WorldWideScience

Sample records for civic cultures public

  1. Online Civic Cultures?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie; Askanius, Tina

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the potential of video activism on YouTube to form a communicative space for deliberation and dissent. It asks how commenting on activist videos can help sustain civic cultures that allow for both antagonism and inclusive political debate. Drawing on a case study of online...

  2. German Muslims and their engagement in participatory culture: reflections on civic and artistic contributions to the public sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Asmaa

    2017-09-01

    This paper examines publics of young German Muslims. Case studies include the singer Huelya Kandemir, the theatre group Uma Lamo and the social network Zahnräder. By focusing on spiritual music publics, theatrical comedy publics and social publics, it tries a new approach to the way in which we understand minority public engagement. In addition to examining the concept of counterpublics, it utilizes the concept of participatory culture, which offers a relevant complement. The study argues that the publics of young German Muslims display multifaceted artistic and civic engagement, which can best be understood in terms of participation in cultural or civic productions and contribution to the wider German public. Features or effects of counterpublics, such as the countering of mainstream representations of minority identities and the offering of alternative discourses, are occasionally reflected in their activities. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  3. Cultural Transmission of Civicness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljunge, Jan Martin

    2012-01-01

    This paper estimates the intergeneration transmission of civicness by studying second generation immigrants in 29 European countries with ancestry in 83 nations. There is significant transmission of civicness both on the mother’s and the father’s side. The estimates are quantitatively significant...

  4. Cultural Transmission of Civicness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljunge, Jan Martin

    This paper estimates the intergeneration transmission of civicness by studying second generation immigrants in 29 European countries with ancestry in 83 nations. There is significant transmission of civicness both on the mother’s and the father’s side. The estimates are quantitatively significant...

  5. Where civics meets science: building science for the public good through Civic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlick, J A; Levine, P

    2017-09-01

    Public understanding of science and civic engagement on science issues that impact contemporary life matter more today than ever. From the Planned Parenthood controversy, to the Flint water crisis and the fluoridation debate, societal polarization about science issues has reached dramatic levels that present significant obstacles to public discussion and problem solving. This is happening, in part, because systems built to support science do not often reward open-minded thinking, inclusive dialogue, and moral responsibility regarding science issues. As a result, public faith in science continues to erode. This review explores how the field of Civic Science can impact public work on science issues by building new understanding of the practices, influences, and cultures of science. Civic Science is defined as a discipline that considers science practice and knowledge as resources for civic engagement, democratic action, and political change. This review considers how Civic Science informs the roles that key participants-scientists, public citizens and institutions of higher education-play in our national science dialogue. Civic Science aspires to teach civic capacities, to inform the responsibilities of scientists engaged in public science issues and to inspire an open-minded, inclusive dialogue where all voices are heard and shared commitments are acknowledged. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Civic Political Culture, Participatory Governance and Political ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof

    This study x-rayed the significance of civic political culture on participatory governance and its .... The literature on participatory governance theory assumes that deliberation is key to effective .... factors and capture all considerations involved in making certain that citizen interests .... vital element in any organization.

  7. Educating for Civic Engagement: Public Achievement as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Bernadette Christine

    Over the last four decades there is evidence that citizens are less civically engaged, have less trust in each other and governmental institutions, and are less prepared to participate in deliberative and civic processes. This research studies the importance of acquiring deliberative and civic skills and behaviors as an integral part of civic engagement and developing educational and learning strategies to impart those skills and behaviors in an educational environment. This research uses a civic action program called Public Achievement (PA) as a case study to investigate if participating in a civic and deliberative focused program enables participants to continue to use the skills and behaviors learned in PA in non-PA activities. The research study was focused by a literature review of philosophical frameworks, educational history in the United States, and educational theory. The literature review and examples of learning civic skills and behaviors in secondary and higher educational institutions are examined to frame the analysis of PA. Based on the literature review and the design of PA, constructs and a survey instrument were developed to test the hypothesis that students who participate in PA will be more likely to exhibit civic skills and behaviors than students who did not participate in PA. The research was conducted with two schools in rural Missouri, two schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and two schools in St. Paul, Minnesota. The study results show that students who participated in PA were not more likely to exhibit civic skills and behaviors, and in many cases, non-PA students exhibited civic skills and behaviors more often. The findings revealed that there are programmatic, organizational, and societal barriers that may impede the effectiveness of PA. The findings suggest that implementation of civic engagement programs may be more effective when the effort is supported and reinforced by and across all parts of the organization, organizational

  8. Reconceptualizing public participation in environmental assessment as EA civics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, A. John; Diduck, Alan P.

    2017-01-01

    Notwithstanding the considerable attention placed on creating meaningful opportunities for public participation in environmental assessment (EA), many participants and those who have reviewed participation processes often find practice sorely wanting. This reality stands in stark juxtaposition to future environmental governance needs, which will require increased openness, deliberation and transdisciplinary knowledge in order to deal with environmental change that is ever more uncertain, complex and conflictual. In this paper, our purpose was to consider how to meet those needs through reconceptualizing public participation as EA civics, founded on an active citizen base, deliberative in nature and orientated toward learning. We do this through developing a new conceptual model of next generation participation processes that is relevant at multiple spatial scales and institutional levels, is applicable to the entire assessment cycle and spans temporal scales through feedback loops. Our EA civics model builds on the “civics approach” to environmental governance and “action civics” by extending their core ideas to participation in EA. We did this by conducting an integrative literature review (including numerous papers we have contributed over the years) and reflecting on our own experiences as EA participants. We apply current thinking on public participation design to our EA civics conceptualization and highlight important design features that have received scant attention. We conclude that EA civics holds promise for fairer and more robust participation processes if all aspects of the model are considered and the actions related to each are implemented. - Highlights: • Consideration of the ‘civics approach’ and ‘action civics’ in an EA context • Conceptualization of public participation as EA civics • Reflection on the EA civics as a model of participation suitable for next generation assessment

  9. Reconceptualizing public participation in environmental assessment as EA civics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, A. John, E-mail: jsincla@umanitoba.ca [Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Diduck, Alan P., E-mail: a.diduck@uwinnipeg.ca [Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg R3B 2E9 (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    Notwithstanding the considerable attention placed on creating meaningful opportunities for public participation in environmental assessment (EA), many participants and those who have reviewed participation processes often find practice sorely wanting. This reality stands in stark juxtaposition to future environmental governance needs, which will require increased openness, deliberation and transdisciplinary knowledge in order to deal with environmental change that is ever more uncertain, complex and conflictual. In this paper, our purpose was to consider how to meet those needs through reconceptualizing public participation as EA civics, founded on an active citizen base, deliberative in nature and orientated toward learning. We do this through developing a new conceptual model of next generation participation processes that is relevant at multiple spatial scales and institutional levels, is applicable to the entire assessment cycle and spans temporal scales through feedback loops. Our EA civics model builds on the “civics approach” to environmental governance and “action civics” by extending their core ideas to participation in EA. We did this by conducting an integrative literature review (including numerous papers we have contributed over the years) and reflecting on our own experiences as EA participants. We apply current thinking on public participation design to our EA civics conceptualization and highlight important design features that have received scant attention. We conclude that EA civics holds promise for fairer and more robust participation processes if all aspects of the model are considered and the actions related to each are implemented. - Highlights: • Consideration of the ‘civics approach’ and ‘action civics’ in an EA context • Conceptualization of public participation as EA civics • Reflection on the EA civics as a model of participation suitable for next generation assessment.

  10. Civic Participation Reimagined: Youth Interrogation and Innovation in the Multimodal Public Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirra, Nicole; Garcia, Antero

    2017-01-01

    This chapter challenges dominant narratives about the civic disengagement of youth from marginalized communities by reconceptualizing what counts as civic participation in public life and how youth are positioned as civic agents. We examine ideologies that undergird traditional forms of civic education and engagement in the United States and offer…

  11. Technological Solutions to Social and Citizen Problems. The Case of Civic and Public Challenges in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Adalberto TENA-ESPINOZA-DE-LOS-MONTEROS

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the process of civic innovation that, based on technological solutions and open initiatives, the civic society’s organization Codeando México suggests for the attention and solution of social and civic problems in Mexico. The Retos Cívicos (Civic Challenges and Retos Públicos (Public Challenges initiatives are addressed and described as experiences of innovation in the implementation of technological strategies for the solution of social and civic problems. A reflection is made on the civic appropriation of the ICTs and its irruption in the processes of innovation, as well as on the impact that the ICTs have in the conformation of a new civic ecosystem. Last, the strategies of Hacking cívico (Civic Hacking and Comunidades Cívicas (Civic Communities that the Codeando México organization promotes as a model for the linkage and civic participation within the frame of civic innovation, are mentioned.

  12. Fault Lines in American Culture: The Case for Civic Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartoonian, H. Michael; Van Scotter, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The social landscape of the United States can be mapped by using a series of cultural fault lines. This topography portrays conditions that descriptions of the surface fail to illuminate. Many of these schisms are the by-product of ideological positions that diminish personal responsibility and thoughtful civic discourse. If left unattended, these…

  13. Innovation in Public Service Delivery: Civic Participation in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata M. Merickova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Participation as such is connected with political, social and civic dimensions. Through participation, citizens can directly or indirectly help to make the public process become more transparent and more efficient. It allows citizens “to see" into a decision-making process, to understand it, as well as contribute and be able to control it. In practice, civic participation has various forms; it includes both formal civic associations and informal groups of citizens that develop activities in order to solve local problems. In this paper we focus on civic participation in the innovation in the provision of public services, i.e. co-creation. Our objective is to map the best practices of co-creation in social innovations at the local government level in Slovakia. The main findings of our analysis are that co-created innovations are mostly initiated by non-governmental actors. Our study uses a qualitative approach and is based on original survey data from our own research, conducted mainly within the LIPSE research project.

  14. Civic Education at Public Islamic Higher Education (PTKIN and Pesantren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azyumardi Azra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With a brief foundation that covers some reviews of world literature on education and politics, the study points out the significance of developing a certain model of democracy education in the diverse country, Indonesia. The paper aims to establish the development and the excavation of democracy in Indonesia by presenting historical explanation on how Indonesian muslim scholars from UIN Syarif Hidayatullah Jakarta developed a suitable model of Indonesian civic education, which considers the elements of diversity as strengthening elements for democracy. Different from Shanker’s view (1996 on the global challenge of civic education, this study shows the successful experience of Indonesian Muslim in the development and application of civic education as a compulsory subject in Islamic education institutions, namely Public Islamic Higher Education (PTKIN and pesantren. Finally, it recommends further development and emphasizes the vital influence on rooting civic education in Pesantren since it will positively play an important role to strengthen the evolving democracy in Indonesia by integrating Islamic and Indonesian values. Abstrak Dengan melakukan review singkat terhadap beberapa literatur internasional tentang pendidikan dan politik, studi ini menunjukkan pengembangan model khusus  pendidikan demokrasi di Indonesia sebagai negara multi etnis. Tulisan ini bertujuan untuk menggambarkan perkembangan dan pengembangan demokrasi di Indonesia dengan pemaparan historis  tentang bagaimana muslim Indonesia khususnya di UIN jakarta dalam mengembangkan model Civic Education yang tepat, yang mempertimbangkan  elemen keberagamaan sebagai penguat demokrasi. Berbeda dari pendapat Shanker(1996 tentang tantangan global terhadap pendidikan kewarganegaraan, studi ini menggambarkan pengalaman sukses muslim Indonesia dalam mengembangkan pendidikan kewarganegaraan sebagai mata kuliah wajib di institusi pendidikan Islam dengan nama Perguruan Tinggi Keagaamaan

  15. Pelestarian Nilai-Nilai Civic Culture dalam Memperkuat Identitas Budaya Masyarakat: Makna Simbolik Ulos dalam Pelaksanaan Perkawinan Masyarakat Batak Toba di Sitorang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopiana Margaretha Panjaitan

    2016-10-01

    preserve the value of the civic culture. The study uses a qualitative case study method. The techniques of data collection are done through interviews, observation, documentation, and direct participation. The reseach results show that: (1 Ulos is not separated from the life of Batak Toba, because it is a heritage since a very long time ago, ulos is also as a symbol of affection among family, between parents and children, as well as among members of society; (2 The effort made by the public and the government in prevising the value of the civic culture is to provide an understanding and explanation to the younger generation and build a cultural heritage; (3 Reasons why people of Batak Toba need to preserve the value of the civic culture is that the heritage is maintained, because the noble values of Pancasila can be found in the symbolic meanings of ulos, as the value of divinity, humanity, unity, democracy, and justice.

  16. Civic Orientation in Cultures of Privilege: What Role Do Schools Play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Parissa J.; Caccavale, Laura; Buchanan, Christy M.

    2015-01-01

    The context of privilege provides unique opportunities and challenges for youth civic development. A mixed-method approach was used to examine links between school-based community service, school climate, and civic orientation among students in cultures of privilege. Surveys completed by students (N = 376) at two private high schools--one with an…

  17. Are virtuous people happy all around the world? Civic virtue, antisocial punishment, and subjective well-being across cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrova, Olga; Schlösser, Thomas; Fetchenhauer, Detlef

    2013-07-01

    Psychological research postulates a positive relationship between virtue and happiness. This article investigates whether this relationship holds in cultures where virtue is not socially appreciated. We specifically focus on civic virtue, which is conceptualized as citizens' honesty in interactions with state institutions (e.g., tax compliance). Two indicators served as measures of the degree to which civic virtue is a part of a country's normative climate: These were each country's mean level of punishment directed at above-average cooperative players in public good experiments and the extent to which citizens justify fraud and free-riding. The results of two studies with data from 13 and 73 countries demonstrate that a positive relationship between civic virtue and happiness/life satisfaction is not universal: In countries where antisocial punishment is common and the level of justification of dishonest behaviors is high, virtuous individuals are no longer happier and more satisfied with life than selfish individuals.

  18. Revitalisasi moral kewarganegaraan dalam ungkapan Jawa sebagai sumber pembentukan civic culture dan politic culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Ardian Feriandi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to understand and multiply the moral values that exist in the expression of Java. Of the values excavated the hope can be a reference as the formation of civic culture and politic culture. The type of research used in this research is qualitative research, with descriptive-critical method, which in his explanation more emphasis on the power of data analysis on existing data sources. This study is based on library research. The object of the studies in the form of notes, transcripts, books, Journal of Research and so on which is linked to the study of Javanese culture, civic culture and politics culture. From the results of the discussion then known some phrases like aja dumeh, mendhem jero mikul dhuwur, jer basuki mawa bea. Having moral universal citizenship values so as to become a reference in order to form the civic culture which could further impact on politics culture as an effort to civil society in the Republic of Indonesia.

  19. Claiming Our Turf: Students' Civic Negotiation of the Public Space of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sandra J.

    2013-01-01

    In the ongoing effort to conceptualize meaningful civics curriculum, the author looks beyond the intended curriculum to consider the civics lessons embedded in spatial interaction and engagement. She examines how young people negotiate school, a space she contends can be conceived of as a public space. Their negotiations rely upon tactics of…

  20. Digital citizenship? : narrative exchange and the changing terms of civic culture

    OpenAIRE

    Couldry, Nick; Stephansen, Hilde; Fotopoulou, Aristea; MacDonald, Richard; Clark, Wilma; Dickens, Luke

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the possibilities for new forms of ‘digital citizenship’ currently emerging through digitally supported processes of narrative exchange. Using Dahlgren's (Dahlgren, P. 2003. “Reconfiguring Civic Culture in the New Media Milieu.” In Media and the Restyling of Politics, edited by J. Corner, and D. Pels, 151–170. London: Sage; Dahlgren, P. 2009. Media and Political Engagement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.) circuit of ‘civic culture’ as a model for exploring the in...

  1. Secretly political: Civic engagement in online publics in Kazakhstan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shklovski, Irina; Valtysson, Bjarki

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation of networked forms of communication has captured the attention of media and scholars alike. We have never had quite as many resources for communication as we have today, and such communicative potential has implications for social change. In this article we consider public spheres...... that emerge through communication in the digital realm, paying atten- tion to how networked publics operate within such spheres. We present results from a study of a popular local online discussion forum in Kazakhstan. Steeped in Habermas’s idea of the public sphere, this study focuses on cultural public...... spheres defined through engagement and participation of diverse publics. We consider a range of publics that might emerge, such as mundane-publics, issue-publics, and counter-publics and how these differ in their content and purpose. While the majority of work on networked publics has been situated...

  2. Civic space: questions of society, history and politics to make a new public space

    OpenAIRE

    Dinneen, Marian

    2012-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed The ambition of my thesis project is to design civic space, space for civic engagement. Taking inspiration from the various voices who have identified a democratic crisis and who are themselves more civilly engaged, I am designing for a society that has revolutionised itself to be more active in its own governance. I propose an alternative local government whose public face is dissolved into the street into an aggregation of rooms rather than on...

  3. Effective civic and citizenship education : A cross-cultural perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isac, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcing citizenship and social integration are important goals of schools worldwide. In most educational systems, school are free to design their civic and citizenship education curricula and pedagogical objectives and practices may vary. Understanding the possible influence of school factors on

  4. Latino Education, Civic Engagement, and the Public Good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Bedolla, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The strong relationship between education and civic engagement is what leads Fraga and Frost (2010) to describe the U.S. school system as a "center of democratic governance" (p. 119). For immigrant communities, schools also serve to foster political socialization and incorporation. This chapter considers schools' democratic roles from an…

  5. Cultural Relevance and Working with Inner City Youth Populations to Achieve Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Shakoor; Webster, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    This article helps Extension professionals consider the cultural relevant needs of inner city residents in hopes of achieving ongoing civic engagement and appropriate program activities in these communities. Having a deep understanding of how the various dimensions of marginalized community life among inner city populations affect participation in…

  6. Civic Engagement as Risk Management and Public Relations: What the Pharmaceutical Industry Can Teach Us about Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. Blake

    2009-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry's corporate responsibility reports illustrate how the liberal rhetoric of civic engagement can be reappropriated to serve the market-driven aims of risk management and public relations. Tracing the ideologic linkage of corporate responsibility and service-learning versions of civic engagement, and contextualizing…

  7. Behind the ethnic-civic distinction: Public attitudes towards immigrants' political rights in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuyten, Maykel; Martinovic, Borja

    2015-09-01

    Public opinion research has sought to distinguish between ethnic and civic conceptions of citizenship and examined the differential associations of these conceptions with policy preferences in the realm of immigration. What has not been examined empirically is why exactly these conceptions are related to people's preferences. In two survey studies conducted among national samples of native Dutch we tested the proposition that the endorsement of ethnic citizenship is related to lower acceptance of Muslim immigrant rights (Study 1) and their political participation (Study 2) because of a weaker normative sense of common national belonging and higher adherence to autochthony (primo-occupancy) beliefs. In contrast, the endorsement of civic citizenship was expected to be associated with higher acceptance of Muslim immigrant rights and their political participation because of a stronger sense of common belonging and lower belief in autochthony. The findings of the two studies are similar and in support of these expectations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CIVIC CULTURE IN CONTEMPORARY RUSSIA (on the example of Tula region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Krasnopevtseva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the prospects of the development of civil society inTulaandTularegion.Tularegion belongs to the third type of Russian regions according to the classification of regions on the potential development of civil society. This demonstrates the presence of favorable conditions for the development of civil society institutions inTula. Actually today there is a tendency towards more active civic participation of the population in the region. There are several factors which contribute to this.One of the foundations of civil society formation inTularegion is the activity of non-profit organizations. First of all youth non-profit organizations should be mentioned. They play an important role in the political socialization of young people and youth initiatives support. In this context, it is also necessary to note the role of educational institutions, which purpose is civic education of young people.There is a significant increase in the number of volunteer organizations and groups. The younger generation actively takes part in their work. Volunteer organizations involve young people in professional and social activities, form their social and civic responsibility. Thus, volunteering is one of the most important indicator of the functioning of civil society. Over the past few years more than 30 volunteer organizations and groups as well as several centers promoting volunteers have appeared in the region. These measures are a significant step towards the institutionalization of volunteering inTularegion.Civil society is impossible without a high level of legal awareness of the population. The activity of various human rights organizations that promote the legal culture of the region’s population contributes to the development of the civil society institutions.Patriotic and charitable organizations as well as political parties play an important role in the life ofTularegion. Being the intermediaries between civil society and the

  9. Hip-Hop Citizens: Arts-Based, Culturally Sustaining Civic Engagement Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttner, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Amid concerns about the decreasing political engagement of young people, scholars and policy makers have begun discussing the "civic achievement gap," disparities in civic capacity between low-income students and Students of Color and their White, wealthier counterparts. While this scholarship raises important issues, it often relies on…

  10. Civic Innovation & American Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianni, Carmen; Friedland, Lewis

    1997-01-01

    Argues that American democracy is at a critical stage of development, with declining trust in government, citizens feeling displaced by a professional political class, derailed public interest, and policy that limits citizen deliberation and responsibility. Some instances of civic innovation, community organization, civic journalism, and efforts…

  11. Warcraft and Civic Education: MMORPGs as Participatory Cultures and How Teachers Can Use Them to Improve Civic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Kristal

    2010-01-01

    Online role-playing games such as World Of Warcraft represent new participatory cultures in which today's students engage every day. They are appealing to players largely because of the social aspects of game play. Some features of massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) can be incorporated into classroom culture to create more…

  12. Theorizing a public engagement keystone: Seeing fandom's integral connection to civic engagement through the case of the Harry Potter Alliance

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    Ashley Hinck

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Harry Potter Alliance (HPA has invited thousands of Harry Potter fans to view politics and activism through the lens of Harry Potter. HPA members have signed petitions, sent letters, made videos, and raised money in efforts to affect laws and public policies. These activities circulate and operate within the public sphere through an engagement with others. If we are to consider the political actions of fans, we must consider how fans insert arguments into the public sphere, constitute publics, and ultimately assert their own public subjectivities. By drawing on social movement and public sphere theory, I first develop the theoretical concept of the "public engagement keystone." I conceptualize the public engagement keystone as a touch point, worldview, or philosophy that makes other people, actions, and institutions intelligible. Next, I use the case of the HPA to demonstrate how the Harry Potter story operates as a public engagement keystone, opening the door to public subjectivities on par with the healthy public formation of John Dewey, Doug McAdam, or Peter Dahlgren. I offer an interdisciplinary approach to how fandom encourages and invites civic engagement. By doing so, public sphere theory can better account for a wider variety of types of civic engagement, including fandom activism.

  13. Civic activation, vulnerable subjects and public space: the case of the park of Rione Traiano in Naples

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    Gabriella Esposito

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The woman, in every kind of human settlement, culture as well a time, plays a peculiar role in terms of active observation and multitasking actor of the urban form and their organization model. Studying urban phenomena through the filter of the gender interpretation and fostering a proactive participation of women in the process of urban planning could provide added value in terms of feasibility, effectiveness and efficiency. In this paper it was decided to dealing with this issue in the framework of public spaces through the construction of a case study centered on women-mothers and their contribution for interpreting and being proactive in a participatory process of urban regeneration. The expected result of this interactive process is twofold: developing a generalized methodology of interaction with communities for interpreting, in terms of space organization, the demand they express on the one hand as well as for dealing with specific context, with the involvement of activists and associations to define and share possible trajectories of transformation of public spaces, on the other hand. To pursue this goal we have chosen to deal with the specificities of a complex environment such as Naples and with a CEP district, the largest in Italy, whose construction was initiated in 1960: Rione Traiano. In this area has started a dialogue, with non-profit organizations operating in the area first and then with women in the community, in order to address the relationship between vulnerable people and public spaces, testing a methodology for interaction and civic activation finalized to collect, prioritize and translate into proposals instances as expressed by these subjects. The disciplinary horizon selected is the integration between established tools of community planning and project strategies typical of urban design.

  14. Influence of spiritual and moral values of young people on the formation of the civic culture of the Russian society

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    Nina Alekseevna Tkacheva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a sociological analysis of the spiritual and moral orientations of young people and their influence on the formation of civic culture, which largely determines the form of the activity of individuals and social groups, the functioning of social institutions. Implementation of the objective function value consists in the achievement of a modern person in not only different kinds of material goods, but also, more importantly, in spiritual development. This, to a certain extent, will help to overcome the cultural gap between the elite of society and the main mass of citizens which can be considered as one of the important reasons for the failure of reform in Russia. Research of transformation processes have aroused great interest in the study of the social potential of youth as a subject of the reproduction of society. One of the factors in favor of subjectivity of youth is a civic culture, which is a key element of modernization. As a result of its formation, there is a change and activation of value orientations of young people, causing a qualitative transformation in all spheres of society. The empirical base of an article presents the results of original research conducted during 2016 among residents of five cities on the south of the Tyumen region, on the basis of which the authors point out the emerging shift from paternalistic expectations and passivity, the low value of the future to rationality, individualization, orientation on their own power. As one of the factors in the formation of civic culture the potential of the media were highlighted, which allowed the authors to justify the impact of the media on the formation of moral and spiritual values of the younger generation.

  15. Youth civic development: theorizing a domain with evidence from different cultural contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Constance A; Martínez, M Loreto; Cumsille, Patricio; Ngomane, Tsakani

    2011-01-01

    The authors use examples of youth civic engagement from Chile, South Africa, Central/Eastern Europe, and the United States--and also emphasize diversities among youth from different subgroups within countries--to illustrate common elements of the civic domain of youth development. These include the primacy of collective activity for forming political identities and ideas and the greater heterogeneity of civic compared to other discretionary activities, the groupways or accumulated opportunities for acting due to the groups (social class, gender, ethnic, caste, etc.) to which a young person belongs, and the role of mediating institutions (schools, community-based organizations, etc.) as spaces where youths' actions contribute to political stability and change. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  16. The (Bio)politics of Engagement: Shifts in Singapore's Policy and Public Discourse on Civics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weninger, Csilla; Kho, Ee Moi

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a historical overview of civic educational policy and political discourse in Singapore from 1959 to 2011, focusing on changes in the role attributed to students in the education process. A review of educational programmes and analysis of political speeches reveals that an earlier transmissionist approach that focused on value…

  17. PUBLIC COMMUNICATION’ EDUCATION AND EXTENSION: civic skills to talk and act on polis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloiza Helena Matos e Nobre

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Academia has a triple mission: research, education, and extension. This paper deals with ‘public communication’ as a matter for education and extension. The idea is that there is no citizenship or democracy without the training on ‘public communication’ abilities. Only citizens who are able to speak and act at the public sphere can participate on the social life. Such abilities are twofold: parliamentary (how to speak and executive (how to act. The paper shows how is possible to effectively communicate through silent acts, as well as how ‘public communication’ can have a “dark side of the force”. Finally, it states that all ‘public communication’ should lead to peaceful living and social cohesion.   KEYWORDS: public communication; education; extension; training; civic skills.     RESUMO A Academia tem uma tripla missão: pesquisa, educação e extensão. Este artigo trata da "comunicação pública" como uma questão de educação e extensão. A ideia é que não há cidadania ou democracia sem um treinamento em habilidades de ‘comunicação pública'. Apenas os cidadãos que são capazes de falar e agir na esfera pública podem participar na vida social. Essas habilidades são de dois tipos: parlamentar (como falar e executivo (como agir. O artigo mostra como é possível comunicar de forma eficaz através de atos silenciosos, bem como a «comunicação pública» pode ter um "lado negro da força". Finalmente, afirma que toda "comunicação pública" deve levar a uma convivência pacífica e à coesão social.   PALAVRAS-CHAVE: comunicação pública; Educação; extensão; Treinamento; competências cívicas.     RESUMEN La academia tiene una triple misión: investigación, educación y extensión. Este trabajo se ocupa de la ‘comunicación pública’ como una cuestión de educación y extensión. La idea es que no hay democracia ni ciudadanía sin el entrenamiento en habilidades de ‘comunicación p

  18. Safety culture and public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalevich, Alexander A.

    2002-01-01

    After the Chernobyl NPP accident a public acceptance has become a key factor in nuclear power development all over the world. Therefore, nuclear safety culture should be based not only on technical principles, responsibilities, supervision, regulatory provisions, emergency preparedness, but the public awareness of minimum risk during the operation and decommissioning of NPPs, radioactive waste management, etc. (author)

  19. Espacios públicos integrados y accesibilidad como objetivo cívico. / Integrated public spaces, and accessibility as civic objective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavez R.,María Isabel

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Una reflexión que considere los conceptos esenciales de la ciudad occidental, sin soslayar las mutaciones de la ciudad de fines del siglo XX, debería plantear una diversificación e integración mayor de los espacios públicos, y la accesibilidad a ellos como un "objetivo cívico". En el marco de una aproximación ecológica a los asentamientos humanos, interesan las maneras según las cuales el ciudadano entra en contacto con sus semejantes y con su entorno en sentido amplio: físico y sensible, pero también social, económico, cultural. Esto supone asumir las modalidades efectivas de la habitación, las que no se reducen a la "casa" o al "apartamento", sino que significan también habitar un vecindario, un barrio, una ciudad, una región, un país, una cultura, una naturaleza. Y, las modalidades efectivas de la sociabilización, las que no se reducen a una pertenencia comunitaria o laboral, sino que incluyen co-presencias y encuentros imprevistos en ese amplio territorio. /A reflection that considers the essential concepts of the western city, without ignoring the mutations of the city of the late twentieth century, should raise a greater diversification and integration of public spaces, and accessibility to them as a "civic purpose".

  20. Multilevel Analysis of Student Civics Knowledge Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Chris; Miyazaki, Yasuo

    2018-01-01

    Compositional effects of scholarly culture classroom/school climate on civic knowledge scores of 9th graders in the United States were examined using the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) 1999 Civic Education Study data. Following Evans et al. (2010, 2014), we conceived that the number of books at home,…

  1. Dues and Deep Pockets: Public-Sector Unions' Money Machine. Civic Report. No. 67

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    At first glance, public-sector labor unions are just one of many types of organizations that participate in the political process. However, these unions differ significantly from other interest groups made up of individual citizens or non-labor organizations. Because their members' interests are tied to government policy, these unions are more…

  2. The Nays Have It: When Public Sector Unions Win in California. Civic Report. No. 72

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This November, California voters must decide two policy questions of great concern to public-sector unions. One is a tax hike to stave off further cuts to state spending (there are two versions on the ballot with a chance of passing). The other is a "paycheck protection" measure that would ban the practice of unions' deducting money from…

  3. Civic Disobedience: Anti-SB 1070 Graffiti, Marginalized Voices, and Citizenship in a Politically Privatized Public Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    With neither national nor local-level discussions of Senate Bill 1070 adequately addressing bottom line issues such as marginalization, access, and civic engagement, an exploration of marginalized rhetorical acts can provide an informative lens for understanding challenges among marginalized people, their rhetorical tools, and their relations to…

  4. Neutrality and Impartiality in Public Education: The French Investment in Philosophy, Teaching about Religions, and Moral and Civic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    In France, there is no religious education in state schools. "Convictional education" appeared by drawing its perimeter around three educational subjects: philosophy, teaching about religions, and moral and civic education. Today, the French school is facing new challenges in a highly secularised society on which religion is laying new…

  5. Civic Responsibility and Human Rights Education: A Pan-Educational Alliance for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanloo, Azadeh F.

    2009-01-01

    Educating global citizens to have knowledge of world political and economic systems and conditions is imperative as the notion of the "citizen" is constantly evolving. This type of civic education needs to involve critical thinking skills that are pan-educational and allow for cross-cultural discussion that span all public spheres and…

  6. Gender and the transmission of civic engagement: assessing the influences on youth civic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Todd L; Hempel, Lynn M; Howell, Frank M

    2010-01-01

    The study of civic activity has become a central focus for many social scientists over the past decade, generating considerable research and debate. Previous studies have largely overlooked the role of youth socialization into civic life, most notably in the settings of home and school. Further, differences along gender lines in civic capacity have not been given sufficient attention in past studies. This study adds to the literature by examining the potential pathways in the development of youth civic activity and potential, utilizing both gender-neutral and gender-specific structural equation modeling of data from the 1996 National Household Education Survey. Results indicate that involvement by parents in their child's schooling plays a crucial, mediating role in the relationship between adult and youth civic activity. Gender differences are minimal; thus adult school involvement is crucial for transmitting civic culture from parents to both female and male youth.

  7. Quentin Skinner, Staten og friheten. Oslo: Res Publica, 2011. José Luis Martí and Philip Pettit, A Political Philosophy in Public Life. Civic Republicanism in Zapatero's Spain. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010 (Simon Laumann Jørgensen)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Simon Laumann

    2012-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Quentin Skinner, Staten og friheten, Oslo: Res Publica 2011, 199 NOK & José Luis Martí & Philip Pettit, A Political Philosophy in Public Life. Civic Republicanism in Zapatero’s Spain, Princeton: Princeton University Press 2010, $ 24.95......Anmeldelse af Quentin Skinner, Staten og friheten, Oslo: Res Publica 2011, 199 NOK & José Luis Martí & Philip Pettit, A Political Philosophy in Public Life. Civic Republicanism in Zapatero’s Spain, Princeton: Princeton University Press 2010, $ 24.95...

  8. Cultural Journalism Publications for Reluctant Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Barbara

    1980-01-01

    Provides a list of cultural journalism publications (based on oral history interviews) written, edited, and produced by students around the country that provide good easy reading for older reluctant readers. (MKM)

  9. Civic Meanings: Understanding the Constellations of Democratic and Civic Beliefs of Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowham, Elizabeth A.; Lowham, James R.

    2015-01-01

    There is little doubt of public school's role in the enculturation of youth into American democracy. There are several aspects about which little is known that should be addressed prior to seeking options to understand and address civic education for the 21st century: first, the desired civic knowledge, skills, and predispositions are not clearly…

  10. Public Access ICT across Cultures

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    3 Impact of Public Access to ICT Skills on Job Prospects in Rwanda ... reform and information and communication technology (ICT) policies, particularly in developing countries. ... (From internal memoranda prepared by Amy Mahan, 2008) ..... little decision-making autonomy, power, or financial control within the household.

  11. Practices of memorialization and commemoration in public space in Argentina. Artistic interventions about the desappeared and murdered people of the last civic and military dictatorship (1976-1983

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melina Jean Jean

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last years in Argentina, practices of memorialization and commemoration in public space have been adopted multiple forms and strategies. This paper proposes to analyze the artistic interventions about the desappeared and murdered people by State terrorism in the last civic and military dictatorship (1976-1983. This case study is about the artistic productions of murals in public space, made by the “Espacio de Cultura y Memoria El Rancho Urutau” and their proyect “Mosaicos por la Memoria”, performed since 2010 in Ensenada, provincia de Buenos Aires. These murals in ceramic technique and urban scale, privilege a figurative representation for the honored victim. The murals are placed in strategic spaces, in the neighborhood that the victim belonged to. These productions work out as “memory places” because create a social space of “rememoriación” and commemoration from the victims and the recent history developments in the city.

  12. Civic Entrepreneurship: In Search of Sustainable Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banuri, Tariq; Najam, Adil; Spanger-Siegfried, Erika [Stockholm Environment Institute - Boston Center (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Around the world, civic entrepreneurs are practising sustainable development through their actions. Representing civil society, business, and government, civic entrepreneurs are championing sustainable development and succeeding – often despite significant odds – in making it happen on the ground. It may often happen at a small scale, but it does so in undeniably real, robust and promising terms. Civic entrepreneurship is driven explicitly by the public interest, and seeks to create new ways of building social capital and of harnessing existing ideas, methods, inventions, technologies, resources or management systems in the service of collective goals.

  13. Digital Culture, Education and Public Sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Roberto Gomes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the so-called digital culture, this paper discusses the issue of education and the political implications of the distance learning expansion movement in Brazil. In addition to the advances in the democratization of the access to information through the mediation of information and communication technologies (ICTs, which should be recognized as an effort to spread a certain “political culture”, this does not necessarily mean, as Habermas (2003b recalls, that the effective political participation of citizens is assured, especially in light of recurrent dislocation between the political public sphere and civil society. What are the interests behind the phenomenon of digitization of culture? And what is the purpose of education in this new cultural context? As an expression of contemporary social life, digital culture generates structural changes, not only in the form of transmission and access to culture, but also in the very concept and attitude towards culture, with decisive political implications for education. That leads us to think, for example, about the differences between the concepts of education present in the classical Greek Paideia culture, in the modern culture of Bildung, and in the contemporary educational model increasingly subservient to the ICTs we now have.

  14. Cultural Heritage and the Public Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Savenije

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, libraries, archives and museums from across Europe have been the custodians of our rich and diverse cultural heritage. They have preserved and provided access to the testimonies of knowledge, beauty and imagination, such as sculptures, paintings, music and literature. The new information technologies have created unbelievable opportunities to make this common heritage more accessible for all. Recently, the European Commission commissioned a ‘Comité des Sages’ to make recommendations on ways and means to make Europe's cultural heritage and creativity available on the Internet and to preserve it for future generations. In the United States the Association of Research Libraries (ARL endorsed a number of principle recommendations to its members regarding the digitisation of cultural heritage. Both the Comité des Sages and the ARL emphasize the added value of digitisation. The Comité underlines that the digitised material can in itself be a driver of innovation and can be at the basis of new services in sectors such as tourism and learning (Comité des Sages 2011 and the ARL stresses the added value for researchers (ARL Principles July 2010. For over a century, libraries have participated in successful resource sharing cooperatives that have made content widely accessible. According to both the ARL and the Comité, the same spirit should govern commercial digitisation activities. In the best of all possible worlds, there would in our view be some level of free access to all content, with only special value-added services restricted to a subscription model. A landmark in the discussion about Open Access to information is the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities. Referring to this Declaration, people often put emphasis on recent research publications. But the following is also one of the objectives of the Declaration: “encouraging the holders of cultural heritage to support open access

  15. Public education through safety culture demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanitsuksombut, Warapon

    2005-01-01

    The activities relating to nuclear energy have been world widely opposed against, because there have existed scars in the past; atomic bombs and a few accidents in nuclear facilities. It cannot be denied that the most effective education of public is through Medias such as news or documentary on newspaper and television. Once such cases appeared to public, it is difficult to erase the bad pictures from their memory. Since education for public is mainly depending on media, it is recommended putting harder effort on dissemination of information on regulation and regulatory function to public. The regulatory function of each country is the key of safe utilization of nuclear energy. Since prime responsibility of maintenance and operation are rested on the operators. To achieve the goal of safety, regulatory authority's task now is emphasized on encouraging operators of nuclear facilities to implement their safety culture. This will reduce the probability of unwanted events and therefore raising credit of nuclear energy. (author)

  16. Higher Education Civic Learning and Engagement: A Massachusetts Case Study. Promising Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This Promising Practices report explores the civic learning and engagement efforts of Massachusetts' public higher education system in five areas: vision of Preparing Citizens as a core educational commitment, development of a state higher education Policy on Civic Learning, creation of civic engagement and service-learning course designations,…

  17. Civic Engagement and Associationalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Damon Timothy; Barraket, Jo; Lewis, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    use a large survey to explore these questions empirically by focusing on the membership patterns and civic engagement practices of 4,001 citizens drawn from eight suburbs across Greater Melbourne, Australia. Our findings indicate that, while associational intensity is positively related to civic...

  18. Segregation and civic virtue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merry, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Michael Merry defends the following prima facie argument: that civic virtue is not dependent on integration and in fact may be best fostered under conditions of segregation. He demonstrates that civic virtue can and does take place under conditions of involuntary segregation, but that

  19. PERGESERAN NILAI-NILAI BUDAYA PADA SUKU BONAI SEBAGAI CIVIC CULTURE DI KECAMATAN BONAI DARUSSALAM KABUPATEN ROKAN HULU PROVINSI RIAU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Prayogi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was grounded by social problems, which is a shift of cultural values and global transformation with positive and negative values including waning identity tribe Bonai, such as change the culture in the form of traditional values in traditional ceremonies as a result of changes in the environment their lives, both the natural environment and the physical and social environment such as the loss of a sense of kinship, courtesy, honesty, and mutual cooperation. The findings in this study revealed that 1 the tribe Bonai a principle of life that becomes a guideline and regulations that must be adhered to by the tribal people Bonai hereditary implemented include: Birth, Circumcision Rosul, Employment, Education, Marriage Married, Leadership System Society, Death. 2 The shifting cultural mores which are currently experiencing a shift towards cultural values that include a shift in values Nativity, Circumcision Rosul, Marriage, and Ritual Dewo. 3 Preservation made to the successor or the younger generation by providing knowledge about the culture, following the race on culture or festival and explain the meanings contained in each ceremony they have done, executing each set of tribal Bonai traditions, which are birth, circumcision messenger, dewo mating and rituals for marriage. 4 Development of indigenous culture as do general should be imparted to young people from birth to adulthood through education and infomal also goes by way of natural or natural and spontaneous. In particular the development of the cultural values taught to elementary school through high school

  20. Fostering Civic Engagement in the Communication Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min

    2011-01-01

    Civic engagement has become an essential learning goal for institutions throughout higher education. Communication scholars employ various pedagogical tools to foster civic engagement. For instance, service learning has been shown to increase political and community engagement in courses such as family communication and public relations. Teachers…

  1. QUALITY ORIENTED ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TÜNDE SZABÓ

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management is an attractive philosophy and its implementation involves many difficulties.Implementation of total quality management requires a profound transformation of the organization so that theappearance of strong resistance is inevitable. For this reason, it is necessary to consider the huge effort that isrequired to resolve difficulties that appear in this process.Total quality management is based on knowing the stage of organization and its environment and throughcontinuous improvement for it to try to reach excellence.It is well known that the implementation of quality management systems depends on the specifics of eachorganization. Functions performed, defining features, characteristics of public administration systems, rigidity givenby the multitude of laws make it difficult to implement quality management systems, on the one hand and on the otherhand, these difficulties are given from the specific service.The introduction of total quality management in public administration cannot and should not present a radicalreform of it. Public administration, like any other public or private organization, can be improved. In essence, thepractice of recent years shows that the model Total Quality Management in public administration allowsimprovements, but it only with an appropriate organizational culture.

  2. Civic Education in Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Jabbour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 1925, the Lebanese government has attempted to foster harmony and nationwide social cohesion by creating a standardized national civic school curriculum. This investigation aims to explore the method of instructing the national civic curriculum. Then it will examine students' civic learning experiences in the classroom and any related education issues and gaps. Then it will address the opinions of young citizens toward the supports of their civic school teachers The investigation's goal is to provide baseline information to school policy makers, administrators, and educators as they plan, implement, and coordinated civic educational programs that can that inspires and motivates Lebanese youth. Data for the study was obtained from extensive literature reviews and questionnaire surveys of 70 high school students. The investigation was conducted in the fall of the year 2013. The result of the study showed that most Lebanese kids find civic education boring and irrelevant to their lives; they do not understand the benefit of engaging in this education nor why they should learn it. This raises the urgent need to put into practice an effective civic education program that inspires and motivates young citizens.

  3. Presenting "recious Knowledge": Using Film to Model Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Youth Civic Activism for Social Studies Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhouse, Hillary

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I examine the potential for developing preservice social studies teachers' understanding of transformational resistance, Latin@ civil rights movements, and culturally sustaining pedagogy through a project using the film Precious Knowledge. This documentary depicts high school students in a Mexican American Studies (MAS) program…

  4. SOCIAL CAPITAL AND CIVIC PARTICIPATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike ERDOGAN

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of social capital has a long intellectual history in the fie ld of social sciences. In recent years, interest of scholars from sociology, po litical science, economics and public administration is rapidly increasing. The reason for this increasing interest is that it has been aware of the importance of social capital in communities’ administrative, social, economic and political development. In this sense, the concept of social ca pital is an issue to be discussed with solution of current problems of public administration, subjects of governance, civil society, and participation. Social capital has a lot of definitions which are completely different from each other. Common point of these different definitions is that social capital is a resource at both individual and community level. We will use Robert Putnam’s defi nition about social cap ital in this paper. Putnam (1993 defines social capital as “features of social organization, such as trust, norms, and networks that can improve the efficiency of society by facilitating coordinated action”. In his book; Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of the American Community, Putnam describes declining social capital in America. He analyzes relationship between social capital and civic participation and assumes that there is a positive relationship between social capital and civic participation. The paper aims to reveal how there is a relationshi p between social capital and civic participation in Central Florida. We will use “The Central Florida Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey that is made by The Survey Research Labora tory in the Ins titute for Social and Behavior Sciences at the University of Central Florida among central Florida residents. We use notion of civic participation not only as voting but also as concern of politics, volunteering, attending a political meeting, participating in any demonstrations, protests or boycotts, cooperating to solve problems and

  5. Efficiency of Public Administration Management in Cultural Heritage Protection.

    OpenAIRE

    Nozharov, Shteryo

    2017-01-01

    The publication analyzes the possibilities of building a model for effective public administration management in the field of cultural heritage protection using McKinsey 7S model. Bulgaria is a country with rich cultural and archaeological heritage since Roman and Byzantine times. Significant number of cultural monuments are located on the territory of the country and are officially recognized as “world cultural heritage” by UNESCO. In this regard, the failures of Bulgarian cultural heritage ...

  6. Civic and Intercultural Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Nestian Sandu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Our societies are going through a process of continuous transformation. The challenges and opportunities of diversity and globalization can only be addressed if civic education and intercultural education are interrelated. More often than not, there is a lack of coherence between educational practices based on these approaches. Moreover, even if the principles and methods of civic and intercultural education are used for international as well as local development, very seldom their impact is measured through the means of scientific research. In this study, a methodology of civic and intercultural education was piloted, and its impact was measured regarding teachers’ and students’ attitudes toward Roma. We measured the acculturation orientations and stereotypes of teachers and students involved in a civic and intercultural program. The results show that there are changes in both teachers’ and students’ attitudes toward Roma.

  7. Country Report: Civic and Citizenship Education in Italy: Thousands of Fragmented Activities Looking for a Systematization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Bombardelli

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the present paper we describe how civic and citizenship education takes place in Italy, trying to identify strengths and weaknesses, with the aims both of understanding the situation and of identifying possible measures for improvement. Methods: The methodology implies an analysis of the official guidelines by the Ministry in this field, a short view of the research publications of the last 30 years, the informal observation of the daily teaching at school from the personal experience of the authors in Italy. Findings: First of all we study the concept of civic and citizenship education, and focus on the curriculum of civic and citizenship education (aims, teaching approaches, taught time, methods and means in the school system, including the school culture and the experiences of participation inside school; we investigate the teacher training and role, the informal and non-formal influences in this educational field, and conclude dealing with the student assessment, and the evaluation of the outcomes. In the daily practice there are thousands of activities for civic and citizenship education, but a systematic design is lacking.

  8. "Inculcating" Creativity: Culture as Public Pedagogy in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terence

    2014-01-01

    The Singapore government has long relied on the inherent public pedagogical qualities of culture in the forms of official cultural and media policies and in the unscripted signifiers of cultural conduct, such as in the public's attitude towards the arts. The prime objective is to instrumentalise citizens on how they should become both economically…

  9. Genes, psychological traits and civic engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Christopher T.; Settle, Jaime E.; Loewen, Peter John; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Civic engagement is a classic example of a collective action problem: while civic participation improves life in the community as a whole, it is individually costly and thus there is an incentive to free ride on the actions of others. Yet, we observe significant inter-individual variation in the degree to which people are in fact civically engaged. Early accounts reconciling the theoretical prediction with empirical reality focused either on variation in individuals’ material resources or their attitudes, but recent work has turned to genetic differences between individuals. We show an underlying genetic contribution to an index of civic engagement (0.41), as well as for the individual acts of engagement of volunteering for community or public service activities (0.33), regularly contributing to charitable causes (0.28) and voting in elections (0.27). There are closer genetic relationships between donating and the other two activities; volunteering and voting are not genetically correlated. Further, we show that most of the correlation between civic engagement and both positive emotionality and verbal IQ can be attributed to genes that affect both traits. These results enrich our understanding of the way in which genetic variation may influence the wide range of collective action problems that individuals face in modern community life. PMID:26503688

  10. A Critical Geographic Approach to Youth Civic Engagement: Reframing Educational Opportunity Zones and the Use of Public Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kevin J.; Greene, Stuart; McKenna, Maria K.

    2016-01-01

    The article draws on work in Critical Geography Studies and Photovoice methodology, to illustrate the ways in which youth in an inner city conceptualize neighborhoods and public spaces. We utilize youth's photographs, narratives, and maps to tell a story of youth's lived experiences and argue that these experiences are vital sources of knowledge…

  11. Can Architects Help Transform Public Education? What the Sarasota County Civic School Building Program (1955-1960) Teaches Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Nicholas B.

    2013-01-01

    The Sarasota County School Building Program 1955-1960 is revisited through a detailed examination of how architects and educators collaborated to design an innovative group of public schools that provided opportunities for the transformation of learning space. This multi-dimensioned examination is grounded in an historical contextualization of the…

  12. Internet Clubs in Cultural Centers and Public Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Batouch

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A Study about the internet clubs in Cultural Centers and Public Libraries in Algeria, it defines the concept of culture and its relation to internet, then deals the internet clubs and its cultural role and its negatives. Finally, talks about the electronic space and culture in Algeria.

  13. The University as a Site for Transformation: Developing Civic-Minded Graduates at South African Institutions through an Epistemic Shift in Institutional Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paphitis, Sharli Anne; Kelland, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    At least one of the goals of the transformation of universities in South Africa is to develop civic-minded graduates who leave university to become agents of positive social change in broader society. More specifically, universities in South Africa aim to develop graduates who are critical, capable and balanced--graduates who are aware of their…

  14. The Controversy over Civic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Frank

    1983-01-01

    Because of the unpopularity of the inquiry method, most new government texts are of the straight narrative type. Many educators believe that civics curriculum materials are subject to censorship by special interest groups. Regarding goal achievement, many believe civic education has not trained students to accept their civic responsibilities. (RM)

  15. The Value of Civic Science Literacy (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, D.

    2013-12-01

    The persistence of public conflict over climate change is commonly understood to be evidence of the cost borne by our democracy by the failure of citizens to recognize the best available decision-relevant science. This conclusion is true; what's not is the usual understanding of cause and effect that accompanies this perspective. Ordinarily, the inability of citizens to comprehend decision-relevant science is identified as the source of persistent political conflict over climate change (along myriad other issues that feature disputed facts that admit of scientific investigation). The truth, however, is it is the persistence of public conflict that disables citizens from recognizing and making effective use of decision-relevant science. As a result, efforts to promote civic science literacy can't be expected to dissipate such conflict. Instead, the root, cultural and psychological sources of such conflict must themselves be extinguished (with the use of tools and strategies themselves identified through valid scientific inquiry) so our democracy can realize the value of educators' considerable skills in making citizens science literate.

  16. What Cultural Values Influence American Public Relations Practitioners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Gabriel M.; Taylor, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of culture as a key variable in public relations research and practice. Finds (1) American practitioners continue to practice one-way models of public relations; and (2) public relations practitioners who have collectivistic values tend to practice two-way models of public relations. Discusses implications for theory and…

  17. What If a State Required Civic Learning for All Students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Reiff

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available his article tells the story of the first state in the U.S. to set the expectation that every undergraduate in public higher education would be involved in civic learning.  In 2012, the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education made “Preparing Citizens” one of seven key outcomes of its Vision Project for public higher education.  In 2014, the Board passed a Policy on Civic Learning defining civic learning as “acquisition of the knowledge, the intellectual skills and the applied competencies that citizens need for informed and effective participation in civic and democratic life; it also means acquiring an understanding of the social values that underlie democratic structures and practices” (http://www.mass.edu/bhe/lib/documents/AAC14-48CivicLearningwithPolicy-RevisedFinalforBHE.pdf.  First steps toward achieving this goal include• designing a process to identify and designate on every campus under the Board’s oversight those courses with a substantial focus on civic learning—either with or without civic engagement built into them—and • developing a set of rubrics that can be used to assess student learning outcomes in these courses.  The article presents the complex issues emerging through the first year’s work on these two steps, and sketches action steps to follow.

  18. Augmenting the agora: Media and civic engagement in museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Haller Baggesen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mirroring digital culture developments in society at large, museums are increasingly incorporating social media platforms and formats into their communication practices. More than merely providing additional channels of communication, this development is invested with an understanding of social media as integral to the ongoing democratisation of the museum. The confluences of new media affordances with New Museology objectives along with the underpinning of the aforementioned understanding is discussed in this article. The article will argue that development in this area is not only driven by solid results and public demand but also by collective assumptions and associations as well as by a political need for institutions to justify their relevance in society. In conclusion, the article suggests that, while the integration of social media communication may serve to market the museum as inclusive, it may also simply pay lip service to genuine civic engagement and democratic exchanges with the public.

  19. Cultural Economy, Capitalism and the Logic of the Public Sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzkopf, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Review essay: Promotional Cultures: The Rise and Spread of Advertising, Public Relations, Marketing and Branding/ by Aeron Davis. (Polity, 2013, ISBN 978-0-7456-3983-3, 247 + xi pp.......Review essay: Promotional Cultures: The Rise and Spread of Advertising, Public Relations, Marketing and Branding/ by Aeron Davis. (Polity, 2013, ISBN 978-0-7456-3983-3, 247 + xi pp....

  20. Intercultural Interpretations: Making Public Relations Education Culturally Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Joy

    2009-01-01

    Public relations educators delivering courses to international students find that each cohort of students interprets and understands public relations theory and its application to practice according to their respective cultures. The premise of this paper is to reflect on some of the interpretations and expectations of public relations students…

  1. Public Libraries, Digital Literacy and Participatory Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In recent years public libraries have experimented with user-generated or community-contributed content through the interactive tools of Web 2.0. For some commentators this not just establishes a new relationship between libraries and their publics, but signals the end of information hegemony and an "expert paradigm". Such claims need to…

  2. The civic turn of immigrant integration policies in the Scandinavian welfare states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borevi, Karin; Jensen, Kristian Kriegbaum; Mouritsen, Per

    2017-01-01

    This special issue addresses the question of how to understand the civic turn within immigrant integration in the West towards programs and instruments, public discourses and political intentions, which aim to condition, incentivize, and shape through socialization immigrants into ‘citizens’. Emp...... thesis and its descriptive and explanatory claims, and explain why studying the Scandinavian welfare states can further our understanding of the nature of the civic turn and its driving forces. Before concluding, we discuss whether civic integration policies actually work....

  3. Food's cultural geographies: texture, creativity, and publics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, I.; Jackson, P.; Hayes-Conroy, A.; Abrahamsson, S.; Sandover, R.; Sheller, M.; Henderson, H.; Hallett, L.; Imai, S.; Maye, D.; Hill, A.; Johnson, N.; Schein, R.; Winders, J.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is about emerging cultural geographies of food. It is the result of a collaborative blog-to-paper process that led to an experimental, fragmented, dialogic text. Food is often researched precisely because it can help to vividly animate tensions between the small and intimate realms of

  4. Civic communities and urban violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Jessica M; Lee, Matthew R

    2015-07-01

    Civic communities have a spirit of entrepreneurialism, a locally invested population and an institutional structure fostering civic engagement. Prior research, mainly confined to studying rural communities and fairly large geographic areas, has demonstrated that civic communities have lower rates of violence. The current study analyzes the associations between the components of civic communities and homicide rates for New Orleans neighborhoods (census tracts) in the years following Hurricane Katrina. Results from negative binomial regression models adjusting for spatial autocorrelation reveal that community homicide rates are lower where an entrepreneurial business climate is more pronounced and where there is more local investment. Additionally, an interaction between the availability of civic institutions and resource disadvantage reveals that the protective effects of civic institutions are only evident in disadvantaged communities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Research of quality culture in the public sector organization

    OpenAIRE

    Aškelavičius, Izoldas

    2017-01-01

    RESEARCH OF QUALITY CULTURE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR ORGANIZATION Izoldas AŠKELAVIČIUS Paper for the Master’s degree Quality Management Master’s Program Vilnius University, Faculty of Economics, Management Department Supervisor – Assoc. Prof. Dr. R. Adomaitienė Vilnius, 2017 SUMMARY 64 pages, 8 charts, 13 pictures, 81 references. The main purpose of this master thesis is to analyze Vilnius local labor exchange quality culture topics, reveal the current state of quality culture. The work consists ...

  6. Publicity, news content, and cultural debate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete; From, Unni

    2015-01-01

    Taking our point of departure in mediatization theory (Hjarvard, 2013; Lundby, 2009; Schulz, 2004), we analyse the interwoven communicative forms of the film industry and the printed press as they are expressed in the coverage of three blockbusters in Danish newspapers – Ben-Hur (1959/62); Batman...... stimulate socio-cultural debate, at the same time as the portrayal of blockbuster movie events and their directors and actors at-tracts media audiences, serving as entertainment, service as well as enlightenment....

  7. Science in public communication, culture, and credibility

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Jane

    1998-01-01

    Does the general public need to understand science? And if so, is it scientists' responsibility to communicate? Critics have argued that, despite the huge strides made in technology, we live in a "scientifically illiterate" society--one that thinks about the world and makes important decisions without taking scientific knowledge into account. But is the solution to this "illiteracy" to deluge the layman with scientific information? Or does science news need to be focused around specific issues and organized into stories that are meaningful and relevant to people's lives? In this unprecedented, comprehensive look at a new field, Jane Gregory and Steve Miller point the way to a more effective public understanding of science in the years ahead.

  8. Control of Movement: Press and Civic Associations in Zacatecas, Mexico, 1821-1845

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalina Ríos Zúñiga

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores the  development of press and civic associations in Zacatecas during the years 1821 to 1845. Both vehicles had a strong link and helped to emerge local public spaces. After an open and dynamic beginning, in which they helped to expand republican political culture, and also created expectations among  lower classes to  citizenship, they  were closed down  by elites.  This  closing happened  principally as an  elite reaction against the popular revolt that occurred in Sombrerete at the beginning of 1829, and it lasted until 1845.

  9. Closing the Civic Engagement Gap: The Potential of Action Civics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alexander; Stolte, Laurel; Cohen, Alison K.

    2011-01-01

    When taught in an engaging manner, civic education can help stimulate and motivate students to excel in other academic areas, while simultaneously preparing them to be active citizens in the democracy. As an initial attempt to more systematically analyze civic education practice, this article presents four case studies of projects in one action…

  10. The Marcus Caelius Project: a transmedial approach to support cultural communication and educational activities at the Civical Archaeological Museum of Bologna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bentini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The project “Marcus Caelius – the Value of Memory” is a 8 minute short animation movie located in the Roman Bologna at the Augustan Age. It originated with the Civical Archaeological Museum of Bologna in collaboration with Cineca VisIT-Lab. The project emploies a well known historical fact (the Battle of Teutoburg to enable a philological approach within an emotional/narrative process. New philologically accurate reconstructions (i.e archaeological finds hedged in the Museum’s collection are integrated with 3D historical sets caming form previous Cineca projects. Mixed movie-making techniques, such as Blender rendering, Chroma key and Machinima animation, implemented an ad hoc production pipeline in order to define times and costs which could be supported by a small production.

  11. Private Ethics and Civic Virtue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lee C.

    The paper delineates areas to investigate when seeking information about political ethics in western society. The main purpose of the paper is to call attention to the relationship of civic virtue to communal politics. Specifically, five questions are posed and answered which deal with various aspects of civic virtue and its relationship to…

  12. Chapter 11: Civic Youth Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roholt, Ross VeLure; Hildreth, R. W.; Baizerman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We propose civic youth work as a new craft orientation in the family of child and youth care, education, social work, recreation and other relevant semi-to-full professions. We envision this practice as based in the philosophies and practical sciences of pedagogy, politics, and human development. The ideal-type civic youth worker will have a…

  13. Space Culture: Innovative Cultural Approaches To Public Engagement With Astronomy, Space Science And Astronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Roger F.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years a number of cultural organizations have established ongoing programs of public engagement with astronomy, space science and astronautics. Many involve elements of citizen science initiatives, artists’ residencies in scientific laboratories and agencies, art and science festivals, and social network projects as well as more traditional exhibition venues. Recognizing these programs several agencies and organizations have established mechanisms for facilitating public engagement with astronomy and space science through cultural activities. The International Astronautics Federation has established an Technical Activities Committee for the Cultural Utilization of Space. Over the past year the NSF and NEA have organized disciplinary workshops to develop recommendations relating to art-science interaction and community building efforts. Rationales for encouraging public engagement via cultural projects range from theory of creativity, innovation and invention to cultural appropriation in the context of `socially robust science’ as advocated by Helga Nowotny of the European Research Council. Public engagement with science, as opposed to science education and outreach initiatives, require different approaches. Just as organizations have employed education professionals to lead education activities, so they must employ cultural professionals if they wish to develop public engagement projects via arts and culture. One outcome of the NSF and NEA workshops has been development of a rationale for converting STEM to STEAM by including the arts in STEM methodologies, particularly for K-12 where students can access science via arts and cultural contexts. Often these require new kinds of informal education approaches that exploit locative media, gaming platforms, artists projects and citizen science. Incorporating astronomy and space science content in art and cultural projects requires new skills in `cultural translation’ and `trans-mediation’ and new kinds

  14. Teach Students about Civics through Schoolwide Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasof, Marc; Spector, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Building democracies in K-8 schools is a promising approach to increasing young people and educators' civic knowledge, skills and dispositions. The Rendell Center for Civics and Civics Engagement leveraged strategies and concepts from the fields of civic education, student voice, and distributed leadership to build a youth-adult school governance…

  15. Public-Private Partnership in Cultural Heritage Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Angelina JELINČIĆ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades public-private partnership or PPP has become a new way for delivering and fi nancing public sector projects. It may involve investment in fully economic infrastructure such as highways, railways, airports, seaports, etc. up to the investments in social infrastructure projects, such as schools, hospitals, museums and other signifi cant and historic buildings of public interest. The main objective of this article is to analyze the situation in Croatia, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia concerning the topic of public- private partnership (PPP in order to provide grounds for possible future investments in cultural heritage in these countries. For this purpose, a comparative analysis of legal and institutional frameworks was carried out as well as structured interviews with key stakeholders (public and private sector representatives. Special attention has been paid to the use of PPP projects in the revitalization of cultural heritage. The results of the analysis showed the lack of PPP investments in the cultural sector, and also identifi ed possible obstacles in public sector administrative procedures. The results of the analysis may be further used to stimulate both public authorities to set strategic directions for heritage revitalization plans based on PPP schemes as well as private investors who may seek feasible business models complemented with social responsibility benefits.

  16. Public sphere as assemblage: the cultural politics of roadside memorialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Elaine

    2013-09-01

    This paper investigates contemporary academic accounts of the public sphere. In particular, it takes stock of post-Habermasian public sphere scholarship, and acknowledges a lively and variegated debate concerning the multiple ways in which individuals engage in contemporary political affairs. A critical eye is cast over a range of key insights which have come to establish the parameters of what 'counts' as a/the public sphere, who can be involved, and where and how communicative networks are established. This opens up the conceptual space for re-imagining a/the public sphere as an assemblage. Making use of recent developments in Deleuzian-inspired assemblage theory - most especially drawn from DeLanda's (2006) 'new philosophy of society' - the paper sets out an alternative perspective on the notion of the public sphere, and regards it as a space of connectivity brought into being through a contingent and heterogeneous assemblage of discursive, visual and performative practices. This is mapped out with reference to the cultural politics of roadside memorialization. However, a/the public sphere as an assemblage is not simply a 'social construction' brought into being through a logic of connectivity, but is an emergent and ephemeral space which reflexively nurtures and assembles the cultural politics (and political cultures) of which it is an integral part. The discussion concludes, then, with a consideration of the contribution of assemblage theory to public sphere studies. (Also see Campbell 2009a). © London School of Economics and Political Science 2013.

  17. The Role of Civic Engagement for Men’s Health and Well Being in Norway—A Contribution to Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula S. Goth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Using the example of older men volunteering on teams that restore historic ships, this article examines the effects of volunteering on the well-being of older adults. We consider particularly how volunteering impacts levels of social engagement and explore how the men’s reminiscences as they bond with their fellows in highly skilled work helps integrate their life experiences. Methods: Data are based on 14 in-depth interviews with volunteers working on historic vessels in Norway. Self-rated health, functional dependency, and well-being measures were collected using semi-structured questionnaire. Results: Volunteering in a context of skilled, group-bonded, culturally prestigious activity adds considerably to social capital among elderly men in Norway. Respondents explain their involvement in terms of prior relationships and current social benefits. They spoke of the value of maintaining past personal connections to a particular ship, shipping company, or local community. These were reinforced by current social benefits, such as the experience of companionship, unity, and the feeling of making an important contribution to the society. The group dynamics and strong collective aspect of these voluntary associations maintains internal cohesion, and members only leave when forced by increasing age, poor health, or insufficient financial resources. Conclusions: This article illuminates a case study of gender-specific engagement of older adults in volunteer roles returning high benefits both to participants and society, and adds knowledge to public-health programs and policies in the volunteer- and cultural-heritage sector.

  18. Cultural sensitivity in public health: defined and demystified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnicow, K; Baranowski, T; Ahluwalia, J S; Braithwaite, R L

    1999-01-01

    There is consensus that health promotion programs should be culturally sensitive (CS). Yet, despite the ubiquitous nature of CS within public health research and practice, there has been surprisingly little attention given to defining CS or delineating a framework for developing culturally sensitive programs and practitioners. This paper describes a model for understanding CS from a public health perspective; describes a process for applying this model in the development of health promotion and disease prevention interventions; and highlights research priorities. Cultural sensitivity is defined by two dimensions: surface and deep structures. Surface structure involves matching intervention materials and messages to observable, "superficial" characteristics of a target population. This may involve using people, places, language, music, food, locations, and clothing familiar to, and preferred by, the target audience. Surface structure refers to how well interventions fit within a specific culture. Deep structure involves incorporating the cultural, social, historical, environmental and psychological forces that influence the target health behavior in the proposed target population. Whereas surface structure generally increases the "receptivity" or "acceptance" of messages, deep structure conveys salience. Techniques, borrowed from social marketing and health communication theory, for developing culturally sensitive interventions are described. Research is needed to determine the effectiveness of culturally sensitive programs.

  19. Civic Engagement Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Doolittle

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on the development and validation of the Civic Engagement Scale (CES. This scale is developed to be easily administered and useful to educators who are seeking to measure the attitudes and behaviors that have been affected by a service-learning experience. This instrument was administered as a validation study in a purposive sample of social work and education majors at three universities (N = 513 with a return of 354 (69%. After the reliability and validity analysis was completed, the Attitude subscale was left with eight items and a Cronbach’s alpha level of .91. The Behavior subscale was left with six items and a Cronbach’s alpha level of .85. Principal component analysis indicated a two-dimensional scale with high loadings on both factors (mean factor loading for the attitude factor = .79, and mean factor loading for the behavior factor = .77. These results indicate that the CES is strong enough to recommend its use in educational settings. Preliminary use has demonstrated that this scale will be useful to researchers seeking to better understand the relationship of attitudes and behaviors with civic engagement in the service-learning setting. The primary limitations of this research are that the sample was limited to social work and education majors who were primarily White (n = 312, 88.1% and female (n = 294, 83.1%. Therefore, further research would be needed to generalize this research to other populations.

  20. Developing a Model for Assessing Public Culture Indicators at Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisam Latifi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed to develop a model for assessing public culture at universities and evaluating its indicators at public universities in Mashhad. The research follows an exploratory mixed approach. Research strategies in qualitative and quantitative sections are thematic networks analysis and descriptive- survey method, respectively. In the qualitative section, document analysis and semi-structured interviews with cultural experts are used as research tools. In this section, targeted sampling is carried out. In the quantitative section, a questionnaire which is developed based on the findings of the qualitative section is used as the research tool. Research population of the quantitative section consists of all the students who are admitted to public universities in Mashhad between 2009 and 2012. Sample size was calculated according to Cochran’s formula. Stratified sampling was used to select the sample. The results of the qualitative section led to the identification of 44 basic themes which are referred to as the micro indicators. These themes were clustered into similar groups. Then, 10 organizer themes were identified and recognized as macro indicators. In the next phase, importance factor of each indicator is determined according to the AHP method. The results of the qualitative assessment of indicators at public universities of Mashhad show that the overall cultural index declines during the years the student attends the university. Additionally, the highest correlation exists between national identity and revolutionary identity. The only negative correlations are observed between family and two indicators including social capital and cultural consumption. The results of the present study can be used to assess the state of public culture among university students and also be considered as a basis for assessing cultural planning.

  1. Management Control, Results-Oriented Culture and Public Sector Performance : Empirical Evidence on New Public Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeeten, Frank H M; Speklé, Roland F.

    2015-01-01

    New Public Management (NPM) has been guiding public sector reform for over 25 years. Its position on the design of effective management control rests on three key ideas: (1) performance improvement requires a results-oriented culture that emphasizes outcomes rather than inputs or processes; (2)

  2. Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and the Public Speaking Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Janet Weston; Tobler, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    From the earliest roots of rhetoric, practitioners emphasized the need for analyzing one's audience before developing a speech. Textbooks for most basic public speaking courses spend at least one chapter discussing audience analysis. Authors discuss adapting messages to various demographic, cultural, and individual differences. As a result,…

  3. Teaching Culture: The Challenges and Opportunities of International Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Amiso M.

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the challenges and opportunities for international public relations practice. Looks at current United States-Arab relations issues in international crisis communication. Discusses those issues, especially the role of culture and media. Proposes strategies including a case study that teachers can use to help students become effective…

  4. Librarianship and Public Culture in the Age of Information Capitalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Henry T.

    1996-01-01

    Contends that an entrepreneurial model of librarianship contradicts traditional ideals of free and equal access to information and argues that such a model threatens the future of the library as a vital public sphere of democratic culture. Discusses broad trends of advanced capitalism to provide a context for the critical interpretation of issues…

  5. Transnationalism and Civic Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farah, Abdulkadir Osman

    . In order to surmount the dichotomy of essentialist versus no-essentialist frames, the epistemological approach instrumentalized in this work follows an emancipatory method critically engaging both approaches. Furthermore the book proposes a theoretical framework analytically connecting western and non......The question of population migration and Diaspora transnationalism in the age of globalization is an area of social sciences deserving much more attention than it has received. This book deals with the advent of new ideological currents based on an assumed “Clash of Civilizations” increasingly...... or modern, i.e. symbolizing modernity, urbanization and individualism). Finally this book empirically examines how a host country’s mobilizing, political and structural opportunities or lack of them influence transnational Diasporas’ civic engagement that often include the application of combined formal...

  6. Civic Engagement in Higher Education: Concepts and Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn A. Bowen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available As the new millennium dawned, it became clear that American higher education had done some serious soul-searching in light of concerns that it was losing distinctiveness in pursuit of prestige. Moreover, many institutions began returning to their roots in response to exhortations to take a new leadership role in preparing students for active, responsible citizenship. Ernest Boyer struck a responsive chord when he proposed the scholarship of engagement as a means whereby the academy would employ its considerable resources to tackle the social, civic, and ethical problems that beset our communities (Boyer, 1996. In 1999, higher education leaders across the country articulated their commitment to the civic purposes of their institutions as vital agents and architects of a flourishing democracy (Campus Compact, 2000. The present decade has witnessed a widespread renewal of higher education’s historical commitment to public engagement and the growth of service-learning as a pedagogical approach to developing civic knowledge and skills. However, much work remains to be done. Social problems persist, locally and globally; today’s youth view political involvement with skepticism; civic learning is lacking, or lagging. That is the basis of Civic Engagement in Higher Education: Concepts and Practices.

  7. Isotype Visualizations. A Chance for Participation & Civic Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mayr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 1920s, Otto Neurath proposed a method for pictorial statistics called “Isotype”. The Isotype pictorial statistics were intended to educate the broad public and enable them to participate in society. This method is reviewed with respect to its relevance and potential for information visualization nowadays. Though some aspects are outdated, the basic approach has still potential for information visualization and civic education. Possible new media applications are presented and their impact for civic education and participation is discussed.

  8. Journalism as Model for Civic and Information Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Natalia; Saiyed, Gulnaz; Easterday, Matthew W.; Lam, Wan Shun Eva

    2018-01-01

    Journalism can serve as a generative disciplinary context for developing civic and information literacies needed to meaningfully participate in an increasingly networked and mediated public sphere. Using interviews with journalists, we developed a cognitive task analysis model, identifying an iterative sequence of production and domain-specific…

  9. Fandom meets activism: Rethinking civic and political participation

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa M. Brough; Sangita Shresthova

    2012-01-01

    Fan activism lies at the intersection of cultural and political participation. The study of fan activism can inform our understanding of contemporary collective action more broadly. We suggest four key areas for analysis: the relationships between cultural and political participation; the tension between participation and resistance in the context of fan activism; affect and the role of content worlds in civic and political mobilization; and evaluation of the impacts of fan activism. By drawi...

  10. Uses of the web for civic participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirzalla, F.; van Zoonen, L.

    2008-01-01

    This report contains the results of a survey about civic uses of the Internet by youth in the seven CivicWeb partner countries across Europe: Hungary, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and the United Kingdom.

  11. Social Workers as Civic-Minded Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Twill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined civic-mindedness among a sample of social work educators, community practitioners and new graduates. Using a web-based survey, researchers administered Hatcher’s (2008 Civic-Minded Professional scale. Results indicated that traditional and field faculty were more civic-minded than new graduates and other practitioners. Social work educators who focused on raising civic awareness in courses were more civic-minded than colleagues. New graduates who had participated in club service events were more civic-minded; however, there was no significant differences between groups based on number of community service courses completed. Social workers, whether faculty or not, who had participated in collaborative research were more civic-minded. The authors conclude that how social workers view their commitment to civic engagement has implications. Social workers need to be vigilant in our commitment to well-being in society. Intentional practices could be implemented to strengthen the partnership among groups.

  12. Cultural Speak: Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Experiential Learning in a Public Speaking Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Janet; Tobler, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the efficacy of modifications made to a higher education Latina/o public speaking course to enhance student growth and understanding. The changes included the addition of a service-learning component and the incorporation of culturally relevant pedagogy. Selected research, particularly related to college students, on…

  13. Culture Shock in Public-Private Partnerships: Examining P3 from Cultural Persective in Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeczi, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Ask for a definition of the word public-private partnership in a room filled with people from different cultures, and their answers may differ remarkably. The American of the group might refer to privatization and contracting out of traditional government services. A Dutch person might think of a

  14. Creating quality improvement culture in public health agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mary V; Mahanna, Elizabeth; Joly, Brenda; Zelek, Michael; Riley, William; Verma, Pooja; Fisher, Jessica Solomon

    2014-01-01

    We conducted case studies of 10 agencies that participated in early quality improvement efforts. The agencies participated in a project conducted by the National Association of County and City Health Officials (2007-2008). Case study participants included health directors and quality improvement team leaders and members. We implemented multiple qualitative analysis processes, including cross-case analysis and logic modeling. We categorized agencies according to the extent to which they had developed a quality improvement culture. Agencies were conducting informal quality improvement projects (n = 4), conducting formal quality improvement projects (n = 3), or creating a quality improvement culture (n = 4). Agencies conducting formal quality improvement and creating a quality improvement culture had leadership support for quality improvement, participated in national quality improvement initiatives, had a greater number of staff trained in quality improvement and quality improvement teams that met regularly with decision-making authority. Agencies conducting informal quality improvement were likely to report that accreditation is the major driver for quality improvement work. Agencies creating a quality improvement culture were more likely to have a history of evidence-based decision-making and use quality improvement to address emerging issues. Our findings support previous research and add the roles of national public health accreditation and emerging issues as factors in agencies' ability to create and sustain a quality improvement culture.

  15. Creating Quality Improvement Culture in Public Health Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanna, Elizabeth; Joly, Brenda; Zelek, Michael; Riley, William; Verma, Pooja; Fisher, Jessica Solomon

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We conducted case studies of 10 agencies that participated in early quality improvement efforts. Methods. The agencies participated in a project conducted by the National Association of County and City Health Officials (2007–2008). Case study participants included health directors and quality improvement team leaders and members. We implemented multiple qualitative analysis processes, including cross-case analysis and logic modeling. We categorized agencies according to the extent to which they had developed a quality improvement culture. Results. Agencies were conducting informal quality improvement projects (n = 4), conducting formal quality improvement projects (n = 3), or creating a quality improvement culture (n = 4). Agencies conducting formal quality improvement and creating a quality improvement culture had leadership support for quality improvement, participated in national quality improvement initiatives, had a greater number of staff trained in quality improvement and quality improvement teams that met regularly with decision-making authority. Agencies conducting informal quality improvement were likely to report that accreditation is the major driver for quality improvement work. Agencies creating a quality improvement culture were more likely to have a history of evidence-based decision-making and use quality improvement to address emerging issues. Conclusions. Our findings support previous research and add the roles of national public health accreditation and emerging issues as factors in agencies’ ability to create and sustain a quality improvement culture. PMID:24228680

  16. Healthy publics: enabling cultures and environments for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Stephen; Jackson, Mark A.; Wyatt, Katrina; Barlow, Anne E.; Barreto, Manuela; Clare, Linda; Depledge, Michael H.; Durie, Robin; Fleming, Lora E.; Groom, Nick; Morrissey, Karyn; Salisbury, Laura; Thomas, Felicity

    2018-01-01

    Despite extraordinary advances in biomedicine and associated gains in human health and well-being, a growing number of health and well-being related challenges have remained or emerged in recent years. These challenges are often ‘more than biomedical’ in complexion, being social, cultural and environmental in terms of their key drivers and determinants, and underline the necessity of a concerted policy focus on generating healthy societies. Despite the apparent agreement on this diagnosis, the means to produce change are seldom clear, even when the turn to health and well-being requires sizable shifts in our understandings of public health and research practices. This paper sets out a platform from which research approaches, methods and translational pathways for enabling health and well-being can be built. The term ‘healthy publics’ allows us to shift the focus of public health away from ‘the public’ or individuals as targets for intervention, and away from the view that culture acts as a barrier to efficient biomedical intervention, towards a greater recognition of the public struggles that are involved in raising health issues, questioning what counts as healthy and unhealthy and assembling the evidence and experience to change practices and outcomes. Creating the conditions for health and well-being, we argue, requires an engaged research process in which public experiments in building and repairing social and material relations are staged and sustained even if, and especially when, the fates of those publics remain fragile and buffeted by competing and often more powerful public formations. PMID:29862036

  17. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed.

  18. Associativismo, participação e cultura cívica: O potencial dos conselhos de saúde Associativism, participacion, civic culture and health councils in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eliana Labra

    2002-01-01

    , associativism and civic culture; examines aspects of the Brazilian democratization process, the health system reform and the health councils and, analyses the research data. Among other conclusions, it is postulated that participation of representatives of civil society in the health councils fosters a virtuous circle characterized by the involvement of citizens in matters of common good, the accumulation of social capital, and the awakening of civic culture values, thus contributing for the strengthening of democracy.

  19. Family Ties and Civic Virtues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljunge, Jan Martin

    I establish a positive relationship between family ties and civic virtues, as captured by disapproval of tax and benefit cheating, corruption, and a range of other dimensions of exploiting others for personal gain. I find that family ties are a complement to social capital, using within country...... evidence from 83 nations and data on second generation immigrants in 29 countries with ancestry in 85 nations. Strong families cultivate universalist values and produce more civic and altruistic individuals. The results provide a constructive role for families in promoting family values that support...

  20. Do NPM-type reforms lead to a cultural revolution within public sector organizations?

    OpenAIRE

    Wynen, Jan; Verhoest, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Agencification and granting public sector organizations managerial autonomy in particular, is believed to change organizational cultures, away from traditional compliance- oriented, detail- oriented, bureaucratic cultures, and towards organizational cultures which are more oriented towards external customers. There is however very little empirical information on the relationship between managerial autonomy and organizational culture. Using a unique dataset on public agencies in Flanders we no...

  1. Building Civic Bridges: Community-Centered Action Civics

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCompte, Karon; Blevins, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Project-based learning is an example of powerful social studies learning in which student engage in active inquiry. Action civics is a relatively new educational practice in which students "act as citizens" through a cycle of research, action, and reflection about problems they care about in their community. "Building Civic…

  2. Religious Conscience and Civic Conscience in Thomas Hobbes's Civic Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepperell, Keith C.

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses Thomas Hobbes' concept of conscience, the historical context in which the concept was formulated, and Hobbes' conclusion that civil law takes precedence over religious conscience. Hobbes' views are related to the debate between Pratte and Losito over the interaction between religious and civic conscience. (IAH)

  3. Using Pop Culture to Teach Youths Conflict Resolution, Healthful Lifestyles, Disaster Preparedness, and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torretta, Alayne; Black, Lynette Ranney

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents learn sustainable production techniques, civic engagement, leadership, public speaking, food safety practices, conflict resolution, disaster preparedness, and other life skills through Extension programming. Educators can increase participant interest in such programming by applying a creative pop culture twist, such as a zombie…

  4. Evolving Public Perceptions of Spaceflight in American Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launius, R. D.

    2002-01-01

    average of more than 60 percent of those polled rated the job done - Most Americans have shown support for space exploration and view it as important over the years, but - Most are also in favor of NASA as an organization, but are relatively unfamiliar with the majority of - These polls also suggest historically close relationships between public perceptions of NASA and - These images from popular culture, coupled with real-world accomplishments in spaceflight, work The paper will include numerous charts showing trends over time and offer comments on the meaning of public perceptions fort he evolution of space policy and the development of space exploration in the United States since the 1950s.

  5. Analysis of teaching materials of civic education is characterized by the value of character in building an anti-corruption culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmini; Suyanto, Totok; Nadiroh, Ulin

    2018-01-01

    In general, corruption is very harmful to society. One of the efforts in preventing corruption is by the culture of Anti-Corruption Education in the young generation through teaching materials in schools. The research method used is qualitative description. The sample in this research is 60 junior high school teachers of Citizenship Education in Surabaya. Data analysis technique used in this research is descriptive statistic with percentage technique. The result of this research is that it is very important that the value of the character of anti-corruption education in teaching materials to grow in the young generation.

  6. A Crisis in Civic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Council of Trustees and Alumni, 2016

    2016-01-01

    There is a crisis in American civic education. Survey after survey shows that recent college graduates are alarmingly ignorant of America's history and heritage. They cannot identify the term lengths of members of Congress, the substance of the First Amendment, or the origin of the separation of powers. They do not know the Father of the…

  7. Science and Civics: Sustaining Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Environmental Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Project WILD's new high school curriculum, "Science and Civics: Sustaining Wildlife", is designed to serve as a guide for involving students in environmental action projects aimed at benefitting the local wildlife found in a community. It involves young people in decisions affecting people, wildlife, and their shared habitat in the community. The…

  8. Is economics coursework, or majoring in economics, associated with different civic behaviors?

    OpenAIRE

    Sam Allgood; William Bosshardt; Wilbert Van der Klaauw; Michael Watts

    2010-01-01

    Studies regularly link levels of educational attainment to civic behavior and attitudes, but only a few investigate the role played by specific coursework. Using data collected from students who attended one of four public universities in our study, we investigate the relationship between economics coursework and civic behavior after graduation. Drawing from large samples of students in economics, business, or general majors, we compare responses across the three groups and by the number of u...

  9. Transit of Venus Culture: A Celestial Phenomenon Intrigues the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueter, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    When Jeremiah Horrocks first observed it in 1639, the transit of Venus was a desirable telescopic target because of its scientific value. By the next transit of Venus in 1761, though, the enlightened public also embraced it as a popular celestial phenomenon. Its stature elevated over the centuries, the transit of Venus has been featured in music, poetry, stamps, plays, books, and art. The June 2004 transit emerged as a surprising global sensation, as suggested by the search queries it generated. Google's Zeitgeist deemed Venus Transit to be the #1 Most Popular Event in the world for that month. New priorities, technologies, and media have brought new audiences to the rare alignment. As the 2012 transit of Venus approaches, the trend continues with publicly accessible capabilities that did not exist only eight years prior. For example, sites from which historic observations have been made are plotted and readily available on Google Earth. A transit of Venus phone app in development will, if fully funded, facilitate a global effort to recreate historic expeditions by allowing smartphone users to submit their observed transit timings to a database for quantifying the Astronomical Unit. While maintaining relevance in modern scientific applications, the transit of Venus has emerged as a cultural attraction that briefly intrigues the mainstream public and inspires their active participation in the spectacle.

  10. Civic Education and the Learning Behaviors of Youth in the Online Environment: A Call for Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Jansen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Scholarly discourse in political science and communication studies is replete with empirical evidence lamenting the decline in civic engagement and political participation among adolescents and young adults. Scholars offer a variety of factors contributing to the disengagement of youth from the civic and political process including lack of attention paid to youth by politicians and the political process, the limited experience and a narrow frame of reference of young people in the political process, their aversion to traditional politics, and to poor quality courses and a decline in civic education in schools. Youth frequently lack civic and political knowledge as well as information and communications technology and social skills needed to engage in public life due in large part to the superficial coverage of substantive civic topics in textbooks and concentrating on knowledge level information that focuses on rights to the exclusion of obligations and participation. Civics curriculum often lacks opportunities for young people to embrace and communicate about politics on their own terms and frequently has little connection between the academic presentation of politics and the acquisition of skills that might help develop engaged citizens. Current approaches to civic education are at odds with young people’s experiences of informal participation with their peers in a nonhierarchical network. Traditional civics curriculum often treats subject matter as another academic subject with right or wrong answers arbitrated by the teacher as central authority and students in competition for grades. A growing body of literature discusses the affinity that youth have for Internet use and the possibilities of new media to address disengagement and to enhance new forms of citizenship calling for pedagogical reform in civic education.

  11. Fandom meets activism: Rethinking civic and political participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Brough

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fan activism lies at the intersection of cultural and political participation. The study of fan activism can inform our understanding of contemporary collective action more broadly. We suggest four key areas for analysis: the relationships between cultural and political participation; the tension between participation and resistance in the context of fan activism; affect and the role of content worlds in civic and political mobilization; and evaluation of the impacts of fan activism. By drawing on work across several disciplines including media studies and social movement literature, the analysis of fan activism through these lenses offers insights for theorizing contemporary cultures and modes of collective action.

  12. Public Spaces as the Reflection of Society and its Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siláči, Ivan; Vitková, L.'ubica

    2017-10-01

    Spatial structure of places has gone through significant changes in the last 70 years, caused by modernistic approach towards urban design. This approach has brought retraction from traditional spatial form and has started introducing free form design of urban spaces since the 1960’s. Tighter urban structure has started to be applied since the 1980’s, but in a less significant way than in other developed European countries, as a result of starting mass-housing period. However modernistic approach legacy is quite heavily maintained and present in our cities. Single-use commercial areas and family-house “landscapes” located mostly on the outside of city border represent the mentioned system. In those structures, a man usually identifies himself with his own house or apartment rather than with space that commonly surrounds him. Therefore, the role of spaces, their image perceived by men and their character is more and more important. Supporting the distinctive individual character of a city and its places and the identification with districts is fundamental. Urban resident and occupant identify himself with the city and urban environment via arrangement of spaces. Social sustainability is an integral part of the effective urban development. Quality of public spaces, which support the city of neighborhoods, vibrant city and short distance city are the important pillars of sustainability. Cultural environment and the sense of place is another important dimension of sustainability. The paper is focused on mapping and evaluation of the public spaces in Bratislava with the emphasis of their social development and cultural value, as factors of their identity.

  13. Religious Identification and Modes of Civic and Political Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezaei, Shahamak; Goli, Marco; Møballe, Svend

    are represented in public debate. It appears that the most politically active immigrants at the local and national levels and in the media are individuals who focus on issues related to Islam, or are considered to have Islamic affiliations. Danish policy of contradiction (that is formal openness and substantial....... For instance, not only was there a remarkable cut down in the number of immigrants entering the country, but there was also a decline in supporting immigrant population’s participation in civic areas. It seems that the scope, the content and the intensity of the debate, as well as the overall discursive...... and public debate, provide the religious and ethnic identification and participation with an attractive mode of civic and political participation among immigrants; whether these are newcomers or ‘old’ immigrants. There exists a rather substantial variation in the extent to which immigrant groups...

  14. Mind the Civic Empowerment Gap: Economically Elite Students and Critical Civic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swalwell, Katy

    2015-01-01

    Calls to close the civic empowerment gap have traditionally focused on improving and expanding civic education for students in high-poverty urban schools. While important, this recommendation implies that closing the gap is in and of itself a sufficient end and that the civic education of affluent youth is unproblematic. This paper calls for (1)…

  15. Standardization of Lower Secondary Civic Education and Inequality of the Civic and Political Engagement of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witschge, Jacqueline; van de Werfhorst, Herman G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the relation between the standardization of civic education and the inequality of civic engagement is examined. Using data from the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study 2009 among early adolescents and Eurydice country-level data, three-level analysis and variance function regression are applied to examine whether…

  16. Approaching "The Civic Mission of Schools": Examining Adolescent Civic Engagement in an Alternative Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, John P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine students' expected and observable civic engagement in a Montessori Erdkinder-based middle school classroom. Research questions included: (a) In what ways is civic engagement addressed in the Montessori Erdkinder-based middle school explicit curriculum? (b) How does the expected civic engagement in the…

  17. Pre-Planning Civic Action: An Analysis of Civic Leaders' Problem Solving Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the civic thinking heuristics that civic leaders use when pre-planning action. Across eight think-aloud protocols, findings suggest that three heuristics are employed. "Frame alignment" refers to the process of harmonizing personal beliefs and interests with the particulars of a civic action issue to find personal…

  18. The "Civic-Minded" Professional? An Exploration through Hannah Arendt's "Vita Activa"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreber, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    Recent reform initiatives calling for "civic" ("public-good" or "democratic") professionalism can be seen as a response to the widely reported decline in public trust in the professions and an attempt to partially remedy this problem through a more publically engaged professionalism. The author draws on the political…

  19. 75 FR 1656 - Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for Public Comments; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... culture policy statement, including: (1) development of a common safety culture definition; and (2... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2009-0485] Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for...: Issuance of draft safety culture policy statement and notice of opportunity for public comment; Extension...

  20. THE OUTSET AND DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC RELATIONS (PR) IN ROMANIAN ECONOMY AFTER 1990

    OpenAIRE

    Raluca ZOLTAN; Ghiorghi PRISACARU; Romulus VANCEA

    2009-01-01

    Currently, even in Romania the public relations (PR) develops in extremely diverse organizations, have varied frames of work and implies objectives sometimes hard to conciliate; they are practiced in and for governmental institutions, also in / for non-governmental organizations, for companies which pursue the profit, but also for civic associations, for banks, for educational or cultural institutions. The objectives of public relations are different too: from inducement of the public in favo...

  1. Primary teachers go beyond the Slovak civic education curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danišková Zuzana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have pointed to the low level of civic participation among young people. On the other hand, there is a section of the youth population that is politically involved in and supportive of extremist and anti-system political movements. Public discussions have suggested that this may be linked to inadequacies in citizenship education. However, as the Slovak case shows, the causes of this are deeper, have historic roots and are reflected in the fact that citizenship education has been pushed to the margins of the curriculum and is narrowly interpreted. Citizenship education is not just about the nature of the curriculum but also about broader extra-curricular activities and about the direct, or implicit, instruction provided by teachers. The empirical research presented here shows that primary school teachers go beyond the narrow framework of the national social studies syllabus and implicitly teach citizenship education in line with their own civic orientations.

  2. Teaching Civic Journalism: Integrating Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Describes a journalism course that used an integrative approach to teaching about the principles, practice, and effects of civic journalism, combining theory, news writing, and evaluation. Describes the class project on the controversial issue of panhandling. Discusses goals of civic journalism and of the project, journalistic methods used,…

  3. Civic Engagement Patterns of Undocumented Mexican Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, William; Espinoza, Roberta; Ramos, Karina; Coronado, Heidi; Cortes, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the civic engagement of undocumented Mexican students. Civic engagement was defined as providing a social service, activism, tutoring, and functionary work. Survey data results (n = 126) suggest that despite high feelings of rejection because of their undocumented status, part-time employment, and household responsibilities,…

  4. Honours service-learning & civic responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trae Stewart

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Universities have been urged to prepare graduates for successful professional lives and fulfilling lives as civically responsible citizens. Pedagogies of engagement, like service-learning, are touted as one means to achieve these goals. Connections between first-year experience and service-learning programs have been slow to develop. Further, empirical studies on service-learning in university honours education are similarly scarce. This article examines first-semester honours postsecondary students' sense of civic responsibility before and after completing a service-learning program linking a course on the Evolution of Community to direct volunteerism in struggling schools. Based on pre-post-responses (n=119 to the Level III-Civic Responsibility Survey, analysis of variance with repeated measures showed that participants' sense of civic responsibility was significantly increased over time on each of the dependent variables (i.e., community connectedness, civic attitudes, civic efficacy. Community connectedness scores increased significantly at the .005 level, F(1, 118 = 9.703, p = .002. The changes in civic attitudes and civic efficacy scores were extremely significant at the .0005 level, F(1, 118 = 14.498, p < .0005 and F(1, 118 = 23.56, p < .0005, respectively.

  5. Developmental Antecedents of Young Adult Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradovic, Jelena; Masten, Ann S.

    2007-01-01

    Civic engagement was studied in relation to overall development in adolescence, emerging adulthood, and young adulthood to examine how earlier activity involvement and success in prior and concurrent age-salient domains of competence may contribute to 2 forms of civic engagement in adulthood (citizenship and volunteering). Data on 163 youth were…

  6. Assessing Two Theoretical Frameworks of Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cabrero, Benilde; Pérez-Martínez, María Guadalupe; Sandoval-Hernández, Andrés; Caso-Niebla, Joaquín; Díaz-López, Carlos David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically test two major theoretical models: a modified version of the social capital model (Pattie, Seyd and Whiteley, 2003), and the Informed Social Engagement Model (Barr and Selman, 2014; Selman and Kwok, 2010), to explain civic participation and civic knowledge of adolescents from Chile, Colombia and Mexico,…

  7. The mediatization of public sex cultures in the case of the hook-up app Grindr

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian Møller

    The mediatization of public sex cultures in the case of the hook-up app Grindr Along with the normalisation of geo-locative dating and hook-up practices in mainstream publics – through apps like Tinder, Bumble and Happn – imaginations of sexual privacy and indeed publicness seem to be changing....... This paper focuses on the interplay between media and public sex cultures in the case of the Grindr app use in gay male intimacy cultures. Though gay men’s sex practices, vis-à-vis cruising, have historically been thoroughly mobile and mediated, the Internet has brought about new ways of accessing...... and becoming visible in such cultures (Hollister, 2002). Making oneself visible to the right public (and as importantly invisible to others), now occurs in relation to the affordance structure that apps like Grindr offer. The paper asks to what extend different gay, public sex cultures are shaped by Grindr...

  8. Educational Community: Among the Real and Virtual Civic Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenijevic, Jasmina; Andevski, Milica

    2016-01-01

    The new media enable numerous advantages in the strengthening of civic engagement, through removing barriers in space and time and through networking of individuals of the same social, civic or political interests at the global level. Different forms of civic engagement and civic responsibility in the virtual space are ever more present, and…

  9. Police-public interactions : a grid-group cultural theory perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loyens, Kim; Maesschalck, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose - The police culture literature-suggests that police officers' attitude towards the public is characterised by Suspicion and an "us-vs-them" mentality. It also refers to the moral mission of protecting the public by being tough on crime. The traditional police culture model seems to imply

  10. Cultural misconceptions and public stigma against mental illness among Lebanese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Ahmad; Fawaz, Mirna

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine cultural misconceptions about mental illness and how they are associated with the public stigma against mental illness among Lebanese university students. A sample of 203 participants completed the study. Data about cultural misconceptions, attitudes about mental illness, and public stigma of mental illness were obtained. The researchers examined the mean difference in public stigma according to cultural beliefs about mental illness. The majority of students believe that mental health professionals have inadequate knowledge and expertise to treat mental disorders. Various cultural misconceptions about mental illness were reported. Public stigma significantly differed based on these cultural misconceptions. Psychiatric nurses should play a vital role in reshaping the inappropriate cultural view about mental illness. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Children’s Civic Engagement in the Scratch Online Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricarose Roque

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In public discourse, and in the governance of online communities, young people are often denied agency. Children are frequently considered objects to protect, safeguard, and manage. Yet as children go online from very early ages, they develop emergent forms of civic and political engagement. Children appropriate the affordances of digital platforms in order to discuss, connect, and act with their peers and in their communities. In this paper, we analyze civic engagement in Scratch Online, a creative community where children from around the world learn programming by designing and sharing interactive media projects. We explore the ways that young Scratch community members connect with issues of global importance, as well as with local topics and questions of community governance. We develop a typology of the strategies they use to express themselves, engage with their peers, and call for action. We then analyze the reaction of the community, including other Scratch members and adult moderators, and draw key lessons from these examples in order to describe guidelines for educators and designers who would like to support children’s rights to civic engagement in online learning environments.

  12. Private bodies, public texts: race, gender, and a cultural bioethics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holloway, Karla F. C

    2011-01-01

    ... on cultural complexity as the origin of subjectivity. For bioethics, this means a primary and focused consideration of the habits, patterns, and practices in medicine and law that subsequently constitute the discipline's subjects. In other words, cultural ethics acknowledges that the discursive practices of the field- the complexities of history, instituti...

  13. Civic Engagement in Adolescents: Engendering Civic Awareness Through a University Youth Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Parker

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A weeklong residential Youth Leadership Institute Project was conducted at USC Upstate to promote essential skills deemed necessary for future civic engagement and political identity. The program and curriculum followed a framework that suggests that underlying civic skills are necessary to foster civic engagement among youth. Building on this theory, this reported study illustrates that civic engagement requires a developmental and educational process. Adolescence is a primary time for identity exploration and formation, which makes this stage an optimal time to engender civic awareness. A diverse group of 49 youth ranging in age from 14 to 17 participated. Results from the project demonstrate that when evaluating the significance and success of youth civic engagement programs, an account must be made for both the developmental and educational capacities. In pursuing projects such as ours on university campuses and beyond, psychologists and political scientists should work together to measure their outcomes in terms of these variables.

  14. Civic Education and Visions of War and Peace in the Spanish Transition to Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamud Angulo, Kira; Groves, Tamar; Milito Barone, Cecilia Cristina; Hernández Laina, Yovana

    2016-01-01

    This article explores visions of war and peace in the education system during the Spanish transition to democracy. During those years, the Spanish state was faced with the challenge of leaving its authoritarian political past behind and forging a democratic civic culture. As the concepts of war and peace are inextricably linked to those of state…

  15. Making Americans: UNO Charter Schools and Civic Education. Policy Brief 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feith, David

    2013-01-01

    This policy brief is the third in a series of in-depth case studies exploring how top-performing charter schools have incorporated civic learning in their school curriculum and school culture. The UNO Charter School Network includes 13 schools serving some 6,500 students across Chicago. Located in predominantly Hispanic neighborhoods, the…

  16. Organizational culture and its relationship with hospital performance in public hospitals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Bundorf, Kate; Le Chang, Ji; Huang, Jin Xin; Xue, Di

    2011-12-01

    To measure perceptions of organizational culture among employees of public hospitals in China and to determine whether perceptions are associated with hospital performance. Hospital, employee, and patient surveys from 87 Chinese public hospitals conducted during 2009. Developed and administered a tool to assess organizational culture in Chinese public hospitals. Used factor analysis to create measures of organizational culture. Analyzed the relationships between employee type and perceptions of culture and between perceptions of culture and hospital performance using multivariate models. Employees perceived the culture of Chinese public hospitals as stronger in internal rules and regulations, and weaker in empowerment. Hospitals in which employees perceived that the culture emphasized cost control were more profitable and had higher rates of outpatient visits and bed days per physician per day but also had lower levels of patient satisfaction. Hospitals with cultures perceived as customer-focused had longer length of stay but lower patient satisfaction. Managers in Chinese public hospitals should consider whether the culture of their organization will enable them to respond effectively to their changing environment. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Linking learning contexts: The relationship between students’ civic and political experiences and their self-regulation in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eMalafaia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the relationship between self-regulation strategies and youth civic and political experiences, assuming that out-of-school learning can foster metacognition. The study is based on a sample of 732 Portuguese students from grades 8 and 11. Results show that the quality of civic and political participation experiences, together with academic self-efficacy, are significant predictors of young people’s self-regulation, particularly regarding cognitive and metacognitive strategies (elaboration and critical thinking. Such effects surpass even the weight of family cultural and school variables, such as the sense of school belonging. There-fore, we argue that the pedagogical value of non-formal civic and political experiences is re-lated to learning in formal pedagogical contexts. This is because civic and political participa-tion with high developmental quality can stimulate higher-order cognitive engagement and, thus, contribute to the development of learning strategies that promote academic success.

  18. Linking Learning Contexts: The Relationship between Students’ Civic and Political Experiences and Their Self-Regulation in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malafaia, Carla; Teixeira, Pedro M.; Neves, Tiago; Menezes, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between self-regulation strategies and youth civic and political experiences, assuming that out-of-school learning can foster metacognition. The study is based on a sample of 732 Portuguese students from grades 8 and 11. Results show that the quality of civic and political participation experiences, together with academic self-efficacy, are significant predictors of young people’s self-regulation, particularly regarding cognitive and metacognitive strategies (elaboration and critical thinking). Such effects surpass even the weight of family cultural and school variables, such as the sense of school belonging. Therefore, we argue that the pedagogical value of non-formal civic and political experiences is related to learning in formal pedagogical contexts. This is because civic and political participation with high developmental quality can stimulate higher-order cognitive engagement and, thus, contribute to the development of learning strategies that promote academic success. PMID:27199812

  19. Linking Learning Contexts: The Relationship between Students' Civic and Political Experiences and Their Self-Regulation in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malafaia, Carla; Teixeira, Pedro M; Neves, Tiago; Menezes, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between self-regulation strategies and youth civic and political experiences, assuming that out-of-school learning can foster metacognition. The study is based on a sample of 732 Portuguese students from grades 8 and 11. Results show that the quality of civic and political participation experiences, together with academic self-efficacy, are significant predictors of young people's self-regulation, particularly regarding cognitive and metacognitive strategies (elaboration and critical thinking). Such effects surpass even the weight of family cultural and school variables, such as the sense of school belonging. Therefore, we argue that the pedagogical value of non-formal civic and political experiences is related to learning in formal pedagogical contexts. This is because civic and political participation with high developmental quality can stimulate higher-order cognitive engagement and, thus, contribute to the development of learning strategies that promote academic success.

  20. The civic integrationist turn in Danish and Swedish school politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández, Christian; Jensen, Kristian Kriegbaum

    2017-01-01

    , yet with different styles and content. Citizenship education in Denmark concentrates on reproducing a historically derived core of cultural values and knowledge to which minorities are expected to assimilate, while the Swedish model subscribes to a pluralist view that stresses mutual adaptation...... it follow the pattern of residence and citizenship? This article addresses these questions through a comparative study of the EU’s allegedly strictest and most liberal immigration regimes, Denmark and Sweden, respectively. The analysis shows a growing concern with citizenship education in both countries...... and intercultural tolerance. Despite claims to the contrary, the analysis shows that Sweden too has experienced a civic turn....

  1. Public Library Services to Ethno-Cultural Minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Albert, Hans G.

    1984-01-01

    Report on development of multicultural and multilingual public library services in Federal Republic of Germany highlights influx of migratory workers, education, occupational training, efforts of public libraries to address information needs of foreign workers, illiteracy, and an international seminar titled "Books for Children from…

  2. Warm and Supportive Parenting Can Discourage Offspring's Civic Engagement in the Transition to Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Maria K; Silbereisen, Rainer K; Ranta, Mette; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2016-11-01

    It is widely believed that warm and supportive parenting fosters all kinds of prosocial behaviors in the offspring, including civic engagement. However, accumulating international evidence suggests that the effects of family support on civic engagement may sometimes be negative. To address this apparent controversy, we identified several scenarios for the negative effects of supportive parenting on youth civic engagement and tested them using four waves of data from the Finnish Educational Transitions Studies. They followed 1549 students (55 % female) from late adolescence into young adulthood, included both maternal (n = 231) and offspring reports of parental support, and assessed civic engagement in young adulthood. Control variables included socioeconomic status, other sociodemographic indicators, church belonging, personality traits, and earlier civic engagement. Higher maternal warmth and support and a stronger identification with the parental family in adolescence predicted offspring's lower political activism up to 10 years later. Perceived parental support in young adulthood predicted lower volunteering 2 years later. There were no significant effects on general organizational involvement (e.g., in student and hobby associations). None of the a priori scenarios that we identified from the literature appeared to explain the pattern of results satisfactorily. We put forth cultural and life stage explanations of our findings.

  3. Popular Public Discourse at Speakers' Corner: Negotiating Cultural Identities in Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    1996-01-01

    In this paper I examine how cultural identities are actively negotiated in popular debate at a multicultural public setting in London. Speakers at Speakers' Corner manage the local construction of group affiliation, audience response and argument in and through talk, within the context of ethnic...... in which participant 'citizens' in the public sphere can actively struggle over cultural representation and identities. Using transcribed examples of video data recorded at Speakers' Corner my paper will examine how cultural identity is invoked in the management of active participation. Audiences...... and their affiliations are regulated and made accountable through the routines of membership categorisation and the policing of cultural identities and their imaginary borders....

  4. Civil Society and Civic Consciousness = Sivil Toplum ve Sosyal Bilinç

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert BİLGİN

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The meta-narratives of modern times are considered as the most significant factors impeding the development of the civil society' that coincided with the western definition of democracy. Nevertheless, this article suggests that the real problem was institutional inadequacy, which was produced by lack of civic consciousness. The best evidence for this argument is the search by theoreticians for a civic consciousness despite their different ideological orientations. Indeed, the demise of meta-narratives in post-modern times does not tend to lead to a more civil society because of the vicissitude of this extant institutional inadequacy, which appears to be created by the decline of cultural understanding of civic consciousness.

  5. Civic Engagement and Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The recent wave of protests, from the Arab Spring to the Occupy movement and austerity protests, have reinvigorated hopes for the democratic potential of the Internet, and particularly social media. With their popular appeal and multimodal affordances social media such as YouTube, Twitter...... and Facebook have generated both media and scholarly interest in their possibilities for granting visibility to and facilitating the organization of activism. However, the role of social media in sustaining civic engagement beyond protest and fatalism remains under-explored. How can social media contribute...... to sustaining longer-term involvement of civil society? What is the potential of social media for making available alternative social imaginaries? And what role may social media play in facilitating social change through cooperation with business? This volume offers answers to these questions by providing...

  6. The concept of culture in academic and public discourses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristoffanini, Pablo Rolando

    2012-01-01

    The present article is an exploratory examination of some of the problems and consequences that the application of different theoretical approaches to the study of culture entails. The aim is to show through examples some of the strengths and weaknesses of the main theoretical currents that have...... served as paradigms in different periods, such as configurationalism, functionalism and postmodern constructivism, and to question some of the epistemological and ontological suppositions of these approaches. In addition, the article traces the roots of the idea of coherence and incoherence of culture...

  7. Assessing two Theoretical Frameworks of Civic Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benilde García-Cabrero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to empirically test two major theoretical models: a modified version of the social capital model (Pattie, Seyd and Whiteley, 2003, and the Informed Social Engagement Model (Barr and Selman, 2014; Selman and Kwok, 2010, to explain civic participation and civic knowledge of adolescents from Chile, Colombia and Mexico, using data from the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study 2009 (Schulz, et al., 2010. The models were used to identify factors associated with different levels of knowledge and civic participation: expected participation in legal and illegal protests, and electoral participation. Data were analyzed using regression analysis. Results show that the Informed Social Engagement approach (ISEM, explains better the observed differences in civic knowledge and civic participation, than the Social Capital Model (SCM. That is, the expected values associated with the variables included in the ISEM are closer to the observed values, than those predicted by the SCM. This is true for the three outcomes (expected participation in legal protests, illegal protests, and electoral participation and in the three countries analyzed (Chile, Colombia and Mexico.

  8. Public Access ICT across Cultures: Diversifying Participation in the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... Public access venues – most often Internet cafés in cities and ... 35 years working as an economist for international development agencies. ... Birth registration is the basis for advancing gender equality and children's rights.

  9. Cultural Change, the Hybrid Administrative System and Public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-17

    Jan 17, 2013 ... The absence of an indigenous entrepreneurial class, and human and ... independence to become a major actor in socio-economic development. ... public sector management reforms in achieving their intended objectives in ...

  10. Disrupting the Dissertation: Linked Data, Enhanced Publication and Algorithmic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Frances; Carmichael, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This article explores how the three aspects of Striphas' notion of algorithmic culture (information, crowds and algorithms) might influence and potentially disrupt established educational practices. We draw on our experience of introducing semantic web and linked data technologies into higher education settings, focussing on extended student…

  11. ICTs, Openness and Citizen Perceptions of Government: How Civic Technologies Can Facilitate External Citizen Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Rumbul

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines whether civic technologies deliver an effective technique for developing the political efficacy of citizens and altering their perceived accountability of governments. Employing a survey-based methodology, a quantitative analysis was performed on the users of civic technology sites in the USA, UK, Kenya and South Africa. The primary question posed is whether the specific citizen monitoring actions facilitated by these sites cause a related effect in altering the extent to which citizens believe that governments are responsive to citizen-audit. The results indicate an enhancement in citizen efficacy and perceptions of government accountability. Notable differences detected in the user demographics between the countries studied demonstrate a wide spectrum of citizen usage; however, with common confidence displayed by respondents in the efficacy of the ICT. The findings indicate that the publication and citizen-audit of government information through civic technologies in developed and developing countries increases feelings of external efficacy and perceived government accountability.

  12. Cultural text mining: using text mining to map the emergence of transnational reference cultures in public media repositories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Toine; Verheul, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the research project Translantis, which uses innovative technologies for cultural text mining to analyze large repositories of digitized public media, such as newspapers and journals.1 The Translantis research team uses and develops the text mining tool Texcavator, which is

  13. Methodological Lessons Learned from Conducting Civic Education Research in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Elizabeth C.; Vercellotti, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    With the growing size of the "Millennial Generation" and its potential impact on American democracy, the civic education of this cohort deserves study. Using news media and discussion of politics at home and in the classroom at four public high schools in New Jersey, we conducted an experiment to measure changes in media use, political…

  14. Rising to the Challenge: Developing a Survey of Workplace Skills, Civic Engagement, and Global Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouimet, Judith A.; Pike, Gary R.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes the ongoing development of a survey of students' workplace skills, civic engagement, and global awareness that colleges and universities can use to document their contributions to the public good. The student growth survey currently under development offers colleges and universities an opportunity to refocus the attention of…

  15. Fair and Cloudy Weathers of Tolerance in Civic and Religious Education in Northern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandbrink, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the normative logic and orientation of civic and religious education in seven countries in northern Europe. One main underlying argument is that public schooling must be generically regarded as a heavy functional contributor to the "soft" normative reproduction and validation of certain ethical and cultural…

  16. 78 FR 53790 - Public Forum-Safety Culture: Enhancing Transportation Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Public Forum--Safety Culture: Enhancing Transportation Safety On Tuesday and Wednesday, September 10-11, 2013, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a forum titled, ``Safety Culture: Enhancing Transportation Safety.'' The forum will begin at 9:00...

  17. Organisational Cultures in Public and Private Portuguese Universities: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Aristides I.; Hill, Manuela M.

    2008-01-01

    Perceptions of organisational culture made by three categories of staff playing managerial roles in each of two Portuguese Universities (one public and the other private) were compared using a questionnaire adapted from the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument and translated into Portuguese. The four scales of the questionnaire, designed…

  18. Public stigma towards mental illness in the Greek culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzouvara, V; Papadopoulos, C

    2014-12-01

    Mental illness stigma negatively affects the lives of individuals with mental health disorders. Studies have indicated that the type and degree of stigma significantly varies across cultures. This study aimed to add to this body of knowledge by examining the prevalence and the type of mental illness stigma among individuals who identified themselves as Greek. It also examined the influence of a range of potential within-culture stigma moderating factors, including levels of previous experience with mental illness and mental illness knowledge. A cross-sectional quantitative design was employed, and 111 participants living in England and Greece were sampled through the snowball sampling technique. Stigma prevalence was measured using the 'Community Attitudes to Mental Illness' questionnaire. The findings revealed that participants showed a high degree of sympathy for people with mental illness but also considered them to be inferior and of a lower social class, and needing strict societal control. Higher stigma was significantly associated with being educated in England (instead of Greece), higher religiosity, lower knowledge levels and lower levels personal experience of mental illness. Targeted antistigma campaigns specifically tailored for the Greek culture are required in order to help reduce stigmatizing attitudes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Interrogating Public Sphere and Popular Culture as Theoretical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because of its theoretical roots in Western liberal thinking, scholars in African studies such as Comaroffs, Mamdani and Ekeh have vigorously debated the extent to which the concept of civil society is useful in explaining and interrogating developments in Africa. However, the concept of the public sphere has been subjected ...

  20. Enhancing youth potential through Civic Service: ethical reflections arising from a geo-educational project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbia, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    Different forms of Civic Service are present in Europe. The National Civic Service (SCN) of Italy started, with a law, as an alternative to military service in 2001. It was conceived as an opportunity to people from 18 to 28 years, the volunteers, who intend to grow in social, civic, cultural and professional dimensions while performing experiences of social solidarity, national and international cooperation, protection and preservation of national heritage. Each accredited organization, which hosts SCN projects, signs up an ethical charter, regulating relationships between volunteers and the hosting organization. Summarizing, the organization must be aware 1)of putting into effect a law aimed to involve young generations in homeland defense with non violent means through services of social utility; 2) that the Civic Service wants young people to spend one year of their life in a critical phase in which they reach the responsibilities of adults; 3) that adopted working method is learning by doing, working with tutors having to increase skills and exploit the full potential of volunteers; 4) of recognizing the volunteers' right to work to reach the project's objectives, and not only for the benefits of the hosting organization; 5) that volunteers should work with well defined procedures, clear since the beginning; 6) of requiring from volunteers their full commitment to learn and responsibly participate to project's activities as well as to fully express and increase their expertise, skills and personal resources. Ethical implications emerged during an ongoing Earth Sciences education project funded by SCN and involving young volunteers at Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV). According to SCN's ethical charter, in this case the challenge is to welcome a group of young people in a public research organization, and to integrate them in the limited time lapse of one year. The European Charter for Researchers came as a valuable help. Its principles

  1. Does misery love company? Civic engagement in economic hard times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chaeyoon; Sander, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We examine how economic hardship affects civic engagement. Using the Roper Political and Social Trends data, we show that the unemployed were less civically engaged throughout the period covered in the data (1973-1994). The gap in civic engagement between the employed and the unemployed is stable throughout the period. We find little evidence that national economic recession affects the overall level of civic engagement. We do find that higher state unemployment is positively related to political participation for both employed and unemployed residents, especially for political partisans. Finally, we find a strong and negative relationship between state-level income inequality and civic engagement. Our findings suggest that in terms of civic engagement: (1) the state-level economic context matters more than the national context; (2) economic recession may affect political and non-political civic participation differently; (3) economic inequality, rather than economic hardship, appears more negatively to impact civic engagement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Civic crowdfunding is niet alleen een speeltje van zelfredzame burgers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, Frank Jan; Bakker, Ezrah

    2017-01-01

    De opkomst van civic crowdfunding biedt mogelijkheden voor gemeentelijke overheden die burgerinitiatieven willen stimuleren. Maar slaat civic crowdfunding vooral aan bij een beperkte groep relatief hoogopgeleide burgers? De Hogeschool van Amsterdam onderzoekt dit.

  3. Talking about AIDS in Hong Kong: Cultural Models in Public Health Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rodney H.

    A study explored the issues of cultural identity and interaction in public health discourse concerning Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in Hong Kong's multilingual, multicultural social context. Twenty public service announcements (PSAs) concerning AIDS awareness televised in both English and Cantonese in Hong Kong from 1987 to 1994 were…

  4. The role of transformational leadership and organizational culture in service delivery within a public service organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophillia Ledimo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous changes in the external environment deriving from legislative, economic and technological factors, puts pressure not only to corporate organizations, but also to public service organizations. These changes have increased pressure on service delivery and calls for accountability in public service organizations. With this increased pressure comes the need for public service organizations to discover how to most effectively enhance their organizational performance. Two of the most effective ways to improve performance are through the organizational leadership and culture. Although many studies were conducted on transformational leadership and organizational culture, there is still a need to investigate the link between these constructs in public service organizations. Hence the objective of this study was to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational culture for service delivery practices. The Leadership Practice Inventory (LPI and Organizational Culture Inventory (OCI were administered to a random sample size of N=238, from a population of 4350 employees working within the public service organization. Descriptive statistics and Pearson’s correlation were conducted to analyse the data. The results of this study indicated a significant positive relationship between transformational leadership and the constructive dimension of organizational culture within a public service organization. In terms of contributions and practical implications, insight gained from the findings may be used in proposing leadership and organizational development interventions and future research

  5. Culture clash: alcohol marketing and public health aspirations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Geoffrey; de Wever, Johanna

    2008-03-01

    It is of no coincidence that a number of recent Harm Reduction Digests have addressed the issue of the reduction of alcohol-related harm. Despite the dominant focus on illicit drug use in the popular discourse, alcohol remains Australia's number one drug problem, as it is in many other developed countries. In this Digest Munro and de Wever use the 'four Ps' of marketing: product, price, place and promotion, to critique the two decades industry self-regulation of alcohol marketing. They conclude that if we are going to develop policies which effectively change Australian drinking culture to reduce alcohol-related harm, we need first to accept that the alcohol industry and the health field have separate and conflicting interests.

  6. Towards Culture 3.0 - Performative space in the public library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochumsen, Henrik; Skot-Hansen, Dorte; Rasmussen, Casper Hvenegaard

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse and discuss the development of performative spaces in public libraries from a cultural policy perspective. First, a framework of three concepts of culture, 1.0–3.0, is used as a tool to analyse the overall development of public libraries. Against...... this background, we introduce the notion of performative spaces in public libraries by highlighting Nordic examples. The tendency can also be seen on a broader level in European and North American libraries, where a ‘performative turn’ can be seen as the relationship between the library and its users, especially...... the younger ‘digital natives’. The rationales behind the emergence of performative spaces in public libraries are analysed and discussed: democratisation, empowerment and economic impact. This article concludes that the performative spaces are legitimized by multiple rationales in the same way as cultural...

  7. Action Plan for the Development of Civic Morality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese Education and Society, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the action plan for the development of civic morality. Here, the importance, substance, ideology and policy principles guiding the development of civic morality is elaborated. In order to strengthen the development of civic morality, it is a must to adapt to the requirements of the developing situation; seize good…

  8. Civic Education and Deeper Learning. Deeper Learning Research Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Peter; Kawashima-Ginsberg, Kei

    2015-01-01

    This report proposes that the turn toward deeper learning in education reform should go hand in hand with a renewed emphasis on high-quality civics education. Not only does deeper learning have great potential to promote civic outcomes and strengthen our democracy but, at the same time, civic education exemplifies deeper learning, in that it…

  9. Gender and Leadership. The Impact of Organizational Culture of Public Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Cornelia MACARIE

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study approaches the public organizations and their organizational culture by taking into account the gender factor. More specifically, it will approach women’s presence in the leadership of public organizations, the influence of the public organizational culture in the promotion of women in middle and top management positions, and it will finally identify the defining characteristics of the organizational culture of the institutions led by women in comparison to those led by men. Our study is based on a research conducted in Bistriţa-Năsăud County, Romania, by applying a survey in 12 public organizations. The survey comprises 16 questions, seven of which are open questions; 25 women with different positions in the medium and the top management of public institutions were surveyed. The conclusions of the research confirm the existence of some clear differences in the organizational culture of womenled and respectively, men-led public institutions. At the same time, the study identifies possible causes for the low presence of women in the public top management in contrast to their high presence in the execution positions.

  10. Participation of the public in funding of the cultural offer: ethical arguments for debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Cejudo Córdoba

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews arguments for and against voluntary and direct participation of the public in the funding of cultural activities. The starting point is that financing schemes implemented by cultural policies bear ethical implications aside from their instrumental aims. Using A. Sen’s comparative approach, it is discussed whether crowdfunding and other investment instruments for cultural consumers are forms of citizen patronage worthwhile from an ethical point of view. In spite of accusations of paternalism and commoditization of the cultural life, citizen patronage is argued to be a social innovation that encourages social responsibility of cultural consumers. Accordingly, cultural policies should take into account that private behaviors concerning consumption and investment are also ways of getting involved in social life.

  11. THE ANALYSIS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE VALUES IN PUBLIC SECTORS IN LATVIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Ivanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture is an important issue because of its` big influence on enterprises’ productivity and consequently on realization of their objectives and goals. The validation and harmonization of organizational values and employees’ values has an important role in increasing operational efficiency. It has long been established that enterprises and organizations, where creative and interested employees who support and understand the organizational values of the company work, operate more effectively. In this article elements of organizational culture are studied with a particular focus on the meaning of organizational culture values. This article also reveals an evaluation of the organizational culture in public sectors in Latvia (based on publicly available data and sources of information. In the research there is an indepth analysis of official public organizational culture values included. The analysis has been done in the context of rating different leaders’ organizational values. In this article we analyze the conclusions of various writers on the subject of organizational culture framework characterization. The research of values guidance as well as a view of cultural meaning and influence on both individual and organizational development is described here. The authors analyze the results of empirical research about official public values of companies and the results of a public leaders’ survey (as well as the personal values of employees which provide an opportunity to compare organizational employees’ values with the common results of organizations. Conclusions shows public characterization of values and values distribution in potentially limitative and positive values. The in-depth research of organizational values is based on A. Maslow’s (Maslow 2000 hierarchy of needs approach and developed on R. Barrett`s (Barrett 2006 sample of seven levels of consciousness.

  12. Public safety risk management at socio-economic and / or historic-cultural significant dam sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earle, Gordon D.; Ryan, Katherine; Pyykonen, Nicole K.; Pitts, Lucas [Otonabee Region Conservation Authority, Peterborough, (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The Lang Dam and adjoining gristmill, located near Peterborough are integral parts of the Lang Pioneer Village museum. Activities occurring within close proximity to the dam have led to safety issues. The owner (ORCA) has developed and implemented public safety management plans (PSMPs) for each of its water control structures, including the Lang Dam. ORCA gave special attention to the social, economic, aesthetic, historic and cultural dimensions associated the implementation of public safety management plans. These factors play a significant role in how well public safety measures (PSMs) are received by stakeholder groups and the general public. This paper reported the challenges of developing and implementing a PSMP for the Lang Dam, with the focus on property site-specific PSMS while preserving socio-economic and historic-cultural character and values. It was demonstrated that the dam owners, regulatory authorities, control agencies and preservationists need to come together to develop a holistic public safety management process.

  13. Graphical animation for education and public orientation – a necessity in the Nigerian society

    OpenAIRE

    N. K. Egun; H. Dunkwu

    2013-01-01

    Graphical animation which refers to comics and cartoons has been shown to be a veritable tool for formal and informal education; and an effective medium for communication due to their popularity and easy accessible format. There is the necessity to bring to the fore the need to exploit the human natural attraction to graphical animation, in utilizing comics and cartoons as a medium for formal and informal education of the indigenous cultural, civic and social values in Nigeria for public re-o...

  14. Public Nordic Cultural Policy - Historical preconditions, overriding objectives, significant developments, recent challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Public Nordic cultural policy have, especially since the 1960s, in large part been characterised by convergence regarding major elements. In addition the Nordic countries, like other European national states are today confronted with and affected by fundamental late-modern processes: Globalisation......, migration, economic instrumentalisation, political colonisation, questions of the freedom of speech, issues on national identity vs. cosmopolitanism etc. By these and other reasons it is reasonable to speak of a pan-Nordic cultural policy model in 2016, while still highlighting the fact, that cultural...... policies in Norden also differ mutual in many aspects. The survey introduces and discusses major common public cultural policy elements in the five Nordic national states (Denmark, Island, Norway, Sweden and Finland), the autonomous and semi autonomous small nations (Greenland, The Faeroe Islands...

  15. A STUDY ON THE CULTURAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HOSPITALS IN BUCHAREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobre Ovidiu Iliuta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Turnover rates for hospital personnel (nurses, doctors and auxiliary staff have been increasing in recent years, especially in the public sector, being the result of a couple of factors. I believe that one of the main causes is related to organizational culture aspects. This research analyses if dated facilities, unpleasant work environment and lack of personnel contribute to a low job satisfaction and involvement. The study also compares the results obtained from persons working in the public sectors with the results given by respondents from private clinics. An organization’s culture could be strong or weak, being dependent to cohesiveness, value consensus and individual commitment to collective goals. Effective cultures help organizations anticipate and adapt to environment changes, thus proactive cultures should enhance and support profitability on the long-run. This research also investigates strength of the occupational culture by comparing the results obtained in the public sector with results from private sector. My study is developed on 63 professionals working in the medical system and it is based mainly on quantitative methods. The instrument of the research is the structured questionnaire. The main goal of the study is to highlight the significant cultural differences between the state-owned and public-owned hospitals and to assess if they have a greater influence to the institutions, as compared to common occupational values and norms. The implications of my research for the field of organizational behavior refers to the fact that I have identified the organizational elements that are common to both public and private hospitals, influenced by a strong occupational culture, and those that differ significantly, being the result of underfunding and poor management. As a conclusion, I consider that this is a great starting point for further research in the field and I plan to enlarge the investigation on a greater number or

  16. Promotional Cultures: The Rise and Spread of Advertising, Public Relations, Marketing and Branding

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Aeron

    2013-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, promotion is everywhere and everything has become promotable: everyday goods and organizations, people and ideas, cultures and futures. This engaging book looks at the rise of advertising, public relations, branding, marketing and lobbying, and explores where our promotional times have taken us.\\ud \\ud Promotional Cultures documents how the professions and practices of promotion have interacted with and reshaped so much in our world, from commodities, celebrities ...

  17. Politicile patrimoniului cultural în contextul reformei administraţiei publice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile COMENDANT

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lucrarea reprezintă o analiză complexă a politicilor publice în domeniul patrimoniului cul¬tural național realizate în cadrul reformelor administraţiei publice din Republica Moldova. Sunt examinate programele de reformă a administraţiei publice în domeniul protejării patrimoniului cultural. În procesul cercetării sunt indicate autorităţile administraţiei publice centrale responsabile de realizarea reformelor de salvgardare a patrimoniului cultural în baza politicilor culturale. Investigația ne-a permis să constatăm că, actualmente, o cerinţă de cea mai mare actualitate pentru Republica Moldova este de a determina în cadrul reformei administraţiei publice moda¬lităţile de îmbunătăţire a formelor de protejare a patrimoniului cultural naţional, precum și de implementare a politicilor publice în acest domeniu. Concomitent, a fost elucidată necesitatea dezvoltării de către autorităţile publice a unui dialog intercultural permanent privind politica cul¬turală cu ţările Uniunii Europene și cooperarea în cadrul forurilor internaționale pentru a dezvolta diversitatea culturală și pentru a conserva și a valorifica patrimoniul național cultural și istoric.

  18. Public Address, Cultural Diversity, and Tolerance: Teaching Cultural Diversity in Speech Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Marquita L.

    While speech instructors work to design appropriate diversity goals in the public speaking class, few have the training for such a task. A review of course objectives and assignments for the basic course may be helpful. Suggestions for instructors working to incorporate diversity in the basic course include: (1) recognize the dominance of the…

  19. Ecomuseums (on Clean Energy, Cycle Tourism and Civic Crowdfunding: A New Match for Sustainability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Simeoni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An ecomuseum is an ‘instrument’ to share the interests of a region and protect its cultural, historical and natural heritage. Cycle tourism is a sustainable type of tourism. Civic crowdfunding is a method of raising funds from a community for the fulfilment of civic initiatives. Starting from the literature on the link between cycle tourism and sustainability, the interaction between renewable energy resources and tourism, and finally the place-based dimension of a civic crowdfunding campaign, the purpose of this study is to show that an ecomuseum focused on clean energy has the potential to attract cycle tourists, increase the numbers of funders, as well as attract the interest of the municipality, not-for-profit associations and energy and tourism firms, and thus significantly enhance its beneficial effects on sustainability from economic, social and environmental points of view. This study employed an action research method to gain in-depth knowledge of this issue, as well as a qualitative case study approach to present and discuss the results. The principal result of this study is the identification of a potential way to create sustainability, via the match between an ecomuseum devoted to clean energy, cycle tourism and civic crowdfunding.

  20. How social learning adds up to a culture: from birdsong to human public opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernichovski, Ofer; Feher, Olga; Fimiarz, Daniel; Conley, Dalton

    2017-01-01

    Distributed social learning may occur at many temporal and spatial scales, but it rarely adds up to a stable culture. Cultures vary in stability and diversity (polymorphism), ranging from chaotic or drifting cultures, through cumulative polymorphic cultures, to stable monolithic cultures with high conformity levels. What features can sustain polymorphism, preventing cultures from collapsing into either chaotic or highly conforming states? We investigate this question by integrating studies across two quite separate disciplines: the emergence of song cultures in birds, and the spread of public opinion and social conventions in humans. In songbirds, the learning process has been studied in great detail, while in human studies the structure of social networks has been experimentally manipulated on large scales. In both cases, the manner in which communication signals are compressed and filtered - either during learning or while traveling through the social network - can affect culture polymorphism and stability. We suggest a simple mechanism of a shifting balance between converging and diverging social forces to explain these effects. Understanding social forces that shape cultural evolution might be useful for designing agile communication systems, which are stable and polymorphic enough to promote gradual changes in institutional behavior. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Activities on safety culture study. Study status in public and private sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Maomi; Takano, Kenichi

    2004-01-01

    Around after entering in the 21st century, organizational accidents had occurred in Japan at various industries including nuclear industry, which were caused directly by unsafe action, human error and illegal conduct of personnel but there were problems in safety culture of organization such as slow retreat of safety system stimulated by management, schedule control and procedure management becoming a dead letter, lack of safety education, and workplace climate of schedule priority. This article referred to organizational factors common to many severe accidents and introduced safety culture study in public and private sectors to overcome those factors. Safety Culture Evaluation Support Tool (SCEST) was developed for self-evaluation of safety culture of organization as well as Organizational Reliability model (OR model) for analysis of initiation and propagation process of risk event. Safety diagnosis system and feedback type risk assessment system for promoting safe organizational climate and culture were also developed. (T. Tanaka)

  2. Contested Normative Cultures. Gendered Perspectives on Religions and the Public/Private Divide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    The article considers religious and secular normative cultures from a gendered perspective focusing on gender and the class and gender privileges linked to the introduction of a public/private divide. It finally discusses issues concerning 'gender display' and gender performance in the 21st century...... as a field, where 'religion', 'public', 'private' and 'gender' overlap, interact, and possibly take on new forms and new meanings and changes all involved actors....

  3. Renewable energy policy and public perceptions of renewable energy. A cultural theory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J.; Bailey, I.; Winter, M.

    2010-01-01

    Public opposition to the siting of renewable energy (RE) facilities and public reluctance to invest in RE remain key obstacles to the expansion of the renewables sector in the UK and a number of other European countries. Although there is a growing body of qualitative research on factors that inform public attitudes towards RE, the majority of studies have tended to be quantitative and to view 'the public' and 'public opinion' as homogeneous wholes. This study uses a cultural theory framework and focus groups conducted in the South West UK to develop deeper understandings of how individuals' worldviews can inform opinions and behaviour in relation to RE. These findings are used to explore ways in which government policies on RE might be tailored to engender greater public support and participation. Issues discussed include the provision of economic incentives, information on climate change and RE, linking renewables to overall energy behaviour, and landscape aesthetics. (author)

  4. Cultivating Practitioners of Democratic Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Novella Zett

    2016-01-01

    How can we support campus-based practitioners of civic and community engagement in moving from normalized engagement toward practices that engage others democratically and respectfully across borders created by social race, class, gender, status, and other markers of difference? The article presents a framework derived from practice theory, a…

  5. Civic ecology practices: insights from practice theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne E. Krasny

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to explore the use of practice theory as an approach to studying urban environmental stewardship. Urban environmental stewardship, or civic ecology practice, contributes to ecosystem services and community well-being and has been studied using social-ecological systems resilience, property rights, communities of practice, and governance frameworks. Practice theory, which previously has been applied in studies of consumer behaviors, adds a new perspective to urban stewardship research, focusing on how elements of a practice, such as competencies, meanings, and physical resource, together define the practice. We applied practice theory to eight different civic ecology practices, including oyster gardening in New York City, a civil society group engaged in litter cleanup in Iran, and village grove restoration in South Korea. Our analysis suggests that in applying practice theory to the civic ecology context, consideration should be given to social and communication competencies, how meanings can motivate volunteers and sustain practice, and the nature of the resource that is being stewarded. Future studies may want to focus on how practice elements interact within and vary across practices and may be used to more systematically analyze and share ideas among diverse civic ecology practices.

  6. Civic Education and Citizenship in Malaysian Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Thomas N.

    This paper seeks to provide an overview of theoretical concepts of civic education and citizenship. The paper discusses recent comparative education research on political socialization and its implications for future research, such as in not fully democratic countries like Malaysia. Based on a literature review and prior research in the region,…

  7. Speech and Debate as Civic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, J. Michael; Kurr, Jeffrey A.; Johnson, Jeremy D.; Bergmaier, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    In light of the U.S. Senate's designation of March 15, 2016 as "National Speech and Debate Education Day" (S. Res. 398, 2016), it only seems fitting that "Communication Education" devote a special section to the role of speech and debate in civic education. Speech and debate have been at the heart of the communication…

  8. High School Teachers' Identities: Constructing Civic Selves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Balkute, Asta; Vaughn, Erin; White, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that teachers play a role in the type of citizenship education implemented in schools. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how two high school teachers understood and enacted their civic identities as a dimension of their teacher identities. Findings suggest that factors contributing to an individual's civic…

  9. From Global Knowledge to Global Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I argue that student learning is enhanced when civic engagement is a component of international education initiatives. When only presented with knowledge about global challenges, students can become frustrated and overwhelmed unless they also understand how they might contribute to solutions. Political science programs are…

  10. Institutional comunication and cultural marketing: Peculiarities in museum communication within the framework of public relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia BURGHELE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultural management theoreticians believe that the main target of museum communication is gaining knowledge on specific messages by as large a number of people as possible. Museum public relation practice – intensified and upgraded at the same time with the revolution of the new communication technologies – is both science and art which analyse certain tendences (in attitude, taste and informal of anticipating their consequences for implementing certain museum offer programs to appeal to the public.As an institution with a decisive role in guarding cultural heritage and in outlining cultural identity – as it keeps the necessary instruments for this, the specialists and also the motivation through its own purposes – the museum in its dynamic, modern, enhanced shape must provide an attractive cultural product to the public, based on a anthropological approach to cultural fact.Modern museum-ology is built upon the concept that museum is a story and modern museums stimulate to a high degree participative learning, generated by a productive dialogue.

  11. U.S.-Based Short-Term Public Health Cultural Immersion Experience for Chinese Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Dorothy Lewis; Biederman, Donna J.

    2017-01-01

    A U.S. and Chinese university developed a short-term student exchange program in public/community health. The program--which consisted of lectures, seminars, field trips, cross-cultural experiences, and a synthesis excursion--resulted in high levels of program satisfaction, increased intrapersonal awareness, and skill acquisition. Program content…

  12. Cultural and Linguistic Imperatives in Public Health Delivery in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goke-Pariola, Abiodun

    Some cultural realities and linguistic considerations are discussed that public health providers can use to make preventive health care delivery more effective and acceptable in several developing countries. The case of the Yoruba people of southwestern Nigeria is used as an example. Two points are addressed: the question of the usefulness of…

  13. Evolution of public relations in the activity of organizations of ukrainian socio-cultural sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Євгенія Олегівна Кияниця

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article traces the evolution of public relations in various fields of life including socio-cultural and found creative and social potential of this activity. Analysis of historical experience of using the PR-technologies in the field of sociocultural institutions promotes understanding of importance of this activity for the efficient work of organizations of this sphere

  14. Cultural Demands of the Host-Nation: International Student Experience and the Public Diplomacy Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional approaches for hosting international students tend to focus on classroom achievement rather than on intercultural exchange and cultural immersion. Such approaches lessen the possibility of successful educational experiences which also hinders public diplomacy. Two case studies are presented that reveal how structural changes at a…

  15. Organisational Culture: An Exploratory Study Comparing Faculties' Perspectives within Public and Private Universities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Sharimllah Devi; Chong, Siong Choy; Ismail, Hishamuddin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this paper to study the organisational culture (OC) in private and public higher education institutions (HEIs) from the perspective of faculty members in order to provide empirical insights on the differences and consequently pave an avenue for cross-learning. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 594…

  16. A District-Wide Approach to Culturally and Linguistically Sustaining Practices in the Boston Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Colin; Issa, Mwalimu Donkor

    2018-01-01

    Boston Public Schools' system-wide professional development on culturally and linguistically sustaining practices (CLSP) creates consistent expectations for educators to address their biases, build relationships with students and parents, and improve instruction--and gives them the tools to do so. In this article, the authors touch on changes at…

  17. The Rationalizing Logics of Public School Reform: How Cultural Institutions Matter for Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridwell-Mitchell, E. N.

    2013-01-01

    The research herein uses a mixed methods approach to examine how organizational phenomena at the macro level of analysis translate into phenomena at the micro level. Specifically, the research attempts to explain how cultural institutions may translate into individual attitudes and actions, such as public school teachers' decisions about using…

  18. Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-24

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases Another Dimension, Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness.  Created: 4/24/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/24/2013.

  19. Family Life and Alcohol Consumption: The Transmission of "Public" and "Private" Drinking Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayne, Mark; Valentine, Gill; Gould, Myles

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the transmission of drinking cultures within families. In particular, we highlight the differential and discursive construction of the home as a space where parents/carers are happy to introduce children to alcohol in a "safe" environment in opposition to public spaces which they consider to be locations where…

  20. New scenes and houses for literature - a challenge for cultural and public library policy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the emergence of new initiatives and undertakings in the field of promotion and use of literature in comparison with the possibilities and practices of the traditional public library institutions and of public cultural policy. First a description of a dual development...... of the public library and of UNESCO’s agenda City of literature makes a setting; then three parts mention different scenes and initiatives: small scenes for performance of literature, festivals of literature as a mode, and – more detailed – the various types of houses of literature - with primarily Danish...... questions of subsiding and relations to libraries and civil society....

  1. The four cultures: Public engagement with science only, art only, neither, or both museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein, Paichi Pat; Li, Yuh-Yuh; Huang, Tai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    This study uses an art-and-science comparative lens to understand the science culture, particularly the public engagement with science museums. A representational Taiwanese sample of 1863 subjects was categorized into "four cultures," who visit science only, art only, neither, or both museums, resulting in six multivariate logistic regression models. Knowledge of science, interests in scientific and social issues, and socio-demographic variables were considered in the models. Adults with children and males prefer science museums, females prefer art museums, and the young and urban intellects show no strong preference, appearing to be open to both science and art museums. The findings show the complex decisions the public make in visiting museums. It is no longer a strictly science or art decision, as framed by Snow's "The Two Cultures" argument; rather, the possibility of visiting both museums has emerged, a phenomenon we describe as cognitive polyphasia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Assessment of patient safety culture in private and public hospitals in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Alejandro; Suárez, Gabriela; Hakim, Galed

    2018-04-01

    To assess the patient safety culture in Peruvian hospitals from the perspective of healthcare professionals, and to test for differences between the private and public healthcare sectors. Patient safety is defined as the avoidance and prevention of patient injuries or adverse events resulting from the processes of healthcare delivery. A non-random cross-sectional study conducted online. An online survey was administered from July to August 2016, in Peru. This study reports results from Lima and Callao, which are the capital and the port region of Peru. A total of 1679 healthcare professionals completed the survey. Participants were physicians, medical residents and nurses working in healthcare facilities from the private sector and public sector. Assessment of the degree of patient safety and 12 dimensions of patient safety culture in hospital units as perceived by healthcare professionals. Only 18% of healthcare professionals assess the degree of patient safety in their unit of work as excellent or very good. Significant differences are observed between the patient safety grades in the private sector (37%) compared to the public sub-sectors (13-15%). Moreover, in all patient safety culture dimensions, healthcare professionals from the private sector give more favorable responses for patient safety, than those from the public sub-systems. The most significant difference in support comes from patient safety administrators through communication and information about errors. Overall, the degree of patient safety in Peru is low, with significant gaps that exist between the private and the public sectors.

  3. Oil sands and organizational cultures: strategy and stakeholder dynamics in an environmental public consultation process (Alberta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouse, M.J.

    2000-07-01

    The demand for corporate responsiveness to environmental and social concerns, more specifically the requirement for public participation/consultation with stakeholders is, according to industry insiders, one of the most pressing changes for the oil industry. For this study, data on a public consultation process involving Syncrude Canada Limited, Alberta Environmental Protection, and the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board was collected through a combination of public hearing transcripts, participant observation, interview methodologies and reports. >From the perspective of organizational strategy, stakeholder relations, institutional theory and organizational cultures, the author investigated the public consultation process. Strategic action was the central theme to emerge through the findings. Positioning strategies influenced by stakeholder status from the organization's viewpoint and stakeholder relationships informed by the network of stakeholder relationships are included in stakeholder dynamics. The management of organizational culture and the creation of an institutional field to generate and maintain values across the relational field of focal organizations, and reduce costs and conflicts, are included in strategic outcomes. The elaboration and extension of components of stakeholder and institutional theories are part of further results, as well as an integrated understanding of the dynamic interconnectedness of organizational cultures, strategies and stakeholders in an environmental public consultation process.

  4. Study on Significant Mechanisms of Maintenance Culture Among Public Building Users in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binti Rusli Ezzatul Aifa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia, a country in Asia, is a fast-growing developing country in its construction so as to fulfil the demands of today. Many buildings, infrastructures and facilities were constructed; however, the necessary support required after construction was disregarded. Maintenance is the key for the system, and culture is the main point of attitude and behaviour towards the maintenance culture. Becoming one of the first class infrastructures in the world is the vision that Malaysia is striving to achieve, and a third mentality from society and organisations should be avoided. However, to achieve this vision, proper maintenance is not enough; a maintenance culture should be applied. Developing a maintenance culture will help obtain the vision quickly and increase the quality of productivity in maintenance. It will also reduce the repair cost and increase responsibility. Malaysia is becoming a first class infrastructure, which is the vision for today; therefore, it needs to avoid a third mentality. Concerning this matter, decisive components of the maintenance culture were studied to identify the types of components that influence the maintenance culture among public building users. The decisive components of maintenance were uncertainty awareness and responsibility; personality/human behaviour and attitude; mind-set/motivation; training; knowledge and learning process; culture trends; management commitment; management of organisation; leadership; fundamental and policy; operating system organisation; the enforcement; laws and rules; and current practice of maintenance methods.

  5. Strategic Orientation and Organisational Culture in Polish Public Organisations: Insights from the Miles and Snow Typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wronka-Pośpiech Martyna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Polish public organisations are often perceived as having strong bureaucratic orientation, avoiding both change and risk. However, in the last decade a distinct change in the management model of public organisations can be noticed. Public sector becomes an open ground for mergers and partnerships, entrepreneurial leadership, diversified services and commercialization (Golensky and DeRuiter 1999; Zimmerman and Dart, 1998; Pollitt and Bouckaert, 2004; Walker, 2013]. Public organisations embrace these strategies from the for-profit sector in order to manage change and to be effective. Most importantly, public organisations are adopting these frameworks in order to survive the changing operating environment, including changes in the level of government funding. Our paper draws on the Miles and Snow (1978 typology of generic strategies - prospectors, defenders, analysers, and reactors - to identify different organisational strategies within public organisations providing social services in Poland. In order to assess organisational culture we used the most widespread and used in many empirical studies Cameron and Quinn’s model (2003, the Competing Values Framework (CVF, from which four cultures - adhocracy, clan, market and hierarchy - emerge. The choice of these two providers of social services was dictated by our conviction, that these organisations are critical both for the national economy and for mitigating, counteracting and preventing social exclusion.

  6. Do senior management cultures affect performance? Evidence from Italian public healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenestini, Anna; Lega, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare organizations are often characterized by diffuse power, ambiguous goals, and a plurality of actors. In this complex and pluralistic context, senior healthcare managers are expected to provide strategic direction and lead their organizations toward their goals and performance targets. The present work explores the relationship between senior management team culture and performance by investigating Italian public healthcare organizations in the Tuscany region. Our assessment of senior management culture was accomplished through the use of an established framework and a corresponding tool, the competing values framework, which supports the idea that specific aspects of performance are related to a dominant management culture. Organizational performance was assessed using a wide range of measures collected by a multidimensional performance evaluation system, which was developed in Tuscany to measure the performance of its 12 local health authorities (LHAs) and four teaching hospitals (THs). Usable responses were received from 80 senior managers of 11 different healthcare organizations (two THs and nine LHAs). Our findings show that Tuscan healthcare organizations are characterized by various dominant cultures: developmental, clan, rational, and hierarchical. These variations in dominant culture were associated with performance measures. The implications for management theory, professional practice, and public policy are discussed.

  7. Becoming Bombs: 3D Animated Satellite Imagery and the Weaponization of the Civic Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Stahl

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This essay traces the recent history of 3D satellite animation from its military origins to its visibility in the civic sphere. Specifically, technologies unveiled in 2004 as Google Earth first received widespread public visibility in the television coverage of the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq. The essay first maps the political economy of the “military-media-geotech” complex, focusing mainly on the coverage of the Iraq War as an nexus of interests. Second, the essay analyzes the aesthetic uses of 3D satellite animation on the news during this period, including how these imaging practices meshed with existing discourses such as the clean war, the weaponization of the civic gaze, and others. The essay concludes with thoughts regarding what these practices mean for the efficacy of the deliberative citizen, public life, and the meaning of war.

  8. Parochial education in a global world? Teaching history and civics in Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Bahous

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory article is based on a research project which runs from 2011 to 2013 that examines how global processes are expressed in educational policies and pedagogical texts in Lebanon, Sweden and Turkey by focusing on school subjects like civics, history, geography, and religion. In this text we discuss the development of education in Lebanon, the development of history and civics after the civil war, and on opinions about these school subjects in order to make a preliminary analysis of how the future Lebanese citizen is depicted in policies, curricula, and textbooks. Lebanon is interesting because of its unique education system in which foreign international institutions rather than national ones have the task of preparing individuals for a globalized world. Material for the study were collected from a sample of curricula used in private and public or national schools for history and civics/citizenship education in grade 8 as well as interviews and conference proceedings and conversations with activists, teachers and principals. We also reviewed findings of relevant empirical studies conducted in Lebanon. Our data collection was guided by three questions: how is the right citizen depicted in the Lebanese material? How is the relationship between national and global perspectives treated in guidance documents and pedagogical texts? What civic rights and obligations are given attention and what individuals are included/ excluded? Our preliminary findings imply that there is no consensus on the importance of teaching a unified history and civics book and subjects in Lebanon. Other findings indicate that private and international schools have a greater impact than national schools on preparing Lebanese students as future citizens.

  9. Living on the Outside: cultural diversity and the transformation of public space in Melbourne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jakubowicz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Melbourne has been described as Australia’s most liveable and most multicultural city. What relation do these descriptions have to each other? How has the public culture of Victoria been influenced by the cultural diversity of the state? The political class in Victoria has tended to be more in favour of multiculturalism as a policy, more resistant to populist racism and more positive about immigration than elsewhere in Australia. How has this orientation been affected by the institutional embedding of ethnic power during the past four decades? The organization of ethnic groups into political lobbies, which have collaborated across ethnic borders, has brought about cultural transformations in the “mainstream”. Often the public experiences these transformations through changing uses of public spaces. This paper offers an historical sociology of this process, and argues for a view of public space as a physical representation of the relative power of social forces. It is based on research for the Making Multicultural Australia (Victoria project. (http://multiculturalaustralia.edu.au. An online version of the paper inviting user-generated comments can be found at http://mmav1.wordpress.com.

  10. Media Usage and Civic Life: The Role of Values

    OpenAIRE

    Firat, Rengin Bahar

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has observed that media usage influences civic outcomes, including trust and political behavior. However, this research has rarely examined the social psychological mechanisms underlying the relationship between media and civic life. The current study focuses on values as potential explanations for how media usage impacts civic engagement. Using data from Round 5 of the European Social Survey (2010) and employing two-level structural equation modeling, this paper examines wh...

  11. CHARACTERISTICS OF YOUTH CIVIC ENGAGEMENT IN LIEPAJA CITY

    OpenAIRE

    Jurs, Pāvels; Samuseviča, Alīda

    2018-01-01

    Youth civic engagement is an essential precondition for the preservation of democratic values and the existence of civil society. The implementation of the competence approach in the education process in Latvia provides as one of the key priorities of pedagogical work – encourage students' civic engagement and personal responsibility,  developing students' thinking and self-initiative, the skills to be accountable to the citizens of society with the development national, historical and civic ...

  12. Cultural Variance as a Challenge to Global Public Relations: A Case Study of the Coca-Cola Scare in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Maureen

    2000-01-01

    Explores cultural variability, especially uncertainty avoidance and power distance, and examines how it affects public response to crisis. Presents an analysis of the national cultures of six European countries that showed that publics who live in nations that are high in uncertainty avoidance and power distance tend to react more strongly, and…

  13. Organizational factors, organizational culture, job satisfaction and entrepreneurial orientation in public administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos M. Karyotakis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper outlines the critical role and influence of organizational culture and job satisfaction on the relationship between organizational factors and entrepreneurial orientation (EO in the public sector through generating the theoretical framework. Upon examining these terms, a model that reflects their mutual relationships has been suggested. The amalgam of internal work environment, work discretion and rewards/recognition in combination with the appropriate degree of organizational boundaries, such as formalization, centralization, technology routines and connectedness, are crucial for fostering organizational culture and job satisfaction that lead to EO through innovativeness, proactiveness and risk taking.

  14. Framing clean energy campaigns to promote civic engagement among parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, Nichole; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Hoyos, Lisa; Rauch, Molly

    2018-03-01

    Civic engagement is one important way citizens can influence the rate of decarbonization in the electricity sector. However, motivating engagement can be challenging even if people are affected and interested in participating. Here we employed a randomized controlled trial to assess the effect of clean energy campaigns emphasizing cost savings, health, climate, or health and climate, or no additional information at all (control) on civic engagement behaviors (signing a petition or making a phone call). We targeted parents as they have been shown to be powerful agents of political and business practice change in other contexts, and hence, could play an important role in the decarbonization of the electricity sector. In Study 1, we recruited n = 292 parents already engaged in climate advocacy; in Study 2, we recruited a representative sample of n = 1254 parents drawn from the general public. Both studies were conducted in Michigan, Florida, and California, as these states have sizable advocacy group membership, divergent energy profiles, and strategic importance to the climate movement. In both studies, we find the odds of taking action are reduced by over 90% when participants are asked to make a phone call and leave a voicemail message, versus signing an online petition. Among the parents already engaged in advocacy, we observe a ceiling effect regarding attitudes towards clean energy and find the cost campaign produces unintended consequences. Among our public sample, we find that participants who believe the campaign to be credible and comprehendible are more likely to take action than those who discredit the campaign or do not understand its message. Additionally, we find parents who have children under the age of 18 negatively adjust their attitudes towards fossil fuels after being presented with health information. Ultimately, we find that campaign messages can influence energy attitudes and parents are willing to take action on the topic if the

  15. Rethinking Students’ Dispositions towards Civic Duties in Urban Learning Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga Adedayo Ige

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the causative influence of thinking dispositions on secondary school students’ civic attitudes in school ecologies. 167 students from eight selected secondary schools in northern and southern Nigeria responded to the Senior Students’ Thinking Dispositions Questionnaire (SSTDQ, and Students’ Attitude to Civic Education Scale (SACES. Results of the stepwise linear regression model declared that absolutism, superstition, and dogmatism were the potent predictors that are strongly connected to students’ civic attitudes. The study has inferences for teachers’ development viz a viz teaching students’ civic attitudes from inside out (critical teaching that uses social tools as yardstick in school ecologies.

  16. SUSTAINING THE CULTURAL VITALITY OF URBAN PUBLIC MARKETS: A Case Study of Pasar Payang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalilah Zakariya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of a public market in the city planning is pivotal in supporting the growth of the local economy. The market is also a place where the culture of the locals evolves daily. However, the unique qualities of the market are vulnerable to the redevelopment process. This study examines the cultural aspects of Pasar Payang in Terengganu, Malaysia, as one of the well-known markets among the locals and the tourists, which will soon be redeveloped. The aim of this paper is to identify the tangible and intangible qualities of the market, so that it can sustain its cultural qualities in the future. The methods adopted for this study comprise of conducting a survey among 497 visitors, and semi-structured interviews among 19 market vendors. The findings reveal that the cultural vitality of the market can be sustained by strengthening its local identity through its products and culture, providing spaces that can facilitate tourist activities and cultural participation, and enhancing the development of the local businesses.

  17. MEASUREMENT OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION: CASE STUDY OF 5 MUNICIPALITIES IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabahudin Jašarević

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Public administration is classified into a specific organizational form that follows the development of all civilizations. Today, more than ever, we deal with creating a new model of public administration. The reform of public administration intends to achieve the model adjusted to the needs of society, based on lawful solutions, and real conditions. The EU integration process puts a pressure on public administration to deliver better service, with more and more demands to increase the skills of employees, to make performance of duties and tasks more effective, adhering to the principles of good governance. This paper presents a study of administrative body's organizational culture, based on the selected standpoint that the organizational culture is defined as a set of values, norms and beliefs in which the servants in administrative body share the same opinion. This brought ten characteristic values that can be shaped into the mission of observed local self-government (public administration unit. We tried to estimate through this research how civil servants perceive these ten values, and whether they like it or not.

  18. Organisational Culture and the Adoption of New Public-Management Practices = Povzetki Abstracts novega javnega managementa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Hookana

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study provides insights into the levels of adoption and success of New Public Management practices, reflected in the degree of innovative accounting practices and cultures. The analysis draws upon two in-depth empirical investigations. The results provide empirical evidence to support a two-way interaction between management orientation to adopting the new accounting methods and organisational innovative changes. The success and failure could be characterised as a fragile construction that turns on the strength of diverse ties connecting many heterogeneous elements. The meaning of the subcultures and the externally driven change process are discussed in the context of Scandinavian public management.

  19. Review: ICCS International Civics and Citizenship Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Toots

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In November 2010 the largest international study ever conducted on civic education in secondary schools has been released in Brussels. The study was performed under the auspices of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA, an independent consortium that brings together educational researchers and policy makers in 62 countries around the world. The IEA is probably more widely known in connection of large-scale comparative studies on educational assessment in math and science (TIMSS and in reading (PIRLS. Yet, the association has longstanding and impressive expertise also in civic education. The first study in this area has been carried out already in 1971 (Torney et al., 1975, the second – so called CIVED in 1999 (Torney-Purta et al., 2001 and now, ten years later, 38 counties around the world participated in the third study – the IEA International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS. The study tested in 2008–2009 over 140,000 lower secondary students, over 62,000 teachers and headmasters from 5,300 schools in order to analyse how young people are prepared to undertake their roles as citizens.

  20. Cultural and Normative Imaginaries in Parliamentary and Public Debates on Social Egg Freezing in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Janne Rothmar; Kroløkke, Charlotte

    Widely known as a global exporter of cryopreserved sperm, Danish women’s eggs follow very different trajectories. This paper identifies the cultural and normative imaginaries, which are expressed in parliamentary and public debates on social egg freezing in Denmark. We use the concept...... of sociotechnical imaginaries (Jasanoff, 2015) to demonstrate how imaginaries are not merely hoped-for-futures but also embedded within the nexus of cultural, legal, and political milieus. To expound on what imaginaries has shaped the Danish regulation on the cryopreservation of eggs, we trace the bills......, their three readings in Parliament and the concurrent public and ethical debates that in time relaxed the legal limit for the cryopreservation of eggs from the initial proposed 1 year limit to the current 5 years and today ignite discussions on elective egg freezing. We then discuss how those imaginaries...

  1. Academic stratospheres-cum-underworlds: When highs and lows of publication cultures meet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stöckelová, Tereza; Vostal, Filip

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 5 (2017), s. 516-528 ISSN 2050-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16452S; GA ČR(CZ) GJ16-18371Y Institutional support: RVO:68378025 ; RVO:67985955 Keywords : predatory publishing * publication cultures * Web of Science * Elsevier * publishing oligopoly Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography; AO - Sociology, Demography (FLU-F) OBOR OECD: Sociology; Sociology (FLU-F) Impact factor: 1.514, year: 2016

  2. Innovation-oriented culture in the public sector: do managerial autonomy and result control lead to innovation?

    OpenAIRE

    J. Wynen; K. Verhoest; E. Ongaro; S. van Thiel

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the effect of specific new public management (NPM)-related characteristics to explain innovation-oriented culture within public sector organizations. According to NPM doctrines, an enhanced managerial autonomy combined with result control will stimulate a more innovation-oriented culture in such organizations. Using multi-country survey data of over 200 public sector agencies, we test for the influence of organizational autonomy, result control and their interactions, on...

  3. Experience of migrant care and needs for cultural competence training among public health workers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Duckhee; Lee, Jina; Asami, Keiko; Kim, Hyunlye

    2018-05-01

    This study explored the experiences of public health workers (PHWs) providing health care for migrants living in Korea and clarified needs for cultural competence training. Twenty-six PHWs from five public health centers in Gwangju city, South Korea, participated in this exploratory qualitative study. Five semi-structured focus group interviews of PHWs were conducted from September to December 2016. A directed content analysis approach was conducted using four categories: perceived characteristics of migrants, interaction between PHWs and migrants, interaction between PHWs and organizations/systems, and cultural competence training needs. PHWs perceived that migrants lacked autonomy in health decisions and awareness of health behaviors. PHWs experienced difficulties in communicating and in establishing trusting relationships. They found clients hard to reach and easy to miss, a lack of continuity in health care programs, and inadequate human and material resources. They preferred passive teaching methods to activity-based simulation. PHWs believed essential training should be provided through e-learning to all PHWs, including management. PHWs reported experiencing multiple challenges from a lack of preparedness for culturally competent care and their clients' vulnerability. Development of cultural competence training is suggested through e-learning that reflects the PHWs' experiences and provides systematic support. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cultural and Normative Imaginaries in Parliamentary and Public Debates on Social Egg Freezing in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Janne Rothmar; Kroløkke, Charlotte

    Widely known as a global exporter of cryopreserved sperm, Danish women’s eggs follow very different trajectories. This paper identifies the cultural and normative imaginaries, which are expressed in parliamentary and public debates on social egg freezing in Denmark. We use the concept of sociotec......Widely known as a global exporter of cryopreserved sperm, Danish women’s eggs follow very different trajectories. This paper identifies the cultural and normative imaginaries, which are expressed in parliamentary and public debates on social egg freezing in Denmark. We use the concept...... of sociotechnical imaginaries (Jasanoff, 2015) to demonstrate how imaginaries are not merely hoped-for-futures but also embedded within the nexus of cultural, legal, and political milieus. To expound on what imaginaries has shaped the Danish regulation on the cryopreservation of eggs, we trace the bills...... differ or are consistent with the general perception in law, parliamentary, and public debate. Relying on welfare state theory, we discuss why reproduction in the Danish context is seen as a legitimate and appropriate sphere to regulate, while we turn to feminist theorizing to discuss their gendered...

  5. QUANTIFYING THE HETEROGENITY OF PUBLICATION CULTURES IN ECONOMIC, BUSINESS, AND FINANCIAL HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline Poelmans

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Researchers working in the interdisciplinary field of ‘economic, business and financial history’ come from at least two different disciplinary backgrounds, namely history and economics. These two backgrounds may lead to differences in research practices, as there are potentially other demands for tenure and promotion requirements. We performed a survey to assess whether there is heterogeneity in the submission and publication culture (i.e. one multi-faceted culture, or simply multiple cultures between respondents working in an economics versus a history department. Among other things, we found differences in their motivation for publishing, the type of publications they aim for, and their journal selection strategies. Our results show that the department the respondents work at—irrespective of their disciplinary focus and background—determines most of their research and publication decisions. Hence working successfully in an interdisciplinary field or working in a department different from the main field of research requires researchers to learn the (informal rules and practices of an unfamiliar field.

  6. LIKE TURTLES IN THEIR SHELLS?: CIVIC WITHDRAWAL AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE IN DIVERSE SMALL TOWNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Celeste Lay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Robert Putnam has argued that ethnic diversity is associated with declines in civic engagement because when faced with diversity, a natural reaction is to retreat into oneself. Goals: This paper tests this proposition by looking at adolescents in small towns that have recently undergone “rapid ethnic diversification”. Immigrants and refugees from Latin America and Southeast Asia have migrated to these small, ethnically homogeneous towns. Methods: I utilize a panel study in which adolescents in five small Iowa public high schools were surveyed at the beginning and the end of an academic year. Conclusions: This paper shows very little evidence of a lasting negative effect of ethnic diversity on civic engagement. In the first wave, young people in the diverse towns have lower levels of political knowledge and trust than those in predominantly-White towns, but they also have higher levels of participation in school activities. At the end of the year, these differences have been alleviated.

  7. Cultural impacts on public perceptions of agricultural biotechnology: A comparison of South Korea and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Richard Harrison

    According to Millar (1996), the gulf between science and society is growing. Technologies are tools cultures develop to solve society's problems. The rapid dispersion of science and technology across cultural borders through trade, technology transfer and exchange, increasingly requires people in different cultures to make choices about accepting or rejecting artifacts of science and technology such as genetically modified (GM) foods, which originate primarily from the United States. These issues challenge policy makers and scientists to account for the affects of different cultural perspectives on controversial scientific issues. Given the controversy across cultures over acceptance or rejection of genetically modified (GM) foods, GM foods are an excellent example with which to begin to reveal how culture impacts public perceptions of the risk and benefits of science and technology in different societies. This research will: (1) Define public awareness and understanding of science, specifically GM foods; (2) Examine culture's impact on knowledge, including different cultural approaches to research; and (3) Compare recent findings of a bi-national public opinion survey on GM comparing in South Korea and the United States. The proposed research outlines two research questions: (1) How and in what ways do South Koreans and Americans differ in their opinions about GMOs? This question is important for gathering current points of contrast about how the two cultures may differ; and (2) What role does culture play on opinion formation about GM foods? Through grounded theory, the researcher will investigate how cultural differences help explain opinion on public perceptions of GM foods. Is it possible to identify common cultural factors that impact public perceptions of GM foods between South Koreans and Americans? The study will utilize both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Higher education is a major producer of new science and technology. The study is

  8. Building Global Citizenship: Engaging Global Issues, Practicing Civic Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunell, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    How can international politics courses be used to generate global civic engagement? The article describes how experiential learning can be used to stimulate student interest in issues of contemporary, global significance and to build students' repertoire of globally and locally relevant civic skills. It describes how students can become active…

  9. Contributing to civic innovation through participatory action research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Biekart (Kees)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractCivic innovation is about focusing on what is positive, creative and imaginative in the face of a world that seems beset by crisis narratives. In exploring the term civic innovation, as it is used in Development Studies, we are not looking for a new theory and practice that will lead to

  10. User-led innovation in civic energy communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Gerben; Boon, Wouter; Peine, A.

    2016-01-01

    Building on user and grassroots innovation literature, we explore user innovations in five Dutch civic energy communities. Less attention has been paid to the interplay of social, symbolic and technological innovations that seems to be at the heart of many civic energy communities. In this paper, we

  11. Participation in Sports and Civic Engagement. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mark Hugo; Moore, Kimberlee

    2006-01-01

    One reason to offer sports in school is to teach youth the values, skills, and habits that will make them more active, engaged, and responsible citizens. Past evidence on the civic effects of sports is mixed, but points to some potential positive civic effects. This fact sheet uses recent data from the 2002 National Youth Survey of Civic…

  12. Workplace Civics & Government. Prospectus for a Multimedia Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Mardell, Ed.

    This guide is designed to help students understand civics and government as well as the social, organizational, and technological systems that effect citizenship. It proposes use of a multimedia curriculum intended to combine the skills, knowledge, and content of civics with the workplace. The guide provides a rationale for an interdisciplinary…

  13. More than Winning: When Students become Teachers of Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    This essay is an account of student civic engagement in action. It stresses the vital role of environments in which students learn to be civic actors. The student experiences recorded in this account point toward a form of campus politics that places students in a role of coworker and cocreator, where they must negotiate differences and…

  14. Civics Education for Adult English Language Learners. ERIC Q & A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Lynda

    This article provides a brief historical review of efforts to prepare immigrants to pass the U.S. citizenship test, defines key terms, discusses events that have shaped civics education, and offers suggestions, whatever the approach chosen, for integrating civics content with English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) skills development. Covered topics…

  15. Romanian Youths' Civic Identities: 20 Years after the Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenchain, Kathryn; Bellows, Elizabeth; Bernat, Simona-Elena; Smith, Billy

    2013-01-01

    The study explores the civic identities of Romanian youth. Children born after 1989 have no memory of the communism; yet, they are the children and students of those who were educated under communism. Data sources were small group interviews with 21 youth and results indicate that participants believe "civic engagement is possible and…

  16. ICCS 2009 Encyclopedia: Approaches to Civic and Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainley, John, Ed.; Schulz, Wolfram, Ed.; Friedman, Tim, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS) is the largest international study of civic and citizenship education ever conducted. Over 140,000 Grade 8 students, 62,000 teachers, and 5,300 school principals from 38 countries participated in this study. Among these were five from Asia, 26 from Europe, six from Latin America, and…

  17. The Devil Is in the Details: Defining Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabant, Margaret; Braid, Donald

    2009-01-01

    For "civic engagement" work to have meaningful and long-term impact upon students, partners, and postsecondary institutions, each institution must undertake the difficult work of defining civic engagement for itself such that the definition aligns with the institution's educational mission and local context. We argue that civic…

  18. Fault Lines in Our Democracy: Civic Knowledge, Voting Behavior, and Civic Engagement in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Richard J.; Sum, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    As the 21st century unfolds, the United States faces historic challenges, including a struggling economy, an aging infrastructure and global terrorism. Solutions will have to come from educated, skilled citizens who understand and believe in our democratic system and are civically engaged. This incisive new report examines these fault lines and…

  19. Civic Engagement of Older Adults in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiping; Adamek, Margaret

    2017-07-01

    Due to great challenges resulting from China's rapid population aging, Chinese elders are mobilized to address problems caused by this demographic trend through civic engagement. Based on an integrative review of policy, research, and practice, this article reveals that today's Chinese elders have a higher level and wider scope of civic engagement than previous cohorts. A set of factors contributing to such improvement are further identified, including the reform of the national economy, transformation of governmental functions, and the use of effective strategies applied to concrete programs. However, several constraints limiting Chinese elders' equal, active engagement in civic life remain, including the social stratification of older adults, preferential selection of participants due to the nation's socioeconomic development strategy, and family care work competing with other types of civic activities. Finally, future directions for policy, research, and practice are proposed in order to increase Chinese elders' civic engagement.

  20. SOCIO - CULTURAL ASPECTS OF TUBERCULOSIS AND DIALOGUE WITH PUBLIC HEALTH POLICIES IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Regina Marques Barbosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis away from individuals affected by their social and affective and reconstructionof collective values, relegating them to the condition of inferiority and subservience Sartrean,liabilities oppressive conditions imposed by society, which dismisses the other as legitimatein the intersubjective social construction. This work aims to address the social, psychologicaland symbolic carrier of tuberculosis and PPS in Brazil through integrative review in databasesScientific Electronic Library Online (Scielo and Google Scholar using the descriptorsTuberculosis Society, Culture, Psychosocial Aspects, Sociocultural Aspects; Public Policy inHealth, Social Movements and Social Control, individually or grouped according to theirproximity or remoteness to the guiding question: "How Public Policies on Health dialoguewith social movements and sociocultural aspects of Tuberculosis?". Whereas the way ofseeing a situation and its meaning in a certain reality is guiding factor, even though subjective,of actions, it is stressed that interventions should take in the full measure of human socio-economic-political-cultural. In this sense, knowledge of cultural and socioeconomic situationof a region is essential to confronting the chain of events that disease primarily social in agiven community.

  1. Empowerment and Civic Surrogacy: Community Workers' Perceptions of Their Own and Their Latino/a Students' Civic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how three Nashville educational support professionals' conceptions of empowerment map onto their civic expectations for their Latino/a students and themselves. It argues that these expectations are inversely related, with students standing as surrogates for professionals' civic selves or professionals acting as civic…

  2. International Civic Engagement: From Development Studies and Service-Learning, to Miami University-Dominica Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Klak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available During the past four years, faculty, students, and staff from Miami University have been cultivating civic engagement relationships with citizens of the Commonwealth of Dominica, in the Eastern Caribbean. For members of the Miami University community, this has been an effort to create opportunities for learning and scholarship through partnerships with people in the Global South who are working for community empowerment, progressive change, and sustainable development. For our Dominican counterparts, benefits include financial inputs, manual labor, relevant research projects, and an outside interest in contributing positively to ameliorating their community challenges. We work to base the Miami University-Dominica relationships on trust, long-term commitment, and mutuality, so that the benefits go back and forth in myriad ways. The result has been a set of relationships across international borders and cultural differences that is more fulfilling for both sides than typical study abroad, research, or ecotourism encounters in the Global South. This paper describes the conceptual underpinnings of this international civic engagement, and recounts three examples of the kinds of community groups and activities that the partnerships involve. We also note where the project has encountered constraints and limitations, and our next steps in the effort. We hope this example can serve as a template and motivation for other university groups to commit to cultivating civic engagement relationships with people and communities in the Global South. KEYWORDScivic engagement; community engagement; community partnerships; sustainability

  3. Participation or New Media Use First? Reconsidering the Role of New Media in Civic Practices in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Macek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses qualitative research on the mundane civic practices of some Czechs, with a specific focus on the role of new media. It works with a context-oriented approach in order to avoid media-centrism. Our research is focussed on the ways in which civic practices are structured by immediate and wider social and political contexts and how they are experienced by post-socialist citizens from villages and large cities. The role of new media and the place of civic practices in everyday life is analysed with respect to these contexts. The research based on semi-structured in-depth interviews with 22 politically and publicly active citizens indicates that Czechs experience a similar crisis in relation to institutional politics as their counterparts in long established democracies and it reveals tell-tale differences between the social spaces of villages and cities both in participatory practices and in civic uses of new media. However, the study does not indicate a radical, new media-driven transformation of citizenship, rather it suggests subtle shifts in practices and a pragmatic mixing of face-to-face communication and traditional media (print, public address systems, noticeboards with new communication technologies.

  4. The Civic Informatics of FracTracker Alliance: Working with Communities to Understand the Unconventional Oil and Gas Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Jalbert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Unconventional oil and gas extraction is fueling a wave of resource development often touted as a new era in US energy independence. However, assessing the true costs of extraction is made difficult by the vastness of the industry and lack of regulatory transparency. This paper addresses efforts to fill knowledge gaps taken up by civil society groups, where the resources produced in these efforts are used to make informed critiques of extraction processes and governance. We focus on one civil society organization, called FracTracker Alliance, which works to enhance public understanding by collecting, interpreting, and visualizing oil and gas data in broad partnerships. Drawing on the concepts of civic science, we suggest that the informational practices of civil society research organizations facilitate critical knowledge flows that we term “civic informatics.” We offer three case studies illustrating how different characteristics of civic informatics enable public-minded research as well as build capacity for political mobilizations. Finally, we suggest that empirical studies of civic informatics and its facilitators offer insights for the study of “engaged” Science and Technologies Studies (STS that seek to generate new models of science at the intersection of praxis and theory.

  5. Museums and Culture-Driven Innovation in Public-Private Consortia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe; Veirum, Niels Einar

    2012-01-01

    that a better interaction between the three sectors will be of mutual benefit, but still much too little is happening. This article describes an attempt to overcome the barriers and presents ‘A Joint Venture Model for Culture-driven Innovation in Public-Private Consortia’ which has shown successful......Cultural institutions like museums are under pressure to shift to a more market-driven approach, universities are eager to make a far more aggressive outreach to the surrounding society, and businesses are forced to adapt new tools to innovate at a more and more rapid pace. It is obvious...... at the initial stages. The model has been tailored specifically for the current circumstances in the Danish society, regarding the legislation and the degree of freedom available for different types of organizational forms. But it might be of inspirational value for an international audience and in this article...

  6. Constructing publics, preventing diseases and medicalizing bodies: HIV, AIDS, and its visual cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizzio Mc Manus

    Full Text Available Abstract: In this paper we analyze the visual cultures surrounding HIV and AIDS; we are especially interested in tracking the actors, discourses and visual cultures involved in AIDS prevention in Mexico for a period of twenty years: from 1985 to 2005. We use media studies to better comprehend how HIV and AIDS further medicalized human bodies by mobilizing specific discourses, metaphors and visual resources that, though promoting a better understanding of how HIV could be acquired and how it could be prevented, also generated new representations of sexuality, bodies and persons living with HIV or AIDS often biased in favor of different systems of value. Moreover, we try to offer a general characterization of the different publics that were targeted and preconceptions involving ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, geography and membership in different sociocultural groups.

  7. Developing a civic intelligence: local involvement in HIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, Eva; Williams, Gareth

    2004-01-01

    Public involvement and participation in policy development and implementation is becoming an increasingly prominent feature of social life. However, as politics and policy become ever more concerned with 'evidence,' the relationship between 'expert evidence' and political judgements and decisions becomes ever more complicated. For this reason, public participation increasingly has to mean inclusion in arguments about information, evidence and knowledge as much as it means straightforward involvement in decision making. Such involvement can involve critical questioning of a kind that can challenge and sometimes debunk experts' claims to privileged understanding. One practical arena in which knowledge-based policy and politics is being expressed is in health impact assessment (HIA). This paper describes a health impact assessment of housing options in a former mining village in South Wales in order to illustrate the contributions that local people can make to both evidence and decision making. This case study exemplifies an emerging civic intelligence that challenges a traditional demarcation between different forms of expertise and creates public spaces that provide the basis for new opportunities of democratic renewal

  8. A safety culture assessment by mixed methods at a public maternity and infant hospital in China

    OpenAIRE

    Listyowardojo, Tita Alissa; Yan, Xiaoling; Leyshon, Stephen; Ray-Sannerud, Bobbie; Yu, Xin Yan; Zheng, Kai; Duan, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Tita Alissa Listyowardojo,1 Xiaoling Yan,2,3 Stephen Leyshon,1 Bobbie Ray-Sannerud,1 Xin Yan Yu,4 Kai Zheng,4 Tao Duan2,3 1Life Sciences Program, Group Technology and Research, DNV GL, Hovik, Norway; 2Quality and Safety Department, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, 3Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 4Healthcare Department, Business Assurance, DNV GL, Beijing, China Objective: To assess safety culture at a public maternity hospital in Shanghai, China, using a sequenti...

  9. Identifying Socio-Cultural Factors That Impact the Use of Open Educational Resources in Local Public Administrations

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Stoffregen; Jan M. Pawlowski; Eric Ras; Snezana Scepanovic; Dragica Zugic

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to define relevant barriers to the exchange of Open Educational Resources in local public administrations. Building upon a cultural model, eleven experts were interviewed and asked to evaluate several factors, such as openness in discourse, learning at the workplace, and superior support, among others. The result is a set of socio-cultural factors that shape the use of Open Educational Resources in public administrations. Significant factors are, in...

  10. Institutional Communication and Organizational Culture In Romanian Public Administration. A Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminița Rosca

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to emphasize the extent to which modern management principles are known and applied in the Romanian public institutions. We also aim to identify a system of values that set a pattern of the organizational culture in the system of public institutions. The investigation technique we used is the questionnaire and the method we chose is the sociological survey. According to the standards of research methodology and in order to obtain accurate results, we have pre-tested the research tools in conditions similar to those of the study itself. In this respect, the present study will test the validity of the questionnaire on a group of 41 subjects, master’s students in a specialized program at the University of Bucharest, with the purpose of undertaking the sociological survey. The pilot study conclusions will allow the methodological framework of the sociological survey to refine and adapt the models of international analysis to the actual Romanian context.

  11. Business Culture and the Death of Public Education: Mayor Bloomberg, David Steiner, and the Politics of Corporate "Leadership"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a case study of how a business culture imposes modes of educational leadership on a public school system in New York City that has little if any concerns for empowering children, teachers, and the communities. The article provides a counter-narrative that serves to dispel the notion that the culture of educational empowerment…

  12. An Organizational Culture Study of Missouri State University Faculty/Staff in Relation to the University's Public Affair Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Marissa LeClaire

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to address a problem of practice of the public affairs mission through the perceptions of faculty and staff members at Missouri State University of the University's organizational culture. The design included a phenomenological study with a set of organizational culture procedural questions related to the perceptions…

  13. Civic Ecology: A Postmodern Approach to Ecological Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, V. L.

    2013-12-01

    Human agency is transforming the planetary processes at unprecedented rates risking damaging essential life-support systems. Climate change, massive species extinction, land degradation, resources depletion, overpopulation, poverty and social injustice are all the result of human choices and non-sustainable ways of life. The survival of our modern economic systems depends upon insatiable consumption - a simple way of life no longer satisfies most people. Detached, instrumental rationality has created an ideal of liberalism based on individual pursuit of self-interest, leading the way into unprecedented material progress but bringing with it human alienation, social injustice, and ecological degradation. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce a community-based systems response to a growing sense that the interlocked social-ecological crisis is as much a problem of human thought and behavior as it is about identifying carrying capacities and CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. This approach, referred to here as civic ecology, presents a new and important paradigm shift in sustainability practice that attempts to bring together and integrate ecological ideas and postmodern thinking. As such, it is as much a holistic, dynamic, and synergistic approach to ecological sustainability, as it is a philosophy of life and ethical perspective born of ecological understanding and insight. Civic ecology starts with the proposition that the key factor determining the health of the ecosphere is the behavior of human beings, and therefore many of the most important issues related to sustainability lie in the areas of human thought and culture. Thus, the quest for sustainability must include as a central concern the transformation of psychological and behavioral patterns that have become an imminent danger to planetary health. At the core of this understanding is a fundamental paradigm shift from the basic commitments of modern Western culture to its model of mechanism

  14. Framing the impact of culture on health: a systematic review of the PEN-3 cultural model and its application in public health research and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwelunmor, Juliet; Newsome, Valerie; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews available studies that applied the PEN-3 cultural model to address the impact of culture on health behaviors. We search electronic databases and conducted a thematic analysis of empirical studies that applied the PEN-3 cultural model to address the impact of culture on health behaviors. Studies were mapped to describe their methods, target population and the health behaviors or health outcomes studied. Forty-five studies met the inclusion criteria. The studies reviewed used the PEN-3 model as a theoretical framework to centralize culture in the study of health behaviors and to integrate culturally relevant factors in the development of interventions. The model was also used as an analysis tool, to sift through text and data in order to separate, define and delineate emerging themes. PEN-3 model was also significant with exploring not only how cultural context shapes health beliefs and practices, but also how family systems play a critical role in enabling or nurturing positive health behaviors and health outcomes. Finally, the studies reviewed highlighted the utility of the model with examining cultural practices that are critical to positive health behaviors, unique practices that have a neutral impact on health and the negative factors that are likely to have an adverse influence on health. The limitations of model and the role for future studies are discussed relative to the importance of using PEN-3 cultural model to explore the influence of culture in promoting positive health behaviors, eliminating health disparities and designing and implementing sustainable public health interventions.

  15. How do scientists perceive the current publication culture? A qualitative focus group interview study among Dutch biomedical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijdink, J K; Schipper, K; Bouter, L M; Maclaine Pont, P; de Jonge, J; Smulders, Y M

    2016-02-17

    To investigate the biomedical scientist's perception of the prevailing publication culture. Qualitative focus group interview study. Four university medical centres in the Netherlands. Three randomly selected groups of biomedical scientists (PhD, postdoctoral staff members and full professors). Main themes for discussion were selected by participants. Frequently perceived detrimental effects of contemporary publication culture were the strong focus on citation measures (like the Journal Impact Factor and the H-index), gift and ghost authorships and the order of authors, the peer review process, competition, the funding system and publication bias. These themes were generally associated with detrimental and undesirable effects on publication practices and on the validity of reported results. Furthermore, senior scientists tended to display a more cynical perception of the publication culture than their junior colleagues. However, even among the PhD students and the postdoctoral fellows, the sentiment was quite negative. Positive perceptions of specific features of contemporary scientific and publication culture were rare. Our findings suggest that the current publication culture leads to negative sentiments, counterproductive stress levels and, most importantly, to questionable research practices among junior and senior biomedical scientists. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Nurse perceptions of organizational culture and its association with the culture of error reporting: a case of public sector hospitals in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafree, Sara Rizvi; Zakar, Rubeena; Zakar, Muhammad Zakria; Fischer, Florian

    2016-01-05

    There is an absence of formal error tracking systems in public sector hospitals of Pakistan and also a lack of literature concerning error reporting culture in the health care sector. Nurse practitioners have front-line knowledge and rich exposure about both the organizational culture and error sharing in hospital settings. The aim of this paper was to investigate the association between organizational culture and the culture of error reporting, as perceived by nurses. The authors used the "Practice Environment Scale-Nurse Work Index Revised" to measure the six dimensions of organizational culture. Seven questions were used from the "Survey to Solicit Information about the Culture of Reporting" to measure error reporting culture in the region. Overall, 309 nurses participated in the survey, including female nurses from all designations such as supervisors, instructors, ward-heads, staff nurses and student nurses. We used SPSS 17.0 to perform a factor analysis. Furthermore, descriptive statistics, mean scores and multivariable logistic regression were used for the analysis. Three areas were ranked unfavorably by nurse respondents, including: (i) the error reporting culture, (ii) staffing and resource adequacy, and (iii) nurse foundations for quality of care. Multivariable regression results revealed that all six categories of organizational culture, including: (1) nurse manager ability, leadership and support, (2) nurse participation in hospital affairs, (3) nurse participation in governance, (4) nurse foundations of quality care, (5) nurse-coworkers relations, and (6) nurse staffing and resource adequacy, were positively associated with higher odds of error reporting culture. In addition, it was found that married nurses and nurses on permanent contract were more likely to report errors at the workplace. Public healthcare services of Pakistan can be improved through the promotion of an error reporting culture, reducing staffing and resource shortages and the

  17. The Organization Culture In The Public Service At The Regional Secretariat Of Samarinda City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this research to analyzing the process of the management of internal integration in an effort to improve public services in the secretariat of the city .In the research results seen that there are culture of bubuhan familial in the management of internal integration in the secretariat of the city of samarinda through a the creation of a language together and conceptual categories in b the distribution of power and status c establishment norms closeness of a working relationship peers and d the application of the award and punishment. In addition to want to answer a desire as well as the need for public service excellence service unit to improve integrated permit handling UPT integrated permit handling services agency one gate BPPTSP capital city of samarinda . In the management of internal integration process in cultural organization that takes the conceptculture of bubuhan must be planned carefully and without prejudice to the rules of law applicable because if not handled wisely can be counter-productive with the vision and mission of Samarinda Government because it can cause a client patron relations which can actually inhibit the organization in achieving its vision and mission.

  18. Jewish national cultural-and-religious public motion in Ukraine in 1920th

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Dotsenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is based on the archived documents, periodic press and monographic literature analysis and deals with the problem of cultural-and-religious development of Jewish society’ public initiative in Ukraine in 1920th. The special features of activity of religiously-elucidative public associations are determined, their relationships with Communist Party organs. Anti-religious work of Communist Party organs is illuminated. At the beginning of 1920th Ukrainian Jewishness actively supported and heard the confession Judaism that remained next to languages Yiddish and Hebrew like instrument for maintenance of jewries national identity in the new soviet state. At the beginning of 1920th the cells of many public associations of religiously-cultural and educational aspiration functioned in Ukraine. Religious organizations developed in Jewish cult buildings. Separately maintenance of national identity of jewries was assisted by educational establishments that were actively helped by religious communities and societies. From the first years the Communist Party organs began active attacks on Jewish religious public motion. Active politics of division of jewries on atheists and believers was conducted. The last was constantly pursued and yielded to the repressions. Active voice in an anti-religious campaign was accepted by Jewish-section at the Central Committee of CP(bU. For their assistance local authorities closed synagogues, converted them into working clubs, khati-chital’ni (reading homes. Headers and eshibotes were closed, the retinues of Thora, prayer books and other religious literature were destroyed. During the Jewish holytides and on Saturdays, various atheistic actions, trials of rabbis and Judaism. got organized among the Jewish young people, workers and intelligentsia. With rolling down of New Economic Policy and beginning of mass population sovietization at the end of 1920th pressure on religious Jewish public motion from the side of

  19. Categorial Conflict Didactics as Paradigm of Civic Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst Leps

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Rudolf Engelhard presents a lesson model in his article How to Deal with Party Politics at School? that dates back to the 1960s, when civic education was revived in the Federal Republic of Germany (West-Germany. In order to improve civic education at school, the former Ministers of Education of German states reached a joint decision on the new subject. This was as a reaction against the first massive scribbling of Nazi propaganda since the end of World War II. Therefore, a new subject in secondary education was introduced to serve this purpose. This subject was called Sozialkunde1 (civic education or Gemeinschaftskunde2 (social studies.

  20. EDUCATIONAL COMMUNITY: AMONG THE REAL AND VIRTUAL CIVIC INITIATIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Arsenijević

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The new media enable numerous advantages in the strengthening of civic engagement, through removing barriers in space and time and through networking of individuals of the same social, civic or political interests at the global level. Different forms of civic engagement and civic responsibility in the virtual space are ever more present, and internet and mobile technology are its main instruments. Taking into account the findings of previous research in this area, in particular, the findings of a positive correlation between new media literacy and civic engagement in the United States and in Serbia, the objectives of this study were to investigate the differences in civic engagement in relation to media exposure and the differences in civic engagement in relation to digital participation of the Serbian academic and educational community. The survey was conducted in 2013. Questionnaire regarding the presence of respondents’ civic engagement has been taken from the author’s Literat earlier study (2011 and it consists of 5 close ended questions, whose reliability is satisfactory: α = 0.742. The research sample was consisted from the members of Serbian educational community, including those from high school students to university professors. The research results of differences in civic engagement in relation to media exposure showed that the research participants who spend more time reading the print media or using the Internet for the purposes of work or school are more socially engaged, while respondents who watch television program are not. Analysis of civic engagement in relation to digital participation showed that respondents who use online communities, forums and message boards (online activities that require discussion and active participation achieve higher scores on civic engagement, in contrast to respondents who spend more time on entertainment, commercial facilities, such as YouTube and video gaming. The results of this study are

  1. Embodied civic education: The corporeality of a civil body politic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Donna Paoletti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the lived experience of democratic civic education for middle school students. Grounded in the tradition of hermeneutic phenomenology as guided by Heidegger (1962, Gadamer (1960/2003, Casey (1993, and Levinas (1961/2004, among others, the framework for conducting action-sensitive research, as described by van Manen (2003, guides this inquiry as I endeavor to uncover what it means for students to embody civic education. Twenty-nine students are taped engaging in discussions, debates, simulations, and other civic education. Twelve students self-select to engage in reflective writing and conversations about their experiences.

  2. Ethnographic exercises as activities in public space: Social Occupational Therapy in art, culture and politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Galvani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ethnographic exercises are discussed - as proposed by the Metuia Project/ USP between 2007 and 2013 - as an activity able to enhance the recognition of the compound, plural and sometimes contradictory knowledge, but produced creatively in the intellectual and social do, in the interaction among students, occupational therapists, researchers and homeless people. It starts from the need to develop an understanding of the significant activities of artists working in the public spaces in São Paulo, as it persists as a plurality of meanings that the street acquires amid disputes of interests and cultural tensions, but also interconnections and creativity. The itinerant life and social areas’ characteristics, combined with reflections of urban anthropology and ethnographic research favored the theoretical and practical teaching in dialogic territorial shares of social occupational therapy. This article is the result of reflections built from the research Circuits and religious practices in life trajectories of adult homeless people in city of São Paulo, associated with university extension project linked to Metuia Project/USP, called Point meeting and culture: social networks, culture and social occupational therapy. In conclusion, on the one hand, there is need for renewed reflection about the occupational therapist’s place, considering the asymmetries of the relations in the construction of knowledge. On the other hand, it indicates that the produced activities, necessarily, in dialogical relations, only share meanings when inserted into the experience of the difference in consistent proposals with its own plasticity and in the middle of specific social and cultural contexts.

  3. A safety culture assessment by mixed methods at a public maternity and infant hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Listyowardojo TA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tita Alissa Listyowardojo,1 Xiaoling Yan,2,3 Stephen Leyshon,1 Bobbie Ray-Sannerud,1 Xin Yan Yu,4 Kai Zheng,4 Tao Duan2,3 1Life Sciences Program, Group Technology and Research, DNV GL, Hovik, Norway; 2Quality and Safety Department, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, 3Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 4Healthcare Department, Business Assurance, DNV GL, Beijing, China Objective: To assess safety culture at a public maternity hospital in Shanghai, China, using a sequential mixed methods approach. The study was part of a bigger study looking at the application of the mixed methods approach to assess safety culture in health care in different organizations and countries.Methodology: A mixed methods approach was utilized by first distributing the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire measuring six safety culture dimensions and five independent items to all hospital staff (n=1482 working in 18 departments at a single hospital. Afterward, semistructured interviews were conducted using convenience sampling, where 48 hospital staff from nine departments at the same hospital were individually interviewed.Results: The survey received a response rate of 96%. The survey findings show significant differences between the hospital departments in almost all safety culture dimensions and independent items. Similarly, the interview findings revealed that there were different, competing priorities between departments perceived to result in a reduced quality of collaboration and bottlenecks in care delivery. Another major finding was that staff who worked more hours per week would perceive working conditions significantly more negatively. Issues related to working conditions were also the most common concerns discussed in the interviews, especially the issue on high workload. High workload was also reflected in the fact that 91.45% of survey respondents reported that they worked 40 hours or longer per week. Finally, interview findings complemented

  4. The Violence of Cultural Difference: Accommodation and Oppositional Practices of Muslim Pupils in a Public Primary School in Metro Manila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry M. Lanuza

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary schools are supposed to provide a haven for young people to learn respect for individual differences and cultural diversity. However, schools often do not acknowledge cultural differences among their pupils or do not consciously consider the dynamics of these cultural differences in the school, which may lead to a simmering violence. This paper is an attempt to document the ways in which minority Muslim pupils in a primary public school develop different strategies of accommodation, assimilation, and resistance to the mainstream culture of the school.

  5. Does sociability predict civic involvement and political participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foschi, Renato; Lauriola, Marco

    2014-02-01

    In contemporary history as well as in political science, a strong associational life known as sociability is thought to explain the roots of modern democracy by establishing a link between the increasing availability of free time to the middle classes, increasing willingness to gather with others in circles or associations, and increasing social capital. In personality psychology, sociability is related to prosocial behavior (i.e., the need for affiliation, agreeableness, openness, and extraversion), whose importance in different political behaviors is increasingly recognized. In the present article, we carried out 5 studies (N = 1,429) that showed that political and associative sociability (a) can be reliably assessed, can have cross-cultural validity, and are properly associated with general social interest measures and personality domains and facets in the five-factor model; (b) do not overlap with similar concepts used in political psychology to account for political participation (political expertise, political interest, political self-efficacy); and (c) predicted political and nonpolitical group membership as well as observable choices in decision-making tasks with political and nonpolitical outcomes. The results are discussed, taking into consideration the extent to which specific facets of sociability can mediate between general personality traits and measures of civic involvement and political participation in a holistic model of political behavior. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Civic Participation in the Democratisation Process in Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , village and chiefdom levels were prevalent throughout Tanzania even before the advent of colonialism. The scope, size and focus of civic societies have increased and changed over time from being primary agents for social service delivery ...

  7. Eerste bevindingen International Civics and Citizenship Education Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.Maslowski, [No Value; H.M.Naayer, [No Value; M.M.Isac, [No Value; G.H.Oonk, [No Value; M.P.C.van der Werf, [No Value

    2010-01-01

    Nederland heeft deelgenomen aan de International Civics and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS), een internationaal vergelijkend onderzoek naar burgerschapscompetenties van leerlingen in de onderbouw van het voortgezet onderwijs. Het doel van deze studie is om burgerschapscompetenties van leerlingen

  8. Civic Engagement and Organizational Learning Strategies for Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tami L.; Mendez, Jesse P.

    2014-01-01

    Students succeed in college by engaging with faculty, peers, and the community. Institutional leaders can utilize organizational learning strategies to learn what works to support civic learning outcomes and student success.

  9. Young James Madison: His Character and Civic Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William J.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the life of James Madison, Founding Father and "theoretic statesman." Focuses specifically on Madison's education and character, his friendship with Thomas Jefferson, and his civic legacy: a selfless devotion to republican government and union. (JDH)

  10. Civic engagement education: a case study of millennial in Langkawi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Civic engagement education: a case study of millennial in Langkawi island and ... control through integrated marketing communication (IMC) and its exposure, ... The findings revealed a lot of strategies that need to be implemented by the ...

  11. Talk Shows in Pakistan TV Culture: Engaging Women as Cultural Citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munira Cheema

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gendered content that travels through popular TV in Pakistan highlights gender-based crimes and allows women access to the mediated public sphere. This is an unprecedented form of access in a society that defines public/private through Shariah. The boundaries between the two spheres have thus far been immutable. Recent changes in the media landscape have made these boundaries porous. Drawing on theoretical debates on popular culture, cultural citizenship and counter public sphere, the study argues that these popular cultural spaces can be read in terms of an emerging feminist public sphere where women can engage as members of the public and as cultural citizens. To determine engagement patterns of young viewers, focus groups turned out to be effective method. In the sample of university students, there were 42 participants in 10 groups with 4 to 6 members in each group. The study finds that gendered content allows women to act in pro-civic ways. Their engagement with this content allows viewers to revisit their intersecting identities as Muslims, women and Pakistanis.

  12. Moral regeneration: Seedbeds for civic virtue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piet G.J. Meiring

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Taking his cue from a recent report by the US National Council on Civil Society, the author discusses a number of “seedbeds of civic virtue” that may play a role in the much needed moral regeneration of South African society. The “seedbeds” are (1 family, (2 the local community, (3 faith communities, (4 voluntary civil organizations, (5 arts and art institutions, (6 education, (7 business, labour and economic institu-tions, (8 the media, (9 government, (10 the nation. The “rainbow nation”, the author contends, has in recent times lost some of its colour, but if the different partners in the quest for moral regeneration take hands, the colours of the rainbow may return.

  13. Civic Friendship in Aristotle: Concord and Fraternity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Farrés Juste

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available the article shows the importance of friendship in the context of Aristotelian political philosophy. this importance is verified in its specific weight compared with justice. As it is known, Aristotle argues that the pursuit of friendship outranks the pursuit of justice in the polis. Particularly, the article focuses on the role of concord, as a special type of civic friendship, in terms of preserving the unity and stability of the polis. to grasp its significance, we have to consider the role of concord as a supplement of the political condition of the human being. Concord is necessary in the light of the trend to the struggle between the parts of the city, between the demos and the oligarchs. Since this fight endangers the continuity of the polis, concord among citizens becomes a privileged background of early republican fraternity, which has not enjoyed sufficient attention in the field of history of political philosophy.

  14. Case Study Shows Disconnect on Civic Journalism's Role

    OpenAIRE

    Tully, M.; Harmsen, S.; Singer, J.; Ekdale, B.

    2017-01-01

    This in-depth case study examines attempts to transform a traditional newsroom to one oriented around civic journalism principles, offering a unique look at the resistance toward those principles even in a digital environment that facilitates new audience relationships. Civic journalism emphasizes understanding and addressing community concerns from a citizen perspective. This study finds that journalists still struggle to integrate citizens’ contributions into newsroom practice in meaningful...

  15. Embodied civic education: The corporeality of a civil body politic

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips Donna Paoletti

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the lived experience of democratic civic education for middle school students. Grounded in the tradition of hermeneutic phenomenology as guided by Heidegger (1962), Gadamer (1960/2003), Casey (1993), and Levinas (1961/2004), among others, the framework for conducting action-sensitive research, as described by van Manen (2003), guides this inquiry as I endeavor to uncover what it means for students to embody civic education. Twenty-nine students are taped engaging in discus...

  16. [Civic religion, civil religion, secular religion. a historiographical investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucheron, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Because of its conceptual plasiticity, the term civic religion is now widely used by historians, particularly historians of the Middle Ages. Yet, as this article suggests, historians would do well to interrogate the relationships (which can be hidden) that this term bears to similar concepts such as Greek Roman civic religion, Enlightenment civil religion or even the secular religion that emerged in the work of 20(th) century thinkers.

  17. Civic Crowdfunding-monitor: eerste schets van civic crowdfunding in Nederland : een schatkist aan informatie over slagingspercentages, succesfactoren en donateurs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Ezrah; de Graaf, Frank Jan

    2017-01-01

    Crowdfunding door burgers voor lokale maatschappelijke projecten neemt laatste jaren aanzienlijk toe. Hogeschool van Amsterdam deed er onderzoek naar en bundelde de uitkomsten in het eerste civic crowdfunding monitor.

  18. Jedi Public Health: Co-creating an Identity-Safe Culture to Promote Health Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geronimus, Arline T; James, Sherman A; Destin, Mesmin; Graham, Louis A; Hatzenbuehler, Mark; Murphy, Mary; Pearson, Jay A; Omari, Amel; Thompson, James Phillip

    2016-12-01

    The extent to which socially-assigned and culturally mediated social identity affects health depends on contingencies of social identity that vary across and within populations in day-to-day life. These contingencies are structurally rooted and health damaging inasmuch as they activate physiological stress responses. They also have adverse effects on cognition and emotion, undermining self-confidence and diminishing academic performance. This impact reduces opportunities for social mobility, while ensuring those who "beat the odds" pay a physical price for their positive efforts. Recent applications of social identity theory toward closing racial, ethnic, and gender academic achievement gaps through changing features of educational settings, rather than individual students, have proved fruitful. We sought to integrate this evidence with growing social epidemiological evidence that structurally-rooted biopsychosocial processes have population health effects. We explicate an emergent framework, Jedi Public Health (JPH). JPH focuses on changing features of settings in everyday life, rather than individuals, to promote population health equity, a high priority, yet, elusive national public health objective. We call for an expansion and, in some ways, a re-orienting of efforts to eliminate population health inequity. Policies and interventions to remove and replace discrediting cues in everyday settings hold promise for disrupting the repeated physiological stress process activation that fuels population health inequities with potentially wide application.

  19. Jedi public health: Co-creating an identity-safe culture to promote health equity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arline T. Geronimus

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which socially-assigned and culturally mediated social identity affects health depends on contingencies of social identity that vary across and within populations in day-to-day life. These contingencies are structurally rooted and health damaging inasmuch as they activate physiological stress responses. They also have adverse effects on cognition and emotion, undermining self-confidence and diminishing academic performance. This impact reduces opportunities for social mobility, while ensuring those who ''beat the odds'' pay a physical price for their positive efforts. Recent applications of social identity theory toward closing racial, ethnic, and gender academic achievement gaps through changing features of educational settings, rather than individual students, have proved fruitful. We sought to integrate this evidence with growing social epidemiological evidence that structurally-rooted biopsychosocial processes have population health effects. We explicate an emergent framework, Jedi Public Health (JPH. JPH focuses on changing features of settings in everyday life, rather than individuals, to promote population health equity, a high priority, yet, elusive national public health objective. We call for an expansion and, in some ways, a re-orienting of efforts to eliminate population health inequity. Policies and interventions to remove and replace discrediting cues in everyday settings hold promise for disrupting the repeated physiological stress process activation that fuels population health inequities with potentially wide application. Keywords: Population health, Health equity, Social identity, Race/ethnicity, LGBTQ, Gender, Stereotype threat, Weathering

  20. Sexual diversity and homophobia: a “disarrangement” culture in public educational policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaias Batista de Oliveira Júnior

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Levels resulting from the disqualification of “compulsory heteronormativity” process that focus on Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, Bigenders, Transvestites, Transsexuals, Transgenders, Queers, Questioners, Intersexes, Indecisives, Asexuals and Allies people emerge in several instances. As a dialog agent, the school has been characterized asa strategic place to implement public policies and, in this context, emerge actions as the School without Homophobia and Health and Prevention in School programs. In order to promote the discussion on strategies developed in the national scenario, it is discussed its products: Gay Kit, Adolescents and Youth Peer Education Guide and Comic Books. Using bibliographical research as a methodology, excerpts of a master’s thesis are used so as to bring the theory of Cultural Studies as a mainstay of discourse. Given the government’s suspension of these materials, one realizes how difficult it is to stand up against public opinion. However, the refusal of the majority does not give the State the right to withhold basic rights of minorities.

  1. One Nation, Divided: Culture, Civic Institutions, and the Marriage Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, W. Bradford; Wolfinger, Nicholas H.; Stokes, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1960s, the United States has witnessed a dramatic retreat from marriage, marked by divorce, cohabitation, single parenthood, and lower overall marriage rates. Marriage is now less likely to anchor adults' lives or provide a stable framework for childrearing, especially among poor and working-class Americans. Much research on the retreat…

  2. A review of the public health management of shigellosis in Australia in the era of culture-independent diagnostic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Alex Y C; Easton, Marion; Encena, Jess; Rotty, Jessica; Valcanis, Mary; Howden, Benjamin P; Slota-Kan, Simon; Gregory, Joy

    2016-12-01

    To review the national case definition for shigellosis following the introduction of culture independent diagnostic testing by clinical laboratories and provide evidence to reform jurisdictional public health practices for the management shigellosis., . A review of all Australian jurisdictional public health guidelines for shigellosis was conducted. Victorian 2014 shigellosis data were analysed: demographics and risk factors for cases identified by conventional culture or culture-independent diagnostic methods were described. There was considerable variation in reporting of cases to the National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS) by the eight Australian jurisdictions, with an array of classifications based on diagnostic testing methodologies. Analysis of Victorian 2014 shigellosis data found that culture positive cases were more likely to have reported men who have sex with men (MSM) as a risk factor than PCR positive only cases (p<0.0001) and less likely to have reported overseas travel during their incubation period (p<0.0001). Over a 10-year period (2005 to 2014), only two of 86 cases who were employed in high-risk occupations had ongoing positive faecal cultures after appropriate treatment. The national surveillance case definition for shigellosis should be reviewed to facilitate standardised reporting across Australia. All jurisdictions must consider the public health significance of PCR positive only results in their surveillance risk assessments to inform management of shigellosis cases. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  3. Essential education in communication skills and cultural sensitivities for global public health in an evolving veterinary world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, S M; Adams, C L

    2009-08-01

    In the practise of veterinary medicine and global public health, communication skill is as critical as clinical reasoning and an extensive knowledge base. Effective communication skills and cross-cultural sensitivity are essential across the board for interdisciplinary, international, and local veterinary medicine. This paper offers an evidence-based, three-part framework for developing and sustaining curricula that enhance communication skills and cross-cultural sensitivity so that students are better prepared to practise veterinary medicine in an evolving world. These curricula may well also serve as a conduit for encouraging more veterinary graduates to choose global public health as a career path.

  4. THE MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE CIVIC EDUCATION IN MODERN SCHOOL (USING THE EXAMPLE OF THE USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Stanislavovna Bessarabova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The urgency of the topic is stipulated by the importance of the problem of civic education under modern conditions of forming of the constitutional state and civic society, which has the rights and freedoms of citizens as the highest value.The purpose of the research is to reveal and characterize the peculiarities of the process of civic education of schoolchildren in modern secondary school (using the example of the USA.The results of the research showed that civic education involves three basic components: civic knowledge, civic skills and civic position. Civic knowledge includes clear understanding of the government structure and the processes of law adoption. At this stage the main focus in the process of civic education is directed to the students’ knowledge and skills to analyze historical and political events in the country, to understand the directions of the state policy in the country. The main function of the civic knowledge is its stimulation of the civic activity.The essential part of civic education is the formation of the civic skills, which are dependent on many factors including home environment, active and responsible participation in political life of the society, general education. These skills are classified as interaction, control and influence.The next basic component of civic education – civic position – is connected with personal and social characteristics of a citizen, which are important for active participation under the conditions of constitutional democracy. Civic position is closely connected with conscious readiness of a person to take part in social activity, availability of the theoretical civic know-ledge and practical civic skills. Itshould be mentioned that civic knowledge, civic skills and civic position are interconnected.Practical implications of the results. The results of the research are applicable in the process of working out of the new technologies, methods and approaches in education to

  5. A Framework Approach to Evaluate Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Public Engagement Strategies for Radioactive Waste Management - 13430

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The complex interplay of politics, economics and culture undermines attempts to define universal best practices for public engagement in the management of nuclear materials. In the international context, communicators must rely on careful adaptation and creative execution to make standard communication techniques succeed in their local communities. Nuclear professionals need an approach to assess and adapt culturally specific public engagement strategies to meet the demands of their particular political, economic and social structures. Using participant interviews and public sources, the Potomac Communications Group reviewed country-specific examples of nuclear-related communication efforts to provide insight into a proposed approach. The review considered a spectrum of cultural dimensions related to diversity, authority, conformity, proximity and time. Comparisons help to identify cross-cultural influences of various public engagement tactics and to inform a framework for communicators. While not prescriptive in its application, the framework offers a way for communicators to assess the salience of outreach tactics in specific situations. The approach can guide communicators to evaluate and tailor engagement strategies to achieve localized public outreach goals. (authors)

  6. Identifying Socio-Cultural Factors That Impact the Use of Open Educational Resources in Local Public Administrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Stoffregen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to define relevant barriers to the exchange of Open Educational Resources in local public administrations. Building upon a cultural model, eleven experts were interviewed and asked to evaluate several factors, such as openness in discourse, learning at the workplace, and superior support, among others. The result is a set of socio-cultural factors that shape the use of Open Educational Resources in public administrations. Significant factors are, in this respect, the independent choice of learning resources, the spirit of the platform, the range of available formats and access to technologies. Practitioners use these factors to elaborate on the readiness of public administrations towards the use of open e-Learning systems. To academic debates on culture in e-Learning, the results provide an alternative model that is contextualized to meet the demands of public sector contexts. Overall, the paper contributes to the lack of research about open e-Learning systems in the public sector, as well as regarding culture in the management of learning and knowledge exchange.

  7. A Framework Approach to Evaluate Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Public Engagement Strategies for Radioactive Waste Management - 13430

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Laura [Potomac Communications Group, 1133 20th St NW Washington DC 20035 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The complex interplay of politics, economics and culture undermines attempts to define universal best practices for public engagement in the management of nuclear materials. In the international context, communicators must rely on careful adaptation and creative execution to make standard communication techniques succeed in their local communities. Nuclear professionals need an approach to assess and adapt culturally specific public engagement strategies to meet the demands of their particular political, economic and social structures. Using participant interviews and public sources, the Potomac Communications Group reviewed country-specific examples of nuclear-related communication efforts to provide insight into a proposed approach. The review considered a spectrum of cultural dimensions related to diversity, authority, conformity, proximity and time. Comparisons help to identify cross-cultural influences of various public engagement tactics and to inform a framework for communicators. While not prescriptive in its application, the framework offers a way for communicators to assess the salience of outreach tactics in specific situations. The approach can guide communicators to evaluate and tailor engagement strategies to achieve localized public outreach goals. (authors)

  8. Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy B; Rodríguez, Melanie Domenech; Bernal, Guillermo

    2011-02-01

    This article summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients' cultural backgrounds. We begin by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 participants. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele than traditional treatments. The most effective treatments tended to be those with greater numbers of cultural adaptations. Mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those provided to clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. We recommend a series of research-supported therapeutic practices that account for clients' culture, with culture-specific treatments being more effective than generally culture-sensitive treatments. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Assessment of the culture of safety in public hospitals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima de; Arruda, Lidyane Parente; Nascimento, Nayanne Karen Pinheiro do; Sampaio, Renata Lopes; Cavalcante, Maria Lígia Silva Nunes; Costa, Ana Carolina Pinto

    2017-03-02

    to assess the culture of safety in three public hospitals. transversal study undertaken in three Brazilian public hospitals, with health professionals through applying the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Scores greater than or equal to 75 were considered positive. a total of 573 professionals participated in the study, including nurse technicians and auxiliary nurses 292 (51%), nurses 105 (18.3%), physicians 59 (10.3%), and other professionals 117 (20.4%). The mean of the SAQ varied between 65 and 69 in the three hospitals. Among the domains, however, 'Job satisfaction' presented a higher score, and the opposite was observed for the domain 'Perceptions of management'. The outsourced professionals presented a better perception of the culture of safety than did the statutory professionals. The professionals with higher education presented a better perception of the stressing factors than did the professionals educated to senior high school level. the level of the culture of safety found is below the ideal. The managerial actions are considered the main contributing factor to the culture's weakness; however, the professionals demonstrated themselves to be satisfied with the work. evaluar la cultura de seguridad en tres hospitales públicos. estudio transversal realizado en tres hospitales públicos brasileños, desarrollado con profesionales de la salud aplicando el Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Fueron considerados positivos puntajes mayores o iguales a 75. participaron del estudio 573 profesionales, incluyendo técnicos y auxiliares de enfermería 292 (51%), enfermeros 105 (18,3%), médicos 59 (10,3%), y otros profesionales 117 (20,4%). El promedio del SAQ varió entre 65 a 69 en los tres hospitales. Sin embargo, en los dominios, Satisfacción en el Trabajo presentó mayor puntaje y lo opuesto fue observado en el dominio Percepción de la Administración. Los profesionales tercerizados presentaron mejor percepción de la cultura de seguridad que los

  10. Evaluation of Legionella real-time PCR against traditional culture for routine and public health testing of water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S; Stevenson, D; Walker, J; Bennett, A

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of Legionella qPCR alongside traditional culture for enumeration of Legionella from water samples as part of both routine and public health investigation testing. Routine water samples (n = 2002) and samples from public health investigations (n = 215) were analysed by culture and qPCR for Legionella spp., Legionella pneumophila and L. pneumophila sg-1. A negative qPCR result was highly predictive of a negative culture result for all water systems (negative predictive values, NPV from 97·4 to 100%). Positive predictive values (PPV) were lower (0-50%). Results for qPCR were generally larger than culture with average log 10 differences of 1·1 for Legionella spp. and 1·2 for L. pneumophila. Alert and action levels of 1000 and 10 000 GU per litre, respectively, are proposed for Legionella qPCR for hot and cold water systems (HCWS). The use of qPCR significantly reduced the time to results for public health investigations by rapidly identifying potential sources and ruling out others, thus enabling a more rapid and efficient response. The high NPV of qPCR supports its use to rapidly screen out negative samples without culture. Alert and action levels for Legionella qPCR for HCWS are proposed. Quantitative PCR will be a valuable tool for both routine and public health testing. This study generated comparative data of >2000 water samples by qPCR and culture. Action and alert levels have been recommended that could enable duty holders to interpret qPCR results to facilitate timely Legionella control and public health protection. © 2017 Crown copyright. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. 76 FR 9760 - Presidential Academies for Teaching of American History and Civics; Office of Innovation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... for Teaching of American History and Civics (Presidential Academies) that offer workshops for both... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Presidential Academies for Teaching of American History and Civics; Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information; Presidential Academies for Teaching of American...

  12. Dealing with Cultural Differences in Public-Private R&D Projects: The Experience of the Australian Seafood Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dentoni, D.; English, F.

    2012-01-01

    This essay 1) discusses the current agribusiness managers’ human capital problem of dealing with cultural differences in public-private Research & Development (R&D) projects involving firms, government agencies and universities and 2) proposes a “learning by doing” process for managers to

  13. THE DYNAMICS OF THE CIVIC ENGAGEMENT IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VERONICA DUMITRAŞCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The civic engagement is an important element for the consolidation of democracy. This article aims at showing the dynamics of the civic engagement in Romania reflected in three series of data pertaining to the years 1995–1999, 2005–2009, and 2010–2014. Using data from World Values Survey, the article tries to measure the intensity and the development of the civic participation in Romania viewed on three dimensions: civic, electoral and political. The World Values Survey does not cover all the indicators, so we shall use for the study the indicators found in the survey which can best reflect the dimensions suggested. For the civic dimension, we shall use as indicators the membership in voluntary organisations − charitable organisations, churches or religious organisations, labour unions, professional associations, sport or recreation, and other voluntary organisations. For the electoral dimension, we follow the indicators: volunteering for political organizations (membership in political parties, and regular voting (parliamentary vote and national vote. For the political voice dimension, the indicators that suggest political actions are: protesting, attending peaceful demonstrations, sending written petitions (political action −signing a petition, boycotting (political actions − joining in boycotts and also joining strikes, and other acts of protest

  14. Trade union activity, cultural, public and political life of Krasnoyarsk Polytechnic Institute in the second half of 1950s–1980

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrik Valeriy V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Basing on rich documentary, the article studies the activity of the trade union organization in Krasnoyarsk Polytechnic Institute and the impact the trade union had on the cultural, public and political life of the Institute in the second half of the 1950s-1980s. The activity is stated to be held in different forms and areas: amateur arts, propaganda, wall-newspaper and house magazine, vigilant groups, University of Culture, student club, lecturing agitation group, student construction brigades, department, groups and hostels competitions. The authors come to the conclusion that involving students and faculty members into cultural, public and political life added greatly to fostering the future engineers as it took them less time to adapt to the team-spirited workforce after graduating from the higher educational establishment. The article is intended for the people interested in history of higher education in Siberia and Russia.

  15. Using a Critical Service-Learning Approach to Facilitate Civic Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tania D.

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights elements of civic engagement programs that have the rich potential to facilitate civic identity development. Focusing on research with alumni, the study examines 3 civic engagement programs, the approaches of which are guided by critical service-learning. It explores elements of the experiences that alumni name as…

  16. Alienated and Disaffected Students: Exploring the Civic Capacity of "Outsiders" in Asian Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xiaoxue; Kennedy, Kerry John

    2018-01-01

    As an important group of students, the alienated and disaffected students are often overlooked in more general studies of civic education. Based on data from the International Civics and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS 2009), the study investigated alienated and disaffected students in Asia and explored the development of their civic attitudes.…

  17. Educating for a Critical Democracy: Civic Participation Reimagined in the Council of Youth Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirra, Nicole; Morrell, Ernest D.; Cain, Ebony; Scorza, D'Artagnan; Ford, Arlene

    2013-01-01

    This article explores civic learning, civic participation, and the development of civic agency within the Council of Youth Research (the Council), a program that engages high school students in youth participatory action research projects that challenge school inequalities and mobilize others in pursuit of educational justice. We critique the…

  18. The Role Played by the Family in Shaping Early and Middle Adolescent Civic Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Michela; Vieno, Alessio; Santinello, Massimo; Nation, Maury; Voight, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a multi-informant methodology, the current study examines the relative influence of multiple parental characteristics (civic responsibility, encouragement of civic action, parent-youth closeness) on adolescents' civic responsibility (local and global). The participants were 384 early and middle adolescents (47.9% male), randomly selected…

  19. Confronting Social Injustice: Cognitive Dissonance and Civic Development in Higher Education Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Leslie Cohen

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative, insider account of student civic development in a university service-learning course has two primary goals. One is to propose frameworks for describing the process of civic development of service-learning students that are situated in theories of civic identity, cognitive development, and cognitive dissonance. The other is to…

  20. Investigating General and Specific Links from Adolescents' Perceptions of Ecological Assets to Their Civic Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray-Lake, Laura; Sloper, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Civic engagement is an important marker of thriving among adolescents, and more research is needed that clarifies the ecological assets (positive supports across settings) that foster youth civic engagement. Simultaneously modeling associations between multiple ecological assets and civic behaviors can provide a nuanced view of the way…

  1. From Receivers of Service to Givers of Service: Promoting Civic Engagement in Youth from Disadvantaged Circumstances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Denisha

    2013-01-01

    Youth civic engagement has been an important topic for educators, policy makers, community leaders, and parents with many voicing concerns over a growing decrease in youth civic engagement. Youth civic engagement is often defined by engagement with politics and or the local community through volunteering or service-learning. Youth from…

  2. Happiness Is the Way: Paths to Civic Engagement between Young Adulthood and Midlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shichen; Galambos, Nancy L.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Krahn, Harvey J.

    2018-01-01

    Directional associations between civic engagement and happiness were explored with longitudinal data from a community sample surveyed four times from age 22 to 43 (n = 690). Autoregressive cross-lagged models, controlling for cross-time stabilities in happiness and civic engagement, examined whether happiness predicted future civic engagement,…

  3. Perceptions of Campus Climates for Civic Learning as Predictors of College Students' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Joshua J.; Reason, Robert D.; Hemer, Kevin M.; Finley, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    This study explored whether three broad areas promoted students' mental health: perceptions of the climate related to civic learning, experiences on campus, and civic engagement. Campus climates for civic learning including the development of ethical and moral reasoning and the importance of contributing to community were the strongest predictors…

  4. Civic Education Trends in Post-Communist Countries of Central and Eastern Europe. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamot, Gregory E.

    Developments during the decade and a half following the fall of communism in Central and Eastern Europe indicate broad advancement in civic education for democracy. This digest notes the rising trend in civic education competency in Central and Eastern Europe, describes an increasingly accepted and used framework for civic education, and…

  5. Civic Education as a Means of Talent Dissemination for Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon-Young

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the need for civic education as a mode of talent dissemination among gifted students. Based on a comprehensive review of literature, civic education was found to be instrumental for gifted students in developing academic, psychological, and social abilities; enhancing civic awareness, responsibility, and commitment; and taking…

  6. Examining Developmental Transitions in Civic Engagement across Adolescence: Evidence from a National U.S. Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray-Lake, Laura; Rote, Wendy M.; Benavides, Celina M.; Victorino, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Describing how much and what type(s) of change are evident in civic engagement across adolescence is a fundamental starting point for advancing developmental theory in the civic domain. Using five annual waves of data from a large national U.S. sample spanning 8th-12th grades, our study describes civic engagement typologies and transitions in and…

  7. Culture and Leadership in a Public University Setting: Implications for Shared Governance and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    Noting a lack of quantitative research on perceptions of culture, leadership and change in the shared governance environment of Higher Education, this study utilized the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (Cameron & Quinn, 2011) to measure current (now) and preferred cultural perceptions of faculty and administrative leaders.…

  8. Integrating cultural values, beliefs, and customs into pregnancy and postpartum care: lessons learned from a Hawaiian public health nursing project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, L J; Affonso, D D; Shibuya, J; Clemmens, D

    1999-06-01

    Determining the elements of culturally competent health care is an important goal for nurses. This goal is particularly integral in efforts to design better preventive health care strategies for pregnant and postpartum women from multiple cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Learning about the values, beliefs, and customs surrounding health among the targeted groups is essential, but integrating this knowledge into the actual health care services delivery system is more difficult. The success of a prenatal and postpartum program developed for native Hawaiian, Filipino, and Japanese women in Hawaii has been attributed to the attention on training, direct care giving, and program monitoring participation by local cultural and ethnic healers and neighborhood leaders living in the community, with coordination by public health nurses. This article profiles central design elements with examples of specific interventions used in the Malama Na Wahine or Caring for Pregnant Women program to illustrate a unique approach to the delivery of culturally competent care.

  9. Moral Bioenhancement for Social Welfare: Are Civic Institutions Ready?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Shook

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Positive assessments of moral enhancement too often isolate intuitive notions about its benefits apart from the relevance of surrounding society or civic institutions. If moral bioenhancement should benefit both oneself and others, it cannot be conducted apart from the enhancement of local social conditions, or the preparedness of civic institutions. Neither of those considerations has been adequately incorporated into typical neuroethical assessments of ambitious plans for moral bioenhancement. Enhancing a person to be far less aggressive and violent than an average person, what we label as “civil enhancement,” seems to be quite moral, yet its real-world social consequences are hardly predictable. A hypothetical case about how the criminal justice system would treat an offender who already received civil enhancement serves to illustrate how civic institutions are unprepared for moral enhancement.

  10. The Relationship between Adolescents' News Media Use and Civic Engagement: The Indirect Effect of Interpersonal Communication with Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Michelle J.; Zaff, Jonathan F.; Phelps, Erin; Weiner, Michelle B.; Lerner, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development, a longitudinal study involving U.S. adolescents, multi-group structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to evaluate whether news media use is predictive of a set of civic indicators (civic duty, civic efficacy, neighborhood social connection, and civic participation) for youth in Grades…

  11. Identity styles, positive youth development, and civic engagement in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Erentaitė, Rasa; Zukauskienė, Rita

    2014-11-01

    Identity formation is a core developmental task of adolescence. Adolescents can rely on different social-cognitive styles to seek, process, and encode self-relevant information: information-oriented, normative, and diffuse-avoidant identity styles. The reliance on different styles might impact adolescents' adjustment and their active involvement in the society. The purpose of this study was to examine whether adolescents with different identity styles report differences in positive youth development (analyzed with the Five Cs-Competence, Confidence, Character, Connection, and Caring-model) and in various forms of civic engagement (i.e., involvement in school self-government activities, volunteering activities, youth political organizations, and youth non-political organizations). The participants were 1,633 (54.1 % female) 14-19 year old adolescents (M age = 16.56, SD age = 1.22). The findings indicated that adolescents with different identity styles differed significantly on all the Five Cs and on two (i.e., involvement in volunteering activities and in youth non-political organizations) forms of civic engagement. Briefly, adolescents with an information-oriented style reported high levels of both the Five Cs and civic engagement; participants with a normative style reported moderate to high scores on the Five Cs but low rates of civic engagement; diffuse-avoidant respondents scored low both on the Five Cs and on civic engagement. These findings suggest that the information-oriented style, contrary to the diffuse-avoidant one, has beneficial effects for both the individual and the community, while the normative style has quite beneficial effects for the individual but not for his/her community. Concluding, adolescents with different identity styles display meaningful differences in positive youth development and in rates of civic engagement.

  12. Differences in Ethical Standards: Factoring in the Cultural Expectation in Public Relations Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Bonita Dostal

    Focusing on ethics in public relations from a multicultural point of view brings together elements which are critical to international public relations. The Public Relations-Ethics-Multicultural (PREM) model illustrates that articles can be found in the literature on ethics, public relations, and multicultural as individual concepts. The…

  13. Teaching of evolution in public schools: A cross-cultural examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Joshua M.

    The current study sought to examine how the cultural settings of Colorado, United States, and Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany, influenced perspectives, understandings, and acceptance of college students who want to become teachers (i.e., prospective teachers) in regard to the theory of evolution, creationism, and intelligent design with both quantitative and qualitative components. The quantitative sample for the study consisted of 221 German prospective teachers from Baden-Wurttemberg and 231 United States prospective teachers from Colorado. The quantitative component consisted of a 42-item survey with both Likert and true/false items to examine how (1) country of origin, (2) religious participation, and (3) educational background influence students' views and understandings of the theory of evolution and alternative conceptions. Additionally, in a Likert 6-item motivated reasoning task (a theoretical construct), prospective teachers were asked to read and critique arguments supporting and opposing the theory of evolution; differences in how students critiqued arguments were hypothesized to demonstrate biases. For a separate sample from the same locations (8 German and 11 United States students), a qualitative component examined prospective teachers' positions on teaching the theory of evolution in public schools. Prospective teachers were asked to provide support for their position, anticipate opposing arguments, and implications that both positions would have for students. Lastly, prospective teachers were also asked to explain and define the theory of evolution. The current study aided in examining how teachers' perspectives, understandings, and acceptance impacted what was taught in the science classroom. The researcher found that country of origin, religious behavior, and educational background predicted prospective teachers' responses to numerous criterion variables used in the current study. Further, qualitative results expressed major differences between

  14. The Evaluation of Public Policies from the Perspective of the Agenda 21 of Culture: a Case Study

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    María Aracely Mendívil-Portillo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available . This research shows the results of the implementation of a public cultural policy at the municipal level and has as a main objective to evaluate, from the perspective of the agenda 21 of culture, the program "Art for social development" by the Municipal Institute of Art and Culture developed in a secondary-level boarding school located at the Topolobampo community, in the municipality of Ahome, Mexico. A QUAN-QUAL methodology was used with instruments like questionnaires applied to the young participants and interviews with the workshop facilitators and administrative staff. Guitar, painting and theatre workshops were given, through which the development of new artistic expression skills was achieved, as well as contributing to the strengthening of social behaviors such as tolerance, patience and interpersonal communication, among others. It was found the constant need of having permanent programs of integral training, both in the field of artistic training and socio-emotional, giving priority to groups at risk, such as students of the boarding school that mostly come from families of scarce resources, some of the low performance academic and aggressive behavior. The conclusion is that public policies are required to promote greater articulation of education and culture in order to have a stronger impact on the social and cultural inclusion of young people.

  15. Promoting inclusive education, civic scientific literacy, and global citizenship with videogames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Matthew T.; Hayes, Michael T.

    2012-12-01

    In this response to Yupanqui Munoz and Charbel El-Hani's paper, "The student with a thousand faces: From the ethics in videogames to becoming a citizen", we examine their critique of videogames in science education. Munoz and El-Hani present a critical analysis of videogames such as Grand Theft Auto, Street Fight, Command and Conquer: Generals, Halo, and Fallout 3 using Neil Postman's (1993) conceptualization of technopoly along with Bill Green and Chris Bigum's (1993) notion of the cyborg curriculum. Our contention is that these games are not representative of current educational videogames about science, which hold the potential to enhance civic scientific literacy across a diverse range of students while promoting cross-cultural understandings of complex scientific concepts and phenomenon. We examine games that have undergone empirical investigation in general education science classrooms, such as River City, Quest Atlantis, Whyville, Resilient Planet, and You Make Me Sick!, and discuss the ways these videogames can engage students and teachers in a constructivist dialogue that enhances science education. Our critique extends Munoz and El-Hani's discussion through an examination of the ways videogames can enhance science education by promoting inclusive education, civic scientific literacy, and global citizenship.

  16. IMPACT OF PERSONAL ORIENTATIONS ON ATTITUDES TO DIVERSITY AND CIVIC SOCIAL-POLITICAL ACTIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Zografova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamically ongoing processes of integration are among the crucial premises for the development of contemporary interpersonal, intergroup and cross-cultural relations, attitudes, conflicts and more. The research problem here directs to an analysis, based on ESS data collected in 8 countries, rounds 2006 and 2008, on the extent to which Europeans' personal orientations significantly influence the attitudes towards ethno-national diversity, in this case, towards two social groups: immigrants coming from poorer countries outside Europe and people with different sexual orientation. Furthermore, the influence of the same factors on the civic activeness and involvement in the social-political processes has been followed. Through regressive analysis the important effect of the co-otherness orientation (a concept developed by Sicakkan, 2003, the orientation to success and traditionalism on all included dependent variables has been proved. The expectations for predicting effects of the three personal orientations have been confirmed regarding the civic involvement and tolerance to diversity. Simultaneously the necessity of working EU politics to deal with the risks of emerging negative attitudes has been pointed out in relation to the broad immigrant and refugee wave to European countries.

  17. How to change organisational culture: Action research in a South African public sector primary care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Robert; De Sa, Angela; Christodoulou, Maria

    2016-08-31

    Organisational culture is a key factor in both patient and staff experience of the healthcare services. Patient satisfaction, staff engagement and performance are related to this experience. The department of health in the Western Cape espouses a values-based culture characterised by caring, competence, accountability, integrity, responsiveness and respect. However, transformation of the existing culture is required to achieve this vision. To explore how to transform the organisational culture in line with the desired values. Retreat Community Health Centre, Cape Town, South Africa. Participatory action research with the leadership engaged with action and reflection over a period of 18 months. Change in the organisational culture was measured at baseline and after 18 months by means of a cultural values assessment (CVA) survey. The three key leaders at the health centre also completed a 360-degree leadership values assessment (LVA) and had 6 months of coaching. Cultural entropy was reduced from 33 to 13% indicating significant transformation of organisational culture. The key driver of this transformation was change in the leadership style and functioning. Retreat health centre shifted from a culture that emphasised hierarchy, authority, command and control to one that established a greater sense of cohesion, shared vision, open communication, appreciation, respect, fairness and accountability. Transformation of organisational culture was possible through a participatory process that focused on the leadership style, communication and building relationships by means of CVA and feedback, 360-degree LVA, feedback and coaching and action learning in a co-operative inquiry group.

  18. How to change organisational culture: Action research in a South African public sector primary care facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sa, Angela; Christodoulou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Organisational culture is a key factor in both patient and staff experience of the healthcare services. Patient satisfaction, staff engagement and performance are related to this experience. The department of health in the Western Cape espouses a values-based culture characterised by caring, competence, accountability, integrity, responsiveness and respect. However, transformation of the existing culture is required to achieve this vision. Aim To explore how to transform the organisational culture in line with the desired values. Setting Retreat Community Health Centre, Cape Town, South Africa. Methods Participatory action research with the leadership engaged with action and reflection over a period of 18 months. Change in the organisational culture was measured at baseline and after 18 months by means of a cultural values assessment (CVA) survey. The three key leaders at the health centre also completed a 360-degree leadership values assessment (LVA) and had 6 months of coaching. Results Cultural entropy was reduced from 33 to 13% indicating significant transformation of organisational culture. The key driver of this transformation was change in the leadership style and functioning. Retreat health centre shifted from a culture that emphasised hierarchy, authority, command and control to one that established a greater sense of cohesion, shared vision, open communication, appreciation, respect, fairness and accountability. Conclusion Transformation of organisational culture was possible through a participatory process that focused on the leadership style, communication and building relationships by means of CVA and feedback, 360-degree LVA, feedback and coaching and action learning in a co-operative inquiry group. PMID:27608671

  19. Organizational culture in public institutions and its impact in the process of implementation of total quality management (case of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.Sc. Ilir Rexhepi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management (TQM is a management philosophy and approach, whose importance is growing evermore after the 90s. Kosovo's public institutions for a short time now organise activities as part of an independent state and as such they are facing ahead management challenges which are becoming more acute and in the framework of the EU integration processes. Total Quality Management in public institutions, is preceded by establishment and implementation phase ISO 9001 systems. In this paper we tried that through an empirical study in three public institutions of Kosovo, evidence the factors that facilitate or impede timely and successful implementation of quality systems and therefore of TQM. Moreover, we will concentrate on organizational culture. Analysis on the norms, beliefs, principles that characterize the organizational culture of Kosovo institutions and furthermore intertwined with the Law on Public Administration and the political context, will serve to shape the changes that need to be designed to proceed to successful implementation of TQM. In function of the analysis of impeding factors, elements of organizational culture as well as modeling the changes there will be used a number of interviews and questionnaires.

  20. Designing and Implementing the Model of Public Assessment of Social and Cultural Progress in Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khaje Sarvi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Implementing Investigations, analyzes and performance measurements in special and qualitative social/cultural arena in our country, needs local and special methodologies. Thus the aim of present article is investigating these issues: the concept of culture, classification of cultural organizations in Islamic Republic of Iran, the Pyramidal structure of cultural hierarchy, the process of development and mutual influences of institutions, reviewing related literature of policy making in cultural issues, compatibility of strategies to existing realities in cultural performance structure, double division in measures and analyzing and elaborating suggested measures in elaborating weighting model and assessment method and investigating progress measures by focusing on Islamic-Iranian pattern of progress and investigating the effects of implementing this pattern plus weighting method and using related measures and studying some university cases which are implemented in three phases in universities and high education centers overall the country. This research has shown a linear model by considering weighting coefficients.

  1. History of a modern place: Clorindo Testa and the Santa Rosa Civic Center, La Pampa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Costa Cabral

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Santa Rosa, capital of the young province of La Pampa, was founded in 1892 at the end of the military campaigns that annihilated the indigenous people and ensured republican control over the Patagonia region. In 1955, the city held a design competition for the construction of its Civic Center. This was not a current infill operation intended to renew the core of the city, since it was not just a matter of raising a new facade along one of the four sides of the main square. The task implied designing, almost from scratch, a new part of city. Competitors were supposed to organize new buildings and public spaces within an area of nine hectares standing between the existing city and the surrounding pampas. Clorindo Testa won the competition by proposing that it be built as a piece of a modern city. Situated in the middle of Argentinean pampas, the Santa Rosa Civic Center has been less extensively discussed than other of Testa’s great contemporary works, such as the London Bank (1959 and the National Library (1962, both in Buenos Aires, even in the South American context. The Government Building, the Bus Station and the covered central space were built before 1963. Testa finished the Legislature Building in 1976, and even though in 2006 he was able to conclude the little Legislature Library, half of the Civic Center area still remains as open space. Nevertheless, as a living piece of the never-completed modern project installed in the far south, La Pampa’s case seems to pose relevant urban questions. This paper explores the case from two complementary perspectives. One focuses on the results of the first competition, recognizing an original contribution to the relationship between modernity, monument, and place. The second discusses the unfinished condition of the Civic Center as constitutive to modern tradition in the very modern sense of the city as a never-completed work.

  2. Levers supporting program evaluation culture and capacity in Romanian public administration: The role of leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Mora; Raluca Antonie

    2012-01-01

    Program evaluation culture and capacity is at the very beginning of its development in Romania. In this article we highlight one of the fundamental, but not always obvious, connections that support sustainable evaluation culture and capacity building and development: the link between leadership and program evaluation. If properly used, program evaluation results can be a strong instrument in leadership, just as leadership can fundamentally encourage the development of evaluation culture and c...

  3. A Cross-Context Analysis of Civic Engagement Linking CIVED and U.S: Census Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Torney-Purta

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates direct and indirect family, peer, school, and neighborhood effects on adolescents’ civic engagement utilizing data from the 1999 IEA Civic Education Study and the U.S. Census. The nationally representative sample consists of 2,729 students from 119 schools in the U.S. Multi-level regression techniques provide precise estimates of the separate and shared impact of each context on adolescents’ civic engagement. Individual students’ civic experiences and discourse in school and at home predict higher civic engagement, although the effects of these experiences vary based on the larger school and neighborhood contexts. Overall, interactive effects indicate that students who may traditionally be deemed at a disadvantage (either because of poor school or neighborhood conditions experience more benefits from increases in civic learning opportunities than do more advantaged students. Suggestions are made for secondary analyses of ICCS (the IEA civic education study of 2009.

  4. Consuming America : A Data-Driven Analysis of the United States as a Reference Culture in Dutch Public Discourse on Consumer Goods, 1890-1990

    OpenAIRE

    Wevers, M.J.H.F.

    2017-01-01

    Consuming America offers a data-driven, longitudinal analysis of the historical dynamics that have underpinned a long-term, layered cultural-historical process: the emergence of the United States as a dominant reference culture in Dutch public discourse on consumer goods between 1890 and 1990. The ideas, values, and practices associated with the United States in public discourse remained relatively steady over time, which might explain the country’s longevity as a reference culture and its po...

  5. Does community participation set the local press agenda? A view on deliberative and civic practices in the Portuguese press

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Gil Baptista

    2013-01-01

    What are journalists’ perceptions of the citizen’s role in democratic life? What is the role that journalists attribute to the public in the construction of the news agenda? The main goal of this study is to investigate the relationship between the local press, citizens and civic practices. It takes as starting point a dual theoretical approach, the theory of deliberative democracy and the public journalism movement, to assess the scope of the concept of “deliberative journalism.” Under the a...

  6. Civic Participation and Self-rated Health: A Cross-national Multi-level Analysis Using the World Value Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saerom Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Civic participation, that which directly influences important decisions in our personal lives, is considered necessary for developing a society. We hypothesized that civic participation might be related to self-rated health status. Methods: We constructed a multi-level analysis using data from the World Value Survey (44 countries, n=50 859. Results: People who participated in voting and voluntary social activities tended to report better subjective health than those who did not vote or participate in social activities, after controlling for socio-demographic factors at the individual level. A negative association with unconventional political activity and subjective health was found, but this effect disappeared in a subset analysis of only the 18 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD countries. Moreover, social participation and unconventional political participation had a statistically significant contextual association with subjective health status, but this relationship was not consistent throughout the analysis. In the analysis of the 44 countries, social participation was of borderline significance, while in the subset analysis of the OECD countries unconventional political participation was a stronger determinant of subjective health. The democratic index was a significant factor in determining self-rated health in both analyses, while public health expenditure was a significant factor in only the subset analysis. Conclusions: Despite the uncertainty of its mechanism, civic participation might be a significant determinant of the health status of a country.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION: CASE STUDY OF 5 MUNICIPALITIES IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

    OpenAIRE

    Sabahudin Jašarević; Džeraldina Miličević; Safet Brdarević; Samir Lemeš

    2017-01-01

    Public administration is classified into a specific organizational form that follows the development of all civilizations. Today, more than ever, we deal with creating a new model of public administration. The reform of public administration intends to achieve the model adjusted to the needs of society, based on lawful solutions, and real conditions. The EU integration process puts a pressure on public administration to deliver better service, with more and more demands to increase the skills...

  8. Socio-cultural innovation through and by public libraries in disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Denmark: concepts and practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delica, Kristian Nagel; Elbeshausen, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Our paper describes three examples of how public libraries in at-risk-neighbourhoods have worked with social innovations in order to develop and strengthen their services for minority groups. The libraries were chosen because they are frontrunners in the field of cultural diversity...... in workshops and evaluations of development projects in public libraries. Analysis. We examine different library services adopting theories of “Innovation Communities” and “Integrated Area Development”, which both represent a locally based approach to conceptual development and social transformation. Results...... and different the particular conditions of library services to minority groups are and how slowly conceptual changes and innovation processes took place. As a main result, we present libraries in at-risk-communities as a cultural institution with a social responsibility and suggest a new concept entitled...

  9. 75 FR 20009 - Development of NRC's Safety Culture Policy Statement: Cancellation of Public Workshops Scheduled...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... included the development of the safety culture common terminology effort comprised of: (1) Development of a... alignment on the safety culture common terminology effort. The NRC held the first workshop on February 2-4... of individual industry groups, such as, [[Page 20010

  10. Digital Forensics and Born-Digital Content in Cultural Heritage Collections. CLIR Publication No. 149

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Matthew G.; Ovenden, Richard; Redwine, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is twofold: first, to introduce the field of digital forensics to professionals in the cultural heritage sector; and second, to explore some particular points of convergence between the interests of those charged with collecting and maintaining born-digital cultural heritage materials and those charged with collecting…

  11. Neoliberalism, Corporate Culture, and the Promise of Higher Education: The University as a Democratic Public Sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the corrosive effects of corporate culture on the academy and society, arguing that neoliberal discourses of privatization and commercialization reduce citizenship to self-interest. Maintains that corporate culture ignores social injustices while emphasizing unfettered market forces, threatening understanding of democracy and the meaning…

  12. The American lawn revisited: awareness education and culture as public policies toward sustainable lawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoqi Zhang; Bin Zheng; Ge Sun; Peilei Fan Fan

    2015-01-01

    Lawn has been used for landscaping, gardening, and beautification of homes and cities for a long time. The evolution of the lawn reflects important cultural and biophysical interactions between humans and nature. The American lawn, which was from Europe and has been a part of the American dream for home ownership and culture, has become an area going against nature for...

  13. Japan: The Modernization of an Ancient Culture. Series on Public Issues No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolken, Lawrence C.

    This booklet, one of a series of booklets intended to apply economic principles to major social and political issues of the day, traces the modernization of the ancient culture of Japan. Four major areas are covered: (1) "An Ancient Culture" covers the period from the first settling of Japan through the Heian period, the medieval ages,…

  14. Moral and political feelings in civic education in Colombia: attributes and stigmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieta Quintero Mejía

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17227/01234870.39folios137.147 The processes of civic education have been focused on the strengthening of the cognitive path of morals, which has led to locating moral and political feelings in a restricted place. This allows us to understand, to a considerable extent, the reasons for which we have valued these feelings as vital for our political and moral life. Because of this, feelings such as empathy, solidarity, indignation, among others, have been stripped of their intersubjective nature and been pushed back into the field of irrationality. In order to account for this, this article presents some attributes and stigmas of feelings in the process of civic education. To this aim, scholarly texts are analysed (1800, to be exact, and the results of interviews with members of educational institutions in four Colombian departments affected by the Colombian armed conflict are given. We consider that the meaning of the public, the processes of socialisation, subjectivity, as well as our forms of collective action, are motivated, in some way, by feelings which trigger rejection/indifference; resistance/apathy when faced with situations where our rights are violated.

  15. Politics as a Vocation: Prayer, Civic Engagement and the Gendered Re-Enchantment of the City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Duffuor

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Drawing upon extensive oral history interviews and long scale participantobservation in two London churches, an ethnically diverse Catholic parish inCanning Town and a predominantly West-African Pentecostal congregationin Peckham, this article compares and contrasts differing Christian expressionsand understandings of ‘civic engagement’ and gendered articulations of laysocial ‘ministry’ through prayer, religious praxis and local politics. Throughcommunity organizing and involvement in the third sector, but also throughspiritual activities like the ‘Catholic Prayer Ministry’ and ‘deliverance’, Catholicsand Pentecostals are shown to be re-mapping London – a city ripe for reversemission – through contesting ‘secularist’ and implicitly gendered distinctionsbetween the public and private/domestic, and the spiritual and political. Greaterscholarly appreciation of these subjective understandings of civic engagementand social activism is important for fully recognizing the agency of lay people,and particularly women often marginalized in church-based and institutionalhierarchies, in articulating and actuating their call to Christian citizenship andthe (resacralization of the city.

  16. Contested embryonic culture in Japan--public discussion, and human embryonic stem cell research in an aging welfare society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the reasons for the lack of a broad discussion on bioethical regulation of human embryonic stem cell research (hESR) in Japan and asks why scientists experience difficulties accessing resources for hESR despite the acclaimed indifference of dominant Japanese culture to embryo research. The article shows how various social actors express their views on the embryo and oocyte donation in terms of dominant Japanese culture, foiled against what is regarded as Western culture. Second, it shows how the lack of concern with hESR should be understood in the context of public health policies and communications and bioethics decision making in Japan. Finally, it interprets the meaning of the embryo in the context of Japan as an aging modern welfare society, explaining how policymakers have come to emphasize the urgency of infertility problems over issues around abortion and embryonic life.

  17. How to change organisational culture: Action research in a South African public sector primary care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Mash

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organisational culture is a key factor in both patient and staff experience of the healthcare services. Patient satisfaction, staff engagement and performance are related to this experience. The department of health in the Western Cape espouses a values-based culture characterised by caring, competence, accountability, integrity, responsiveness and respect. However, transformation of the existing culture is required to achieve this vision. Aim: To explore how to transform the organisational culture in line with the desired values. Setting: Retreat Community Health Centre, Cape Town, South Africa. Methods: Participatory action research with the leadership engaged with action and reflection over a period of 18 months. Change in the organisational culture was measured at baseline and after 18 months by means of a cultural values assessment (CVA survey. The three key leaders at the health centre also completed a 360-degree leadership values assessment (LVA and had 6 months of coaching. Results: Cultural entropy was reduced from 33 to 13% indicating significant transformation of organisational culture. The key driver of this transformation was change in the leadership style and functioning. Retreat health centre shifted from a culture that emphasised hierarchy, authority, command and control to one that established a greater sense of cohesion, shared vision, open communication, appreciation, respect, fairness and accountability. Conclusion: Transformation of organisational culture was possible through a participatory process that focused on the leadership style, communication and building relationships by means of CVA and feedback, 360-degree LVA, feedback and coaching and action learning in a co-operative inquiry group.

  18. Human Rights and Peace Education in the Lebanese Civics Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuayb, Maha

    2015-01-01

    In 1997 the Lebanese government published its newly developed curriculum and textbooks following a long and fierce civil war, which started in 1975. The new curriculum emphasized nation building, reconciliation and citizenship. This study aims to examine how the civics textbooks in Lebanon addressed human rights and peace education, both of which…

  19. Comparative Perspectives on Political Socialization and Civic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torney-Purta, Judith

    2000-01-01

    Four books, published 1997-99, draw on diverse disciplines in 18 countries to examine the meaning of civic identity and the contributions of formal and informal institutions to it during late childhood and adolescence. The books move beyond a narrow view of outcomes and inputs of political socialization to encompass activist social movements and…

  20. Interactive Performance as a Means of Civic Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossitto, Chiara; Normark, Maria; Barkhuus, Louise

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of an interactive performance that was produced and designed to encourage civic engagement and reflection in relation to the social tensions in a low-income suburb, mostly inhabited by people with immigrant backgrounds. The technological setup in the performance...

  1. Experiental Civic Learning by using "Projekt: Aktive Bürger"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Koopmann

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Various social and political developments seem to sum up to a process of 'de-civilization' which impede - rather than facilitate - the project of a humane and democratic society. In order to make this project a successful one it is necessary to reclaim citizens as politically acting subjects. The ability to act as enlightened and autonomous citizens will be sustainably acquired by experiencing extensive participation in society and in politics. Civic education should foster this process of 'revi-talization of citizenship' by offering youth meaningful participatory experiences of social and po-litical relevance. That is: Civic education should create, organize and offer learning strategies that are oriented towards the notion of reflective acting as experiential learning. Experiential learning processes, aimed at the sustainable acquisition of competencies which are relevant in politics and civil society, will particularly unfold in the course of the (interactive dealing of the individual(s with the authentic political and social problems and processes that surround and concern them. This also includes reflection and co-operation. One example of how to practice an experiential and prob-lem-centred learning strategy is well being demonstrated by the civic education program "Projekt: Aktive Bürger", the German adaptation of "We the People ... Project Citizen" designed by the American Center for Civic Education.

  2. Pieces of Civic Intelligence: Towards a Capacities Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Civic intelligence is the capacity of collectivities--from small informal groups to humanity as a whole--to equitably and effectively address important shared problems such as poverty, bioterrorism, and natural disasters. It's an abstract concept that can be expressed in policy, art, demonstrations, or conversation. In this article, civic…

  3. Political Microcultures: Linking Civic Life and Democratic Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    At the core of democratic citizenship is deliberation: citizens' tendency and capacity for debating issues of common importance. This study considers civic organizations--often found to be political mobilizers--as political microcultures: environments for political discourse that structure participants' understanding of the practice of…

  4. The Varieties of Adult Civic Engagement in Adult Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Linda; Wrigley, Heide Spruck

    2012-01-01

    Civic engagement, or the practice of democratic deliberation in adult education and learning, asks that adults use their experiences to cooperatively build solutions to the difficult social, economic, and political problems that affect their lives and communities now and into the future. The articles presented in this issue look at the…

  5. Embodied Civic Education: The Corporeality of a Civil Body Politic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Donna Paoletti

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the lived experience of democratic civic education for middle school students. Grounded in the tradition of hermeneutic phenomenology as guided by Heidegger (1962), Gadamer (1960/2003), Casey (1993), and Levinas (1961/2004), among others, the framework for conducting action-sensitive research, as described by van Manen (2003),…

  6. Adolescents' Civic and Organizational Activity: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashkevich, O. V.; Slavgorodskaia, E. L.

    1995-01-01

    Reports on the attitudes of 175 Russian adolescents and their teachers toward civic and community service activities. Argues that economic and social crises have created negative attitudes towards community service. Finds that students who are involved in community activities are more optimistic. (CFR)

  7. Music Preferences and Civic Activism of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ambrose; Kier, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between music preferences and civic activism among 182 participants aged 14-24 years. Our analyses show that participants who regularly listened to certain music genres such as classical, opera, musicals, new age, easy listening, house, world music, heavy metal, punk, and ska were significantly more likely to…

  8. One Hen: Teaching Elementary-Level Economics for Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Annie McMahon

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is a qualitative case study focused on describing and analyzing the student and teacher experience with One Hen, a project-based learning unit specifically designed to teach civic engagement. In this study I address three questions: 1) Do fifth-grade students' knowledge and skills in economics change after participating in a…

  9. Civic Engagement and Gentrification Issues in Metropolitan Baltimore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durington, Matthew; Maddox, Camee; Ruhf, Adrienne; Gass, Shana; Schwermer, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Since the fall of 2006 a number of Towson University students concentrating in the discipline of anthropology have been part of a civic engagement and service-learning project focusing on an historic African-American community in Baltimore. While the focus of the research project concentrates on the processes of gentrification, individual student…

  10. Shaping Students' Civic Commitments: The Influence of College Cocurricular Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolian, Teniell L.; Barnhardt, Cassie L.

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on social capital theory, this study examines the extent to which several college cocurricular involvement experiences during college contribute to students' civic commitments toward social and political involvement at the end of college. Results are based on longitudinal data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education and…

  11. Civic Ecology: Linking Social and Ecological Approaches in Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasny, Marianne E.; Tidball, Keith G.

    2010-01-01

    Civic ecology refers to the philosophy and science of community forestry, community gardening, watershed enhancement, and other volunteer-driven restoration practices in cities and elsewhere. Such practices, although often viewed as initiatives to improve a degraded environment, also foster social attributes of resilient social-ecological systems,…

  12. Inter-religious dialogue in schools: A pedagogical and civic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social and civic conflict inspired by the fundamental convictions of different religious groups seems to be rife all over the world, also in schools. One way of addressing this problem is to promote interreligious dialogue. To establish the viability of this solution, the authors take several steps. They analyze the phenomenon ...

  13. Civic initiatives in the context of legal uncertainty

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gregor, M.; Smith, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2013), s. 36-62 ISSN 0951-6298 Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : civic initiatives * direct democracy * referendum Subject RIV: AD - Politology ; Political Science s Impact factor: 0.840, year: 2013 http://jtp.sagepub.com/content/25/1/36.abstract

  14. What Do We Mean by Science Education for Civic Engagement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, John L.; Horibe, Shusaku

    2016-01-01

    One of the most frequently cited goals for science education over the years has been to provide students with the understanding and skills necessary to engage in science-related civic issues. Despite the repeated insistence on the importance of this kind of democratic participation, there has been little effort in the research community either to…

  15. De los Derechos Humanos: Reimagining Civics in Bilingual & Bicultural Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Melissa Leigh

    2017-01-01

    Dominant approaches to teaching social studies often marginalize bilingual and bicultural students. This is particularly troubling because the explicit goal of the social studies is to cultivate civic participation. Educational inequalities are thus tied to political inequalities. In light of this, this article shares a narrative case study of the…

  16. Civic Engagement and the Arts and Humanities: An Australian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    An Australian scholar in the Arts and Humanities responds to recent US models emphasizing civic-engaged learning as a way to renew the humanities in undergraduate education. Policy contexts and curriculum initiatives of kindred trends in recent Australian undergraduate education in the humanities are contrasted in this essay. The Australian…

  17. Listening to the Voices of Civically Engaged High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preus, Betty; Payne, Rachel; Wick, Carly; Glomski, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This study examines why a group of students representing two high schools became involved in an activist organization, the benefits they gained as a result, the impact they had on their school and community, and their recommendations for how school personnel can foster civic engagement in young people. The student-led group campaigned for a school…

  18. Emancipating migrant women? Gendered civic integration in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirk, K.M.; Suvarierol, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the Dutch civic integration policy is the emancipation of migrant women. Emancipation herein implies both the ability to make choices about one's personal life and participation in the labour market. However, the content and implementation of the programme fails to meet

  19. Chapter 8: The "Citizen" in Youth Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roholt, Ross VeLure; Hildreth, R. W.; Baizerman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The concept of citizenship is a central, necessary, and defining feature of youth civic engagement. Any effort to educate young people for citizenship entails an implicit idea of what a "good citizen" is. There are a number of different and sometimes competing versions of what is a "good citizen." This chapter reviews "standard" accounts of…

  20. Fault Lines in Our Democracy: Civic Knowledge, Voting Behavior, and Civic Engagement in the United States. Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Richard J.; Sum, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    As the 21st century unfolds, the United States faces historic challenges, including a struggling economy, an aging infrastructure and global terrorism. Solutions will have to come from educated, skilled citizens who understand and believe in our democratic system and are civically engaged. This incisive new report examines these fault lines and…

  1. Teens, Video Games, and Civics: Teens' Gaming Experiences Are Diverse and Include Significant Social Interaction and Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Amanda; Kahne, Joseph; Middaugh, Ellen; Macgill, Alexandra Rankin; Evans, Chris; Vitak, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Video games provide a diverse set of experiences and related activities and are part of the lives of almost all teens in America. To date, most video game research has focused on how games impact academic and social outcomes (particularly aggression). There has also been some exploration of the relationship between games and civic outcomes, but as…

  2. 77 FR 75443 - Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for Public Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ... personal and organizational characteristics are present in a positive safety culture. A characteristic, in this case, is a pattern of thinking, feeling, and behaving that emphasizes safety, particularly in goal...

  3. Study on Significant Mechanisms of Maintenance Culture Among Public Building Users in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Binti Rusli Ezzatul Aifa; Othuman Mydin Md Azree; Abdullah Shardy

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia, a country in Asia, is a fast-growing developing country in its construction so as to fulfil the demands of today. Many buildings, infrastructures and facilities were constructed; however, the necessary support required after construction was disregarded. Maintenance is the key for the system, and culture is the main point of attitude and behaviour towards the maintenance culture. Becoming one of the first class infrastructures in the world is the vision that Malaysia is striving to ...

  4. GAP-REACH: a checklist to assess comprehensive reporting of race, ethnicity, and culture in psychiatric publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Raggio, Greer A; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Duan, Naihua; Marcus, Sue; Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Humensky, Jennifer; Becker, Anne E; Alarcón, Renato D; Oquendo, María A; Hansen, Helena; Like, Robert C; Weiss, Mitchell; Desai, Prakash N; Jacobsen, Frederick M; Foulks, Edward F; Primm, Annelle; Lu, Francis; Kopelowicz, Alex; Hinton, Ladson; Hinton, Devon E

    2013-10-01

    Growing awareness of health and health care disparities highlights the importance of including information about race, ethnicity, and culture (REC) in health research. Reporting of REC factors in research publications, however, is notoriously imprecise and unsystematic. This article describes the development of a checklist to assess the comprehensiveness and the applicability of REC factor reporting in psychiatric research publications. The 16-item GAP-REACH checklist was developed through a rigorous process of expert consensus, empirical content analysis in a sample of publications (N = 1205), and interrater reliability (IRR) assessment (N = 30). The items assess each section in the conventional structure of a health research article. Data from the assessment may be considered on an item-by-item basis or as a total score ranging from 0% to 100%. The final checklist has excellent IRR (κ = 0.91). The GAP-REACH may be used by multiple research stakeholders to assess the scope of REC reporting in a research article.

  5. Small groups, contexts, and civic engagement: A multilevel analysis of United States Congregational Life Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Andrew L; Stroope, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    Prior research suggests that church-goers are more civically engaged than their non-church-going counterparts. Little is known, however, about how the popular phenomenon of small groups factors into this equation. In the present study, we examine relationships between small group participation at individual and congregation levels and civic engagement. Using multilevel modeling and national data on congregations and individuals from the U.S. Congregational Life Study (n=82,044), we find that: (1) individual-level small group involvement is associated with four measures of civic engagement; (2) congregation-level small group participation is associated with both lower and higher civic engagement in the case of two outcomes; and (3) in the case of three civic outcomes, congregation-level small group participation moderates individual-level small group involvement such that small group members' civic activity more closely resembles the lower civic engagement of small group nonparticipants. In the case of one civic outcome, at high levels of overall small group participation, small group members' civic engagement drops below that of small group nonparticipants. Explanations for these findings, including a "crowding out" effect, are examined including their complex implications for debates regarding small groups, religious involvement, and civic engagement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Intersection of Emotional and Sociocognitive Competencies with Civic Engagement in Middle Childhood and Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Aaron; Alvis, Lauren M; Oosterhoff, Benjamin; Babskie, Elizabeth; Syvertsen, Amy; Wray-Lake, Laura

    2018-03-23

    Civic developmental theory anticipates connections between normative developmental competencies and civic engagement, but little previous research has directly studied such links. The current study sought to contribute to civic development theory by examining associations between emotional and sociocognitive competencies (empathy, emotion regulation, prosocial moral reasoning, future-orientation) and civic engagement (volunteering, informal helping, political behaviors and beliefs, environmental behaviors, social responsibility values, civic skills). Data came from a geographically and racially diverse sample of 2467 youth (M age  = 13.4, Range: 8-20 years, 56% female). The results indicated that empathy and future-orientation significantly predicted nearly all forms of civic engagement, whereas emotion regulation and prosocial moral reasoning were uniquely associated with specific forms of civic engagement. Exploratory multi-group models indicated that empathy and emotion regulation were more strongly associated with civic engagement among younger youth and prosocial moral reasoning and future-orientation were more strongly related to civic engagement among older youth. The findings help to advance developmental theory of youth civic engagement.

  7. Deploying culture as a defence against incompetence: The unconscious dynamics of public service work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peliwe P. Mnguni

    2012-01-01

    Research purpose: This article employs social defense theory to explore manifestations of anxiety and defense within South African public service organisations. Motivation for the study: Dominant discourse on public service institutions over-relies on political, sociological and public administration theories and tends to ignore psychosocial explanations. Further, whilst the psychodynamics of social service work are generally understood, the unconscious dynamics of generic public service work remain under-theorised. Research design, approach and method: This conceptual article draws on my personal observations as a reflective citizen and experiences as a consultant to government departments. Main findings: Herein, an argument is advanced that the deployment of ill-qualified party loyalists to key positions in the public service is perverse: it serves as a collective defense against the impossible aspects of the task at hand. The appointees, in turn, deploy organisational processes to defend against feelings of incompetence and the inevitability of failure. This practice, coupled with acute resource constraints, sets up front line staff for scapegoating. Practical/managerial implications: An appreciation of the multiple meanings of public service work and the defensive role played by public institutions stands to inform purposeful change towards sustainable public service organisational practice. Contribution/value-add: The discussion seeks to contribute to attempts that employ systems psychodynamics to make sense of anxiety and defense within organisations in general and public service institutions in particular.

  8. The role of public libraries in culture-led urban regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skot-Hansen, Dorte; Hvenegaard, Casper; Jochumsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this article is to present a research project on public libraries in urban development focusing on how libraries contribute to culture‐led urban regeneration as icons, placemakers and community vitalization. Design/methodology/approach – The research project is based...... implications – The article provides a framework for development of strategies and legitimization for public libraries and a point of departure for the discussion of the library's contribution to urban development. Originality/value – This is the first public presentation of the findings of the results...... of the research project Public Libraries in Urban Development – Creativity, Innovation and Experience outside the Nordic countries....

  9. The Influence of Organisational Culture on Mainstreaming Monitoring and Evaluation in Public Entities Revenue Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sebedi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research informs us that most of the problems confronting governments can be traced to their inability and failure to appropriately analyze and evaluate organizational culture. This article argues that there is a direct link between organizational culture, organizational performance, as well as monitoring and evaluation. Understanding the effect that organizational culture has, is a significant factor of good governance. The importance of a strong organizational culture together with effective monitoring and evaluation processes contribute appreciably towards efficient performance and effective service delivery. Yet mainstreaming monitoring and evaluation in government departments and entities is often met with varying challenges. Such challenges can be better understood and addressed through aligning the entities’ organizational culture to government’s monitoring and evaluation initiatives. The focus of the article is on responding to the pertinent question: what are the current challenges relative to implementation and how should they be addressed? The article will thus highlight some of the key challenges that are associated with organizational culture, which have direct impact on the mainstreaming of monitoring and evaluation.

  10. Waste Oriented Innovation Culture-Transparency-Public Trust Cycle : Success Key for Nuclear Facility Management in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susetyo Hario Putero; Haryono B Santosa

    2007-01-01

    Radioactive matter that is a primary material in a nuclear facility, including nuclear power generation, is a part of hazardous materials. Its existence will lead a controversy, although the precise management system for handling it is available. Public sometimes reject the nuclear technology due to the lack of understanding and wrong perception on that technology, especially the radioactive waste treatment. So, strategies should be designed for correcting public perception, until public acceptance on utilization of nuclear technology in Indonesia increase. The innovation development on radioactive waste management was studied by observing and interviewing managements and operators of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Japan. The constructing of concept was based on study result. Based on assumption that the current state of the radioactive waste treatment is suitable and there is serious improvement of technology, therefore systematic and precise oriented corrective efforts of public perception could be done. Transparency, intensive communication, and public participation that show responsible action for emerging mutual trust are basic of strategy that should be developed. High level public acceptance on utilization of nuclear technology is expected to be able for stimulating and supporting sustainable technology innovation culture. (author)

  11. Global Trends in Civic and Citizenship Education: What are the Lessons for Nation States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry J. Kennedy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Civic and citizenship education is a component of the school curriculum in all nation states. The form it takes, its purposes and the way in which it is implemented differs from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The pressures of globalization in recent times have meant that citizenship has increasingly come to be seen in global terms brought about by processes such as transnational migration, the homogenization of cultural practices and the development of supranational groupings that often seem to challenge more local versions of citizenship. Despite these pressures, the key responsibility for citizenship continues to rest with nation states. This paper will review issues relating to a more globalized citizenship and outline the strategies that nation states might adopt to ensure they remain capable of creating an active and engaged citizenship.

  12. The resilience of citizenship traditions: Civic integration in Germany, Great Britain and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Per

    2013-01-01

    Many western European states are adopting integration and naturalization policies that focus on the practices, values and identities of citizenship. On this background, and given the combined crisis of multiculturalism and decline of old-school ethno-nationalism, it has been argued that national......, cultural–ideological distinctiveness matters less for what is traditionally the heartland of national sovereignty and identity. A comparison of three citizenship/integration trajectories – Germany, Great Britain and Denmark – suggests that the thesis of liberal convergence must be qualified. Although...... occurring in civic and liberal registers, national citizenship policies still reflect continuities, and path-dependent reactions to such continuities, of culturally bounded nation states. Germany’s development reflects a republican normalization, facilitated by reunification, but also a distinct liberal...

  13. Public Relations: The Route to Success and Influence. Public Relations for Your Library: A Tool for Effective Communications; Tooting Your Own Horn: Web-Based Public Relations for the School Media Specialist; Bookmarks as a Teaching Tool; Customers and Culture: The Who and What of Library Public Relations Efforts; Strategies for Successful Job Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Linda; Silverstein, Roberta; Fisher, Julieta Dias; Hill, Ann; Hegel, Claudette; Miller, Donna; Moyer, Mary

    2002-01-01

    This special section includes five articles that discuss public relations strategies for school librarians. Highlights include effective communication, including measuring and evaluating the success of public relations efforts; Web-based public relations; giving bookmarks to students; customers and cultural contexts; and successful job…

  14. Publicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Joan

    Publicity for preschool cooperatives is described. Publicity helps produce financial support for preschool cooperatives. It may take the form of posters, brochures, newsletters, open house, newspaper coverage, and radio and television. Word of mouth and general good will in the community are the best avenues of publicity that a cooperative nursery…

  15. Public Perception of Climate Change: The Importance of Knowledge and Cultural Worldviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Visschers, Vivianne H M; Siegrist, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The importance of knowledge for lay people's climate change concerns has been questioned in recent years, as it had been suggested that cultural values are stronger predictors of concern about climate change than knowledge. Studies that simultaneously measured knowledge related to climate change and cultural values have, however, been missing. We conducted a mail survey in the German-speaking part of Switzerland (N = 1,065). Results suggested that cultural worldviews and climate-related knowledge were significantly related with people's concern about climate change. Also, cultural worldviews and climate-relevant knowledge appeared important for people's willingness to change behaviors and to accept climate change policies. In addition, different types of knowledge were found to have different impacts on people's concern about climate change, their willingness to change behaviors, and their acceptance of policies about climate change. Specifically, causal knowledge significantly increased concern about climate change and willingness to support climate-friendly policies. We therefore concluded that risk communication should focus on causal knowledge, provided this knowledge does not threaten cultural values. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  16. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  17. Political culture, the dimensions of exercising citizenship and the participation in public life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celene Tonella

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to think about the elements of exercising citizenship, of political culture and of subjective values that influence political phenomena. The relationship between cultural values and political dynamics still constitutes a controversial issue among political scientists, yet, increasing links between the variables can be perceived. Authors such as Putnam (2000 and Moses (2010 emphasize the importance of the attitudes of the citizenry. The analysis is based on data collected by a survey (2010 conducted with the population of three cities that constitute the so-called urban sprawl of the Metropolitan Region of Maringá: Sarandi, Paiçandu and Maringá. Classical themes were presented in researches on political culture, as well as controversial issues such as the decriminalization of marijuana, the legalization of abortion, among others.

  18. Classroom and School Predictors of Civic Engagement Among Black and Latino Middle School Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagers, Robert J; Lozada, Fantasy T; Rivas-Drake, Deborah; Guillaume, Casta

    2017-07-01

    This study used short-term longitudinal data to examine the contributions of democratic teaching practices (e.g., the Developmental Designs approach) and equitable school climate to civic engagement attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors among 515 Black and Latino middle school students (47.9% male). Concurrent experiences of democratic homeroom and classroom practices, and equitable school climate were associated with higher scores on each civic engagement component. The relation between classroom practices and civic attitudes was more robust when school climate was seen as more equitable. Longitudinally, homeroom practices and equitable school climate predicted higher civic attitudes 1 year later. Discussion focuses on civic attitudes and future research on school experiences that support civic engagement among youth of color. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  19. Social and Cultural Identity Pendekatan Face Negotation Theory dan Public Relations Multikulturalism Negara Jerman-China dan Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasrun Hidayat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research examines the focus of social identity and cultural identity of individuals between states of Germany, China and Indonesia. Building a sense of one's cultural identity is comprised of various identities that are interconnected with face negotiation theory perspective. Research constructive significance intersubjective phenomenology with qualitative constructivist paradigm. The study found that the inter-state identity constructed in a different manner. Germany builds social identity because of the role of government not of the family. Germany does not take into account the family so that the identity of individual awakes more independent. Chinese social identity constructed by social status, stratum or class. China still sees a group of men as dominant and women as a minority. Socially constructed male identity as it is considered more capable than women. Social identity of opposites so that social structures are built are also different. Similarly, Indonesia, social identity is built almost the same as China, only differentiating factor lies in obedience to carry out the norms and values prevailing in the social strata. Indonesia and China still uphold the cultural dimension of collectivity than Germany Individual dimensions. Using multicultural Public Relations function approach finally be able to recognize the cultural identity of each country and each social identity

  20. Crisis Communication in the Spanish Public Administration: Organizational Culture and Empirical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Crespo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Catastrophes, earthquakes, pandemics, epidemic diseases, emergencies and the disruption of basic services are just a few of the unpredictable events which show how rapidly crises can develop and how important it is for governments and public administrations to manage their crisis communication effectively.Experience from national crises (the politics behind the Ebola crisis, Lorca earthquake, the neighborhood movement of Gamonal in Burgos, the unauthorized strike by air traffic controllers in 2010 or the train crash in Angrois shows that effective communication requires extensive preparation and this article presents one of the first empirical works on the crisis communication of public administrations in Spain.This research aims to describe the state of the practice of crisis communication in the different levels of the Spanish Public Administration (State, Autonomous Communities and municipalities, based on the perceptions of its workers. To achieve this objective, a poll study was developed, with references to crisis cases managed by the Spanish Public Administration.

  1. 75 FR 51825 - Quality and Compliance in Merging and Emerging Cultures; Public Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... announcing a public conference entitled ``The New Paradigm: Quality and Compliance in Merging and Emerging... accommodations because of a disability, please contact Wanda Neal, at least 7 days in advance of the conference...

  2. Speaking of public space: cultures and countercultures in the confrontation about street art

    OpenAIRE

    L. M. Visconti; L. Anderson; S. Borghini; J. F. Sherry Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, discussion about public space has been revitalized by the attention that street art has acquired in the media, public policy, social discussion, marketing strategies, and the arts (Borghini et al. forthcoming). Our multi-sited ethnography (Marcus 1995), primarily conducted in the States and Italy but expanded much beyond by means of extensive netnographic analysis (Kozinets 2002), accounts for this increasing and pervasive impact of street art. Among others, we observe media i...

  3. Quality management techniques in public sector organizations: the role of managerial autonomy and organizational culture

    OpenAIRE

    Demuzere, Sara; Verhoest, Koen; Bouckaert, Geert

    2008-01-01

    According to NPM, more effective and efficient public services can be delivered if public sector organizations are granted more managerial autonomy and if they use various (private sector) management techniques. To date, only very limited attention has been paid to the link between managerial autonomy and the use of management techniques. With this study, we seek to fill this gap in the extensive NPM literature by examining the extent to which managerial autonomy has an effect on the use of m...

  4. The Puerto Ricans: Culture Change and Language Deviance. Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology, Number 51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Ruby Rohrlich

    This anthropological study examines whether sociocultural factors are basic to the etiology of stuttering through (1) an investigation of the incidence of stuttering in a single ethnic group, Puerto Rican rural migrants living in two different cultural milieus (San Juan and New York City), and (2) a comparison of the sociocultural variables in the…

  5. Community based fish culture in the public and private floodplains of Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfuzul Haque, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal floodplains are water bodies that retain water for 5-6 months during which they are suitable to grow fish and other aquatic animals. Out of 2.8 million ha of medium and deep-flooded areas, about 1.5 million ha are estimated to be suitable for Community-Based Fish Culture (CBFC).

  6. Imagining Pedagogy in Public Space: Visions of Cultural Policies and Practices in a City in Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemeersch, Danny

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a research project completed with graduate students of the adult-education programme at the Leuven University in Flanders, Belgium. The research focused on cultural policies and practices in urban contexts that try to facilitate the learning of democratic citizenship in non-formal settings. In the first part we introduce some…

  7. Private View, Public Birth: Making Feminist Sense of the New Visual Culture of Childbirth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imogen Tyler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last three decades, there has been a dramatic increase in media representations of childbirth across a range of platforms: cinema, reality television and television drama, online video-sharing platforms, pornographic film, and in fine art practice. As yet, however, there is little feminist scholarship on the implications of this new and varied visual culture of childbirth and its relationship to earlier feminist debates about the cultural taboo against the representation of birth. This paper focuses on two contemporary sites: the growing phenomenon of 'childbirth reality TV' and the birthrites collection, a unique art collection in the UK dedicated to the subject of childbirth. We explore the meanings and implications of this new visual culture of birth, and the ways its reception is challenging earlier feminist conceptualisations of motherhood and the birthing body. In particular, we argue that these new popular and artistic representations of birth trouble accounts of the birthing body as abject, and what could be described as the 'abject aesthetics' that has dominated the visual representation of birth. In place of abjection, we conclude by arguing for a more thoroughly social and political account of the place of birth in contemporary culture, based on forms of 'natal thinking', which we suggest that the birthrites collection proposes.

  8. 78 FR 79057 - Public Notice; Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Treasures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ..., 1392-1910,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, are of cultural... also determine that the exhibition or display of the exhibit objects at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA, from on or about March 2, 2014, until on or about May 26, 2014; the Los Angeles County Museum...

  9. Cultural Relativism and the Discourse of Intercultural Communication: Aporias of Praxis in the Intercultural Public Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, John P.; MacDonald, Malcolm N.

    2007-01-01

    The premise of much intercultural communication pedagogy and research is to educate people from different cultures towards open and transformative positions of mutual understanding and respect. This discourse in the instance of its articulation realises and sustains Intercultural Communication epistemologically--as an academic field of social…

  10. 75 FR 76997 - Public Consultation on Personnel Reliability and Culture of Responsibility Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... recommendations in this regard and to develop specific guidance that reflects broad input from the scientific... institutional leadership for promoting biosecurity, personnel reliability, and a culture of responsibility; (2... on the meeting agenda, which can be accessed at http://www.biosecurityboard.gov . The meeting is open...

  11. Family ties and health cross-nationally: the contextualizing role of familistic culture and public pension spending in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Christine A

    2013-11-01

    Although previous research theorizes that cross-national variation in the relationship between family ties and health is due to nation-level differences in culture and policy/economics, no study has examined this theorization empirically. Using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), this study uses multilevel modeling to analyze individual-, nation-, and cross-level effects for 30,291 older adults in 14 nations. Family ties to spouses/partners and parents are associated with better health, but ties to coresident children are associated with poorer health in certain contexts. Familistic culture and public pension spending have a weak but statistically significant moderating effect on the relationship between intergenerational family ties and health. This article underscores the complexity of family and highlights the need for continued theorization and measurement at the nation level to promote older adults' health in diverse contexts.

  12. The Climate is A-Changin': Teaching Civic Competence for a Sustainable Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Carolyn A.; Kharecha, Pushker; Goble, Pam; Goble, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    A central aim of social studies curriculum is to prepare young people for making "informed and reasoned decisions for the public good" concerning consequential problems like global climate change. By developing students' "vision of a good society" and exploring what actions and policies move our society in this direction, social studies teachers have an important role in preparing students for a world undergoing enormous environmental change. This article discusses elementary curriculum connections between building students' knowledge and understanding about "their community, nation and world" and global climate change. It also suggests ideas for building civic competency and climate literacy while creating opportunities for students to practice high-value skills like "data collection and analysis, collaboration, decision-making and problem-solving."

  13. Participation, civic engagement and Web 2.0 – three cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Zander, Pär-Ola Mikael

    2013-01-01

    This paper takes its starting point in the civic sphere, in the meeting between (municipal) democracy, social technologies (Web 2.0) and participatory design as it has been brought to non-work settings. There is a significant body of literature that deals with the use of social technologies/Web 2...... increasing the available amount of information about public policy does not lead to increased democratic engagement. Based on the eGov+ project where we explored three cases of Web 2.0 and participatory design in municipal government settings, we discuss the various understandings of democracy...... themselves vis-à-vis their voters. We discuss how we develop the potentials of participation on the boundaries of design and use of Web 2.0 technologies. We also discuss the extent to which participation can be of political value by enabling active citizenship. And vice versa, we investigate how democracy...

  14. Civic Education in European States: the Aspect of Education for Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ema Klemenčič

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Realistically speaking, it is impossible to discuss a unifi ed model of education for democracy, since no model encompasses the various dimensions of that which we call ‘education for democracy’. In public discourse there are several documents attempting to defi ne the said concept. To some extent they are merged into the so-called concept of education for democratic citizenship (the Council of Europe Programme. Likewise the education of a European citizen is one of the central points of common educational trends in EU documents. There are, in fact, only two approaches. Since one cannot even speak of a model in the theoretical sense, it would be quite irresponsible to try and speak of it in the practical sense, which is why we attempt here to focus on a single aspect, namely, civic education in schools.

  15. Ethical and Civic Education. Difficulties during the Curricular Reform in Argentine Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelino Siede

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17227/01234870.41folios51.68 What type of ethical and civic education is effectively provided at school? This article analyzes the curricular prescriptions of Ethical and Citizenship Education in primary schools of the Argentine Patagonia, as well as its relations and contradictions with the school practices of moral education It inquires the process of definition of the area in the context of the Educational Reform in the 90s. Also, it pursuits to remake the way it was incorporated in the provincial curriculum design. Throughout focus groups and interviews to teachers from different public and private schools of three towns from de north of Santa Cruz, we analyze the descriptions and expectative of the teachers about their teaching practice in the moral area, as well as the possible causes of the differences and the contradictions between the policies of the curricular statement and educational proposals offered at school.

  16. Influences of culture and environmental attitude on thermal, emotional and perceptual evaluations of a public square

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knez, Igor; Thorsson, Sofia

    2006-05-01

    The main objective of the present quasi-experimental study was to examine the influence of culture (Swedish vs Japanese) and environmental attitude (urban vs open-air person) on participants’ thermal, emotional and perceptual assessments of a square, within the PET (physiological equivalent temperature) comfortable interval of 18 23°C. It was predicted that persons living in different cultures with different environmental attitudes would psychologically evaluate a square differently despite similar thermal conditions. Consistent with this prediction, Japanese participants estimated the current weather as warmer than did Swedish participants and, consistent with this, they felt less thermally comfortable on the site, although participants in both countries perceived similar comfortable thermal outdoor conditions according to the PET index. Compared to the Japanese, the Swedes estimated both the current weather and the site as windier and colder, indicating a consistency in weather assessment on calm-windy and warm-cold scales in participants in both cultures. Furthermore, Swedish participants felt more glad and calm on the site and, in line with their character (more glad than gloomy), they estimated the square as more beautiful and pleasant than did Japanese participants. All this indicates that thermal, emotional and perceptual assessments of a physical place may be intertwined with psychological schema-based and socio-cultural processes, rather than fixed by general thermal indices developed in line with physiological heat balance models. In consequence, this implies that thermal comfort indices may not be applicable in different cultural/climate zones without modifications, and that they may not be appropriate if we do not take into account the psychological processes involved in environmental assessment.

  17. African-American and Latina Women Seeking Public Health Services: Cultural Beliefs regarding Pregnancy, including Medication-taking Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Dalia Sanchez, MD, MCP, MHA, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe cultural beliefs and medication-taking-behavior about pregnancy in African-American and Latina women. Design: qualitative study using phenomenological methodology; face-to-face, semi structured interviews and focus group. Thematic analysis was done to obtain themes consistent with the research objective. Setting: Maricopa County, Arizona, Department of Public-health Programs, November 2008 through April 2009.Participants: women seeking public-health services in the greater Phoenix, Arizona.Results: fifteen adult women representing two ethnic groups (seven African-Americans and eight Latinas participated. Themes derived from the interview data included: “The Dilemma: To Become or Not to Become Pregnant;” “The Ideal Stress-free World: Support System;” “Changing Worlds: Wanting Dependency;” and “The Health care System: Disconnection from Pregnancy to Postpartum.”Conclusions: based on the cultural themes: 1. pregnancies were not planned; 2. healthy life-style changes were not likely to occur during pregnancy; 3. basic facts about the biology of sexual intercourse and pregnancy were not understood, and there was no usage of any preconceptional or prenatal medications; and 4. professional health care was not desired or considered necessary (except during delivery. These cultural beliefs can contribute to negative birth outcomes, and need to be considered by pharmacists and other health-care providers. The information gained from this study can guide the implementation of educational programs developed by pharmacists that are more sensitive to the cultural beliefs and points of view of these particular women. Such programs would thus be more likely to be favorably received and utilized.

  18. Creating a culture of risk in the Greek public administration. A brief retrospect on the memorandum era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iordanis Eleftheriadis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose -The recent financial crises in America and Europe have shown emphatically that the findings of the relevant risk management literature concluding that lurking risks can be converted into opportunities have unfortunately not informed policy. The assumption of the risk as a burden, often leads economies to crises that undermine the development and prosperity of states and citizens. In this context, this article aims at highlighting risk characteristics and presentation of basic management principles which should govern the operation of public service organizations. The aim of the present paper is also to highlight the dual nature of risk. Risk is frequently uni-dimensionally perceived by people. Usually, its usefulness in effecting change and making the most of the manifold opportunities of the contemporary volatile environment is ignored. Design/methodology/approach -There has been an extensive literature review on risk culture (organizations and personnel. Elements of the Greek Economy were used as well. Findings -The significance of developing a risk culture in organizations and governments. However, the unsuccessful attempt which was made by the Greek state so as to deal with the risks, shows that minimal preparation and progress has been achieved. Based on literature review of the economic facts of the 2008-2015 period in Greece, the fact that emerges is that effective risk management is a necessary condition for the survival of public organizations in today΄s global environment. Research limitations/implications-In relation to risk-taking by employees as well as their financial and operational risks in Public Administration and Economics, is ascertained that there are few studies, as opposed to the interest in the importance of taking risks in the strategy, which has risen sharply in recent years. Originality/value- The provision of the theoretical framework for the development of a risk management culture in organizations since

  19. Cultura organizacional em organizações públicas no Brasil Organizational culture in Brazilian public organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Calixto de Souza Pires

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta e discute conceitos e abordagens que contribuem para a compreensão de aspectos e traços relacionados à cultura organizacional de organizações públicas no Brasil. Inicialmente, são tratados os conceitos e diferentes abordagens de cultura e cultura organizacional, especificamente de Fleury, Frost, Schein e Hofstede. A seguir, o artigo aborda a cultura de organizações públicas, apresentando um pequeno histórico das organizações públicas no Brasil, bem como seus conceitos e características, entre as quais se destacam a burocracia, o autoritarismo centralizado, o paternalismo, a descontinuidade e a ingerência política. Essas características interferem no modo como os trabalhadores atuam nessas organizações, observando-se o apego às regras e rotinas, a supervalorização da hierarquia, o paternalismo nas relações e o apego ao poder. Isso é importante na definição dos processos internos, na relação com inovações e mudança, na formação dos valores e crenças organizacionais e nas políticas de recursos humanos. Na conclusão, o artigo salienta os aspectos fundamentais a serem considerados ao se lidar com a cultura de organizações públicas no Brasil.This article presents and discusses concepts and views that help understand features and peculiarities of the organizational culture in public organizations in Brazil. It begins by discussing the concepts and different approaches to culture and organizational culture, specifically by Fleury, Frost, Schein, and Hofstede. It then deals with the culture of public organizations, presenting a brief history of these organizations in Brazil, as well as their concepts and features, among which bureaucracy, centralized authoritarianism, patronizing, lack of continuity, and political interference stand out. Such characteristics interfere with the way people work in these organizations, where attachment to rules and routines, hierarchy overrating, patronizing

  20. Betel Nut Chewing in Hawai‘i: Is it Becoming a Public Health Problem? Historical and Socio-Cultural Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Enrico I

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the socio-cultural significance of betel nut use among Micronesians, in light of the recent migration of Micronesians to Hawai‘i. The different ways of chewing betel nut are the result of historical changes within Micronesia over time due to Spanish and US colonialism as well as the introduction of tobacco. These divergent ways of chewing may have different risks or impacts on health and it remains to be seen whether or not betel nut will become a significant public health problem in Hawai‘i. PMID:22413101

  1. PEMBENTUKAN MASYARAKAT MADANI DI INDONESIA MELALUI CIVIC EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Wajdi Ibrahim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Civil society is often positioned as the ideal pattern of community life. From the historical aspect, the Islamic thinkers usually refers to the condition of civil society such as on the condition of Medina under the leadership of the Prophet Muhammad Ṣallallāh ‘alayh wa Sallam. Ideal concept of civil society is driven by a variety of many aspects including the pattern of the life of society, nation that refers to the rule of law, human rights, and respect for diversity in all its forms (pluralism. Certainly not an easy thing to realize the ideal society as the concept of civil society in such a way. It requires a serious effort, continuous and consistent from the variety and facets, one of which is a crucial aspect of civic education (civic education. These issues are the focus of discussion of this article.

  2. Civics and Citizenship Education: historical and comparative reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Leigh

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Dalam sejarah panjang dunia ini civics dan pendidikan kewarganegaraan di sekolah merupakan fenomena yang relatif baru. Ada dua faktor yang mengarahkan hal ini. Pertama adalah pertumbuhan negara-bangsa dan kedua adalah diperkenalkannya pendidikan untuk massa. Negara bangsa muncul di seluruh dunia dalam jumlah yang besar setelah akhir perang dunia kedua pada pertengahan abad ke dua puluh. Kekuasaan kolonial telah ditentang dan pergerakan kemerdekaan dilakukan atau mencapai kemerdekaan. Di Afrika, Amerika Latin, dan Asia ada peningkatan di sejumlah negara merdeka. Sebagian terbesar menjalankan bentuk pemerintahan demokratis. Mereka melaksanakan pemilu dan memiliki badan perwakilan. Semuanya memperkenalkan beberapa bentuk persekolahan bagi kebanyakan penduduk. Artikel ini membahas sejarah pendidikan yang didukung oleh negara di eropa. Di dalam konteks itu, dibahas civics dan pendidikan kewarganegaraan di Sekolah abad ke dua puluh satu dengan kemungkinan implikasinya bagi Pendidikan Kewarganegaraan di Indonesia.

  3. CULTURAL PROGRAMMES POSITIONING AS AN ELEMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE TELEVISION MISSION IN NRK BASED ON ANALYSIS OF THE PROGRAMME OFFER IN 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Chacinska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of 2010 the culture editor of the Norwegian newspaper Aftenposten called the Norwegian television NRK “the best public service broadcaster in the world” and „the biggest and most important Norwegian cultural institution”. The article is an attempt to verify this statement through identifying the place of cultural programmes in NRK schedule in 2009. The author analyses how the cultural mission is described in current legal documents concerning Norwegian public service media mission. Furthermore the article is an attempt to identify how NRK defines cultural programmes and how it classifies them. In the second part of the article the author analyses the television programme of NRK1 and NRK2 in 2009, and presents the results of a more detailed analysis of selected three weeks of that year concerning the execution of its cultural mission.

  4. Public and Hidden Economies in Atuntaqui (Ecuador: The Challenge of Sustaining Cooperation in Textile Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi Colloredo-Mansfeld

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the 2000s, Atuntaqui’s quality improvement program, joint marketing investments, and cultural initatives were designed to leverage the power of strategic cooperation. Over the course of several development projects, however, social interactions became more inclusive and more contentious. In this paper, we introduce the idea of a public economy and contrast it with narrower social capital theories to account for the benefits of Atuntaqui’s move from hidden production to an open trade. With data from field research that spans seven years, this article documents how the pressures of rapid manufacturing growth and the missteps in managing civic projects have undermined public participation and closed off important features of the public economy. The paper concludes with observa­tion about how to revive more robust collaborations through diversification of local participants, strengthening of the chamber of commerce, and recognizing and including the large wave of new, smaller producers. 

  5. Civic values in the texts of the Primary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ortiz Cermeño

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Documentary study university textbooks on civic values in the Primary Education. Technique has been used as discourse analysis with ATLAS.ti version 6.2. The results show how the theories discussed affect the values of freedom and discipline primarily, followed by respect, equality related to justice, accountability and participation closely with citizen participation. We conclude that the values that work in this subjet are essential in the initial training of teachers.

  6. Perception of Civic Education: contributions from secondary education students.

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro Valverde, Alicia; Badilla Vargas, Maynor

    2016-01-01

    The following article presents the views of students, especially for tenth and eleven graders in secondary education about the Civic. It includes the perception they have about this subject as well as the feelings they developed around it. When students take lessons in this area, they can express strengths of this discipline regarding the integral formation of people and the necessity to reflect on communal issues relating to the environment, poverty, inequality, and strengthening democracy a...

  7. Characteristics of Spanish adolescents’ and youngsters’ civic activity: e- citizenship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Fuentes Esparrell

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we aim to illustrate and provide data on the access, use, equipment, habits and motivations of Spanish adolescents and young people towards ICT (computers, networks, internet, mobile phones.... We will focus mainly on social networks and mobile telephony as the main technologies currently in use. Thus, we can gain an insight into the main features of civic activity among Spanish adolescents and youngsters for proper e‐citizenship.

  8. Necessary Conditions for Improving Civic Competence: A Scientific Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur Lupia

    2005-01-01

    Many attempts to increase civic competence are based on premises about communication and belief change that are directly contradicted by important insights from microeconomic theory and social psychology. At least two economic literatures are relevant to my effort to improve matters. One is the literature on strategic communication, which includes Spence (1974), Crawford and Sobel (1982), Banks (1991), and Lupia and McCubbins (1998). The other is the literature on mechanism design, which incl...

  9. Guns, Culture or Mental Health? Framing Mass Shootings as a Public Health Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFoster, Ruth; Swalve, Natashia

    2017-08-25

    In recent years, public health scholars and policymakers have been calling for increased research on the public health implications of gun violence. However, scientific research on this issue has been stifled by a 1996 budget rider that eliminated Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) funding for gun research. In this study, we examined newspaper coverage of three mass shootings that took place over a 20-year period before and after the passage of this budget rider. We found that sources and frames provided by news media to contextualize gun violence shifted markedly over time, progressing from episodic and individual-level frames to broader thematic societal-level concerns, with increased discussion of mental health but limited discourse explicitly related to public health.

  10. The public space of social media connected cultures of the network society

    CERN Document Server

    Tierney, Therese

    2013-01-01

    Social media is restructuring urban practices-through ad-hoc experimentation, commercial software development, and communities of participation. This book is the first to consider how practices contained within social media are situated within a larger genealogy of public space, including theories of communal identity, civitas and democracy, the fete, and self-expression. Through empirical research, the actual social practices of participants of networked publics are described and analyzed. Documenting how online counterpublics use the Internet to transmit classified photos, mobilize activists, and challenge the status quo, Tierney argues that online activities do not stop in online conversations; they are physically grounded through mobile GPS coordinates which are then transformed into activities in physical space-the street, the plaza, the places where people have traditionally gathered to demonstrate and express their opinions publicly.

  11. Consuming America : A Data-Driven Analysis of the United States as a Reference Culture in Dutch Public Discourse on Consumer Goods, 1890-1990

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wevers, M.J.H.F.

    2017-01-01

    Consuming America offers a data-driven, longitudinal analysis of the historical dynamics that have underpinned a long-term, layered cultural-historical process: the emergence of the United States as a dominant reference culture in Dutch public discourse on consumer goods between 1890 and 1990. The

  12. How Organizational Culture as Perceived by Senior Administrators Influences the Adoption of Information Technology Systems in Two 4-Year Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, David Edward

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between university culture, organizational characteristics, and central IT systems adoption within two four-year public universities. A qualitative multi-case methodology was used to examine the influence of organizational cultures and characteristics on personal perceptions, actions,…

  13. Why Do Staff of Joint-Use Libraries Sometimes Fail to Integrate? Investigating Cultures and Ethics in a Public-Tertiary Joint-Use Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Philip James

    2010-01-01

    Joint-use libraries have identified staff integration as a problem. Using focus groups, this project investigated the culture, professional ethics, and attitudes of staff in a public-tertiary joint-use library in Auckland, New Zealand. Findings show some difference in organizational cultures, but more variation at the lower level of roles and…

  14. THE ANALYSIS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE VALUES IN PUBLIC SECTORS IN LATVIA

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, Maija; Kokina, Irēna

    2016-01-01

    Organizational culture is an important issue because of its` big influence on enterprises’ productivity and consequently on realization of their objectives and goals. The validation and harmonization of organizational values and employees’ values has an important role in increasing operational efficiency. It has long been established that enterprises and organizations, where creative and interested employees who support and understand the organizational values of the company wo...

  15. Culturally appropriate organization of water and sewerage projects built through public private partnerships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Kaminsky

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the pursuit of socially sustainable water and sanitation infrastructure for all people by discovering statistically robust relationships between Hofstede's dimensions of cross-cultural comparison and the choice of contract award types, project type, and primary revenue sources. This analysis, which represents 973 projects distributed across 24 low- and middle-income nations, uses a World Bank dataset describing high capital cost water and sewerage projects funded through private investment. The results show that cultural dimensions explain variation in the choice of contract award types, project type, and primary revenue sources. These results provide empirical evidence that strategies for water and sewerage project organization are not culturally neutral. The data show, for example, that highly individualistic contexts are more likely to select competitive contract award types and to depend on user fees to provide the primary project revenue stream post-construction. By selecting more locally appropriate ways to organize projects, project stakeholders will be better able to pursue the construction of socially sustainable water and sewerage infrastructure.

  16. Culturally appropriate organization of water and sewerage projects built through public private partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Jessica A

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to the pursuit of socially sustainable water and sanitation infrastructure for all people by discovering statistically robust relationships between Hofstede's dimensions of cross-cultural comparison and the choice of contract award types, project type, and primary revenue sources. This analysis, which represents 973 projects distributed across 24 low- and middle-income nations, uses a World Bank dataset describing high capital cost water and sewerage projects funded through private investment. The results show that cultural dimensions explain variation in the choice of contract award types, project type, and primary revenue sources. These results provide empirical evidence that strategies for water and sewerage project organization are not culturally neutral. The data show, for example, that highly individualistic contexts are more likely to select competitive contract award types and to depend on user fees to provide the primary project revenue stream post-construction. By selecting more locally appropriate ways to organize projects, project stakeholders will be better able to pursue the construction of socially sustainable water and sewerage infrastructure.

  17. The V in VGI: Citizens or Civic Data Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suthee Sangiambut

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Volunteered geographic information (VGI, delivered via mobile and web apps, offers new potentials for civic engagement. If framed in the context of open, transparent and accountable governance then presumably VGI should advance dialogue and consultation between citizen and government. If governments perceive citizens as consumers of services then arguably such democratic intent elide when municipalities use VGI. Our empirical research shows how assumptions embedded in VGI drive the interaction between citizens and government. We created a typology that operationalises VGI as a potential act of citizenship and an instance of consumption. We then selected civic apps from Canadian cities that appeared to invoke these VGI types. We conducted interviews with developers of the apps; they were from government, private sector, and civil society. Results from qualitative semi-structured interviews indicate a blurring of consumer and citizen-centric orientations among respondents, which depended on motivations for data use, engagement and communication objectives, and sector of the respondent. Citizen engagement, an analogue for citizenship, was interpreted multiple ways. Overall, we found that government and developers may increase choice by creating consumer-friendly apps but this does not ensure VGI offers an act of civic participation. The burden is placed on the contributor to make it so. Apps and VGI could potentially further a data-driven and neoliberal government. Planners should be mindful of the dominance of a consumer-centric view even as they assume VGI invariably improves democratic participation.

  18. On the evaluation of cultural and environmental public goods, and its implications for social innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffeo, Michele; Bonini, Nicolao

    2013-01-01

    Public goods (e.g., parks) and welfare services (e.g., garbage disposal and transportation policies) are extremely important for the citizens' well-being but in the complex modern societies their influence and effectiveness are affected by the citizens' support. For this reason, it is crucial to understand which are the factors that influence the citizens' perception of the benefits, costs, and risks associated to public goods and welfare services. In this chapter, we describe some psychological variables that are relevant for the evaluation process of the public goods, but that are not considered by the standard economic models. At the same time, we show that some variables of central importance for the economic models do not significantly affect the citizens' evaluations. Finally, we discuss the concept of Nudge, a policy-making approach that suggests the use of psychological mechanisms to increase the citizens' support to public provision of welfare services. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Outside in America: George Michael's music video, public sex and global pop culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, J.

    2004-01-01

    Six months after his controversial arrest for ‘lewd conduct’ at a men’s public restroom in Beverly Hills, British pop star George Michael released the song and music video ‘Outside’ which can be seen as an explicit commentary on the controversy. In this article, I read the music video in three ways:

  20. Pedagogical Models for Enhancing the Cross-Cultural Online Public Health Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Srikanta; Firtell, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Background: Online distance learning (e-learning) is an established method for providing higher education on a global scale due to its potential to reduce inequalities particularly in the area of public health education. Simultaneously, multicultural education is a key component of health education and can be achieved by fostering cultural…

  1. Acceptance of online audio-visual cultural heritage archive services: a study of the general public

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongena, G.; van de Wijngaert, Lidwien; Huizer, E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. This study examines the antecedents of user acceptance of an audio-visual heritage archive for a wider audience (i.e., the general public) by extending the technology acceptance model with the concepts of perceived enjoyment, nostalgia proneness and personal innovativeness. Method. A

  2. Occupational culture in policing reviewed : A comparison of values in the public and private police

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loyens, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing privatization of the security sector, leading to an intermingling of private and public policing and a possible "value-shift" for the overall security policy. Systematic comparative research between police and private security values is, however, still lacking.

  3. Organisational Behaviour and Culture : Insights from and for public safety management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Belschak-Jacobs (Gabriele)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractLarge-scale migration, forced displacement, organised crime, terrorism and natural disasters, but also the proliferation of child pornography, hacking, identity theft and other types of cybercrime provide very concrete challenges to public safety and can trigger profound feelings of

  4. Toward a Culture of Consequences: Performance-Based Accountability Systems for Public Services. Monograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecher, Brian M.; Camm, Frank; Damberg, Cheryl L.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Mullen, Kathleen J.; Nelson, Christopher; Sorensen, Paul; Wachs, Martin; Yoh, Allison; Zellman, Gail L.

    2010-01-01

    Performance-based accountability systems (PBASs), which link incentives to measured performance as a means of improving services to the public, have gained popularity. While PBASs can vary widely across sectors, they share three main components: goals, incentives, and measures. Research suggests that PBASs influence provider behaviors, but little…

  5. Between Criminality and Civic Ordn: lmages and Representations of Childhood during the Porfirian Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto del Castillo Troncoso

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence that images have acquired in all aspects of culture has not been  adequately reflected in historical research. Most works still revolve around wrítten documents, while iconographic ones serve, at best, as simple  illustrations. In the last quarter of the nineteenth century, photographic images broke with great strength into the structures designed for writing, such as newspapers, reviews and magazines, completing the universe of letters,  and sometirnes even invading it. Photography was suppoed  to build an exact and  objective  representa­tion of reality, a testimony haloed by the prestige of science and the illusion of progress characteristic  or late-eighteenth century Western societies. The  beginning of this important process concurred and rela­ted very closely with a qualitative increase in the State's interest and  concern for childhood, particulary visible  in education, pedagogy, pediatry and child hygiene. This article sets forth and supports two lines of research that rescue, analyze and interpret a rich and meaningful iconograph­ic documentation from newspapers, in relation with two concre­te Mexico City childhood problems  that required the Porfirian State's institutional action and that were somewhat complementary: the control and  repression of childhood delinquency, and the civic recruiment and recovery of children as future citizens. While the first one proves how infantile bodies became study objects capable of offering scientific truths for  their  time, the second one opens a reflection on how the civic act of imagining the nineteenth-century citizens passed  through a process of differentiating childhood as a key stage  in the construction of new values.

  6. Cultural property, museums and Tourism: analysis of the public factor in the Museum of Caceres (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Marcos Arévalo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work exposes the interim analysis of the results obtained so far on the ongoing research carried on over the Social Anthropology final Master´s degree project at the University of Extremadura entitled "Analysis of public factor at the Cáceres’ Museum". The research aims to establish a profile of each one of the Caceres Museum Visitors and also to aknowledge the perceptions, representation and the connection the Museum neighborhood residents have towards the institution with the idea of using this previously mentioned gathered information in order to contribute to the planification of activities and to generate links between the Museum and its public. In order to accomplish this objective, Anthropology own data recollection techniques such as the participant observation and surveys have been used at the first instance and in-depth interviews at the later stage.

  7. Spectacular Subjects : Race, Rhetoric, and Visuality in American Public Cultures (1870-1900)

    OpenAIRE

    Jabour, Tania Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Spectacular Subjects engages with the campaigns of three activists who inserted themselves into the nineteenth century American public sphere to combat forces of exploitation and disfranchisement in the communities they came to represent. The project is divided into three chapters, which correspond to the figures profiled : Ida B. Wells, an African American anti-lynching crusader; Sarah Winnemucca, a Native American advocate for reservation reform; and Wong Chin Foo, a Chinese American journa...

  8. Science and Society: Public History in the Context of Historical Culture of the Globalization Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorina P. Repina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the XIX century known as the „historical age”, a high degree of trust to history and social prestige of historical science relied on the entrenched in public consciousness the idea of continuity of historical development of a human civilization and, respectively, of the unique opportunities of the use of the past experience as a means to solve the problems of the present and to build „the bright future”. But the understanding of the dramatic experi-ence of the XX century undermined the belief in the “use of history”, and this situation has been greatly aggravated with intensification of the processes of globalization on the bor-der of XX and XXI centuries. The problems of interaction between “academic (professional history” and the wide public in the concrete societies and the changes in their relations in the context of deep social transformations proved to take place at the center of many re-searchers’ attention. Public history is purposefully overcoming the typical for historical science of the XX century alienation from „the uninitiated”; it strives to restore the interest of the consumer to the historians’ production, to propagate professional standards, histor-ical knowledge and proper understanding of the specific character of “historian’s craft” among the wide circles of the non-professionals.

  9. Well-being and consumer culture: a different kind of public health problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Sandra; Hanlon, Phil

    2007-09-01

    The concept of well-being is now of interest to many disciplines; as a consequence, it presents an increasingly complex and contested territory. We suggest that much current thinking about well-being can be summarized in terms of four main discourses: scientific, popular, critical and environmental. Exponents of the scientific discourse argue that subjective well-being is now static or declining in developed countries: a paradox for economists, as incomes have grown considerably. Psychological observations on the loss of subjective well-being have also entered popular awareness, in simplified form, and conceptions of well-being as happiness are now influencing contemporary political debate and policy-making. These views have not escaped criticism. Philosophers understand well-being as part of a flourishing human life, not just happiness. Some social theorists critique the export of specific cultural concepts of well-being as human universals. Others view well-being as a potentially divisive construct that may contribute to maintaining social inequalities. Environmentalists argue that socio-cultural patterns of over-consumption, within the neo-liberal economies of developed societies, present an impending ecological threat to individual, social and global well-being. As the four discourses carry different implications for action, we conclude by considering their varied utility and applicability for health promotion.

  10. Developing Public Policy in Romania: Focusing Responsability, Authority and Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. RINGSMUTH

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The model of foreign friends visiting fellow democracies to observe and participate in the civic culture, has a long and distinguished tradition. Tocqueville’s visit to and observations of the United States nearly 200 years ago provide a lofty exemplar to which few could pretend to or attempt to duplicate or approach. Nothing in the following observations is meant to make such a pretense1 My journey in Romania has been and will be substantially less noted and notable, but my observations are offered with similar intentions. Rather they are meant in the spirit and offered with the hope that they might, in some small way, begin to make a contribution to the dialogue about the development of democracy and democratic institutions in Romania. In particular, here, I am concerned with Romania’s ability, will and means to develop public policy.

  11. [The "culture of survival" and international public health in Latin America: the Cold War and the eradication of diseases in the mid-twentieth century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the main campaigns run by international agencies and national health bodies to eradicate infectious diseases in rural Latin America in the 1940s and 1950s. The political dimensions of the period have been studied but there has been little attention as yet to the health dimensions. This article proposes the concept of a "culture of survival" to explain the official public health problems of states with limited social policies that did not allow the exercise of citizenship. Public health, as part of this culture of survival, sought a temporary solution without confronting the social problems that led to infections and left a public health legacy in the region.

  12. Nudging the Public Sphere: A Habermasian Perspective on Public Deliberation as an Aim of Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This article offers an account of the understanding citizens need in order to justify moral principles in the public sphere and it identifies an important role for moral education in the promotion of that civic understanding. I develop this account through a contrastive analysis of Phillip Kitcher's conception of public knowledge and Jurgen…

  13. Culture du résultat et pilotage par les indicateurs dans le secteur public

    OpenAIRE

    Chatelain-Ponroy, Stéphanie; Sponem, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    Depuis 20 ans, la question de la gestion de l’État est au cœur des réformes de l’administration dans tous les pays de l’OCDE. À cet égard, l’introduction d’une culture du résultat et des dispositifs de contrôle de gestion qui l’accompagnent dans l’administration publique telle qu’elle est mise en avant dans la LOLF, si elle peut avoir des effets positifs en termes d’évaluation des politiques publiques et d’incitation des agents, peut aussi engendrer des effets pervers. En la matière, l’expéri...

  14. The transition to medication adoption in publicly funded substance use disorder treatment programs: organizational structure, culture, and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Roman, Paul M

    2014-05-01

    Medications for the treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs) are not widely available in publicly funded SUD treatment programs. Few studies have drawn on longitudinal data to examine the organizational characteristics associated with programs transitioning from not delivering any pharmacotherapy to adopting at least one SUD medication. Using two waves of panel longitudinal data collected over a 5-year period, we measured the transition to medication adoption in a cohort of 190 publicly funded treatment organizations that offered no SUD medications at baseline. Independent variables included organizational characteristics, medical resources, funding, treatment culture, and detailing activities by pharmaceutical companies. Of 190 programs not offering SUD pharmacotherapy at baseline, 22.6% transitioned to offering at least one SUD medication at follow-up approximately 5 years later. Multivariate logistic regression results indicated that the employment of at least one physician at baseline, having a greater proportion of Medicaid clients, and pharmaceutical detailing were positively associated with medication adoption. Adoption of pharmacotherapy was more likely in programs that had greater medical resources, Medicaid funding, and contact with pharmaceutical companies. Given the potential expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, patients served by publicly funded programs may gain greater access to such treatments, but research is needed to document health reform's impact on this sector of the treatment system.

  15. An Organization of the Theoretical Perspectives in the Field of Civic and Political Participation: Contributions to Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Norberto; Neves, Tiago; Menezes, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a review of the theoretical perspectives on civic and political participation. Four distinct views were identified in the literature: (a) The orthodox view: "Civic and political participation are always positive"; (b) The broad view: "Civic and political participation are multidimensional"; (c) The…

  16. God's punishment and public goods : A test of the supernatural punishment hypothesis in 186 world cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dominic D P

    2005-12-01

    Cooperation towards public goods relies on credible threats of punishment to deter cheats. However, punishing is costly, so it remains unclear who incurred the costs of enforcement in our evolutionary past. Theoretical work suggests that human cooperation may be promoted if people believe in supernatural punishment for moral transgressions. This theory is supported by new work in cognitive psychology and by anecdotal ethnographic evidence, but formal quantitative tests remain to be done. Using data from 186 societies around the globe, I test whether the likelihood of supernatural punishment-indexed by the importance of moralizing "high gods"-is associated with cooperation.

  17. Toward a Culture of Consequences: Performance-Based Accountability Systems for Public Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecher, Brian M; Camm, Frank; Damberg, Cheryl L; Hamilton, Laura S; Mullen, Kathleen J; Nelson, Christopher; Sorensen, Paul; Wachs, Martin; Yoh, Allison; Zellman, Gail L; Leuschner, Kristin J; Camm, Frank; Stecher, Brian M

    2012-01-01

    Performance-based accountability systems (PBASs), which link incentives to measured performance as a means of improving services to the public, have gained popularity. While PBASs can vary widely across sectors, they share three main components: goals, incentives, and measures. Research suggests that PBASs influence provider behaviors, but little is known about PBAS effectiveness at achieving performance goals or about government and agency experiences. This study examines nine PBASs that are drawn from five sectors: child care, education, health care, public health emergency preparedness, and transportation. In the right circumstances, a PBAS can be an effective strategy for improving service delivery. Optimum circumstances include having a widely shared goal, unambiguous observable measures, meaningful incentives for those with control over the relevant inputs and processes, few competing interests, and adequate resources to design, implement, and operate the PBAS. However, these conditions are rarely fully realized, so it is difficult to design and implement PBASs that are uniformly effective. PBASs represent a promising policy option for improving the quality of service-delivery activities in many contexts. The evidence supports continued experimentation with and adoption of this approach in appropriate circumstances. Even so, PBAS design and its prospects for success depend on the context in which it will operate. Also, ongoing system evaluation and monitoring are integral components of a PBAS; they inform refinements that improve system functioning over time. Empirical evidence of the effects of performance-based public management is scarce. This article also describes a framework used to evaluate a PBAS. Such a system identifies individuals or organizations that must change their behavior for the performance of an activity to improve, chooses an implicit or explicit incentive structure to motivate these organizations or individuals to change, and then

  18. Participación cívica y producción mediática de los jóvenes: «Voz de la Juventud» Promoting Youth Civic Participation with Media Production: The Case of Youth Voice Editorial Board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirkku Kotilainen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hoy más que nunca se promueve el espacio público, especialmente on-line. A pesar de ello, el papel de la producción mediática pública en la cultura juvenil no ha sido muy relevante en el ámbito de lo educativo. Este texto facilita la comprensión de las relaciones entre la participación cívica y la difusión mediática de la juventud en el contexto de sus intervenciones e interacciones. Está basado en el seguimiento durante tres años de la «Voz de la Juventud», de Finlandia, dirigido a jóvenes de entre 13 y 17 años de edad. Los resultados del estudio muestran que el fomento de la ciudadanía en los jóvenes puede potenciarse con la educación en medios, resultado de tres elementos relacionados entre sí: la participación ciudadana de la juventud, incluyendo la producción mediática, la difusión mediática, y la pedagogía entendida como aprendizaje colaborativo. Public space, especially online, is now offered more than ever before. Still, the role of public media production in youth cultures has not been very much noticed in civic pedagogic settings. This contribution provides insights to the relations between youth, civic participation and media pu blicity in the context of youth work. It is based on three years follow up study of the «Youth Voice Editorial Board» in Finland, among youngsters aged 13-17 years. The results of the study show that youth citizenship can be strengthened with media literacy education which consists on three elements related with each other: youth civic participation including media production, media publicity and pedagogy understood as learning community.

  19. Rethinking Students' Dispositions towards Civic Duties in Urban Learning Ecologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ige, Olugbenga Adedayo

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the causative influence of thinking dispositions on secondary school students' civic attitudes in school ecologies. 167 students from eight selected secondary schools in northern and southern Nigeria responded to the Senior Students' Thinking Dispositions Questionnaire (SSTDQ), and Students' Attitude to Civic Education Scale…

  20. Forum: Learning Outcomes in Communication. Civic Engagement and a Communication Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Timothy C.; Procopio, Claire H.; Goering, Beth; Dong, Qingwen; Bodary, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Civic engagement has long been a pedagogical and societal goal for communication scholars (Arnett & Arneson, 1999; Bennett, Wells, & Freelon, 2011). Kidd and Parry-Giles (2013) point out that belief in the "inherent civic value of speech to meaningful citizenship" is the "pedagogical core of the discipline" (n.p.).…

  1. The Policies on Civic Education in Developing National Character in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurdin, Encep Syarief

    2015-01-01

    Each country has different policies on the implementation of Civic Education. As an independent country, Indonesia administers Civic Education separately through a special subject under the name "citizenship education", while other countries, such as Malaysia, integrate this form of education into other subjects. The policies on Civic…

  2. Motivation of Civic Education Teachers-in-Training in the Field of Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Katharina; Reichhart, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The objective of teacher-training at university for political science is the development of professional competencies that enable teachers-in-training to act proficiently in all aspects of civic education. Although there are some studies that focus on civic education for teachers' professional competencies, most of them relate to general…

  3. Adolescent Moral Motivations for Civic Engagement: Clues to the Political Gender Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Heather; Tirri, Kirsi; Liauw, Indrawati

    2015-01-01

    This study explored gender differences in moral motivations and civic engagement among adolescents to add to existing explanations for the gender gap in political engagement in the US. We examined moral motivations for civic engagement in a sample of 1578 high school seniors, using a mixed-methods analysis of survey and interview data. Multiple…

  4. Schools as Incubators of Democratic Participation: Building Long-Term Political Efficacy with Civic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Josh; Feldman, Lauren; Romer, Daniel; Jamieson, Kathleen Hall

    2008-01-01

    Despite a growing consensus that civic education is an important aspect of political socialization, little research has prospectively examined how gains made during civics courses are maintained after high school. This study used a quasi-experimental design to examine longer-term effects of the Student Voices program, which was originally…

  5. The producers of civic websites for young people in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirzalla, F.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of CivicWeb work package 7 is to investigate the organisational properties of (civic) youth websites, and to assess how the producers of these websites conceptualise their work and audiences. In the Netherlands, we conducted interviews with the producers of twelve websites to investigate

  6. Toward a New Measure for Faith and Civic Engagement: Exploring the Structure of the FACE Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droege, Jocelyn R.; Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Civic and political engagement may encourage individuals to make positive societal contributions and thus act as responsible and productive citizens. A positive relationship between civic/political engagement and the extent of one's faith-based beliefs and behaviors has been the basis for a growing field of research (e.g., Becker & Dhingra, 2001;…

  7. The Risks We Are Willing to Take: Youth Civic Development in "Postwar" Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellino, Michelle J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Michelle J. Bellino explores contrasting approaches to civic education in two rural schools serving indigenous Maya youth in post-civil war Guatemala. Through comparative ethnography, she examines how youth civic pathways intersect with legacies of authoritarianism while young people shape their identity as members of historically…

  8. Civic Engagement in Extreme Times: The Remaking of Justice among Guatemala's "Postwar" Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellino, Michelle J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic growth in the field of youth civic engagement, although little of this work has been conducted in fragile democracies contending with legacies of war and authoritarianism. This study explores how Guatemalan postwar generation youth develop as civic actors under extreme conditions of violence, social and…

  9. Does Civic Education Matter?: The Power of Long-Term Observation and the Experimental Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Ryan L.; Monson, J. Quin

    2015-01-01

    Despite consensus regarding the civic shortcomings of American citizens, no such scholarly consensus exists regarding the effectiveness of civic education addressing political apathy and ignorance. Accordingly, we report the results of a detailed study of students enrolled in introductory American politics courses on the campuses of two large…

  10. Civic Journalism and Nonelite Sourcing: Making Routine Newswork of Community Connectedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Brian L.

    1998-01-01

    Compares the number of "average" citizens brought into the news in three newspapers. Finds nonelite information sources in numerical parity with elite sources in a civic-journalism newspaper, but finds the frequency and directness of their news voices largely unchanged. Finds that routine civic journalism did more to tone down elites'…

  11. Indigenizing Civic Education in Africa: Experience in Madagascar and the Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Carrie; Easton, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In Africa, as in many countries of the South, democratization is sometimes perceived as a process modeled upon outside--and specifically Northern--experience. Formal civic education programs in those countries arguably reflect the same bias and have not always been notably successful. Yet there are rich patterns of civic involvement and democratic…

  12. Teaching for Citizenship in Lebanon: Teachers Talk about the Civics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Bassel

    2012-01-01

    "National and Civic Education" is a program of study compulsory across all grade levels in Lebanon aimed at promoting social cohesion and active citizenship. A sample of 19 civics teachers in Lebanon across four of the six governorates participated in semi-structured interviews. The conversations delved into their conceptions of…

  13. Characteristics of competence and civic education materials curriculum in primary school in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmanto; Listyaningsih; Wijaya, R.

    2018-01-01

    Civic education is a compulsory subject within the structure of the primary school curriculum, junior high, and high schools in Indonesia. This study aimed to analyze the characteristic of the subject matter and competence of civic education in primary schools in Indonesia. The approach used in this study is a qualitative research. The results showed that the subjects of civic education at Indonesia serves as education, legal, political and educational value. Civic education as an education program in primary schools as a primary vehicle and have the essence of a democratic education carried out in order to achieve competency in the civic aspects of Intelligence, civic responsibility, and civic participation. Core competencies in civic education in primary school psychological-pedagogical competence of learners to integrate fully and coherently with the planting, development, and strengthening moral values of Pancasila; values and norms of the Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia 1945; values and the spirit of unity in diversity; as well as the insight and commitment of the Republic of Indonesia.

  14. Civic Action and Play: Examples from Maori, Aboriginal Australian and Latino Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Jennifer Keys; Phillips, Louise; Ritchie, Jenny; Sachdeva, Shubhi

    2017-01-01

    Using data from an international, comparative study of civic action in preschools in New Zealand, Australia and the US, we consider some of the types of civic action that are possible when time and space are offered for children to use their agency to initiate, work together and collectively pursue ideas and things that are important to the group.…

  15. Civic Education in Ethiopian Schools: Adopted Paradigms, Instructional Technology, and Democratic Citizenship in a Multicultural Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semela, Tesfaye; Bohl, Thorsten; Kleinknecht, Marc

    2013-01-01

    After nearly two decades of military dictatorship, democratic civic education has been integrated into the Ethiopian school curriculum. This paper examines the policy-practice concordance in implementing the civic education curriculum based on empirical evidence generated on the philosophical underpinnings, curricular contents, pedagogical…

  16. Using Classroom Recordings in Educational History Research. An East German Civics Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehle, May; Blessing, Benita

    2014-01-01

    Students learned in civics lessons in the German Democratic Republic (GDR, or East Germany) that their socialist society uniquely guaranteed all individuals the right to work, and that, as good socialists, they had the duty to take on socially meaningful work. Using the example of a video recording of an East German civics lesson and its…

  17. Capacity Building for the Common Good: PSU's Interdisciplinary Minor in Civic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishishiba, Masami; Kecskes, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, Portland State University has furthered its commitment to civic engagement education by adopting an integrated approach to its general education curriculum. As an outgrowth to this initiative, the minor in Civic Leadership was developed in 2004-05. This interdisciplinary minor was designed with the intent to further…

  18. American Philanthropic Studies: The Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy (1903-1920)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Graham Taylor was a leader in the movement for schools of civics and philanthropy. As founder of the Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy, Taylor served as President and Professor. The study focuses on the development of the study of philanthropy through following the pedagogy of Graham Taylor beginning with his early efforts during the late…

  19. Generalized Trust Through Civic Engagement? Evidence from Five National Panel Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ingen, Erik; Bekkers, René

    2015-01-01

    According to a popular version of social capital theory, civic engagement should produce generalized trust among citizens. We put this theory to the test by examining the causal connection between civic engagement and generalized trust using multiple methods and multiple (prospective) panel

  20. Understanding College Students' Civic Identity Development: A Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew R.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study designed to understand the development of college students' civic identity--that is, an identity encompassing their knowledge, attitudes, values, and actions regarding civic engagement. Grounded theory was used to examine the experiences and attitudes of 19 college seniors who manifested strong civic…

  1. The Role of Online Games in Promoting Young Adults' Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themistokleous, Sotiris; Avraamidou, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we present an argument for the need to support young adult's civic engagement and we explore the role of online games in supporting such engagement. In doing so, in the first section of the paper, we offer a definition for civic education and citizenship alongside a discussion for the pedagogical frameworks that better support…

  2. Civic Republican Social Justice and the Case of State Grammar Schools in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to consider the ways in which civic republican theory can provide a meaningful and useful account of social justice, one that is which holds resonance for educational debates. Recognising the need for educationalists interested in civic republicanism to pay greater attention to ideas of justice--and in particular social…

  3. Adolescent Civic and Political Engagement: Associations between Domain-Specific Judgments and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Aaron; Smetana, Judith G.

    2009-01-01

    Judgments and justifications for different forms of civic involvement and their associations with organized and civic behavior were examined in 312 middle-class primarily White adolescents (M = 17.01 years). Adolescents applied moral, conventional, and personal criteria to distinguish involvement in community service, standard political, social…

  4. Teaching Who You Are: Connecting Teachers' Civic Education Ideology to Instructional Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Ryan T.

    2018-01-01

    This quantitative study uses survey data to test connections between 735 teachers' civic education ideology (CivID) and their self-reported instructional practices. Analysis demonstrates teachers' beliefs in relation to conservative, liberal, and critical civic education ideology as well as preference for instructional strategies, such as…

  5. Community Relations - Public Affairs - Personal Staff - Joint Staff - The

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Public Affairs : Community Relations Community Relations The National Guard Bureau Civic Engagement Report National Commission of the Future of the Army White Papers I am the Guard ARNG Media ARNG Public Public Affairs Executive Support Services Legislative Liaison Special Staff Directorate of Management

  6. Service-learning for students of spanish: promoting civic engagement and social justice through an exchange tutoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Burgo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Service-learning courses are designed to promote civic engagement and social justice, and to connect the classroom with the community in an environment of cooperation and mutual interest. In this article, a service-learning course of Spanish at the university level is supported as a reciprocal language exchange between the campus and the community. According to this course proposal, students attend a Latino community site once a week, where their members are tutored in English and American culture, while students are tutored in Spanish and Spanish-speaking culture. This way, service-learning is connected to the Spanish classroom through “Reflection” sessions led by mentors visiting the class periodically. This course was designed so that students would be able to improve their conversation skills in this exchange tutoring service while they are involved with the community by seeing their members as equal peers.

  7. The Kids are All Right? Income Inequality and Civic Engagement among Our Nation's Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Erin B; Cherng, Hua-Yu Sebastian

    2016-11-01

    Prior work suggests that income inequality depresses civic participation among adults. However, associations between income inequality and youth civic engagement have not been assessed. This is true despite evidence that other features of communities influence youth civic development. To fill the gap, we examine associations between county-level income inequality and civic engagement among a nationally representative sample of 12,240 15-year-olds (50 % female). We find opposite patterns than those suggested by the adult literature. Higher county-level income inequality is associated with slightly more civic engagement (greater importance of helping others, higher rates of volunteering often), and this is particularly true for low-socioeconomic status and racial/ethnic minority youth. Potential developmental and structural explanations for these differences are offered. In addition, practical implications of these findings are drawn, and future research directions for scholars studying youth are proposed.

  8. Sustainability and the cultural factor. Results from the Dutch GOES Mass Public Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ester, P.; Vinken, H. [Institute for Globalization and Sustainable Development GLOBUS, Tilburg University, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    GOES stands for the GlObal Environmental Survey. The Dutch government declared sustainable development as the cornerstone of its environmental policy. This strategic policy shift presupposes a concerned citizenry willing to accept the way this might affect private lifestyles. The Dutch GOES MASS PUBLIC MODULE - part of a large-scale international study on citizens' environmental perceptions, values, and behaviors - shows the Dutch are concerned about environmental problems. Though they are most worried about classic environmental problems (e.g. air pollution), they realize that more long-term issues (e.g. global warming) are pressing too. They define themselves as being well-informed, feel the individual can make a difference, display a high self-efficacy, and prioritize ecological concerns over economic gains. They, however, do not accept policies that limit personal choice. The Dutch favor soft policies, voluntary lifestyle change, and softer ways of taking action (e.g. checkbook participation). Water and energy conservation no longer seem on the household agenda. Explaining policy preferences, protective action, and individual environmentally-friendly behavior shows environmental attitudes hardly make a difference. Basic values (e.g. post materialism), supporting the environment over economic growth, and a higher education do have an impact as regards protective action. This is less so for policy preferences or environmentally-friendly behavior. The Dutch GOES MASS PUBLIC MODULE points at the imperative necessity to bridge the grand environmental narratives of policy makers, particularly when they frame ecological problems as global, abstract, and long-term issues, and the here-and-now narratives of the well-informed and concerned citizens in their role of responsible consumers.

  9. A Study of public policies for the management of the intangible cultural heritage in Uruguay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Anon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to perform a review of the evolution of the intangible cultural heritage, to understand the difficulties and limitations that this heritage faces in the present. In a first moment, will present in the role that the State has maintained with this intangible heritage when even the category did not exist as such and the Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Heritage of UNESCO (2003 had not been ratified by Uruguay. Counting with this background will be analyzed the current regulations and decrees governing the field of intangible heritage to understand how different intangible expressions are conceived and managed. Since 2009, Uruguay has two elements declared by UNESCO as Intangible Heritage, the Tango and the Candombe. The second manifestation will be the conducting wire through which will be seen how over the years the expression was worked by the State. Through interviews with authorities from different institutions of intangible heritage and a thorough study of academic texts, the article seeks to understand the framework and the dispute between the Candombe and his interests and the State structure and their possibilities to manage and safeguard this heritage.

  10. [Art, mental health, and public healthcare: profile of a care culture in the history of São Paulo city].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanese, Ana Tereza Costa; D'Oliveira, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas; Lima, Elizabeth Maria Freire de Araújo; Pereira, Lygia Maria de França; Nascimento, Ana Paula; Nascimento, Andréia de Fátima

    2016-01-01

    By studying the inclusion of artistic and cultural activities in the care provided throughout the history of public mental healthcare in greater São Paulo, Brazil, we can better understand and characterize the practices adopted in the Psychosocial Care Centers in the city today. Experiments carried out between the 1920s and 1990s are investigated, based on bibliographic research. The contemporary data were obtained from research undertaken at 126 workshops at 21 Psychosocial Care Centers in the same city between April 2007 and April 2008. The findings indicate that the current trend in mental healthcare, whose clinical perspective spans the realms of art and mental health and has territorial ramifications, has maintained some of the features encountered in earlier mental healthcare experiments.

  11. Family Ties and Health Cross-Nationally: The Contextualizing Role of Familistic Culture and Public Pension Spending in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Although previous research theorizes that cross-national variation in the relationship between family ties and health is due to nation-level differences in culture and policy/economics, no study has examined this theorization empirically. Method. Using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), this study uses multilevel modeling to analyze individual-, nation-, and cross-level effects for 30,291 older adults in 14 nations. Results. Family ties to spouses/partners and parents are associated with better health, but ties to coresident children are associated with poorer health in certain contexts. Familistic culture and public pension spending have a weak but statistically significant moderating effect on the relationship between intergenerational family ties and health. Discussion. This article underscores the complexity of family and highlights the need for continued theorization and measurement at the nation level to promote older adults’ health in diverse contexts. PMID:24043356

  12. Public awareness of aesthetic and other forest values associated with sustainable forest management: a cross-cultural comparison among the public in four countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sang Seop; Innes, John L; Meitner, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Korea, China, Japan and Canada are all members of the Montreal Process (MP). However, there has been little comparative research on the public awareness of forest values within the framework of Sustainable Forest Management, not only between Asia and Canada, but also among these three Asian countries. This is true of aesthetic values, especially as the MP framework has no indicator for aesthetic values. We conducted surveys to identify similarities and differences in the perceptions of various forest values, including aesthetic values, between residents of the four countries: university student groups in Korea, China, Japan and Canada, as well as a more detailed assessment of the attitudes of Koreans by including two additional groups, Korean office workers, and Koreans living in Canada. A multivariate analysis of variance test across the four university student groups revealed significant differences in the rating of six forest functions out of 31. However the same test across the three Korean groups indicated no significant differences indicating higher confidence in the generalizability of our university student comparisons. For the forest aesthetic values, an analysis of variance test showed no significant differences across all groups. The forest aesthetic value was rated 6.95 to 7.98 (out of 10.0) depending on the group and rated relatively highly among ten social values across all the groups. Thurstone scale rankings and relative distances of six major forest values indicated that climate change control was ranked as the highest priority and scenic beauty was ranked the lowest by all the groups. Comparison tests of the frequencies of preferred major forest values revealed no significant differences across the groups with the exception of the Japanese group. These results suggest that public awareness of aesthetic and other forest values are not clearly correlated with the cultural backgrounds of the individuals, and the Korean university students' awareness

  13. THE END OF OBJECTIVITY AND NEUTRALITY IN CIVIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL JOURNALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Dornelles

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article stems from a bibliographic study about American civic journalism and from an exploratory research, using content and documental analysis of data collected by interview, questionnaire and copies of neighborhood and small town newspapers that have community characteristics, resulting in an comparative analysis of the two types of journalistic practice during the 1990s and the first five years of the 21st century. This kind of journalism, marked by the participation of the community, was also called communitary journalism, engaged journalism, popular journalism and public journalism. All of them have in common the centralizing of the profession´s practical objectives on encouraging efforts to advance citizenship, improving public debate, reviewing public life and contributing to the improvement of democracy. Based on this study, a proposal arose regarding some themes that are present in the daily press, especially the environment theme, calling for the end of the practical journalism that advocates a “sham neutrality, impartiality and objectivity”.

  14. The end of objectivity and neutrality in civic and environmental journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Dornelles

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article stems from a bibliographic study about American civic journalism and from an exploratory research, using content and documental analysis of data collected by interview, questionnaire and copies of neighborhood and small town newspapers that have community characteristics, resulting in an comparative analysis of the two types of journalistic practice during the 1990s and the first five years of the 21st century. This kind of journalism, marked by the participation of the community, was also called communitary journalism, engaged journalism, popular journalism and public journalism. All of them have in common the centralizing of the profession´s practical objectives on encouraging efforts to advance citizenship, improving public debate, reviewing public life and contributing to the improvement of democracy. Based on this study, a proposal arose regarding some themes that are present in the daily press, especially the environment theme, calling for the end of the practical journalism that advocates a “sham neutrality, impartiality and objectivity”.

  15. The civic status of Theodotos in Lysias III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Cairns

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper revives the view, advanced in the past by several authorities but currently neglected, that τοῦτο τὸ ... παιδίον in Lysias 3.33 refers, not to Theodotos, the young man over whom the parties to the case had clashed, but to the speaker’s slave ἀκόλουθος. The problems usually perceived over the civic status of Theodotos vanish if this view is accepted.

  16. PEMBUDAYAAN DEMOKRASI DI PESANTREN DALAM MENGEMBANGKAN CIVIC DISPOSITION SANTRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supangat Supangat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article is motivated by issues attitude and character of citizenship among the younger generation which is very alarming. The understanding of democracy that one result of excessive democratic freedoms. Disorientation attitude and character citizenship (civic disposition experienced by almost all elements of the nation thus eliminating the identity of the nation and much of the value-milai democracy. Pesantren Daarut Tauhid as modern schools also provide planting of democratic values among his students. The data were taken with the study documentation, observations, interviews, and the active participation of researchers in the field. The results of this study found: democracy education should be introduced in educational institutions schools, for boarding institutions are educational institutions which make the process of developing the potential of learners (students. Through the process of democratic education will produce a democratic man.For students develop civic disposition, pendidikkan process conducted in schools in various ways; 1 exemplary; 2 exercise and habituation; 3 educate through ibrah (taking lessons; 4 educate through mauidzah (advice; 5 educate through discipline; and 6 educate targib wa tahzid (inducements and threats   Abstrak: Artikel ini dilatarbelakangi oleh persoalan sikap dan watak kewarganegaran di kalangan generasi muda yang sangat memprihatinkan. Pemahaman terhadap demokrasi yang salah mengakibatkan kebebasan berdemokrasi yang kebablasan. Disorientasi sikap dan watak kewarganegaraan (civic disposition hampir dialami oleh seluruh elemen bangsa sehingga menghilangkan jati diri anak bangsa dan jauh dari nilai-milai demokrasi. Pesantren Daarut Tauhid sebagai pesantren modern juga memberikan penanaman nilai-nilai demokrasi dikalangan para santrinya. Data dalam penelitian ini diambil dengan studi dokumentasi, observasi, wawancara, dan partisipasi aktif peneliti dilapangan. Hasil dari penelitian ini

  17. Putting NIMBY in perspective: The cultural origins of public response to hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, P.H. III; Lilie, S.A.; Vittes, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The study of public response to the siting of hazardous waste treatment facilities has found a natural home in the literature on localized reaction, the so-called NIMBY (not in my backyard) syndrome. This concern for dealing with NIMBY in practical terms has fallen short in two respects. First, NIMBY has become isolated from two other basic responses: generalized acceptance (open-quotes Yes, in my backyardclose quotes or YIMBY) and generated opposition (open-quotes Not in anybody's backyardclose quotes or NAMBY). Second, too narrow a focus on NIMBY neglects a potentially revealing explanatory analogy: the parallel between the controversy over hazardous waste facilities and other technical controversies, such as the decades-old debate over nuclear power. In this paper, we review three theories that have been developed to explain general attitudes toward risk-bearing technologies. Using data from a statewide random sample, we then look to see if variables that figure prominently in these theories help shape the NIMBY, YIMBY or NAMBY responses to hazardous waste facilities

  18. The Perforated Curtain: Configuring the Public and the Private in Calcutta’s Cabin Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twisha Deb

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available When I was very young, eating out was not a regular activity for our family. On one of such rare occasion we ended up in a restaurant where the waiter made us sit in a cubicle with a curtain on one side. You pull the curtain and it creates a weird sense of privacy. That idea of intimate space in the middle of a busy city intrigued me. Later I found many restaurants in Kolkata where they have this sort of cabin, a private eating area. Starting from pre-independence when they were there to provide some privacy to the ladies of the family who were not allowed to eat in public, the cabin witnessed many private affairs with time, from political discussions to lovers’ silence. With changing time and the emergence of posh cafes with quirky interiors, the shabby little cabins have lost their charm, but the almost empty cabins, some even without the curtains stand there to tell a story of a time gone by.

  19. The development and deployment of low-carbon energy technologies: The role of economic interests and cultural worldviews on public support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, Todd L.; García, Jorge H.; Kallbekken, Steffen; Torvanger, Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale deployment of low-carbon energy technologies is crucial to mitigating climate change, and public support is an important barrier to policies and projects that facilitate deployment. This paper provides insights to the origins of public opposition that can impede the adoption of low-carbon technologies by investigating how perceptions are shaped by local economic interests and individual cultural worldviews. The research considers both carbon capture and storage and wind energy technologies because they differ in maturity, economic impact and resource base. Further, for each technology, the research examines support for two types of policies: deployment in local community and public funding for research and development. Results indicate the influence of economic interests and cultural worldviews is policy specific. Individual cultural worldviews do not affect support for the deployment of technology, but they do significantly influence a person's support for publicly funded research and development. Conversely, local economic interests have a significant role in determining support for deployment, while they do not affect support for research and development. - Highlights: • We investigate factors that shape public support for low-carbon energy technologies. • We consider two low-carbon energy technologies and two stages of implementation. • Economic interests and cultural worldviews influence support but in different stages

  20. Practice of Participatory Governance in Public Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алена Сергеевна Перезолова

    2018-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the idea of participatory democracy. The article provides case study of pilot projects aimed to engage citizens for public participation in different forms, such as: participatory budgeting, participatory modeling, public consultations and other participatory practices. The concept of public participation implied in most common methods of consultation as local meetings, public hearings, creation of working groups, public dialogue commissions, workshops, discussion forums on Web sites, contests of ideas and projects, crowdfunding projects, cooperation citizens initiatives and more consumerist type as polls and focus groups. The ability to work together becomes a resource for growth of civic consciousness, where citizens become active actors, who able to participate in public policy, resource mobilization, independent projects for realization and formation of social capital. The challenge for participatory democracy is maturity degree of civil society and examined examples of participatory practices are pilot projects that aimed formation of civic consciousness.