radiation protection and risk issues. This was given the attention of people at all levels in view of nuclear terror by bombing the first nuclear bomb on Hiroshima-Japan on 6 August 1945 and the second nuclear bomb on Nagasaki on 9 August 1945. At the end of World War II scientists and officials realized the political and military risks of nuclear energy and its destructive side with benefits and positive repercussions. Atomic energy is produced from great power that God placed in the nucleus of the atom, where nuclear energy is liberated when a change in the structure of the atom and its formations happens or so-called nuclear reaction. (author)

  10. Nuclear reactions video (knowledge base on low energy nuclear physics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRV (nuclear reactions video) is an open and permanently extended global system of management and graphical representation of nuclear data and video-graphic computer simulation of low energy nuclear dynamics. It consists of a complete and renewed nuclear database and well known theoretical models of low energy nuclear reactions altogether forming the 'low energy nuclear knowledge base'. The NRV solves two main problems: 1) fast and visualized obtaining and processing experimental data on nuclear structure and nuclear reactions; 2) possibility for any inexperienced user to analyze experimental data within reliable commonly used models of nuclear dynamics. The system is based on the realization of the following principal things: the net and code compatibility with the main existing nuclear databases; maximal simplicity in handling: extended menu, friendly graphical interface, hypertext description of the models, and so on; maximal visualization of input data, dynamics of studied processes and final results by means of real three-dimensional images, plots, tables and formulas and a three-dimensional animation. All the codes are composed as the real Windows applications and work under Windows 95/NT

  11. Identification and evaluation of radionuclide generation/depletion codes for potential use by the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design, licensing, and operating activities involved with the transportation, storage, and geologic disposal of high-level radioactive wastes involve calculation of waste nuclide content and characteristics at various time out-of-reactor. Gamma and neutron fields must be known to meet transportation and radiation protection regulations of the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Radioactive decay heat must also be known to demonstrate compliance with other DOT and NRC regulations involving transportation, storage, and geologic disposal operations. NRC licensing of a mined geologic repository---to be constructed and operated by the Department of Energy (DOE)---will require nuclide inventory data over a 10,000-year time period in order to show expected compliance with NRC repository engineered facility radionuclide release rules and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) repository 10,000-year cumulative radionuclide environmental standards. 58 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  12. Hadronic nuclear energy: An approach towards green energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is undoubtedly the largest energy source capable of meeting the total energy requirements to a large extent in long terms. However the conventional nuclear energy involves production of high level of radioactive wastes which possesses threat, both to the environment and mankind. The modern day demand of clean, cheap and abundant energy gets fulfilled by the novel fuels that have been developed through hadronic mechanics/chemistry. In the present paper, a short review of Hadronic nuclear energy by intermediate controlled nuclear synthesis and particle type like stimulated neutron decay and double beta decay has been presented

  13. Nuclear energy vs. black coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investment decisions taken for a power plant concern a period of up to 8 years of construction and more than 20 years of operation - i.e. a total of 30 years and over. Such periods require the different cost developments of power generation from nuclear energy and black coal to be made comparable. To this end, business economics has developed a number of more or less sophisticated calculation methods whose quantitative statements depend from a number of factors (wages, interests, etc.) but whose qualitative statements are clear-cut. The entrepreneur's decision when choosing from different power plant alternatives does not really depend from the nicest intricacies of the calculation methods but must be based on the safe qualitative statement indicating which alternative will result in the least cost in the final run. With this in mind, the author presents a simple analysis method which will suffice for decision taking. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear symmetry energy from QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculated the nucleon self-energies in iso-spin asymmetric nuclear matter and obtained the nuclear symmetry energy by taking difference of these of neutron and proton. We find that the scalar (vector) self-energy part gives a negative (positive) contribution to the nuclear symmetry energy, consistent with the result from relativistic mean-field theories. Also, we found exact four-quark operator product expansion for nucleon sum rule. Among them, twist-4 matrix elements which can be extracted from deep inelastic scattering experiment constitute an essential part in the origin of the nuclear symmetry energy from QCD. Our result also extends early success of QCD sum rule in the symmetric nuclear matter to the asymmetric nuclear matter. (authors)

  15. Nuclear energy in China: Contested regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    China is leading the recent revival of nuclear energy programs; it is building not one but four nuclear power plants at a time. The government is determined to expand nuclear energy programs and the general public supports the efforts. China also has the financial and human resources to achieve the desired objective-building 40 GW generation capacity by 2020. The politics surrounding nuclear energy expansion, however, is fluid and competition for influence is vibrant. Nuclear energy issues have become openly contested between general economic and specific industry interests and between international and domestic perspectives and designs. This article examines the political dynamics in China to show how the rival players and their competing interests shape the strategy of nuclear energy development

  16. Nuclear energy - basis for hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of human civilization in general as well as that of every country in particular is in direct relation to the assurance of a cost effective energy balance encompassing all industrial spheres and everyday activities. Unfortunately, the uncontrolled utilization of Earth's energy resources is already causing irreversible damage to various components of the eco-system of the Earth. Nuclear energy used for electricity and hydrogen production has the biggest technological potential for solving of the main energy outstanding issues of the new century: increasing of energy dependence; global warming. Because of good market position the political basis is assured for fast development of new generation nuclear reactors and fuel cycles which can satisfy vigorously increasing needs of affordable and clean energy. Political conditions are created for adequate participation of nuclear energy in the future global energy mix. They must give chance to the nuclear industry to take adequate part in the new energy generation capacity.(author)

  17. Department of Energy Civilian Energy Programs Authorization Act for fiscal year 1987. US House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, July 28, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The House Science and Technology Committee report accompanying H.R. 4929 is favorable, with some changes, to the appropriation bill. The report lists 20 amendments to the bill which are primarily changes or additions to funding proposals. A list of witnesses who testified at hearings relating to the bill and subcommittee activities explain the rationale for raising the budgets for fossil energy, energy conservation, solar and geothermal programs, and general research, and deletions or reductions of other items. The report also addresses the need for information and technology transfers between scientists in the public and private sectors. Descriptions of specific programs include committee views of the programs as well as the funding levels. The report concludes with a review of how the legislation will affect existing law and the economy and with a recommendation for passage and dissenting views of the committee

  18. Nuclear structure at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, B.E.; Mutchler, G.S.

    1991-09-30

    The theme that unites the sometimes seemingly disparate experiments undertaken by the Bonner Lab Medium Energy Group is a determination to understand in detail the many facets and manifestations of the strong interaction, that which is now referred to as nonperturbative QCD. Whether we are investigating the question of just what does carry the spin of baryons, or the extent of the validity of the SU(6) wavefunctions for the excited hyperons (as will be measured in their radiative decays in our CEBAF experiment), or questions associated with the formation of a new state of matter predicted by QCD (the subject of our BNL experiments E810, E854, as well as our approved experiment at RHIC), -- all these projects share this common goal. Our other experiments represent different approaches to the same broad undertaking. LAMPF E1097 will provide definitive answers to the question of the spin dependence of the inelastic channel of pion production in the n-p interaction. FNAL E683 may well open a new field of investigation in nuclear physics: that of just how quarks and gluons interact with nuclear matter as they transverse nuclei of different sizes. In most all of the experiments mentioned above, the Bonner Lab Group is playing major leadership roles as well as doing a big fraction of the hard work that such experiments require. We use many of the facilities that are unavailable to the intermediate energy physics community and we use our expertise to design and fabricate the detectors and instrumentation that are required to perform the measurements which we decide to do.

  19. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This seventh Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) describes activities and expenditures of the Office during fiscal years (FY) 1989 and 1990. In November 1989, OCRWM is responsible for disposing of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. To direct the implementation of its mission, OCRWM has established the following objectives: (1) Safe and timely disposal: to establish as soon as practicable the ability to dispose of radioactive waste in a geologic repository licensed by the NRC. (2) Timely and adequate waste acceptance: to begin the operation of the waste management system as soon as practicable in order to obtain the system development and operational benefits that have been identified for the MRS facility. (3) Schedule confidence: to establish confidence in the schedule for waste acceptance and disposal such that the management of radioactive waste is not an obstacle to the nuclear energy option. (4) System flexibility: to ensure that the program has the flexibility necessary for adapting to future circumstances while fulfilling established commitments. To achieve these objectives, OCRWM is developing a waste management system consisting of a geologic repository for permanent disposed deep beneath the surface of the earth, a facility for MRS, and a system for transporting the waste

  20. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-01

    This seventh Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) describes activities and expenditures of the Office during fiscal years (FY) 1989 and 1990. In November 1989, OCRWM is responsible for disposing of the Nation`s spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. To direct the implementation of its mission, OCRWM has established the following objectives: (1) Safe and timely disposal: to establish as soon as practicable the ability to dispose of radioactive waste in a geologic repository licensed by the NRC. (2) Timely and adequate waste acceptance: to begin the operation of the waste management system as soon as practicable in order to obtain the system development and operational benefits that have been identified for the MRS facility. (3) Schedule confidence: to establish confidence in the schedule for waste acceptance and disposal such that the management of radioactive waste is not an obstacle to the nuclear energy option. (4) System flexibility: to ensure that the program has the flexibility necessary for adapting to future circumstances while fulfilling established commitments. To achieve these objectives, OCRWM is developing a waste management system consisting of a geologic repository for permanent disposed deep beneath the surface of the earth, a facility for MRS, and a system for transporting the waste.

  1. Theories of Low Energy Nuclear Transmutations

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Y. N.; Widom, A.; Swain, J.

    2012-01-01

    Employing concrete examples from nuclear physics it is shown that low energy nuclear reactions can and have been induced by all of the four fundamental interactions (i) (stellar) gravitational, (ii) strong, (iii) electromagnetic and (iv) weak. Differences are highlighted through the great diversity in the rates and similarity through the nature of the nuclear reactions initiated by each.

  2. Nuclear energy. Sources and global perspective (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a review of the global nuclear energy, economic aspects of its utilization, as well as its environmental impacts. The data of the nuclear power are being compared by countries and regions. The perspectives of the nuclear power development are also analysed

  3. The long road to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a historical survey of nuclear energy applications in the world. In particular are studied the influence of the international context: the secrecy policy, the era of international nuclear exchanges with the safeguarded assistance, the Russo-American detente and last apparition of non-proliferation and contestation on industrial development, nuclear trade and international organizations

  4. Nuclear energy - a source of sustainable, clean and safe energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses various factors which make nuclear energy an attractive source of cheap, reliable and clean power in Indian scenario, with a special reference to Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KKNPP)

  5. New energies and nuclear plants controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book reviews the needs for energy, because oil is in limited supplies and located in few countries. Data are given on electricity consumption, power needed, cost and possible savings. The different energy sources are examined: solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, winds energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, energies from the sea or river and nuclear energy and also how to store and transport energy. The different risks of nuclear stations are evaluated: radioactivity, thermal pollution, wastes ... Scientific and technical facts, as complete as possible, are given in order to find the different solutions possible. If facts are clear and precise they should no more produce contestation

  6. Development, utilization and competability of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from the worldwide continously increasing energy demand, the possibility of the various energy carriers to cover this demand are explained. Nuclear energy for known reasons plays a particular role. Besides the energy-political reasons, the profitableness of nuclear energy is of particular importance regarding its utilization. The costs of a light water reactor are compared to those of a pit-coal fired power plant as example. Taking the given assumptions, the total costs for generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant are about 70% lower than for coal power plants. Merely an annual utilization period of only 2000 hours involves equal costs. The insecurity of this calculation is simultaneously made clear. It is very difficult to estimate the development of the investment costs (plant costs) and fuel costs. Finally, a few comments are made on the supply safety, resulting costs of nuclear energy, financing of nuclear power plants and on reactor safety. (UA)

  7. Nuclear energy: Status and future limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of nuclear energy today and its potential evolution during the next 10–20 years is discussed. Nuclear energy contributes only about 14% of the world’s electric energy mix today, and as electric energy contributes itself only about 16% to the end energy use, its contribution is essentially negligible. Still, nuclear energy is plagued already with a long list of unsolved problems. Among the less known problems one finds the difficulties that nuclear plants cannot provide power according to needs, but have to be operated at full power also during times of low demand and regions with large contributions from nuclear power need some backup hydropower storage systems. The better known problems, without solutions since at least 40 years, are the final safe storage of the accumulated highly radioactive nuclear waste, that uranium itself is a very limited and non renewable energy resource and that enormous amounts of human resources, urgently needed to find a still unknown path towards a low energy future, are blocked by useless research on fusion energy. Thus, nuclear energy is not a solution to our energy worries but part of the problem.

  8. Nuclear energy between science and public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the presented research was to establish the presence and the structure of nuclear energy as a theme in Slovenian mass media and at the same time to answer the question what chances an active Slovenian reader had in the year 1991 to either strengthen or change his opinion on nuclear power. Measurement and analysis of chosen relevant variables in 252 contributions in six Slovenian mass media publications in the year 1991 showed that the most frequent nuclear theme was decommissioning and closing down of a nuclear power plant. Other themes followed in the order of the frequency of appearance: nuclear energy as an economic issue, waste disposal, NPP Krsko operation, influence on health, information about events, seismic questions. The scientific theme - nuclear energy, was intensely represented in chosen Slovenian mass media publications in 1991. Common to all nuclear themes is that they were being presented from the political point of view. (author)

  9. Nuclear energy. Ambiguous lessons from history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power is treated from the historical viewpoint; in particular, the question is discussed whether hopes and expectations from the beginning of the 'nuclear era' have come true. It is suggested that the efforts were driven by political rather than economic considerations. It is demonstrated that the development of nuclear power was no consequence of the oil crisis; actually the situation developed the other way round: the oil crisis was a consequence of the failure of the nuclear option. The fact that the nuclear programme failed to bring the expected results to Western countries is analyzed. The contribution of nuclear to total energy generated will not reach - in the near future at least - the expected proportion: nuclear is actually less competitive because the threat to the environment which some opponents attach to nuclear energy has become mirrored in economic aspects. (M.D.). 33 refs

  10. IEA Energy Technology Essentials: Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-03-15

    The IEA Energy Technology Essentials series offers concise four-page updates on the different technologies for producing, transporting and using energy. Nuclear power is the topic covered in this edition.

  11. Nuclear energy - option for the future. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this conference was to analyse the future national and international problems arising with energy supplies with regard to the large mass flows and CO2 flows involved in the use of nuclear energy. The following topics are dealt with: - nuclear energy, world-wide energy management and developments in Europe and Asia - disposal and ultimate waste disposal, plutonium management, an assessment of the Chernobyl accident 10 years on - new reactor developments in the energy mix - the costs arising with nuclear energy in the energy mix. In view of the demand made by climate researchers, to reduce CO2, and the additional construction work planned in the eastern and Asian areas, it will remain necessary for the Federal Republic of Germany,too, to maintain the know-how and technology for nuclear energy generation. (orig./DG)

  12. Nuclear energy in transition countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transition countries, respectively the countries that have in the year's 89/90 broken with the communist political and economy system are passing through difficult years. From their traditional markets within the closely interconnected socialist economy system, which has disintegrated, they have to reorient themselves to new, often saturated and sophisticated markets. To integrate into Europe as equal partners, rather then remain poor relatives, they must reduce this development gap in a reasonable time, not longer than 15 years. Slower pace would not give acceptable perspective to their young people and they would look for it elsewhere, thereby reducing creative forces for progress. Examples of economic development show that sustained growth of GDP is impossible without similar industrial growth, which, in turn, requires corresponding increase of energy use. In the same time these countries are the parts of densely populated European region and are subject to emission restriction of effluents with local or global effects. It is difficult to see how these countries could attain their development goals, whilst respecting their Kyoto obligations, without supplying increased energy demand from nuclear sources. (author)

  13. Nuclear, energy, environment, wastes, society - NEEDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the seven projects based on partnerships between several bodies, companies and agencies (CNRS, CEA, Areva, EDF, IRSN, ANDRA, BRGM) on research programmes on nuclear systems and scenarios, on resources (mines, processes, economy), on the processing and packaging of radioactive wastes, on the behaviour of materials for storage, on the impact of nuclear activities on the environment, on the relationship between nuclear, risks and society, and on materials for nuclear energy

  14. An easy explanation book on glossary of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book mentions about 260 words of nuclear energy, which include general term of nuclear energy, nuclear reactor, nuclear fuel and technique for concentration, using of nuclear energy, radiation and measurement, radwaste disposal, development plan on nuclear energy and international bodies. This book is useful for students studying nuclear energy and radiation and those who are interested in nuclear field to research in easy access.

  15. Improving public acceptance of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, public acceptance of nuclear energy decreased dramatically. In order to prevent such catastrophic events, major safety improvements have been achieved both in the operating nuclear power plants and in the future advanced projects as well. Nowadays, the nuclear energy problem was totally modified by the complete mastery and control of nuclear power generation as well as of radioactive waste management. It become a solution to the global climatic challenges and equally to the ever increasing world energy demand. (author)

  16. Nuclear energy: technical, economical and ecological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This information document aims to present all the different aspects of nuclear energy and the economic, industrial and ecological data from which the French nuclear energy programme was worked out, the techniques and the sites were chosen. Prepared with the collaboration of experts from the public services interested, this document attempts to cover all the questions raised and to provide answers (dependence with respect to oil versus the advantages of nuclear energy, environment and siting problems, consequences for public health and radiation protection, organization of nuclear industry

  17. Symmetry energy in nuclear density functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    W. Nazarewicz; Reinhard, P. -G.; Satula, W.; Vretenar, D.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy represents a response to the neutron-proton asymmetry. In this survey we discuss various aspects of symmetry energy in the framework of nuclear density functional theory, considering both non-relativistic and relativistic self-consistent mean-field realizations side-by-side. Key observables pertaining to bulk nucleonic matter and finite nuclei are reviewed. Constraints on the symmetry energy and correlations between observables and symmetry-energy parameters, using...

  18. Ministerial Presentation: Jordan. Why Nuclear? [International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy in the 21. Century: Addressing Energy Needs and Environmental Challenges, Beijing (China), 20-22 April 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , with excess production to be made available for export. Jordan has been seriously exploring nuclear power as a long-term alternative for electricity generation, water desalination, and as insurance for both energy security and future volatility of oil and natural gas prices. Nuclear energy is an important alternative to fossil fuels and is a particularly important component in a low-carbon energy strategy. In this regard, I urge this Conference to call for the inclusion of nuclear energy in the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of any future climate change negotiations. Nuclear power also maximizes and leverages Jordan's indigenous uranium resources. The Kingdom is endowed with rich uranium resources which have not been fully explored, with estimated reasonably assured resources of about 70,000 metric tons of uranium oxide in Central Jordan with additional quantities that could be extracted as byproduct of phosphoric acid production. There are, however, many challenges standing in the way of introducing nuclear power in Jordan such as the high investment cost, the need for skilled engineers and technicians, the limited suitable sites for power plants, the lack of adequate water sources for cooling, and the volatile regional political climate. Since 2001, Jordan has been developing a national strategy for civilian nuclear power. But only in January 2008, that Jordan's parliament empowered the Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) to lead the national effort and implement the Kingdom's nuclear strategy ---to be the Nuclear Power Implementation Organization (NEPIO) for the country. Furthermore and In compliance with the best of international practices, the parliament established an independent Jordan Nuclear Regulatory Commission (JNRC), to promulgate the needed legal, regulatory, and security framework for the introduction of nuclear power. JAEC has concluded nuclear cooperation agreements with France, China, South Korea, Canada, and will conclude two soon with Russia

  19. General information about nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following briefing notes were written to provide background information about nuclear power in Europe for journalists covering ENC 2002. They deal with four separate aspects of nuclear electricity generation: Economics; Environment; Safety; Waste Management. (authors)

  20. Nuclear symmetry energy: An experimental overview

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, D. V.; Yennello, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy is a fundamental quantity important for studying the structure of systems as diverse as the atomic nucleus and the neutron star. Considerable efforts are being made to experimentally extract the symmetry energy and its dependence on nuclear density and temperature. In this article, we review experimental studies carried out up-to-date and their current status.

  1. Factors in public perception of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public communication about nuclear energy needs to relate to the cultural undercurrents which determine how people perceive the environment. The paper discusses some of these and suggests ways of responding to them. It also outlines major ethical considerations relevant to uranium mining and nuclear energy and communication about both and shows that competent discourse about values is fundamental

  2. Nuclear symmetry energy: An experimental overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D V Shetty; S J Yennello

    2010-08-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy is a fundamental quantity important for studying the structure of systems as diverse as the atomic nucleus and the neutron star. Considerable efforts are being made to experimentally extract the symmetry energy and its dependence on nuclear density and temperature. In this article, the experimental studies carried out up-to-date and their current status are reviewed.

  3. Designing the Nuclear Energy Attitude Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Lawrence; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents a refined method for designing a valid and reliable Likert-type scale to test attitudes toward the generation of electricity from nuclear energy. Discusses various tests of validity that were used on the nuclear energy scale. Reports results of administration and concludes that the test is both reliable and valid. (CW)

  4. Nuclear Energy Assessment Battery. Form C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showers, Dennis Edward

    This publication consists of a nuclear energy assessment battery for secondary level students. The test contains 44 multiple choice items and is organized into four major sections. Parts include: (1) a knowledge scale; (2) attitudes toward nuclear energy; (3) a behaviors and intentions scale; and (4) an anxiety scale. Directions are provided for…

  5. Nuclear energy, energy of the future or bad solution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document presents the speeches of the debate on the nuclear energy solution for the future, presented during the meeting of the 6 may in Rennes, in the framework of the National Debate on the energies. The debate concerns the risks assessment and control, the solutions for the radioactive wastes, the foreign examples and the future of the nuclear energy. (A.L.B.)

  6. Better materials for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    material joining are some outstanding issues, which need to be addressed for the successful development of high temperature reactor systems. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  7. Building confidence in nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anti-nuclear groups have been very active in public communication and are advocating nuclear phase-out. The Canadian Nuclear Society has launched a course for science teachers to help them address the lack of understanding of an advanced technology, by teaching good science in plain language. (author)

  8. Building confidence in nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttler, J.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada); Garland, W.J. [McMaster Univeristy (Canada); Reynolds, A.B. [University of Virginia, Nuclear Reactor Facility (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The anti-nuclear groups have been very active in public communication and are advocating nuclear phase-out. The Canadian Nuclear Society has launched a course for science teachers to help them address the lack of understanding of an advanced technology, by teaching good science in plain language. (author)

  9. Low density behaviour of nuclear symmetry energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear symmetry energy is a fundamental quantity important for studying the structure of systems as diverse as the atomic nucleus and the neutron star. Considerable efforts have been made to ascertain the symmetry energy and its dependence on nuclear density. The theoretical studies are in agreement in general but differences in detail e.g. at sub- and supra-saturation density. The density behavior of the symmetry energy with respect to charge asymmetric nuclear matter is studied within the density functional derived from Density-Dependent Relativistic Hadron field (DDRH) theory. We explored the genuine contribution of the isovector and isoscalar mesons to the symmetry energy and the isospin dynamics of nuclear matter. The results of our calculation for the isospin dependence of nuclear symmetry energy and the effective pairing interaction in comparison to phenomenological approaches are presented.

  10. Nuclear Energy in Brazil; La energia nuclear en Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranjan Filho, A.

    2011-07-01

    This article deals with the fact that sustainable development requires the use of all forms of primary energy for electricity production and particularly of those which are environmental friendly, as nuclear. Any strategy to counterbalance the greenhouse effect will mean curtailing the use of fossil fuel and in that regard nuclear technology, the only one that manages to isolate safety its wastes, is a feasible alternative to protect the environment. Currently, hydropower is the major source of electricity generation in Brazil, but according to the expected increase of demand up to 2030, it will need to be complemented by thermal units, that in fact are currently needed to compensate for reservoirs fluctuations. In that scenario, nuclear appears as one of the most competitive options for base-load operation and in the case of Brazil, nuclear energy could have the support of important uranium reserves and technological mastering of the nuclear fuel fabrication. (Author)

  11. Mission analysis of photovoltaic solar energy conversion. Volume II. Survey of near-term (1976--1985) civilian applications in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rattin, E. J.

    1977-03-01

    The purpose of this market study was to identify and evaluate potential terrestrial civilian photovoltaic applications in the U.S. which were most likely to contribute significantly to the growth of near-term (to 1985) markets. A survey was conducted which led to the identification of many potential applications for photovoltaic power. These applications were subjected to a screening process which selected about 50 application groupings with considerable promise as near-term markets for photovoltaic arrays. For 21 of these 50 promising application groups, it was possible to make quantitative market estimates that totaled 13 MW/sub pk/ in projected annual array sales in 1985. The markets associated with the remaining 29 groups could not be quantitatively evaluated because of lack of an adequate existing data base and because the primary research required in order to provide such a data base was not feasible within the resources available in the study. If the average size of the markets associated with the unquantified groups, however, is comparable to the average for the quantified cases, then the total non-military U.S. market for arrays may well exceed 25 MW/sub pk//year in 1985. Foreign and U.S. military markets should add significantly to this total. In fact, the consensus of the photovoltaic industry representatives who were contacted is that the total foreign market over the near term may be several times as large as the domestic one.

  12. Intermediate energy nuclear data for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive review of the data needs for various applications was performed by the participants of the meeting. The status of compilation and evaluation of the needed data in the intermediate energy range of incident particles was discussed. The following broad application areas were identified and considered by the participants: intermediate energy nuclear data needed for accelerators; intermediate energy nuclear data needed for space applications; intermediate energy nuclear data for medical applications. The role of nuclear model calculations in data evaluations in this energy range was considered. The possibilities of existing model codes were considered from the point of view of reliability, accuracy, cost of computer time, availability to specialists in the Member States. The Meeting presentations were divided into the following three sessions: Nuclear data needs in the intermediate energy range (6 papers), Progress of nuclear data computations and evaluations in the intermediate energy range (6 papers) and Progress of experimental data measurements in the intermediate energy range. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. The ways of further improvement of the status of nuclear data in the intermediate energy range were discussed and the results of these discussions can be found in the conclusions and recommendations of this meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Nuclear energy: the real cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report on the discussions within a small group of academics falls under the headings: chairman's foreword; summary and recommendations; the government's nuclear power programme and its implications; the CEGB's planning record; the past performance of Britain's nuclear power stations - a guide for the future (query); nuclear power -early uncertainties; historic costs - 'the fraud inherent in all inflationary finance'; current cost accounting; fuel costs - coal stays steady, nuclear rises; net effective cost and the rationale for nuclear power; reinterpreting net effective costs; other considerations; conclusions and recommendations; references. (U.K.)

  14. Nuclear energy technology: theory and practice of commercial nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reviews Nuclear Energy Technology: Theory and Practice of Commercial Nuclear Power by Ronald Allen Knief, whose contents include an overview of the basic concepts of reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle; the basics of nuclear physics; reactor theory; heat removal; economics; current concerns at the front and back ends of the fuel cycle; design descriptions of domestic and foreign reactor systems; reactor safety and safeguards; Three Mile Island; and a brief overview of the basic concepts of nuclear fusion. Both magnetic and inertial confinement techniques are clearly outlined. Also reviews Nuclear Fuel Management by Harry W. Graves, Jr., consisting of introductory subjects (e.g. front end of fuel cycle); core physics methodology required for fuel depletion calculations; power capability evaluation (analyzes physical parameters that limit potential core power density); and fuel management topics (economics, loading arrangements and core operation strategies)

  15. The Future of Nuclear Energy: Facts and Fiction Chapter I: Nuclear Fission Energy Today

    OpenAIRE

    Dittmar, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear fission energy is considered to be somewhere between the holy grail, required to solve all energy worries of the human industrialized civilization, and a fast path directly to hell. Discussions about future energy sources and the possible contribution from nuclear energy are often dominated by variations of fundamentalists and often irrational approaches. As a result, very little is known by the general public and even by decision makers about the contribution of nuclear energy today,...

  16. Preventing heat injury: military versus civilian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J K

    1997-01-01

    Guidelines for preventing heat injury (HI) among military personnel are not directly applicable to civilian personnel. Military guidelines call for relatively large volumes of prophylactic water consumption and physical activity limitations depending on the wet bulb globe temperature. However, in civilian populations, there is an increased prevalence of HI risk factors: older age, medication use, especially anticholinergic and psychotropic medications, obesity, previous HI, and skin disorders. Although dehydration is a major contributor to HI in military situations, it is unlikely in classical heat stroke among civilians. Civilian guidelines are based on the heat index. Activity levels must be restricted more for civilians, and prophylactic water consumption (beyond replacing loss from sweat) is not necessary. This review discusses the pathophysiology of heat injury, contrasts the military and civilian approach to prevention of HI, and describes appropriate field intervention for HI. PMID:9002705

  17. Climatic change and nuclear energy; Changement climatique et energie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M

    2000-08-15

    The data presented in the different chapters lead to show that nuclear energy ids not a sustainable energy sources for the following reasons: investments in nuclear energy account financing that lacks to energy efficiency programmes. The nuclear programmes have negative effects such the need of great electric network, the need of highly qualified personnel, the freezing of innovation in the fields of supply and demand, development of small performing units. The countries resort to nuclear energy are among the biggest carbon dioxide emitters, because big size nuclear power plants lead to stimulate electric power consumption instead of inducing its rational use. Nuclear energy produces only electric power then a part of needs concerns heat (or cold) and when it is taken into account nuclear energy loses its advantages to the profit of cogeneration installations. Finally nuclear energy is a dangerous energy source, difficult to control as the accident occurring at Tokai MURA showed it in 1998. The problem of radioactive wastes is not still solved and the nuclear proliferation constitutes one of the most important threat at the international level. (N.C.)

  18. Nuclear energy and development of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India is a developing country and aims at reaching the category of a developed country in the near future. Energy in general and nuclear energy in particular has a lead role to play in this endeavour. The role of nuclear energy in the development of the country can roughly be put into two categories: Power applications and Non-power applications. The non-power applications include agriculture, industrial, water treatment, medical and other applications. The importance of nuclear energy in power applications will be discussed in this article

  19. Development of nuclear energy in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an attempt to depict the situation in the Armenian Nuclear Energy Sector with the particular focusing on its further development. Basing on the energy independence and national security strategy principles, the Government of Armenia made a decision to construct a new nuclear unit in the Republic to replace Unit 2 of the Armenian NPP after its decommissioning. The paper shows that the only acceptable way of electricity generation in Armenia is the combined operation of thermal power plants and new nuclear unit, with the use of domestic renewable energy sources. This will allow to cover the Republic's energy demand and to export the excess electricity to the neighboring countries

  20. By paths of the history of nuclear energy in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 44 papers on nuclear energy in Korea. The titles of these papers are view of an atomic energy agreement, development of nuclear energy and a technological revolution, education of nuclear energy and university, reconsideration for nuclear energy business in Korea, reminiscence and problem in nuclear energy administration in Korea, Is the nuclear power plant safe? advice for establishment of constructure of nuclear power, the meaning of Korean nuclear reactor, responsibility for anti nuclear power and from discovering fire to using nuclear energy.

  1. Media Coverage of Nuclear Energy after Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltra, C.; Roman, P.; Prades, A.

    2013-07-01

    This report presents the main findings of a content analysis of printed media coverage of nuclear energy in Spain before and after the Fukushima accident. Our main objective is to understand the changes in the presentation of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as a result of the accident in Japan. We specifically analyze the volume of coverage and thematic content in the media coverage for nuclear fusion from a sample of Spanish print articles in more than 20 newspapers from 2008 to 2012. We also analyze the media coverage of nuclear energy (fission) in three main Spanish newspapers one year before and one year after the accident. The results illustrate how the media contributed to the presentation of nuclear power in the months before and after the accident. This could have implications for the public understanding of nuclear power. (Author)

  2. Media Coverage of Nuclear Energy after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the main findings of a content analysis of printed media coverage of nuclear energy in Spain before and after the Fukushima accident. Our main objective is to understand the changes in the presentation of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as a result of the accident in Japan. We specifically analyze the volume of coverage and thematic content in the media coverage for nuclear fusion from a sample of Spanish print articles in more than 20 newspapers from 2008 to 2012. We also analyze the media coverage of nuclear energy (fission) in three main Spanish newspapers one year before and one year after the accident. The results illustrate how the media contributed to the presentation of nuclear power in the months before and after the accident. This could have implications for the public understanding of nuclear power. (Author)

  3. Imagined Modernity. Nuclear Power and West German Society in the 1960s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1969 the first commercial nuclear power plant went into operation in West Germany, making the country a latecomer (compared to other Western countries) in the civilian use of nuclear energy. Yet, in the late 1950s and 1960s, nuclear energy played a major part in public debates on energy supply, on science and technology policy, and the relationship between state and the economy. The civilian use of atomic energy also served as a source of national identity and a projection of modernity. The paper seeks to connect analyses of technical, economic, political, and cultural developments, in order to assess the overall impact of nuclear power on West German society. (author)

  4. Future nuclear energy scenarios for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is back on the agenda worldwide. In order to prepare for the next decades and to set priorities in nuclear R and D and investment, market share scenarios are evaluated. This allows to identify the triggers which influence the market penetration of future nuclear reactor technologies. To this purpose, scenarios for a future nuclear reactor park in Europe have been analysed applying an integrated dynamic process modelling technique. Various market share scenarios for nuclear energy are derived including sub-variants with regard to the intra-nuclear options taken, e.g. introduction date of Gen-III (i.e. EPR) and Gen-IV (i.e. SCWR, HTR, FR) reactors, level of reprocessing, and so forth. The assessment was undertaken using the DANESS code which allows to provide a complete picture of mass-flow and economics of the various nuclear energy system scenarios. The analyses show that the future European nuclear park will exist of combinations of Gen-III and Gen-IV reactors. This mix will always consist of a set of reactor types each having its specific strengths. Furthermore, the analyses highlight the triggers influencing the choice between different nuclear energy deployment scenarios. In addition, a dynamic assessment is made with regard to manpower requirements for the construction of a future nuclear fleet in the different scenarios. (authors)

  5. The black book of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear partisans and opponents have been fighting for years. On one side, the energy autonomy of France, its electricity exports and the 70000 people employed in the nuclear industry are put forward. On the other side, the accident risk, the cost and dangerousness of waste management are the key words. But, can France, like Germany, really phase out nuclear energy? Is there other solutions? Since the Fukushima accident, what has changed in the pro-nuclear discourse? How strong is the nuclear lobby in France? Can we really have an unbiased debate on this question? The author analyzes the global question of nuclear energy, both in France and abroad, without partiality and political ideology

  6. Nuclear energy and natural environment. Information seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The material of the Jadwisin 93' seminar is the collection 20 of 19 articles discussing aspects of the subject of nuclear energy and natural environment. The lectures were presented at six sessions: 1) Nuclear energy applications in medicine, agriculture, industry, food preservation and protection of the environment; 2) Nuclear power in the world; 3) Public attitudes towards different energy options, the example of Sweden; 4) Nuclear power in neighbouring countries; 5) Radiation and human health; 6) Radioactive waste management and potential serious radiological hazards. The general conclusion of the seminar can be as follows. In some cases the nuclear power is a source of environment pollution but very often nuclear techniques are now used and certainly more often in the future will be used for environment and human health protection

  7. UN peace operations and protection of civilians

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Hultman

    2013-01-01

    Protection of civilians is now at the forefront of the responsibilities of the international community. There is a strong international norm that civilian populations should be protected from violence. But how committed is the United Nations to acting in line with this norm? I argue that the UN Security Council (UNSC) has an interest in demonstrating that it takes violence against civilians seriously. Through a broadened security agenda including human security, the legitimacy and the credibi...

  8. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, Unit 3. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 3 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to identify the key elements of the United States' nuclear waste dilemma and introduce the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and the role of the…

  9. Solar energy versus nuclear energy as energy sources at the transition period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical aspects and social aspects of nuclear power plants and solar energy system as energy sources, were comparatively evaluated. The evaluation proves that solar energy is better than nuclear energy. (SMN)

  10. The role of nuclear energy in the European energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the strongest messages to emerge from his presentation is the need to extend the lifetime of existing nuclear power plants and build the next generation of reactors that will continue to underscore nuclear energy's important contribution to the goal of achieving a low- carbon economy. Thus nuclear energy and the developing Europe's low-carbon economy reflect one of the EU's main policy priorities, namely to encourage sustainable economic growth while at the same time reducing the Community's carbon footprint. Without nuclear energy the EU would never reduce its carbon footprint as renewable energies alone could never achieve this goal. The aim is to give emphasis to the process how the debate in favour of nuclear energy as a main pillar of the fight against climate change has gained considerably in impetus in the European Parliament and to note the great recent strides that have taken place within the Parliament with regards to the nuclear debate

  11. Nuclear energy education scenario around the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabas, Roberta de Carvalho; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: praroberta@uol.com.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy has been used as a source of clean energy with many benefits. Nevertheless, it is still addressed with prejudice. The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II (1945), the Three Mile Island accident (1979), Chernobyl accident (1986), the crash of the cesium-137 in Goiana, Brazil (1987), and the recent accident in Fukushima (2011) may have been responsible for the negative image of nuclear energy. Researches on education have been conducted with students concerning the conceptual and practical issues of nuclear energy. This work aims to review the literature about nuclear energy education around the world in both, elementary school and high school. Since most educational researches on nuclear energy were published after 1980, this literature review covered the researches that have been published since 1980. The data were presented in chronological order. The results from the literature review provided a clear visualization of the global nuclear energy educational scenario, showing that the theme is still addressed with prejudice due to an incorrect view of nuclear energy and a limited view of its benefits. Concerning the science textbooks, the literature reports that the theme should be better addressed, encouraging students to research more about it. The data from this literature review will serve as a reference for a future proposal for a teaching training program for Brazilian science/physics high school teachers using a new teaching approach. (author)

  12. Nuclear energy education scenario around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy has been used as a source of clean energy with many benefits. Nevertheless, it is still addressed with prejudice. The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II (1945), the Three Mile Island accident (1979), Chernobyl accident (1986), the crash of the cesium-137 in Goiana, Brazil (1987), and the recent accident in Fukushima (2011) may have been responsible for the negative image of nuclear energy. Researches on education have been conducted with students concerning the conceptual and practical issues of nuclear energy. This work aims to review the literature about nuclear energy education around the world in both, elementary school and high school. Since most educational researches on nuclear energy were published after 1980, this literature review covered the researches that have been published since 1980. The data were presented in chronological order. The results from the literature review provided a clear visualization of the global nuclear energy educational scenario, showing that the theme is still addressed with prejudice due to an incorrect view of nuclear energy and a limited view of its benefits. Concerning the science textbooks, the literature reports that the theme should be better addressed, encouraging students to research more about it. The data from this literature review will serve as a reference for a future proposal for a teaching training program for Brazilian science/physics high school teachers using a new teaching approach. (author)

  13. Nuclear Energy Principles, Practices, and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Bodansky, David

    2008-01-01

    The world faces serious difficulties in obtaining the energy that will be needed in coming decades for a growing population, especially given the problem of climate change caused by fossil fuel use. This book presents a view of nuclear energy as an important carbon-free energy option. It discusses the nuclear fuel cycle, the types of reactors used today and proposed for the future, nuclear waste disposal, reactor accidents and reactor safety, nuclear weapon proliferation, and the cost of electric power. To provide background for these discussions, the book begins with chapters on the history of the development and use of nuclear energy, the health effects of ionizing radiation, and the basic physics principles of reactor operation. The text has been rewritten and substantially expanded for this edition, to reflect changes that have taken place in the eight years since the publication of the first edition and to provide greater coverage of key topics. These include the Yucca Mountain repository plans, designs ...

  14. What about the future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future of nuclear energy, which looked bright in the first part of the seventies, is apparently dull today. However, facts remain. Nuclear energy will be necessary. Oil will be scarce in the nineties, and will not compete with other energies on the heat market. Coal development meets a certain number of obstacles. Moreover, it is demonstrated from American experience, but still more from European and French experience, that nuclear electricity is and will be the cheapest. There remains a key problem: the nuclear debate, and its byproducts, the regulatory perfectionism and administrative red tape. From the author's experience, the following points are essential: a clear expression of why nuclear energy is needed and the corresponding political will, little arguing on technical issues in public (contrary to what is generally done), but achieving ways of convincing the public opinion that safety matters are handled with paramount care and competence

  15. Nuclear energy in Turkey. Recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The global demand for electricity is rapidly increasing. There is growing uncertainty in regard to the supply and prices of oil and natural gas. These considerations have opened new prospects for the development of nuclear energy on a global state. Despite the negative impact of the Fukushima Daichi accident, still some countries are considering or have expressed interest in developing nuclear power programmes. As the country using nuclear technology is primarily responsible for safety and as operational safety cannot be out sourced, building of sound safety expertise and strong safety culture is an essential precondition for the country introducing nuclear technology. Turkey's energy policy is naturally focused on the security, sustainability and competitiveness of energy supply. It is designed to sustain targeted economic and social growth in the long run. Turkey remains resolutely committed to the goal of ensuring safe, secure and peaceful utilization of nuclear energy

  16. Peaceful nuclear energy to Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The argument for and against the application of peaceful nuclear energy in Saudi Arabia is discussed in terms of the country's industrial development and power requirement for electricity and desalination. The discussion leads to the conclusion that due to its large oil reserve, Saudi Arabia may tolerate a considerate approach to nuclear energy up to the year 2000. Beyond this date, nuclear energy should be used in order to achieve the desired industrial maturity in the country. The introduction of nuclear energy, however, will be faced with three constraints, namely man power availability, cooling water requirement, and the size of the electrical grid. The period 1980-2000 is thus most suitable for important preparation steps, among which are the adoption of regulatory provisions, establishment of nuclear facilities with necessary equipments, and staff training for regulatory, organizational, and technical activities. The paper outlines a scheme for the initiation steps and efforts to meet these requirements. (orig.)

  17. Teachers and nuclear energy - German situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    School education in Germany is the responsibility of each federal state; there is no national curriculum. Nevertheless, all pupils of all types of school are confronted with the energy topic; nuclear energy is a compulsory topic in a subject where pupils' achievements are marked; interdisciplinary thinking is encouraged. The approach may however fail because of inflexible teachers (against nuclear energy), organizational structures and complementary training

  18. Continued development of nuclear energy in Sweden?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortage of electric power may become a serious problem for Sweden within a short time. Trade union leaders disagree with the planned discontinuation of the nuclear energy industry. The authorities are asked to retain it or even develop it further. The four great rivers that are not yet developed for hydroelectricity are protected. Alternative renewable energy sources may contribute only marginally. Gas is the only real alternative to nuclear energy

  19. The new face of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, Alex (comp.)

    2014-12-15

    The United Arab Emirates will be the first of the Gulf Co-operation Council nations to develop nuclear power - and only the second in the Middle East after Iran. In this exclusive interview, the CEO of the Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation, Mohamed Al Hammadi, explains why the UAE has chosen to develop nuclear energy, why he is confident the reactors will come on stream on time and within budget, and why the nation sees itself as a model of how nuclear power can be developed cost-effectively and safely.

  20. Lauvergeon-Cochet: what about nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty years after the Chernobyl accident, nuclear energy seems to make a worldwide come back. Several reasons can be put forward: the global warming threat and the rise of petroleum prices. However, on can question if the re-launching of nuclear power is ineluctable and if there is other alternatives. Two French personalities: A. Lauvergeon, president of Areva company, world nuclear leader, and Y. Cochet, ecologist deputy and former minister of environment, have accepted to debate and share their opinions about the ticklish topic of nuclear energy. (J.S.)

  1. The nuclear energy in the seawater desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general, the hydric resources of diverse regions of the world are insufficient for to satisfy the necessities of their inhabitants. Among the different technologies that are applied for the desalination of seawater are the distillation processes, the use of membranes and in particular recently in development the use of the nuclear energy (Nuclear Desalination; System to produce drinkable water starting from seawater in a complex integrated in that as much the nuclear reactor as the desalination system are in a common location, the facilities and pertinent services are shared, and the nuclear reactor produces the energy that is used for the desalination process). (Author)

  2. Energy accounting in nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy analysis is a systematic way of tracing and accounting for the flows of energy through an industrial system and apportioning a quantity of the primary energy input of the goods and services sent out. The application of energy accounting to nuclear power stations and their growth in generating systems is discussed. Misunderstandings arising from discrepancies and weaknesses in some published simple analyses of hypothetical growth situations are outlined. Results of a more complex energy flow analysis are used to demonstrate that current nuclear energy programs are running at an energy profit. Large fossil fuel savings will occur in a real electrical grid system under anticipated nuclear power growth rates. These savings will give a new dimension in planning the use of fossil energy resources which will still be needed for transport and industrial processes, such as steel-making, for some time to come. (author)

  3. Energy modeling: nuclear energy as China's main energy after 2040

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the energy modeling and the strategic forecast of China's economic development and population, the energy demand in China in the coming century has been calculated yearly by computer simulation. It is shown by the calculation results that the primary energy consumption in 2050 will be 3.37-4.25 times as that of 2000. The fossil energy will still be the main energy during the early stage of 21st century, but it will be cut down rapidly since 2020s as its annual consumption is increased to 1.656-2.044 x 109 tce/a. Because the fossil fuel ressources in China are limited, more and more fossil fuel will be mainly turned to chemical products, and the environmental pollution will be serious if we still use the fossil as a main fuel widely. The amount of renewable energy will be increasing, but its share in the primary energy consumption will be cut down from 36% to about 20% during the first half of next century and then will maintain this portion. In this case, the nuclear energy will be developed rapidly during the early stage of next century and will become the main energy since 2040. The methodology of energy forecast has also been reviewed

  4. Nuclear energy regulation in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority was established as an autonomous body reporting to the Presidency of Argentina by Act known as the Nuclear Activity National Act, and is empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regard to radiation and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. This report details functions and competence of the regulatory body in order to preserve its own independent criterion regarding every aspect of radiological and nuclear safety, and the global strategy of the regulatory system, which are concentrated in the following basics aspects: issue of the corresponding standards; execution of regulatory inspections and audits to verify the compliance with granted licenses and authorisations; independent execution of analyses and studies for the licensing process of nuclear installations; development of technical and scientific aspects associated to radiological and nuclear safety; training of personnel involved in radiological and nuclear safety, either belonging to the Regulatory Body or those working in installations, which perform practices under control. The regulatory control activities are carried out with independence of technical opinions and decisions; administrative autarchy; legal capacity to act in the field of public and private rights, and qualified personnel. The regulatory system complies with the concept of safety culture and its development, and the commitment to nuclear power plants' safety is made clear in design or operation concepts giving priority to safety over economic rentability of the installations. The compliance with Maintenance Programs, In-service Inspection Programs and good operation practices are also part of the commitment. This paper describes the organisational structure of the regulatory body, its human resources, personnel qualification and training, and the necessary financial resources. The regulatory body issues and establishes the standards, which regulate and

  5. The situation of the nuclear energy in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents an overview of the nuclear energy in the world. It approaches the following main topics: kinds of nuclear power plants; operation experience of the nuclear plants; environmental and social aspects of the nuclear energy; economic aspects of the nuclear energy; development of the reactors technology and supply of the nuclear fuel

  6. Nuclear Inter Jura '91: nuclear law and nuclear energy for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1991 congress of the International Nuclear Law Association took as its subject Nuclear Law and Nuclear Energy for the future. As well as individual reports, there were four sessions each covering the report of one or more working groups. The first session investigated licensing and decommissioning, while the second focussed on insurance and liability. The third session was devoted to nuclear supply and commerce at an international level. Finally radiological protection and nuclear waste management was discussed in the fourth session. (UK)

  7. Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database Description and User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2014, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Science and Technology Innovation initiated the Nuclear Energy (NE)–Infrastructure Management Project by tasking the Nuclear Science User Facilities, formerly the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility, to create a searchable and interactive database of all pertinent NE-supported and -related infrastructure. This database, known as the Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database (NEID), is used for analyses to establish needs, redundancies, efficiencies, distributions, etc., to best understand the utility of NE's infrastructure and inform the content of infrastructure calls. The Nuclear Science User Facilities developed the database by utilizing data and policy direction from a variety of reports from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Research Council, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and various other federal and civilian resources. The NEID currently contains data on 802 research and development instruments housed in 377 facilities at 84 institutions in the United States and abroad. The effort to maintain and expand the database is ongoing. Detailed information on many facilities must be gathered from associated institutions and added to complete the database. The data must be validated and kept current to capture facility and instrumentation status as well as to cover new acquisitions and retirements. This document provides a short tutorial on the navigation of the NEID web portal at NSUF-Infrastructure.INL.gov.

  8. Security of energy supply, sustainable development - nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation author deals with the security of energy supply in the Slovak Republic (SR). Nuclear energy sector in the SR is presented. Completion of Unit 3 and 4 of the Mochovce NPP is necessary

  9. Global Energy Challenges of the 21. Century and Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers the world energy demand till the middle of the century, as well as possible forecasting solution for this challenge. On the base of the mathematical model developed in the Kurchatov Institute in 2003- 2006, the vision of the global nuclear energy system and its potential contribution in the energy mix was analyzed. The rate of rapprochement between specific energy consumptions in different countries of the world is a key parameter determining the energy market strain. It was shown that a continuation of the current world trends of this rapprochement would result in an energy resource deficit already in the nearest future. The energy mix picture would contain an 'unsatisfied demand' area of about 10 000 Mtoe of total energy to be consumed by the mid-century Supposing that the mankind has to meet the 'unsatisfied demand' by nuclear energy, the global energy challenges of the 21. century energy do not impose any upper limit on nuclear energy development, the scale of which would be determined by development opportunities. Russia, as one of the pioneers of the First Nuclear Era, possesses great experience of solving the key issues of nuclear energy of the 20. century, and is capable to play an important role in dealing with the challenges faced by nuclear in the 21. century. (authors)

  10. Public acceptance of nuclear energy in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main constraints to adopt a nuclear program is the public acceptance. In Mexico, at least, it lacks of an adequate promotion of its benefits and challenges. A big stigma for nuclear electricity production is the association with nuclear weapons, along with myths and misconceptions and bad information about nuclear energy. Mexico has adopted an energy policy to diversify the electricity sources and nuclear energy is among the alternatives to achieve this goal because current studies show that is a safe and a competitive option from an economical point of view. Public opinion plays a very important role in the policy decision making to adopt the deployment of new reactor units; therefore it is necessary to define communication strategies to promote nuclear energy. The current study is an investigation to learn what is the perception and positioning about nuclear energy as a starting point to define the way to improve public acceptance. The national assessment carry on here is divided in two parts, the first one is a qualitative study to know knowledge level, associations and nuclear perception, identifying controversy items and expectations about advantages and disadvantages to define the adequate question to be used in the second part, which is a quantitative study that shows the acceptance of nuclear energy at national level and in particular in two sites that are suitable to deploy new nuclear reactors. From the results of this study some communication and persuasion strategies to improve public perception are defined and they could be used as part of a nuclear program. (author)

  11. International commercial nuclear reactor safety. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Nuclear Regulation of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 25, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This hearing addresses the safety of civilian nuclear power reactors in Eastern Europe and in Cuba and evaluates the existing international nuclear safety programs. Testimony was heard from representatives of the World Associations of Nuclear Operations, Department of State (Inter-American Affairs), Duke Power Company, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, International Atomic Energy Agency (Division of Nuclear Safety), Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Department of Energy, and a professor of nuclear engineering from the University of Florida

  12. Public acceptance of nuclear energy in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Indonesia, the activities in nuclear field have developed since 1954 when a government committee was formed. This committee had the task to carry out nuclear energy research, and after this committee reported its work, the Lembaga Tenaga Atom (Agency for Atomic Energy) was founded in 1958, and in 1964, it became Badan Tenaga Atom Nasional through the Basic Act on Atomic Energy. BATAN is a government agency, of which the main tasks are the development of nuclear energy by regulating, administering and controlling all nuclear activities in Indonesia and conducting the research and development of the use of nuclear energy. One of its tasks is to give general and technical informations on nuclear technology to public, and the activities on public acceptance started at the end of 1985. The feasibility study to introduce the first nuclear power plant has been done by a Japanese NEWJEC Inc., and completed in May, 1996. The public acceptance program and strategy and the activities of the public acceptance of a nuclear power plant are reported. The results of the public socialization and exhibition can be seen by the increasing number of the participants in the programs. (K.I.)

  13. Man is overcharged by nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author states four points against nuclear power: 1. Although the probability of a catastrophic accident is very low, the consequences will be enormous. 2. Extension of the nuclear power generation worldwide will increase the danger of proliferation of nuclear weapons. 3. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and disposal of nuclear waste will be a problem for many generations. 4. Protection of nuclear facilities may lead to the eventual abandonment of the civil rights assured by law. The author gives priority to energy conservation; he states that an 80% utilization factor is achievable in cogeneration and district heating. He agress with C.F. Weizsaecker on the long-term relevance of solar energy as the main energy source, which would also help to reduce the CO2 problem (heat-up of the earth atmosphere, destruction of tropical forests). Energy supply without nuclear power plants would also provide new jobs, since there is no energy source as capital-intensive and low in staff requirements as nuclear power. (GL)

  14. Nuclear and conventional energy transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pollution from fossil fuel- and nuclear power plants have been compared. SO2 is the substance chosen from coal- and oil fuel power plants. Measured values for chemical pollution are at levels 10 times, and radioactive pollution near to nuclear power plants, 10.000 times, below that which would cause damage to health. (A.R.H.)

  15. Can we live without nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demands for a withdrawal of nuclear energy are usually based on alleged safety deficiencies of nuclear power plants. Renewable energy sources, electricity saving and heat-power coupling should make possible the replacement of nuclear power plants. But are solar and wind energy sources real alternatives, by which electricity can be generated cheaply and sufficiently? Or could the energy problem be solved by saving energy without lowering our standard of living and narrowing the development of our industry? Must we instead burn expensive and rare fossil fuels that also have many disadvantages? For the chemical industries of the Federal Republic of Germany and Switzerland who are very large electricity consumers these are essential questions, on which their future competitiveness depends. The question naturally then arises whether our nuclear power plants are really so unsafe that we are obliged to accept solutions that are far from ideal. The present technical and economical article tries to answer these questions. 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  16. Nuclear Energy Density Functionals Constrained by Low-Energy QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Vretenar, Dario

    2008-01-01

    A microscopic framework of nuclear energy density functionals is reviewed, which establishes a direct relation between low-energy QCD and nuclear structure, synthesizing effective field theory methods and principles of density functional theory. Guided by two closely related features of QCD in the low-energy limit: a) in-medium changes of vacuum condensates, and b) spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry; a relativistic energy density functional is developed and applied in studies of ground-s...

  17. Nuclear physics, neutron physics and nuclear energy. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book contains of proceedings of XI International School on Nuclear Physics, Neutron Physics and Nuclear Energy organized traditionally every two years by Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and the Physics Department of Sofia University held near the city of Varna. It provides a good insight to the large range of theoretical and experimental results, prospects, problems, difficulties and challenges which are at the core of nuclear physics today. The efforts and achievements of scientists to search for new phenomena in nuclei at extreme circumstances as superdeformation and band crossing in nuclear structure understanding are widely covered. From this point of view the achievements and future in the field of high-precision γ-spectroscopy are included. Nuclear structure models and methods, models for strong interaction, particle production and properties, resonance theory and its application in reactor physics are comprised also. (V.T.)

  18. Nuclear energy an opportunity for Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this document is to present, in a clear and concrete way, the results presented in the book -Nuclear energy an opportunity for Mexico- this book was prepared to evaluate the feasibility of constructing a new nuclear power plant in Mexico considering the evident worldwide rise of the nuclear energy as a way to produce electricity. The worldwide nuclear power renaissance is based on several factors, some of the most important are the uncertainty about the availability and behavior of fossil fuels, the impacts of the green house gases over the environment; improvements in the design and construction process that allow to reduce the construction periods; the competitiveness of nuclear power with other clean technologies and the experience of the nuclear power plant fleet that has shown performance indicators that exceed other technologies. Also, the competitiveness of the nuclear power as base load to satisfy the electricity demand. This book include the actual situation of the nuclear power in the world and the challenges and opportunities to incorporate additional nuclear power plants in Mexico, with the aim of satisfy the future electricity demand, in harmony with the environment and in a secure and safety way. Nonetheless, by itself a nuclear power plant is not the entire or only solution for the environmental and security of supply issues, but nuclear power is a main part of the integral solution where renewable and new clean technologies (e.g. carbon capture and storage and integrated gasification combined cycle) plays an important role. Nowadays, several countries go forward for the use or nuclear power, reinforcing and in some cases restarting their nuclear power programs, Mexico should not be the exception, nuclear power deserves to be included in the portfolio of generation technologies in the future years. The main advantages of nuclear power, as well as the most questionable issues are deeply discussed in the book. (Author)

  19. Nuclear energy and its future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of nuclear power in the world and its future are briefly discussed. It is shown that nuclear power capacity is increasing in the Asian and Pacific rim region and that new reactor designs, with the increased emphasis on safety and standardisation, could make nuclear power a more acceptable option in the future. The author also outlines the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization wide range of skills and facilities which are bringing the benefits of nuclear science and technology to Australia. These include: the development of Synroc as an advanced second generation waste management; production of radiotracers for biomedical researches and environmental problems; application of gamma irradiation in industry and of ion beam analysis in biology, archaeology, semi-conductor and environmental science. 2 tabs

  20. Nuclear energy and climate change; Energia nuclear y cambio climatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Jimenez, A.

    2002-07-01

    Energy is one of the essential motives for social and economic development of the humanity. Nuclear energy is a feasible option to stand up to a larger demand of energy, and it is playing, and will continue playing in the future, a decisive role in the debate about climate change and sustainable development, and in the efforts to reduce the CO{sub 2} emissions. (Author)