WorldWideScience

Sample records for city school children

  1. School Social Work with Grieving Children in the Twin Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn-Lee, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    A review of the literature reveals few articles that deal with social work with grieving children in the public school setting. The purpose of this research is to describe and analyze the services that school social workers provide to grieving children. Grieving children are defined as those who have experienced loss through death of someone…

  2. Dietary levels for Tri-City elementary school children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldat, J.K.; Honstead, J.F.

    1968-02-26

    This program investigates dietary pathways affecting school-age children. Primarily elementary school children are approached with this study, including ages 6 through 12. A much smaller number of children aged 13 and 14 have also been contacted. The research includes measurements of the body burdens of radioactive materials in children and a study of the children's diets. This report presents a partial compilation of the dietary levels obtained for children of different ages. These data are tabulated here for reference purposes. 3 refs., 13 tabs.

  3. Prevalence of dental fluorosis among school children residing in Kanpur City, Uttar Pradesh, India

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    Ashish Bhalla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to find the prevalence of dental fluorosis among school children residing in Kanpur city, Uttar Pradesh India. Materials and Methods: A total of 1343 school children, residing in the city since childhood and consuming the groundwater, in the age group of 7-17 years was selected from various schools. Schools were selected from all four directions of the city. Children were categorized in five age groups and were examined for dental fluorosis. Dean′s criteria for assessment of dental fluorosis were used, and observations were recorded on a study specific performa. Results: Among the 1343 children examined, 243 (18% were found to be having dental fluorosis, among which number of males (131 was more than females (112. Among the different grades of fluorosis observed, mild dental fluorosis was observed in most of the cases (158. It was observed that the southern part of the city had a maximum number of cases of dental fluorosis. Conclusion: It was evident from the results that the city had a good number of cases of dental fluorosis and that the groundwater in certain areas had more than normal quantity of fluoride. Since this study was the first attempt in this area, more studies can be undertaken to substantiate our findings.

  4. A comparative study of nutritional status between government and private primary school children of Mysore city

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    N C Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: School health has been acknowledged as important since the beginning of 20 th century. Nutritional status is a major component of school health services. This study was undertaken to assess the nutritional status of government and private primary school children of Mysore city. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study design was adopted. One private and one government school were selected using multistage stratified random sampling method. A total of 1566 school children aged 6-12 years were measured for height and weight. Data on demographic details, dietary habits, and physical activity of child and education status, occupation, monthly income of their parents were collected. Results: Of 1566 children, 385 (24.5% were underweight, 132 (8.4% were overweight, and 65 (4.1% were obese. Majority of underweight children 226 (32.5% were found in government school. Except for two overweight children in government school, all overweight and obese children were found in private schools. Socioeconomic status, dietary habits, and physical activity of the child were found to be the determinants of their nutritional status. Conclusion: This study attempt to highlight the dual nutritional problem, under-nutrition among the lower socioeconomic class on one hand and growing epidemic of obesity among the affluent on the other.

  5. Dental Treatment Needs in Vancouver Inner-City Elementary School-Aged Children

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    F. Samim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To examine the dental treatment needs of inner-city Vancouver elementary school-aged children and relate them to sociodemographic characteristics. Methods. A census sampling comprising 562 children from six out of eight eligible schools was chosen (response rate was 65.4%. Dental treatment needs were assessed based on criteria from the World Health Organization. Results. Every third child examined needed at least one restorative treatment. A higher proportion of children born outside Canada were in need of more extensive dental treatments such as pulp care and extractions compared to the children born in Canada. There were no statistically significant differences in dental treatment needs between age, gender, or income groups or between children with or without dental insurance (Chi Squared P>0.05. The best significant predictors (Linear Multiple Regression, P>0.05 of higher dental treatment needs were being born outside Canada, gender, time of last dental visit, and family income. Having dental insurance did not associate with needing less treatment. Conclusion. A high level of unmet dental treatment needs (32% was found in inner-city Vancouver elementary school-aged children. Children born outside Canada, particularly the ones who recently arrived to Canada, needed more extensive dental treatments than children born in Canada.

  6. [Results of school children with enterobiasis in Tainan city, treated with mebendazole].

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    Chang, J H; Huang, W H; Chen, E R; Hu, S C

    1995-01-01

    There were 2,471 school children suffering from enterobiasis in six primary schools of Tainan city. The infected children in five primary schools, Po-Ai, Yung-Hua, Fu-Hsiao, Pao-Jeng and Hsin-Nan, were treated with one single dosage of 100 mg mebendazole. In Shih-Men primary school, the sixth, the students were given placebos as a control group. Negative conversion rates of infected children were examined after three weeks of chemotherapy and school children in the six primary schools were surveyed for enterobiasis two months after chemotherapy to obtain infection rates. The method of examination was two consecutive-day adhesive cellophane perianal swabs. With the purpose of evaluating the efficiency of treatment, positive reduction rates were used and calculated according to the infection rates of school children gained before and after chemotherapy. Those rates in Pao-Jeng, Fu-Hsiao, Yung-Hua, Po-Ai and Hsin-Nan were 62.1%, 47.8%, 41.8%, 37.1% and 3.3%, respectively, and in Shih-Men 3.9%. Judging the data obtained from each grade or each class of schools showed that the efficacy of chemotherapy in reducing the rate of infection was variable. Hence, one single dose of mebendazole and education on personal hygiene were not sufficient to reduce the prevalence of enterobiasis in primary schools. This was because the cycle of E. vermicularis was relatively short, cutting out the routes of transmission was very difficult, and the factors involved were very complex. Overall, though the positive reduction rate presented in Hsin-Nan primary school showed nearly no success in reducing the infection, the other four schools showed valuable rates. Whether continue a treatment, of about three-months in duration, can inhibit the prevalence of enterobiasis among children in primary schools or not will need further study.

  7. Prevalence of obesity and its influencing factor among affluent school children of Davangere city

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    Kumar S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood obesity is a fast emerging problem for which national representative data is scarce. Effective preventive of adult obesity will require prevention and management of childhood obesity. Objectives: To know the prevalence of obesity in two affluent school children of Davangere city studying between 5th and 10th standard and to identify the factors influencing childhood obesity. Methods: A cross sectional study followed by a case control study was conducted in two affluent schools of Davangere city - Sri. Siddaganga and Sri. Taralabalu residential school. A total of 1496, school children studying between 5th & 10th standard aged between 10 and 15 years were enrolled and data on family history of obesity, diet, snacking habits and physical activity was collected. Results: Out of 1496 children 86 were obese. Prevalence of obesity was 5.74 %. Prevalence of obesity was more in girls (8.82% than boys ( 4.42%. Prevalence of obesity increased, with increase in age in both boys and Girls. Family history of obesity, snacking of high energy foods and lack of physical activity were the important influencing factors of obesity. Conclusion : Consumption of high fat and high energy (Junk foods and snacking in between the meals should be avoided by children. Health education should be given to parents, teachers and children regarding dietary habit and sedentary life style.

  8. Prevalence of obesity and its influencing factor among affluent school children of Davangere city

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar S; Mahabalaraju D; Anuroopa M

    2007-01-01

    Background: Childhood obesity is a fast emerging problem for which national representative data is scarce. Effective preventive of adult obesity will require prevention and management of childhood obesity. Objectives: To know the prevalence of obesity in two affluent school children of Davangere city studying between 5th and 10th standard and to identify the factors influencing childhood obesity. Methods: A cross sectional study followed by a case control study was conducted in two afflu...

  9. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices on Oral Health of Public School Children of Batangas City

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    JENNIFER U. DOTADO-MADERAZO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries among Filipino children ranked second worst among 21 World Health Organization Western Pacific countries. A recent National Oral Health Survey showed that 97 percent of Grade 1 students and 82 percent of Grade 2 students surveyed suffered from tooth decay. WHO (2007 urges governments to “ promote oral health in schools, aiming at developing healthy lifestyles and self care practices in children”. The study assessed the dental health education of public school children in Batangas City to determine the knowledge, attitude and practices of the respondents on oral health; to determine the significant relationship between the profile of the respondents and their assessment on the dental health education and propose a program to improve the project. This study used a descriptive type of research and distributed a standardized questionnaire to 279 public school children of Ilijan, Sta. Rita Kalsada and Julian Pastor Memorial Elementary School. The participants were selected randomly. The findings of the study showed that there is an observed significant to highly significant relationship between the school and the assessment on oral health in terms of knowledge, attitude and practices. This means that their assessment is affected by the school where they belong.

  10. There Are No Children Here: The Case of an Inner-City School Addressing Issues Facing Children and Families Living in Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Mariel; Boske, Christa

    2013-01-01

    This case is based on real-life experiences of community school members within Horner School--an inner-city public school. Specifically, the case explores challenges faced by Cathleen, a 1st-year, White, female principal, who was hired by central office to "revamp a charter school" to promote a quality education for all children. The case raises…

  11. Summer camp and self-esteem of school-age inner-city children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Readdick, Christine A; Schaller, G Robert

    2005-08-01

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that a session of summer camp would increase the self-esteem of economically disadvantaged, school-age children from New York's inner-city neighborhoods. This study was conducted at a small, coeducational residential summer camp in the Pocono Mountains designed for children ages 6-12 years from low-income areas of New York City. During each of four 12-day sessions, the Piers-Harris Children's Self-concept Scale was administered as a pretest and posttest to a sample of 68 children (36 boys and 32 girls; 33 African American, 34 Hispanic, and 1 Asian) of 742 attending camp for the sumnmer. Children scored significantly higher on the measure of self-esteem at the end of camp than at the beginning. Positive descriptions and ratings of self on popularity increased significantly. Observations and interviews with children suggested physical and social environmental features, such as contact with nature and having the same counselor as a previous year, may support self-esteem. Findings are discussed within a framework for biophilia, an innate urge to affiliate with nature which unfolds from earliest childhood on.

  12. A Survey on Injury Incidence in School Children in Shantou City, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI-PING LI; SHENG WANG; GE HUANG; JIA-YI LUO

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To study incidence characteristics and causes of injury, and its medicalconsequences in school children of China. Methods A total of 2 553 school children aged 7-16years were recruited from Shantou City in Gunagdong by cluster sampling method, and wereinvestigated with questionnaires on cases of injuries occurred among them from October 1, 1996 toSeptember 30, 1997. Results Injuries tended to increase with children's age, with an overallincidence rate of 37.96%, higher in boys than in girls (P<0.05); and 38.1% of children had more thantwo episodes of injury during this period. Falls took leading place of injury incidence both in boys andgirls and in all age groups. Most injuries occurred when they were playing, sporting, riding andwalking at home or in school. Self-inflicted injury ranked the first place of all injuries, followed byhurt caused by others (classmates, sibling or others). Moderate and serious injuries accounted for 8%of the total with a disability rate of 121.4/100 000. Conclusions Currently, injury has become oneof the serious public health problems in China. For the improvement of children survival, it is crucialto reduce their injury to strengthen research on child safety and to implement safety-promotionprograms.

  13. Fast food intake and prevalence of obesity in school children in Riyadh City.

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    Almuhanna, Monira Abdulrahman; Alsaif, Mohammed; Alsaadi, Muslim; Almajwal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become a new challenge for healthcare providers. The issue is not limited to certain parts of the world; its prevalence is increasing worldwide. The causes of obesity are poorly understood and continue to be debated and studied. It is a multifactorial disorder which involves dietary, behavioral, environmental as well as genetic factors. The increased consumption of more energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods with high levels of sugar and saturated fats, combined with reduced physical activity, have led to high obesity rates among children. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dietary intake on the occurrence of childhood obesity, and study other associated factors including the education, occupation and income of parents and the living status. Normal healthy school girls (n =196) and school boys (n = 85) between the age of 6- 15 were recruited for the study. We found that obesity among children in Riyadh City was significantly associated with fast food intake (p = 0.0280). It was also observed that 72.5% of the overweight or obese students consumed fast food at least 4 times/week, and the other 15.9% were taking fast food 1- 3 times/week, while only 11.6% of the same overweight or obese group did not consume any fast food/ week. Father's and mother's occupations were not significantly correlated to their children's body weight. The prevalence of childhood obesity is changing and increasing yearly and is attributed to the nutritional risk factors for the Saudi school-age children. It is interesting to know that most of overweight or obese school students belonged to the families of highincome. Parents must take necessary precautions for the diet of their children and should adopt healthy life style in order to prevent or manage obesity of their children.

  14. Fast food intake and prevalence of obesity in school children in Riyadh City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaif, Mohammed; Alsaadi, Muslim; Almajwal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Childhood obesity has become a new challenge for healthcare providers. The issue is not limited to certain parts of the world; its prevalence is increasing worldwide. The causes of obesity are poorly understood and continue to be debated and studied. It is a multifactorial disorder which involves dietary, behavioral, environmental as well as genetic factors. The increased consumption of more energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods with high levels of sugar and saturated fats, combined with reduced physical activity, have led to high obesity rates among children. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dietary intake on the occurrence of childhood obesity, and study other associated factors including the education, occupation and income of parents and the living status. Normal healthy school girls (n =196) and school boys (n = 85) between the age of 6- 15 were recruited for the study. We found that obesity among children in Riyadh City was significantly associated with fast food intake (p = 0.0280). It was also observed that 72.5% of the overweight or obese students consumed fast food at least 4 times/week, and the other 15.9% were taking fast food 1- 3 times/week, while only 11.6% of the same overweight or obese group did not consume any fast food/ week. Father’s and mother’s occupations were not significantly correlated to their children’s body weight. The prevalence of childhood obesity is changing and increasing yearly and is attributed to the nutritional risk factors for the Saudi school-age children. It is interesting to know that most of overweight or obese school students belonged to the families of highincome. Parents must take necessary precautions for the diet of their children and should adopt healthy life style in order to prevent or manage obesity of their children. PMID:27493393

  15. Overweight and obesity among school-going children of Lucknow city

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    Rajaat Vohra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood obesity is increasingly being observed with changing lifestyles of families. The magnitude of overweight ranges from 9% to 27.5% and obesity ranges from 1% to 12.9% among Indian children. Objectives: The present study was undertaken to study the magnitude of overweight/obesity and its determinants among children in Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: A list of government and private school was procured from Office of Basic Shiksha Adhikari. Three government and three private schools were selected by Simple Random Sampling. Students of 5th to 12th grades available at the time of study were included as study unit. Predesigned and pretested questionnaire was used to elicit the information on family characteristics and individual characteristics. Height and weight were measured and BMI was calculated. Children with BMI of 25 and above were considered overweight and children with BMI more than 30 were considered obese. Results: Overweight and obesity was found to be 4.17% and 0.73%, respectively; they together constitute 4.91% for overweight/obesity. The study revealed that the important correlates of overweight/obesity were father′s education, father′s occupation, class, children playing outdoor games for less than 30 min, and those consuming fast foods. Conclusions : Children of higher classes (above 8th standard belonging to higher socioeconomic group with less outdoor activities and consuming fast foods were more predisposed to overweight/obesity. As a preventive strategy, there is a need to apply health and nutritional education programs for inculcating healthy life styles, and incorporating more outdoor activities in Physical Education Department of school curriculum.

  16. Prevalence of dental fluorosis among 12–15 years school children of Bharatpur city: A cross-sectional study

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    Harsh Vardhan Dubey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Healthy teeth are important for any section of society. Dental caries, the product of man's progress toward civilization, has a very high morbidity potential. Fluoride has been recognized as one of the most influential factor responsible for the observed decline of caries among children as well as adults of these countries. While fluoride is accepted as an effective method to prevent caries, the excessive consumption of fluoride can put teeth at risk of developing dental fluorosis. Aims and Objectives: To assess the prevalence of dental fluorosis among 12–15 years old government and private school children of Bharatpur city, Rajasthan. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was carried out on total 1400 school children, out of which 700 school children were from government schools and 700 were from private schools. Simple random sampling methodology was used to select the sample. The subjects were examined for dental fluorosis according to WHO 1997 assessment form. Results: The prevalence of dental fluorosis was found higher among government school children, that is, 54.5% when compared to private school children, that is, 45.5% respectively, and this difference was found to be statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: The study showed the increased prevalence of dental fluorosis among government school children as compared to private school children. Dental fluorosis was found to be the major public health problem among both government and private school children of Bharatpur city which needed immediate attention. Regular dental check-ups and routine oral hygiene practice will enable them to lead a healthier life.

  17. Prevalence of iodine deficiency disorders among 6 - 12 years school children of Gulbarga city

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    Raveesh P M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Iodine Deficiency Disorders is among the easiest and least expensive of all nutrient disorders to prevent. Salt iodization is currently the most widely used strategy to control and eliminate Iodine Deficiency Disorders. The Central Government has issued the notification banning the sale of non-iodated salt for direct human consumption in the entire country with effect from 17th May, 2006 under the Prevention of Food Adulteration Act 1954.  Rationale: 6 out of 17 districts surveyed in Karnataka were endemic to Iodine deficiency with goiter prevalence rates in the range of 10.67–41.11%. In Gulbarga more than 90% of the families were consuming salt with Iodine content less than 15 ppm.  Objectives: To assess the magnitude of the Iodine Deficiency Disorders among the children. To determine the Iodine content of the salt used at houses of the children and to find out the availability of adequately iodized salt at the retail shops. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study among 6-12 Years School Children conducted in Gulbarga city. Cluster sampling methodology and surveillance methods for iodine deficiency disorders as recommended by WHO/ICCIDD were used. The study included 1620 school children with equal proportion of girls and boys. The salt samples were tested on spot with MBI kit provided by UNICEF, and Iodine concentration was recorded as 0, <15 and >15 ppm. Results:  The overall prevalence of goitre was 4.32%, there was no significant gender variation in total goitre prevalence. The association between anaemia and the prevalence of total goitre was statistically significant. Proportion of the children consuming adequately iodised salt was 51.1%. Among salt samples collected from retail shops, only 44.62% samples were adequately iodised. Conclusion: prevalence of goitre was 4.32% which is below the cut-off to indicate endemicity of IDD. Adequately iodised salt availability and consumption among household is not

  18. Tendency for Evolution of High Myopia in 308 Chinese School Children from Xi'an City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanming Chen; Yining Shi; Le Yang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the refractive status,.especially the ten-dency for evolution of high myopia,.in eyes of Chinese school children from Xi'an city. Methods:.The study was conducted in 11514 eyes of the 5757 students aged between 7~18 years in Xi’an city primary and high schools..The inclusion criterion was>-6D of the spherical equivalent refraction..The object ophthalmic examinations were done, included non-cycloplegic objective refraction, vi-sual acuity,.intraocular pressure,.fundus evaluation by oph-thalmologists and nurses with professional training..Specially designed questionnaires were filled in and the data were statis-tically analyzed with SPSS10.0. Results:.Of 11514 eyes,.the detection rate was 81.4% (9376 eyes) for myopia and 5.3%(615 eyes) for high myopia. High myopia was found in 2.6%. (300 eyes).of right eyes,.2.7%(315 eyes) in left eyes, and 2.4% (275 eyes) were in boys and 2.9% (340 eyes) in girls. Among 12 school grades,.the detection rates of high myopia increased significantly with stu-dent age,.with 0.9% in the 1st grade of primary school and 12.5% in the 3rd year of senior middle school..The average refractive error of spherical equivalent refraction was (-7.43± 1.29) D with 95% confidence interval (-7.54,-7.33). No sig-nificant differences were found between the right and left eyes or both genders..The distribution of myopic severity was low-est(-6D).in primary school students younger than 12 years, was higher (-8D) in junior middle school students older than 13 years, and highest (-13D) in senior middle school students. Conclusion: A continuous growth was evident in the severity of high myopia throughout 12 years of primary and middle school except for the first year of primary school, with growth occurring in two transitional stages between the senior primary and junior middle school years,.and between the junior and senior middle school years..The distribution of high myopia was lowest,.at -6D,.in primary school,.increased to -8D in

  19. The influence of cultural and racial identification on the psychosocial adjustment of inner-city African American children in school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Duane E; Townsend, Tiffany G; Belgrave, Faye Z

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship and combined influence of racial identity and Africentric values on African American children's psychosocial adjustment. Participants were 104 (53 males, 51 females) African American fourth-grade students attending an inner-city public school in a northeastern city. Child and teacher ratings were used to assess the relationship between racial identity, Africentric values, and several indices of child psychosocial adjustment, including child behavior control, school interest, and teacher perceptions of child strengths and problems in the classroom. Child self-esteem and the effects of gender and cohort were used as covariates in several analyses in the study. Overall, findings from the study supported the usefulness of combining racial identity and Africentric values into a single model of ethnic identification for African American children. Implications for risk prevention and enhancement of psychosocial functioning among African American children are discussed.

  20. Oral health status of 5 years and 12 years school going children in Chennai city - An epidemiological study

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    Mahesh Kumar P

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available India, a developing country, faces many challenges in rendering oral health needs. The majority of Indian population resides in rural areas of which more than 40% constitute children. The purpose of this study was to assess the oral health status of 5 years and 12 years school going children in Chennai city. The study population consisted of 1200 school children of both the sexes (600 private and 600 corporation school children in 30 schools, which had been selected randomly. The survey is based on WHO, 1999 Oral Health Assessment, which has been modified by including gingival assessment, enamel opacities/ hypoplasia for 5 years. Evaluation of the oral health status of these children revealed, dental caries is the most prevalent disease affecting permanent teeth, more than primary teeth and more in corporation than in private schools, thereby, correlating with the socioeconomic status. It may be concluded that the greatest need of dental health education is at an early age including proper instruction of oral hygiene practices and school based preventive programs, which would help in improving preventive dental behaviour and attitude which is beneficial for life time.

  1. The oral health status of institutionalized children that is, Juvenile home and orphanage home run by Gujarat state Government, in Vadodara city with that of normal school children

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    Ankita Gaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental Caries and Periodontal Diseases are widespread and virtually everybody suffers from them, and in global scenario dental caries are the most prevalent oral diseases among children. Observation home serve as temporary holding facilities of juvenile and orphans who are arrested by police or found to be living in neglected. Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate oral health status (caries prevalence, dmft, DMF, OHI index of the institutionalized children that is, juvenile home, orphanage home run by Gujarat Government in Vadodara city with that of normal school children. Design: Cross-sectional study was conducted among the 166 children residing in juvenile and orphanage home with 384 school children. Results: The prevalence of dental caries was higher among the school going children (62.12% with juvenile group having (52.4% but the oral hygiene was poor among the juvenile group children with respect to those of school going group. Conclusion: It is concluded from the present study that juvenile group children had lower caries prevalence but poor oral hygiene status in contrast to school going children.

  2. A prospective study of hearing impairment in school going children of Ghaziabad city attending a tertiary care hospital

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    Saud Lateef Chishty

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Overcrowding, poor hygiene, socio-economic status, climate, lack of resources to avail medical facilities, poor medical awareness have their bearing on the incidence of hearing loss. The family of each hearing-impaired child has its own cultural, social, educational, and financial background, and its own special needs. The aim of this study is to determine the percentage of hearing impaired school going children in Ghaziabad city. Methods: The material for the present study were a representative sample constituting 1000 school children selected from various localities of Ghaziabad city within age group of 6-12 years. The children belonged to all the strata of society and children from both sexes were evaluated for hearing loss and its underlying etiological factors. Children were subjected to detailed ENT examination in our OPD. Results: In the present study sample the incidence of hearing loss is 9.3%. The maximum cases 60.22% belonged to the low socio-economic strata. A statistically significant difference of distribution by gender was noticed with a male preponderance (61.29% as against 38.71% for females. The hearing loss in majority of cases was of a mild degree i.e., 26 to 45 dB (34.41% of which majority of cases (87.10% had conductive loss. Wax was the commonest cause of hearing loss (41.94%. CSOM was found in 21.50 % of all cases. Peak prevalence of hearing loss was found at 8 years of age, again declining after that from 20.43 % to 5.38 % by 12 years of age. Also it was observed that 59.14% children were living in crowded localities of city and 40.86% were living in non- crowded/open locality which is again statistically significant (P and #8804;0.05. Conclusion: The inferences drawn from the present study substantiates the view point of earlier workers that school screening is the most effective method of diagnosing deafness in school going children and should be extended to all schools in all the areas. Proper assessment

  3. Severe Obesity Among Children in New York City Public Elementary and Middle Schools, School Years 2006–07 Through 2010–11

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    Day, Sophia E.; Konty, Kevin J.; Leventer-Roberts, Maya; Nonas, Cathy; Tiffany G Harris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although studies have shown that childhood obesity overall is on the decline among New York City (NYC) public school children, the prevalence of severe childhood obesity has not been studied. Methods We used height and weight measurements of 947,765 NYC public school students aged 5 to 14 years in kindergarten through 8th grade (K–8), from school years 2006–07 through 2010–11. We used age- and sex-specific body mass index (BMI) percentiles according to Centers for Disease Control...

  4. Caries dental en escolares del Distrito Federal Dental caries in school children in Mexico City

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    MARÍA ESTHER IRIGOYEN-CAMACHO

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Presentar las estimaciones de la prevalencia y la severidad de caries dental, así como las necesidades de tratamiento de la población escolar del Distrito Federal examinada en la encuesta de caries dental que se llevó a cabo en 1988 con la finalidad de obtener datos basales sobre caries en los escolares al inicio del Programa Nacional de Fluoruración de la Sal en México. Material y métodos. La población de estudio fue seleccionada empleando un marco muestral basado en el listado de las escuelas primarias y los jardines de niños registrados por la Secretaría de Educación Pública en 1988. En el examen de la cavidad bucal de los escolares se utilizaron los criterios diagnósticos señalados por la Organización Mundial de la Salud. Resultados. Un total de 4 475 escolares de 5 a 12 años de edad participaron en el estudio. La prevalencia de caries dental en la población alcanzó 90.5%. El índice de necesidades de tratamiento fue elevado (79.6%. El promedio de los índices de caries en los escolares de 12 años de edad fue CPOD= 4.42 (desviación estándar –DE– 3.2 y CPOS= 6.53 (DE 4.8. Conclusiones. Los resultados de la encuesta subrayan la pertinencia de un programa preventivo de amplia cobertura, como el de fluoruración de la sal. Además, muestran que se requiere elaborar estrategias para mejorar el acceso de la población escolar a los servicios odontológicos del sistema de salud en México.Objective. To estimate the prevalence and severity of dental caries and the dental treatment necessities of school children in Mexico City. The studied population was surveyed for dental caries in 1988 to obtain data necessary for the National Program of Salt Fluoridation in Mexico. Material and methods. The population was selected with a sample frame based on a list of Kindergardens and primary schools registered at the Ministry of Public Education in 1988. The oral cavity examination was based on diagnostic criteria marked by the

  5. PREVALENCE OF OBESITY AND ITS INFLUENCING FACTORS AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN OF BAGALKOT CITY, KARNATAKA

    OpenAIRE

    Mannapur; Nyamagouda; Dorle; Jayaraj R; Kulkarni; Siera

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity are the fifth leading risk of global deaths. Once considered a high income country problem, overweight and obesity are now raising in low income and middle income countries especially in urban settings . OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of obesity in school children and to identify the factors influencing childhood obesity. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: The present study has been undertaken at one of the school of Vidyagir...

  6. School and Behavioral Outcomes among Inner City Children: Five-Year Follow-Up

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    Kim, Seijeoung; Mazza, Jessica; Zwanziger, Jack; Henry, David

    2014-01-01

    Educational achievement is a key determinant of future life chances, but children growing up in poverty tend to do worse by many academic measures. Family, school, and neighborhood contextual characteristics may affect academic outcomes. In an attempt to explore neighborhood and individual-level factors, we performed multilevel analyses to explain…

  7. PSYCHOMOTOR PROFILE OF CHILDREN WITH ADHD-A SCHOOL IN THE CITY OF PRESIDENTE PRUDENTE

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    Camila Rodrigues Costa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Attention Deficit Hyperactivity/ Impulsiveness Disorder (ADHD is a neurobehavioral disorder which is common in the population of children at school age and the psychomotor activity in these children can be substantially lower than that expected in 30% to 50% of the cases. Thus, this study aims at describing the psychomotor profile of children diagnosed with ADHD. Initially, the research was assessed and authorized by the Education Department of Presidente Prudente-SP. Five children with the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity/ Impulsiveness isorder took part in the study, none of them carrying comorbidities, aging between six and nine years, of both sexes, regularly enrolled in a public school in President Prudente-SP and participating in an extension project developed by the school. For the collection of data, the Motor Development Scale was used, as described by Rosa Neto (2002,in which all the tests proposed were used: fine motor skills, global motor skills, balance, body schema/ speed, spatial and temporal organization. The test was individually applied, in a single session, lasting 35 minutes on average. The data were analyzed according to the criteria established by the author. By analyzing the data, the motor performance of the children was between lower normal and medium.

  8. Overweight and obesity in school-age children and teenagers of a urban area of Riobamba city, Ecuador

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    Patricio David Ramos-Padilla

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity among school students and adolescents of a urban area of the city of Riobamba.Material and Methods: 3680 students between 5 and 19 years, 1581 school students and 2099 adolescents enrolled in 65 units of basic education and high school were studied. The variables studied were: type of educational establishment, sex, age, weight and height. For the diagnosis of nutritional status, the WHO-2007 reference standards of body mass index for were used. School children and adolescents whose standard deviation was found <–2 were considered thin, between –2 and +1 normal weight, >+1 to +2 overweight and >+2 as obesity. Data were analyzed by the computer programs: Anthro Plus v1.0.4 and SPSS v20.Results: Being overweight affects 24.1% of school/adolescents; overweight, 17.8% and 6.3% obese. Excess weight is statistically higher (p<0.0001 in school (27.7% than in adolescents (21.5%. Similarly, excess weight is statistically higher (p<0.0001 in children men (31.0% than in women (24,4% at school age. And it is statistically higher (p<0.0001 in adolescent females (23.3% than in adolescent males (19.8%. Being overweight in school/adolescents affects: private schools (27.7%, treasury missionary establishments (25.3% and fiscal establishments (22.9%. Similarly, excess weight is greater among schoolchildren in private schools (28.1% than in fiscal establishments, 27.7% (non statistically p = 0.9984. And it is statistically greater (p <0.0001 in adolescents of private establishments (27.6% than in fiscal establishments (18.4%.Conclusions: The prevalence of weight excess (overweight / obesity in school students and young urban area of the city of Riobamba is high (24.1%, and is higher in school age (27.7% than in adolescents (21,5%. An intervention is needed to prevent and treat this serious public health trend.

  9. Anthropometric variables, lifestyle and sports in school-age children: comparison between the cities of Bologna and Crotone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toselli, S; Brasili, P; Iuliano, T; Spiga, F

    2014-12-01

    Weight disorders are rapidly increasing in childhood. In Italy a strong geographic North-South gradient of overweight and obesity has been reported. The purpose of this study is to examine anthropometric variables, physical activity and lifestyles in school-age children in the cities of Bologna and Crotone. The sample consists of 963 children attending primary schools, aged 6-10 years. Height, weight, triceps, and subscapular skinfolds were measured for each child; body mass index (BMI) and percentage of fat mass were calculated. Physical activity was determined through an interview with each child. Another questionnaire was submitted to parents, in order to obtain information on sleep duration, means of transport and type of physical activity. In the city of Bologna, the mean values of anthropometric variables were: height (boys - 1,335 mm, girls - 1,332 mm), BMI (boys - 17.8 kg/m(2), girls - 17.3 kg/m(2)), and the proportion of overweight and obese individuals was: boys - 20.6%, girls - 12.7%. In Crotone the mean values were: height (boys - 1,275 mm, girls - 1,265 mm), BMI (boys - 19.4 kg/m(2), girls - 19.3 kg/m(2)), and the proportion of overweight and obese individuals was: boys - 46.7%, girls - 49.0%. The results have demonstrated significant correlations of lifestyle and physical activity with children's weight status. In Crotone there is a larger variation of weight disorders with higher percentages of overweight children than in Bologna. The children in Crotone are engaged in sedentary activities for a significantly longer time than children in Bologna, who are more physically active. The data show a strong North-South gradient concerning not only distribution of weight status, but also lifestyles especially including participation in sports and sedentary behavior. Our study also provides meaningful suggestions how to define lifestyles in order to achieve an optimal health status during growth.

  10. Dietary intake, lung function and airway inflammation in Mexico City school children exposed to air pollutants

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    Díaz-Sánchez David

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Air pollutant exposure has been associated with an increase in inflammatory markers and a decline in lung function in asthmatic children. Several studies suggest that dietary intake of fruits and vegetables might modify the adverse effect of air pollutants. Methods A total of 158 asthmatic children recruited at the Children's Hospital of Mexico and 50 non-asthmatic children were followed for 22 weeks. Pulmonary function was measured and nasal lavage collected and analyzed every 2 weeks. Dietary intake was evaluated using a 108-item food frequency questionnaire and a fruit and vegetable index (FVI and a Mediterranean diet index (MDI were constructed. The impact of these indices on lung function and interleukin-8 (IL-8 and their interaction with air pollutants were determined using mixed regression models with random intercept and random slope. Results FVI was inversely related to IL-8 levels in nasal lavage (p 1 (test for trend p 1 and FVC as was with MDI and ozone for FVC. No effect of diet was observed among healthy children. Conclusion Our results suggest that fruit and vegetable intake and close adherence to the Mediterranean diet have a beneficial effect on inflammatory response and lung function in asthmatic children living in Mexico City.

  11. SCREENING FOR SIMPLE MYOPIA AMONG HIGH SCHOOL CHILDREN IN HYDERABAD CITY

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    Vundi Krishna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Refractive error is one of the most common causes of visual impairment around the world and the second leading cause of treatable blindness. Due to the high magnitude of uncorrected refractive errors, myopia is considered as one of the important public health problems, especially in the urban population in India. It has been given high priority under the National Programme for Control of Blindness. AIM The aim of the present study is to know the prevalence of myopia and assess the degree of myopia among school going children. SETTINGS AND DESIGN Cross-sectional study done for one year. METHODS AND MATERIAL Age group of children 13-15 years, a total of 1600 were included in the study. Refractive error was tested using Snellen’s chart, Pin hole test, Occluder, Retinoscope. Statistical Analysis was done using the Epi Info version 7. RESULTS The prevalence of refractive errors was more in private schools (28.6% than in government schools (23%. It was observed that myopia was the major refractive error (89.8% among total refractive errors, followed by astigmatism (6.1% and hypermetropia (4.1%. In myopic children, both eyes were involved in 71.5%, right eye alone in 16.4%. Only 60% (478 and 98.4% (788 have undergone eye checkups yearly once, 36% and 0.3% didn’t have eye checkups so far in private and government schools respectively. CONCLUSION We conclude that prevalence of refractive errors more in private schools than government schools and myopia is the major among refractive errors. In most of them both the eyes are involved. Bitot’s spots were more in government schools, suggesting the need of vitamin A supplementation.

  12. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF HEARING IMPAIRMENT IN SCHOOL GOING CHILDREN OF GHAZIABAD CITY ATTENDING A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Saud Lateef chishty

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Overcrowding, poor hygiene, socio-economic status, climate, lack of resources to avail medical facilities, poor medical awareness have their bearing on the incidence of hearing loss .The family of each hearing-impaired child has its own cultural, social, educational, and financial background, and its own special needs. The aim of this study is to determine the percentage of hearing impaired school going children in Ghaziabad city. Materials and Methods: The material for the present study were a representative sample constituting 1000 school children selected from various localities of Ghaziabad city within age group of 6 — 12 years. The children belonged to all the strata of society and children from both sexes were evaluated for hearing loss and its underlying etiological factors. Children were subjected to detailed ENT examination in our OPD. Results: In the present study sample the incidence of hearing loss is 9.3 %. The maximum cases 60.22 % belonged to the low socio-economic strata. A statistically significant difference of distribution by gender was noticed with a male preponderance (61.29% as against 38.71% for females. The hearing loss in majority of cases was of a mild degree i.e., 26 to 45 dB (34.41% of which majority of cases (87.10% had conductive loss. Wax was the commonest cause of hearing loss (41 .94%. CSOM was found in 21.50 % of all cases. Peak prevalence of hearing loss was found at 8 years of age, again declining after that from 20.43 % to 5.38 % by 12 years of age. Also it was observed that 59.14% children were living in crowded localities of city & 40.86% were living in non- crowded/open locality which is again statistically significant (p< or =0.05 Conclusion: The inferences drawn from the present study substantiates the view point of earlier workers that school screening is the most effective method of diagnosing deafness in school going children and should be extended to all schools in all the areas

  13. SURVEILLANCE OF HEARING IMPAIREMENT IN SCHOOL CHILDREN OF SLUM AREAS OF KURNOOL CITY; A.P

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    Shanthi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: For a child, hearing and speech are essential tools of learning, playing and developing social skills. External sound and speech is used by infants and children to learn their communicating skills by imitation. In absence of perception of this external stimulus, they cannot develop speech and language. This results in delayed speech/language development, social problems and academic difficulty. Hearing loss, in varying degrees, affects two in every 100 children under the age of 18. The most effective treatment is achieved through diagnosis, early intervention by fitting suitable hearing aids. An early start on special education programs helps maximize a child's hearing which will give the child best of chances for successful speech and language development. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study carried out to determine the hearing level, prevalence of loss of hearing and to identify its causes in schools of slums of Kurnool, Andhra Pradesh, India where the population is homogeneous in terms of occupation, socio-economic status, literacy, food habits and health related beliefs and practices. The children were of 5yrs to 15yrs in age. Totally 1041 children constituted the sample frame and underwent clinical examination and audiometry. OBSERVATIONS: Out of 440 students examined for HL 102 were had different causes for HL. 22.5% of children belonged to the age group of 5 to 8 ears. Presence of wax10.2%, ASOM 5.68%, Glue ear 3.4%, CSOM 3.4% were among the common causes. 39.09% children showed a loss of more than 25dB. 66.74% of the causes were preventable and curable at a district level Hospital. CONCLUSION: Analysis showed that 16.3% of these children have low-frequency or high-frequency hearing loss of at least 20dB hearing level in 1 or both ears. Among children in elementary, middle, and high school, audiometric screening should include low-frequency and high-frequency testing to detect hearing loss. As more than 50% of the causes of

  14. Ethnic Differences in Body Mass Index and Prevalence of Obesity in School Children of Urumqi City, Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI-LI YAN; YU-JIAN ZHENG; JUN WU; SHU-FENG CHEN; XIAO-KAI TI; LING LI; XIAO-RUI LIU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of obesity and distribution of body mass index (BMI) in school children of four ethnic groups in Urumqi, Xinjiang, China. Methods A total of 55 508 school children of Han, Hui, Uygur and Kazak nationalities aged 8-18 years were selected by a cluster sampling from a districts of Urumqi City for anthropometric measurement and demographic survey. Prevalence of obesity and overweight and distribution of body mass index (BMI) by gender, age, and nationality were analyzed and compared. Cutoff points of BMI for defining obesity and overweight were based on the proposal set by the Working Group on Obesity in China (WGOC) to assess age-, gender- and nationality-specific prevalence of obesity and overweight. Results Prevalence of obesity was 5.34%, 6.78%, 3.39 %, and 1.22% for boys and 2.61%, 1.83%, 1.78%, and 1.40% for girls of Han, Hui, Uygur and Kazak nationalities, respectively. Prevalence of obesity tended to decrease with age overall, whereas that of overweight increased with age in Han children. Conclusions Prevalence of obesity in school children in Urumqi varies with their nationalities and is lower than that of an average national level and a level of western countries. Obesity is more prevalent in boys than in girls of Urmuqi overall, which is just the opposite in Kazak children. Han boys and Hui girls have the highest prevalence of obesity and Kazak boys and girls have the lowest ones. Prevalence of obesity decreases with age, but that of overweight shows a different trend.

  15. PREVALENCE OF OBESITY AND ITS INFLUENCING FACTORS AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN OF BAGALKOT CITY, KARNATAKA

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    Mannapur

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity are the fifth leading risk of global deaths. Once considered a high income country problem, overweight and obesity are now raising in low income and middle income countries especially in urban settings . OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of obesity in school children and to identify the factors influencing childhood obesity. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: The present study has been undertaken at one of the school of Vidyagiri, Bagalkot. The duration of study was during March to August 2014 for a period of two months. A total of 750 students from standard V to X, aged between 10 - 15 year s had been enrolled in the study. It is a Cross - sectional descriptive study Obesity was assessed by BMI for age. Body mass index (BMI was calculated as body weight in kilograms/height in meter square. The children were categorized into obese and non - obese by using K.N. Agarwal percentiles, children with 95th Percentile of BMI is taken as cut - off point. Children with BMI more than this cut - off point with respect to age and sex is considered as obese. The association of each of the variables with obesity was assessed with the Chi - square test. RESULTS: 22.53% of the children had family history of obesity. The total prevalence of obesity was 2.80%. The Prevalence of obesity among male was 2.01% and in female it was 0.79%. The association between obesity in chil dren and family H/O obesity, Diabetes, frequency of outdoor games, number of high energy food intake and education of mother is found to be statistically significant

  16. Anxiety Disorder amongst Secondary School Children in an Urban City in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Briggs, Angela I; Alikor, E A D

    2010-09-01

    Anxiety is a source of concern to the clinicians as it is co morbid with other mental disorders, particularly depression and learning disabilities, and it causes low self-esteem. The aim of this research was to evaluate the prevalence of anxiety disorder amongst secondary school children in Port Harcourt. A two-staged stratified sampling method was used to select the schools. Structured questionnaire based on Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Teacher Rating Scale for anxiety and depression symptoms was used in evaluating the students. The questionnaires administered to the students were filled with the assistance of the researchers and the classroom teachers. Direct verbal interview was conducted for those noted to have symptoms of any of the various types of anxiety disorders and fears. Out of 885 students, 91 met the criteria for the diagnosis of anxiety/ depression disorder; prevalence was 10.28%, age range was 9-18 years. There were 37 males and 54 females giving a male: female ratio of 0.69:1. Majority 52 (57.14%) of the children lived with their parents, 28 (30.77%) of them lived with family relations and 11 (12.09%) of them were working as house helps to other families. The reasons given for being anxious were poor self image, fear of death, repeated physical and sexual abuses by their care givers and other adults. Learning disability was the major associated co morbid disorder (18.68%). Generalized anxiety was the most common type of anxiety disorder identified (32.97%). Anxiety disorders are debilitating chronic conditions. When it affects school aged children it contributes significantly to poor academic performance.

  17. Oral health-related KAP among 11- to 12-year-old school children in a government-aided missionary school of Bangalore city

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    Harikiran A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To organize community-oriented oral health promotion programs systematic analysis of the oral health situation would be needed, including information on oral health knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP toward oral health among 11 to 12-year-old school children in a government-aided missionary school of Bangalore city. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised of 212 children (Male: 108; Female; 104 who were in the age group of 11-12 years studying in a government-aided missionary school of Bangalore city. Data on oral health KAP were collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Statistical significance was determined by Chi-square test. Results: This survey found that only 38.5% of the children brush their teeth two or more times a day. Pain and discomfort from teeth (35.1% were common while dental visits were infrequent. Fear of the dentist was the main cause of irregular visit in 46.1% of study participants. High proportion of study participants reported having hidden sugar at least once a day: soft drinks (32.1%, milk with sugar (65.9%, and tea with sugar (56.1%. It was found that 5.4% and 3.9% of study participants smoke and chew tobacco, respectively. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that oral health KAP of study participants are poor and needs to be improved. Systematic community-oriented oral health promotion programs are needed to improve oral health KAP of school children.

  18. Intestinal parasites prevalence and related factors in school children, a western city sample-Turkey

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    Onen Ozlem

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal parasitic infections are amongst the most common infections worldwide. Epidemiological research carried out in different countries has shown that the social and economical situation of the individuals is an important cause in the prevalence of intestinal parasites. Previous studies in Turkey revealed a high prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection. The objectives of the current study were to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in Aydin among 7–14 years old school children and to identify associated socio-demographic and environmental factors, behavioral habits and also related complaints. Methods Multistage sampling was used in the selection of the study sample. A questionnaire, cellulose adhesive and a stool specimen examination were done. Results A total of 456 stool specimens were collected. 145 students (31.8% were infected with one or more intestinal parasites. 29 (6.4% of the students were infected more than one parasite, 26 (5.7% with two parasites and 3 (0.7% with three parasites. The three most common were E. vermicularis, G. intestinalis and E. coli. Intestinal parasite prevalence was higher in rural area, in children with less than primary school educated mother, in children who use hands for washing anal area after defecation, and in children who use toilet paper sometimes or never. The relation between child health and mother education is well known. Children were traditionally taught to wash anal area by hand. Toiler paper usage was not common and might be due to low income or just a behavioral habit also. Most of the complaints of the study population were not significantly related with the intestinal parasitic infection. Conclusions Intestinal parasitic infection is an important public health problem in Aydin, Turkey. Rural residence, mother education less than primary school, sometimes or never usage of toilet paper, and washing anal area by hands after defecation were

  19. Elemental carbon exposure and lung function in school children from Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza-Villarreal, A; Escamilla-Nuñez, M C; Hernández-Cadena, L; Texcalac-Sangrador, J L; Sienra-Monge, J J; Del Río-Navarro, B E; Cortez-Lugo, M; Sly, P D; Romieu, I

    2011-09-01

    Though exposure to air pollution has a detrimental effect on respiratory health, few studies have examined the association between elemental carbon exposure and lung function among schoolchildren. The aim of the present study was to present the association between short-term elemental carbon exposure and lung function in schoolchildren from Mexico City. 55 asthmatic and 40 non-asthmatic children were followed for an average of 22 weeks. A spirometry test was performed every 15 days during follow-up. Portable air samplers collected particulate matter onto Teflon filters. Gravimetric analysis was conducted and elemental carbon was quantified using transmission densitometry. The association between the main variables was analysed using linear mixed effects models. The mean ± sd of elemental carbon light absorption was 92.7 ± 54.7 Mm(-1). An increase of one interquartile range in the 24-h average of elemental carbon (100.93 Mm(-1)) was associated with a significant negative impact on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) (-62.0 (95% CI -123.3- -1.2) mL) and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of forced vital capacity (FVC) (FEF(25-75%)) (-111 (95% CI -228.3- -4.1) mL) among asthmatic children, equal to 3.3% and 5.5%, respectively; and on FEV(1) (-95.0 (95% CI -182.3- -8.5) mL) and FVC (-105.0 (95% CI -197.0- -13.7) mL) among non-asthmatic children. Exposure to elemental carbon resulted in an important negative effect on lung function in atopic schoolchildren, regardless of asthma status.

  20. Marketing active transportation to school to improve children's health: Utilizing parental perspectives from an inner-city environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royne, Marla B; Ivey, Stephanie S; Levy, Marian; Fox, Alexa K; Roakes, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Thirty years ago, nearly half of the children in the United States walked or rode their bikes to school. Today, less than 15% of children actively commute to school. With the growing obesity epidemic, encouraging children to walk or bike to school has become a national priority. This research examines factors that influence parental decisions allowing their children to walk to school in an urban environment to identify effective marketing and communication strategies to reach those parents. Results indicate differences in parental perspectives across populations; suggestions for effectively marketing the Safe Routes to School program to minority populations are provided.

  1. Playgrounds for City Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, M. Paul

    The work of a contemporary landscape architect is a living realization of the possibilities for increasing children's learning by improving play environment. The designer's philosophy and photographs of six playgrounds are contained in this bulletin, directed wherever there is need to make parks and school playgrounds open, aesthetic, and…

  2. Oral health status and treatment needs among 12- and 15-year-old government and private school children in Shimla city, Himachal Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailee, Fotedar; Girish, M. Sogi; Kapil, R. Sharma; Nidhi, Pruthi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the dental caries, periodontal health, and malocclusion of school children aged 12 and 15 years in Shimla city and to compare them in government and private schools. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study of 12- and 15-year-old children in government and private schools was conducted in Shimla city, Himachal Pradesh, India. A sample of 1011 school children (both males and females) was selected by a two-stage cluster sampling method. Clinical recordings of dental caries and malocclusion were done according to World Health Organization diagnostic criteria 1997. Periodontal health was assessed by Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs index. The data collected was analyzed by SPSS package 13. The statistical tests used were t-test and Chi-square tests. Results: The prevalence of dental caries was 32.6% and 42.2% at 12 and 15 years, respectively. At the12 years of age, the mean decayed, missing, filled teeth was 0.62 ± 1.42 and it was 1.06 ± 2.93 at 15 years of age. Females had higher level of caries than males at both the ages. At both ages, mean of decayed teeth was statistically higher in government schools as compared with private schools. Children in government schools had significantly less number of mean filled teeth at both ages as compared with private schools. The healthy component of gingiva was present in higher percentage of children in private schools as compared with government schools at both the age groups. The prevalence of malocclusion among the 12- year-old (58.1%) was more as compared with that among the 15-year-old (53.5%). Conclusion: The caries experience of 12- and 15-year-old children was low but the prevalence of gingivitis and malocclusion was quite high. Effective oral health promotion strategies need to be implemented to improve the oral health of school children further in Shimla city. PMID:24478980

  3. ACTIVE AND PASSIVE ATTITUDE MOTIVES FORMATION TO PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OF PRIMARY SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN OF THE NORTHERN CITY

    OpenAIRE

    Zhanna Ildarovna Busheva

    2015-01-01

    Current issue under the study of problems of positive motivation formation for education of active attitude to physical culture and sports among primary school age children living in the northern city,is the study of students engaged and not engaged in physical culture and sports and main reasons research for passive attitude to the activity. In Surgut, KhMARYugra, 350 pupils were involved in theresearch of the age 710 years from the gymnasium named after Salmanov F.K. Following the procedure...

  4. Prevalence of Hypertension and Association of Obesity with Hypertension in School Ggoing Children of Surat City, Western India

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    Salvi S. Shah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The association of obesity with hypertension has been recognized for the decades which are the important risk factors for the cardiovascular disease. So the purpose of the present study was to determine association of obesity with hypertension in school going children of Surat. Methodology: School going children aged between 12-18 years, of five schools in Surat were selected for the study. Height and weight were measured and BMI was calculated. Blood pressure measurements were taken as per recommendation of American heart society and family history of hypertension has also been assessed. Hypertension was considered if blood pressure is more than 95th percentile according to the update of task force report and Obesity was diagnosed by BMI for age. Results: Of 682 children, 8.94% were obese and 20.09% were hypertensive. Conclusion: Obesity is strongly associated with hypertension in children and both together may risk factors for later coronary disease.

  5. Building an Extended Family in East Harlem. How Parents, a School's Staff, and a Fireball Principal Are Working Together to Provide a School Home for Elementary School Children in New York City's Community School District Four.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinchy, Evans

    1992-01-01

    Describes Public School 146, a public elementary school in New York City where the principal has created a school community that builds on the strengths of the parents and makes the school an extended family for each child. Describes special services, a student leadership program, and student achievement gains. (JB)

  6. Determinants of obesity and overweight among school children of Pune city, Maharashtra, India: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Swati Ghonge; G. D. Bhambhani; Adhav, P. S.; Nilesh Thakor

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality as well as reduced life expectancy. The last two decade of previous century have witnessed dramatic increase in health care cost due to obesity and related issues among children and adolescents.The main objective of the study was to find out determinants of obesity and overweight among school children. Methods: The present cross sectional study was undertaken during...

  7. Assessment of dental caries prevention program applied to a cohort of elementary school children of Kebemer, a city in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daouda, Faye; Aïda, Kanouté; Mbacké, Lo Cheikh; Mamadou, Mbaye

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dental caries is frequently observed in children, particularly among those residing in developing countries. The most adapted strategies against this pathology remains prevention based on information, education, and communication (IEC), as well as on early diagnosis and treatment. We carried out a study that aimed to analyze the development of dental caries in a cohort of school children followed during their primary education. The objective was to assess the evolution of the dental status of a cohort of students during their elementary curriculum. Materials and Methods: A cohort of school children was followed during 6 years from the first grade to the sixth grade. Monitoring of these school children focused every year on IEC based on learning methods of brushing messages, dietary advice, systematic visits, fluoride use, and primary dental care. During the school year, the students were periodically subjected to education and communication briefings (IEC). Primary care consisted of extracting and descaling rhizalyzed teeth in the same period. The data from this review were collected using the World Health Organization questionnaire, and statistical analysis was performed with the software Epi-info version 6.04 d. Results: The mean age of the 171 school children was 6 years in the first grade and 11 years in the sixth grade. In the first grade, the decayed permanent teeth prevalence was 31.6% and the In permanent teeth: Decayed, missing or filled teeth (DMF/T) was 0.47. The decayed primary teeth prevalence was 75% and the in primary teeth: decayed or filled teeth (df/t) 2.23. In the sixth year, the prevalence of decayed permanent teeth was 51% and DMF/T 0.36 whereas the decayed primary teeth prevalence was 12% and the df/t was 0.19. The prevalence of decayed permanent teeth increased from 31.6 to 51% whereas the mean DMF/T was not statistically different between school children of the first and sixth grade class. Conclusion: The promotion of oral health

  8. Quality of life and provision of social rehabilitation services in elementary school age children with special needs in Riga City

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Long-term quality of life of children with special needs has not been studied in Latvia, and information on changes of quality of life (QoL) rates during child’s development period is insufficient. The aim of the study was to analyze and compare the QoL related self-reports of school age children with special needs, which were repeatedly carried out once a year (2009–2010), with the proxy reports of their parents, as well as to compare the obtained results with Europe normative data on QoL de...

  9. Nutritional Status Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-School Children in the City of Montes Claros - MG, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz Igor Raineh Durães; Mourão Daniella Mota; Freitas Daniel Antunes; Souza Andrey George Silva; Pereira Alessandra Ribeiro; Aidar Felipe José; Carneiro André Luiz Gomes

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between nutritional status and prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in middle-school students in the city of Montes Claros - MG. The sample consisted of 382 students, aged 10-16 years. Nutritional status was evaluated using the Body Mass Index (BMI). Metabolic syndrome (MS) was defined as the presence of two or more criteria in accordance with definition of the International Diabetes Federation. The overall prevalence of MS was 7.9%. 9...

  10. Socio-demographic Determinants of Overweight and Obesity among School Children in an Urban city of Central India

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    Garima Namdev, Mahesh Kumar Mishra, Dinesh Kumar Saxena, Swarna Kanta Likhar

    2015-01-01

    Results: In present study, 256 (5.6% students were overweight and 46 (1.0% were obese. Maximum numbers of 2.5% obese students were belonging to upper SES as compared to middle and lower SES. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of overweight and obesity was found more common in girls and among students of private schools. It was found more in children with their working mothers with higher education."

  11. Prevalence of obesity and overweight among school children of Pune city, Maharashtra, India: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Ghonge

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: High prevalence of obesity and overweight in school children indicate an urgent need to increase awareness via education and motivation of all stakeholders. This will go a long way in preventing childhood obesity and thus ultimately stemming the rising tide of non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and cardio vascular disease in India. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(12.000: 3599-3603

  12. Smart Cities for Smart Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Jensen, Martin Lynge; Wøldike, Niels Peter

    This position paper presents the concept of smart cities for smart children before highlighting three concrete projects we are currently running in order to investigate different aspects of the underlying concept like social-relational interaction and situated and experiential learning....

  13. Quality of life and provision of social rehabilitation services in elementary school age children with special needs in Riga City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibule L.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Long-term quality of life of children with special needs has not been studied in Latvia, and information on changes of quality of life (QoL rates during child’s development period is insufficient. The aim of the study was to analyze and compare the QoL related self-reports of school age children with special needs, which were repeatedly carried out once a year (2009–2010, with the proxy reports of their parents, as well as to compare the obtained results with Europe normative data on QoL developed by KIDSCREEN research group; to investigate the provision of social rehabilitation services for such families. The study was carried out in Riga municipality 2009–2010. Altogether 34 families with 8–11 years of age children with developmental disabilities participated in the study. Both parents and children filled KIDSCREEN-52 questionnaire, but a survey developed by a group of researchers “Social services” was used to gather information from the parents about the received children and family centered social services in the period between the both quality of life assessments. Results showed statistically significant changes in the latest quality of life self-assessment rates of school-age boys and girls with special needs in time period 2009–2010. Participants of the study – children with developmental disabilities – in both cases reported a lower QoL in comparison with Europe normative data on QoL developed by KIDSCREEN research group.

  14. Nutritional Status Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-School Children in the City of Montes Claros - Mg, Brazil

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    Cruz Igor Raineh Durães

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the association between nutritional status and prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in middle-school students in the city of Montes Claros - MG. The sample consisted of 382 students, aged 10-16 years. Nutritional status was evaluated using the Body Mass Index (BMI. Metabolic syndrome (MS was defined as the presence of two or more criteria in accordance with definition of the International Diabetes Federation. The overall prevalence of MS was 7.9%. 9.7% of students with MS were overweight and 72.4% were obese. Therefore, it can be inferred that carrying excess weight considerably increases the chances for a child to develop MS, and concomitantly increases the child’s risk for developing cardiovascular disease.

  15. When cities move children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant Klinker, Charlotte; Schipperijn, Jasper; Toftager, Mette;

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel method to assess context-specific physical activity patterns using accelerometer and GPS. The method efficiency is investigated by providing descriptive results on the use of domains and subdomains, and assessing how much of children's and adolescents' daily activity t......, clubs and sports facilities. Satisfactory method efficiency was found during weekdays. Natural experiments combined with objective assessment of context-specific behaviours hold the potential to create evidence on the effects of changes to the built environment on behaviour....

  16. Muslim Children's Other School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Leslie C.

    2012-01-01

    Millions of Muslim children around the world participate in Qur'anic schooling. For some, this is their only formal schooling experience; others attend both Qur'anic school and secular school. Qur'anic schooling emphasizes memorization and reproduction (recitation, reading, and transcription) of Qur'anic texts without comprehension of their…

  17. A School Voucher Program for Baltimore City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Baltimore City's public school system is in crisis. Academically, the school system fails on any number of measures. The city's graduation rate is barely above 50 percent and students continually lag well behind state averages on standardized tests. Adding to these problems is the school system's current fiscal crisis, created by years of fiscal…

  18. School-Family Partnership for Coexistence (SFPC) in the City of Acre: Promoting Arab and Jewish Parents' Role as Facilitators of Children's Literacy Development and as Agents of Coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelniker, Tamar; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    A two-year (1998-2000) School-Family Partnership for Coexistence (SFPC) programme was implemented in Acre, a mixed Jewish-Arab city in Israel, to promote parents' role as facilitators of their children literacy development and to empower parents to advance coexistence and inter-group relations. The SFPC program was part of a five-year (1995-2000)…

  19. A comparative study of two mouthrinses on plaque and gingivitis in school children in the age group of 13-16 years in Bangalore city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, K; Veeresha, K L; Hiremath, S S

    2007-01-01

    Research and clinical evidence indicate that most forms of plaque associated periodontal disease start as inflammatory lesions of the gingiva which if left untreated, may progress and eventually involve and compromise the entire periodontal attachment apparatus of the affected teeth. A study was conducted to assess the effect of a mouthrinse containing chlorhexidine and sodium fluoride on plaque accumulation and gingivitis in comparison with a chlorhexidine mouthrinse alone in a group of school children aged 13-16 years in Bangalore city. This combination along with the well established effect of fluoride in the prevention of caries presents an important contribution to dental public health. The results suggest that the chlorhexidine-sodium fluoride mouthrinse potentially possesses a significant effect on inhibition of plaque accumulation and gingivitis. This combination along with the well-established effect of fluoride in the prevention of caries, presents an important contribution to dental public health.

  20. A comparative study of two mouthrinses on plaque and gingivitis in school children in the age group of 13-16 years in Bangalore city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakash K

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Research and clinical evidence indicate that most forms of plaque associated periodontal disease start as inflammatory lesions of the gingiva which if left untreated, may progress and eventually involve and compromise the entire periodontal attachment apparatus of the affected teeth. A study was conducted to assess the effect of a mouthrinse containing chlorhexidine and sodium fluoride on plaque accumulation and gingivitis in comparison with a chlorhexidine mouthrinse alone in a group of school children aged 13-16 years in Bangalore city. This combination alongwith the well established effect of fluoride in the prevention of caries presents an important contribution to dental public health. The results suggest that the chlorhexidine-sodium fluoride mouthrinse potentially possesses a significant effect on inhibition of plaque accumulation and gingivitis. This combination along with the well-established effect of fluoride in the prevention of caries, presents an important contribution to dental public health.

  1. School-Phobic Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittelman, Rachel

    1976-01-01

    Separation anxiety is the major difficulty (and anticipatory anxiety a secondary difficulty) in treating school phobic children, and must be dealt with in a coordinated effort by school therapists, teachers, and parents. (MB)

  2. Vitamin D, not iron, is the main nutrient deficiency in pre-school and school-aged children in Mexico City: a cross-sectional study

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    Georgina Toussaint-Martínez de Castro

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2012, the Mexican National Health Survey (ENSANUT 2012 showed a moderate prevalence rate of vitamin D deficiency, around 16%, in a national representative sample of children. A decreasing prevalence of anemia during the last 15 years has been observed in Mexico. The aim of this study was to determine the levels of vitamin D in children 3-8 years old in four different locations within the metropolitan area of Mexico City and to compare them to levels of iron and zinc as references of nutritional status. Methods: One hundred and seventeen healthy children aged 3-8 years attending four hospitals in Mexico City were invited to participate. All children received medical and nutritional evaluation, and blood samples were obtained. Results: Children were selected in four hospitals between April and August 2008. More than half (51.3% were boys; their average age was 5.5 ± 1.6 years. The prevalence of subjects with deficient levels of 25-OH-vitamin D (< 50 nmol/L was 24.77%. None of the children had haemoglobin levels below the anaemia threshold, and zinc determination revealed 8.26% of individuals with deficient levels (< 65 μg/dL. These data confirm the findings reported in ENSANUT about the sustained reduction of anaemia prevalence among preschool and schoolchildren and the rising rates of vitamin D deficiency in the same population. Similar to other studies, we found a link between socioeconomic status and micronutrient deficiency, these being markers of better nutrition, and vitamin D is remarkably related to the quality of the diet. This finding has not been considered in our population before. Conclusions: There is evidence of a sustained decrease of anaemia in Mexican children due to general enrichment of foods and focus on vulnerable populations, while vitamin D deficiency seems to have increased. More studies are needed to obtain more information on vitamin D levels at different ages and definition of susceptible groups in

  3. Study to Assess the Prevalence of Soft Drinking and its Determinants among the School going Children of Gwalior city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Gour

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the time there has been spectrum of changes in the universe. It may be at physical, chemical and cultural level. People have adopted newer life styles like their working style, clothing’s, food habits and so on. One of the pertinent example of this newer food habits is rising consumption of soft drinks rather than traditional home made drinks. This study was aimed to find out various determinants responsible for this rising trend of soft drinking so that effective intervention can be undertaken to overcome this creeping problem. Objectives: To find out the prevalence of soft drinking consumption among the students and to assess the determinants of soft drink consumption among the students. Materials and methods: It was a cross sectional study. A sample of 200 students was selected from the both govt. and private schools by stratified random sampling. Then they all were interviewed by using pre tested, semi structured proforma. Later on data was analyzed manually and by using suitable statistical software. Results: Frequent drinking of soft drinks was found more among the students of private schools than govt. (p < 0.05. A significant association was found between pocket money, TV watching and frequency of soft drinking (p< 0.05.Other reasons which were found to be responsible by far for frequent soft drinking like lack of awareness regarding hazards, frequent TV watching, desire of new taste, lack of health education from the parents side etc. Conclusion: Soft drinking consumption is creeping day by day amongst the children with out knowing their hazards. And they are the future of any country so there should be effective intervention from both sides govt. as well as parents to get rid of it at earliest.

  4. Microorganisms and viruses causing diarrhea in infants and primary school children and their relation with age and sex in Zakho city, Kurdistan Region, Iraq

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    Wijdan M.S. Mero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diarrheal diseases in children are a major public health concern in developing countries. Diarrheal infection spreads through contaminated food or drinking-water, or from person-to-person as a result of poor hygiene. This study was conducted to investigate the incidence of different microorganisms associated with diarrhea in infants and primary school children and their relation to sex and age in Zakho city, Kurdistan region, Iraq. Methods: During the period from September 2013 to May 2014, 600 diarrheic samples were collected from both sexes and different ages (4-8 years (65.38 and 64.07%, while parasites were among >6-10 years (64.67 and 60.11%. High viral prevalence were recorded among ages <2 to 6 years with the peak among <2 years (40.54%. Conclusions: From this study we conclude that about 57% of diarrheal cases were associated with bacteria, parasites, and viruses with E. coli, E. histolytica, G. lamblia and rotavirus as leading microorganisms. The mixed prevalence with two or more microorganisms was documented in 179 (37.36% out of 479 positive samples and the rate of microbial prevalence was found to be gender and age dependent. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3266-3273

  5. A Tri-Univer-City Project for Teachers in Inner-City Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsand, Jean E.

    Recognizing the problems of reading instruction as a major challenge in education, Educational Professions Development Act (EPDA) Institutes of recent years have funded several programs to develop new methods and materials for teaching in inner-city schools. The project reported here is an EPDA Institute for teachers of disadvantaged children in…

  6. Healthy casetas: A potential strategy to improve the food environment in low-income schools to reduce obesity in children in Guatemala City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlke, Elisa L; Letona, Paola; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Developing countries have undergone transitions driven by globalization and development, accelerating increases in prevalence of overweight and obesity among children. Schools have been identified as effective settings for interventions that target children's dietary behaviors. In Guatemala, public schools commonly have food kiosks (Casetas) that sell products to children. From July through October 2013, observations during recess, in-depth interviews with school principals (n = 4) and caseta vendors (n = 4), and focus groups with children (n = 48) were conducted. This article explores products available to children at casetas. Factors that affect what casetas offer include regulations and enforcement, vendor investment and earnings, vendor resources, product demand, pricing, and children's preferences. These factors influence the products that are available and children's tendency to purchase them. Potential strategies for improvement include healthy food preparation, price manipulation and promotions, raffles and games to encourage healthier choices, and policy to push toward development of healthier products.

  7. Prevalence of hypertension and its association with obesity among school children of Pune city, Maharashtra, India: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Ghonge

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Anthropometric measurements like Waist Hip Ratio, MAC and mean SBP and DBP among obese and overweight group of children were significantly higher as compared to normal weight group of children. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(12.000: 3739-3742

  8. Preschool Children's School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekdogan, Serpil; Akgül, Esra

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine preschool teachers' perspectives about children's school readiness. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the study as a mixed method research. Data, in the quantitative aspects of the research, were collected through the use of "School Readiness Form" developed by Boz (2004)…

  9. Determinants of obesity and overweight among school children of Pune city, Maharashtra, India: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Ghonge

    2015-12-01

    Results: Out of 1281 children, 54.09% were males. Overall prevalence of obesity and overweight was 5.62% and 9.99% respectively. The prevalence of obesity and overweight was significantly higher amongst less active group (9.3 % and 13.95%, respectively as compared to more active group. Prevalence of obesity and overweight was significantly higher in the group of children who spent >3 hours for study and who spent >2 hours daily in front of television or computers. The prevalence of obesity and overweight was significantly higher amongst group of children who took daily calories above RDA (18.57% and 15.19% , respectively as compared to the other group. The prevalence of obesity and overweight was significantly higher in them (8.91% and 13.36% as compared to those who took junk food less than or equal to 2 times per week (1.71% and 5.98%,respectively. The prevalence of obesity and overweight among children having parents with history of obesity was 46.15% and 17.94%, respectively which was significantly higher than those without parental history of obesity (4.34% and 9.74%. Conclusions: The prevalence of obesity and overweight was significantly higher in children with sedentary lifestyle, high consumption of junk food and high calorie diet with positive family history of obesity. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(12.000: 3638-3643

  10. Prevalence of Dental Caries in relation to Body Mass Index, Daily Sugar Intake, and Oral Hygiene Status in 12-Year-Old School Children in Mathura City: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prahlad; Gupta, Nidhi; Singh, Harkanwal Preet

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To correlate the prevalence of dental caries to body mass index, daily sugar intake, and oral hygiene status of 12-year-old school children of Mathura city. Material and Methods. The study design was cross-sectional and included 100 school children aged 12 years (n = 50 boys and n = 50 girls) who were randomly selected from two schools based upon inclusion and exclusion criteria. Body weight/height was recorded and BMI was calculated and plotted on CDC-BMI for age growth charts/curves for boys and girls to obtain percentile ranking. Dental caries was recorded using WHO criteria. Oral hygiene status of the study subjects was assessed using oral hygiene index-simplified. Data regarding the daily sugar intake was recorded using 24-hour recall diet frequency chart. The data obtained was analysed using SPSS version 11.5 for windows. Result. Only 27 subjects were affected by caries. The mean DMFT/dmft was 0.37 ± 0.79 and 0.12 ± 0.60, respectively. Statistical analysis by means of a logistic regression model revealed that only oral hygiene status had a significant effect on caries prevalence (OR = 5.061, P = 0.004), whereas daily sugar intake and body mass index had no significant effect. Conclusion. From the analysis, it was concluded that oral hygiene status had a significant effect on caries prevalence of 12-year-old school children of Mathura city.

  11. Prevalence of Dental Caries in relation to Body Mass Index, Daily Sugar Intake, and Oral Hygiene Status in 12-Year-Old School Children in Mathura City: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prahlad Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To correlate the prevalence of dental caries to body mass index, daily sugar intake, and oral hygiene status of 12-year-old school children of Mathura city. Material and Methods. The study design was cross-sectional and included 100 school children aged 12 years (n=50 boys and n=50 girls who were randomly selected from two schools based upon inclusion and exclusion criteria. Body weight/height was recorded and BMI was calculated and plotted on CDC-BMI for age growth charts/curves for boys and girls to obtain percentile ranking. Dental caries was recorded using WHO criteria. Oral hygiene status of the study subjects was assessed using oral hygiene index-simplified. Data regarding the daily sugar intake was recorded using 24-hour recall diet frequency chart. The data obtained was analysed using SPSS version 11.5 for windows. Result. Only 27 subjects were affected by caries. The mean DMFT/dmft was 0.37 ± 0.79 and 0.12 ± 0.60, respectively. Statistical analysis by means of a logistic regression model revealed that only oral hygiene status had a significant effect on caries prevalence (OR = 5.061, P=0.004, whereas daily sugar intake and body mass index had no significant effect. Conclusion. From the analysis, it was concluded that oral hygiene status had a significant effect on caries prevalence of 12-year-old school children of Mathura city.

  12. Adapted Excerpt from "Hope against Hope: Three Schools, One City, and America's Struggle to Educate Its Children"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In this amended excerpt from "Hope Against Hope", educational reform in post-Katrina New Orleans is considered from a journalistic perspective in presenting the story of Geraldlynn Stewart as she and her family navigate the new school system. In providing voices of lived experiences of Stewart as well as other individuals within this new…

  13. School Choice in New York City after Two Years: An Evaluation of the School Choice Scholarships Program. Interim Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, David; Peterson, Paul; Mayer, Daniel; Chou, Julia; Howell, William G.

    This report describes the second-year results for an evaluation of the School Choice Scholarships Foundation (SCSF) program to award 1,300 scholarships so that children of low-income families in grades 1 through 4 in New York City public schools could transfer to private schools. Because the scholarships were awarded through a lottery, the…

  14. A City for All Citizens: Integrating Children and Youth from Marginalized Populations into City Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Van Vliet

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Socially just, intergenerational urban spaces should not only accommodate children and adolescents, but engage them as participants in the planning and design of welcoming spaces. With this goal, city agencies in Boulder, Colorado, the Boulder Valley School District, the Children, Youth and Environments Center at the University of Colorado, and a number of community organizations have been working in partnership to integrate young people’s ideas and concerns into the redesign of parks and civic areas and the identification of issues for city planning. Underlying their work is a commitment to the Convention on the Rights of the Child and children’s rights to active citizenship from a young age. This paper describes approaches used to engage with young people and methods of participation, and reflects on lessons learned about how to most effectively involve youth from underrepresented populations and embed diverse youth voices into the culture of city planning.

  15. City Schools: How Districts and Communities Can Create Smart Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Robert, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    In "City Schools," Robert Rothman and his colleagues at the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University put forward a vision of "smart education systems" that link a highly functioning and effective school district with a comprehensive and accessible web of supports for children, youth, and families. One-third of…

  16. Prevalence of Malocclusion Among School Children in Bangalore, India

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of malocclusion among school children of Bangalore city, India during their mixed dentition period. The sample consisted of 745 children (388 males and 357 females) in the age group of 8-12 years randomly selected from twelve different schools in Bangalore city. The subjects were randomly selected, and none had received previous orthodontic treatment. Occlusal anteroposterior relationships were assessed based on the Angle classificat...

  17. Survey of pinworm infection in school children in Binyang city%宾阳县农村学校儿童蛲虫感染调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 梁海; 陈俪文; 蒙娇芳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To survey the prevalence of enterobiasis in rural school children in Binyang County,Guangxi. Methods The pinworm eggs were detected by anal swab method which used the round bottom tube and transparent adhesive tape. The results were analyzed. Results The total infection rate of pinworm in rural children in Binyang was 45.87%,in which the infection rate in kindergarten children was 48.09%,while the primary school children was 44.31%. Conclusions The infection rate of pinworm in rural school children in Binyang country was high. The integrated measures of health education, environment modification,prevention and treatment be carried out to reduce the infection rate of pinworm in school children in Binyang.%目的 了解南宁市宾阳县农村学校儿童蛲虫感染情况. 方法 采用圆底试管透明胶纸拭肛法检查蛲虫卵. 结果 宾阳县农村儿童蛲虫感染率为45.87%,其中幼儿园儿童感染率为48.09%,小学儿童感染率为44.31%.结论 南宁市宾阳县农村学校儿童蛲虫感染率较高,应采取加强健康教育,改善卫生条件,整治环境卫生和定期驱虫治疗的综合防治措施,降低学校、幼儿园儿童蛲虫感染率.

  18. Factors of children's school readiness

    OpenAIRE

    Ljubica Marjanovič Umek; Urška Fekonja; Katja Bajc

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of preschool on children's school readiness in connection with their intellectual abilities, language competence, and parents' education. The sample included 219 children who were 68 to 83 months old and were attending the first year of primary school. Children were differentiated by whether or not they had attended preschool before starting school. Children's intellectual ability was determined using Raven's Coloured Progress...

  19. School Choice in New York City after Three Years: An Evaluation of the School Choice Scholarships Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Daniel P.; Peterson, Paul E.; Myers, David E.; Tuttle, Christina Clark; Howell, William G.

    This report presents third-year findings from an evaluation of the School Choice Scholarships Foundation Program. In 1997, this program provided scholarships via a lottery to low-income, New York City children in grades 1 through 4 that allowed them to transfer to private schools. The evaluation compared scholarship to control students, using test…

  20. [Obesity and sedentary lifestyles in four-years old children attending two pre-schools in the city of Río Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghtein, Ileana Ruth

    2014-12-01

    The precocious start of the adipocyte rebound, such as sedentarism, increases the risk of developing obesity and its comorbidities at later ages. The city of Río Grande is located in the Northwestern part of Tierra del Fuego and its monthly average temperature is the lowest in all of Argentina. It also possesses the largest juvenile population (in proportion to the total) as well as a very low mortality rate. According to the 2006 National Health and Nutrition Survey, the prevalence of obesity among its children was also one of the highest in the country. The objective of this investigation was to determine the prevalence of obesity and sedentarism in 4-year-old children; the sample was taken from two local kindergartens. In order to achieve this, the children were weighed and measured, their body mass index and waist perimeter, as well as their percentiles, were calculated. A structured questionnaire was applied to characterize the average weekly time allotted to sedentary activities. In this study, 27.3% of children were deemed to be overweight, while 18.2% were classified as obese. Furthermore, 23.6% presented a waist circumference in the > 90 percentile or higher and 70.1% fell in the sedentary classification. Both the predominance of sedentarism and the pattern of fat distribution are a clear alert towards the need to deepen the search for metabolic-risk syndrome factors in vulnerable groups.

  1. School Adaptation of Roma Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerganov, Encho; Varbanova, Silvia; Kyuchukov, Hristo

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the degree of school adaptation among Roma children who were included in a program for the desegregation of Roma schools in Bulgaria. More specifically, the program requires Roma children to attend mixed classes with Bulgarian students and Roma teacher assistants to work with them. The Bulgarian version of the Questionnaire on…

  2. Nocturnal enuresis among primary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Mohamed Aljefri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence and personal and family risk factors for nocturnal enuresis (NE among primary school children in Al-Mukalla City, Yemen, we conducted a cross-sectional survey using a self-administered, three-part structured questionnaire involving 832 school children aged 6 - 15 years between 2007 and 2008. We assessed participants′ socio-demographic factors, family characteristics and factors related to the presence of NE. The mean age of the children was 11.5 (±2.7 years. The overall prevalence of NE was 28.6%, with a predominance of girls, and the prevalence decreased with increasing age (P 0.002 and a higher number of siblings (P = 0.01. Our findings reveal a high prevalence of NE among children in Al-Mukalla City, Yemen, with a higher prevalence in girls than in boys compared with the other studies. Sleep pattern, stressful life events, family history of NE, large family size and more children in the household may act as a risk factor for NE.

  3. Factors of children's school readiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Marjanovič Umek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of preschool on children's school readiness in connection with their intellectual abilities, language competence, and parents' education. The sample included 219 children who were 68 to 83 months old and were attending the first year of primary school. Children were differentiated by whether or not they had attended preschool before starting school. Children's intellectual ability was determined using Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM; Raven, Raven, & Court, 1999, language competence using the Lestvice splošnega govornegarazvoja–LJ (LSGR–LJ, Scales of General Language Development; Marjanovič Umek, Kranjc, Fekonja in Bajc, 2004, and school readiness with the Preizkus pripravljenosti za šolo (PPŠ, Test of School Readiness; Toličič, 1986. The results indicate that children's intellectual ability and language competence have a high predictive value for the school readiness — they explained 51% of the variance in children's scores on the PPŠ. Preschool enrollment has a positive effect on school readiness for children whose parents have a low level of education, but not for those whose parents are highly educated.

  4. Prevalence of Asthma and Allergic Diseases and Its Risk Factors in School Children Aged (6-7 and 13-14 Years in Assalouyeh City, Bushehr Province Based on III ISAAC Protocol Phase I, in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Gooya

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asthma and allergic diseases are raised as a major health  problem. The prevalence of these diseases are increasing in Iran and  all over the world. Based on this, the present study assessed to prevalence of these diseases in Assalouyeh region, Bushehr Province. Material and Methods: This study was performed on 190 school children aged 6-7 years and 223 girl student aged 13-14 years in Assalouyeh city in 2014 based on ISAAC standard questionnaires Phase I and III which examined prevalence and risk factors for these diseases. Results: The prevalence of atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis and asthma among  6-7 year-old students were 11.6%, 13.7% and 5.8%, respectively. While, the prevalence of these diseases among 13-14 year-old students were 14.3%, 21.5% and 15.2%, respectively. Also, there were a significant association between risk factors such as exposure to tobacco smoke, pet keeping, consumption of fast and sea foods with prevalence of these diseases (P<0.05. Conclusion: Asthma and allergic diseases were high among school children in Assalouyeh and it seems that this increasing prevalenc can be associated with risk factors such as exposure to tobacco smoke, pet keeping, consumption of fast and sea foods.

  5. Assessment of awareness amongst school teachers regarding prevention and emergency management of dentoalveolar traumatic injuries in school children in Pune City, before and 3 months after dental educational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karande, Namrata; Shah, Preetam; Bhatia, Mitali; Lakade, Laxmi; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Arora, Nitin; Bhalla, Monika

    2012-11-01

    Children have boundless energy, so, they are continuously engaged in some or the other physical activity. It is seen that when child reaches school age, accidents in the school environment in the form of falls, injuries due to contact sports, fights, abuse, etc. are very common and the main cause of traumatic dental injuries. Trauma may vary from minor enamel chipping or avulsion to extensive maxillofacial damage, more serious neck and brain injury, which may cause pain, disfigurement and mental agony, having immediate and long lasting effects. In such cases, a school teacher is in the right position to handle such an emergency and refer the child to the concerned dental surgeon or a pedodontist for further needful care. The main reason for delayed treatment of dental trauma is that people present at the site of injury are unaware of protocol of rapid and appropriate management leading to improper first aid treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the awareness of a group of school teachers from different schools about the prevention and emergency management of dental trauma in school children, by means of a questionnaire. Then educating them and reassessing their knowledge after a period of 3 months. Unfortunately, the public is unaware of the risks and does not have enough information about first aid emergency treatment or to avoid traumatic injuries.

  6. Forest School in an Inner City? Making the Impossible Possible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The Forest School approach to Early Years education, originally developed in Scandinavia, is influencing learning outside the classroom in England. An inner city primary school in Yorkshire investigated the nature and purpose of Forest Schools in Denmark, through a study visit, prior to developing their own Forest School in the midst of an urban…

  7. Children, Computers, and School Furniture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lorraine E.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the rise of posture-related discomfort and injury in children using computers in their classrooms and explores the research in the area. Recommends greater effort in encouraging school furniture manufacturers to create ergonomically appropriate computer workstations. Advice on what children can do to lessen musculoskeletal discomfort…

  8. Investigation and Analysis on Psychological Health Situation for Middle and Primary School Students in Xianning City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yanping

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is used to know about the psychological health situation for middle and primary school students in Xianning City and provide a certain empirical basis for meaningful development of psychological health education and psychological assistance. This paper uses the MHT scale prepared by Bucheng Zhou professor et al. to conduct a test for 1000 students in 7 middle and primary schools in Xianning City. The detection rate of psychological health problem accounts for 1.6% where the positive detection rate of study anxiety ranks first (43.2%. The psychological health situations have much difference in sex (t = -4. 624, P<0. 001, and it’s lower in male students than female ones. There is a significant difference between the psychological health situation for only and non-only children (t = -2. 519, P<0. 01.There is a significant difference on the psychological health situation for primary school, middle school and high school students (F = 11. 3, P<0. 001, and the psychological health situation of primary school students is better than that for middle school students. It can be concluded that the psychological health situation of middle and primary school students in Xianning City is fairly good, and the psychological health situation for male student, only children and primary school student is also fairly good.

  9. Is the Earth Flat or Round? Primary School Children's Understandings of the Planet Earth: The Case of Turkish Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özsoy, Sibel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore primary school children's understandings about the shape of the Earth. The sample is consisted of 124 first-graders from five primary schools located in an urban city of Turkey. The data of the study were collected through children's drawings and semi-structured interviews. Results obtained from the drawings…

  10. Assessing school disaster preparedness by applying a comprehensive school safety framework: A case of elementary schools in Banda Aceh City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, A.; Bisri, M. B. F.; Oda, T.; Oktari, R. S.; Murayama, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The study assessed the depth of school disaster safety at public elementary schools in Banda Aceh City, Indonesia in terms of comprehensive school safety, especially school location, disaster management and disaster education. The findings indicate that 56% of public elementary schools in Banda Aceh City are exposed to high tsunami risk, and most externally driven school disaster preparedness activities were not continued by the schools due to lack of ownership and funding. To realize comprehensive school safety, disaster preparedness programs should neither be brought in by external donors, nor be in a patchwork. Rather, it should be conducted jointly and sustainably by the local school and the community and supported by multi-sectoral support in the city. Comprehensive school safety of public elementary schools in Banda Aceh City could be realized by reviewing, updating and localizing school disaster preparedness programs by all the education partners in the city with strong political will and commitment.

  11. The Albuquerque City Center Schools. Program Evaluation, 1984-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Jennifer S.; Panofsky, Carolyn

    The Albuquerque City Center Schools (ACCS) project, begun in 1983, was designed to increase the effectiveness of 12 schools in the Albuquerque High School cluster by creating a climate of high expectations, improving academic achievement, encouraging a climate of positive discipline, promoting student, community and private sector participation,…

  12. Indoor metallic pollution and children exposure in a mining city

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Enio, E-mail: enniobg@gmail.com [IRD (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement), La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Fontúrbel, Francisco E. [Departamento de Ciencias Ecológicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Herbas, Cristian [Instituto IGEMA, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Barbieri, Flavia L. [IRD (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement), La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, SELADIS (Instituto de Servicios de Laboratorio para el Diagnóstico e Investigación en Salud), La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Berlin School of Public Health, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Gardon, Jacques [IRD (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement), La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, SELADIS (Instituto de Servicios de Laboratorio para el Diagnóstico e Investigación en Salud), La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); IRD, HSM, Montpellier (France)

    2014-07-01

    Mining industries are known for causing strong environmental contamination. In most developing countries, the management of mining wastes is not adequate, usually contaminating soil, water and air. This situation is a source of concern for human settlements located near mining centers, especially for vulnerable populations such as children. The aim of this study was to assess the correlations of the metallic concentrations between household dust and children hair, comparing these associations in two different contamination contexts: a mining district and a suburban non-mining area. We collected 113 hair samples from children between 7 and 12 years of age in elementary schools in the mining city of Oruro, Bolivia. We collected 97 indoor dust samples from their households, as well as information about the children's behavior. Analyses of hair and dust samples were conducted to measure As, Cd, Pb, Sb, Sn, Cu and Zn contents. In the mining district, there were significant correlations between non-essential metallic elements (As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Sn) in dust and hair, but not for essential elements (Cu and Zn), which remained after adjusting for children habits. Children who played with dirt had higher dust-hair correlations for Pb, Sb, and Cu (P = 0.006; 0.022 and 0.001 respectively) and children who put hands or toys in their mouths had higher dust-hair correlations of Cd (P = 0.011). On the contrary, in the suburban area, no significant correlations were found between metallic elements in dust and children hair and neither children behavior nor gender modified this lack of associations. Our results suggest that, in a context of high metallic contamination, indoor dust becomes an important exposure pathway for children, modulated by their playing behavior. - Highlights: • Mining activities are an important source of environmental pollution. • Mining pollution contaminated also indoor homes, creating a risk to population. • Indoor dust and hair concentrations

  13. Marketing Small Schools in New York City: A Critique of Neoliberal School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiller, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to critically examine a school reform effort that has taken hold in New York City over the past seven years. A largely privately funded venture, the New Century Schools Initiative (NCSI), opened hundreds of new small high schools in poor urban communities in New York City starting in 2002. The theory behind opening…

  14. The Relationship between the Neighborhood Safety and Nutritional Status of Children in Baghdad City, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanain Faisal Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The neighborhoods where the children live play an important role in their development physically and mentally. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between neighborhood safety and child nutritional status in Baghdad city, Iraq. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out in Baghdad city, Iraq, among 400 primary school children from 4 schools. BMI-for-age Z score was used to assess the nutritional status of the children. Newly developed questionnaires on neighborhood safety were distributed to the parents to answer them. Results. In this study, males were more predominant than females with 215 participants compared to 185 females. A total of 49% were normal weight, 38.8% either overweight or obese, and only 12.2% underweight. There was a significant relationship between father education, father and mother working status, family income, and children nutritional status (P=0.10, 0.009, <0.001, 0.37, respectively. The association between neighborhood safety variables and child nutritional status was significant except for worrying about child safety and thinking of leaving the neighborhood (P=0.082, 0.084, respectively. Conclusion. Nutritional status of school children continues to be a public health issue in Iraq especially Baghdad city. There was a significant association between neighborhood safety and children nutritional status.

  15. The Development of Afterlife Beliefs in Religiously and Secularly Schooled Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, Jesse M.; Blasi, Carlos Hernandez; Bjorklund, David F.

    2005-01-01

    Children aged from 4;10 to 12;9 attending either a Catholic school or a public, secular school in an eastern Spanish city observed a puppet show in which a mouse was eaten by an alligator. Children were then asked questions about the dead mouse's biological and psychological functioning. The pattern of results generally replicated that obtained…

  16. Cities and Children: the challenge of urbanisation in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Cities are becoming home to a growing proportion of Africa’s children. In Tanzania, already one in four lives in an urban centre – and many more will in coming years. Within the short span of a generation, more than one-third of Tanzania’s children will be raised in a city or town. Growing up urban can offer these children the chance for a brighter future, or the grim conditions in which so many are now living in the sprawling cities of the continent. Increasingly urban Tanzan...

  17. City School Desegregation and the Creative Uses of Enrollment Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Joseph M.

    1977-01-01

    Enrollment shifts create several planning and financial problems for school districts accustomed to continued growth and rising budgets; however they can also signal new possibilities for quality integrated education both in cities and metropolitan areas. (Author/AM)

  18. Enuresis in School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehbens, James A.

    1970-01-01

    Studies relating to the more popular explanations of enuresis, are discussed and research relating to each is presented. Evidence supporting, or failing to support, treatment methods is also presented. Research possibilities for the school psychologist are suggested. (Author)

  19. Parenting School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... important role model in her life. For some children, however, school may cause frustration and stress. Learning disabilities can interfere with the joy of learning. Poor study habits and/or a lack of motivation can create academic difficulties. Sometimes youngsters may have ...

  20. Tinea capitis among children at one suburban primary school in the City of Maputo, Mozambique Tinea capitis entre as crianças de uma escola primária suburbana na Cidade Maputo, Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsin M. Sidat

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the prevalence of Tinea capitis among schoolchildren at one primary school and also identified the causative agents. Scalp flakes were collected from children presenting clinical signs suggestive of Tinea capitis. Dermatophytes were identified by following standard mycological procedures. This study found a clinical prevalence of Tinea capitis of 9.6% (110/1149. The dermatophytes isolated were Microsporum audouinii, Trichophyton violaceum, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The most prevalent causative agent in this study was Microsporum audouinii, thus confirming the findings from previous cross-sectional studies carried out in the city of Maputo.O estudo avaliou a prevalência da Tinea capitis na população estudantil duma Escola Primária e também identificou os agentes causais responsáveis. Escamas do couro cabeludo foram recolhidas das crianças apresentando sinais clínicos sugestivos de Tinea capitis. Dermatófitos foram identificados seguindo procedimentos micológicos padronizados. Este estudo encontrou uma prevalência clínica de Tinea capitis de 9,6% (110/1149. Os dermatófitos isolados foram Microsporum audouinii, Trichophyton violaceum e Trichophyton mentagrophytes. O agente causal mais prevalente neste estudo foi Microsporum audouinii confirmando os achados dos estudos transversais anteriores levados a cabo na Cidade de Maputo.

  1. MIXTECAN CHILDREN AT SCHOOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SWADESH, EVANGELINA ARANA

    SINCE ONLY ONE FOURTH OF THE POPULATION SPOKE SPANISH, THE LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION, EDUCATION BEFORE 1955 WAS ESSENTIALLY PRECLUDED FOR 150,000 MIXTECAN INDIANS LIVING IN SOUTHERN OAXACA, MEXICO. IN 1955, 7 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS WERE ESTABLISHED BY THE NATIONAL INDIAN INSTITUTE, WITH TEACHERS FROM THE LOCAL POPULATION AND INSTRUCTION IN MIXTECO, THE…

  2. Creative Arts Therapies in an Inner City School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish-Weiss, Beth

    A project was undertaken to improve mental health treatment services to seriously emotionally disturbed inner city ethnic minority children. Many of these children and the majority of their parents did not speak English. As service planning began it was agreed that the developers would like to emphasize the creative arts therapies, most especially…

  3. Inner-City Schools: A Multiple-Variable Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Royal

    1999-01-01

    Reviews variables from several disciplines relevant to understanding and improving inner-city schools. Neighborhood and other sociological variables, such as the concentration effects of living in poverty areas, are significant. So are teacher competence, school climate, faculty sociometry, student background, and entry-level factors, including…

  4. A Study on the Current Situation and Countermeasures of Primary School Children's Literature Reading:Taking Wuxi City of Jiangsu Province as an Example%小学生儿童文学阅读现状与对策研究--以江苏省无锡市为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾媛

    2016-01-01

    采用问卷调查法对无锡市小学生儿童文学阅读状况进行调查,分析小学生对儿童文学认识不足,阅读动机缺乏,阅读选择困难等问题,提出相关策略。%This paper takes a questionnaire survey of Wuxi City primary school children's literature reading status, and analy⁃ses problems of children's literature understanding insufficiency, lack of reading motivation, choose reading difficulties, then puts forward relevant strategies.

  5. PREVALENCE OF FOOD ALLERGIES IN THE POPULATION OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN FROM THE CITY OF OSIJEK

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović, Nika; Vlahović, Jelena; MIŠKULIN, MAJA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Food allergy is an immune-mediated hypersensitivity to allergens in food. This allergy affects about 6-8% of children younger than three years, about 4% of school-age children and about 2% of the adult population in the world. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of food allergies in the population of preschool children from the city of Osijek and to identify the most common causes of these allergies in the study population. Materials and methods: This cross-sectional study ...

  6. School meal program in Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam: reality and future plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Duc Son Nguyen Trung

    2012-01-01

    The socio-economic status in Vietnam has developed during the past decades. People become busier for work, and thus they do not have enough time to prepare meal for their children. The school meal program, organized by Department of Education, was first implemented at a kindergarten in 1977, which has been extended to elementary school since 1980. Up to date, 100% of kindergarten and approximately 90% of elementary schools have school meal programs. The purposes of this program are to provide appropriate meals for students, and to serve as education and communication tool for students. About 90% of school meals are prepared in the school's kitchen and the rest are provided by food companies. The weekly menu provides approximately 30% of recommended dietary allowances (RDA) for students. To date, there has been is no official dietitian training school in Vietnam. The head of school kitchen, who is not dietitian, is required to participate in a short-term training course, where s/he learns basic nutrition, nutrition requirements and food hygiene and safety. The food companies, which provide meals to school, must be approved for the hygiene and safety condition by the Human Health Services Department of Ho Chi Minh City. In the next plan of national nutrition strategy, establishing dietitian training schools will be prioritized. In addition, the regular nutritional surveillance for school-aged students will be introduced in school system thus we can develop and evaluate the school meal program in terms of nutrients, food safety and nutrition education.

  7. School-Based Interventions for Anxious Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Gail A.; Layne, Ann E.; Egan, Elizabeth A.; Tennison, Dana M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of three school-based interventions for anxious children: group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for children, group CBT for children plus parent training group, and no-treatment control. Method: Students (7-11 years old) in three elementary schools (N = 453) were screened using the Multidimensional…

  8. Unhealthy Behaviours of School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria LAZA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the study was to ascertain nutritional customs of pupils in grade schools.Material and Method: Anonymous questionnaires were done to a sample of 380 children, aged 10 to 14, in 20 fourth-to eight grade classes from 2 schools in Cluj-Napoca: one from down-town, the other one from a poorer neighbourhood.Results: Almost half of students revealed to have an irregular diet. In the last month, some of them did not have enough food or money to buy it (much of them come from the poorer neighbourhood. In this latest school, a triple percent of children have a vegetable diet (no meat, in fact. The obsession to lose weight and the irregular diet has conducted to lose appetite in over 30% of girls. About 60% take vitamins or nutritional supplements. Social status as well as the irregular diet is reflected in general status: over one third feel sad, alone, useless or cry without any reason. Some of the pupils which have problems with daily food supply, think the life is hard and do not worth to live it.Conclusions: There is a wide diversity in nutritional customs of children. Some of them are due to inappropriate nutritional knowledge or a wrong perception of being on fashion as well as to social status. Although the economic conditions are difficult to change, we consider that nutrition education should still be a part of health teaching.

  9. Investigation of glucose metabolism and obesity in school-age children in Zhengzhou city%郑州地区学龄儿童肥胖特征及糖代谢的调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁慧娟; 赵志刚; 汪艳芳; 李德霞; 苏永; 张会峰; 王遂军; 田睿

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the status of children adiposity at school age, and to analysis their related factors. Methods We advertised through the press, and recruited obese children aged 7~14y to our hospital- All the children meeting the diagnostic criteria for obesity filled out the unifiable form and had a physical examinations and laboratory tests. Results The prevalence of diabetes, impaired glucose regulation, insulin resistance,benign acanthosis nigricans and hypertension were 2. 4% ,20. 3% ,43.1 % ,80. 1%,35. 9% respectively among adolescents with adiposity in Zhengzhou city. By multiple linear stepwise regression analysis, we found that birth weight and waist circumference were related to body mass index(P<0. 01), Meanwhile sex,age,waist, fasting plasma glucose were related to fasting serum insulin level (P<0.01). Conclusions The prevalence of glucose dysregulation, insulin resistance and hypertension performance among obese children were increased in Henan province. The degree of obesity in children tended to increase with increasing age gradually. Strengthened screening and management of obese children are very helpful to prevent the high incidence of metabolic disease after being adults .%目的 了解郑州地区学龄儿童肥胖症的患病情况并分析相关影响因素. 方法 通过报纸招募7~14岁肥胖儿童来我院检查,对于符合肥胖症标准的422例儿童填写统一设计的表格并进行体检和实验室检查. 结果 郑州地区学龄肥胖症的儿童,糖尿病、IGR、IR、良性黑棘皮病、高血压的患病率分别为2.4%、20.3%、43.1%、80.1%、35.9%.多元线性逐步回归分析发现,出生时体重和WC与BMI相关(P<0.01),性别、年龄、WC、FPG与FIns水平相关(P<0.01). 结论 郑州地区肥胖儿童的糖调节障碍、IR、高血压的患病率高.儿童的肥胖程度呈现随年龄增加逐渐加重趋势.加强对肥胖儿童的筛查与管理,对防止成年后代谢疾病的高发具有重要意义.

  10. Factors Influencing Obesity on School-Aged Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soepardi Soedibyo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available School-aged children of 6-12 year old in big cities have less physical activities and relax life style. Fast food and soft drink consumed contain high calorie and protein of protein and carbohydrate sources. Obesity has impact on children’s growth and development especially on psychosocial aspect. The factors that play a role in supporting the obesity occurrence in children include socio-economic condition, behavior and life style and diet. A cross sectional descriptive –analytic study was conducted on elementary school students in Jakarta, to identify factors that play roles on obesity of school-aged children. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:43-54Keywords: childhood obesity, weight shape index, body mass index

  11. Effect of a school-based oral health education programme in Wuhan City, Peoples Republic of China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Peng, Bin; Tai, Baojun

    2004-01-01

    experimental and 3 control schools in Hongshan District, Wuhan City, Central China, with a 3-year follow-up. Data on dental caries, gingival bleeding and behaviour were collected. PARTICIPANTS: 803 children and their mothers, and 369 teachers were included at baseline in 1998. After three years, 666 children...... and their mothers (response rate 83%), and 347 teachers (response rate 94%) remained. RESULTS: DMFT/DMFS increments were comparable but the f/F components were higher among children in experimental schools than in control schools and the gingival bleeding score was, similarly, significantly lower. More children...... showed higher oral health knowledge and more positive attitudes, also being satisfied with training workshops, methods applied, materials used and involvement with children in OHE. CONCLUSIONS: The programme had positive effects on gingival bleeding score and oral health behaviour of children...

  12. Prevalence and association between obesity and metabolic syndrome among Chinese elementary school children: a school-based survey

    OpenAIRE

    Liu AiLing; Lin Rong; Liu WeiJia; Du Lin; Chen Qing

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background China has experienced an increase in the prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity over the last decades. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome among Chinese school children and determine if there is a significant association between childhood obesity and metabolic syndrome. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1844 children (938 males and 906 females) in six elementary schools at Guangzhou city from April...

  13. School-Based Budgeting in New York City: Perceptions of School Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatarola, Patrice; Stiefel, Leanna

    1998-01-01

    Summarizes results of surveys and interviews of community members from 29 New York City schools involved in school-level budgeting during 1995-96. Analyzes respondents' knowledge about school budgets, ideas about resource decision making, perceptions of budgetary power, and suggestions. Fully 80% of respondents supported a participatory process.…

  14. School Wellness Programs: Magnitude and Distribution in New York City Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, Leanna; Elbel, Brian; Pflugh Prescott, Melissa; Aneja, Siddhartha; Schwartz, Amy E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Public schools provide students with opportunities to participate in many discretionary, unmandated wellness programs. Little is known about the number of these programs, their distribution across schools, and the kinds of students served. We provide evidence on these questions for New York City (NYC) public schools. Methods: Data on…

  15. Teachers Talk: Views from Inside City Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Estelle

    Excerpts from tape recorded interviews with 14 beginning teachers in slum schools form the basis of this volume. Written to help neophyte teachers gain insights into the problems and experiences of teaching in such schools, the book presents anecdotes followed by discussion of relevant social science and cultural anthropological theory. There are…

  16. Enhancing Science in Inner-City Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Jen; Smyth, Steve

    2006-01-01

    London Metropolitan University in Islington, North London, is very much part of the local community. A very high proportion of the students come from the areas around the university, and an even higher proportion go on to take up posts in the immediate inner-city environment. The education department was therefore very keen to foster…

  17. Evaluation of school absenteeism data for early outbreak detection, New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostashari Farzad

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background School absenteeism data may have utility as an early indicator of disease outbreaks, however their value should be critically examined. This paper describes an evaluation of the utility of school absenteeism data for early outbreak detection in New York City (NYC. Methods To assess citywide temporal trends in absenteeism, we downloaded three years (2001–02, 2002–03, 2003–04 of daily school attendance data from the NYC Department of Education (DOE website. We applied the CuSum method to identify aberrations in the adjusted daily percent absent. A spatial scan statistic was used to assess geographic clustering in absenteeism for the 2001–02 academic year. Results Moderate increases in absenteeism were observed among children during peak influenza season. Spatial analysis detected 790 significant clusters of absenteeism among elementary school children (p Conclusion Monitoring school absenteeism may be moderately useful for detecting large citywide epidemics, however, school-level data were noisy and we were unable to demonstrate any practical value in using cluster analysis to detect localized outbreaks. Based on these results, we will not implement prospective monitoring of school absenteeism data, but are evaluating the utility of more specific school-based data for outbreak detection.

  18. OBESITY AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN: AN EMERGING THREAT IN CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity in children and adolescents is rapidly reaching epidemic proportions globally as well as in India. It is a well-recognized risk factor for adult obesity, which in turn may be the basis of various chronic diseases. So, by preventing the development of obesity in childhood can reduce the likelihood of obesity in adulthood and its health consequences. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: To find out the prevalence of overweight and obesity among school children in Bhopal city. MATERIAL & METHODS: STUDY DESIGN: Cross sectional descriptive study. STUDY POPULATION: Students studying in IX, X, XI, XII class in government and private schools of Bhopal STUDY PERIOD: July 2012-June 2014 (24 Months SAMPLING PROCEDURE: Multistage simple random sampling method was used to select schools from a list obtained by Ministry of education. Total 38 schools were chosen to fulfill the sample size, in which 120 students from each school were included under study. METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION: Data was collected by taking anthropometric measurements like body weight, height, BMI (Body mass index, WC (waist circumference. RESULTS: In present study, 256 (5.6% students were overweight and 46 (1.0% were obese. Total 2505 (55.0% of students have waist circumferences between 70 to 85 cm, whereas only 187(4.0% students have waist circumference more than 85 cm. CONCLUSION: The overall prevalence of overweight and obesity was 5.6% and 1.0% respectively among school children. It was more common in girls and among students of private schools.

  19. Children of immigrants in schools in New York and Amsterdam: the factors shaping attainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Crul; J. Holdaway

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: This article considers the ways in which school systems in New York City and Amsterdam have shaped the educational trajectories of two groups of relatively disadvantaged immigrant youth: the children of Dominican immigrants in New York and the children of Moroccan immigrants in A

  20. Impact of Physical, Psychological, and Sexual Violence on Social Adjustment of School Children in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sibnath; Walsh, Kerryann

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to understand the pervasiveness and impact of physical, psychological, and sexual violence on the social adjustment of Grade 8 and 9 school children in the state of Tripura, India. The study participants, 160 boys and 160 girls, were randomly selected from classes in eight English and Bengali medium schools in Agartala city,…

  1. Predicting Social Responsibility and Belonging in Urban After-School Physical Activity Programs with Underserved Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey J.; Byrd, Brigid; Garn, Alex; McCaughtry, Nate; Kulik, Noel; Centeio, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this cross sectional study was to predict feelings of belonging and social responsibility based on the motivational climate perceptions and contingent self-worth of children participating in urban after-school physical activity programs. Three-hundred and four elementary school students from a major Midwestern city participated.…

  2. Child-Oral impacts on daily performances: A socio dental approach to assess prevalence and severity of oral impacts on daily performances in South Indian school children of Bangalore city: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral disorders can have a negative impact on the functional, social and psychological well-being of children and their families. Oral health and dental treatment may have an impact on eating, speaking and appearance, thereby affecting quality of life. Thus, there has been a greater focus on the measurement of quality of life as a complement to the clinical measures. Objective: The aim was to assess the prevalence, characteristics and severity of oral impacts in south Indian school children using Child-Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (Child-OIDP index as a measure of oral health related quality of life. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was undertaken among the six government, and six private school children aged 11-12 years, of Karnataka, South India randomly selected as cluster, and all their 563 children were invited to participate. A cross culturally adapted and validated oral health-related quality of life measure; Child-OIDP was used to assess oral impacts. Results: The common perceived oral health problems were tooth ache reported by 342 children, a sensitive tooth reported by 230 children, tooth decay - hole in the tooth reported by 226 children. Eating was the most common performance affected (68.3%. The severity of impacts was high for eating and cleaning mouth and low for the study and social contact performances. Conclusion: The study reveals that oral health impacts on quality of life of school children of Karnataka aged 11-12 years. Oral impacts were prevalent, but not severe. The impacts mainly related to difficulty eating. Toothache, a sensitive tooth, tooth decay and bleeding gums contributed largely to the incidence of oral impacts.

  3. The Children's Aid Society community schools: a full-service partnership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jane

    2005-01-01

    In 1989, the Children's Aid Society (CAS) created an unprecedented partnership with the New York City Board of Education by developing a comprehensive response to the pressing needs of children and families in the northern Manhattan neighborhood of Washington Heights. After three years of careful planning, CAS and the New York City public schools opened the first community school at Intermediate School 218, offering a full array of supports, services, and learning opportunities. Adding, on average, one partnership school per year and remaining very flexible in adapting its model to the individual needs of each community, CAS now has thirteen community schools around New York City. The model's flexibility is seen also in the success of its national and international adaptation-an intentional part of CAS's work.

  4. Families with School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kathleen; Schneider, Barbara; Butler, Donnell

    2011-01-01

    Most working parents face a common dilemma--how to care for their children when they are not in school but the parents are at work. In this article Kathleen Christensen, Barbara Schneider, and Donnell Butler describe the predictable and unpredictable scheduling demands school-age children place on working couples and single working parents. The…

  5. DIETARY HABITS OF SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN IN TBILISI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebonia, N; Trapaidze, D; Kvanchakhadze, R; Zhizhilashvili, S; Kasradze, N

    2015-11-01

    Study Goal was to determine dietary habits in school-aged children. Sampling of children was conducted in two stages. In the first stage, five schools in Nadzaladevi district of city Tbilisi were randomly selected. On the second stage the study groups from the appropriate school-aged students (10-14 years old children) were also randomly selected. All student participants filled out standardized and adopted questionnaires suggested by the American Academy of family physicians. Data were analyzed by using EpiInfo 7th version. Statistical analyses looked at correlations between criteria of unhealthy diet (such as morning without breakfast, frequent consumption of non-alcoholic beverages and fast food products) and overweight/obesity. A Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated by using CDC tool. 175 children with ages of 10-14 years (47% boys) were included and interviewed. Half of the children noted that they love or like fast food products. 10% - visits fast food places 2-3 times a week together with a family. 11% - visits fast food places 5 times a week and even more. 34% - do not start morning with breakfast; 15% - eat only twice a day; 26% - add salt to their dishes; 58% - drink non-alcoholic beverages every day or many times during a week; 24% - are overweight; 29% suffer from obesity; 25% noted that fast food places are located near schools. Very weak correlation was found between unhealthy diet (morning without breakfast, frequent consumption of non-alcoholic beverages and fast food products) and overweight/obesity. According to study results, dietary habits of school-age children in Tbilisi is unhealthy; to improve nutritional habits is essential: (1) promote consumer (students, parents and teachers) awareness on a healthy diet, (2) educate children, adolescents and adults about nutrition and healthy dietary practices, (3) encourage to raise awareness about the salt consumption in recommended doses in children.

  6. INDIVIDUAL TYPICAL FEATURES OF MICROCIRCULATION OF PRIMARY SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anosov I. P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the question of primary school age children`s blood microcirculation in dependence on their individual typical features. We examined some 120 healthy children of 6-9 years, which were the students of secondary schools of the city of Melitopol. Anthropometric survey was conducted by the standard measurement scheme of longitudinal chest and weight parameters of the bodies of children. Diagnosis of body type (somatotype was conducted by the method of M. Chernorutskiy. According to the index of physical development - Pine index (PI, the children were divided into three somatic type: asthenic with IP> 30 gipersteni at PI <10 and normostenic type at 10 children of 6-9 years correspond to normoemic type. This pattern doesn’t change with age, and counts about of 51% from prepubertal age children; hypoemic type was registered for 48% of children, hyperemic type – for 1%

  7. Change Agents in Inner-City Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Calvert H.

    The educational institution's resistance to change may be attributed to its non-profit motive, domesticated service role, bureaucratic structure, and the fact that its existence is ensured by law. The characteristics likely to contribute to the success of change agent in school settings are: (1) a high social status within the faculty of the…

  8. Formation of concept of decimal system in Mexican school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Quintanar Rojas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with initial formation of concept of decimal system in second year of education at primary school in Mexico (City of Puebla. Our research is based on Activity Theory conception of teaching-learning process and of gradual introduction of scientific concepts in school age. The method has been designed and worked out with the help of actions in which logic, symbolic, spatial and mathematical aspects were implemented. All actions were introduced within divided activity of children in group guided by adult. A pretest-posttest design was used with an experimental group of Mexican school children. The results showed that children have developed the significant skills necessary for understanding the concept of decimal number system. They were also able to apply this concept for new kind if activity al the end of school year. Such new activity was solving of mathematic problems, which was not included in official school program. We consider that proposed method can be an approximation for solution of common difficulties which arise at primary school concerning teaching of mathematics.

  9. School Social Work with Grieving Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn-Lee, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research reported in this article was to advance understanding of the work of school social workers with grieving students. This research was aimed at answering the following question: What are school social workers' experiences working with grieving children? There were two steps in this study. Fifty-nine school social workers…

  10. Supporting Children's Transition to School Age Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2016-01-01

    While a great deal of research has focused on children's experiences as they start school, less attention has been directed to their experiences--and those of their families and educators--as they start school age care. This paper draws from a recent research project investigating practices that promote positive transitions to school and school…

  11. Exposure and peritraumatic response as predictors of posttraumatic stress in children following the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing

    OpenAIRE

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Doughty, Debby E.; Reddy, Chandrashekar; Patel, Nilam; Gurwitch, Robin H.; Nixon, Sara Jo; Tivis, Rick D.

    2002-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated a positive relationship between exposure and posttraumatic stress, but one's subjective appraisal of danger and threat at the time of exposure may be a better predictor of posttraumatic stress than more objective measures of exposure. We examined the role of peritraumatic response in posttraumatic stress reactions in over 2,000 middle school children 7 weeks after the 1995 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, bombing. While many children reported hearing and feeling the blast an...

  12. Analysis of the Impacts of City Year's Whole School Whole Child Model on Partner Schools' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Julie; Anderson, Leslie M.

    2015-01-01

    City Year is a learning organization committed to the rigorous evaluation of its "Whole School Whole Child" model, which trains and deploys teams of AmeriCorps members to low-performing, urban schools to empower more students to reach their full potential. A third-party study by Policy Studies Associates (PSA) examined the impact of…

  13. Characteristics of specific reading disability in children from a neuropsychological clinic in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poblano Adrián

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This report describes the main clinical features associated with specific reading disability (RD in a group of 778 school-age children studied in a Neuropsychological Clinic in Mexico City. Material and Methods. The study was performed retrospectively, using data abstracted from clinical records of subjects seen in 1995-1996. Children were mainly from low and middle economic strata and aged between 6 to 12 years. The following data were collected: age, gender, diagnosis, school grade, food intake, maternal complications during pregnancy, perinatal and postnatal neurological risk factors, and neurological signs and handedness. Results. Subjects with RD had a mean age of 102.9 months, were predominantly male (male female ratio, 2:1. Among the study group, 49.1% of the children were diagnosed with RD of a visuo-sensory-motor type, and 75.1% were from early school years (1st to 3rd grades; 27.6% showed evidence of malnutrition. A previous history of language disorders (49.2%, and a high frequency of perinatal risk factors and neurological soft signs were also found. Conclusions. This study shows that variables such as gender, food intake, and genetic and neurological risk factors, were associated with reading disabilities in school children.

  14. Occupational Profile and Perceptions of Street Children in Surat City

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    Patel NB, Desai Toral, Bansal RK, Girish Thakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Street children constitute a highly vulnerable, most deprived and marginalized section of the society, whose rights are constantly violated with impunity. This study attempts to explore the occupational profile of the street children in the city of Surat and pertinent aspects thereof. This cross-sectional study was conducted by interviewing 326 street children in Surat city. The study revealed that majority of the street children (79.8% start earning money as beggars. They soon switch over to other petty jobs/ activities. The street children select their occupation according to their choice of work, availability of an opportunity and the amount of money available to them. Their occupational profile changes according to their age; the period of stay in Surat; and, the money available with them. The earnings of these children fluctuate with the season. Leading five occupation adopted by street children includes Working in eatables and tea stalls (11.7%; Begging and or sweeping (11.3%; Selling newspapers, magazines and books (11.3%; Shoe shining (9.8% and Selling drinking water bottles & pouches & cold drinks (9.5%. Shoe shining is mostly carried out by the boys aged more than 12 years. Commercial sex work by girls is considered as inevitable by street girls. Illicit alcohol transport and selling is most lucrative and is often attract street children in to this occupation. Some street children become pick pockets under the guidance of an older pick pocket. Usually children who are very young, have recently come into the streets and their original families are often the most disadvantaged are more likely to engage in Picking up rags work as this requires no capital, no contacts and very less labour.

  15. Dental fluorosis severity in a group of school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susy Yukie Fujibayashi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: This study aimed to assess the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in a group of school children in the city of Campo do Tenente (Parana, Brazil in order to compare the mean fluoride concentration in public water supply and discuss the effective values for fluoridation of water supply, as well as, the need of control of fluoride concentration within the water consumed by population. Material and methods: Firstly, 362 children enrolled in regular public schools, at elementary level, were examined by a single researcher, previously calibrated for Dean’s index application. From these, 90 children were affected by some degree of fluorosis, but only 40 returned the signed free and clarified consent form for participating in the research. Results: It was found that 42.5% of the children presented mild fluorosis and 32.5% moderate fluorosis. Moreover, it was observed that the average fluoride concentration in public water supply, in 2004, was 1.7 ppm of fluoride. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the need of a closer supervision of the city situation, by the inclusion of fluoridation external control and constant monitoring of the oral health status of the population.

  16. Oral findings of Down syndrome children in Chennai city, India

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    Asokan Sharath

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the common oral findings and anomalies of Down syndrome (DS children in Chennai city, India. Materials and Methods: Among the 130 DS children examined, 102 children aged 15 years and below were included in the study. There were 57 male children and 45 female children in the total study sample. A specially prepared case record was used to record the following findings in each child: a brief family and personal history; anomalies of soft tissues, teeth, occlusion, and temporomandibular joint. Age wise and sex wise comparisons of the findings were done. Results: About 97 children (95% had the habit of regular tooth brushing. Everted lower lip (66%, retained primary teeth (31%, and midface deficiency (76% were the most commonly seen soft tissue, dental, and occlusion anomalies, respectively. Conclusions: Midface deficiency was the most common orofacial anomaly seen in these children, followed by everted lower lip and retained primary teeth. Almost all the children had a regular tooth brushing habit. All the children examined were offered free dental treatment in our dental college.

  17. Diet Survey Of Icds Children In Pune City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratinidhi A.K

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: What is the protein & calorie intake of children getting supplementary nutrition under ICDS? Objectives: I To study the protein and calorie intake of children covered under ICDS. ii To study the protein & caloric content of supplementary nutrition. Study design: Cross- sectional. Setting: ICDS project of Pune city. Participants: Children aged 1-6 years, receiving supplementary nutrition from anganwadis. Sample size: 165 children aged 1-<6 tears. Study variables: Knowledge and perception of ICDS, Protein and calorie intake of children, nutritive value of ICDS supplementary foods. Results: There was a gross deficiency of proteins and calories in majority of the children. The protein and calorie intake was less than 50% of recommended daily allowance in 38.2% and 35.7% children respectively. Only 13.9% of children had a protein intake of ³90% of RDA while 12.7% had a calorie consumption of ³90% of RDA. 71.6% of children aged 3-<6 years took the food to their homes and shared with other family members thus depriving them the total benefit of supplementary nutrition. 46.1% mothers perceived the supplementary nutrition to be a substitude. The supplement given at anganwadi had an average nutritive value of 213 calories and 5.1 gm protein as compared to recommended values of 300 calories & 10 gms protein.

  18. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene in children living in city and rural residences in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Knudsen, Lisbeth Ehlert; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims to assess the biological uptake in children of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons measured as 1-hydroxypyrene in urine from children living in city and rural residences.......The present study aims to assess the biological uptake in children of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons measured as 1-hydroxypyrene in urine from children living in city and rural residences....

  19. Educating the smart city: Schooling smart citizens through computational urbanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Williamson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Coupled with the ‘smart city’, the idea of the ‘smart school’ is emerging in imaginings of the future of education. Various commercial, governmental and civil society organizations now envisage education as a highly coded, software-mediated and data-driven social institution. Such spaces are to be governed through computational processes written in computer code and tracked through big data. In an original analysis of developments from commercial, governmental and civil society sectors, the article examines two interrelated dimensions of an emerging smart schools imaginary: (1 the constant flows of digital data that smart schools depend on and the mobilization of analytics that enable student data to be used to anticipate and shape their behaviours; and (2 the ways that young people are educated to become ‘computational operatives’ who must ‘learn to code’ in order to become ‘smart citizens’ in the governance of the smart city. These developments constitute an emerging educational space fabricated from intersecting standards, technologies, discourses and social actors, all infused with the aspirations of technical experts to govern the city at a distance through both monitoring young people as ‘data objects’ and schooling them as active ‘computational citizens’ with the responsibility to compute the future of the city.

  20. School Phobic Children and Adolescents: A Challenge to Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Sandra R.

    1980-01-01

    Although fearful avoidance of school is a complex and serious problem among school-age children, there are techniques available to professionals for assisting children to overcome school-related anxiety. It is important for school personnel to identify school-phobic children and to assist in planning the earliest possible intervention. (Author)

  1. Comparison of Environmental Attitudes and Experiences of Five-Year-Old Children Receiving Preschool Education in the Village and City Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkan, Nazmi; Güngör, Hande; Fetihi, Leyla; Erol, Ahmet; Gülay Ogelman, Hülya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare environmental attitudes and experiences of five-year-old children receiving preschool education in the village and city centre. The first group comprised 54 five-year-old children who received preschool education and attended kindergartens of two primary schools in the Karateke and Kocabas villages of Honaz…

  2. Enterprise Risk Management in the Great City Schools, Spring 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Scott B.; DeCato, Kristen Devan; George, Dave; Henderson, Dana; Henry, Aston A., Jr.; Hoch, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Public schools have a mandate to educate children in a way that is safe, effective, and cost efficient. The risks involved in achieving that mandate have become increasingly complex, and the need to manage those risks has never been greater. The emergence of widespread, interconnected risks, such as cyber risks and data management, infrastructure…

  3. Disabled Children Face Bullying Throughout School Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162772.html Disabled Children Face Bullying Throughout School Years More must be done to ... 29, 2016 WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Bullying is a problem that affects almost all students ...

  4. School bus and children's traffic safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Shu-ming; Stephen Hargarten; ZHU Shan-kuan

    2007-01-01

    There is no safer way to transport a child than a school bus. Fatal crashes involving occupants are extremely rare events in the US. In recent years, school bus transportation began to develop in China. We want to bring advanced experience on school bus safety in Western countries such as the US to developing countries.Methods: We searched the papers related to school bus safety from Medline, Chinese Scientific Journals Database and the Web of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).Results: There were only 9 papers related to school bus safety, which showed that higher levels of safety standards on school buses, school bus-related transportation and environmental laws and injury prevention were the primary reasons for the desired outcome. Few school bus is related to deaths and injuries in the developed countries.Conclusions: The developing countries should make strict environmental laws and standards on school bus safety to prevent children's injury and death.

  5. Buying behaviour of children at secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Snížková, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    The bachelor thesis deals with buying behaviour of children at secondary school. The aim is to describe their buying behaviour and find out their motivational factors to purchase factors with a focus on advertisement. In the theoretical part is specified buying behaviour and factors influencing consumer. Gen Z and Net generation, in which children at secondary school class, are characterized. It described their buying behaviour and specification that characterize this generation. A part of th...

  6. Children's Effortful Control and Academic Competence: Mediation through School Liking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carlos; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Castro, Kimberly S.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relations among children's effortful control, school liking, and academic competence with a sample of 240 7- to 12-year-old children. Parents and children reported on effortful control, and teachers and children assessed school liking. Children, parents, and teachers reported on children's academic competence. Significant positive…

  7. Environmental Lead Exposure among Primary School Children in Shebin El-Kom District, Menoufiya Governorate, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HM Gabr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lead still remains an important problem for poor, inner-city, ethnic minority children, with a particular emphasis on lead paint and dust. In Egypt, there is no national survey about the prevalence of elevated blood lead level among children.Objective: To assess the environmental lead level as well as to determine blood lead level among primary school children and find out its relationship with their intelligent quotient (IQ, hemoglobin level, hearing impairment and school performance.Methods: 190 primary school children from rural and urban areas were selected and their blood lead levels (BLL, hemoglobin concentrations, IQ, hearing threshold and school performance were measured. Also, environmental lead level was measured in the school and home.Results: The mean value of environmental lead (μg/m3 in urban schools air was significantly higher than that in rural areas. BLL had a significant negative correlation with hemoglobin level and IQ; it was positively correlated with the hearing threshold. With increasing BLL, the school performance of children decreased significantly.Conclusion: Exposure to lead would deteriorate IQ, school performance and hearing level of school children. Even in the absence of overt clinical manifestations of lead toxicity, lead intoxication should be among differential diagnosis in children presenting anemia, intellectual impairment, poor academic performance and hearing impairment.

  8. Serving Hispanic School-Aged Children in after School Programming: Implications for School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joy Pastan

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. school-age population has been experiencing dramatic demographic changes over the past two decades. Hispanic students constitute the fastest growing student group today, and this growth is expected to continue such that there will be more Hispanic school-aged children than non-Hispanic school-aged children in 2050. Unfortunately, Hispanic…

  9. Scoliosis in school children aged from 7 to 8 and conditions in primary and secondary schools in Kragujevac

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    Đonović Nela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Scoliosis, a lateral curvature of the spine, is the most frequent deformity of the spinal column. It is additionally aggravated by the inadequate environmental conditions in schools, such as unadjusted furniture, teaching aids and most of all, school bag and bad lighting. Material and methods. This investigation was carried out during the years 2005 and 2006 on the territory of the city of Kragujevac and included school children attending 22 primary and 8 secondary schools, whose medical records were obtained from school children health centres, the counseling centre for scoliosis at the Orthopedic Department of the Hospital in Kragujevac and the Institute of Public Health in Kragujevac. Results. The statistical analysis of these data showed that a significantly higher number of children with scoliosis was detected in 2005, being χ²=11.6, p<0.01 for primary schools. Scoliosis was more frequent in girls than in boys: in 2005 it was χ²=10.54, p<0.01 and in 2006 χ²=10.72, p<0.01 in primary schools, whereas no difference was found in secondary schools in 2005 -c2=4.14, p>0.05, but in 2006 scoliosis was more frequent in girls χ²=49.51, p<0.01. Conclusion. Scoliosis is extremely important in both primary and secondary schools and therefore, it is necessary to intensify preventive systematic examinations of school children.

  10. REVALENCE OF BACKACHE AMONG SCHOOL GOING CHILDREN OF HYDERABAD SINDH

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    Shireen Khanzada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of backache is increasing in children with heavy weighed school bags and abnormal sitting posture both, at home and school. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of this much avoided issue of back pain among school going children of Hyderabad, Sindh. Methodology: 240 pupils (range, 7-14 years old were recruited in their respective schools of Hyderabad city. Inclusions were all the present students on that particular day of data collecting and excluding those who were absent that day. A preformed questionnaire form was filled with all due consent, following which, examination was done to check the parameters of height, weight, BMI, weight of school bag, and posture analysis. Result: The prevalence of back pain was 46.7% among the total 240 subjects studied. Out of which 14.4% boys and 32.3% girls were affected. The majority of affected children were age group of 10-12 years old. In our study 61% children had school bags weighing around 5 kg, which is point to be considered by high officials of Primary Education System in Pakistan. Conclusion: The symptoms of backache were significantly visible in those students carrying heavy bags in proportion to their own weight and BMI. This was also closely related to the time duration, subjects were spending in front of computer/television. After analysis and all, it turned out that a significant number of students were affected by abnormal postures leading to backache-, which may be held equally responsible for further Alleviation of such symptoms later in life.

  11. Children, Schools, & Inequality. Social Inequality Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entwisle, Doris R.; And Others

    Findings from the Beginning School Study, conducted in Baltimore (Maryland) are used to show how differences in family circumstances translate into beliefs and activities that help or hinder children's development. The Beginning School Study started in 1982 and has followed 790 randomly selected Baltimore students from first-grade in 1982 through…

  12. Ritalin for School Children: The Teachers' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Stanley S.; Bosco, James J.

    Research in an urban public school system (Grand Rapids, Michigan) was conducted to determine teachers' view of Ritalin for school children. Three questions were addressed: what contact with and information about Ritalin do teachers have; what attitude do teachers express toward Ritalin; and what professional behaviors do teachers report in regard…

  13. A Conversation with Randy Asher, Principal of New York City's Brooklyn Technical High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Randy J.

    2016-01-01

    This is a conversation with Randy Asher, principal of New York City's Brooklyn Technical High School. Brooklyn Tech is a selective science high school in New York City, founded in 1922 as a school for boys with potential for careers in engineering and applied science. Today, it provides full-time education for both male and female students from…

  14. The School Children's Development in Language Skills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史崔丽

    2009-01-01

    @@ During the school years, children's development in cognition enables them to focus their thinking on the facts and relationships less intuitively and more analytically. Growing language abilities complement these cognitive skills. As a result, older children can discuss and explain their world and themselves in ways no presehoolers can. And the ability to plan and follow through on cognitive strategies further distinguishes older children from preschoolers.

  15. Sleep, school performance, and a school-based intervention among school-aged children: a sleep series study in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghui Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sufficient sleep during childhood is essential to ensure a transition into a healthy adulthood. However, chronic sleep loss continues to increase worldwide. In this context, it is imperative to make sleep a high-priority and take action to promote sleep health among children. The present series of studies aimed to shed light on sleep patterns, on the longitudinal association of sleep with school performance, and on practical intervention strategy for Chinese school-aged children. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A serial sleep researches, including a national cross-sectional survey, a prospective cohort study, and a school-based sleep intervention, were conducted in China from November 2005 through December 2009. The national cross-sectional survey was conducted in 8 cities and a random sample of 20,778 children aged 9.0±1.61 years participated in the survey. The five-year prospective cohort study included 612 children aged 6.8±0.31 years. The comparative cross-sectional study (baseline: n = 525, aged 10.80±0.41; post-intervention follow-up: n = 553, aged 10.81±0.33 was undertaken in 6 primary schools in Shanghai. A battery of parent and teacher reported questionnaires were used to collect information on children's sleep behaviors, school performance, and sociodemographic characteristics. The mean sleep duration was 9.35±0.77 hours. The prevalence of daytime sleepiness was 64.4% (sometimes: 37.50%; frequently: 26.94%. Daytime sleepiness was significantly associated with impaired attention, learning motivation, and particularly, academic achievement. By contrast, short sleep duration only related to impaired academic achievement. After delaying school start time 30 minutes and 60 minutes, respectively, sleep duration correspondingly increased by 15.6 minutes and 22.8 minutes, respectively. Moreover, intervention significantly improved the sleep duration and daytime sleepiness. CONCLUSIONS: Insufficient sleep and daytime sleepiness

  16. Study of Prevalence and Risk Factors of Asthma and Allergic Diseases Among School Children (6-7 and 13-14 years Based on ISAAC Protocol in Jam City, Bushehr Province in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahere Assadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asthma and allergic diseases are raised as a major health problem in the world. The prevalence of these diseases is on the rise specifically in the world and Iran. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of these diseases in Jam City, from environs of Bushehr Province. Material and Methods: this study was performed on 516 schoolchildren aged 6-7 years and 569 schoolchildren aged 13-14 years in schools of this city based on a standard questionnaire of allergic conditions and asthma (ISAAC phase 1 and 3, which mention to the prevalence and risk factors for these diseases in 2014.     Results: in prevalence of atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis and asthma among 6-7year old schoolchildren were 13.8 %, 20% and 3.9%, respectively, While, the prevalence of these diseases among 13-14 year old schoolchildren were 19.5%, 19.2% and 6.7%, respectively. There were a significant association in each group, between affliction rate to asthmaand its association with rhinitis and eczema (P<0.05. Also, there were a significant association between the prevalence of these diseases and the presence of risk factors such as exposure to cigarette smoke, pet care and use of gas as a fuel at home. (P<0.05. Conclusion: the prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases was high in Jam city and this increase is associated to risk factors such as exposure to cigarette smoke, pet care and use of gas as a fuel at home.

  17. Allergens in School Settings: Results of Environmental Assessments in 3 City School Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Stuart L.; Turner-Henson, Anne; Anderson, Lise; Hemstreet, Mary P.; Bartholomew, L. Kay; Joseph, Christine L. M.; Tang, Shenghui; Tyrrell, Shellie; Clark, Noreen M.; Ownby, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    Environmental allergens are major triggers for pediatric asthma. While children's greatest exposure to indoor allergens is in the home, other public places where children spend a large amount of time, such as school and day care centers, may also be sources of significant allergen encounters. The purpose of this article is to describe schoolroom…

  18. Fungal infection risk groups among school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Ejdas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between ocurrence of fungi in children and living environment (city - countryside, sex, age, diet, undergone diseases therapy with antibiotics and exposure to hospital environment, and to indicate children potentially vulnerable to fungal infections. The material was consisted of swabs collected from the oral cavily, the throat and the nose of healthy children, aged 6-9 and 10-15, from both urban and rural environmens. Candida albicans, the basic aetiological factor in thc majority of mycoses recorded in humans, unquestionably prevailed in the group of the 13 speciec of yeast-like fungi and yeasts isolated. Records of C. glabrata and C. krusei increasing numbers of whose strains show resistance to basic antimycoties, as well as relatively frequent records of Trichosporon beigelii, Saccharomycopsis capsularis and Saccharomyces sp., fungi whose expansiveness and enzymatic activity have been growing, may be considered disconcerting. Vulnerability to fungal infection increases following anti-bacterial antibiotic therapy in the majority of subjects regardless season or age. This is particularly true primarily of the most stable ontocoenosis of the throat. Younger children, on the other hand, are the most vulnerable foUowing infection of the respiratory system. Fungi are likely to colonise the nose in this case. Children living in the countryside who had been ll immediately prior to the collection of the material constitute the highest risk group of the occurrence of fungi in any of the ontocoenoses studied. A greater number of positive inoculations were recorded in these children in comparison to the children from the city. It may be indicative of a more extensive spectrum of natural reservoirs of fungi and the vectors of their transmission in rural areas than those in the city, lower health hygiene and lower immunity or of a more common carriage of fungi among rural children.

  19. Integrating Technology in Teaching Students with Special Learning Needs in the SPED Schools in Baguio City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn L. Balmeo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Leading-edge creation and development of technologies including those for the children with special learning needs found common place in the educational system. Allowably, this study’s focal point engages in the integration of technologies in the educational environments where students with special learning needs are housed. Respondents include 53 teachers employed in the special education schools in Baguio City, who were to determine the availability and effectiveness of technology in their schools and the problems encountered in the integration of technologies. Results indicate that availability and effectiveness of technologies are at limited level and that there are problems encountered in technology integration. This is significant for the achievement of the aim of students with special learning needs for they would be guided appropriately in the development of their skills with the challenges of educational attainment and life itself

  20. Visual impairment in urban school children of low-income families in Kolkata, India

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    Sambuddha Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate pattern of visual impairment in school children from low-income families in Kolkata, India, an institutional cross-sectional study was conducted among 2570 children of 10 primary schools. Ocular examination including refraction was done and pattern of visual impairment and refractive error was studied. The age range was 6-14 years. Refractive error was seen in 14.7%. Only 4 children were already wearing correction. Myopia and hypermetropia was present in 307 (11.9% and 65 (2.5% children, respectively. Visual acuity of less than 6/12 in better eye was present in 109 (4.2% and 5 (0.2% children pre- and post-correction, respectively. Eighteen children had amblyopia. Although prevalence of refractive error in this group is less compared to school children of all income categories reported from other cities of India, it is more compared to school children of all income categories from the same city. Refractive error mostly remains uncorrected in this group.

  1. Nutrition Status Of Children (1-6 Years In Slums Of Ghaziabad City

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    Garg S.K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question : What are the nutritional problems of pre- school children in slums? Objectives: (i To assess the nutritional status of the children . (ii To find out the nutritional deficiency disorders in them (iii To study their dietary intake. Study design: Cross- sectional. Setting : Slums of Ghaziabad city. Participants :771 children (1-6 years. Study Variables : Age, sex, caste, ICDS beneficiary status, weight, nutritional deficiency disorders, dietary intake and supplementary nutrition. Statistical analysis : Simple proportions and Chi- square test. Results : A majority (58.2 % of children were having under nutrition of varying grades irrespective of their sex and caste but influenced by their age and ICDS beneficiary status. Anaemia, xerophthalmia and goitre were present in 14.7%, 1.6% and 0.6 % children respectively. Average daily dietary intake of energy & nutrients were lower than the recommended daily allowances (RDA. Conclusion: Regular nutritional supplementation along with adequate nutrition education would reduce the nutritional deficiency disorders among children.

  2. Psychosocial and Friendship Characteristics of Bully/Victim Subgroups in Korean Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoolim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial and friendship characteristics of Korean children who engaged in bully/victim subgroups among their peer groups. The participants were 605 elementary school students in Bucheon City, Korea. The participants completed a peer nomination inventory as well as loneliness and social anxiety scales. Friendship quality…

  3. Anemia among school children in eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatiwada, Saroj; Gelal, Basanta; Gautam, Sharad; Tamang, Man Kumar; Shakya, Prem Raj; Lamsal, Madhab; Baral, Nirmal

    2015-06-01

    Anemia is one of the most common public health problems in developing countries like Nepal. This study was done to find the prevalence of anemia among the children aged 4-13 years in eastern Nepal. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in four districts (Morang, Udayapur, Bhojpur and Ilam) of eastern Nepal to find the prevalence of anemia among the school children of eastern Nepal. Children aged 4-13 years were selected randomly from different schools of above districts and 618 venous blood samples were collected. Hemoglobin level was estimated by using cyanmethemoglobin method. The mean hemoglobin level was 12.2 ± 1.82 gm/dl. About 37.9% (n = 234) children were found anemic. Anemia prevalence was 42.4% (n = 78), 31.6% (n = 60), 45.3% (n = 48) and 34.8% (n = 48) among school children of Morang, Udayapur, Bhojpur and Ilam district, respectively. The study finds anemia as a significant health problem among the school children of eastern Nepal.

  4. School Brand Management: The Policies, Practices, and Perceptions of Branding and Marketing in New York City's Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMartino, Catherine; Jessen, Sarah Butler

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, market-based choice initiatives have become a popular approach to education reform. Since 2002, the New York City Department of Education has opened over 250 high schools, creating a marketplace so widespread that many students no longer have a zoned or neighborhood school. This article uses two New York City--based case…

  5. Níveis de imunidade contra a poliomielite em uma amostra de escolares do município de São Paulo, Brasil Immunity levels to poliomyelitis in a sample of school children from the city of S. Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus E. Stewien

    1977-06-01

    levels were determined in 13 Public Administrative Regions, as well as in the three geographical zones of S. Paulo city. The results showed that only about a half of the children had antibodies to all three poliovirus types in the different age groups examined, except in the 13 year age bracket, where the percentage of triple-immunes was 68.0%. Consequently, the immune status of the population does not reach the desirable levels of 75% of triple positives and the principal cause for this situation was the relative low prevalence of antibodies to the type 3 poliovirus, in almost all the age groups studied. It was also shown that the immune status of the school population was similar in the three geographical zones of the city. However, significant differences in immunity were detected in the 13 Public Administrative Regions of S. Paulo city, where the percentages of triple positive children varied from 38.6% to 66.9%. Booster doses of oral vaccine were recommended for children at school age.

  6. Distance to school is associated with sedentary time in children: Findings from the URBAN study

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    Erica Aneke Hinckson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sedentary behavior is associated with overweight and obesity in children, and distance to school has been negatively associated with active commuting to school. It is not known how distance to school relates to sedentary behavior in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between distance to school and children’s sedentary behavior during weekdays at times where children interact with the neighborhood environment. Children (5-13 y, n=295 who participated in the Understanding Relationships between Activity and Neighborhoods (URBAN study (2008-2010 across four New Zealand cities wore a hip-mounted accelerometer for seven days. Minutes spent sedentary (accelerometer count <100 min-1 were derived for the school travel periods (0800-0859 &1500-1559 and after school discretionary time (1600-1759. Shortest street network distance to school was calculated from residential addresses using Geographical Information Systems and parsed into tertiles for analysis. Children completed a daily travel log including mode of transport to and from school, which was dichotomized into active (walking and cycling and passive (motorized modes. Children living in the 2nd tertile of distance from school were the least sedentary during the school travelling periods (42 ± 10 %, mean ± true between-child SD compared to those living in the 1st or 3rd distance tertiles (47 ± 10 % and 49 ± 10 % respectively; the differences were clear and likely substantial (90% confidence limits ±6%. Children who travelled by motorized transport were more sedentary for each of the distance tertiles (50 versus 44 %, 46 versus 39 %, and 54 versus 27 % for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd tertiles, respectively; 90% confidence limits ±7%. In the period of 1600-1759, girls in the 3rd distance tertile were the most sedentary. The combined effects of 1-2 km distance from school and active commuting to school contributed to least sedentary time in children.

  7. Partners in school asthma management: evaluation of a self-management program for children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, L Kay; Sockrider, Mariannam; Abramson, Stuart L; Swank, Paul R; Czyzewski, Danita I; Tortolero, Susan R; Markham, Christine M; Fernandez, Maria E; Shegog, Ross; Tyrrell, Shellie

    2006-08-01

    The "Partners in School Asthma Management" program for inner-city elementary school children comprises (1) case finding; (2) linkage of school nurses, parents, and clinicians; (3) a computer-based tailored educational program; and (4) school environmental assessment and intervention. Case finding identified 1730 children in 60 elementary schools with probable asthma; 835 (96% Hispanic or African American) joined the study. Baseline, posttest, and follow-up measures of asthma knowledge, self-efficacy, and self-management behavior were obtained from the children, and data on symptoms, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations were obtained from their parents. The schools provided data on grades and absences. Each school had a baseline and follow-up environmental assessment. The children in the intervention group showed greater increases in knowledge, self-efficacy, and some aspects of self-management. No differences between groups were found in health status variables, school performance, attendance, or levels of environmental allergens in schools. In 15 schools, an enhanced intervention allowed children and their parents to meet with a project physician, develop an asthma action plan, and receive a 1-month supply of medication; the project physician then followed up with the child's community physician. Children participating in this enhanced intervention had better school performance and fewer absences than the comparison group. Overall, the program was effective in improving children's asthma self-management but not in improving their health status. While the case-finding, computer-based self-management training program and linkage system were successfully implemented, the program failed in creating needed changes in the medical (action plans by community physicians) and physical environments (reduced school allergen levels) of the children.

  8. Biophysical profile of blood pressure in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, M; Chhatwal, J; George, S M

    1995-07-01

    The study was conducted in an industrial and prosperous city of Punjab to evaluate the biophysical profile of blood pressure (BP) in apparently healthy school children. A total of 2560 children between the ages of 5-15 years were enrolled. Their age, religion, dietary and family history were recorded. Weight and height of all children were measured and body mass index (BMI) calculated. A value of 2.26 or more was taken as obesity. BP measurements were made as per recommendations of the American Heart Association. Systolic as well as diastolic BP increased with age in both sexes, correlation coefficients being 0.59 and 0.6, respectively. A statistically significant linear relationship between BP and weight and height was noted. Children with BMI of > 2.26 had a significantly higher BP (P vegetarians and also non- vegetarians also did not differ. A family history of hypertension was associated significantly with elevated BP (p obesity and a family history of hypertension in children are associated with elevated BP and such children may be at risk for developing hypertension at a later date. They should be followed up and considered for modification of risk factors.

  9. Estimated Prevalence of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in a Sample of Panamanian School-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Emelyn Y.; Velarde, Silvia; Britton, Gabrielle B.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the prevalence of ADHD in a school sample of children ages 6-11 years in the city of Panama. The assessment battery included the Conners' Parent and Teacher Rating Scales, the Structured Developmental History of the Behavioral Assessment System for Children (BASC-2), and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children…

  10. [Stress in school-age children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, R G

    1994-10-01

    In April 1988, following preliminary research, Notre Dame Elementary School in Edmunston, N.B. initiated a pilot project entitled Management of Children's Stress. Using a three-dimensional process, parents, teachers and students collaborated to empower all students enrolled at the school to effectively manage their day-to-day stress. To prepare, the children, parents and teachers participated in nine- and 15-hour education sessions, respectively. Various techniques, including deep breathing exercises, stretching, relaxation techniques and listening to music, were considered. Visualization, maximizing the mind's potential to envision relaxing images, became the preferred technique. In addition to complementing other relaxation techniques used by the children, visualization facilitated their learning; developed and improved their concentration, motivation and self-confidence; gave them a positive self-image; and reduced health problems. The project has surpassed all expectations. In March 1993, it became part of a Quality of Life Education Project at the school.

  11. Energy and macronutrient intakes in preschool children in urban areas of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

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    Sibbritt David W

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity has been documented in preschool children in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC, Vietnam. However, little is known about what preschool children in HCMC eat or how well their nutrient intake meets nutrient recommendations. This study aims to describe the energy and macronutrient intake and compare these nutrient intakes with the recommendations for Vietnamese children aged four to five years. Methods The data comes from the baseline measurement of a one year follow-up study on obesity in 670 children attending kindergartens in HCMC. Dietary information for each child at the school and home settings was collected using Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQs, by interviewing teachers and parents or main caregivers. The average energy and nutrient intake in a day was calculated. The proportion of children with energy intake from macronutrients meeting or exceeding the recommendations was estimated based on the 2006 recommended daily allowance (RDA for Vietnamese children in this age group. Results The dietary intake of the participants contained more energy from protein and fat, particularly animal protein and fat, and less energy from carbohydrates, than the RDA. Most children (98.1% had mean energy intake from protein greater than the recommended level of 15%, and no child obtained energy from animal fat that was in accordance with the recommendation of less than 30% of the total fat intake. Nearly one half of children (46.5% consumed less than the advised range of mean energy intake from carbohydrate (60%–70%. Conclusion In this preschool child population in HCMC, in which obesity is emerging as major public health problem, there is an imbalance in dietary intake. Healthy eating programs need to be developed as a part of an obesity prevention program for young children in HCMC.

  12. Spanish-speaking Parents' Negotiation of Language and Culture with their Children's Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Bickmore, Ronda L.

    2013-01-01

    Latinos are now the largest public school minority population in the U.S. Because of a shift in the states, cities, and counties where Latinos are choosing to live, many schools that did not previously serve substantial numbers of Latinos are doing so now. Additionally, many of the Latinos in these new settlement areas are recent immigrants who speak little or no English. This qualitative study examined how immigrant Latino parents who speak little or no English supported their children in th...

  13. Sleep problems in primary school children: comparison between mainstream and special school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quine, L

    2001-05-01

    This paper reports on a study of the prevalence and social correlates of dyssomnias, features associated with obstructive sleep apnoea, and parasomnias in primary school children aged 4-12. Head teachers of schools selected randomly from lists of local primary and special schools were contacted by telephone and asked to distribute a questionnaire package to the parents of all pupils aged 4-12 years. In all, 890 parents of children from mainstream schools and 300 from special schools were approached. The response rates were 64.7% and 60%, respectively. The results showed that significantly higher proportions of children in special schools than in mainstream schools presented four of the five dyssomnias investigated and all of the features associated with obstructive sleep apnoea. In contrast, only two of the seven parasomnias were presented by higher proportions of the children in special schools. Age and gender differences for the two groups of children are presented. Finally, multiple correlations were computed between a range of child, family, and environmental characteristics and the three problems most frequently reported: frequency of settling problems; sleeping in the parents' bed; and night waking. The findings are discussed with reference to other studies of children's sleep problems, and the implications for treatment are considered.

  14. Quality assessment of restorations in a population of school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagramian, R A; Jenny, J; Woodbury, P J; Proshek, J

    1975-01-01

    An index to measure quality of dental restorative care was devised and utilized on a population of 838 Caucasian school children in a large midwestern city. Quality was measured using a four-point scale. All restorations present were considered as part of the entire mouth. Quality was tested in relation to socioeconomic status. Based on this index the problem of poor quality dental restorations is significant and not necessarily related to socioeconomic status as represented by income or education. Evidence of high quality dentistry as evidenced by stainless steel crowns, space maintainers, and orthodontic appliances was limited to children whose families reported incomes over $6,000. Further use of this quality index is recommended to improve and refine measurements in the area of dental care. PMID:1119639

  15. NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN BLIND CHILDREN: ISFAHAN ABABASIR BOARDING SCHOOL

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    M RAJAI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inadequate dietary intake causes malnutrition associated with poor physical and mental development, specially in children. This study evaluated the nutritional status in blind children in Ababasir Boarding Center (a boarding school in Isfahan city. Methods: A 72 hours food regimen survey was measured in 50 subjects (boys and girls by weighting method. The anthropometric data was collected to compare with NCHS normal data. Results: Energy intake was less than 75 percent RDA in all the subjects and the amounts of animal protein intake was also little. Chronic malnutrition was more prevalent. Discussion: Althought the energy intake was lower than RDA, but it did not cause under weight among them probably because of reduced physical activity due to their disability and inadequate high quality protein and other nutrients probably could be the major cause in chronic malnutrition.

  16. Effect Evaluation on the Intervention Measure for Overweight and Obese Children in Primary School in Xianmen City%学龄期儿童肥胖干预对身高发育水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈友兰; 杨晓剑; 杜玉开; 管纪惠

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of group obesity intervention on body height development in overweight and obese children in primary schools in Xiamen. Methods Two primary schools with same basic conditions and located in the areas with high incidence rate of obesity in Xiamen were selected, one as the intervention group, and another as a control group. In the intervention school, a program of "focus on obesity control to create health-promoting school" and related health promotion were carried out, but no program and activities were did in the control school. The baseline survey was finished before April 2006 in two schools and then the 840 students were followed-up for 5 years, tracking and taken weight measurement once per month. Results After the intervention, the rates of overweight and obesity in the intervention school were decreased (x2=27.198, P0.05). Conclusion The intervention to obesity in children had no significant effect on their body development.%目的 对学龄期儿童进行群体性肥胖干预,探讨儿童肥胖干预对儿童身高发育水平的影响.方法 在厦门市肥胖发生率较高的地区选择条件基本相同的两所小学,1所为干预学校,1所为对照学校.干预学校开展“中国/WHO以肥胖控制为切入点发展健康促进项目”活动,对照学校不开展相关活动.2006年4月-2010年4月,对两所学校各840名学生进行每月一次的身高、体重监测,持续监测5年.结果 干预后,干预学校学生的超重率和肥胖率显著下降(x2=27.198,P<0.001),干预学校学生的体质指数(BMl)均值下降明显,与对照学校学生比较,差异有统计学意义(t=-93.814,P<0.01).干预学校学生干预后的BMI值与干预前BMI值相减求差值,对照学校学生也与自己干预前BMI值相减求差值,对两组差值进行独立样本t检验,差异有统计学意义(t=-89.785,P<0.01).干预学校学生干预后的身高值与干预前身高值相减求差值,对照学校学生也

  17. School playground facilities as a determinant of children's daily activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Glen; Bugge, Anna; Hermansen, Bianca;

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of school playground facilities on children's daily physical activity.......This study investigates the influence of school playground facilities on children's daily physical activity....

  18. Oral Health: What Parents Can Do: School Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Oral Health What Parents Can Do: School Age Children Past ... offices, clinics, and sometimes in schools. Read More "Oral Health" Articles Children's Dental Health / What Parents Can Do: ...

  19. A Review of School Reintegration Programs for Children with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevatt, Frances F.; Heffer, Robert W.; Lowe, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Descriptive articles on school reintegration programs for children with cancer are reviewed to synthesize the information of best practices for program development. Suggestions are given for school psychologists working with chronically ill children. (Author/JDM)

  20. The prevalence of fibromyalgia among school children in Kalubia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the work This study aimed to determine the prevalence of juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome (JFMS) among school children in Kalubia. Patients and methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted on school children in Kalubia governorate in January 2012 to determine the prevalence of fibromyalgia syndrome among school children. A total of 2000 children attending on the days of our visits were recruited from (a) primary and (b) preparatory schools. JFMS was diagnosed according to ...

  1. Food intake patterns and factors affecting in preschool children in Bushehr city

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    Farideh Nazari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous factors, some obvious and others subtle, determine food intake patterns in children. Likes and dislikes are established in the early years. The purpose of this study is to assess the food consumption pattern and factors affecting in preschool children in bushehr city. Materials and Methods: This is descriptive, analytical study. The total of 191 preschool children (6 years old was selected at random sampling method. Data were collected by food frequency questionnaire and were analyzed by table of serving sizes food groups for children and adolescents and by SPSS software 16. Results: Frequency Of milk consumption was 41.9% daily, 40.9% weekly, and 12.6% rarely. Frequency Of fish consumption was 1.6% daily, 71.7% weekly, and 16.8% rarely. Frequency Of chicken consumption was 1% daily, 83.4% weekly, and 9.9% rarely. Frequency Of fruit consumption was 69.6% daily, 22% weekly, and 7.3% rarely. There was significant statistical relationship between Frequency consumption Of dairy, salad, fruit , juices, chicken, egg, and fathers ‘job and fathers’ and mothers’ education level.(P<0. 05 Conclusion: It is concluded that situation of food group consumption about dairy, meats, vegetables, cereals is poor but fruit consumption was good in preschool children. Based on results we recommended planning for educational program in relation to Nutrition and food group consumption by media and in school and public centers and health centers.

  2. A school-based intervention to reduce overweight and inactivity in children aged 6–12 years : Study design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Jansen (Wilma); H. Raat (Hein); E. Joosten-van Zwanenburg (Evelien); I. Reuvers (Ivo); R. Walsem, van (Ron); J. Brug (Hans)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground Effective interventions to prevent overweight and obesity in children are urgently needed especially in inner-city neighbourhoods where prevalence of overweight and inactivity among primary school children is high. A school based intervention was developed aiming at the reduct

  3. The New York City School Reform: Consequences for Supervision of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Vivian; Sullivan, Susan; Glanz, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the status of instructional supervision within the current New York City school reform movement. Reports from interviews with New York City public school teachers demonstrate the prevalence of directive, checklist and narrative approaches to supervision, raising serious questions for the future of instructional supervision.…

  4. Parental Involvement (and Uninvolvement) at an Inner-City High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Terrinieka T.; Sanchez, Bernadette

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to understand the perceptions of parental involvement and parental uninvolvement at a predominantly African American inner-city high school. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 15 parents and 10 staff at an inner-city public high school. Five major themes emerged regarding the meanings of parental involvement at this…

  5. Integrating Emerging Technologies in Teaching Ugandan Traditional Dances in K-12 Schools in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabingo, Alfdaniels

    2015-01-01

    Schools in New York City have made attempts to embrace and support the strand of "making connections", which is laid out in the New York City Department of Dance blueprint for teaching and learning in dance for grades PreK-12. Accordingly, some schools have integrated Ugandan traditional dances into the dance curriculum, and dance…

  6. Prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization in 7–9-year-old children of Bengaluru City, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH is a developmental defect. The prevalence of MIH ranges widely from 2.4% to 40.2%. Aim: This study was under taken to determine the prevalence of MIH in 7–9-year-old children of Bengaluru City, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in a representative sample of 2500 school children aged 7–9 years of Bengaluru, India. Oral examination was carried out by a single trained calibrated examiner under natural daylight. Results: Twelve children (0.48% were diagnosed with MIH. A total of 68 teeth were observed with MIH. All four first permanent molars were affected in 50% of children. In the molar group, mandibular molars (29.41% were more frequently affected than maxillary molars (27.94%. Conclusion: The prevalence of MIH in 7–9-year-old children of Bengaluru was 0.48%, with no gender predilection.

  7. Prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization in 7–9-year-old children of Bengaluru City, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Priya; Gupta, Tulika; Sharma, Akhilesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect. The prevalence of MIH ranges widely from 2.4% to 40.2%. Aim: This study was under taken to determine the prevalence of MIH in 7–9-year-old children of Bengaluru City, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in a representative sample of 2500 school children aged 7–9 years of Bengaluru, India. Oral examination was carried out by a single trained calibrated examiner under natural daylight. Results: Twelve children (0.48%) were diagnosed with MIH. A total of 68 teeth were observed with MIH. All four first permanent molars were affected in 50% of children. In the molar group, mandibular molars (29.41%) were more frequently affected than maxillary molars (27.94%). Conclusion: The prevalence of MIH in 7–9-year-old children of Bengaluru was 0.48%, with no gender predilection. PMID:27041893

  8. Transition of special needs children from kindergarten to primary school

    OpenAIRE

    Purkat, Maja

    2016-01-01

    In my master's thesis, I dealt with the issue of transition of special needs children from kindergarten to school. First, I provided a general description of the term transition, and then I focused more on the period when children first enter school. I described two dominant approaches to transition of children when starting schoolschool readiness and transition in accordance with the ecological model. I showed why this transition to school may represent an obstacle, what may hinder the pr...

  9. Communicating Astronomy to School Children Through Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.; Collado, M. G.

    2011-06-01

    Artistic activities permeate our culture and our education, mainly because they speak of our most precious and intimate feelings, hopes, fears and sensations. Art constitutes, therefore, a universal language that can communicate and inspire through time and space, addressed to anybody with any kind of background. The power of inspiration of art is a wonderful way to excite children's imagination while communicating astronomical concepts. We present an example of communicating astronomy through different kinds of art pieces to school children. Also, children artworks are very useful to understand many of their conceptions and misconceptions about astronomical concepts.

  10. Energy and nutrient intake in preschool and school age Mexican children: National Nutrition Survey 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barquera Simón

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate energy and nutrient intake and adequacy in preschool and school age Mexican children, using the National Nutrition Survey 1999 (NNS-1999. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty four-h dietary recalls from pre-school (n=1 309 and school (n=2 611 children obtained from a representative sub-sample of the NNS-1999 were analyzed. Intakes and adequacies were estimated and compared across four regions, socio-economic strata, and between urban and rural areas, and indigenous vs. non-indigenous children. RESULTS: Median energy intake in pre-school children was 949 kcal and in school children 1 377 kcal, with adequacies 150% in both age groups. The North and Mexico City regions had the highest fat intake and the lowest fiber intake. Children in the South region, indigenous children, and those in the lowest socio-economic stratum had higher fiber and carbohydrate intakes and the lowest fat intake. These children also showed the highest risks of inadequacies for vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, iron, zinc and calcium. CONCLUSIONS: Mexico is experiencing a nutrition transition with internal inequalities across regions and socio-economic strata. Food policy must account for these differences in order to optimize resources directed at social programs.

  11. Prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization in 7–9-year-old children of Bengaluru City, India

    OpenAIRE

    Priya Subramaniam; Tulika Gupta; Akhilesh Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect. The prevalence of MIH ranges widely from 2.4% to 40.2%. Aim: This study was under taken to determine the prevalence of MIH in 7–9-year-old children of Bengaluru City, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in a representative sample of 2500 school children aged 7–9 years of Bengaluru, India. Oral examination was carried out by a single trained calibrated examiner under na...

  12. Children's School Placement in Germany: Does Kindergarten Attendance Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, C. Katharina; Buchel, Felix; Wagner, Gert G.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the relationship between kindergarten attendance and seventh-grade school placement of children in West Germany, differentiating associations for children of citizens from those of immigrants' children. Found a significant relationship between kindergarten attendance and later school placement for children in immigrant households but not…

  13. Perceptions of Elementary School Children's Parents Regarding Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Christine M.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Glassman, Tavis

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the preferences of parents of elementary school-aged children regarding when sexuality topics should be discussed in school and at home. The survey was mailed to a national random sample of parents of elementary school age children. Overall, 92% of parents believed that sexuality education should be taught in schools.…

  14. Children, Schools and Hallowe'en

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plater, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the attitudes and experiences of key stage one and two children concerning the British autumn festival of Hallowe'en, and then compares the results with data on the attitudes and practices of British primary schools and their teachers towards the festival, showing that there is a discordance between the two. After outlining…

  15. Children Diagnosed with Cancer: Returning to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer: Late Effects of Cancer Treatment . How your child’s cancer may affect schoolwork Most children adjust well to ... what to say when others ask about the cancer. Talk with your child about going back to school and about being ...

  16. Children's Need to Know: Curiosity in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Susan Engel argues that curiosity is both intrinsic to children's development and unfolds through social interactions. Thus, it should be cultivated in schools, even though it is often almost completely absent from classrooms. Calling on well-established research and more recent studies, Engel argues that interactions between…

  17. HEALTH STATUS OF CHILDREN UNDER SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES IN DOIWALA BLOCK, DEHRADUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kakkar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background -The introduction of school health services in India dates back to 1909, when school children in the city of Baroda were given the first medical examination. School Health programme ,promoting basic check up of school children for a variety of health related problems, is a systematic effort in raising awareness about health issues among school children and their families. Good health increases enrollment and reduces absenteeism. It also ensures attendance of the poorest and most disadvantaged children to school, many of whom are girls. Aim- To study the morbidity status of the school children & elicit relationship of healthy habits with morbidity pattern. Study Type- Observational study Methodology- A cross sectional survey to find out the morbidity pattern was conducted on 757 school children (340 boys and 417girls, aged 5-16 years studying in class I-VIII in five different schools of Doiwala, Dehradun under Rural Health training centre, Rajeev Nagar. Results- Overall students attendance was 78.2%. Clinical anaemia was higher in Girls (46.7% as compared to Boys (34.1%. Worm infestation was higher in boys (65.1% as compared to Girls(57.3%. Over all abnormal Visual acquity(8.5% or eye abnormality (14% was noticed among study subjects. Dental Caries (53.1% and dermatitis (16.3% were more in boys. Healthy habits like daily bathing (82.6%, daily teeth brushing (61.1%, mouth rinsing after meal (53% and hair clean/combed (80.2% were more in girls as compared to boys while trimmed nail was equally (55% noticed among both the groups. Conclusion- Morbidities found amongst students are basically due to low awareness & negligent behaviour about personal hygiene are the key areas of concern and by active involvement of school teachers improvement in personal hygiene of school children and reduction in related morbidities can be achieved.

  18. Analysis of the Permanent Tooth Eruption and Contraction of Dental Caries Based on Physical Development in School Children

    OpenAIRE

    相澤 徳久; 結城 昌子; アイザワ ノリヒサ; ユキ マサコ; Aizawa, Norihisa; Masako YUKI

    2006-01-01

    We performed a cohort study on the physical development, eruption of permanent teeth, and contraction of dental caries in school children. To establish criteria for the effective maintenance of dental hygiene, we analyzed the relationship between the eruption of permanent teeth and contraction of dental caries based on the physical development. The subjects were 373 elementary school children in Koriyama City, consisting of 215 boys and 158 girls, who were examined from their first to sixth g...

  19. A Formative Study of the Implementation of the Inquiry Team Process in New York City Public Schools: 2007-08 Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marian A.; Kannapel, Patricia; Gujarati, Joan; Williams, Hakim; Oettinger, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    During the 2007-08 school year, the New York City Department of Education launched the second phase of its ambitious and innovative initiative known as "Children First." Ultimately, this initiative aims to intensify the focus by all educators on student performance and in doing so to stimulate the development of evidence-based cultures…

  20. Managing for Results in America's Great City Schools. A Report of the Performance Measurement and Benchmarking Project, Spring 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report describes statistical indicators developed by the Council of the Great City Schools and its member districts to measure big-city school performance on a range of operational functions in business, finance, human resources and technology. The report also presents data city-by-city on those indicators. This is the second time that…

  1. Managing for Results in America's Great City Schools. A Report of the Performance Measurement and Benchmarking Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report describes statistical indicators developed by the Council of the Great City Schools and its member districts to measure big-city school performance on a range of operational functions in business, finance, human resources and technology. The report also presents data city-by-city on those indicators. This is the second time that…

  2. HEIGHTS AND WEIGHTS OF URBAN AND RURAL SCHOOL CHILDREN IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ghassemi

    1977-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometric Measurements is a simple and reliable tool for assessment of nutritional status of children. In this study height and weight of 23,170 middle class school children of 6-14 years in the city of Shiraz and four rural areas were measured. Results showed no difference among the rural and urban children. They were close to the third percentile of Boston standard for height and weight for the age. While height and weight of middle class school children in Tehran are reported to be close to fiftieth percentile of the Boston standard, similar patterns of growth have been reported from similar countries. Our results confirm close correlation between socio-economic development and child physical growth. Evaluation of weight for height in our sample showed that 19.3 per cent of children in the city and 16.8 per cent in rural areas were nutritionally at risk. And relative risk was higher below ten years of age. Therefore twenty bottom percent of younger school children in provinces are to be given highest priority in nutrition intervention programs in school.

  3. Families with school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kathleen; Schneider, Barbara; Butler, Donnell

    2011-01-01

    Most working parents face a common dilemma--how to care for their children when they are not in school but the parents are at work. In this article Kathleen Christensen, Barbara Schneider, and Donnell Butler describe the predictable and unpredictable scheduling demands school-age children place on working couples and single working parents. The authors assess the potential capacity of schools to help meet the needs of working families through changes in school schedules and after-school programs and conclude that the flexibility parents need to balance family-work responsibilities probably cannot be found in the school setting. They argue that workplaces are better able than schools to offer the flexibility that working parents need to attend to basic needs of their children, as well as to engage in activities that enhance their children's academic performance and emotional and social well-being. Two types of flexible work practices seem especially well suited to parents who work: flextime arrangements that allow parents to coordinate their work schedules with their children's school schedules, and policies that allow workers to take short periods of time off--a few hours or a day or two-to attend a parent-teacher conference, for example, or care for a child who has suddenly fallen ill. Many companies that have instituted such policies have benefited through employees' greater job satisfaction and employee retention. Yet despite these measured benefits to employers, workplaces often fall short of being family friendly. Many employers do not offer such policies or offer them only to employees at certain levels or in certain types of jobs. Flexible work practices are almost nonexistent for low-income workers, who are least able to afford alternative child care and may need flexibility the most. Moreover the authors find that even employees in firms with flexible practices such as telecommuting may be reluctant to take advantage of them, because the workplace culture

  4. SUCCES AT SCHOOL IN VISUALLY IMPAIRED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanika DIKIC

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The research included 200 visually impaired children of primary school during the period from 1992 to 1996. By means of adequate instruments we have tested the relation between the success at school of partially seeing children and hyperkinetic behavior, active and passive vocabulary richness, visuo-motoric coordination and the maturity of handwriting. Besides the already known factors (intellectual level, specific learning disturbances, emotional and neurotic disturbances, cultural deprivation, the success in class depends very much on the intensity of hyperkinetic behavior as well as its features: unstable attention, impulsiveness and hyperactivity. Visual-motor coordination eye-hand and the maturity of handwriting have a strong influence on their success at school.

  5. Survey on hypertension and risk factors among school age children in Shenzhen City%深圳市学龄儿童高血压危险因素调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞; 黄彩; 黄婵; 周海滨; 彭绩

    2011-01-01

    Aim To survey the incidence of hypertension in school-aged children and related risk factors in Shenzhen. Methods Children aged 6~14 years old were sampled and surveyed by random cluster sampling. The blood pressure was measured,and the possible risk factors were investigated by questionnaires. Results The incidence rate of hypertension in 1 140 children was 4.04%,and the blood pressure was elevated along with the increase of age both in boys and girls. The body height,weight,waistline,hip circumference and BMI demonstrated significant differences between hypertensive and normal children. The rate of hypertension of children with census registration in Shenzhen was higher than those without. Obesity, high salt and fat diet were the risk factor related to hypertension. Conclusions The blood pressure of children is elevated along with the increase age, and the incidence rate of hypertension is associated with the status of growth,economy, obesity and eating habit. Therefore controlling body weight and changing the unhealthy eating habit can prevent and reduce the occurrence of hypertension.%目的 了解深圳市儿童血压水平及高血压患病率情况,探讨儿童高血压的易患因素.方法 采用整群随机抽样的方法,对深圳市6~14岁儿童进行血压测量及问卷调查,观察与小学生高血压可能相关的危险因素.结果 在调查的1 140名儿童中,高血压患病率为4.04%,男女儿童血压均随着年龄增长而呈升高的趋势;高血压儿童与正常儿童之间的身高、体重、腰围、臀围和体质指数(BMI)均具有显著差异(P<0.05);深圳户籍儿童高血压患病率显著高于非户籍儿童(P<0.05).肥胖、高盐高脂饮食是儿童高血压的危险因素.结论 儿童血压随着年龄增长呈升高趋势,高血压患病率与生长发育、家庭经济水平、肥胖及饮食习惯有关,控制体重,改变不良饮食习惯可减少高血压的发生.

  6. New York City Schools March Off to War: The Nature and Extent of Participation of the City Schools in the Great War, April 1917-June 1918.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, Stephan F.

    1990-01-01

    Uses New York City schools as a case study in the translation of national policy into local action during World War I. Examines how the Board of Education initiated the intertwined tasks of stimulating patriotism and promoting Americanization. Discusses how schools were used as channels of communication to all Americans. (JS)

  7. New York City Schools March Off to War: The Nature and Extent of Participation of the City Schools in the Great War, April 1917 to April 1918.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, Stephan F.

    In April 1917, the United States went to war, and the public schools across the nation initiated programs that encouraged patriotism, supported war policies, and promoted the assimilation of immigrants. In New York City in 1917-18, the Board of Education: (1) called for the unqualified allegiance of school principals and teachers to the U.S.…

  8. 2010年深圳市福田区新入学、入托儿童接种证查验工作调查分析%The survey of vaccination certificates inspection in school and kindergarten children in Futian district of Shenzhen city in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林宝妮; 方琼; 周志锋; 蔡琳; 刘俊玲

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To understand the prophylactic immunization condition in school and kindergarten children in Fu-tian district of Shenzhen city in 2010, in order to provide the basis for advancing preventive vaccination certificate inspection system and strengthening the supervision system. Methods: According to The notice on further strengthening inspection of vaccination certificates in school and kindergarten beginners of Futian district, inoculate certificates and inoculate registration condition of 28 192 children in 211 schools and kindergartens were checked. Results: Inspection coverage rate of vaccination certificates was 100%. The number of 28 192 children should be checked, and 27 625 children were really checked, the rate of inspection was 99.79%, among which the rate of certificates holder was 99.16%. The full vaccination rate was 76.32%, 5 975 children were supplementary vaccination, with the rate of 91.35%. The rate of full vaccination and supplementary vaccination of children in kindergartens were higher than that in schools, the differences were statistically significant (x2=6.632, 20.392, P=0.01, 0). The average vaccination rate of BCG vaccine, hepatitis B vaccine and measles vaccine were up to 98%, whereas the average vaccination rate of DBT, OPV and JEV were relatively low. Conclusion: Vaccination certificates inspection of children in school and kindergarten of Futian district has achieved great progress. Education department and health department need coordinate and increase propaganda, in order to improve the rate of full and supplementary vaccination of type I vaccine.%目的:了解深圳市福田区2010 年入学、入托儿童预防接种情况,为完善预防接种证查验制度和监督体系提供依据.方法:按照深圳市福田区卫生局和教育局发布的,对福田区所辖211 所幼儿园和小学28 192 名入学、入托儿童预防接种证及接种登记情况进行查验.结果:接种证查验覆盖率为100%,应查验儿童28

  9. An Analysis of the Street-Children Phenomenon in the City of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Alireza Afshani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction   In nearly all big cities around the world, the phenomenon of street children is one of the contemporary social issues. During past several decades, there is an increase in the volume of street children phenomenon around the world. The rising number of street children has many pathological and consequential negative impacts for children, youth, families, and the society at the whole . According to 2000 UN report, the number of street children is estimated between 100 to140 million people. According to this report, it is estimated that around 40 million people living in Latin America, 35 million in Asia, 10 million in Africa and remaining live in other countries including advanced industrial societies. There are not reliable data about the number of street children in Iran. According to the available reports there are around 20 thousand street children in Iran. Some preliminary studies show a trend towards the growth of street children phenomenon in several big cities of Iran. The pathological impact of street children phenomenon need appropriate policy-making based on scientific approach. Thus various scientific researchers should work for deeper understanding of factors associated with the formation and characteristics of street children to better social policy.     Materials and Methods   The present paper aims to examine the overall situation of street children concerning their life style, activities, experiences, family background, educational achievement and other behavioral characteristics. For this purpose, data collected through a survey administered in the face-to-face interview among 122 street children aged 6-14 which working in the street of Isfahan city in the spring of 2010. The measurement validity of the study obtained through face validity and the questionnaire has been revised based on the experts’ comments and suggestions. Also a pretest study conducted to examine questionnaire and based on the results of

  10. Biochemical Risk Factors for Stone Formation in Healthy School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maasumeh Mohkam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of urolithiasis in childhood is increasing. The wide geographic variation in the incidence of lithiasis in childhood is related to climatic, dietary, and socioeconomic factors. Many children with stone disease have a metabolic abnormality. In Southeast Asia, urinary calculi are endemic and are related to dietary factors. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of renal stone, urine metabolic abnormality, control of blood pressure and demographic character in elementary school children of Qom. A cross sectional study was performed on 110 primary school children (56 girls and 54 boys aged 7 to 11 years old. Demographic data such as age, height, weight were gathered, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, Urine analysis and culture, urinary levels of calcium, creatinine, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, uric acid, cystine, citrate, oxalate, protein and sonographic findings were evaluated. The mean (±SD of age was 8.85±1.51 years. Only one child had renal stone (1%, but the prevalence of abnormal renal sonography was 7%. The most prevalent urine metabolic abnormalities were hypercalciuria (23% and hypocitraturia (100%. 11.2% of children had positive urine culture that all were female. The prevalence of high blood pressure was 7.1% for girls and 11.1% for boys. The prevalence of renal stone in children in this study was 1%, which means the accurate judgment about the prevalence of renal stone in Qom city needs more comprehensive studies. Similar to other studies in Iran this study shows that the prevalence of hypercalciuria is significantly higher comparing to other countries, it may be associated with excessive intake of sodium.

  11. A survey of dental caries and its influencing factors in school-aged children of Xiamen city in 2005 and 20 1 5%厦门市学龄儿童龋病状况十年对比调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊震; 陈玫; 刘艺华

    2016-01-01

    目的:了解厦门市学龄儿童10年间龋病流行病学情况,为开展学龄儿童龋病防治工作提供科学依据。方法:分别于2005及2015年按照分层随机整群抽样方法选取厦门市城乡各2所小学,共2334名小学生为调查对象。按照WHO推荐的龋病流行病学调查方法进行口腔检查,记录龋、失、补情况,并进行统计学分析。结果:2005、2015年受检学龄儿童患龋率分别为73.31%、52.65%(P<0.05);龋均分别为2.69、1.67(P<0.05)。结论:10年间我市学龄儿童患龋率及龋均均有明显下降。%AIM:To investigate the prevalence of dental caries in school-aged children of Xiamen city in 2005 and 2015.METHODS:With stratified cluster random sampling method,2,334 urban and rural school-aged children in Xiamen from 2 schools were surveyed.Oral examination was conducted by the WHO recommended caries epidemiological investigation method.Dental caries,tooth loss,and tooth filling status were recorded.The results were entered by EpiData 3.0 and analyzed by SPASS 13.0.RESULTS:In 2005 the prevalence rate of dental caries was 73.31% and the mean DMFT/dmft was 2.69.In 2015,the number decreased to 52.65% and 1.67,respectively (P0.05).CONCLUSION:The prevalence of dental caries of the school-aged children in Xiamen decreased sig-nificantly in 2015 as compared with that in 2005.

  12. Prevalence of anterior dental trauma and its associated factors among children aged 3-5 years in Jaipur City, India – A cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the prevalence of anterior dental trauma and its associated factors among 800 preschool children aged 3 to 5 years in Jaipur City, Rajasthan, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among children aged 3-5 years, who were enrolled in various private and public schools in Jaipur. Parents were asked to fill a form addressing socio-demographic data and clinical examinations were performed by a single dentist. Traumatic dental injuries (TDI) were a...

  13. A Research on Relationship among Academic Performance, Loneliness and Subjective Well-being of the Migrant Laborers' Children in City Junior Middle Schools%初中农民工子女学习成绩与主观幸福感和孤独感的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范晓玲; 李光; 张斌

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship among academic performance, loneliness and subjective well-being of the rural migrant laborers' children in the city junior middle schools. Methods: From three state-owned middle schools that accepted rural migrant laborers' children in a district of Fuzhou, 178 rural migrant laborers' children of grade 1 and 2 were tested by the UCLA Loneliness Scale and General Well-being Schedule, meanwhile their academic performances were obtained from their class advisors. Results: Except for the factor of fear, the relationships among the academic performance, loneliness and factors of subjective well-being were significant. The result of the structural equation modeling indicated that loneliness of the rural migrant laborers' children had partial mediation effect between academic performance and subjective well-being. Conclusion: The academic performance of the rural migrant laborers' children not only can directly affect the subjective well-being, but also indirectly affect it through loneliness.%目的:探讨初中农民工子女学习成绩、孤独感和主观幸福感之间的关系.方法:从福州市某区3所接收农民工子女的中学抽取初一、初二年级的农民工子女学生178人,进行UCLA孤独量表和GWB总体幸福感量表测验,并通过班主任收集学生的学习成绩等级.结果:除担心因子外,初中农民工子女的学习成绩与孤独感(r=0.326)、满足兴趣(r=0.247)、精力(r=0.281)、心境(r=0.170)、控制(r=0.268)、松弛-紧张(t=0.273)之间相关显著;采用结构方程模型验证发现.初中农民工子女的孤独感在学习成绩与主观幸福感的关系中起部分中介作用.结论:初中农民工子女学习成绩不但能够直接影响他们的主观幸福感,还能通过影响他们的孤独感而间接影响主观幸福感.

  14. Oral health status and behaviour of 6-year-old school children in Taizhou city%泰州市6~7岁儿童口腔健康状况、行为及其影响因素的调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾春梅; 蔡桥银; 段义峰

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe oral health status and oral health behavior of 6-7-year-old children in Taizhou city. Methods Dental caries of 1800 6-7-year-old children in Taizhou city were recorded according to WHO criteria. Data from 1800 mothers and school teachers in Taizhou city who finished questionnaires were analyzed. Results The caries prevalence was 68.2% for primary teeth and 5.2% for permanent teeth. About 33.80% of the children brushed their teeth twice a day and 59.10% once a day. Fluoridated toothpaste was used by 61.28% of the children. Nearly 25.32% of the children had seen a dentist during the last year,and 59.20% children consumed food with suger at least 3 times a day. Conclusions Dental caries prevalence of primary teeth of 6-7-year-old children is relatively high.%目的 调查泰州市6~7岁儿童的口腔健康状况和及其影响因素.方法 随机抽取泰州市10所小学1 800名6~7岁儿童,按WHO龋病诊断标准调查儿童患龋情况.采用母亲问卷和教师问卷的调查方法收集儿童的口腔健康态度、行为以及相关影响因素.结果 泰州市1 800名6~7岁儿童乳牙患龋率为68.2%,龋均为3.54,龋面均为8.24;恒牙患龋率为5.2%,龋均为0.07,面均为0.08,33.80%的儿童每天刷牙2次以上,59.10%的儿童每天刷牙1次,4.62%的儿童很少或从不刷牙.61.28%的儿童使用含氟牙膏.大约25.32%的儿童在过去1年拜访过牙医,59.20%儿童每天吃含糖食品3次以上.结论 泰州市儿童患龋率高于全国2008年口腔流行病学调查结果.

  15. Meeting the Needs of Urban Students: Creative Arts Therapy in Jersey City Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cindy Lou

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the history and development of the Jersey City Public Schools creative arts therapy program. Creative arts therapists contributed examples of their work throughout the district that provide a window into their respective school settings. Examples include technology-based art therapy, an extended school year program,…

  16. An Analysis of the Street-Children Phenomenon in the City of Isfahan

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Alireza Afshani; Abbas Askari-Nodoushan; Mohammad Heydari; Mohammad Noorian Najafabadi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction   In nearly all big cities around the world, the phenomenon of street children is one of the contemporary social issues. During past several decades, there is an increase in the volume of street children phenomenon around the world. The rising number of street children has many pathological and consequential negative impacts for children, youth, families, and the society at the whole . According to 2000 UN report, the number of street children is estimated between 100 to140 milli...

  17. Maternal Parenting Styles, School Involvement, and Children's School Achievement and Conduct in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stright, Anne Dopkins; Yeo, Kim Lian

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the roles of children's perceptions of maternal parenting styles (warmth, psychological control, and behavioral control) and maternal involvement in school-focused parenting practices (home-based involvement, home-school conferencing, and school-based involvement) predicting children's school achievement and conduct in…

  18. Implementation of an evidence-based hand hygiene program in elementary schools in Ghana, as part of a City-to-City partnership between Ottawa public health and KEEA health directorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Marie-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Ottawa Public Health in partnership with health staff from the municipality of KEEA (Komenda, Edina, Eguafo, Abrem) in Ghana engaged in a city-to-city partnership to adapt, implement, and evaluate an evidence-based hand hygiene public health initiative in elementary schools in Ghana. All 4 participating schools gained the necessary resources to carry out proper hand hygiene practice, and hand hygiene practice improved. Furthermore, pupils were more likely to wash hands after using the toilets and teachers were better equipped to be good role models. Providing resources to schools was key to the success of the implementation. This partnership gave health and education workers in Ghana the tools, knowledge, and confidence to implement a simple, evidence-based, hand hygiene program. One other remarkable outcome is that school children were the initiators of a behavior change in their community.

  19. SCHOOL INTEGRATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioara-Bianca BUBOIU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The right to education is a fundamental right that should not be and can not be denied to any child regardless of his condition of normality or deviation from it. The historic route of educational policies regarding the children with disabilities experienced a positive evolution, from denying the possibility of attending a mainstream school, to current policies of integration and inclusion based on the idea of equal opportunities The rejection of what is considered atypical, unknown, strange, unusual, is the result of perpetuating stereotypes, prejudices regarding the disability, constituting signs of less advanced societies. Is the duty of society to accept children / people with disabilities as part of the reality that surrounds us, and try by all means not to turn a disable child into one normal child, but to normalize the conditions of his life, to give him the possibility to live the same social and school experiences that live any other typically child.

  20. Birth Order and Maladaptive Behavior in School-Aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    Drawing on Alfred Adler's theories on the effect of birth order on maladaptive behavior in children, this study focused on the relationship between birth order and the referral to counseling of school-aged children with maladaptive disorder. School-aged children (N=217) with academic or behavioral problems, ages 5 to 18, were referred to the staff…

  1. School Readiness and Children's Developmental Status. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, Nicholas; And Others

    In order to provide data to help schools respond to the diversity in the backgrounds and educational needs of children entering school, a U.S. Department of Education study asked parents of 3- to 5-year-old children who had not yet started kindergarten about their children's accomplishments that indicated emerging literacy and numeracy skills and…

  2. Celebrating New York City in Children's Literature: CLA Workshop Brings NYC to Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colabucci, Lesley

    2008-01-01

    New York City has been an inspiration for some of the finest and most memorable children's literature published. Regardless of whether or not readers have ever visited the Big Apple, their understanding of New York is likely to be informed by the representations found in children's books. In addition, scholars of children's literature recognize…

  3. Educational Specifications for Hope School for Exceptional Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson County Public Schools, Marianna, FL.

    A presentation of the Hope School's physical plant and program specifications is introduced with a listing of the specifications committee, a history of the school, the needs of the children served, and a philosophy of teaching mentally handicapped children. Areas discussed are school-wide specifications, the administrative complex, the diagnostic…

  4. Blood Pressure Percentiles for School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Özanli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The prevalence of hypertension in childhood and adolescence is gradually increasing. We aimed to in­vestigate the blood pressure (BP values of children aged 7-18 years. Methods: This study was conducted in a total of 3375 (1777 females, 1598 males children from 27 schools. Blood pressures of children were measured using sphyg­momanometer appropriate to arm circumference. Results: A positive relationship was found between sys­tolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP and the body weight, height, age and body mass index (BMI in male and female children. SBP was high­er in males than females after the age of 13. DBP was higher in males than the females after the age of 14. The mean annual increase of SBP was 2.06 mmHg in males and 1.54 mmHg in females. The mean annual increase of DBP was 1.52 mmHg in males and 1.38 mmHg in fe­males. Conclusion: In this study, we identified the threshold val­ues for blood pressure in children between the age of 7 and 18 years in Erzurum province. It is necessary to com­bine and evaluate data obtained from various regions for the identification of BP percentiles according to the age, gender and height percentiles of Turkish children.

  5. Prevalence of Hearing disorders in 3-6 year old Children of Kindergartens in Yazd City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Jafari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A hearing– impaired patient is defined as one with abnormal or reduced function in hearing resulting from an auditory disorder. The goal of any preschool and schools screening program should be to accurately indentify those children whose hearing has been impaired due to conductive and / or sensory– neural pathology. Methods: This cross– sectional descriptive study was done on 577 children (299 girls and 278 boys aged between 3–6 years at kindergartens of Yazd city from September 2005 to January 2006. The otoscopy examination, pure-tone screening and impedance study was conducted after completion of awareness form of the hearing loss existence by the parents. Results: In this study, there were 12.6% abnormal conditions of external ear canal, 34.2% abnormal tympanic membrane, 35.9% abnormal tympanograms and 13.4% hearing loss including 11.5% conductive hearing loss, 1.5% sensory-neural hearing loss and 0.5% mixed hearing loss. Conclusion: With respect to the high prevalence and negative effects of middle ear disorders in learning of preschool children, and also due to the importance of early identification and intervention of hearing loss in aural rehabilitation programs, increasing the awareness and education of people, especially parents about the effects of hearing disorders and its prevention and identification is very important

  6. Risky exposures and national estimate of HCV seroprevalence among school children in urban Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Wahab, Ekram W; Abdel Maksoud, Ahmed; Shatat, Hanan Z; Kotkat, Amira M

    2016-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world, particularly in Egypt. Limited data are available concerning the national seroprevalence and the possible modes of transmission of HCV in the pediatric age group. The aim of this study was to obtain a better estimate of the national hepatitis C seroprevalence and the possible risky exposures among healthy school children in Alexandria; the second biggest city in Egypt. HCV knowledge and counseling for school children were also investigated. A total of 500 school children, age between 6 and 15 years were evaluated for HCV seropositivity and interviewed for potential disease risk factors. The seropositivity for Anti-HCV Ab was 2.8 %. About 71.4 % of seropositive children were 10-15 years old. Urban residence, chronic disease, male circumcision and invasive procedures were detected as significant risk factors for acquiring HCV infection among the studied children. The level of awareness of hepatitis C among school children was very low (3.6 %) and was correlated with the age and educational level. HCV infection continues to occur in children and is frequently unrecognized. This mandates immediate intervention and robust control strategies in the settings of exposure combined with health education programs to limit further HCV spread.

  7. Sino-Japanese Friendship-City Primary School Pupils Table Tennis Tournament

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>To celebrate the 35th anniversary of the normalization of diplomatic relations between China and Japan,the Sino-Japanese friendship-city primary school pupils table tennis tournament,one of the important activities of 2007,

  8. 上海市学龄儿童屈光与立体视锐度的调查%A survey of refractive status and stereopsis in school-aged children in the city of Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关小一; 袁艳; 范先群; 项行; 孙劼; 陆琼; 俞晓萌; 张杰; 孙静

    2014-01-01

    体视发育成熟年龄在7~8岁,远视及中高度近视对学龄儿童立体视的建立影响较大;学龄儿童眼轴长度随年龄增长逐渐增加.%Objective To explore the relative contribution of refractive status and stereopsis in a school population and to determine the associations between refractive status and stereoacuity,age,and axial length.Methods Subject data were sampled from the materials of a population-based cluster sampling of children in 8 primary schools in Shanghai in this cross-sectional investigation.According to the standards established for this study,a table was created based on a questionnaire and the examination of vision,stereopsis and axial length of the subjects.SPSS 20 software was used to analyze the data for the different ages (6,7,8,9 and 10 years of age) and refractive status (emmtropia,mild myopia,severe myopia,mild hyperopia and severe hyperopia).A x2 test was used to compare groups.An ANOVA was used to compare the normal distribution measurement data among groups.For non-normal distributions data,nonparametric tests were used throughout.Results ①The trend for the incidence of myopia increased and for the incidence of hyperopia decreased with an increase in age.There was a positive correlation between the prevalence of myopia and increased age (r=0.427,P<0.01),and a negative correlation between the prevalence of hyperopia and increased age (r=0.269,P<0.01).There was a significant difference in stereopsis with normal uncorrected vision (Kruskal Wallis,x2=88.867,P<0.01).There was a statistically significant difference in stereopsis between ages 6 and 7 (Kolmogorov-Smirnov,Z=2.584,P<0.01),but no difference between ages 7 and 8,8 and 9,and 9 and 10 (P>0.05).The difference in the detection rate of anomalous stereopsis was statistically significant for different refractive states (x2=57.294,P<0.01).Stereoacuity also differed significantly among different refractive groups (Kruskal Wallis,x2=67.428,P<0.01).The differences were

  9. Paradigms, Power, and PR in New York City: Assessing Two School Accountability Implementation Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Craig

    2014-01-01

    This policy study critically compares two different efforts to implement an accountability system in the New York City public schools. In 1971, the New York City Board of Education contracted with the Educational Testing Service (ETS), which created a lengthy accountability plan for the district. Fitful maneuvers to execute the ETS plan fizzled…

  10. Seeking a "Critical Mass": Middle-Class Parents' Collective Engagement in City Public Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey-Maddox, Linn; Kimelberg, Shelley McDonough; Cucchiara, Maia

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of literature has begun to explore the individual identities, motivations, and school choices of middle-class, typically white, parents who choose to reside in socioeconomically and racially mixed central city neighborhoods. Drawing on qualitative research in three US cities, we argue that a focus on middle-class parents' collective…

  11. "I Feel Nervous... Very Nervous" Addressing Test Anxiety in Inner City Schools through Play and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobman, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    The intense focus on standardized tests has created a culture of anxiety in many inner-city schools. This article presents the findings of a case study of a test anxiety program that helped inner-city students and staffs deal more productively with anxiety through play, performance, and team building. According to the findings, the program created…

  12. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Baltimore City Public Schools. Grade 4, Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This one-page report presents overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, scores at selected percentiles, average scores for district and large cities, results for student groups (school race, gender, and eligibility for National School Lunch Program) in 2011, and score gaps for student groups. In 2011, the average…

  13. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Baltimore City Public Schools. Grade 4, Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This one-page report presents overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, scores at selected percentiles, average scores for district and large cities, results for student groups (school race, gender, and eligibility for National School Lunch Program) in 2011, and score gaps for student groups. In 2011, the average…

  14. Health lifestyles of pre-school children in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsdottir, Hrafnhildur; Povlsen, Lene; Ringsberg, Karin C

    2013-01-01

    Holistic understanding of health is one of the key principles of health promotion indicating that the health status of individuals and populations is determined by a variety of environmental, economic, social and personal factors. Traditionally, research focus has been on school-aged children...... and school-based interventions and less on pre-school children and their families' engagement in promoting health in everyday life. The aim of the present study was to explore factors that parents of pre-school children in the Nordic countries experienced as influencing health lifestyles in their children......'s everyday lives. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 parents of pre-school children in the five Nordic countries. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The parents identified themselves as the primary shapers of their children's lifestyles and described influencing factors...

  15. Space-Age City Planning--In the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Phyllis

    1979-01-01

    A City Building Education System uses the process of city planning to teach basic reading, writing, and math skills to children from kindergarten through junior high school and to stimulate creative thinking and problem solving abilities. (JMF)

  16. School environment factors were associated with BMI among adolescents in Xi'an City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibley Michael J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background School environment influences students' behaviours. The purpose of this research was to identify school environment factors associated with BMI. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1792 school-aged adolescents from 30 schools in six districts in Xi'an City in 2004. Height and weight were taken from students by trained field staff. School environment characteristics such as physical factors (school facilities, school shops and fast food outlets in school area, school curricula and policies were collected from school doctors using school environment questionnaire. School environment factors were identified in linear mixed effect models with BMI as outcome and adjusted for socio-demographic factors. Results After adjusted for socio-demographic factors, BMI was associated with the availability of soft drinks at school shops, the availability and the number of western food outlet in the school vicinity. School curricula such as sports-meeting and health education session were also associated with BMI. Conclusions Urgent actions are needed to address the obesogenic elements of school environments. Community and school policy makers should make efforts for students to avoid exposure to fast food outlet in school area and soft drinks at school shops, and to improve school curricula to promote healthy behaviours.

  17. Upper arm composition and nutritional status of school children and adolescents in Abeokuta, Southwest Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Idowu Odunayo Senbanjo; Kazeem Adeola Oshikoya; Olisamedua Fidelis Njokanma

    2014-01-01

    Background: Upper arm composition is a reflection of body protein and calorie reserves. However, there is a paucity of data on upper arm composition of children from African countries, including Nigeria. This study aimed to determine the composition of upper arm and nutritional status of school children in Abeokuta, Nigeria and to compare with international reference standards. The sensitivity and specifi city of upper arm muscle area by height (UAMAH) as a nutritional assessment tool was also determined. Methods: Five hundred and seventy children aged 5 to 19 years were selected from seven schools using multistage random sampling. Weight, height, mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) and triceps skin fold thickness (TSF) were measured. Body mass index, upper arm muscle area (UAMA), upper arm fat area (UAFA), fat percentage and UAMAH were derived. Results: The TSF, UAFA and fat percentage were significantly higher in females than males at each age group. MUAC and UAMA were significantly higher in female children aged 10-14 years, whereas UAMA was significantly higher in male children aged 15-19 years. UAMA and UAFA of the children were lower than those of Americans but similar to those of Zimbabweans, and higher than those of Indians. The sensitivity and specifi city of UAMAH for detecting wasting were 80.8% and 63.9%, respectively, whereas the corresponding values for stunting were 32.2% and 58.2%, respectively. Conclusions: The school children studied have a combination of poor calorie and protein reserve. UAMAH may be a valuable tool for complete evaluation of the nutritional status of school children.

  18. Research on prevalence and influencing factors of simple obesity in 3-6 years old pre-school children in Zaozhuang City%枣庄市城区3~6岁儿童单纯性肥胖症的调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方鲁阳; 王光霞; 沈洁

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and influencing factors of childhood simple obesity in pre-school children in our city,so as to provide scientific evidence for formulating effective interventions. Methods Using stratified cluster sampling physical development of 3- to 6-year old children in our city and parents of all obese and overweight children were surveyed by questionnaires. Results The prevalence rate of obesity in pre-school children in the city was 9.00%. The prevalence rate of boys was 9.78% and that of girls was 8.16% , and the difference was statistically significant (X2= 4.50, P < 0.05 ). Among the obese children, mild obesity accounted for 52.57% , moderately obese accounted for 37.35% , and severe obesity accounted for 10.08%. The prevalence rates in different age groups were different. The incidence of overweight was 14.71%. For boys, it was 15.76% , and for girls, it was 13.57%. The difference was statistically significant (X2=5. 354 ,P < 0.05 ). The main factors of infiluencing childhood obesity were parental obesity, mixed feeding mainly with non-breast milk in infancy stage, good appetite, eating too fast, eating too much, having less than one-hour outdoor exercise,and the intentions of parents who want their children to be strong. Conclusion Obesity becomes a serious problem affecting children' s health in our city. Health education should be the major way and improving children' s bad eating habits and unhealthy lifestyle is the major task in group intervention.%目的 了解我市学龄前儿童单纯性肥胖症的患病状况及影响因素,为制定有效的干预措施提供科学依据.方法 采用分层整群抽样的方法,对我市城区3~6岁学龄前儿童进行体格发育调查,对所有肥胖和超重儿童家长进行问卷调查.结果 我市学龄前儿童单纯性肥胖症患病率为9.00%,男童患病率为9.78%,女童患病率为8.16%,经比较差异具有统计学意义(χ2=4.50,P<0.05).

  19. Study of School Environment and Prevalence of Obesity & Its Predictors among Adolescent (10-13 Years Belonging to a Private School in an Urban Indian City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehan Meenakshi, Munshi Aparna, Surabhi Somila, Bhatt Trushna, Kantharia Neha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent shift in lifestyle and behavioral patterns in population have caused an obesity epidemic during formative years. Present study evaluated existing health and nutrition policies in a private school in an urban Indian city and assessed prevalence of obesity in adolescent children & their association if any, with predictive behaviors of obesity. Methods: A private coeducational school located in an urban Indian city was selected and its existing health policies were evaluated using CDC’s School Health Index (SHI. Further, 5 teachers were assessed regarding their knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP of healthy dietary & lifestyle practices. Critical evaluation of school canteen services was also done. Total 273 adolescents (10-13 years were enrolled after taking informed consent. Prevalence of obesity & its relationship with modifiable risk factors (fast food & sweetened beverage intake, physical inactivity, low fruit & vegetable intake and increased television viewing was found by comparing behaviors amongst obese & non-obese adolescents. Their biochemical profile for assessment of anemia, dyslipidemia and high fasting blood sugar levels was also determined. Results: Current framework of school lacked clear health & nutrition policies. Canteen food service offered unhealthy food. Teachers had insufficient knowledge about healthy behaviors among children. Prevalence of overweight & obesity was 23.5%. Cumulative presence of >3 risk behaviors of obesity was significantly associated with its development (OR 2.07, 95% CI. Mean consumption of sweetened carbonated beverages by overweight and obese subjects was significantly higher (p<0.05 than non-obese. Conclusion: There is a need to sensitize school authorities and teachers about importance of a strong health and nutrition related policies and health promotion programs.

  20. HYGIENE PRACTICES AMONG RURAL SCHOOL CHILDREN IN PUDUCHERRY”

    OpenAIRE

    Basanta Kumar; Saubhagya Kumar; Shakthipriya; Anugya Aparajita; Soumya

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: AIM: To assess the hygiene practices among rural school children. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This cross - sectional study was conducted at Government higher secondary school in rural ar ea of Puducherry. METHODS AND MATERIAL : Around 214 children studying in standard 6 th to 8 th were randomly selected for the study during June to August 2011. The study was explained to the school children and their assent was taken before the study. They an...

  1. Description of a large urban school-located 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccination campaign, New York City 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narciso, Heather E; Pathela, Preeti; Morgenthau, Beth Maldin; Kansagra, Susan M; May, Linda; Scaccia, Allison; Zucker, Jane R

    2012-04-01

    In the spring of 2009, New York City (NYC) experienced the emergence and rapid spread of pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus (pH1N1), which had a high attack rate in children and caused many school closures. During the 2009 fall wave of pH1N1, a school-located vaccination campaign for elementary schoolchildren was conducted in order to reduce infection and transmission in the school setting, thereby reducing the impact of pH1N1 that was observed earlier in the year. In this paper, we describe the planning and outcomes of the NYC school-located vaccination campaign. We compared consent and vaccination data for three vaccination models (school nurse alone, school nurse plus contract nurse, team). Overall, >1,200 of almost 1,600 eligible schools participated, achieving 26.8% consent and 21.5% first-dose vaccination rates, which did not vary significantly by vaccination model. A total of 189,902 doses were administered during two vaccination rounds to 115,668 students at 998 schools included in the analysis; vaccination rates varied by borough, school type, and poverty level. The team model achieved vaccination of more children per day and required fewer vaccination days per school. NYC's campaign is the largest described school-located influenza vaccination campaign to date. Despite substantial challenges, school-located vaccination is feasible in large, urban settings, and during a public health emergency.

  2. School Personnel Responses to Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenemore, Thomas; Lynch, John; Mann, Kimberly; Steinhaus, Patricia; Thompson, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    Authors explored the experiences of school personnel in their responses to children's exposure to violence. Thirty-one school personnel, including administrators, teachers, counselors, school social workers, and psychologists, were interviewed to obtain data on their experiences related to violence exposure in their schools and the surrounding…

  3. "Entre Familia": Immigrant Parents' Strategies for Involvement in Children's Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poza, Luis; Brooks, Maneka Deanna; Valdés, Guadalupe

    2014-01-01

    Teachers and administrators in schools with large, working-class Latino populations often complain of parents' indifference or lack of involvement in children's schooling because of their low visibility at school events and relatively little face-to-face communication with teachers and school administration. In a series of semi-structured…

  4. Elementary school children's science learning from school field trips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Marilyn Petty

    This research examines the impact of classroom anchoring activities on elementary school students' science learning from a school field trip. Although there is prior research demonstrating that students can learn science from school field trips, most of this research is descriptive in nature and does not examine the conditions that enhance or facilitate such learning. The current study draws upon research in psychology and education to create an intervention that is designed to enhance what students learn from school science field trips. The intervention comprises of a set of "anchoring" activities that include: (1) Orientation to context, (2) Discussion to activate prior knowledge and generate questions, (3) Use of field notebooks during the field trip to record observations and answer questions generated prior to field trip, (4) Post-visit discussion of what was learned. The effects of the intervention are examined by comparing two groups of students: an intervention group which receives anchoring classroom activities related to their field trip and an equivalent control group which visits the same field trip site for the same duration but does not receive any anchoring classroom activities. Learning of target concepts in both groups was compared using objective pre and posttests. Additionally, a subset of students in each group were interviewed to obtain more detailed descriptive data on what children learned through their field trip.

  5. Do You See What I See? School Perspectives of Deaf Children, Hearing Children and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Bull, Rebecca; Sapere, Patricia; Nordmann, Emily; Skene, Wendy; Lukomski, Jennifer; Lumsden, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Perspectives on academic and social aspects of children's school experiences were obtained from deaf and hearing children and their (deaf or hearing) parents. Possible differences between (1) the views of children and their parents and (2) those of hearing children and their parents compared to deaf children and their parents were of particular…

  6. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene in children living in city and rural residences in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: The present study aims to assess the biological uptake in children of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons measured as 1-hydroxypyrene in urine from children living in city and rural residences. METHODS: 103 children living in Copenhagen and 101 children living in rural residences of Denmark......, the children excreted on average 0.07 [95% CI: 0.01-0.41] micromol urinary 1-hydroxypyrene per mol creatinine. Children living in urban residences excreted 0.02 [95% CI: 0.01-0.05] micromol more 1-hydroxypyrene than children living in rural residences. This was confirmed in the multiple regression analysis...... showing a 29% (95% CI: 2-64%) higher excretion among urban children than rural children. Moreover, the regression analysis showed that for each hour per day spent outside the children excreted 58% (1.58 [1.22-2.03]) more 1-hydroxypyrene in urine. CONCLUSION: The present study indicates that children...

  7. Prevalence of Sleep Disturbance and Neuropsychological Learning Disabilities in Preschool Children in Isfahan City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghaneian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of sleep disorders is different in international studies. Sleep disorders with the increasing prevalence among children is common. Cognitive problems are the most serious complication of sleep disorders in children. The present study, the prevalence of sleep problems and neuropsychological learning disabilities were evaluated on pre-school children (4-6 years old in Isfahan in the year of (1393-1394. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 350 pre-school children in 1393-1394. They have been selected for cluster sampling method. The sleep disturbances scale questionnaire for children (SDSC and Conners neuropsychological questionnaire were given to the mothers of pre-school children. Results: The results showed 144 (41.14% pre-school children were prone to sleep disturbances,  out of 280 pre-school children, 92 people (32.85% had neuropsychological learning disabilities, 31 children, disorders of initiating and maintaining sleep (8.85%, 15 children, sleep disordered breathing (4.28%, 53 children, excessive sleepiness disorder (15.14%, 74 children, sleep wake disorders (21.14%, 32 children, 32 children, arousal disorder (9.14%, 43 children, sleep hyperhidrosis (12.28%, 62 children, attention problems (22.14%, 1 children, impaired sensory function (0.7%, 4 children, language dysfunction (1.42%, 7 children, general learning and memory impairment (2.5%, 14 children, executive dysfunction (6.42%. Conclusion: The prevalence of sleep and attention problems could indicate the importance of sleep and attention problems, furthermore, it could be awareness as regards patterns of the healthy sleep and neuropsychological learning disabilities in order to enhance the awareness of parents and health care providers.

  8. Color me healthy: food diversity in school community gardens in two rapidly urbanising Australian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitart, Daniela A; Pickering, Catherine M; Byrne, Jason A

    2014-03-01

    Community garden research has focused on social aspects of gardens, neglecting systematic analysis of what food is grown. Yet agrodiversity within community gardens may provide health benefits. Diverse fruit and vegetables provide nutritional benefits, including vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals. This paper reports research that investigated the agro-biodiversity of school-based community gardens in Brisbane and Gold Coast cities, Australia. Common motivations for establishing these gardens were education, health and environmental sustainability. The 23 gardens assessed contained 234 food plants, ranging from 7 to 132 plant types per garden. This included 142 fruits and vegetables. The nutritional diversity of fruits and vegetable plants was examined through a color classification system. All gardens grew fruits and vegetables from at least four food color groups, and 75% of the gardens grew plants from all seven color groups. As places with high agrodiversity, and related nutritional diversity, some school community gardens can provide children with exposure to a healthy range of fruit and vegetables, with potential flow-on health benefits.

  9. Diversity in the Schools in New York City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏

    2008-01-01

    New York City is America's classic immigrant city; it was the major historic gateway for the country's eastern and southern European arrivals a century ago and is a major receiving center today. Its immigrant history, the composition and extraordinary diversity of its current immigrant streams, and its institutions have combined to make it an immigrant city like no other in the United States. The immigrant population brings diversity in the social life, and their offspring make the classrooms diverse.

  10. Alterações oculares em crianças pré-escolares e escolares no município de Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Eye diseases in preschool and school children in the city of Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo de Souza Couto Júnior

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estabelecer a prevalência das alterações oculares, no ano de 2001, em crianças pré-escolares e escolares no município de Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional do tipo transversal, durante campanha de saúde ocular na rede pública de ensino. Crianças com acuidade visual inferior a 0,8 ou com anormalidades foram triadas por voluntários treinados para serem avaliadas por oftalmologistas no Instituto Benjamin Constant. RESULTADOS: Avaliadas 1.800 crianças do total. Destas, 609 (33,83% foram encaminhadas ao IBC. Houve 491 (27,28% do total e 80,62% das crianças triadas que receberam alta por apresentarem visão melhor que 0,8. A prevalência das alterações oculares foi de 3,35%. (ambliopia teve prevalência de 2,00%, estrabismo teve 0,33% e outras causas 1,02%.. Houve 93 crianças (5,17% do total e 15,27% das crianças triadas com ametropias que necessitaram de correção através de óculos. CONCLUSÃO: Demonstrou-se a prevalência das principais alterações oftalmológicas infantis no município de Duque de Caxias e ressaltou-se a necessidade de campanhas para bom êxito no desenvolvimento da acuidade visual das crianças.PURPOSE: To establish the prevalence of the ametropias and eye diseases, in the year 2001, within a preschool and school children in the city of Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. METHODS: Transversal observational study during an ocular health campaign in public education schools. The children that have shown visual acuity lower than 0.8 or other abnormally were referred by trained volunteers to evaluation by ophthalmologists from the Benjamin Constant Institute. RESULTS: From the 1.800 children who were examined, 609 (33.83% were referred to the ophthalmologic examination. There were 491 children (27.28% from total and 80.62% from referred that were dismissed for presenting visual acuity better than 0.8. The Eye diseases prevalence was 3.35% (amblyopia was 2

  11. School lunch program for health promotion among children in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobuko; Miyoshi, Miki

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, the present school lunch program has been implemented under the "School Lunch Act" enacted in 1954. The main purpose of the school lunch program is to promote healthy development of the minds and bodies of school children. Later, "The School Lunch Act" was revised in 2008 and its aim was changed to "promoting Shokuiku". As of May 2009, approximately 10 million school children participate in the school lunch program. This program itself is an educational activity. School children are responsible for serving lunch and clearing the dishes. They could also learn proper manners, by having meals together with classmates. Furthermore, understanding of balanced diet and food culture can be enhanced through learning the menu of each meal. Recently, as eating disorders and obesity increase among adults and school children, there is rising concern on development of lifestyle-related diseases. Under this circumstance, the Basic Law on Shokuiku was enacted in 2005. Besides, in order to enhance Shokuiku to school children, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology established the Diet and Nutrition Teacher System in April 2007. It is reported that, in those schools with Diet and Nutrition Teachers, a positive impact has been observed in terms of awareness and interest in diet among teachers and guardians. It is also reported that proportion of children skipping breakfast has decreased, and quality of life has been improved. In this way, the Japanese school lunch program system is essential for fostering healthy mind and bodies for the next generation.

  12. The New Zealand Earthquakes and the Role of Schools in Engaging Children in Emotional Processing of Disaster Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Carol; Gawith, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The earthquakes that rocked the city of Christchurch and surrounding districts in Canterbury, New Zealand, were to take their toll on families, schools and communities. The places that had once represented safety and security for most children were literally and figuratively turned upside down. Rather than reinforce the trauma and continue to…

  13. Effect of School System and Gender on Moral Values and Forgiveness in Pakistani School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Anam; Kausar, Rukhsana; Khan, Nashi

    2014-01-01

    The present research was conducted to compare children studying in private and public schools in Pakistan on forgiveness and moral values. It was hypothesized that the type of school and gender of the child are likely to affect forgiveness and moral values in children. A sample of 100 children with equal number of girls and boys was recruited from…

  14. Starting School at a Disadvantage: The School Readiness of Poor Children. The Social Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Julia B.

    2012-01-01

    Poor children in the United States start school at a disadvantage in terms of their early skills, behaviors, and health. Fewer than half (48 percent) of poor children are ready for school at age five, compared to 75 percent of children from families with moderate and high income, a 27 percentage point gap. This paper examines the reasons why poor…

  15. Investigation on effect of supplementary immunization activities on pre-school migrant children in Daxing District of Beijing City in 2011%2011年北京市大兴区学龄前流动儿童疫苗接种的强化查漏补种工作调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯文俊; 吕庆伟

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解北京市大兴区2011年开展学龄前流动儿童疫苗接种的查漏补种活动前后的疫苗接种情况.方法 采用描述流行病学方法对2011年强化查漏补种数据进行分析.结果 调查学龄前流动儿童53 230人,活动前建卡率95.78%,建证率99.32%,脊髓灰质炎疫苗(OPV)非零剂次率1.01%,OPV、麻风减毒活疫苗(MR)、麻风腮减毒活疫苗(MMR)、脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗(MPV)、白百破联合疫苗(DPT)、流行性乙型脑炎疫苗(JEV)和乙型肝炎疫苗(HepB)零剂次率为0.20% ~ 1.74%.结论 查漏补种活动前,居住时间<2个月的儿童建卡、建证率低,疫苗零剂次率高;活动后补证率和相关疫苗补种率等均达到工作指标的要求.小年龄组和居住时间短的流动儿童是免疫规划管理的重点人群,春节后及时开展强化查漏补种是非常有必要的.%[Objective] To understand the immunization coverage rate among pre-school migrant children before and after supplementary immunization activities(SIAs) in Daxing District of Beijing City in 2011. [Methods] Descriptive analysis was performed on the report data of SIAs in Daxing District in 2011. [Results] A total of 53 230 pre-school migrant children were investigated. Before SIAs , the coverage of immunization card and certificate among pre-school migrant children was 95. 78% and 99. 32%. OPV non - zero doses rate was 1. 01%. Zero-dose rates of OPV, MR, MMR, MPV, DPT, JEV and HepB were between 0. 20%-1.74%. [ Conclusion ] The results shows the immunization certificate rate and immunization card rate are low and the zero-dose rates are high among living < 2 months of children before SIAs. After SIAs, the immunization certificate rate and supplementary immunization coverage rate meet the requirements of activities. Therefore, the migrant children who are younger, have shorter residence time in local areas are the key groups. The implementation of SIA after the Spring Festival is very

  16. Where Big-City Schools Meet "Microsoft Smarts"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2006-01-01

    This article talks about a new school built, which is called "School of the Future," which was born of a partnership between the Philadelphia public schools and the world's leading software-maker, Microsoft Corp. A gleaming white building on the edge of a blighted West Philadelphia neighborhood, the $62 million school garnered wide attention when…

  17. Attitudes to Mathematics in Primary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Dowker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 44 Grade 3 children and 45 Grade 5 children from English primary schools were given the British abilities scales basic number skills subtest, and a Mathematics Attitude and Anxiety Questionnaire, using pictorial rating scales to record their Self-rating for maths, Liking for maths, Anxiety about maths, and Unhappiness about poor performance in mathematics. There were few year group differences in attitudes. Boys rated themselves higher than girls, but did not differ significantly in actual performance. Overall, Anxiety was not related to actual performance, but Self-rating was. This relationship between Self-rating and actual performance seemed to develop between Grade 3 and Grade 5. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  18. Bullying among school children: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benčić, Miro

    2014-12-01

    The case study shows an example of peer violence, a physical attack on a high school student. The attacker was a child his own age attending the same school. Immediately after the attack the victim visited his chosen family doctor accompanying by mother. After interviewing in calm and safe environment and physical examination he was referred to the hospital emergency, because of evident trauma. During the follow up, it was obvious that the patient is interested in talking about the event but is uncomfortable to do so in front of his mother. Having obtained the mother's permission the conversation was carried out alone and the patient revealed all the details regarding the assault as well as his own feelings. The case study contains a description of the incident, the basic information regarding types of abuse amongst children, information on how to approach a victim as well as the obligation to report every type of abuse.

  19. Bullying in New York City Schools: Educators Speak out, 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, 2010

    2010-01-01

    On September 3, 2008, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Schools Chancellor Joel Klein announced Chancellor's Regulation A-832, which established a procedure for preventing and addressing student-to-student bias-based harassment in New York City public schools. Community members and advocates stood with the mayor and chancellor as they announced this…

  20. Bridging the Digital Divide: Changing the Technological Landscape of Inner-City Catholic Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Michael G.; Dosen, Anthony J.; Guerrero, Rosalie B.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an evaluation of the Bridging the Digital Divide Program, an intervention in five inner-city Chicago Catholic schools during one school year conducted by a local university. The interventions included (a) instillation of technology and (b) professional technology skill development for in-service teachers. The analysis…

  1. An Inner-City School Mentor: A Narrative Inquiry of the Life Experiences of "Daddy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Lal, Dhyan

    2006-01-01

    A two-year ethnographic observation of an inner-city high school in Los Angeles, USA, indicated that the principal, who was extremely dedicated to at-risk students and possessed a unique style of mentoring, played a major role in students academic achievement. We--the principal and the researcher who observed the school--inquired about the…

  2. Critical Small Schools: Beyond Privatization in New York City Urban Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantzopoulos, Maria, Ed.; Tyner-Mullings, Alia R., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Critical Small Schools: Beyond Privatization in New York City Urban Educational Reform features the most current empirical research about the successes and challenges of the small schools movement and the implications of such for urban public educational policy. Situated in a climate of hierarchical reform, many of the principles of the original…

  3. Managing for Results in America's Great City Schools. A Report of the Performance Measurement and Benchmarking Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Managing for Results in America's Great City Schools, 2012" is presented by the Council of the Great City Schools to its members and the public. The purpose of the project was and is to develop performance measures that can improve the business operations of urban public school districts nationwide. This year's report includes data from 61 of the…

  4. Pattern of tobacco use among primary school teachers in Belgaum city, India – A Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Savadi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The consumption of tobacco related products by the school teachers is a bad habit because it sends a wrong signal to young minds of students. It is injurious to health and is a waste of money and also is a wrong role model for the students.Objectives To find out the prevalence of pattern of tobacco use among primary school teachers in Belgaum city and to determine the factors influencing the use of tobacco among primary school teachers.Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using random sampling technique among 400 teachers aged 21 to 60 years from 78 primary schools in Belgaum city during March to December 2009.Results Overall, prevalence of any form of tobacco use among primary school teachers was 14.50%. Only male teachers 46.03% used tobacco. 37.93% were using smoking type of tobacco, 46.56% used smokeless & 15.51%were using both types of tobacco products. Most of the users initiated tobacco use by 16 to 20 years of age. A substantial number of teachers initiated tobacco use for fun, imitation and peer pressure. 58.33% of the teachers were using tobacco due to un-satisfaction from profession, 37.50% due to family problems.Conclusion High proportion of male teachers used tobacco than female teachers, because of social norm. Almost all the teachers consciously avoided tobacco use in school premises. Students will be encouraged to start using tobacco, if they observe use of tobacco products by teachers who are the role models for students. It was concluded that it would be beneficial to conduct educational programs and seminars encouraging tobacco cessation to this professional group, along with school children.

  5. Voices of Children, Parents and Teachers: How Children Cope with Stress during School Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mun

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how children's perceptions of stress factors and coping strategies are constructed over time. Children were interviewed before and after they made the transition from preschool to primary school. This study also explores teachers' and parental strategies in helping children to cope with stress at school. The sample included 53…

  6. Food habits, physical activities and sedentary lifestyles of eutrophic and obese school children: a case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Vilchis-Gil, Jenny; Galván-Portillo, Marcia; Klünder-Klünder, Miguel; Cruz, Miguel; Flores-Huerta, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Civilization has produced lifestyle changes; currently, people ingest more calories than are expended, resulting in obesity. This study assessed the association between dietary habits, physical activities, and sedentary behaviors and the risk of obesity in schoolchildren in Mexico City. Methods Of 1,441 children (6–12 years old) screened in elementary schools, 202 obese (BMI ≥95th pc) and 200 normal-weight children (BMI 25th- 75th pc), as defined by the 2000 CDC criteria, were incl...

  7. An Evaluation of the New York City School Choice Scholarships Program: The First Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Paul E.; Myers, David; Howell, William G.

    This paper reports on first-year results for an evaluation of the New York School Choice Scholarships Foundation program, which was designed to provide scholarships for children from low-income families currently attending public schools to transfer to private schools. Families won scholarships through a lottery. Researchers examined data from…

  8. City and School: the Visible Construction of the Fernando Gomes Elementary School in Porto Alegre/RS - Brazil (1913-1935

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane De Freitas Ermel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the context of studies about space and school architecture, this article analyses the visual construction of the Fernando Gomes Elementary School, which was located in downtown Porto Alegre/RS, Brazil between 1913 and 1935. Designed by the engineer Afonso Hébert, head of the Department of Public Works in the State of Rio Grande do Sul/RS, the building was completed in 1922. In addition to functional elements, i.e., a large number of classrooms that would serve to increase the access of children to primary school, its monumental proportions incorporated a series of symbolic elements aligned with the ideals of the First Brazilian Republic (1889–1930. The documentary analysis was performed on the archives of the Directorship of Public Education and the Directorship of Public Works of Rio Grande do Sul, as well as various iconographic sources, capital improvement plans and periodicals of the time. The construction of the school inaugurated a new conception of the space and architecture of public elementary schools in the State, as the visible improvement and sanitation of the cities were considered of great importance in the period. The construction of school buildings was also one of the greatest advertising tools of the new Republican political regime.

  9. Prevalence of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Its Related Factors among 6-13-Year-Old School Children in Lanzhou City%兰州市区6~13岁学龄期儿童注意缺陷多动障碍的患病率及相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王舒雅; 叶新华; 陈虹; 欧光顺; 孟楠楠; 穆静; 张倩

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Objective To investigate the prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)and its related factors among school children aged 6-13 years in Lanzhou city,and to provide the basis for effective prevention and treatment of ADHD in school-age children.Methods The Parent Symptom Questionnaire(PSQ)was used to take stratified random samples of 6-13-year-old school children in four areas of Lanzhou city(Chengguan district,Qilihe district,Anning district,and Xigu district).Mental retardation and other neurological or psychiatric diseases were excluded by pediatric neurologists and psychologists in PSQ-positive children.The ADHD was definitely diagnosed according to the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders(DSM-IV).SPSS 17.0 software was used to analyze the data of related factors for ADHD.Results Of the 3 826 questionnaires issued,3604 were analyzed effectively,including 1 826 boys(50.7%,average age(9.45±1.41)years)and 1 778 girls(49.3%,average age(9.33± 1.75)years).A total of 383 children(10.63%)had ADHD.The prevalence of ADHD among boys (13.91%)was significantly higher than that among girls 7.25%(χ2 =36.982,P 0.05 ).The incidences of predominantly inattentive (ADHD-PI ),hyperactive-impulsive (ADHD-HI)and combined(ADHD-CT)subtypes were 7.13%,1.02% and 2.46%,respectively. The differences were significant among children with different ADHD subtypes(χ2 = 214.739, P <0.001).The related factors for ADHD included gender(male),history of asphyxia,history of central nervous system diseases,history of language development,learning achievement,antenatal depression and anxiety,history of smoking during pregnancy,family income,mother’s age and ed-ucational level,relationship between parents and children,intake of snacks or cold drinks,daily life habits/ physical exercise,and main dependents.Conclusion The prevalence of ADHD is 10.63% among school-age children in Lanzhou city,and ADHD-PI is the main subtype.The inter

  10. Analysis of the incidence of sensory integrative dysfunction and its related factors in 1 008 school-age children in Heze city%菏泽市城区学龄儿童1008例感觉统合失调发生率及其相关因素调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴效普; 赵海英

    2004-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the incidence of sensory integrative dysfunction(SID) and its related factors in school-age children in Heze city. METHODS:A total of 1 008 children at the ages from 6 to 10 years were studies by means of cluster sampling using Beijing SID evaluation scale and the results analyzed statistically. RESULTS:Of all the 1 008 children,the total incidence of SID was 35.52% (358/1008),including 236(23.41% ) mild and 122(12.10% ) severe cases.The incidence was 43.1% (218/506) in boys and 27.9% (140/502) in girls(χ 2=25.404,P< 0.005).The children aged 6- 7 years had lower incidence than in the children aged 8- 10 years(χ 2=9.726,P< 0.01).The incidence of SID was 27.1% (91/336) in children with good academic performance and 51.5% (104/202) in those with poor performance,showing a significant difference(χ 2=49.72,P< 0.005).A rate of 23.6% of the SID students have parents with college education,and 17.9% of the SID students' parents had senior high school or technical secondary school education,as compared with the parents of 38.5% of the students receiving junior high school education or below(χ 2=5.874,P< 0.05).Of all the children with SID,34.4% (123/358) used to have neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). CONCLUSION:The incidence of SID in school-age children is closely associated with sex,age,parents' education background,academic performance and neonatal HIE.%目的:了解本市的学龄儿童感觉统合失调( sensory integration dysfunction,SID)的发生率及造成感觉统合失调的有关因素. 方法:采用北京感觉统合失调评定表,对 6~ 10岁 1 008例在校儿童进行整群抽样调查,所获数据经χ 2检验. 结果:感觉统合失调发生率为 35.52%( 358/1 008),其中轻度 23.41%( 236/1 008),重度 12.10%( 122/1 008);男童发生率为 43.1%( 218/506),女童发生率为 27.9%( 140/502),男高于女χ 2=25.404(P< 0.005).六七岁组感觉统合失调率低于 8~ 10岁组(χ 2=9.726,P< 0.01)学

  11. [Vulnerable children detected by the school health service: the forgotten?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirhomme-Renard, F; Bullens, Q; Malchair, A; Gosset, C

    2014-12-01

    The current health needs of children largely exceeds the biomedical model. The school doctor occupies a special position where he can take into account the social determinants of health and identify vulneirable children. After the detection by the school health service, the harmonious development of, the child requires that health professionals cooperate in a "preventive network".

  12. Canadian Indian Children Who Had Never Attended School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lolita

    1973-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the performance on selected intelligence tests of a group of Canadian Indian children who had never been to school with the performance of a similar group of children who were attending school regularly. (Author/RK)

  13. Senior Secondary School Children's Understanding of Plant Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosothwane, Modise

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess children's understanding of plant nutrition. The research was done on a sample of secondary school pupils in the age range of 16 to 19 years in two senior secondary schools in Botswana. The sample contained 137 senior secondary pupils all in their final year of study. These children were above average…

  14. Children of Separation and Divorce: School Policies, Procedures, Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Ellen A.

    1981-01-01

    Approximately 20 percent of school children are members of families experiencing separation or divorce. This article clarifies 10 major issues affecting these children and provides guidelines for school administrators and teachers who must contend with their special needs. (Author/WD)

  15. Creativity, Emotional Intelligence, and School Performance in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansenne, Michel; Legrand, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that both creativity and emotional intelligence (EI) were related to children school performance. In this study, we investigated the incremental validity of EI over creativity in an elementary school setting. Seventy-three children aged from 9 to 12 years old were recruited to participate in the study. Verbal and…

  16. Relations between School Performance and Depressive Symptoms in Spanish Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgiles, Mireia; Gomez, Marta; Piqueras, Jose A.; Espada, Jose P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Despite data showing the relationship between depression and decreased school performance, there is a lack of studies with Spanish children. The objective of this research is to examine school performance as a function of depression and gender. Method: Participants were 658 Spanish children aged between 8 and 12 years, 49.6% male,…

  17. Abusive Head Trauma at a Tertiary Care Children's Hospital in Mexico City. A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Garcia-Pina, Corina A.; Loredo-Abdala, Arturo; Paz, Francisco; Garcia, Sandra G.; Schilmann, Astrid

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the prevalence, clinical signs and symptoms, and demographic and family characteristics of children attending a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City, Mexico, to illustrate the characteristics of abusive head trauma among this population. Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of infants and children under 5,…

  18. Encountering Migration: English Primary School Teachers' Responses to Polish Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Schools in England have recently undergone a shift in their pupil demographic, which in part reflects changing patterns of trans-European migration since the accession of new member states to the EU in 2004 and 2007. There is evidence that this shift is one experienced not just in inner-city schools most commonly associated with minority ethnic…

  19. Citizen Participation in School Affairs in Two Southern Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roaden, Arliss L.

    The effectiveness of organizations for citizen participation in school affairs depends on their influence in effecting school policies and decisions, and on their stability for sustained influence. In Atlanta, neither citizen initiated (Southern Leadership Conference) nor school initiated (Committee of 100) system-wide mechanisms have been very…

  20. Diverse Family Types and Out-of-School Learning Time of Young School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiromi; Sanders, James

    2010-01-01

    Sources of differentials in out-of-school learning time between children in first marriage biological parent families and children in six nontraditional family types are identified. Analyses of time diaries reveal that children in four of the six nontraditional family types spend fewer minutes learning than do children in first marriage biological…

  1. Does a smoking prevention program in elementary schools prepare children for secondary school?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crone, M.R.; Spruijt, R.; Dijkstra, N.S.; Willemsen, M.C.; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    A smoking prevention program was developed to prepare children in elementary school for secondary school. This study assessed the effects on smoking in secondary school. Methods: In 2002, 121 schools in The Netherlands were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention gro

  2. 某地区不同肥胖分型学龄儿童外周血炎性细胞因子表达的分析%Analysis of Peripheral Inflammatory Cytokines among School Children with Different Obesity Types in A City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任灵; 王玲

    2012-01-01

      目的分析沈阳地区不同肥胖分型学龄儿童外周血炎性细胞因子表达水平.方法连续选择近期来我院诊治的肥胖学龄儿童57例(腹型肥胖22例,复合型肥胖18例和外周型肥胖17例),对照组选择同期参加体检、且结论健康儿童19例,两组对象均接受了外周血炎性细胞因子[高敏 C-反应蛋白(Hs-CRP)、肿瘤坏死因子(TNF-α)、白细胞介素-6(IL-6)和白细胞介素-8(IL-8)]表达水平检测.结果不同肥胖分型学龄儿童外周血 Hs-CRP、TNF-α、IL-6和 IL-8表达水平均明显高于对照组(P 均<0.05~0.01).同时,腹型肥胖组外周血 Hs-CRP、TNF-α、IL-6和 IL-8表达水平表达水平也显著高于复合型和外周型肥胖学龄儿童(P 均<0.05~0.01).结论沈阳地区不同肥胖分型学龄儿童存在着明确的外周血炎性细胞因子高水平表达,且以腹型肥胖组最为突出.%  Objective To analyze the expressions of peripheral inflammatory cytokines among school children with different obesity types in Shenyang city. Methods A total of 57 school children with obesity, including abdominal obesity (n=22), combined obesity (n=18) and peripheral obesity (n=17), and other 19 healthy children as control group were selected to treat with test of peripheral inflammatory cytokines, i.e., high-sensitive C-reactive protein (HS-CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interleukin 8 (IL-8). Results The expressions of HS-CRP, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in the obesity group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05-0.01). Meanwhile, the expressions of HS-CRP, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in abdominal obesity group were significantly higher than those in the combined and peripheral obesity groups (P<0.05-0.01). Conclusion The expressions of peripheral inflammatory cytokines were high in obesity children, especially in abdominal obesity children.

  3. Active transport among Czech school-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pavelka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Active transport is a very important factor for increasing the level of physical activity in children, which is significant for both their health and positive physical behaviour in adult age. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to establish the proportion of Czech children aged 11 to 15 who select active transport to and from school and, at the same time, describe socio-economic and socio-demographic factors influencing active transport to and from school among children. METHODS: To establish the socio-demographic factors affecting active transport, data of a national representative sample of 11 to 15 year-old elementary school children in the Czech Republic (n = 4,425. Research data collection was performed within an international research study called Health Behaviour in School Aged Children in June 2010. Statistical processing of the results was made using a logistic regression analysis in the statistical programme IBM SPSS v 20. RESULTS: Active transport to and from school is opted for in the Czech Republic by approximately 2/3 of children aged 11 to 15. Differences between genders are not statistically significant; most children opting for active transport are aged 11 (69%. An important factor increasing the probability of active transport as much as 16 times is whether a child's place of residence is in the same municipality as the school. Other factors influencing this choice include BMI, time spent using a computer or a privateroom in a family. A significant factor determining active transport by children is safety; safe road crossing, opportunity to leave a bicycle safely at school, no fear of being assaulted on the way or provision of school lockers where children can leave their items. CONCLUSIONS: Active transport plays an important role in increasing the overall level of physical activity in children. Promotion of active transport should focus on children who spend more time using a computer; attention should also be

  4. Habitual Snoring in school-aged children: environmental and biological predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shenghu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Habitual snoring, a prominent symptom of sleep-disordered breathing, is an important indicator for a number of health problems in children. Compared to adults, large epidemiological studies on childhood habitual snoring and associated predisposing factors are extremely scarce. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of habitual snoring among Chinese school-aged children. Methods A random sample of 20,152 children aged 5.08 to 11.99 years old participated in a cross-sectional survey, which was conducted in eight cities of China. Parent-administrated questionnaires were used to collect information on children's snoring frequency and the possible correlates. Results The prevalence of habitual snoring was 12.0% (14.5% for boys vs. 9.5% for girls in our sampled children. Following factors were associated with an increased risk for habitual snoring: lower family income (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.46, lower father's education (OR = 1.38 and 1.14 for middle school or under and high school of educational level, respectively, breastfeeding duration Conclusion The prevalence of habitual snoring in Chinese children was similar to that observed in other countries. The potential predisposing factors covered socioeconomic characteristics, environmental exposures, chronic health problems, and family susceptibility. Compared to socioeconomic status and family susceptibility, environmental exposures and chronic health problems had greater impact, indicating childhood habitual snoring could be partly prevented by health promotion and environmental intervention.

  5. Obesity status trajectory groups among elementary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Tzu-An; Baranowski, Tom; Jennette P. Moreno; O’Connor, Teresia M; Hughes, Sheryl O; Baranowski, Janice; Woehler, Deborah; Kimbro, Rachel T.; Johnston, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about patterns in the transition from healthy weight to overweight or obesity during the elementary school years. This study examined whether there were distinct body mass index (BMI) trajectory groups among elementary school children, and predictors of trajectory group membership. Methods This is a secondary analysis of 1651 elementary school children with complete biannual longitudinal data from kindergarten to the beginning of 5th grade. Heights and weights were ...

  6. Day/Night Cycle: Mental Models of Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiras, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated the mental models of primary school children related to the day/night cycle. Semi-structure interviews were conducted with 40 fourth-grade and 40 sixth-grade children. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the data indicated that the majority of the children were classified as having geocentric models. The results also…

  7. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among School Age Palestinian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Vivian

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to assess the prevalence of PTSD among Palestinian school-age children. Variables that distinguish PTSD and non-PTSD children were examined, including child characteristics, socioeconomic status, family environment, and parental style of influence. Method: Participants were 1,000 children aged 12 to 16 years.…

  8. Elementary School Children's Perception of Helpers and Their Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Randall W.

    1975-01-01

    Data suggest that family members, especially mothers, are primary sources of help for elementary school children who want to discuss problems. This is more true with younger children than with older ones. Moreover, children consider warmth, trust and understanding as the main characteristics of helping persons. (Author/SE)

  9. Passive cigarette smoke exposure in primary school children in Liverpool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Delpisheh; Y. Kelly; B.J. Brabin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure amongst primary school children. Methods: A descriptive, community-based, cross-sectional study of self-reported parental smoking patterns and children's salivary cotinine concentrations in 245 children aged 5-11 years attending 10 prim

  10. Teaching Young Children How to Sing: One School's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In many schools, classroom teachers are responsible for the music experiences of young children. Children may learn songs, but may not learn "how" to sing. This article outlines simple teaching strategies to help young children develop listening and vocal habits leading to beautiful singing. The article discusses how the kindergarten classes at…

  11. Executive Dysfunction in School-Age Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambek, Rikke; Tannock, Rosemary; Dalsgaard, Soeren; Trillingsgaard, Anegen; Damm, Dorte; Thomsen, Per Hove

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The study examined executive function deficits (EFD) in school-age children (7 to 14 years) with ADHD. Method: A clinical sample of children diagnosed with ADHD (n = 49) was compared to a population sample (n = 196) on eight executive function (EF) measures. Then, the prevalence of EFD in clinical and non-clinical children was examined…

  12. Inner city air pollution and respiratory health and atopy in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, T.; Safeca, A.F.; Leupold, W. [Univ. Children' s Hospital Dresden (Germany); Weiland, S.K.; Duhme, H.; Keil, U. [Univ. of Muenster, Inst. of Epidemiology and Social Medicine (Germany); Mutius, E. von [Univ. Children' s Hospital, Klinikum Innenstadt, Munich (Germany); Graefe, H. [Saxony State Agency for Environment and Geology, Radebeul (Germany); Csaplovics, E. [Univ. of Technology, Inst. of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Dresden (Germany)

    1999-09-01

    The impact of inner city air pollution on the development of respiratory and atopic diseases in childhood is still unclear. In a cross sectional study in Dresden, Germany, 5,421 children in two age groups (5-7 yrs and 9-11 yrs) were studied according to the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) phase II protocol, The prevalences of wheezing and cough as well as doctor diagnosed asthma and bronchitis were assessed by parental questionnaires. Children also underwent skin-prick testing, venepuncture for the measurement of serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E, lung function testing and a bronchial challenge test (4.5% saline) to assess airway hyperresponsiveness. Exposure was assessed on an individual basis by relating mean annual air pollution levels (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, CO, benzene, and O{sub 3}) which had been measured on a 1 km{sup 2} grid, to the home and school address of each study subject. After adjusting for potential confounding factors an increase in the exposure to benzene of 1 {mu}g{center{underscore}dot}m{sup 3} air was associated with an increased prevalence of morning cough (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.15; 1.04-1.27) and bronchitis (aOR: 1.11; 1.03-1.19). Similar associations were observed for NO{sub 2} and CO. In turn, the prevalences of atopic sensitization, symptoms of atopic diseases and bronchial hyperresponsiveness were not positively associated with exposure to any of these pollutants. It is concluded that in this study a moderate increase in exposure to traffic-related air pollution was associated with an increased prevalence of cough and bronchitis, but not with atopic conditions in children. (au)

  13. Sick Schools 2009: America's Continuing Environmental Health Crisis for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    Everybody knows that healthy school buildings contribute to student learning, reduce health and operating costs, and ultimately, increase school quality and competitiveness. However, 55 million of the nation's children attend public and private K-12 schools where poor air quality, hazardous chemicals and other unhealthy conditions make students…

  14. Diagnostics of children's school readiness in scientific studies abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarenko V.V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problem of children's school readiness as it is represented in contemporary studies of foreign scholars. It displays a variety of approaches to estimation of school readiness as well as the ways of measuring the levels of child development as relating to school readiness, namely those of them which are in common practice in education.

  15. CONSTRUCTION ENVIRONMENT EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITY FOR CHILDREN PRE-SCHOOL

    OpenAIRE

    MA. TRAN THI THUY NGA; MA. PHAM THI YEN

    2015-01-01

    Education motor development contribute to the comprehensive development of pre-school children. Building educational environment for young athletes develop in pre-school is one of many issues of concern in the current stage of pre-school education in Vietnam.

  16. Can Schools Promote the Health of Children with Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jenny; McCann, Donna; Coleman, Helen; Calvert, Marguerite; Warner, John

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the evaluation of a whole-school intervention to improve morbidity and psychosocial well-being in pupils with asthma. In all, 193 children with asthma (7-9 years) from 23 primary/junior schools in the south of England participated. Schools (n = 12) randomly assigned to the intervention group (IV) received a staff asthma…

  17. Determinants of Children's Schooling: The Case of Tigray Region, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abafita, Jemal; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the determinants of educational outcomes of primary school children in Tigray region of Ethiopia using a survey data gathered from four villages in 2013. Four different measures of schooling were used to examine the impact of household and child-specific factors. First, we examine the determinants of school attendance (ever-attendance,…

  18. Can Future Uncertainty Keep Children Out of School?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilleør, Helene Bie

    There is little doubt in the literature, that poverty and liquidity constraints can drive children out of school and into child labour in developing countries. But are there other important explanations for low primary school enrolment rates? The child labour and schooling literature often ignore...

  19. Prevalence and association between obesity and metabolic syndrome among Chinese elementary school children: a school-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu AiLing

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background China has experienced an increase in the prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity over the last decades. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome among Chinese school children and determine if there is a significant association between childhood obesity and metabolic syndrome. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1844 children (938 males and 906 females in six elementary schools at Guangzhou city from April to June 2009. The body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, Tanner stage, lipids, insulin and glucose levels were determined. Criteria analogous to ATPIII were used for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children. Results Among 1844 children aged 7-14 years, 205 (11.1% were overweight, and 133 (7.2% were obese. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 6.6% overall, 33.1% in obese, 20.5% in overweight and 2.3% in normal weight children. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that BMI (3rd quartile(OR 3.28; 95%CI 0.35-30.56, BMI (4th quartile(OR 17.98; 95%CI 1.75-184.34, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR (2nd quartile (OR2.36; 95% CI 0.46-12.09, HOMA-IR (3rd quartile (OR 2.46; 95% CI 0.48-12.66, HOMA-IR (4th quartile (OR3.87; 95% CI 0.72-20.71 were significantly associated with metabolic syndrome. Conclusions The current epidemic of obesity with subsequent increasing cardiovascular risk factors has constituted a threat to the health of school children in China. HOMA-IR and BMI were strong predictors of metabolic syndrome in children. Therefore, rigorous obesity prevention programs should be implemented among them.

  20. Environmental sanitation and health facilities in schools of an urban city of south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Environmental sanitation and health facilities in schools are an important public health issue. Aims : To assess the school environment, sanitation and health related facilities and to compare the availability of these facilities between government, aided and private schools. Materials and Methods : This cross sectional study was done in 30 schools in Mangalore city of south India in February 2010. Results : Out of the 30 schools surveyed, four were government, 12 were aided and 14 were private schools. Overcrowding was seen in one third of schools. The recommended minus desks was lacking in 23(76.7% and chairs with back rest was lacking in 11(36.7% schools. More than a quarter of schools had no drinking water purification facility. Water storage units were not cleaned periodically in 6(20% schools. Quarter of all government schools and half of all aided schools had no dining hall for serving mid-day meals. Toilets were not adequate in 10(33.3% and it was not separated for boys and girls in 8(26.7% schools. Four of the surveyed schools had no medical examination of students and in 13(43.3% schools daily morning inspection by teachers was not done. Hardly few schools had staff trained to deal with medical emergencies and in counselling activities. None of the schools had an immunization register. Although the performance scores between the types of schools did not differ significantly, the combined performance of only private schools were found to be satisfactory. Conclusion : A good number of schools in this urban area were found to be falling short of several essential requirements regarding sanitation and health facilities which needs to be rectified.

  1. Children and elders exposure assessment to particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the city of Rome, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Maria Pia; Gariazzo, Claudio; Gordiani, Andrea; L'Episcopo, Nunziata; Gherardi, Monica

    2014-12-01

    It has been amply demonstrated that exposure to fine particulate matter, containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), may have adverse effects on human health, affecting especially the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Among population, school-age children and elders present particular susceptibilities and unique exposures to environmental factors. The study presented in this paper belongs to the Project EXPAH, founded by the European (EU) LIFE+ instrument, and consists of the personal monitoring of five elementary school children and four elders during the spring and the summer/autumn of the year 2012 in the city of Rome, Italy. The average exposure, expressed as the sum of eight high-molecular-weight PAHs, resulted equal to 0.70 ng/m(3) (SD = 0.37) for children and 0.59 ng/m(3) (SD = 0.23) for the elderly people. The mean levels of gravimetric PM2.5 were equal to 23 μg/m(3) (SD = 10) and 15 μg/m(3) (SD = 4) for children and elders, respectively. During spring and summer seasons, personal BaPeq resulted well below the EU Air Quality reference value of 1 ng/m(3). The personal monitoring average values were in the same order of magnitude with available indoor and outdoor environmental data in Rome during the same periods, for both PAHs and PM2.5. The results suggest that, during non-heating seasons, the personal exposure to PAHs in the city of Rome can be mainly ascribed to the urban background, especially traffic emissions and road dust resuspension; secondhand cigarette smoke can be also considered another possible source of PAHs personal exposure.

  2. Turkish children's Bender-Gestalt test performance: differences in public and private school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Serap

    2011-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide data on the Bender-Gestalt test for children aged 5 to 11 in Turkey. Although it is well documented that sociocultural factors are important in cognitive evaluations, the effects of type of school and differing educational opportunities provided by these schools on the Bender-Gestalt test have not been previously investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of age, sex, and school type on Bender-Gestalt performance. The test was individually administered to 484 children between the ages of 5 and 11 years. The children were enrolled in either public or private schools. Koppitz's Developmental Scoring System was utilized. The results indicated that older children performed with fewer errors. Girls performed with fewer errors than boys. Finally, as expected, private school children outperformed their public school peers. The results are discussed with respect to the importance of taking into account various educational factors in utilizing commonly used tests.

  3. ETHNICITY AND INCOME IMPACT ON BMI AND STATURE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN LIVING IN URBAN SOUTHERN MEXICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Nina; Barrera-Pérez, The Late Mario; Palma-Solis, Marco; Zavala-Castro, Jorge; Dickinson, Federico; Azcorra, Hugo; Prelip, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Obesity affects quality of life and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Mexico, a middle-income country, has a high prevalence of overweight and obesity among urban children. Merida is the most populated and growing city in southern Mexico with a mixed Mayan and non-Maya population. Local urbanization and access to industrialized foods have impacted the eating habits and physical activity of children, increasing the risk of overweight and obesity. This study aimed to contribute to the existing literature on the global prevalence of overweight and obesity and examined the association of parental income, ethnicity and nutritional status with body mass index (BMI) and height in primary school children in Merida. The heights and weights of 3243 children aged 6-12 from sixteen randomly selected schools in the city were collected between April and December 2012. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine differences in the prevalence of BMI and height categories (based on WHO reference values) by ethnicity and income levels. Of the total students, 1648 (50.9%) were overweight or obese. Stunting was found in 227 children (7%), while 755 (23.3%) were defined as having short stature. Combined stunting and overweight/obesity was found in 301 students (9.3%) and twelve (0.4%) were classified as stunted and of low weight. Having two Mayan surnames was inversely associated with having adequate height (OR=0.69, pchildren increased the odds of short stature and stunting. Children from lower income families had twice the odds of being stunted and obese. Overweight, obesity and short stature were frequent among the studied children. A significant proportion of Meridan children could face an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and its associated negative economic and social outcomes unless healthier habits are adopted. Action is needed to reduce the prevalence of obesity among southern Mexican families of all ethnic groups, particularly

  4. 杭州市2009-2011年小学生乳、恒牙患龋情况抽样调查分析%Investigation of status of dental caries in children of primary school in Hangzhou city from 2009 to 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡其勇; 刘敏; 王仁飞; 李小凤; 荆畅; 田小华

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE:To investigate the status of dental caries in children of primary school in Hangzhou City from 2009 to 2011. METHODS:The status of dental caries was examined annually from 2009 to 2011, and the caries prevalence, filling rates, mean DMFT/dmft were recorded. SPSS 13.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS:From 2009 to 2011, the caries prevalence of deciduous teeth were 49.27%, 48.09% and 48.33%, mean dmft were 2.78, 2.81 and 2.84, filling rates of deciduous teeth were 3.92%, 4.31% and 4.28%, respectively. No significant difference was found in the caries prevalence of temporary teeth, filling rates of temporary teeth, mean dmft. For the permanent teeth, the caries prevalence were 20.24%, 18.48% and 15.85%, mean DMFT were 0.46, 0.41 and 0.33, filling rates were 10.17%, 15.67% and 23.00%, respectively. From 2009 to 2011, the caries prevalence and mean DMFT of permanent teeth was decreased, while the filling rate was increased. CONCLUSIONS : In the past three years, the status of dental caries of permanent teeth shows a remarkable improving tendency in children of primary school in Hangzhou City. However, the status of dental caries of deciduous teeth presents no significant improvement.%目的:了解杭州市小学生乳、恒牙患龋情况.方法:随机抽取杭州市10所小学的小学生为调查对象,连续3年(2009-2011)进行口腔检查,记录乳、恒牙患龋情况.采用SPSS 13.0软件包对所得数据进行统计学分析.结果:2009-2011年杭州市小学生乳牙患龋率分别为49.27% 、48.09%和48.33%,龋均为2.78、2.81和2.84,充填率分别为3.92% 、4.31%和4.28%,3年中无显著变化;恒牙患龋率分别为20.24% 、18.48%和15.85%,龋均分别为0.46、0.41和0.33,充填率分别为10.17%、15.67%和23.00%,3年中恒牙患龋率和龋均显著下降,充填率则显著上升.结论:2009-2011年,杭州市小学生恒牙患龋情况显著改善,而乳牙患龋情况则无显著变化.

  5. Body Composition and Cardiovascular Health in School-aged Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klakk, Heidi

    Background In 2011 the World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that more than 40 million children under the age of five were overweight and ten per cent of the world’s school aged children are estimated to carry excess body fat. Childhood obesity is associated with a number of immediate...... and youth and plays an important role in the prevention of overweight and obesity and related morbidities. Schools are recognized as potentially effective settings for public health initiatives, as they access a large population of children and youth across a variety of ethnic and socioeconomic groups......-school to 6th grade) on health related outcomes in children. The objectives are: 1.To describe the Svendborg Project and the CHAMPS study-DK (paper I). 2.To evaluate the effect of four extra PE lessons per week in primary schools on body composition and weight status in children aged 8 to 13 (paper II). 3.To...

  6. SPECIFIC RISKS OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH BEHAVIOURAL DISORDERS OF THE CITY OF PULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Radetić-Paić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This research, which is part of a scientific-research project named “Matching interventions with the needs of children at risk – creating a model, by the Department for Behavioural Disorders from the Educational-rehabilitative Faculty of the Zagreb University, tries to determine the specific risks and needs for the city of Pula (N=100 compared to the Republic of Croatia (N=512 with the aim of planning interventions for children and youths with behavioural disorders or at risk for the city of Pula.The results show that there are statistically significant differences in some risks/needs between the sample of examinees from the city of Pula and the Republic of Croatia and give guidelines for action in relation to factors of risks on the level of the local community of the city of Pula, as well as for the development and implementation of different programmes with the possibility of their constant evaluation.

  7. Analysis of the mismatch between school furniture and children

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Maria Antónia; Arezes, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of school furniture are strongly associated with back and neck pain, referred by school-aged children. In Portugal, about 60% of the adolescents involved in a recent study reported having felt back pain at least once in the last three months. The aim of this study was to compare furniture sizes of the 2 types indicated for primary schools, within 9 schools, with the anthropometric characteristics of Portuguese students, in order to ...

  8. Scientific Investigations of Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valanides, Nicos; Papageorgiou, Maria; Angeli, Charoula

    2013-04-01

    The study provides evidence concerning elementary school children's ability to conduct a scientific investigation. Two hundred and fifty sixth-grade students and 248 fourth-grade students were administered a test, and based on their performance, they were classified into high-ability and low-ability students. The sample of this study was randomly selected and included 80 students, 40 fourth-grade and 40 sixth-grade students of low and high abilities. Students were specifically instructed to investigate the functioning of a device, to think aloud prior and after any experiment with the device, and to keep a record of their experimental results. The results showed that students were inclined to mainly collect evidence from the experimental space and failed to control variables during their investigation. The majority of the students had difficulties with effectively organizing collected data and failed to coordinate hypotheses with evidence. The significant interaction effect that was found between grade level and ability in terms of students' investigation ability indicates that the existing gap between high- and low-ability students becomes bigger as students become older. Undoubtedly, ongoing research efforts for identifying patterns of children's cognitive development will be most valuable as they can have important implications for the design of teaching scenarios and inquiry-based science activities conducive to accelerating students' cognitive growth and scientific investigation abilities.

  9. Prevalence and severity of molar incisor hypomineralization in children aged 11-16 years of a city in Karnataka, Davangere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kirthiga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH describes the clinical picture of hypomineralization of systemic origin affecting one or more first permanent molar. There is a rarity of prevalence studies in Indian population. Objectives: The main aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MIH in a population of South Indian children. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional epidemiological survey, included 2000 children aged 11-16 years chosen by stratified random sampling from government and private schools of Davangere, a city in South India. Materials and Methods: Evaluation of MIH and decayed, missing and filled teeth was carried out in these children by a calibrated examiner. The severity of hypomineralization was recorded according to the Wetzel and Reckel scale. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test was used to analyze the categorical data. P ≤ 0.05 was considered for statistical significance. Results: About 8.9% of all examined children showed at least one ill-structured first permanent molar in terms of MIH. The male and female ratio was found to be 1:1.1. The decreasing order of occurrence of MIH affected teeth were permanent maxillary molars, maxillaryincisors, mandibular molars and the mandibular incisors. Conclusion: The prevalence of MIH in the permanent dentition of south Indian children was 8.9%. There is a need for a proper planned preventive and restorative program with regard to the increasing prevalence of MIH.

  10. FOOD HABIT AMONG ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN IN URBAN BOGOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evy Damayanthi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Food habit strongly predicts individual nutritional status. It is largely influenced by family food habit and family socioeconomic, partly by nutrition education learning in the school.  Objectives of this study were to analyze elementary school children eating habit and examine whether it relates to family socioeconomic and nutritional status. One hundred elementary school children, and their mother, from one school in urban Bogor were chosen purposively according to SIBERMAS Program criteria (i.e. grade 4th and 5th, morning school, having UKS program and not having canteen. Self administered, structured pre-coded questionnaire were used to collect the data. Nutritional status was assessed using weight and height, and body mass index for age (BAZ and height for age (HAZ were then calculated using AnthroPlus software developed by WHO (2009. School children were 8-11 years old (mean 9.37 + 0.66 years, more girls (54%, and mostly had normal nutritional status using both indexes (72% for BAZ and 95% for HAZ. School children were commonly from middle class as indicated by father education (sarjana and mother (senior high school.  Almost all school children (99% knew breakfast was important and 81% of them ate breakfast. Only 32% school children brought lunch box everyday although 92% stated their habit to bring lunch box to school. Buying snack in school was also common among school children. Generally school children ate rice 3 times a day (2.95 + 0.97 with fish, meat, chicken (2.47 + 1.14, tempe and

  11. School Reintegration for Children and Adolescents with Cancer: The Role of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mekel S.

    2009-01-01

    As a result of advancements in medical expertise and technology, children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer now have opportunities to participate in many typical activities, including school. To some extent, school reintegration reflects positive adjustment to their illness. Nevertheless, children and adolescents with cancer may experience…

  12. Small High Schools and Student Achievement: Lottery-Based Evidence from New York City. NBER Working Paper No. 19576

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkadiroglu, Atila; Hu, Weiwei; Pathak, Parag A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most wideranging reforms in public education in the last decade has been the reorganization of large comprehensive high schools into small schools with roughly 100 students per grade. We use assignment lotteries embedded in New York City's high school match to estimate the effects of attendance at a new small high school on student…

  13. No Child Left Bilingual: Accountability and the Elimination of Bilingual Education Programs in New York City Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menken, Kate; Solorza, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Although educational policies for emergent bilinguals in New York City schools have historically supported the provision of bilingual education, the past decade has borne witness to a dramatic loss of bilingual education programs in city schools. This study examines the factors that determine language education policies adopted by school…

  14. Civic Mobilization for School Reform in Rivergrove, Florida: Contesting the "Social Construction of Place" in an Inner Ring Suburban City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shircliffe, Barbara J.; Lance Rowland, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines civic mobilization for school improvement in Rivergrove, a small suburban city within the inner rings of a large Florida metro (All names of individuals, schools, organizations and communities are pseudonyms per IRB agreement with district. Subsequently, references to local media reports and city documents are disguised to meet…

  15. Hypothesis: Impregnated school uniforms reduce the incidence of dengue infections in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, A; Lover, A; Kittayapong, P; Burnham, G

    2011-06-01

    Dengue infection causes a significant economic, social and medical burden in affected populations in over 100 countries in the tropics and sub-tropics. Current dengue control efforts have generally focused on vector control but have not shown major impact. School-aged children are especially vulnerable to infection, due to sustained human-vector-human transmission in the close proximity environments of schools. Infection in children has a higher rate of complications, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndromes, than infections in adults. There is an urgent need for integrated and complementary population-based strategies to protect vulnerable children. We hypothesize that insecticide-treated school uniforms will reduce the incidence of dengue in school-aged children. The hypothesis would need to be tested in a community based randomized trial. If proven to be true, insecticide-treated school uniforms would be a cost-effective and scalable community based strategy to reduce the burden of dengue in children.

  16. Percepção de pais de escolares da 1ª série do ensino fundamental a respeito da campanha "Olho no Olho" 2000, na cidade de Maceió - Alagoas Perception by the parents of school children in the 1st elementary series about the "Olho no Olho " Campaign - 2000, in the city of Maceió - Alagoas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Mota Cavalcante

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a Campanha "Olho no Olho" - 2000, na perspectiva dos pais dos escolares da rede pública estadual, em Maceió/AL. MÉTODOS: Questionário aplicado a 263 pais de escolares, escolhidos por amostra aleatória, de um universo de 1.996 crianças encaminhadas à consulta. Entrevista realizada entre agosto e outubro de 2001, para coleta de dados a respeito das etapas da Campanha, da saúde ocular e aspectos sociais dos pais. RESULTADOS: Foram entrevistados pais de 263 crianças encaminhadas à consulta, das quais 89,35% compareceram à consulta e 82,98% foram acompanhadas pelo entrevistado; 82,13% das consultas foram realizadas em mutirão em escola da região; 73,85% acharam que a informação sobre a prescrição ou não de óculos na consulta foi satisfatória; foram prescritos óculos a 47,23% das crianças; dessas, 87,39 % receberam óculos; 65,77% dos entrevistados disseram que não houve demora na entrega dos óculos; 69,07% disseram que a criança gostou dos óculos recebidos; 79,38% das crianças estavam usando os óculos; aprovação da Campanha por 91,64% dos entrevistados; 69,96% eram mães das crianças; 66,92% sabiam ler; a renda da família era até dois salários mínimos em 71,86%; 15,59% dos entrevistados usavam óculos. Os 10,65%, que não foram à consulta, alegaram não ter dinheiro para o transporte em 28,57% dos casos. CONCLUSÕES: Alto nível de comparecimento das crianças e dos seus pais à consulta em mutirão. Pais satisfeitos com a Campanha. Produção e entrega dos óculos com resultado satisfatório. População alvo é carente e tem baixo nível de escolaridade. Necessidade de melhor informação à família do escolar sobre saúde ocular e sobre a prescrição e uso dos óculos, durante a consulta.PURPOSE: To describe the Ocular Health Campaign ("Olho no Olho" - 2000, as perceived by parents of schoolchildren who study at Alagoas State public schools, in the city of Maceió. METHODS: Questionnaires

  17. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among children from six cities of China

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    Xu Haiquan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS in childhood can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia in adulthood, which is of increasing concern in transitional and advanced economies. The aim of the current study was to explore the prevalence of MetS among children from six cities of China. Methods A total of 8,764 children (4,495 boys, 4,269 girls aged 7-11 years were randomly selected from 6 cities of China. MetS was mainly defined by the criteria proposed by International Diabetes Federation (IDF. Results The overall prevalence of MetS for children older than 10 years was 0.8% by IDF definition. Obese children had significantly higher MetS prevalence compared with their counterparts with overweight (6.6% vs. 0.9%, p p Conclusions The early onset of MetS among children and relatively high proportions of children with at least one or two metabolic abnormalities in cities of China can increase the risk of developing MetS. It implies the necessity to take effective actions to control and prevent the rapid development of obesity among children in developing countries, especial those undergoing transition to a Western lifestyle.

  18. The Impact of Charter Schools on the Budget, Operations, and Educational Services of Columbus City Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Stephanie R.

    2009-01-01

    Today one of the most notable school reform efforts is that of providing school choice options to families. An aim of this reform effort is to create market driven changes in the performance of traditional public schools. Of all school choice options, charter schools have emerged as an influential educational choice. As public schools, charter…

  19. Impact of low blood lead concentrations on IQ and school performance in Chinese children.

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    Jianghong Liu

    Full Text Available Examine the relationships between blood lead concentrations and children's intelligence quotient (IQ and school performance.Participants were 1341 children (738 boys and 603 girls from Jintan, China. Blood lead concentrations were measured when children were 3-5 years old. IQ was assessed using the Chinese version and norms of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence - Revised when children were 6 years old. School performance was assessed by standardized city tests on 3 major subjects (Chinese, Math, and English [as a foreign language] when children were age 8-10 years.Mean blood lead concentration was 6.43 µg/dL (SD = 2.64. For blood lead concentrations, 7.8% of children (n = 105 had ≥10.0 µg/dL, 13.8% (n = 185 had 8.0 to <10.0 µg/dL, and 78.4% (n = 1051 had <8.0 µg/dL. Compared to children with blood lead concentrations <8 µg/dL, those with blood lead concentrations ≥8 µg/dL scored 2-3 points lower in IQ and 5-6 points lower in school tests. There were no significant differences in IQ or school tests between children with blood lead concentrations groups 8-10 and ≥10 µg/dL. After adjustment for child and family characteristics and IQ, blood lead concentrations ≥10 µg/dL vs <8 µg/dL at ages 3-5 years was associated with reduced scores on school tests at age 8-10 years (Chinese, β = -3.54, 95%CI = -6.46, -0.63; Math, β = -4.63, 95%CI = -7.86, -1.40; English, β = -4.66, 95%CI = -8.09, -1.23. IQ partially mediated the relationship between elevated blood lead concentrations and later school performance.Findings support that blood lead concentrations in early childhood, even <10 µg/dL, have a long-term negative impact on cognitive development. The association between blood lead concentrations 8-10 µg/dL and cognitive development needs further study in Chinese children and children from other developing countries.

  20. No More Bullying: An Analysis of Primary School Children's Drawings of School Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slee, Phillip T.; Skrzypiec, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Bullying in schools is an international problem impacting negatively on children's well-being. Children's drawings can provide an insight into their emotional states. There is little published literature that uses children's drawings to gain better understandings of the nature and impact of bullying. We report two studies using indicators of…

  1. Predisposing, Reinforcing and Enabling Predictors of Middle School Children's After-School Physical Activity Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kristi M.; Ogletree, Roberta J.; Fetro, Joyce V.; Brown, Stephen L.; Partridge, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Children's participation in after-school physical activity can attenuate the overweight and obesity rates among rural, low socioeconomic status (SES) children. Children's individual determination, as well as social and environmental factors, can influence their behaviors. Purpose: The purposes of this study were to determine if a difference…

  2. Differing Reactions to Television in Kibbutz and City Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Bachrach, Riva S.

    Children's social and cultural environments may affect their perceptions of the reality of television violence. One of the problems in measuring the importance of societal variables is the difficulty in finding children whose social environments have differed for most of their lives in well prescribed ways. An exception to this are kibbutz- and…

  3. School Satisfaction of Elementary School Children : The Role of Performance, Peer Relations, Ethnicity and Gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuyten, Maykel; Thijs, Jochem

    2002-01-01

    The present study examines school satisfaction among 1,090 Dutch and ethnic minority children aged between ten and twelve in relation to their school context. Data were gathered in 51 classes from 26 schools. Individual and classroom variables were examined simultaneously, using multilevel analysis.

  4. Working with Homeless School-Aged Children: Barriers to School Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groton, Danielle; Teasley, Martell L.; Canfield, James P.

    2013-01-01

    With the needs and challenges of adolescent homelessness on the rise, the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (MVA) was crafted as a public policy initiative aimed at facilitating access to schools for this population. While school social workers are the designated personnel for practice with homeless school-aged children, we know little about…

  5. Families, Schools, and Children's School Achievement: A Study Based on Rural Regions in China Gansu Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijun, Sun; Zeyun, Liu; Baicai, Sun

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of school factors on student achievement due to differences in family backgrounds. Based on the principle of diminishing effects of school investment in children's achievement, this study built a model that includes individual characteristics, family characteristics, and school characteristics. Family and school…

  6. Language Proficiency and Home Languages of Students in New York City Elementary and Middle Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, Leanna; Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Conger, Dylan

    This report describes demographic characteristics and educational experiences of New York City's elementary and middle school students by English language proficiency and home language. It compares the characteristics and achievement of students who are limited English proficiency (LEP), most of whom: live in homes where a language other than…

  7. The Attitudes of Negro High School Students in Kansas City, Missouri: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiddmont, Norman; Levine, Daniel U.

    This report evaluates a questionnaire submitted to 529 economically disadvantaged black high school students in Kansas City, Missouri. The questionnaire was designed to assess attitudes in the following areas: value placed on education and its importance for one's future; interracial relationships, the Black Power movement, and violence; interest…

  8. EFL Secondary School Teachers' Views on Blended Learning in Tabuk City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfahadi, Abdulrahman M.; Alsalhi, Abdulrhman A.; Alshammari, Abdullah S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate EFL Secondary School Teachers' Views on Blended Learning. It also aims to investigate (a) the teachers' views on blended learning content and process, and (b) how blended learning is effective in developing teachers' performance. The study sample included 35 EFL Saudi teachers in Tabuk City, KSA. In order to…

  9. From Cultural Dissonance to Diasporic Affinity: The Experience of Jamaican Teachers in New York City Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Erold K.

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological study was designed to investigate the experience of Jamaican teachers recruited to serve in elementary and high schools in New York City. The study explored three broad questions: (1) What was teaching like for the participants before they assumed their assignments in the US? (2) What is teaching in the US like for them? and…

  10. Teaching the War on Terror: Tackling Controversial Issues in a New York City Public High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthe, Adam

    2011-01-01

    In this article, a New York City public school teacher discusses the creation and implementation of a course that explores controversial topics surrounding terrorism and modern reactions to terrorism. The author describes the challenges of creating such a course and questions why such courses are seemingly rare in social studies education.…

  11. Nasal nitric oxide levels in healthy pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, G L; Bodini, A; Peroni, D G; Sandri, M; Brunelli, M; Pigozzi, R; Boner, A L

    2010-12-01

    The evaluation of nasal nitric oxide (nNO) has been proposed as a screening tool in children with clinically suspectable primary ciliary dyskinesia. Nevertheless, normal values have been reported for school-aged children. This study was designed to identify normal nNO levels in pre-school children. nNO was assessed in 300 healthy children aged between 1.5 and 7.2. Two hundred and fifty of them were unable to fulfill the guideline requirements for nNO measurement and were assessed by sampling the nasal air continuously with a constant trans-nasal aspiration flow for 30 s during tidal breathing. For those children who were able to cooperate, the average nNO concentration was calculated according to guidelines. A statistically significant relationship between nNO level and age was demonstrated in this study group of pre-school children (p < 0.001). An increase in nNO of about 100 ppb was observed in children older than 6 yr vs. those aged < 3. This study presents a description of normal nNO values in pre-school children. The effect of the age and the eventual presence of rhinitis and snoring need to be considered whenever nNO is evaluated in the clinical practice, in particular in non-cooperative children.

  12. Health Assessment of School Children II -- Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Victor; Oglesby, Allan

    1971-01-01

    The article concludes that adequate screening, and the use of expensive diagnostic procedures (such as medical referral) only for children who have failed a screening test, will result in the most effective use of school health time and funds. (Author)

  13. Chronic Respiratory Diseases of School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, John P.

    1976-01-01

    The author examines the problems of chronic respiratory disease in school-age children from a medical viewpoint, including recognition and diagnosis, commonly encountered diseases, their effect on participation in physical exercise, emotional factors, medication, and emergency care. (MB)

  14. Children stories about primary schools: sceneries and (autobiographic research challenges

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    Maria da Conceição Passeggi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with 4-10 year-old children stories and analyses how they portrait their experiences at school. It is the outcome of an inter-institutional research project performed at schools in Natal, São Paulo, Recife, Niterói and Boa Vista. To collect data, we opted for conversations of children in groups of five, who would share a conversation with a little alien whose planet lacked schools. The analyses revealed consensus and tensions between scholar cultu - re and childhood cultures, which affect the way children play and learn, make friends or not, remain children or not. When narrating, the child redefines his/her experience and contributes to seize the primary school as a place where he/she becomes (or not a citizen.

  15. Who's in charge of children's environmental health at school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Jerome; Barnett, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Children spend many hours each week in and around school buildings. Their short- and long-term health outcomes and ability to learn are affected by numerous environmental factors related to the school buildings, the school grounds, the school transportation system, and the use of various products and materials in and around the school. Many school buildings are old, and they-and even newer buildings-can contain multiple environmental health hazards. While some districts self-report they have environmental health policies in place, no independent verification of these policies or their quality exists. Teachers and other staff, but not children who are more vulnerable to hazards than adults, are afforded some protections from hazards by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, by their employment contracts, or through adult occupational health services. Major environmental problems include: indoor air quality, lighting, pests and pesticides, heavy metals and chemical management issues, renovation of occupied buildings, noise, and cleaning processes and products. No agency at the federal or state levels is charged with ensuring children's health and safety in and around school buildings. No systematic means exists for collecting data about exposures which occur in the school setting. Recommendations are made for dealing with issues of data collection, federal actions, state and local actions, and for building the capacity of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-designated and funded Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSU) in responding to and evaluating risks to children's environmental health in schools.

  16. Spatial and temporal variations in traffic-related particulate matter at New York City high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Molini M.; Chillrud, Steven N.; Correa, Juan C.; Feinberg, Marian; Hazi, Yair; Deepti, K. C.; Prakash, Swati; Ross, James M.; Levy, Diane; Kinney, Patrick L.

    Relatively little is known about exposures to traffic-related particulate matter at schools located in dense urban areas. The purpose of this study was to examine the influences of diesel traffic proximity and intensity on ambient concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) and black carbon (BC), an indicator of diesel exhaust particles, at New York City (NYC) high schools. Outdoor PM 2.5 and BC were monitored continuously for 4-6 weeks at each of 3 NYC schools and 1 suburban school located 40 km upwind of the city. Traffic count data were obtained using an automated traffic counter or video camera. BC concentrations were 2-3 fold higher at urban schools compared with the suburban school, and among the 3 urban schools, BC concentrations were higher at schools located adjacent to highways. PM 2.5 concentrations were significantly higher at urban schools than at the suburban school, but concentrations did not vary significantly among urban schools. Both hourly average counts of trucks and buses and meteorological factors such as wind direction, wind speed, and humidity were significantly associated with hourly average ambient BC and PM 2.5 concentrations in multivariate regression models. An increase of 443 trucks/buses per hour was associated with a 0.62 μg/m 3 increase in hourly average BC at an NYC school located adjacent to a major interstate highway. Car traffic counts were not associated with BC. The results suggest that local diesel vehicle traffic may be important sources of airborne fine particles in dense urban areas and consequently may contribute to local variations in PM 2.5 concentrations. In urban areas with higher levels of diesel traffic, local, neighborhood-scale monitoring of pollutants such as BC, which compared to PM 2.5, is a more specific indicator of diesel exhaust particles, may more accurately represent population exposures.

  17. Prevalence of intolerance to food additives among Danish school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, G.; Madsen, C.; Saval, P.

    1993-01-01

    The prevalence of intolerance to food additives was assessed in a group of unselected school children aged 5-16 years. A study group of 271 children was selected on the basis of the results of a questionnaire on atopic disease answered by 4,274 (86%) school children in the municipality of Viborg......, Denmark. The children in the study group followed an elimination diet for two weeks before they were challenged with a mixture of food preservatives, colourings and flavours. The challenge was open and the additives were prepared as a fizzy lemonade. If the open challenge was positive, a double...... clinics, the prevalence of intolerance to food additives in school children is estimated to be 1-2%....

  18. Anemia among Primary School Children in Eastern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Firehiwot Mesfin; Yemane Berhane; Alemayehu Worku

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia during childhood impairs physical growth, cognitive development and school performance. Identifying the causes of anemia in specific contexts can help efforts to prevent negative consequences of anemia among children. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and identify correlates of anemia among school children in Eastern Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted from January 2012 to February 2012 in Kersa, Eastern Ethiopia. The study included ran...

  19. Prevalence and associated risk factors of dyslexic children in a middle-sized city of China: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are many discussions about dyslexia based on studies conducted in western countries, and some risk factors to dyslexia, such as gender and home literacy environment, have been widely accepted based on these studies. However, to our knowledge, there are few studies focusing on the risk factors of dyslexia in China. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of dyslexia and its potential risk factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Qianjiang, a city in Hubei province, China. Two stages sampling strategy was applied to randomly selected 5 districts and 9 primary schools in Qianjiang. In total, 6,350 students participated in this study and there were 5,063 valid student questionnaires obtained for the final analyses. Additional questionnaires (such as Dyslexia Checklist for Chinese Children and Pupil Rating Scale were used to identify dyslexic children. The chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression were employed to reveal the potential risk factors to dyslexia. RESULTS: Our study revealed that the prevalence of dyslexia was 3.9% in Qianjiang city, which is a middle-sized city in China. Among dyslexic children, the gender ratio (boys to girls was nearly 3∶1. According to the P-value in the multivariate logistic regression, the gender (P<0.01, mother's education level (P<0.01, and learning habits (P<0.01 (active learning, scheduled reading time were associated with dyslexia. CONCLUSION: The prevalence rate of dyslexic children in middle-sized cities is 3.9%. The potential risk factors of dyslexic children revealed in this study will have a great impact on detecting and treating dyslexic children in China as early as possible, although more studies are still needed to further investigate the risk factors of dyslexic children in China.

  20. Strongyloides stercoralis and other Enteroparasites in Children at Uberlândia City, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Machado Eleuza

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the rate of infection by Strongyloides stercoralis and other enteroparasites a survey was conducted in the city of Uberlândia, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. A total of 900 stool samples from 300 children aging from four months to seven years, randomly selected in ten nursery schools from September 1994 to December 1995, were examined, both by the Baermann-Moraes and Lutz methods. Thirty nine children (13% were found to be infected by S. stercoralis, 64.1% were boys and 35.9% were girls. Taking all the enteroparasites as a whole the results of the survey pointed out that 265 (88.4% of the 300 children were infected by the following: Giardia lamblia, 78.3%; Ascaris lumbricoides, 15.3%; S. stercoralis, 13%; Hymenolepis nana, 6.7%; hookworms, 6%; Enterobius vermicularis, 4%; Hymenole-pis diminuta, 4% and Trichuris trichiura, 0.7%. From 265 infected children 64.5% were mono-infected, 27.2% were infected by two parasites and 8.3% had a poly-specific parasite burden. It was concluded that strongyloidiasis is hyperendemic in this area

  1. Prevalence of Sleep Disturbance and Neuropsychological Learning Disabilities in Preschool Children in Isfahan City

    OpenAIRE

    M Ghaneian; H Kazemi-Zahrani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of sleep disorders is different in international studies. Sleep disorders with the increasing prevalence among children is common. Cognitive problems are the most serious complication of sleep disorders in children. The present study, the prevalence of sleep problems and neuropsychological learning disabilities were evaluated on pre-school children (4-6 years old) in Isfahan in the year of (1393-1394). Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 350 pre-s...

  2. [Analysis of the nutritional state and body composition of school children in Granada (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Jiménez, E; Aguilar Cordero, M J; García López, P A; Schmidt Río-Valle, J; García García, C J

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to first determine the nutritional state of a sample population of school children, and then analyze the distribution pattern of their subcutaneous fat layer. The sample was composed of 977 school children from the city and province of Granada (Spain). All of the children (524 girls and 452 boys) were 9-17 years of age. To study their nutritional state and the distribution of the subcutaneous fat layer, they were given a complete anthropometric evaluation, which included measuring their weight, height, body mass index, skin folds, and body perimeters. The results obtained showed a 23.01% prevalence of overweight in the female subjects and 20.81% in the male subjects. Furthermore, the female subjects had an obesity prevalence of 12.70% in comparison to the male subjects, whose obesity prevalence was 4.98%. The distribution pattern of subcutaneous fat was found to be mainly located in the central part of body. The high percentage of overweight and obesity along with the development of a central fat distribution pattern (neck, chest, and abdomen) in these school children is clear evidence of potential cardiovascular risk.

  3. SCHOOL AND OUT-OF-SCHOOL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OF CHILDREN IN RURAL AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podstawski Robert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The aim of the study was to assess the level of school and out-of-school physical activity of children living in rural area at the early stage of their education. Material : The research was conducted in 2009 at primary school in Świętajno (a village. The study group consisted of 42 girls and 44 boys from the 1 st, 2 nd and 3 rd grade of primary school, aged 7-10. The children were chosen by means of a purposeful selection and surveyed by a questionnaire consisting of five open-ended and five closed-ended questions. Results : The research showed that the children living in the rural area at the early stage of their education eagerly participated in the classes of physical education held at school. The most popular physical activities among the children included: games and plays with the ball and other equipment, running, gymnastics (among girls and matches and competitions (among boys. The outdoor physical activities in which the children were involved outside of school were spontaneous and unorganized including mainly cycling, roller-skating, skating or skiing. Conclusions : A marginal percentage of children participated in out-of-school sports trainings or other physical education-oriented classes (e.g. swimming lessons. A relatively high percentage of children devoted a great deal of their free time to watching television, DVDs or playing on the computer.

  4. Overweight and school performance among primary school children: the PIAMA birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldwijk, Jorien; Fries, Marieke C E; Bemelmans, Wanda J E; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; Smit, Henriëtte A; Koppelman, Gerard H; Wijga, Alet H

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between overweight and school performance among primary school children prospectively and including a broad range of potential confounding factors. In addition it was investigated what factors mediate this association. For this purpose, data of 2,159 12-year-old children who participated in the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA) birth cohort study were used. Two indicators of school performance were parental reported when children were 12 years of age and included (i): the score on a standardized achievement test that Dutch children have to complete at the end of their primary education (Cito)-test and (ii): the teacher's advice regarding a child's potential performance level in secondary education. Children's height and weight were measured by a trained research assistant at the age of 8 and by their parents at the age of 12. Overweight was defined using age and gender specific cut-off points. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to assess the association between overweight and school performance. Besides, both confounder and mediation analyses were conducted. Results showed lower Cito-test scores and lower teacher's school-level advice among overweight children. These associations were no longer significant when adjusting for parental educational level, skipping breakfast, and screen time. This study found no independent association between overweight and school performance among primary school children. Results showed strong confounding by parental educational level.

  5. City Children Now Know How a Tomato Grows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JANE SHAW

    1994-01-01

    "WHERE does a tomato come from?" The top class in a Chinese kindergarten was silenced by this question. Some children looked to the right and left. Others twiddled their fingers and lowered their heads. The teacher in charge of the class called a student’s name, "Come, you answer it." "A tomato grows on a plate." Before the little boy finished his words, the children began to discuss this point heatedly.

  6. Too Cool for School?: Gifted Children and Homeschooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Homeschooling can be a last resort for frustrated families where gifted children are not having their complex needs met through mainstream schooling. Unlike many other groups of homeschoolers, parents of highly able children take this option for pragmatic reasons rather than as a kind of moral stance. This article explores some of the ways that…

  7. Education, Schooling, and Children's Rights: The Complexity of Homeschooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzman, Robert

    2012-01-01

    By blurring the distinction between formal school and education writ large, homeschooling both highlights and complicates the tensions among the interests of parents, children, and the state. In this essay, Robert Kunzman argues for a modest version of children's educational rights, at least in a legal sense that the state has the duty and…

  8. Say the Word Islam: School Counselors and Muslim Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Daa'iyah; Rasheed, Sakinah

    2010-01-01

    Two Muslim women who hold Ph.D.'s, a clinical and developmental psychologist and a teacher educator speak personally and professionally about important information school counselors need to know about Islam and providing services to Muslim children. First, the authors draw from personal experiences in parenting Muslim children who have come of age…

  9. Developing Children's Language Learner Strategies at Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Claudine

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the strategy repertoires and strategy development of six English children who learned foreign languages at primary school. My study differs from mainstream research, in that it focuses on young children and on the development of their strategies, draws on sociocultural theory and uses ethnographic methods. My findings show…

  10. Epidemiological Study of Mental Health Problems among Handicapped School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur Singh, Tej

    1988-01-01

    Indian teachers rating the prevalence of psychiatric problems in 79 school children with visual handicaps, 91 with hearing handicaps, and 105 nonhandicapped identified a higher prevalence than did psychiatrists. Although similar percentages of children in the 3 groups were diagnosed as having psychiatric problems, the types of problems experienced…

  11. Emergent Technological Literacy: What Do Children Bring to School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, W. B.

    2013-01-01

    There has been very little research into children's technological practice in early childhood settings. This article describes four typical examples of the technological activity that occurs on a daily basis in New Zealand early childhood settings. It is suggested that children come to compulsory schooling with well-developed technological…

  12. Civic and Patriotic Education of Pre-School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokeyeva, Ekaterina V.; Andreeva, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the current research devoted to civic and patriotic education of pre-school children is determined by the contradiction between the necessity of civic-patriotic education of children in the current context, their readiness to defend their Motherland and the lack of the development of this issue both in pedagogical theory and…

  13. An Investigation of School Violence through Turkish Children's Drawings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtal, Filiz; Artut, Kazim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates Turkish children's perception of violence in school as represented through drawings and narratives. In all, 66 students (12 to 13 years old) from the middle socioeconomic class participated. To elicit children's perception of violence, they were asked to draw a picture of a violent incident they had heard, experienced, or…

  14. Children's Diurnal Cortisol Activity during the First Year of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Jung; Lamb, Michael E.; Kappler, Gregor; Ahnert, Lieselotte

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined 4- to 5-year-old British children's diurnal cortisol activity during their first year of school. The children's cortisol was measured before enrollment (baseline), upon enrollment, and both 3 and 6 months after enrollment. On each day, cortisol was sampled four times, providing information about the diurnal amount of…

  15. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and…

  16. Recapturing Hope: Elementary School Support Groups for Children of Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    Considers the usefulness of elementary school support groups for children of alcoholics. Discusses identification of young children of alcoholics and offers suggestions for establishing support groups. Examines techniques for exploring feelings, building self-esteem, developing coping skills, managing stress, rehearsing decision making, and…

  17. School-Age Children in CCDBG: 2012 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Hannah; Reeves, Rhiannon

    2014-01-01

    The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the primary funding source for federal child care subsidies to low-income working families, as well as improving child care quality. CCDBG provides child care assistance to children from birth to age 13. This fact sheet highlights key information about school-age children and CCDBG. This…

  18. Life style and behavior of school children without parental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvrgić Svetlana T.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Indroduction Life style (behavior is one of the most significant factors affecting health. Although a number of factors participate in creating behavior, family is one the most important. The goal was to analyze the life style of children without parental care. Material and methods The research was done using cross-sectional data from "Children village" in Sremska Kamenica (N=127, and a questionnaire was especially created for this purpose. Results and discussion It was established that 75% of elementary school children and 43% of high school children are physically active. The greatest health risk is smoking (only 50% of students reported never to smoke cigarettes, while 17.5% were daily smokers. The problem is greatest in high school children (43% polled are daily smokers. Alcohol consumption is less common than in the general population of the same age (10% polled drink beer and wine several times a month, while 5% drink spirits - brandy, whisky etc.. Attitudes to sports, smoking and alcohol are mainly positive, but at older age there is an increased number of children with negative attitudes. Knowledge regarding healthy diet is on a lower level comparing with general population, meals are more regular, but with less desirable food. Conclusion From the aspect of health, life style of children without parental care is characterized by risky behavior, particularly in high school children.

  19. Teaching Humility in First-Grade Christian School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonker, Julie E.; Wielard, Cassie J.; Vos, Carolyn L.; Tudder, Ashley M.

    2017-01-01

    Four classes of first-grade children at a Christian school took pre- and post-tests measuring humility. Two intervention classes had devotional lessons on humility and two comparison classes did not. For one week, devotional lessons featured humility-related children's literature, cognitively appropriate discussions, writing about humility, and…

  20. Children with Asthma: Assessment and Treatment in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Grigerick, Sarah E.; Loftus, Susan; Nicholson, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease of the airways. It affects approximately 12% of American children, and it appears that that incidence is increasing. Asthma in children negatively influences school-based outcomes such as absenteeism and friendship formation. Potential triggers of asthma include environmental allergens, exercise, weather, and emotional…

  1. High blood pressure in school children: prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivers Patrick A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of high blood pressure (HBP and associated risk factors in school children 8 to 13 years of age. Methods Elementary school children (n = 1,066 were examined. Associations between HBP, body mass index (BMI, gender, ethnicity, and acanthosis nigricans (AN were investigated using a school based cross-sectional study. Blood pressure was measured and the 95th percentile was used to determine HBP. Comparisons between children with and without HBP were utilized. The crude and multiple logistic regression adjusted odds ratios were used as measures of association. Results Females, Hispanics, overweight children, and children with AN had an increased likelihood of HBP. Overweight children (BMI ≥ 85th percentile and those with AN were at least twice as likely to present with HBP after controlling for confounding factors. Conclusion Twenty one percent of school children had HBP, especially the prevalence was higher among the overweight and Hispanic group. The association identified here can be used as independent markers for increased likelihood of HBP in children.

  2. Developing School Provision for Children with Dyspraxia. A Practical Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nichola, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    With a much greater awareness in schools of conditions like dyslexia, dyspraxia and autism, and the effects they have in the context of the educational curriculum, schools are becoming better placed to help children access a curriculum that takes account of the diverse needs of its learners. It has been predicted that as people move through the…

  3. The Realities of Middle School for Mexican Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollin, Gail G.

    2003-01-01

    Presents information about the middle school educational system in Mexico. Considers the implications for better meeting the needs of Mexican children in U.S. schools. Describes experiences and knowledge gained while the author taught a graduate workshop to American teachers in Guanajuato, Mexico. Places the information gained in the context of…

  4. Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children and the School Nurse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Lisa Goldblatt; Starck, Maureen; Potenza, Jane; Kenney, Patricia A.; Sheetz, Anne H.

    2012-01-01

    As trusted health professionals in the school setting, school nurses are well positioned to identify students who may be victims of commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC). However, until recently this issue has been clouded by lack of awareness, stigma, and/or denial. Since nationally the average age of entry for girls into the…

  5. Obesity status trajectory groups among elementary school children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about patterns in the transition from healthy weight to overweight or obesity during the elementary school years. This study examined whether there were distinct body mass index (BMI) trajectory groups among elementary school children, and predictors of trajectory group membership. T...

  6. Obesity and Other Predictors of Absenteeism in Philadelphia School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Elizabeth B.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Andrel, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Limited data indicate that obese children are absent from school more than their normal-weight peers. We analyzed administrative data from a large urban school district to investigate the association of obesity and student sociodemographic characteristics with absenteeism. Methods: We analyzed 291,040 records, representing 165,056…

  7. Sleep Disorders in Children: Collaboration for School-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, D. Erik

    2011-01-01

    The effects of sleep disturbance on children are wide ranging and include alterations in behavior, mood, cognition, and academic performance. Screening and intervention for pediatric sleep disorders within the schools are not widely implemented, and the concept of integrating school personnel into the multidisciplinary sleep team has yet to be…

  8. School Psychologists Working with Children Affected by Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezen, Kristin A.; Gurl, Aaron; Ping, Jenn

    2010-01-01

    School psychologists encounter children regularly who have been affected by abuse and neglect. Maltreatment adversely affects the mental health status and academic achievement of youth, thereby making the topic an area of concern for school psychologists. More recently, child protection laws have been expanded to include mandatory child abuse…

  9. Caregivers' perspective of school reintegration in children survivors of burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, R.; Santos, B.D.; Van Loey, N.E.E.; Geenen, R.; Rossi, L.A.; Nascimento, L.C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pediatric burns are an important reason of treatment and hospitalization. Children victims of burns may interrupt or even abandon school activities. The process of school reintegration of this population has become a point of attention. Aim: To analyze the caregivers’ perspective of th

  10. Children of Divorce in the Elementary School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Mary E.

    In this document, literature is reviewed concerning (1) effects of divorce on the academic achievement, behavior, and self-concept of elementary school students; and (2) ways the adjustment of children whose parents have divorced can be facilitated in schools by teachers and counselors. Annotations of 40 articles are provided. Also included are a…

  11. Children's Rights, School Exclusion and Alternative Educational Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Gillean; Riddell, Sheila; Weedon, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines findings from a recent study in Wales of school exclusion and alternative educational provision. Many, but not all, children in alternative provision have been excluded from school. The most recent statistics reveal that nearly 90% of pupils in alternative provision have special educational needs, nearly 70% are entitled to…

  12. Color Vision Defects in School Going Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Shrestha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Color Vision defect can be observed in various diseases of optic nerve and retina and also a significant number of people suffer from the inherited condition of red and green color defect. Methods: A cross-sectional descritptive study was designed with purposive sampling of students from various schools of Kathmandu Valley. All children were subjected to color vision evaluation using Ishihara Isochromatic color plates along with other examination to rule out any other causes of color deficiency. Results: A total of 2001 students were examined, 1050 male students and 951 females with mean age of 10.35 (±2.75 and 10.54 (±2.72 respectively. Among the total students examined, 2.1% had some form of color vision defects. Of the male population , 3.9% had color vision defects while none of the female was found with the deficiency. Conclusions: The prelevance of color vision defect in Nepal is significant and comparable with the prelevance quoted in the studies from different countries. Keywords:color vision; congenital red green color effect; Nepal; prevalence.

  13. Awareness of dengue fever among school children: a comparison between private and government schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Kalra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue is the mosquito born viral disease spreading its tentacles all over the world. Dengue constitutes for major cause of deaths in children. According to WHO, globally it was estimated that approximately 70-100 million people were infected every year. Therefore, the study has been conducted with the aim to assess knowledge regarding dengue fever among school children. Methodology: Total of 500 children were selected from 9th and 10th class of private and government schools using total enumerative sampling technique. Data was collected using questionnaire method. After assessing knowledge classes were taken by investigators focusing on prevention of dengue fever. Results: Finding of study revealed that among Private schools excellent knowledge was found in 06 (01.2% children, good in 123 (24.6% children, average 112 (22.4% children and poor in 02 (00.41 whereas in Government schools none of students had excellent knowledge, 76(15.2% children were having good knowledge, 178(35.6% children were having average knowledge & 03 (00.6 children were having poor knowledge. The mean knowledge scores were higher in students of Private schools i.e. 31.45 ± 6.41 as compared to students of Government schools i.e. 28.17 ± 5.39 at t=6.19 (p=0.00. Conclusion: It is concluded that majority of school students of private and government schools were having average knowledge regarding prevention of dengue fever. Therefore, there is need for further information, education and communication programs regarding prevention of dengue fever and this can be achieved by organizing health education campaigns in community involving schools.

  14. Prevalence of obesity in school-going children of Karachi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Javed Warraich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is an emerging problem in Pakistan. The authors sought to determine prevalence of obesity and malnutrition in school-going children, from grades 6(th to 8(th of different schools of Karachi and assess associations that affect the weight of the children. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross sectional study design with children studying in grades 6(th to 8(th grade, in different schools of Karachi. We visited 10 schools of which 4 consented; two subsidized government schools and two private schools. A questionnaire was developed in consultation with a qualified nutritionist. Height and weight were measured on calibrated scales. A modified BMI criterion for Asian populations was used. Data was collected from 284 students. Of our sample, 52% were found to be underweight whereas 34% of all the children were normal. Of the population, 6% was obese and 8% overweight. Of all obese children, 70% belonged to the higher socio-economic status (SES group, while of the underweight children, 63.3% were in the lower SES. Amongst obese children in our study, 65% ate meat every day, compared to 33% of normal kids. CONCLUSION: Obesity and undernutrition co-exist in Pakistani school-children. Our study shows that socio-economic factors are important since obesity and overweight increase with SES. Higher SES groups should be targeted for overweight while underweight is a problem of lower SES. Meat intake and lack of physical activity are some of the other factors that have been highlighted in our study.

  15. Narrative Development in Preschool and School-Age Children

    OpenAIRE

    Hegsted, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Children hear and use narratives in a variety of contexts including school, social situations, and at home. A narrative is a form of discourse that is used to tell the listener what happened in a temporally sequenced, agent-focused way, and these stories can be a production of a real or fictional account. Speech language pathologists take a particular interest in children's narrative abilities because children's story telling capabilities play a large role in language acquisition as well as f...

  16. A STUDY ON PREVALENCE OF REFRACTIVE ERRORS IN SCHOOL CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Kolli Sree Karuna

    2014-01-01

    ‘’Sarvendriya nam nayanam pradhanam” Of all the organs in the body, eyes are the most important. The blindness or defect in vision decreases the productivity of the nation in addition to increased dependability. The refractive errors in the school children throw them in to defective future. Nutrition deficiency, mental strain, wrong reading habits etc are some of the causes for this defect in these children. Vision is essential for all the children, for the academic and overal...

  17. Research or "Cheerleading"? Scholarship on Community School District 2, New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois Weiner

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available This article examines data on student achievement and school demographics not explored by the researchers who have promoted Community School District 2 (CSD 2 as a model of urban school reform that should be replicated elsewhere. Data on achievement indicate a remarkable degree of social and racial stratification among CSD 2's schools and levels of achievement that closely correlate with race, ethnicity, and poverty. In addition, when CSD 2's scores on state and city tests of mathematics are compared with results from CSD 25 in Queens, a school district that serves a population demographically similar, the superiority of its functioning becomes questionable. The article explains why the design of research on CSD 2 illustrates the perils to both research and policy when university-based researchers assume the role of “cheerleader” (Cuban, 1988, promoting reforms they have aided in implementing and assessing.

  18. Lamont-Doherty Research Collaboration with Public High Schools in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, R.; Sambrotto, R.; Chillrud, S. N.; Vincent, S.; Gonzalez, M.; Moshos, M.; Olivieri, E.

    2009-12-01

    Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory has established educational partnerships with 6 New York City high schools, focused on engagement of science teachers and students in real (rigorous, publicly funded, publishable) research projects. The partnering schools are all "regular" public schools (non competitive entry, predominantly Title I/Title III, predominantly under-served populations). The projects include: * Long-term ecological monitoring of a Hudson River wetlands for hydrological, nutrient, floral, bacterial and nekton conditions; * Deployment of automated, internet-linked monitoring platforms in the Harlem River and a local research Marsh; * Development of miniaturized airborne particulate sampling devices capable of sampling separately for home, school, and outdoor environments; * Water pollution impact monitoring testing of pilot oyster beds in the lower New York Harbor. The presentation will describe the first four years of the program, with an emphasis on lessons learned and tangible impacts on the students, teachers and schools particpating in the partnerships.

  19. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pyloriin school-aged Chinese in Taipei City and relationship between ABO blood groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tzee-Chung Wu; Liang-Kung Chen; Shinn-Jang Hwang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the seropositive rate of antibodies against H. pylori(anti-HP) in Taipei City and to compare the relationship of ABO blood groups and H. pylori infection.METHODS:In 1993, high school students in Shih-Lin District were randomly selected for blood samplings by their registration number at school. In addition, similar procedures were performed on the well-children clinics of Taipei Veterans General Hospital. Besides, randomly selected sera from the adults who took the physical examination were recruited for evaluation. Informed consents were obtained from all the subjects before blood samplings and parents were simultaneously informed for those who were younger than 18-year-old. Blood tests for anti-HP and ABO blood groupings were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Chi square tests were used for the comparisons between seroprevalence of H. pylori and ABO blood groups.RESULTS: Totally, 685 subjects were recruited (260 children aged 1-14 years, 425 high school students aged 15-18 years)were evaluated, and another 88 adult healthy volunteers were studied as well for comparison. The age-specific seropositive rate of anti-HP was 1.3 % at age 1-5 years,7.7 % at age 6-10 years, and 11.5 % at age 11-14 years.The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection was abruptly increased in young adolescence: 18.6 % at age 15 years,28.1% at age 16 years, 32.4 % at age 17 years and 41.0%at age 18 years, respectively. In the 425 high school students,ABO blood groupings were performed, which disclosed 48.5 % (206/425) of blood group O, 24 % (102/425) of blood group A, 21.8 % (93/425) of blood group B and 5.6 %(24/425) of blood group AB. In comparison of the subjects with blood group O and the other blood groups, no statistical significance could be identified in the seroprevalence of H. pylori(P=0.99).CONCLUSION: The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection in Taipei City in adults is similar to the developed countries,and the abrupt increase of H. pylori during high

  20. Malnutrition among 3 to 5 Years Old Children in Baghdad City, Iraq: A Cross-sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazi, Hasanain Faisal; Mustafa, Jamsiah; Aljunid, Syed; Isa, Zaleha Md; AbdalQader, Mohammed A

    2013-01-01

    The unstable geopolitical situation in Iraq since 2003 still affects the health of people, especially children. Several factors may indirectly affect a child's nutritional status. The main aim of this study was to identify factors contributing to malnutrition among 3 to 5 years old children in Baghdad city, Iraq. Two hundred twenty children aged 3 to 5 years were chosen randomly from four kindergartens in Baghdad city according to the cross-sectional design. The nutritional status of the chil...

  1. [Prevalence of obesity amount elementary school children in Grenoble].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viguié, M; Fayard, M; Micheletti, P; Boussuges, S

    2002-12-01

    Facing the growing increase of childhood obesity in France, the Grenoble Municipal School Health Service wanted to evaluate the importance of this phenomenon present among elementary school children in the area. A descriptive, cross-sectional and retrospective survey was conducted during the 2000/2001 academic year among a group of 1361 children born in 1990. The Quetelet Index was utilized to measure the level of being overweight, and the breaking point levels for being overweight and obese were defined according to new international standards. The prevalence of obesity is approximately 3% (2.7% in girls and 2.9% in boys) and remains constant from nursery school to elementary school. Nearly 35% of obese children in nursery school remain obese at the end of elementary school. Overweight prevalence is at its highest and increases significantly from nursery school (8.3%) through elementary school (14%). The study further revealed that girls aged 10-12 who did not pass and were held back from the next grade are five times more at risk of obesity than those who pass. The Municipal School Health Service has a critical role to play in the prevention of childhood obesity and its early screening and detection.

  2. School performance in cholesteatoma-operated children in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djurhuus, Bjarki; Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Pedersen, Jacob Krabbe

    2016-01-01

    Cholesteatoma in childhood had no long-term effect on school performance for the majority who completed lower secondary school. Aim To investigate whether individuals operated on for cholesteatoma in childhood have impaired school performance in adolescence. Methods All children born in Denmark...... between 1986-1991 with cholesteatoma surgery performed before the age of 15 years were included (cholestetaoma group). A control group consisting of a 5% random sample of all children born in Denmark during the same period was used for comparison. Final marks (average, mathematics, Danish, and English...

  3. Communities of Children in the transition from preschool to school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanek, Anja Hvidtfeldt

    2017-01-01

    This article is concerned with the meaning of Communities of Children in the transition from preschool to school – analyzed from the children’s perspectives (Aronsson, Hedegaard, Højholt, & Ulvik, 2012).The text is based on an ethnographic study where a group of Danish children where followed...... participation possibilities within the children’s communities in preschool. This means that we need both cooperation with the children’s parents and professional collaboration and information sharing across preschool and school and professional cooperation within the school....

  4. Excretion of arsenic (As) in urine of children, 7--11 years, exposed to elevated levels of As in the city water supply in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyatt, C.J.; Quiroga, V.L.; Acosta, R.T.O.; Mendez, R.O. [Centro de Investigaciones en Alimentacion y Desarrollo, Hermosillo (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    Arsenic (As) is a common element in the environment with many industrial uses, but it also can be a contaminant in drinking water and present serious health concerns. Earlier studies on the quality of drinking water in the city of Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico, showed high levels of As in water from wells located in the northern part of the city. Additionally a high positive correlation between the levels of Fluoride (F) and As in the same wells was found. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the excretion of As in children, 7--11 years of age, that had been exposed to elevated levels of As in their drinking water. Twenty-four-hour urine samples and a water sample taken directly in the home were collected from school age children living in two different areas with known high levels of As in their drinking water. A control group with normal levels of As in their water was also included.

  5. Lifestyle riskfactors of noncommunicable diseases: Awareness among school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Divakaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Currently, the health scenario is riddled with the burden of noncommunicable diseases. Aim : The aim of this study is to assess the awareness of school children regarding the risk factors of noncommunicable diseases (NCD. Setting and Design : Three hundred and seventy-five school children, studying in classes 6 to 10, formed the study subjects. Materials and Methods : The school selected for the study was a government school, located in a rural area. The socioeconomic status of the children was mainly in the upper lower and lower class. Students from the 6 to 10 grades formed the study subjects and from among them, a random sample of 375 children were selected for the study. A close-ended questionnaire relating to 3 most commonly occurring NCDs, namely, Cancer, Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD, and Diabetes Mellitus (DM was administered to the students. Statistical Analysis: Frequency and proportions were used to analyze the data. Results : It is found that awareness among the school children regarding lifestyle risk factors of NCDs is not satisfactory. The areas of least knowledge were found to be regarding passive smoking, early age at marriage, and reuse of cooking oil as risk factors for NCD. Conclusion : The study recommends the need for curriculum-based health education regarding the prevention aspects and motivation of the children to incorporate healthy lifestyle practices into their daily lives.

  6. Children's physical activity levels during school recess: a quasi-experimental intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairclough Stuart J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recess provides a daily opportunity for children to engage in moderate-to-vigorous (MVPA and vigorous physical activity (VPA. Limited research has investigated the effects of recess-based interventions on physical activity using large sample sizes whilst investigating variables that may influence the intervention effect. The aim of the study was to investigate the short-term effects of a playground markings and physical structures intervention on recess physical activity. A secondary aim was to investigate the effects of covariates on the intervention. Methods 150 boys and 147 girls were randomly selected from 26 elementary schools to wear uni-axial accelerometers that quantified physical activity every 5 seconds during recess. Fifteen schools located in deprived areas in one large urban city in England received funding through a national initiative to redesign the playground environment. Eleven schools served as matched socioeconomic controls. Data were collected at baseline and 6-weeks following playground intervention. Recess MVPA and VPA levels adjusted for pupil- and school-level covariates (baseline physical activity, age, gender, recess length, body mass index were analysed using multilevel analyses. Results Positive but non-significant intervention effects were found for MVPA and VPA when confounding variables were added to the model. Gender was a significant predictor of recess physical activity, with boys engaging in more MVPA and VPA than girls. Significant interactions for MVPA revealed that the intervention effect was stronger for younger elementary aged school children compared to older children, and the intervention effect increased as daily recess duration increased. Conclusion The playground redesign intervention resulted in small but non-significant increases in children's recess physical activity when school and pupil level variables were added to the analyses. Changing the playground environment produced a

  7. Introdução de alimentos complementares nos primeiros dois anos de vida de crianças de escolas particulares no município de São Paulo Introduction of complementary foods in the first two years of life of children attending private schools in the city of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Gabriela N Simon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Verificar a idade de introdução de alimentos complementares nos primeiros dois anos de vida e sua relação com variáveis demográficas e socioeconômicas de crianças matriculadas em pré-escolas particulares do município de São Paulo. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com informações demográficas e socioeconômicas de 566 crianças, sendo verificada a idade em meses de introdução dos alimentos complementares. Foi considerada como variável dependente a idade em meses da introdução dos alimentos complementares e, como variáveis independentes ou explanatórias, a idade e escolaridade maternas, a condição de trabalho materno e a renda familiar. Para análise da relação entre as variáveis, utilizou-se a técnica de regressão múltipla de Cox. RESULTADOS: 50% das crianças eram do sexo masculino e 61% maiores de 4 anos. A maior proporção das mães tinha nível superior de escolaridade e trabalhava fora. A renda familiar mostrou uma população de alto nível socioeconômico. A água e/ou chá, frutas e leite não-materno foram introduzidos antes do sexto mês de vida. A variável 'idade da mãe' mostrou associação com introdução de três grupos de alimentos: cereais, carne e guloseimas. CONCLUSÃO: Alimentos complementares foram introduzidos precocemente nessa população de nível socioeconômico elevado e a única variável que se associou à introdução desses alimentos foi a idade materna.OBJECTIVE: To verify the age of complementary food introduction in the first two years of life and its relation to demographic, social, and economic status of preschool children of private schools in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey with demographic, social and economic status information. The studied population included 566 children. The age in months of complementary foods introduction was verified. The dependent variable was the age in months of complementary foods introduction. Independent or

  8. Impact of Instructional Resources on Mathematics Performance of Learners with Dyscalculia in Integrated Primary Schools, Arusha City, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusta, Nyudule; Karugu, Geoffrey; Muthee, Jessica; Tekle, Tesfu

    2016-01-01

    Learners with dyscalculia in the integrated primary schools in Arusha have been performing poorly in the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE). Thus, the journal sought to investigate the impact of instructional resources on mathematics performance of learners with dyscalculia in integrated primary schools found in Arusha city, Tanzania. The…

  9. Parents' Participation in Improving the Quality of Elementary School in the City of Malang, East Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarsono, Raden Bambang; Imron, Ali; Wiyono, Bambang Budi; Arifin, Imron

    2016-01-01

    This research aims at describing parents participation in improving the quality of education of elementary schools viewed from the school substance and management. This is a qualitative research using phenomenology approach. The research design employed is comparative multicase involving four elementary schools in Malang city, East java,…

  10. The Effect of School Dismissal on Rates of Influenza-Like Illness in New York City Schools during the Spring 2009 Novel H1N1 Outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Joseph R.; Konty, Kevin J.; Wilson, Elisha; Karpati, Adam; Matte, Thomas; Weiss, Don; Barbot, Oxiris

    2012-01-01

    Background: The effects of individual school dismissal on influenza transmission have not been well studied. During the spring 2009 novel H1N1 outbreak, New York City implemented an individual school dismissal policy intended to limit influenza transmission at schools with high rates of influenza-like illness (ILI). Methods: Active disease…

  11. "Pushed out of School for Being Me": New York City's Struggle to Include Youth and Community Voices in School Discipline Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kesi

    2015-01-01

    Every day in New York City, between 90,000 and 100,000 young people, almost all of them Black and Latina/o, must show up to school thirty to forty-five minutes before their first class begins because they attend schools with metal detectors and scanners. School administrators and policymakers have accepted this scenario as part of Black and…

  12. School Breakfast Program and School Performance

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1989-01-01

    The effects of participation in the school breakfast program by low income children on academic achievement and rates of absence and tardiness are reported from the Department of Pediatrics, Boston City Hospital, Boston, MA.

  13. Children's Books in a High School Library? A Risky Question Worth Asking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith

    2001-01-01

    An online survey seeking librarians' opinions about including children's books in the high school library returned many positive responses. Lists ways children's books could be used in high school. Discusses the new wave of children's literature; children's books made into movies; commonality of high school libraries having collections of…

  14. The relation between maternal work hours and cognitive outcomes of young school-aged children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Künn-Nelen, A.C.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first that analyzes the relation between maternal work hours and the cognitive outcomes of young school-going children. When children attend school, the potential time working mothers miss out with their children, is smaller than when children do not yet attend school. At the same

  15. Towards Healthy Schools 2015: Progress on America's Environmental Health Crisis for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    States compel children to attend school; in fact, 98% of all school-age children attend schools--irrespective of conditions. Yet the environmental conditions of decayed facilities or facilities close to hazards can damage children's health and ability to learn. At the same time, it is well documented that healthy school facilities can help…

  16. School Readiness among Low-Income, Latino Children Attending Family Childcare versus Centre-Based Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Arya; Winsler, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Latino children often struggle in school. Early childhood education programmes are seen as critical for fostering children's school readiness. Latino families often choose family childcare (FCC) over centre-based childcare (CBC), yet little is known about the school readiness of Latino children attending FCC. We compared school readiness over the…

  17. Comparisons between inner-city and private school adolescents' perceptions of health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D K; Cross, A W; Heyman, P W; Ruch-Ross, H; Benson, P; Tuthill, J W

    1982-09-01

    A youth health survey was administered to 247 students in an inner-city ghetto high school and 404 students in a private boarding school. Significant differences between the two socioeconomic groups were found for responses about health information, health concerns and problems, and health status and service utilization. Sex-related issues were of greater concern to the private school youth and they desired more help with depression-sadness and birth control. Inner-city youth had more health worries and indicated a desire for more help with physical problems such as toothaches, headaches, and stomach aches, and social problems such as racial discrimination and parent relations. From a list of 22 health problems, the inner-city youth ranked dental problems, acne, and health worries highest while the private school youth ranked depression-sadness, tiredness, and acne highest. Regardless of social class, most adolescents perceived large gaps in their health education. One implication of our data is that the specific self-reported needs and concerns of adolescents should be considered in planning health services and education programs.

  18. Blood Lead Levels in Children and Environmental Lead Contamination in Miami Inner City, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theophile Niyonsenga

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that the environmental conditions of the home are important predictors of health, especially in low-income communities. Understanding the relationship between the environment and health is crucial in the management of certain diseases. One health outcome related to the home environment among urban, minority, and low-income children is childhood lead poisoning. The most common sources of lead exposure for children are lead paint in older, dilapidated housing and contaminated dust and soil produced by accumulated residue of leaded gasoline. Blood lead levels (BLL as low as 10 μg/dL in children are associated with impaired cognitive function, behavior difficulties, and reduced intelligence. Recently, it is suggested that the standard for intervention be lowered to BLL of 5 μg /dl. The objectives of our report were to assess the prevalence of lead poisoning among children under six years of age and to quantify and test the correlations between BLL in children and lead exposure levels in their environment. This cross-sectional analysis was restricted to 75 children under six years of age who lived in 6 zip code areas of inner city Miami. These locations exhibited unacceptably high levels of lead dust and soil in areas where children live and play. Using the 5 μg/dL as the cutoff point, the prevalence of lead poisoning among the study sample was 13.33%. The study revealed that lead levels in floor dust and window sill samples were positively and significantly correlated with BLL among children (p < 0.05. However, the correlations between BLL and the soil, air, and water samples were not significant. Based on this pilot study, a more comprehensive environmental study in surrounding inner city areas is warranted. Parental education on proper housecleaning techniques may also benefit those living in the high lead-exposed communities of inner city Miami.

  19. Blood lead levels in children and environmental lead contamination in Miami inner city, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasana, Janvier; Hlaing, WayWay M; Siegel, Kristy A; Chamorro, Armando; Niyonsenga, Theophile

    2006-09-01

    Studies have shown that the environmental conditions of the home are important predictors of health, especially in low-income communities. Understanding the relationship between the environment and health is crucial in the management of certain diseases. One health outcome related to the home environment among urban, minority, and low-income children is childhood lead poisoning. The most common sources of lead exposure for children are lead paint in older, dilapidated housing and contaminated dust and soil produced by accumulated residue of leaded gasoline. Blood lead levels (BLL) as low as 10 microg/dL in children are associated with impaired cognitive function, behavior difficulties, and reduced intelligence. Recently, it is suggested that the standard for intervention be lowered to BLL of 5 microg/dl. The objectives of our report were to assess the prevalence of lead poisoning among children under six years of age and to quantify and test the correlations between BLL in children and lead exposure levels in their environment. This cross-sectional analysis was restricted to 75 children under six years of age who lived in 6 zip code areas of inner city Miami. These locations exhibited unacceptably high levels of lead dust and soil in areas where children live and play. Using the 5 microg/dL as the cutoff point, the prevalence of lead poisoning among the study sample was 13.33%. The study revealed that lead levels in floor dust and window sill samples were positively and significantly correlated with BLL among children (p air, and water samples were not significant. Based on this pilot study, a more comprehensive environmental study in surrounding inner city areas is warranted. Parental education on proper housecleaning techniques may also benefit those living in the high lead-exposed communities of inner city Miami.

  20. 吴江市学校食堂的食品安全现状%Present situation of food safety in school canteens of Wujiang City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨定登; 蒋亚平; 杨雄; 秦立强

    2012-01-01

    [ Objective ] To investigate and analyze the present situation of food safety in school canteens of Wujiang City. [ Methods] The food hygiene classification of all school canteens in Wujiang City from 2007-2009 was evaluated by mass screening. This study randomly investigated 18 middle schools, 18 primary schools, 18 kindergartens and 18 schools for migrant laborers'children (including primary school and kindergarten). The indexes related to food safety which included management, basic health facilities, awareness rate of hygiene knowledge among canteen employees, and the rate of absence caused by food were studied. [Results] Most of canteens in public schools of Wujiang City were ranked in class A or B of hygiene classification, 61.9% of canteens in schools for migrant laborers'children were ranked in class C of hygiene classification, which was not good. The canteens in public schools had perfect hygiene management system which had been well implemented. The health facilities in canteens of schools for migrant laborers'children were not satisfactory, the awareness rate of hygiene knowledge of canteen employees was significantly lower than that of the public schools, and the rate of absence caused by food was higher than that of the public schools. [ Conclusion]The food safety situation in canteens of public schools in Wujiang City is good, but there are serious potential dangers of food safety in canteens of schools for migrant laborers'children, which directly affect the health of students.%目的 了解和分析吴江市学校食堂的食品安全现状.方法 采用普查的方法对2007-2009年辖区内全部学校食堂的食品卫生分级进行评估,随机抽查各18所普通中学、小学、幼儿园(以上3类为公办)和民工子弟学校(包括幼儿园和小学),调查学校的组织管理、基本卫生设施、食堂从业人员卫生知识知晓率和因食物引起的缺课率等与食品安全相关的指标.结果 吴江市公办学校食堂

  1. Impact of Television Programs and Asvertisements of School Going Adolescents: A Case Study of Bahawalpur City, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hassan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Teenage is the most vital and delicate stage of human life. During teenage youngsters try to follow new fashion, culture and style which is being presented in different programs and advertisements on television. They have strong urge and inclination to adopt something new and extra ordinary different from their surroundings. In Pakistan, there are about 43.40% are the adolescents of the age between 13-16 years as stated by Federal Bureau of Statistics. Adolescents are the age group that is the most effected by T.V pro-grams and advertisements. Target audience of most of the programs and ad-vertisements area adolescents e.g. cell phone advertisements. Most of the children in different countries spend almost 3-4 hours per day in watching T.V as per statement of UNESCO. The effects of the commercials and T.V pro-grams on children vary from person to person. This research tries to dig out the impact of different T.V programs and ads on the children between the age group of 13-16 of different schools of Bahawalpur City.

  2. Prevalence and risk factors of Pediculus (humanus) capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae), in primary schools in Sanandaj City, Kurdistan Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, A; Shemshad, K; Sayyadi, M; Biglarian, A; Vahabi, B; Sayyad, S; Shemshad, M; Rafinejad, J

    2012-06-01

    Human head lice, Pediculus (humanus) capitis, infest people worldwide and are most prevalent in children. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of head lice, in relation to socioeconomic status of the family and hygienic practices in the home. The prevalence rate was determined in 27 primary schools that had 810 students in Sanandaj city who were selected by multistage, systematic random sampling. A total of 38 students from all grades were infested with different rates of infestations. In addition, standard questionnaire recorded information about demographic features of each student were fulfilled. Children aged 10-11 years were the most frequently affected, there was a significant relationship between head louse infestation, family income and parents education level (α=5%). Pediculosis is a public health problem in many parts of the world. Pediculosis was found to be more prevalent among children of fathers with lower level of education and socioeconomic status, it is necessary to give health education to families in order to prevent pediculosis in this area.

  3. Chinese City Children and Youth Physical Activity Study: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peijie

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity and its repercussions will be one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century. Promoting physical activity and preventing the decline of children's fitness and the increase of childhood obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease therefore need to be a high priority. So far, besides a few large-scale…

  4. Chinese City Children and Youth Physical Activity Study: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peijie

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity and its repercussions will be one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century. Promoting physical activity and preventing the decline of children's fitness and the increase of childhood obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease therefore need to be a high priority. So far, besides a few large-scale…

  5. Children's body mass index, participation in school meals, and observed energy intake at school meals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackelprang Alyssa J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data from a dietary-reporting validation study with fourth-grade children were analyzed to investigate a possible relationship of body mass index (BMI with daily participation in school meals and observed energy intake at school meals, and whether the relationships differed by breakfast location (classroom; cafeteria. Methods Data were collected in 17, 17, and 8 schools during three school years. For the three years, six, six, and seven of the schools had breakfast in the classroom; all other schools had breakfast in the cafeteria. Information about 180 days of school breakfast and school lunch participation during fourth grade for each of 1,571 children (90% Black; 53% girls was available in electronic administrative records from the school district. Children were weighed and measured, and BMI was calculated. Each of a subset of 465 children (95% Black; 49% girls was observed eating school breakfast and school lunch on the same day. Mixed-effects regression was conducted with BMI as the dependent variable and school as the random effect; independent variables were breakfast participation, lunch participation, combined participation (breakfast and lunch on the same day, average observed energy intake for breakfast, average observed energy intake for lunch, sex, age, breakfast location, and school year. Analyses were repeated for BMI category (underweight/healthy weight; overweight; obese; severely obese using pooled ordered logistic regression models that excluded sex and age. Results Breakfast participation, lunch participation, and combined participation were not significantly associated with BMI or BMI category irrespective of whether the model included observed energy intake at school meals. Observed energy intake at school meals was significantly and positively associated with BMI and BMI category. For the total sample and subset, breakfast location was significantly associated with BMI; average BMI was larger for

  6. Infection by Intestinal Parasites, Stunting and Anemia in School-Aged Children from Southern Angola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinamene Oliveira

    Full Text Available Intestinal parasites are responsible for morbidity in children worldwide, especially in low income countries. In the present study we determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites and explore its association with anemia and stunting in school-aged children.A cross-sectional study was conducted from September to October 2010 enrolling 328 children attending the primary school in Lubango, the second largest city after the capital Luanda. Stool samples were collected for parasite detection through microscopy and molecular identification of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar. Stunting was assessed using the z-scores of height for age and hemoglobin concentration was determined using a portable hemoglobin analyzing system.The global prevalence of pathogenic intestinal parasites was 44.2%, the most common being Ascaris lumbricoides (22.0%, Giardia lamblia (20.1% and Hymenolepis nana (8.8%. Molecular detection revealed that 13.1% of the children carried E. dispar and 0.3% were infected with E. histolytica. The prevalence of stunting (mild to severe was 41.5%. Stunting was more frequent in older children (p = 0.006, OR = 1.886, while anemia was more frequent in younger children (p = 0.005, OR = 2.210. The prevalence of anemia was 21.6%, and we found a significant association with infection by H. nana (p = 0.031, OR = 2.449.This is one of the few published studies reporting intestinal parasites infection, nutritional status and anemia in children from Angola. Furthermore, the present work highlights the importance of regular intestinal parasites screening in children.

  7. Infection by Intestinal Parasites, Stunting and Anemia in School-Aged Children from Southern Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Dinamene; Atouguia, Jorge; Fortes, Filomeno; Guerra, António

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal parasites are responsible for morbidity in children worldwide, especially in low income countries. In the present study we determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites and explore its association with anemia and stunting in school-aged children. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from September to October 2010 enrolling 328 children attending the primary school in Lubango, the second largest city after the capital Luanda. Stool samples were collected for parasite detection through microscopy and molecular identification of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar. Stunting was assessed using the z-scores of height for age and hemoglobin concentration was determined using a portable hemoglobin analyzing system. Results The global prevalence of pathogenic intestinal parasites was 44.2%, the most common being Ascaris lumbricoides (22.0%), Giardia lamblia (20.1%) and Hymenolepis nana (8.8%). Molecular detection revealed that 13.1% of the children carried E. dispar and 0.3% were infected with E. histolytica. The prevalence of stunting (mild to severe) was 41.5%. Stunting was more frequent in older children (p = 0.006, OR = 1.886), while anemia was more frequent in younger children (p = 0.005, OR = 2.210). The prevalence of anemia was 21.6%, and we found a significant association with infection by H. nana (p = 0.031, OR = 2.449). Conclusions This is one of the few published studies reporting intestinal parasites infection, nutritional status and anemia in children from Angola. Furthermore, the present work highlights the importance of regular intestinal parasites screening in children. PMID:26371758

  8. A survey of learning problems in black primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, J D; Jukes, C; Wilson, A; Xaba, D

    1981-03-28

    A survey of the prevalence and types of learning disorders among Black primary school children was undertaken on the East Rand. Class teachers were given a questionnaire and asked to identify the number of children in their class with learning problems and the number of those with specific disabilities such as poor eyesight or hearing, epilepsy, physical handicaps or mental retardation. There were 7516 children in the classes surveyed; 1692 (22,4%) of them were identified by their teachers as having learning problems, while 666 (8,7%) had a physical or mental handicap. The prevalence and present status of children with learning disability need to be defined before plans to improve their education can be established. Our data show that at present classes are large and the prevalence of children with learning problems is high. Improving teachers' skills and reducing the number of children per class might improve the education of children with learning problems.

  9. Executive Dysfunction in School-Age Children With ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambek, Rikke; Tannock, Rosemary; Dalsgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The study examined executive function deficits (EFD) in school-age children (7 to 14 years) with ADHD. Method: A clinical sample of children diagnosed with ADHD (n = 49) was compared to a population sample (n = 196) on eight executive function (EF) measures. Then, the prevalence of EFD...... in clinical and non-clinical children was examined at the individual level according to three methods previously applied to define EFD, and a fourth method was included to control for the effect of age on performance. Results: Children with ADHD were significantly more impaired on measures of EF than children...... without ADHD at the group level. However, only about 50% of children with ADHD were found to have EFD at the individual level, and results appeared relatively robust across methods applied to define EFD. Conclusion: As a group, children with ADHD displayed more problems on neuropsychological measures...

  10. SHORT COMMUNICATION: Status of Physical Fitness Index (PFI % and Anthropometric Parameters in Residential School Children Compared to Nonresidential School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti P Khodnapur

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical fitness is the prime criterion for survival, to achieve any goal and to lead a healthy life. Effect of exercise to have a good physical fitness is well known since ancient Vedas. Physical fitness can be recorded by cardiopulmonary efficiency test like Physical Fitness Index (PFI % which is a powerful indicator of cardiopulmonary efficiency. Regular exercise increases PFI by increasing oxygen consumption. Residential school children are exposed to regular exercise and nutritious food under the guidance. Aims and Objectives: Our study is aimed to compare the physical fitness index status and anthropometric parameters in Residential Sainik (n=100 school children compared to Non-Residential (n=100 school children (aged between 12-16 years of Bijapur. Material and Methods: PFI was measured by Harvard Step Test [1]. TheAnthropometrical parameters like Height (cms, Weight (Kg, Body Surface Area (BSA in sq.mts, Body Mass Index (BMI in Kg/m2, Mid Arm Circumference (cms, Chest Circumference (cms and Abdominal Circumference (cms were recorded. Results: Mean score of PFI(%, Height(cms, Weight(Kg, BSA(sq.mts, BMI(Kg/m2, Mid Arm Circumference(cms, Chest Circumference (cms and Abdominal Circumference (cms were significantly higher (p=0.000 in Residential school children compared to Non Residential school children. In conclusion regular exercise and nutritious diet under the guidance increases the physical fitness and growth in growing children.

  11. The Dialectics of Assimilation and Multiculturalism: The Case of Children of Refugees and Migrant Workers in the Bialik-Rogozin School, Tel Aviv

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Nurit; Aloni, Nimrod; Harari, Dor

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on children of refugees and migrant workers from 48 countries who study together in one multicultural school in the city of Tel Aviv, Israel. The context of our study is the current ethos of globalisation and within it the phenomenon of vast migrations and creation of intercultural social realities. The aims of the study were to…

  12. Pre-School Age Visually Impaired Children's Motives for Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Gudonis, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    The article presents longitudinal data of the survey of 212 Šiauliai Petras Avižonis Visual Centre’s 6–7-year-old pre-school children’s motives to attend school. A brief theoretical analysis of significance of motives for learning in child’s development is displayed. Analysing research results, a positive experience on development of positive motives for school attendance in pre-school age children attending Šiauliai Petras Avižonis Visual Centre is rendered in a generalising way.

  13. Contributions of Occupational Therapy for the school inclusion of children suffering from autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Carla de Souza Della Barba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to report the experience of occupational therapists based on the theoretical reference of Collaborative Consulting. The experiment was carried out in two children education schools of the regular school network from two small cities in countryside of the state of São Paulo. The methodology is characterized by a case study and the information was gathered within the period of six months, through open interviews and a field diary, along with the intervention planned by the Extension Project Collaborative Consulting on the school inclusion of children suffering from development disorders – an Occupational Therapy procedure proposal. Subjects from two schools were used as targets for this intervention: two students with diagnosed autism, their mothers, and the schools’ technical teams: the pedagogical coordinators, the teachers, the monitors, and the principals. The proposed intervention began with the construction of a corporation between the actors involved and the organization of the meetings, which consisted of an environment for sharing the experiences as well as for action planning. The results were positive concerning the effectiveness of school inclusion, highlighting the access and permanence of children in school, the facilitation of their learning, and the awareness of the involved actors regarding diversity, respect and team work. The action of the occupational therapist occurred on the articulation of the team work, the support towards awareness, and the identification of needs and achievements, evaluating and building together with the strategies and actions. These actions contributed to the analysis of the activities and orientations about their possibilities of adaptation and flexibility, on the support offered to the actors involved regarding the rules, legislation and specific aspects of each child.

  14. The Prevalence of Anxiety and its related Factors among School-age Children in South West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Banaeipour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Anxiety is one of the most common childhood disorders, so it is necessary to explore extend and its related factors in the students. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of anxiety and the related factors of anxiety among the children aged 9-12 years. Materials and Methods At a descriptive-analytic study 623 children aged 9-12 year- old who were studying in the fourth to sixth grade of elementary school in Dezful city, were selected through multistage random sampling.  The data were collected using demographic profile questionnaire and School Anxiety Scale (SAS using SPSS-16. Results Of total 623 students, 36.3% were girls. 232 (37.2% students had mild anxiety, 304 students (48.8% had moderate anxiety and 87 students (14% had severe anxiety. There was a significant relationship between the mean score of children anxiety and the number of children in family (P0.0.5. Conclusion This study showed that the prevalence of anxiety was higher in boyes, children who were single children, children who had a family history of hereditary disease, and children who experienced corporal punishment at home. It is recommended arranging programs including training, counseling, and psychotherapy ones for these children and their families.

  15. Organization of school health education in obesity in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Woźniak-Holecka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal body weight poses a risk of the development of various health disorders, having a negative impact on the quality and length of life. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among European children is estimated to be 10–20%. In Poland this figure reaches 18%. A war on the epidemic obesity waged from the youngest age of the child is a strategy that brings long-term health benefits for the entire population. Apart from the family, the school is the second important educational environment responsible for conducting health education activities among children and teenagers. School health education programs should be implementing by teachers in collaboration with other school staff, parents and the broadly understood local community. Comprehensive health education aiming at combating obesity should cover the entire population of school children and teenagers, with special attention given to high risk groups. The school, undertaking health education activities aimed at preventing abnormal body weight, should implement nationwide programs for the prevention of obesity, and should also pursue its own health education program based on its curriculum. In most cases, development of obesity at children results from improper eating habits and insufficient physical activity, and therefore school health education programs aimed at the prevention of overweight and obesity should focus on these two most important modifiable risk factors of abnormal body weight.

  16. The feasibility of a school-based VI polysaccharide vaccine mass immunization campaign in Hue City, central Vietnam: streamlining a typhoid fever preventive strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiem, Vu Dinh; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Canh, Do Gia; Son, Nguyen Dinh; Hoa, Nyugen Thai; Thuy, Dang Thi Dieu; Ochiai, R Leon; Lan, Nguyen Thi; Hop, Tran Quang; Ali, Mohammad; Park, Jin Kyung; Abu-Elyazeed, Remon; Holliday, Kris; Ivanoff, Bernard; Anh, Dang Duc; Pang, Tikki; Donner, Allan; Galindo, Claudia M; Trach, Dang Duc; Clemens, John D; Acosta, Camilo J

    2006-05-01

    We report the coverage, safety, and logistics of a school-based typhoid fever immunization campaign that took place in Hue City, central Vietnam; a typhoid fever endemic area. A cluster-randomized evaluation-blinded controlled trial was designed where 68 schools (cluster) were randomly allocated the single dose Vi polysaccharide vaccine (Typherix) or the active control hepatitis A vaccine (Havrix). A safety surveillance system was implemented. A total of 32,267 children were immunized with a coverage of 57.5%. Strong predictors for vaccination were attending primary schools, peri-urban location of the school, and low family income. Human resources were mainly schoolteachers and the campaign was completed in about 1 month. Most adverse events reported were mild. Safe injection and safe sharp-waste disposal practices were followed. A typhoid fever school-based immunization campaign was safe and logistically possible. Coverage was moderate and can be interpreted as the minimum that could have been achievable because individual written informed consent procedures were sought for the first time in Hue City and the trial nature of the campaign. The lessons learned, together with cost-effectiveness results to be obtained by the end of follow-up period, will hopefully accelerate the introduction of Vi typhoid fever vaccine in Vietnam.

  17. Integrative Games for Special Education Schools in the City of Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ricardo Canavelli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Autonomous University of Entre Rios (UADER together with the Ministry of Science, Technology and Productive Innovation of Argentina (MINCyT, using their line of funding called "Technology Projects for Social Inclusion" financed a project to design and construct integrative games for public squares. The idea not only included the building of the units but also sought to coordinate actions between the MINCyT, the UADER a Technical Secondary School and two Special Education Schools of the City of Paraná.     

  18. Sidelights of China-Japan Friendship Cities Junior Middle School Students Table Tennis Friendship Tournament

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>The China-Japan Friendship Cities Junior Middle School Students Table Tennis Friendship Tournament,jointly organized by the Chinese People’s Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries (CPAFFC), the China-Japan Friendship Association(CJFA), the China Table Tennis Association (CTTA), the Japan-China Friendship Association (JCFA), and the Japan Table Tennis Association(JTTA), was held in Beijing from August 16 to 21 on the occasion of the 40th

  19. Orientations and Motivation in the Acquisition of English as a Second Language Among High School Students in Quebec City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmechri, Faiza; Hummel, Kirsten

    1998-01-01

    Investigated the emergence of orientations and their relation to motivation in a predominantly monolingual context. Participants were 93 Quebec City francophone Grade 11 high school students learning English as a Second Language. (Author/JL)

  20. School Nurse Interventions in Managing Functional Urinary Incontinence in School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Charisse L.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary incontinence (UI) in school-age children is a prevalent yet underrecognized problem that has remained in the shadow of other concerns commonly perceived as more prominent or urgent. There is good evidence that functional UI in children can be treated and managed effectively. When there is no structural or neurologic…

  1. Overweight and School Performance Among Primary School Children : The PIAMA Birth Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldwijk, Jorien; Fries, Marieke C. E.; Bemelmans, Wanda J. E.; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; Smit, Henriette A.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Wijga, Alet H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between overweight and school performance among primary school children prospectively and including a broad range of potential confounding factors. In addition it was investigated what factors mediate this association. For this purpose, data of 2,1

  2. Overweight and School Performance Among Primary School Children: The PIAMA Birth Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldwijk, J.; Fries, M.C.E.; Bemelmans, W.J.E.; Haveman-Nies, A.; Smit, H.A.; Koppelman, G.H.; Wijga, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between overweight and school performance among primary school children prospectively and including a broad range of potential confounding factors. In addition it was investigated what factors mediate this association. For this purpose, data of 2,1

  3. Food Group Preferences of Elementary School Children Participating in the National School Lunch Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Linda; Tripurana, Madhuri; Englund, Tim; Bergman, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the study was to assess the food group preferences of second through fifth grade children based on ethnic background, gender, and grade. Food group preferences were determined by the amount of various food groups consumed in meals served as part of the National School Lunch Program at selected schools. Research…

  4. A Controlled Evaluation of a School-Based Obesity Prevention in Turkish School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toruner, Ebru Kilicarslan; Savaser, Sevim

    2010-01-01

    This research was conducted to assess the effect of a weight management program in Turkish school children with overweight and obesity. Forty one students formed the intervention group while 40 students formed the control group in two elementary schools. Students in intervention group were given seven training sessions in a period of 2.5 months.…

  5. Association between serum ferritin and goitre in Iranian school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemipour, Mahin; Soheilipour, Fahimeh; Keshteli, Ammar Hassanzadeh; Siavash, Mansour; Amini, Masoud; Kelishadi, Roya

    2010-04-01

    Despite long-standing supplementation of iodine in Iran, the prevalence of goitre among general people remains high in some regions. The study investigated the role of iron status in the aetiology of goitre in school children in Isfahan, Iran. Two thousand three hundred and thirty-one school children were selected by multi-stage random sampling. Thyroid size was estimated by inspection and palpation. Urinary iodine concentration (UIC) and serum ferritin (SF) were measured. Overall, 32.9% of the children had goitre. The median UIC was 195.5 microg/L. The mean +/- SD of SF in the goitrous and non-goitrous children was 47.65 +/- 42.51 and 44.55 +/- 37.07 microg/L respectively (p=0.52). The prevalence of iron deficiency in goitrous and non-goitrous children was 9.6% and 3.1% respectively (p=0.007). Goitre is still prevalent in school children of Isfahan. However, their median UIC was well in the accepted range. Iron deficiency is associated with goitre in a small group of goitrous children. The role of goitrogens should also be investigated in this region.

  6. 兰州市5~12岁学龄儿童屈光状态与屈光参数相关性研究%Correlation between diopters and refractive parameters among 5 to 12 years old school-age children of Lanzhou city

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王万鹏; 周然; 张婧; 任婉娜; 李玉婷; 张文芳

    2013-01-01

    status of refractive state among school-age children of 5 to 12 years in Chengguan district of Lanzhou city, and to analyze the correlation with axial length (AL), horizontal and vertical corneal refractive power ( K1, K2), anterior chamber depth ( ACD) and corneal diameter ( W-W) . METHODS:The value of AL, K1, K2, ACD and W-W of 813 school-age children (1626 eyes) aged 8.46±2.30 years old ( 5 -12 years ) were measured by IOL -Master, refractive error was measured by computer refractor.The eyes were divided into 5 groups according to different mean spherical equivalent ( SE ) diopter: high myopia, moderate myopia, low myopia, emmetropia and hyperopia.The correlation between diopter and different refractive parameters of different ages and different diopter groups were analyzed respectively, the SPSS 19.0 was used for the statistical analysis. RESULTS: There were statistically significant difference (P<0.05) in uncorrected visual acuity and refractive state among the different groups of 5-12 years school-age children, the prevalence of myopia tended to increase with the age.There were statistically significant difference in AL and ACD among the different age groups (P<0.05), AL and ACD increased with the age. There were statistically significant difference in AL among three myopic groups ( P <0.05 ). There were statistically significant difference in ACD between low myopia and moderate myopia, low myopia and high myopia ( P<0.05 ) . There were statistically significant difference in corneal refractive power and corneal diameter between low myopia and high myopia, moderate myopia and high myopia ( P<0.05).SE was negatively correlated with AL (r=-0.764, P<0.01) and ACD (r=-0.498, P<0.01), but had week correlation with corneal refractive power or corneal diameter. CONCLUSION: The increase of AL plays an important role in the changes of refractive among school -age children of 5-12 years, AL is the main morphological variable related to myopia. Meanwhile, refractive changes

  7. Exposure of children to air pollution in the industrial zone of Metropolitan Area of Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugica-Alvarez, Violeta; Quintanilla-Vega, Betsabé; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, Andrea; Alvarado-Cruz, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    An air quality monitoring in three schools located in the most important industrial zone at the Northeast of the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City (MAMC) was conducted in order to determine the exposure of children to toxics contained in PM10. Particles were analyzed for metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), organic and elemental carbon by ICP-AES, GC-MS and TOT (Sunset lab) respectively. Average concentration of PM10 was 108.4±11.6 μg/m3. Most abundant metals were Fe, Zn and Pb with concentrations ranged by 1.1-5.4 μg/m3, 0.3-2 μg/m3, and 0.18-0.63 μg/m3 respectively; the sum of the seventeen PAHs varied from 1.4 to 3.3 ng/m3 where most abundant PAH were indene[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[a]anthracene, chrysene, and benzo[a]pyrene. The sum of the seven carcinogenic PAH contributed in average with the 48% of the total mixture. Carcinogenic potential of PAH were obtained using toxic equivalent factors determined by Nisbet and La Goy which varied from 0.3 to 0.6 ng/ m3 of benzo[a]pyrene equivalent (BAPeq), this value is lower than the standard proposed for the European Community of 1 ng/ m3, but higher than the standard from the United Kingdom of 0.25 ng/ m3. Principal component analysis for source apportionment showed that vehicular and industrial emissions are the main sources of PM in the zone. In general, the concentrations of particles as well as concentration of metals and PAHs are lower than concentrations measured six year before, showing that the established measures have improved the air quality. Nevertheless these PM10 concentrations exceeded frequently the Mexican Standard and children are especially susceptible due to the higher risk to develop diseases if the exposure occurs at early age.

  8. Does school mobility place elementary school children at risk for lower math achievement? The mediating role of cognitive dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman-Krauss, Allison H; Raver, C Cybele

    2015-12-01

    Children growing up in poverty have a higher likelihood of exposure to multiple forms of adversity that jeopardize their chances of academic success. The current paper identifies school mobility, or changing schools, as 1 such poverty-related risk. Using a sample of low-income, predominantly ethnic-minority children (n = 381) in Chicago, this study tests the hypothesis that repeatedly changing schools during the 5-year period between Head Start (preschool) and third grade is a potent predictor of children's math achievement in fourth grade and that children's cognitive dysregulation serves as a mechanism through which school mobility may negatively affect children's math achievement. Hierarchical linear models controlling for baseline child and family characteristics (including children's early math and dysregulation measured during Head Start) revealed an inverse relation between the number of times low-income children changed schools between preschool and third grade and children's math achievement on state standardized tests in fourth grade. Furthermore, frequently changing schools (3 or 4 school changes over the same time period) was positively associated with teacher-reported cognitive dysregulation in third grade and negatively associated with children's math achievement in fourth grade. Evidence for the role of children's cognitive dysregulation as a partial statistical mediator was found for the relation between frequently changing schools and math achievement, even after accounting for baseline risk. Results are discussed in terms of school policies, practices, and intervention strategies to prevent the disruptive and potentially stressful experiences of school mobility for young, low-income children.

  9. Empirical estimation of school siting parameter towards improving children's safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, I. S.; Yusoff, Z. M.; Rasam, A. R. A.; Rahman, A. N. N. A.; Omar, D.

    2014-02-01

    Distance from school to home is a key determination in ensuring the safety of hildren. School siting parameters are made to make sure that a particular school is located in a safe environment. School siting parameters are made by Department of Town and Country Planning Malaysia (DTCP) and latest review was on June 2012. These school siting parameters are crucially important as they can affect the safety, school reputation, and not to mention the perception of the pupil and parents of the school. There have been many studies to review school siting parameters since these change in conjunction with this ever-changing world. In this study, the focus is the impact of school siting parameter on people with low income that live in the urban area, specifically in Johor Bahru, Malaysia. In achieving that, this study will use two methods which are on site and off site. The on site method is to give questionnaires to people and off site is to use Geographic Information System (GIS) and Statistical Product and Service Solutions (SPSS), to analyse the results obtained from the questionnaire. The output is a maps of suitable safe distance from school to house. The results of this study will be useful to people with low income as their children tend to walk to school rather than use transportation.

  10. Children's Voice or Children's Voices? How Educational Research Can Be at the Heart of Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Julian

    2015-01-01

    There are problems with considering children and young people in schools as quite separate individuals, and with considering them as members of a single collectivity. The tension is represented in the use of "voice" and "voices" in educational debates. Voices in dialogue, in contrast to "children's voice", are…

  11. Children Writing Ethnography: Children's Perspectives and Nomadic Thinking in Researching School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohti, Riikka

    2016-01-01

    This article makes a connection between narrative ethnography, childhood studies and new materialist theories in studying children's perspective on school. It presents "children writing ethnography" as an approach based on complexity and involving participatory research. The question of "what is happening in the classroom" is…

  12. The Prevalence of Anxiety and its related Factors among School-age Children in South West of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Zeinab Banaeipour; Shahnaz Rostami; Kourosh Zarea; Bahman Cheraghian

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety is one of the most common childhood disorders, so it is necessary to explore extend and its related factors in the students. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of anxiety and the related factors of anxiety among the children aged 9-12 years. Materials and Methods At a descriptive-analytic study 623 children aged 9-12 year- old who were studying in the fourth to sixth grade of elementary school in Dezful city, were selected through multistage random samplin...

  13. Pattern and outcome of children admitted for burns in Benin City, mid-western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oludiran O

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Children are a vulnerable to burns, an injury, which is often preventable. A study of the profile of cases of children admitted for burns will provide background information to suggest locally doable preventive strategies as well as supply basic information for future reference. We studied the records of 62 children aged 0-16 years, admitted for burns, at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, between January 2002 and December 2006. There were 34 male and 28 female children. Children under three years constituted 56.5%. Whereas the leading cause of burns in all the children was flame burns from kerosene explosions (52%, scalds were responsible for 68.6% of cases in those under three. The extent of burn injury ranged from 6 to 50% and most of them presented late. 64.6% were discharged within three weeks. Wound sepsis and post burn contractures were the most frequently encountered complications (19.4% and 9.7% respectively. There were two deaths (3.2% related to sepsis. Particular attention to burn safety precautions in children (especially, in the> 3 years age group, safer storage and dispensing of combustible chemicals particularly petroleum products is advocated. Fire safety awareness, correct first aid measures and early presentation in the hospital will reduce morbidity and mortality. Early physiotherapy and splinting strategies will reduce contractures. There is the need locally for the establishment of specialized burn centres both to treat these children and to stimulate interest in burn management.

  14. Comparison of caries and oral hygiene status of child laborers and school children: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanchal Gangwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Child labor is recognized as a global health problem and child laborers are exposed to unique living, working conditions and face such events in life, which are not usually faced by other children. Research on its health impact and oral health impact has been very limited and inconsistent. Aim: The aim was to assess and compare dental caries and oral hygiene status of child laborers and school children of Bareilly city. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 child laborers by snowball sampling technique and 400 school children by random sampling technique were included in the study. A specially designed pretested proforma was used to collect data related to the sociodemographic profile, adverse habits and frequency of dental visits. Decayed, missing, and filled teeth index (DMFT and oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S were used. Results: The mean age of child laborers and school children was 13.07 ± 1.3 and 13.03 ± 1.5. The majority of child laborers (82.8% had no mouth rinsing habit. Tobacco-related habits were found among 37.8% of child laborers. Most of the child laborers (91% never visited dentists. The mean DMFT was 3.8 ± 1.7 and 2.9 ± 1.6 for child laborers and school children, respectively, (P < 0.05. The mean OHI-S score was 2.3 ± 0.70 and 2.1 ± 0.9 in child laborers and school children, respectively, (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that the child laborers have poorer oral health status with respect to dental caries and oral hygiene compared to school children.

  15. Prevalence of underweight and overweight among school-aged children and it's association with children's sociodemographic and lifestyle in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahrul Syahrul

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of underweight and overweight among school-aged children in Makassar, Indonesia is high. These conditions are associated with the sociodemographic characteristics of children and parents, as well as the lifestyle of children. Parental characteristics and children's lifestyle should be considered when planning prevention and intervention programs for underweight or overweight children.

  16. Positive psychological strengths and school engagement in primary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Wilkins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A sizeable body of research has investigated the impact of specific character strengths or traits on significant outcomes. Some recent research is beginning to consider the effects of groups of strengths, combined as a higher order variable and termed covitality. This study investigated the combined influence of four positive character traits, gratitude, optimism, zest and persistence, upon school engagement, within a sample of 112 Australian primary school students. The combined effect of these four traits, in defining covitality as a higher or second-order factor within a path analysis, was found to predict relatively higher levels of school engagement and pro-social behaviour.

  17. 78 FR 64153 - Direct Certification and Certification of Homeless, Migrant and Runaway Children for Free School...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... of Homeless, Migrant and Runaway Children for Free School Meals; Approval of Information Collection... Homeless, Migrant and Runaway Children for Free School Meals was published on April 25, 2011. The ICR...

  18. Prevalence of Parasomnia in School aged Children in Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Naserbakht; Mitra Hakim Shooshtari; Maryam Rasoulain; Mohammad Salehi; Mirfarhad Ghalebandi; Mohammad Hosien Salarifar

    2011-01-01

    "nObjectives: Parasomnias can create sleep disruption; in this article we assessed parasomnias in school-aged children in Tehran. "nMethods: In spring 2005, a total of 6000 sleep questionnaires were distributed to school-aged children in 5 districts of Tehran (Iran). A modified Pediatrics sleep questionnaire with 34 questions was used. "nResults: Parasomnias varied from 0.5% to 5.7% among the subjects as follows: 2.7% sleep talking, 0.5% sleepwalking, 5.7% bruxism, 2.3% enuresis, and nightmar...

  19. Sleep clinical record: what differences in school and preschool children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pia Villa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The sleep clinical record (SCR may be a valid method for detecting children with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA. This study aimed to evaluate whether there were differences in SCR depending on age and to identify the possible risk factors for OSA development. We enrolled children with sleep disordered breathing between 2013 and 2015, and divided them according to age into preschool- and school-age groups. All patients underwent SCR and polysomnography. OSA was detected in 81.1% and 83.6% of preschool- and school-age groups, respectively. Obesity, malocclusions, nasal septal deviation and inferior turbinate hypertrophy were significantly more prevalent in school-age children (p6.5 had a sensitivity of 74% in predicting OSA in preschool children with positive predictive value of 86% (p=0.0001. Our study confirms the validity of the SCR as a screening tool for patient candidates for a PSG study for suspected OSA, in both school and preschool children.

  20. PREVALENCE OF ANAEMIA AMONG ADOLESCENT SCHOOL GOING CHILDREN IN GUNTUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phanindra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Anaemia is a nutritional problem worldwide and its prevalence is higher in developing countries when compared to the developed countries. Anaemia, a manifestation of under-nutrition and poor dietary intake of iron is a public health problem, not only among pregnant women, infants and young children, but also among adolescents. Recent studies on the prevalence of anaemia have been conducted on preschool children only, so there is a need for more studies related to anaemia among school children. The present study was done to estimate the prevalence of anaemia among school children aged 10-15 years from Guntur, Andhra Pradesh. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted among 500 school children aged 10 to 15 years. Purposive sampling was used to include 250 boys and 250 girls. Haemoglobin estimation was done by cyanmethaemoglobin method. The severity of anaemia was classified on the basis of WHO criteria into Mild, Moderate and Severe. Data analysis was done by SPSS version 21. RESULTS The overall prevalence of anaemia was 27.4% in the present study. A higher prevalence of anaemia was observed among girls (42.4% than boys (12.4%. The prevalence of mild anaemia was 34.4% and 9.6% among girls and boys respectively. CONCLUSION The prevalence of anaemia is high among school going adolescents. Special emphasis should be given on nutritional supplementation with iron and health education for this age group.

  1. Children's Progress through School: A Research Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Suzanne M.

    1984-01-01

    Socioeconomic characteristics exert much stronger effects on grade retention among Hispanic, Black, and White children than do family compositional factors. One important exception is that the probability of enrollment below modal grade is much higher for Hispanic children living in single-parent households than for those in two-parent households.…

  2. School-Based Counseling of Abused Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Marla R.; Rivelis, Erin; Diaz, Vielka

    2009-01-01

    Abused children experience high rates of behavior, emotional, and learning problems but infrequently receive treatment. Most services provided to abused children and their families are not based on any clear evidence that they work. A number of evidence-based treatments (EBTs), demonstrated to be safe and effective in treating a range of…

  3. Costs of treating diarrhoea in a children's hospital in Mexico City.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, M.; Kumate-Rodríguez, J.; Mota-Hernández, F.

    1989-01-01

    The treatment received by children aged under 5 years with diarrhoea was studied in the Hospital Infantil de México (Federico Goméz), Mexico City. The costs of treatment were calculated and estimates were made of how these had changed since the establishment of an oral rehydration unit in the hospital in 1985. The results indicate that drug treatment of outpatients was generally appropriate and inexpensive. In contrast, the cost of drugs for inpatients was considerably higher. The seriousness...

  4. Reliability of upright posture measurements in primary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Grimmer Karen; McEvoy Maureen P

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Correct upright posture is considered to be a measure of good musculoskeletal health. Little is known about the usual variability of children's upright standing posture. The aim of this study was to assess differences between repeated measures of upright posture in a group of primary school children. Methods Sagittal plane photographs of usual, relaxed upright standing posture of 38 boys and girls aged 5–12 years were taken twice within an hour. Reflective markers were pla...

  5. Getting southern Sudanese children to school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibeso Luswata

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The Government of Southern Sudan’s Go to School Initiative,supported by UNICEF, which seeks to get 1.6 millionchildren back in school by the end of 2007, incorporateskey elements of the INEE Minimum Standards for Educationin Emergencies, Chronic Crises and Early Reconstruction.

  6. Sexual Abuse of School Age Children : Evidence from Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Student unrest that sometimes culminates in violent expressions have had a long history in Kenyan schools. Recent evidence, however, points to new expressions of abuse on children. There is concern that an ethos of gendered violence often expressed by sexual subjugation of girls by boys is getting institutionalised within Kenyan Schools. The rise in incidents of reported crimes of a sexual nature and the periodic mass sexual violence directed at girls within learning institutions attest to th...

  7. Children's Physical Activity during Recess and Outside of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beighle, Aaron; Morgan, Charles F.; Le Masurier, Guy; Pangrazi, Robert P.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine children's physical activity during recess and outside of school. Third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade students (N = 270; 121 boys, age = 9.5 plus or minus 0.9 years; 150 girls, age = 9.6 plus or minus 0.9 years) wore sealed pedometers during a 15-minute recess period and outside of school for 4 consecutive…

  8. Clustering of Unhealthy Food around German Schools and Its Influence on Dietary Behavior in School Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buck, Christoph; Börnhorst, Claudia; Pohlabeln, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    to investigate (1) the clustering of food outlets around schools and (2) the influence of junk food availability on the food intake in school children. Methods We geocoded food outlets offering junk food (e.g. supermarkets, kiosks, and fast food restaurants). Spatial cluster analysis of food retailers around......-HDR. Conclusion In the built environment of the German study region, clustering of food retailers does not depend on the location of schools. Additionally, the results suggest that the consumption of junk food in young children is not influenced by spatial availability of unhealthy food. However......Background The availability of fast foods, sweets, and other snacks in the living environment of children is assumed to contribute to an obesogenic environment. In particular, it is hypothesized that food retailers are spatially clustered around schools and that a higher availability of unhealthy...

  9. Illness Symptoms Experienced by Children Exposed to Benzene After a Flaring Incident at the BP Refinery Facility in Texas City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2016-10-01

    Objective To evaluate the illness symptoms experienced by children who were exposed to benzene following a flaring incident at the BP refinery in Texas City, Texas. Methods A total of 641 children, aged 5 year (P = .04). Conversely, urinary phenol levels were significantly lower in children 5 years (P = .00). Conclusion Together, these findings reveal that children exposed to benzene experience a range of illness symptoms and an altered profile of urinary phenol indicating their vulnerability to potentially increased health complications.

  10. DYSPRAXIA AS A PSYCHOMOTOR DISORDER OF SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN

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    Nowak Agata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the study was to define the epidemiology of dyspraxia among children from 6 to10 years’ age, attending grades I-III of primary schools in Wrocław, Poland. Material: the study was conducted among pupils of primary schools in Wrocław, Poland. The studied groups included 48 girls and 52 boys. The study employed Polish version of Questionnaire for the screening assessment of dyspraxia’s occurrence among children from 5 to 15 years’ age (DCDQ-PL, as well as the Coordination Test for Children (KTK. Results. After assessing the occurrence of dyspraxia among studied children, it was found out that this disorder is present in the studied group. The prevalence of dyspraxia depends on studied children’s gender; however, it is not related to their age. The results of tests, conducted with the DCDQ-PL and the KTK are consistent and confirm the observed inter-dependencies. Conclusions. Dyspraxia is a widespread psychomotor disorder, which can be diagnosed among children in the early school years. A diagnosis of a child’s development with respect to this disorder should constitute a constant element of work for teachers and educationists dealing with children at this stage of education.

  11. Observations on early school failure in Zulu children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frets-Van Buuren, J J; Letuma, E; Daynes, G

    1990-02-03

    The outcome of the screening of 2,190 children who had to repeat the school entry grades (Substandard A) in 25 junior primary schools in two KwaZulu townships is reported and the implications are discussed. The high number of repeaters did not appear to be due to an excess of mentally retarded children, the percentage being similar to that which could be expected in such a community world-wide. Difficulty in intelligence testing was experienced, but we describe how this was overcome by testing speed of learning. Visual defects, hearing defects and having no food before school accounted for the failure of many repeaters. Lack of preschool teaching by parents and schools and very strict discipline necessitated by large classes and a wide range in ages, which both led to anxiety on the part of the pupils, and sending children to school at too young an age were regarded as additional factors. Simple interventions were suggested to the school teachers; more than 1,000 pupils were followed up, with encouraging results.

  12. Ophthalmic Morbidity in School Children in Hilly Areas of Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Kishore

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: School children constitute about one fourth of population of India. Early detection and treatment of various eye diseases helps in avoiding many complications. The magnitude of blindness is 3-4 times greater in developing countries. Very few studies have been conducted in Uttarakhand revealing the ophthalmic morbidity in school children or general population. Hilly areas especially the remote ones face various problems like, poor transportation facilities, distant health facilities, use of traditional methods for treatment, faith healing, customs and belief system, lack of information.  Moreover   water supply, poor personal hygiene and other factors also add up to these problems. Aim: To study the ophthalmic morbidities in school children in 3 schools of Thatyur block. Methodology: It was a cross sectional study. Result: A total of 705 students were enrolled. Permission from school authorities was seeked before the start of study. Schools were visited twice in a week current and preliminary information was taken from the students & teacher regarding education, occupation, income etc. General examination and ophthalmic examination was done with day & torch light along with refraction, with the help of standard Snellen’s chart. Each eye was examined separately. A vision of 6/6 was considered as normal. Near vision was tested with new vision Snellen’s chart at 12-14 inches away from eye.

  13. The spectrum of dermatological disorders among primary school children in Dar es Salaam

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    Mgonda Yassin M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dermatologic disorders are common in many countries but the spectrum varies greatly. Many studies have reported a significant burden of skin diseases in school children. The objective of this study was to determine the current spectrum of dermatological disorders in primary school children in Dar es Salaam city. Methods Primary school children were recruited by multistage sampling. Detailed interview, dermatological examination and appropriate laboratory investigations were performed. Data was analyzed using the 'Statistical Package for Social Sciences' (SPSS program version 10.0 and EPI6. A p-value of Results A total of 420 children were recruited (51% males; mean age 11.4 ± 2.8 years; range 6-19 years. The overall point prevalence of any skin disorder was 57.3% and it was 61.9% and 52.6% in males and females respectively (p = 0.05. Infectious dermatoses accounted for 30.4% with superficial fungal infections (dermatophytoses and pityriasis versicolor being the commonest (20%. Dermatophytoses were diagnosed in 11.4% (48/420; the prevalence in males and females being 12.6% and 10.1% respectively (p = 0.41 and higher (21.8% in the age-group 6-10 years (p = 0.045. Fungal cultures were positive in 42/48 children (88%. All three dermatophyte genera were isolated. Tinea capitis was the commonest disease among culture-positive dermatophytoses (30/42; 71.4% with an overall prevalence of 7.1% (30/420 followed by tinea pedis (11/42; 26.1% whose overall prevalence was 2.6%. Microsporum canis was common in tinea capitis (14/30; 46.7% followed by Trichophyton violaceum (6/30; 20%. Trichophyton rubrum was common in tinea pedis (5/11; 45.5%. Thirty six children (8.6% had pityriasis versicolor which was more prevalent (6/27; 22.l2% in the age group 16-19 years (p = 0.0004. The other common infectious dermatoses were pyodermas (4% and pediculosis capitis (3.6%. Common non-infectious dermatoses were: acne vulgaris (36.4%, non

  14. Supporting Language in Schools: Evaluating an Intervention for Children with Delayed Language in the Early School Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wendy; Pring, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence exists that many children who experience early socio-economic disadvantage have delayed language development. These delays have been shown to exist when children start school and appear to persist through their education. Interventions that can help these children are desirable to ease the difficulties they have in school and to…

  15. Visiting Again? Subjective Well-Being of Children in Elementary School and Repeated Visits to School Health Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaver, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Children with vague complaints are without chronic illness, and who repeatedly visit the school nurse may be at risk for limited academic success. This study compares student reports of subjective well-being between children who do and do not repeatedly visit the school nurse with vague complaints. Methods: Children in grades 4 through…

  16. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  17. Korean Immigrant Mothers' Perspectives: The Meanings of a Korean Heritage Language School for Their Children's American Early Schooling Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhee

    2011-01-01

    This study examines what a Korean heritage language school means to Korean immigrant families and their children, considering Korean immigrant mothers' perspectives on American early schooling. As part of an ethnographic research project on Korean-American children's peer culture in a heritage school, seven mothers, two guardians (grandmothers),…

  18. Real-Life Science Research: NYC Inner City Middle School-UNY Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, M. A.; Fennelly, G.

    2008-12-01

    We present the preliminary results of a collaboration between a middle school Environmental Science class, taught by an ARMADA Master Teacher, and a college Marine Environmental Science program using Oceanography topics and laboratories to reinforce New York City science standards. Specific topics within the regular middle school curriculum are chosen. After students have received regular instruction from the middle school teacher, including hands-on experiments, the college instructor visits the classroom and reinforces the object lesson. This is followed up by a visit to the college oceanography laboratory where students participate in a different hands-on experiment that reinforces the original topic. Students can use these experiences to develop and design simple research projects. Example using density and buoyancy will be presented.

  19. Survey on the Relationship between Sleep Habits and Children`s Growth in Ahvaz City 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Moradnia; Mohammad Adineh; SHahla Esferanjani; SHahram Baraz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exact determination between children's sleep habits and their growth could help us to prevent this risk factor of children's growth disorders. Thus this research was performed to investigate the correlation between sleep habits and growth of preschool children in Ahvaz- Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the data was obtained by using available sampling from 208 children of 3-6 years old that came to a private pediatric clinic in Ahvaz, South West of Iran ...

  20. Building a Method for Researching Attribution of Meaning by Children Aged 5 to 6 in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tertoolen, Anja; van Oers, Bert; Geldens, Jeannette; Popeijus, Herman

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the first phase of a research project in which we looked for the voices of young children, aged 5 to 6, in school. What do children experience in school? What do they see as the meaning of school? What is their motivation? Children have the right to be listened to. The question is which settings, under which circumstances,…

  1. Attention and Memory in School-Age Children Surviving the Terrorist Attack in Beslan, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimin, Sara; Moscardino, Ughetta; Capello, Fabia; Axia, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of terrorism on children's cognitive functioning and school learning. The primary purpose of this study was to report on cognitive functioning among school-age children 20 months after a terrorist attack against their school. Participants included 203 directly and indirectly exposed children from Beslan and 100…

  2. Cultural Relay in Early Childhood Education: Methods of Teaching School Behavior to Low-Income Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    There is a distinct class difference in the way that children are taught school behavior. Teachers in affluent schools use more implicit teaching techniques while teachers of low-income children are more explicit in their teaching of behavior. This stems largely from the alignment of the home culture of middle class children to school behavior and…

  3. Pets, pica, pathogens and pre-school children

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, R W; Stack, Tom; Blair, R. E.; Keel, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    The incidence of pica in pre-school children was investigated by studying 192 children attending a general paediatric hospital clinic and 69 attending a general practice surgery. The incidence of pica was twice as common in those who kept pets in both study groups. Half of the pet-keeping children with pica had eaten their pet's food. Imitative behaviour is suggested as a probable cause. Pet-keeping compounds a child's risk of infestation not only by providing close contact with a reservoir o...

  4. The development of associate learning in school age children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T Harel

    Full Text Available Associate learning is fundamental to the acquisition of knowledge and plays a critical role in the everyday functioning of the developing child, though the developmental course is still unclear. This study investigated the development of visual associate learning in 125 school age children using the Continuous Paired Associate Learning task. As hypothesized, younger children made more errors than older children across all memory loads and evidenced decreased learning efficiency as memory load increased. Results suggest that age-related differences in performance largely reflect continued development of executive function in the context of relatively developed memory processes.

  5. Poly-helminth infection in east guatemalan school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Sorensen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Soil transmitted helminths (STH remain a global public health concern in spite of occasional dosing campaigns. Aims: To determine baseline prevalence and intensity of STH infection in east Guatemalan school children, and describe the associated epidemiology of anemia, stunting, and wasting in this population. Setting and design: Ten schools in Izabal province (eastern Guatemala were identified, and 1,001 school children were selected for this study. Half of the schools were used as clinical testing sites (blood and stool. Materials and Methods: Anthropometric measures were collected from all children. Over 300 children were tested for anemia and 229 for helminth infection. Ova and parasite specimens were examined via Direct, Kato Katz, and McMaster techniques. Hemoglobin was measured from venipuncture following the hemacue system. Statistical analysis: Correlation between infection intensities and growth indicators were examined. Chi Square or t tests were used for bivariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression was performed on significant variables from bivariate techniques. Results: Over two-thirds of school children were positive for infection by any STH. Prevalence of Hookworm was 30%; Ascaris, 52%; and Trichuris, 39%, most as low-intensity infection. Over half of the children were co-infected. In bivariate analysis, anemia was significantly associated with polyparasitism. Conclusions: For a Guatemalan child who experiences a unit decrease in hemoglobin, one expects to see a 24% increase in the odds of being infected with STH, controlling for age, sex, lake proximity, and growth characteristics. Infection with more than one STH, despite low intensity, led to a significant decrease in hemoglobin.

  6. Evaluation of Obesity in School-Age Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobashi, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    To prevent obesity in middle age, early precautions and interventions are required during childhood. Therefore, it is very important to accurately evaluate the degree of overweight in children. Body mass index (BMI) is widely used worldwide in adults, but not in children. Because standard BMI, which is calculated using the average height and weight for age, changes widely during growth, a constant cut-off point cannot be set for children. An international unified method defining childhood obesity has not been established. In many countries, BMI-for-age percentile (BMI%) value or Z (standard deviation) score is used, whereas in Japan, the percentage of overweight (POW), which is the modified weight-for-height method, is used. We compared BMI% values with POW values obtained using the anthropometric data of elementary and junior high school students based on the Japanese school survey conducted in 2000 and found that the values for the degree of overweight were significantly different between the two methods. It became clear that tall students were easily defined as being overweight, whereas short students tended to be evaluated as being underweight when using BMI%. POW method seemed to be more appropriate than BMI% for school-age children. Abdominal obesity, excess visceral adipose tissue (VAT), is highly associated with obesity-related complications. Waist circumference (WC) is now accepted as an appropriate guide to VAT accumulation. The cut-off value of WC defining excess VAT is 80 cm at the umbilical level in Japanese school-age children. It is not easy to decide the obesity criteria and optimum WC in school-age children. Childhood obesity should be discussed more internationally.

  7. Sex differences in anthropometric characteristics, motor and cognitive functioning in preschool children at the time of school enrolment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Gustav; Katić, Ratko

    2009-12-01

    The study included a sample of 333 preschool children (162 male and 171 female) at the time of school enrolment. Study subjects were recruited from the population of children in kindergartens in the cities of Novi Sad, Sombor, Sremska Mitrovica and Backa Palanka (Province of Voivodina, Serbia). Eight anthropometric variables, seven motor variables and one cognitive variable were analyzed to identify quantitative and qualitative sex differences in anthropometric characteristics, motor and cognitive functioning. Study results showed statistically significant sex differences in anthropometric characteristics and motor abilities in favor of male children, whereas no such difference was recorded in cognitive functioning. Sex differences found in morphological and motor spaces contributed to structuring proper general factors according to space and sex. Somewhat stronger structures were observed in male children. The cognitive aspect of functioning yielded better correlation with motor functioning in female than in male children. Motor functioning correlated better with morphological growth and development in male children, whereas cognitive functioning was relatively independent. These results are not fully in accordance with the current concept of general conditions in preschool children, nor they fully confirm the theory of integral development of children, hence they should be re-examined in future studies. Although these study results cannot be applied to sports practice in general, since we believe that it is too early for preschool children to take up sports and sport competitions, they are relevant for pointing to the need of developing general motor ability and motor behavior in preschool children.

  8. Urban/Rural Disparity and Migrant Children's Education: An Investigation into Schools for Children of Transient Workers in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoqing, Lu; Shouli, Zhang

    2004-01-01

    In the study of compulsory education for transient children, Beijing Xingzhi School for the Children of Transient Workers is a good example. There is no question that this is the most well-known school to date for transient children in China, and it has to a certain extent become a symbol of this social issue. The initial reports regarding this…

  9. Time Concepts for Elementary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Sharon Pray

    1990-01-01

    Points out that children have difficulty learning time concepts. Presents instructional activities for concepts associated with clocks, calendars, and chronology. Outlines Jerome Bruner's three different stages of representation for each concept: enactive, iconic, and symbolic. (DB)

  10. A social work study on quality on quality of physical education programs in primary schools: A case study of governmental and non-for-profit schools in city of Esfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Arabmomeni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical education is one of the most important parts of schoolchildren studies and it could influence of social and academic performance of children, significantly. This paper studies physical education among schoolchildren who attend elementary schools in city of Esfahan, Iran over for the educational calendar of 2010-2011. The study selects 52 schools as sample, 18 non-for-profit and 34 governmental schools and half of them belong to female students. The results of this study indicate that physical education has a somewhat better quality in non-for-profit educational system compared with governmental ones although this difference is not statistically significance (P<0.05. In our survey, ten percent of time, physical education was performed poorly, twenty five percent was in average condition, forty eight percent was in good condition and seventeen percent was in excellent condition.

  11. Factors associated with health risk behavior among school children in urban Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Bich Phuong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health risk behavior among young people is a public health problem in Vietnam. In addition, road traffic injuries are the leading cause of death for those aged 15–29 years. The consequences can be devastating for adolescents and their families, and can create a significant economic burden on society. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify protective and risk factors that may influence three health risk behaviors among school children: suicidal thinking (ST, drinking alcohol (DA, and underage motorbike driving (MD. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 972 adolescents (aged 12–15 years was conducted in two secondary schools in Hanoi, Vietnam. The schools were purposely selected, one each from the inner city and a suburban area, from which classes (grade 6 to 8 were randomly selected. All students attending classes on survey days took part in the survey. The anonymous, self-completed questionnaire included measures of risk behavior, school connectedness, parental bonding, and other factors. Multivariable regression models were used to examine associations between the independent variables and the three health risk behaviors controlling for confounding factors. Results: Young people in the inner city school reported a higher prevalence of all three risk behaviors than those in the suburban area (ST: 16.1% [95% confidence interval, or CI, 12.9–19.3] versus 4.6% [95% CI 2.7–6.5], p<0.001; DA: 20.3% [95% CI 16.8–23.8] versus 8.3% [95% CI 5.8–10.8], p<0.001, and MD: 10.1% [95% CI 7.4–12.8] versus 5.7% [95% CI 3.6–7.8], p<0.01. School connectedness and mother and father care appeared to be significant protective factors. For males, bullying in school was associated with suicidal thoughts, whereas for both males and females, school connectedness may be protective against suicidal ideation. Conclusion: This study supports findings from other nations regarding suicidal thoughts and alcohol use, and appears to be one of

  12. Hand Washing Practices among School Children in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Steiner-Asiedu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of diarrhoeal diseases and other communicable diseases among children due to poor personal hygiene and sanitation remains a concern on the public health agenda in most countries. To address the problem efficiently, an understanding of the knowledge and practices among target populations is needed to plan and design behavioural interventions. It is against this background that the present study was carried out to determine the hand washing practices among children in private and public school in the Metropolis in the Greater-Accra region of Ghana, with both private and public schools. A total of 295 school children were randomly recruited into the study. The study was cross-sectional in design and used qualitative and quantitative methods to collect data. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on sociodemographics. A check list was used during the observation of hand washing practices and an interview guide was used for the focus group discussions. The results showed that, most school children observed did not practice proper hand washing with soap, both in school and at home due to the unavailability and inaccessibility of hand washing facilities such as soap, towel and clean running water. However, majority (90.2% of those who used the school toilet practiced hand washing with soap after defecation. Private schools were found to be 63% (p = 0.02 less likely to wash their hands after using the toilet, 51% (p = 0.03 less likely to wash their hands before eating and 77% (p<0.001 less likely to wash their hands with soap after eating compared to their public school counterparts. Parents reported the presence of hand washing facilities at home but structured observations during home visits proved otherwise. The need to extend the hand washing campaigns to private schools cannot be overemphasised. It will be useful for the Ghana Education Service to collaborate with all stakeholders; such as Ghana Health Services, National

  13. Protecting the Rights of School Children with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, James M.

    2013-01-01

    School children with diabetes are facing increasing difficulties in receiving care during the school day. Despite theexistence of federal statutes ensuring their rights to a free, appropriate public education, many school districts throughout the country do little, if anything, to ensure that their condition is treated throughout the school day. The chronic shortage of school nurses has resulted in hardships on families, relatives, and friends to ensure that care, including insulin, is timely and appropriately provided. While many states have taken measures to provide care by unlicensed trained volunteers, efforts to accomplish this in California have resulted in prolonged litigation. A variety of nursing organizations oppose all efforts to train unlicensed volunteers, arguing that such is not permitted by California law. The issue is unresolved and currently pending in the California Supreme Court. PMID:23566990

  14. Protecting the rights of school children with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, James M

    2013-03-01

    School children with diabetes are facing increasing difficulties in receiving care during the school day. Despite theexistence of federal statutes ensuring their rights to a free, appropriate public education, many school districts throughout the country do little, if anything, to ensure that their condition is treated throughout the school day. The chronic shortage of school nurses has resulted in hardships on families, relatives, and friends to ensure that care, including insulin, is timely and appropriately provided. While many states have taken measures to provide care by unlicensed trained volunteers, efforts to accomplish this in California have resulted in prolonged litigation. A variety of nursing organizations oppose all efforts to train unlicensed volunteers, arguing that such is not permitted by California law. The issue is unresolved and currently pending in the California Supreme Court.

  15. Schools, Choice and Reputation: Local School Markets and the Distribution of Symbolic Capital in Segregated Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunar, Nihad; Ambrose, Anna

    2016-01-01

    An exploration is presented of how urban spaces, polarized by class and ethnicity, structure the basic conditions of emerging local school markets. The authors investigate how the distribution of symbolic capital, or "hot knowledge" of the market, affects schools, the market, and the urban spaces themselves. The study is guided by…

  16. The Micropolitics of Implementing a School-Based Bonus Policy: The Case of New York City's Compensation Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Julie

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the micropolitics of implementing New York City's Schoolwide Performance Bonus Program and school governance bodies (Compensation Committees) that determined distribution of school-level rewards among personnel. Drawing on a two-year, mixed-methods study, the author finds that although most participants surveyed described a…

  17. Who Are Our Students? A Statistical Portrait of Immigrant Students in New York City Elementary and Middle Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Dylan; Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Stiefel, Leanna

    This report describes the demographic characteristics and educational experiences of immigrant students in New York City's elementary and middle schools. Immigrants comprise a substantial share of the elementary and middle school student body. Far more immigrant than native-born students are limited English proficient (LEP) and Asian, and far…

  18. The English Education in Primary Schools in Minor Ethnic Areas in Western China--Taking Leshan City as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Wang

    2016-01-01

    As we all know, China is a country with many ethnic minorities mainly living in the northeastern and southwestern China. The English education in the primary schools in these areas is an important issue. The article analyzes the status quo of English education in primary schools in minor ethnic areas, taking the Leshan city, a western one as an…

  19. FAST and the arms race: the interaction of group aggression and the families and schools together program in the aggressive and delinquent behaviors of inner-city elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Keith; Moberg, D Paul; McDonald, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    This study applies a multi-player arms race model to peer contagion in the aggressive and delinquent behaviors of inner-city elementary school students. Because this model of peer contagion differs from the usual model based on positive reinforcement of delinquent behavior, it raises the possibility that the persistent finding of iatrogenic effects of group treatment might not apply to group treatment of elementary school children if the possibility of aggressive behavior in the group is limited. One way of limiting aggressive behavior is to include parents in the groups. The study therefore applies the model to groups of elementary school students assigned to Families and Schools Together (FAST; a group treatment that includes parental participation) or to an intervention focused on individual families. The model effectively describes the relationship between group averages of aggressive behavior in the classroom and aggressive and delinquent behavior outside the classroom for those students assigned to the individual intervention. The model fits those children assigned to FAST less well, suggesting that FAST may make it less likely that aggressive and delinquent behavior is generalized outside of aggressive classroom settings. Editors' Strategic Implications: The authors draw on evolutionary biology, developmental psychology, sociology, and learning theory to present an innovative prevention model and test the promising FAST program. Using longitudinal data from 403 children, their parents, and their teachers, the authors describe how FAST may interfere with the process of escalating aggression.

  20. Factors Affecting Children's Judgement of Culturally Deviant Acts: Findings from an International School in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsuki, Aya; Tanaka, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between perceptions of culturally deviant acts and multicultural experiences of elementary-school children attending an international school in Japan. Findings indicated that children judged a Japanese harsher than a foreigner, irrespective of the children's age. It was also found that younger children were…

  1. A Hidden Minority Becomes Visible: Romani Refugee Children in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, Judit

    2001-01-01

    Discusses educational concerns of Roma, or Gypsy, children in Canada. Provides background information on this minority group and discusses Roma attitudes toward education and Romani children's experiences in Eastern European schools. Provides suggestions for welcoming Romani children into new schools, including developing children's first and…

  2. Effects of Divorce on Children, Traits of Resiliency and School Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Betty J.

    Gaining an awareness of the needs of children of divorce and how children achieve resilience should help students become well-adjusted and productive. This paper explores ways in which school systems and school counselors can meet the needs of these children. It portrays the effects of divorce on children by drawing on the literature, observations…

  3. The Impact of Pre-School on Young Children's Cognitive Attainments at Entry to Reception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Pam; Elliot, Karen; Sylva, Kathy; Melhuish, Edward; Siraj-Blatchford, Iram; Taggart, Brenda

    2004-01-01

    This article explores the impact of pre-school experience on young children's cognitive attainments at entry to primary school and analyses data collected as part of a wider longitudinal study, the Effective Provision of Pre-school Education (EPPE) project, which followed a large sample of young children attending 141 pre-school centres drawn from…

  4. Cortisol stress responses and children's behavioral functioning at school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, S.S.H.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Weerth, C. de

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated whether cortisol stress responses of 6-year-olds were associated with their behavioral functioning at school. Additionally, the moderating role of stress in the family environment was examined. To this end, 149 healthy children (Magen=n6.09 years; 70 girls) participate

  5. Schooling of Immigrant Children in West Germany, Sweden, England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, I.

    1975-01-01

    The focus of this article is on children of migrant workers and immigrants in the schools of West Germany, Sweden and England. One central problem, that of language, is considered both as it is dealt with in policy, i. e., in curricula, and as it is actually implemented in some programs, which are typical for the actions in these countries.…

  6. Comorbidity in school-aged children with autism disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余明

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the occurrence of comorbidity in school-aged children with autism disorder.Methods Sixty-two outpatients in Peking University Institute of Mental Health,aged 6 to 16 years old,meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental

  7. Children and Natural Disasters: A Primer for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Linda; Oehler-Stinnett, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Worldwide children are impacted by natural disasters, including hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, landslides and sandstorms, winter and severe storms, heat waves, volcanoes and tsunamis. School psychologists should understand natural disaster effects, such as economic loss, relocation and health concerns and mental health…

  8. Effects of Follow Through on School Fearfulness Among Black Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhine, W. Ray; Spencer, Leilani M.

    1975-01-01

    Results suggest some progress in formulating educational environments that reduce the level of school fearfulness among black children. Other studies should explore the differences in classroom atmosphere that nediate these encouraging results; i.e. patterns of pupil-teacher and pupil-pupil interaction. (Author/AM)

  9. Exploring Categorical Body Mass Index Trajectories in Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Black, Geraldine; Boles, Shawn; Johnson-Shelton, Deb; Evers, Cody

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies of body mass index (BMI) change have focused on understanding growth trajectories from childhood to adolescence and adolescence to adulthood, but few have explored BMI trajectories solely in elementary (grades K-5) school children. This report complements these studies by exploring changes in obesity status using analytic…

  10. Preschool Predictors of Narrative Writing Skills in Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Roberts, Joanne E.; Nelson, Lauren; Zeisel, Susan; Kasambira Fannin, Danai

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the preschool predictors of elementary school narrative writing skills. The sample included 65 typically developing African American children, ranging in age from 5.0 to 5.5 years, and was 44.6% male. Targeted preschool predictors included measures of phonological processing, core language abilities, prereading skills, and…

  11. Enhancing Home-School Collaboration through Children's Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Lai Ha

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing concern within the early childhood education sector to empower parents to support the education of young children. Research has shown the importance of home support in early childhood learning and development. Working within the context of a school improvement project, the researcher responded to parents' concerns towards…

  12. Perfectionism and Self Concept among Primary School Children in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofaha, Gamal Al Sayed; Ramon, Patricia Robledo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The main purpose of this study is to explore the correlation between dimensions of perfectionism and self-concepts among school aged students in Egypt. Method: Two hundred-eighty four children (fifth and sixth graders) participated in this study. The mean age of the participants was 144.37 months, SD 6.36. Pearson correlation…

  13. Should Young School Children be Required to Study Art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai; Jingting

    2014-01-01

    Now,more and more parents believe the theory that their children should take the lead as soon as possible at the starting line,requiring the young to study art in school.But after years,we witness the disadvantages of it.This essay states the drawbacks of this demand and exemplifies them through facts in daily life.

  14. Should Young School Children be Required to Study Art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Jingting

    2014-01-01

    Now, more and more parents believe the theory that their children should take the lead as soon as possible at the starting line, requiring the young to study art in school. But after years, we witness the disadvantages of it. This essay states the drawbacks of this demand and exemplifies them through facts in daily life.

  15. Position Effects in Play Equipment Preferences of Nursery School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Peter A.; Gramza, Anthony F.

    With reference to the need for delineation of parameters operative in children's play, the position preferences of four groups of nursery school subjects were studied in a laboratory playroom. A large and small trestle were interchanged between center and corner positions in a series of play sessions. The frequency with which the subjects used…

  16. Living Conditions of Some Basic School Children: Pointers to Disadvantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, D. R. B.

    This study, conducted by the Bernard Van Leer Foundation Project for Early Childhood Education (PECE), presents the results of a survey which was carried out to identify home deficits in socioeconomically disadvantaged children's preparation for schooling. The study was conducted in Jamaica during July, August, and September, 1970, and was…

  17. Family Background and School Achievement of Children with Motoric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojlovic, Jasmina; Ilic-Stosovic, Danijela; Djonovic, Nela; Simovic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    There is no pedagogical literature about school achievement that does not include the family as a very important factor. Family and family relationships of children with motoric disorders are determined by the ability of parents and other family members to build an objective attitude toward the child with disability. That includes the construction…

  18. Parenting Style and Only Children's School Achievement in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing; And Others

    This report describes a study which examined the relation of Chinese parenting style to only-children's academic achievement. Subjects, 186 middle-class parents of fifth and sixth graders (10-13 years old) from one Beijing elementary school, completed a Chinese translation of the Parental Authority Questionnaire (PAQ). Four approximately equal…

  19. Metacomprehension and School-Aged Children's Reading: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Ann Jaffe

    Several research studies were reviewed to formulate a definition of metacomprehension in elementary school children. Although much additional research is needed, the one conclusion evident from the review is that metacomprehension is not a unitary phenomenon. It encompasses several kinds of abilities and degrees of awareness that may appear at…

  20. Obesity in School Children with Intellectual Disabilities in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaun, Laureline; Berthouze-Aranda, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of obesity in school children with intellectual disabilities and to determine the most appropriate indicators of obesity measurement. Materials and Methods: The weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percentage as measured by…