WorldWideScience

Sample records for city hydrothermal field

  1. Interactions Between Serpentinization, Hydrothermal Activity and Microbial Community at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, A.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Schaeffer, P.; Frank, M.; Gutjahr, M.; Kelley, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Seafloor investigations of slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges have reported many occurrences of exposed mantle peridotites and gabbroic rocks on the ocean floor. Along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, these uplifted portions of oceanic crust host high-temperature black smoker-type hydrothermal systems (e.g., Rainbow, Logatchev, Saldanha), and the more distinct low-temperature Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF). Built on a southern terrace of the Atlantis Massif, the LCHF is composed of carbonate-brucite chimneys that vent alkaline and low-temperature (40-90°C) hydrothermal fluids. These fluids are related to serpentinization of mantle peridotites, which together with minor gabbroic intrusions form the basement of the LCHF. Long-lived hydrothermal activity at Lost City led to extensive seawater-rock interaction in the basement rocks, as indicated by seawater-like Sr- and mantle to unradiogenic Nd-isotope compositions of the serpentinites. These high fluid fluxes in the southern part of the massif influenced the conditions of serpentinization and have obliterated the early chemical signatures in the serpentinites, especially those of carbon and sulfur. Compared to reducing conditions commonly formed during the first stages of serpentinization, serpentinization at Lost City is characterized by relatively oxidizing conditions resulting in a predominance of magnetite, the mobilization/dissolution and oxidation of igneous sulfides to secondary pyrite, and the incorporation of seawater sulfate, all leading to high bulk-rock S-isotope compositions. The Lost City hydrothermal fluids contain high concentrations in methane, hydrogen, and low-molecular weight hydrocarbons considered as being produced abiotically. In contrast, organic compounds in the serpentinites are dominated by the occurrences of isoprenoids (pristane, phytane, and squalane), polycyclic compounds (hopanes and steranes), and higher abundances of C16 to C20 n-alkanes indicative of a marine organic input. We

  2. U and Th Concentration and Isotopic Composition of Hydrothermal Fluids at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. A.; Shen, C.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R.; Kelley, D. S.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    Uranium and Th concentration and isotopic composition of hydrothermal fluids at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) were determined using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP- MS). The LCHF is an off-axis, serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal system located at 30°N near the Mid- Atlantic Ridge. Carbonate chimneys reaching 60 m in height vent alkaline (pH~10), calcium-rich fluids at 40- 91°C and the towers are home to dense microbial communities. Vent fluid and seawater U and Th concentration and isotopic composition data provide critical information for constraining U-Th chimney ages. The increased sensitivity (1-2%) of MC-ICP-MS combined with an Aridus nebulization system allows the precise measurement of small quantities of sample (~150 ml) with low concentrations (Thorium concentrations of fluids are close to deep seawater values. U and Th isotopic compositions are reported at the permil level. These data may provide new insights into the role of serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal systems in the budgets of U and Th in the ocean. Techniques presented in this study may be applied to other hydrothermal and seep environments.

  3. Diethers enriched in 13C suggest carbon-limitation at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, A. S.; Hayes, J. M.; Summons, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    Active and inactive carbonate vent structures from the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) contain up to 0.6% organic carbon including diverse lipids. Values of δ 13C for total organic carbon (TOC) range from -18.7‰ vs. VPDB at the active, high-temperature vent known as "The Beehive" (90° C), to -3.1‰ at Marker 7 (active, 70° C). Samples with relatively high levels of 13C also contained high amounts of isoprenoidal and nonisoprenoidal diethers. Samples more depleted in 13C lacked or contained low amounts of these diethers. The correlation between high 13C and abundant diethers is supported by compound-specific isotopic analyses. Archaeal and bacterial diethers are enriched in 13C relative to photosynthetically derived marine carbon. The biomarkers sn-2 hydroxyarchaeol, sn-3 hydroxyarchaeol, and dihydroxyarchaeol - considered diagnostic for methane-cycling archaea - had δ values ranging from -8.5 to +4.8‰ . Phylogenetic data confirms the presence at these vents of a single group of methanogens, related to the Methanosarcinales (Schrenk et al., 2004). Diethers with non-isoprenoidal alkyl chains are also present, are of presumed bacterial origin, and may indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Values of δ for these compounds range from -7.3 to +1.0‰ . At the Beehive vent, diether lipids are absent and the TOC is depleted in 13C. Coexistence of isotopically similar hydroxyarchaeols and nonisoprenoidal glycerol diethers is typical of marine, cold-seep environments at which concentrations of H2 are low and methane is oxidized anaerobically. At the LCHF, however, concentrations of H2 in pore waters reach 15 mM (Proskurowski et al., 2003). This H2, produced by serpentinization reactions, drives production (rather than oxidation) of methane. Simultaneously, sulfate-reducing bacteria can flourish as carbon-fixing autotrophs. Under such conditions, carbon may be the limiting substrate, its nearly complete consumption accounting for the enrichment of

  4. U-Th systematics and 230Th ages of carbonate chimneys at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Kristin A.; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Kelley, Deborah S.; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2011-04-01

    The Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is a serpentinite-hosted vent field located 15 km west of the spreading axis of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In this study, uranium-thorium (U-Th) geochronological techniques have been used to examine the U-Th systematics of hydrothermal fluids and the 230Th ages of hydrothermally-precipitated carbonate chimneys at the LCHF. Fluid sample analyses indicate that endmember fluids likely contain only 0.0073 ng/g U or less compared to 3.28 ± 0.03 ng/g of U in ambient seawater. For fluid samples containing only 2-21% ambient seawater (1.1-11 mmol/kg Mg), Th concentration is 0.11-0.13 pg/g and surrounding seawater concentrations average 0.133 ± 0.016 pg/g. The 230Th/ 232Th atomic ratios of the vent fluids range from 1 (±10) × 10 -6 to 11 (±5) × 10 -6, are less than those of seawater, and indicate that the vent fluids may contribute a minor amount of non-radiogenic 230Th to the LCHF carbonate chimney deposits. Chimney 238U concentrations range from 1 to 10 μg/g and the average chimney corrected initial δ 234U is 147.2 ± 0.8, which is not significantly different from the ambient seawater value of 146.5 ± 0.6. Carbonate 232Th concentrations range broadly from 0.0038 ± 0.0003 to 125 ± 16 ng/g and 230Th/ 232Th atomic ratios vary from near seawater values of 43 (±8) × 10 -6 up to 530 (±25) × 10 -3. Chimney ages, corrected for initial 230Th, range from 17 ± 6 yrs to 120 ± 13 kyrs. The youngest chimneys are at the intersection of two active, steeply-dipping normal faults that cut the Atlantis Massif; the oldest chimneys are located in the southwest portion of the field. Vent deposits on a steep, fault-bounded wall on the east side of the field are all <4 kyrs old, indicating that mass wasting in this region is relatively recent. Comparison of results to prior age-dating investigations of submarine hydrothermal systems shows that the LCHF is the most long-lived hydrothermal system known to date. It is likely that seismic

  5. The Influence of High Seawater Fluxes on Sulfur Compositions of the Serpentinized Peridotites at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, A.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Kelley, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of the actively venting carbonate chimneys at the Lost City hydrothermal vent field (LCHF) on the Atlantis Massif (MAR 30°N) has stimulated great interest in the role of serpentinization in driving hydrothermal circulation in peridotite-hosted systems and in the biological communities that may be supported in these systems. The southern wall of the massif exposes serpentinized peridotites with interspersed gabbroic rocks that have undergone several phases of serpentinization, talc-metasomatism and carbonate veining related to the uplift history and to the formation of the LCHF. We present petrological and isotope data from the serpentinized peridotites and gabbros that provide constraints on the history of seawater-rock interaction, changes in oxygen and sulfur fugacities during serpentinization, and the role of serpentinization as a sink for seawater sulfur. Sr- and Nd-isotope analyses of the basement rocks of the Atlantis Massif show large, systematic changes towards seawater compositions and indicate high seawater fluxes during successive phases of serpentinization. The consequence of these high fluid-rock ratios is a change in the sulfur mineralogy and chemistry of the rocks. Most of the analyzed basement rocks show lower sulfide-sulfur and higher sulfate-sulfur contents compared to fertile mantle. Sulfate in the serpentinites is present as barite and various hydroxysulfates. The distinct absence of anhydrite provides important constraints on upper temperature limits of late-stage serpentinization and hydrothermal activity at the LCHF. The sulfates are dominated by seawater sulfur isotope signatures, which indicate that serpentinization is an important sink of seawater sulfur at the Atlantis Massif. A few samples with lower sulfur isotope compositions suggest an additional local contribution of sulfate produced by sulfide oxidation. Sulfide assemblages are dominated by pyrite, pentlandite, pyrrhotite in the serpentinites and by pyrite, pyrrhotite

  6. Novel insights into methane cycling, lateral gene transfer, and the rare biosphere within carbonate chimneys of the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazelton, W. J.; Ludwig, K. A.; Schrenk, M. O.; Kelley, D. S.; Sogin, M. L.; Baross, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Lost City Hydrothermal Field, an ultramafic-hosted system located 15 km west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has experienced at least 30,000 years of hydrothermal activity. Previous studies have shown that its carbonate chimneys form by mixing of ~90°C, pH 9-11 hydrothermal fluids and cold seawater. Flow of methane and hydrogen-rich hydrothermal fluids through the carbonate chimneys supports dense microbial biofilm communities. This presentation will describe recent studies using new techniques that have provided greater insight into the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of Lost City chimneys. We have investigated the archaeal and bacterial communities of Lost City carbonate chimneys that vary in age between ~30 and ~1200 years, as determined by U-Th isotope systematics. Using next-generation pyrosequencing technology, we collected >200,000 sequences of the V6 region of 16S rRNA genes. This extremely deep sequencing effort enabled detection of very rare organisms as well as abundant organisms detected by previous studies. The taxonomic composition of the archaeal and bacterial communities clearly differed in chimneys of different ages, and many of the rare sequences in young chimneys were more abundant in older chimneys, indicating that members of the rare biosphere can become dominant members of the ecosystem when environmental conditions change. These results suggest that a long history of selection over many cycles of chimney growth has resulted in numerous closely related species at Lost City, each of which is pre-adapted to a particular set of re-occurring environmental conditions. In this model, the rare biosphere can be considered a repository for genes that are not currently advantageous but have been in the past and may be again in the future. Interestingly, metagenomic sequencing at Lost City has indicated the potential for frequent lateral gene transfer among organisms inhabiting the chimney biofilms. Specifically, the Lost City metagenomic dataset

  7. Magnesium-hydroxide-sulfate-hydrate formation at 200°C: Implications for sulfur fixation at the Lost City hydrothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozeva, N. G.; Syverson, D. D.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2010-12-01

    Serpentinization reactions at ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems have been shown to be important sinks for sulfur in the oceanic crust. Indeed, the high sulfate content of serpentinized peridotites beneath the Lost City hydrothermal field and moderately low dissolved sulfate concentrations of the vent fluids suggest a sulfate mineral may precipitate at depth during seawater entrainment into the hydrothermal system. While it has long been proposed that anhydrite provides the primary control on partitioning of SO42- between fluid and rock, other sulfate removal mechanisms need to be considered. This is especially true in light of the high pH fluids and magnesium-rich protolith at Lost City. Examining the stability of alternative sulfate phases, such as magnesium-hydroxide-sulfate-hydrate (MHSH), would therefore yield a better understanding of sulfur fixation in the oceanic crust and the influence of hydrothermal circulation on the global sulfur cycle. Hydrothermal experiments were conducted to investigate the potential for MHSH formation at inferred reaction zone temperatures for Lost City (150-250°C). An evolved seawater solution containing MgSO4 was heated to 200°C at steam saturation pressure, and its fluid chemistry was analyzed by IC and ICP-OES upon quenching. Results suggest removal of SO42- and B with precipitation of Mg(OH)2 from solution. Thermodynamic calculations, however, indicate that precipitation of the previously characterized MHSH(0.75) and MHSH(0.625) is unfavorable under the reaction conditions. Observed incorporation of SO42- into the Mg(OH)2 structure thus demonstrates the formation of MHSH of different stoichiometry and points to the occurrence of a more extensive solid solution between Mg(OH)2 and MgSO4 than previously thought. Experiments have also examined the uptake of SO42- and B by serpentine, a product of olivine hydrolysis. Findings suggest no incorporation of sulfate occurs either within the serpentine structure or as an adsorbed

  8. Comparing Carbonate-Depositing Hydrothermal Systems Along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at Lost City Hydrothermal Field and Along the Rio Grande rift in the Southwestern US: Geochemistry, Geomicrobiology and Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cron, B. R.; Crossey, L.; Hall, J.; Takacs-Vesbach, C.; Dahm, K.; Northup, D.; Karlstrom, K.

    2008-12-01

    Both continental and marine rift settings are characterized by hydrothermal vents (smokers) that include important components of mantle-derived "endogenic" fluids. These fluids ascend along extensional faults and provide unique biologic settings. We hypothesize that deep crustal processes support near-surface metabolic strategies by delivering chemically reduced constituents to partially oxidized surface environments. Lost City hydrothermal field, a marine vent system located 15 km west of the Mid-Atlantic ridge, exhibits a range of temperatures (40 to 75°C), pH (9-9.8), and mineral compositions (carbonate rather than sulfide-dominated) that were originally thought to be non-existent in marine vent systems. Travertine depositing CO2 springs within the Rio Grande rift, NM exhibit striking similarities in many respects to vents in Lost City. Previous research has already determined the importance of methanogenic and sulfur metabolizing microorganisms in carbonate structures at Lost City. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes from a terrestrial CO2 spring was performed. In addition, cells from bacteria and fungi were also cultured with oligotrophic media. Both archaeal phylotypes from the terrestrial spring grouped within Marine Group I of the Crenarchaeota, a clade dominated by sequences from hydrothermal marine vents, including some from Lost City. We will report comparative analyses of sequences from Lost City and both cultured and environmental clone libraries from the terrestrial spring using UniFrac. Geochemical modeling of data (water and gas chemistry from both locations) is used to rank the energy available for dozens of metabolic reactions. SEM and microprobe data are presented to compare mineral compositions. Our results will be discussed in respect to the tectonic setting, microbial community distributions, and the geochemical composition and textural properties of the carbonates that are precipitated in each of these systems.

  9. Metal ion effects on the kinetics of abiotic formation of glycylglycine and diketopiperazine under the simulated conditions of the Lost City hydrothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, K.; Yabuta, H.

    2010-12-01

    Introduction: The Lost City hydrothermal field has been recently discovered in 2000 and known for its characteristic conditions that differs from the typical hydrothermal vents, such as alkaline pH, low temperature (> ~90°C), metal ion compositions [1, 2]. The hydrothermal system is suggested as a plausible environment for the origin and evolution of life in the early Earth [3]. In our previous study, it was revealed that the dimerization of glycine (Gly) in aqueous solution reached the maximum rate in alkaline solution at pH 9.8 [4], supporting the above hypothesis from the perspective of abiotic chemistry. In this study, the heating experiments of Gly were conducted under the conditions simulating the metal ion composition of the Lost City, in order to evaluate the effects of metal ions on the kinetics of the formation of glycylglycine (GlyGly) and diketopiperazine (DKP). Experimental: Eight milliliter of 100 mM aqueous solutions of Gly at pH 9.3 with MgCl2 : MgSO4 : CaCl2 : NaCl : NaOH concentration ratio (mM) of 9.4 : 4.6 : 23 : 35 : 470 (solution A) were put into Teflon bottles and heated at 120, 140, 160 and 180°C for 1 to 5 days. For comparison, 100 mM aqueous solutions of Gly at pH 9.3 with 32 mM NaOH (solution B) and at pH 6.0 without NaOH (solution C) were heated at 140°C for 14 days. After heating, each sample was diluted and analyzed by HPLC. In this experiment, the four reaction pathways were considered: 2 Gly → GlyGly (the second order), GlyGly → DKP (the first order), DKP → GlyGly (the first order), GlyGly → 2 Gly (the first order). The rate constants were determined by fitting the changes of the concentrations of Gly, GlyGly, and DKP with increasing heating time. Results and discussion: The concentration of GlyGly in solution A at equilibrium was 25 % lower than that in solution B, although the formation rates of GlyGly were similar values for solutions A and B, 1.25 ×10-9 and 0.93 ×10-9 l mol-1 s-1, respectively. This observation is

  10. Sulfur Isotope Geochemistry of the Lost City Hydrothermal Vent Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh-Green, G. L.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Butterfield, D. A.; Kelley, D. S.

    2004-12-01

    At the Lost City Hydrothermal Vent Field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30° N), reactions between seawater and ultramafic rocks produce high alkaline (pH 9 to 11) fluids that are venting at temperatures of 40 to 90° C and result in the formation of up to 60m tall carbonate-brucite structures. The fluids are enriched in hydrogen, methane and other hydrocarbons, and support dense microbial communities. We present sulfur isotope data of dissolved sulfate and coexisting sulfide in the fluids venting at Lost City, which together with C-isotope data provide constraints on the links between chemical and biological processes associated with serpentinization. The sulfur isotope composition of sulfate increases from seawater values of +21‰ (VCDT) in fluids with sulfate concentrations of 28 mM to values of up to +30‰ in the low sulfate-, high pH end-member hydrothermal fluids. Sulfide concentrations range between 50 and 2780 micromolar. Sulfur isotope compositions of the sulfides lie in a narrow range of +34 to +37‰ (VCDT) and show no clear correlation with concentrations. The isotopic compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon vary between -0.5‰ (VPDB) in the high sulfate samples and -18‰ in the low sulfate samples. This covariance indicates active sulfate reduction in the vent structures and/or in the shallow serpentinite subsurface. Sulfate reduction likely contributes to the variability of carbon isotope compositions observed in both the dissolved inorganic carbon and the carbonate minerals forming the structures. These data, together with C- and O-isotope data of the vent structures, provide evidence that methane oxidation coupled with sulfate reduction during mixing of the more pristine, hydrogen and methane-rich hydrothermal end-member fluids with seawater is an important process in hydrothermal carbonate precipitation at Lost City. Our results are consistent with previous microbiological and organic geochemical studies, which indicate a close association of methane

  11. Evolving patterns of the fluids within the TAG hydrothermal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The mixing of seawater/hydrothermal fluid within the large seafloor hydrothermal sulfide deposits plays a key role in the formation processes of the sulfide deposits.Some issues attract considerable attentions in the study of seafloor hydrothermal system in recent years,such as the relationships among different types of vent fluids,the characteristics of chemical compositions and mineral assemblages of the hydrothermal deposits and their governing factors.Combined with the measured data of hydrothermal fluid in the TAG field,the thermodynamic model of mixing processes of the heated seawater at different temperatures and the hydrothermal fluid is calculated to understand the precipitation mechanism of anhydrite and the genetic relationships between the black and white smoker fluids within the TAG mound.The results indicate that the heating of seawater and the mixing of hydrothermal fluid/seawater are largely responsible for anhydrite precipitation and the temperature of the heated seawater is not higher than 150 ℃ and the temperature of the end-member hydrothermal fluid is not lower than 400℃.Based on the simulated results,the evolving patterns of fluids within the TAG deposit are discussed.The mixed fluid of the end-member hydrothermal fluid and the seawater heated by wall rock undergoes conductive cooling during upflowing within the deposit and forms "White Smoker" eventually.In addition,the end-member hydrothermal fluid without mixed with seawater,but undergoing conductive cooling,vents out of the deposit and forms "Black Smoker".

  12. Submarine Hydrothermal Systems - No Two Fields Are Alike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Over 300 hydrothermal systems have been discovered since the first finding of Galapagos vents over three decades ago. The size, morphology, chemistry and associated biology show a rich diversity that is in part governed by their host rocks and tectonic setting. Each vent system is unique in terms of the morphology of black smoker edifices and associated diffuse flow, which suggests that local processes and feedback loops govern the nature and evolution of these dynamic systems. In fast-spreading environments (e.g. EPR), vent fields are spaced far apart and individual structures are small in number and size. In contrast, to date, the highest concentrations of fields per kilometer of ridge segment, and the largest individual black smokers occur in intermediate-spreading systems (e.g. Endeavour hosting 45 m-tall chimneys). The largest complexes occur in intermediate and slow-spreading environments (e.g. TAG at 200 m across). The highest temperature vents are transient, with temperature excursions at or above the critical point of seawater. Extremely high temperatures are associated with diking and eruptive events that likely vaporize subsurface fluids, forcing them across the two-phase boundary briefly. Along slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges, the character of vents is strongly controlled by faulting, in particular, long-lived detachment faults that expose variably deformed and altered ultramafic rocks. Here, vent systems evolve from high-temperature black smokers within the axial valley with fluids rich in CO2, to black smokers with mantle and basaltic signatures along the axial valley walls, to end member systems such as the Lost City Field with chimneys and fluid chemistries never before seen: 60 m tall limestone towers that vent 90°C, metal-poor, pH 9-11 fluids devoid of CO2, yet rich in H2, CH4 and other low molecular weight hydrocarbons formed abiotically. This relatively stable environment, free from volcanic events, promotes venting for >150,000 years.

  13. The Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse hydrothermal field: A hydrothermal system on an active detachment fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Susan E.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Tivey, Maurice A.

    2015-11-01

    Over the last ten years, geophysical studies have revealed that the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) hydrothermal field (26°08‧N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge) is located on the hanging wall of an active detachment fault. This is particularly important in light of the recognition that detachment faulting accounts for crustal accretion/extension along a significant portion of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and that the majority of confirmed vent sites on this slow-spreading ridge are hosted on detachment faults. The TAG hydrothermal field is one of the largest sites of high-temperature hydrothermal activity and mineralization found to date on the seafloor, and is comprised of active and relict deposits in different stages of evolution. The episodic nature of hydrothermal activity over the last 140 ka provides strong evidence that the complex shape and geological structure of the active detachment fault system exerts first order, but poorly understood, influences on the hydrothermal circulation patterns, fluid chemistry, and mineral deposition. While hydrothermal circulation extracts heat from a deep source region, the location of the source region at TAG is unknown. Hydrothermal upflow is likely focused along the relatively permeable detachment fault interface at depth, and then the high temperature fluids leave the low-angle portion of the detachment fault and rise vertically through the highly fissured hanging wall to the seafloor. The presence of abundant anhydrite in the cone on the summit of the TAG active mound and in veins in the crust beneath provides evidence for a fluid circulation system that entrains significant amounts of seawater into the shallow parts of the mound and stockwork. Given the importance of detachment faulting for crustal extension at slow spreading ridges, the fundamental question that still needs to be addressed is: How do detachment fault systems, and the structure at depth associated with these systems (e.g., presence of plutons and/or high

  14. Fluid mixing and the deep biosphere of a fossil Lost City-type hydrothermal system at the Iberia Margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Frieder; Humphris, Susan E; Guo, Weifu; Schubotz, Florence; Schwarzenbach, Esther M; Orsi, William D

    2015-09-29

    Subseafloor mixing of reduced hydrothermal fluids with seawater is believed to provide the energy and substrates needed to support deep chemolithoautotrophic life in the hydrated oceanic mantle (i.e., serpentinite). However, geosphere-biosphere interactions in serpentinite-hosted subseafloor mixing zones remain poorly constrained. Here we examine fossil microbial communities and fluid mixing processes in the subseafloor of a Cretaceous Lost City-type hydrothermal system at the magma-poor passive Iberia Margin (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 149, Hole 897D). Brucite-calcite mineral assemblages precipitated from mixed fluids ca. 65 m below the Cretaceous paleo-seafloor at temperatures of 31.7 ± 4.3 °C within steep chemical gradients between weathered, carbonate-rich serpentinite breccia and serpentinite. Mixing of oxidized seawater and strongly reducing hydrothermal fluid at moderate temperatures created conditions capable of supporting microbial activity. Dense microbial colonies are fossilized in brucite-calcite veins that are strongly enriched in organic carbon (up to 0.5 wt.% of the total carbon) but depleted in (13)C (δ(13)C(TOC) = -19.4‰). We detected a combination of bacterial diether lipid biomarkers, archaeol, and archaeal tetraethers analogous to those found in carbonate chimneys at the active Lost City hydrothermal field. The exposure of mantle rocks to seawater during the breakup of Pangaea fueled chemolithoautotrophic microbial communities at the Iberia Margin, possibly before the onset of seafloor spreading. Lost City-type serpentinization systems have been discovered at midocean ridges, in forearc settings of subduction zones, and at continental margins. It appears that, wherever they occur, they can support microbial life, even in deep subseafloor environments.

  15. Subseafloor fluid mixing and fossilized microbial life in a Cretaceous 'Lost City'-type hydrothermal system at the Iberian Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, F.; Humphris, S. E.; Guo, W.; Schubotz, F.; Schwarzenbach, E. M.; Orsi, W.

    2015-12-01

    Subseafloor mixing of reduced hydrothermal fluids with seawater is believed to provide the energy and substrates needed to support autotrophic microorganisms in the hydrated oceanic mantle (serpentinite). Despite the potentially significant implications for the distribution of microbial life on Earth and other water-bearing planetary bodies, our understanding of such environments remains elusive. In the present study we examined fossilized microbial communities and fluid mixing processes in the subseafloor of a Cretaceous 'Lost City'-type hydrothermal system at the passive Iberia Margin (ODP Leg 149, Hole 897D). Brucite and calcite co-precipitated from mixed fluids ca. 65m below the Cretaceous palaeo-seafloor at temperatures of 32±4°C within steep chemical gradients (fO2, pH, CH4, SO4, ΣCO2, etc) between weathered, carbonate-rich serpentinite breccia and serpentinite. Mixing of oxidized seawater and strongly reducing hydrothermal fluid at moderate temperatures created conditions capable of supporting microbial activity within the oceanic basement. Dense microbial colonies are fossilized in brucite-calcite veins that are strongly enriched in organic carbon but depleted in 13C. We detected a combination of bacterial diether lipid biomarkers, archaeol and archaeal tetraethers analogous to those found in brucite-carbonate chimneys at the active Lost City hydrothermal field. The exposure of mantle rocks to seawater during the breakup of Pangaea fueled chemolithoautotrophic microbial communities at the Iberia Margin during the Cretaceous, possibly before the onset of seafloor spreading in the Atlantic. 'Lost City'-type serpentinization systems have been discovered at mid-ocean ridges, in forearc settings of subduction zones and at continental margins. It appears that, wherever they occur, they can support microbial life, even in deep subseafloor environments as demonstrated in the present study. Because equivalent systems have likely existed throughout most of Earth

  16. Constraints on the Lost City Hydrothermal System from borehole thermal data; 3-D models of heat flow and hydrothermal circulation in an oceanic core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarenko, S.; McCaig, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    A perennial problem in near-ridge hydrothermal circulation is that the only directly measurable data to test models is often vent fluid temperature. Surface heat flow measurements may be available but without the underlying thermal structure it is not known if they are transient and affected by local hydrothermal flow, or conductive. The Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex at 30 °N on the mid-Atlantic Ridge, offers a unique opportunity to better constrain hydrothermal circulation models. The temperature profile in gabbroic rocks of IODP Hole 1309D was measured in IODPExpedition 340T, and found to be near-conductive, but with a slight inflexion at ~750 mbsf indicating downward advection of fluid above that level. The lack of deep convection is especially remarkable given that the long-lived Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is located only 5km to the south. We have modelled hydrothermal circulation in the Massif using Comsol Multiphysics, comparing 2-D and 3-D topographic models and using temperature-dependent conductivity to give the best estimate of heatflow into the Massif. We can constrain maximum permeability in gabbro below 750 mbsf to 5e-17 m2. The thermal gradient in the upper part of the borehole can be matched with a permeability of 3e-14 m2 in a 750 m thick layer parallel to the surface of the massif, with upflow occurring in areas of high topography and downflow at the location of the borehole. However in 3-D the precise flow pattern is quite model dependent, and the thermal structure can be matched either by downflow centred on the borehole at lower permeability or centred a few hundred metres from the borehole at higher permeability. The borehole gradient is compatible with the longevity (>120 kyr) and outflow temperature (40-90 °C) of the LCHF either with a deep more permeable (1e-14 m2 to 1e-15 m2) domain beneath the vent site in 2-D or a permeable fault slot 500 to 1000m wide and parallel to the transform fault in 3-D. In both cases topography

  17. An authoritative global database for active submarine hydrothermal vent fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.; Maffei, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The InterRidge Vents Database is available online as the authoritative reference for locations of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields. Here we describe the revision of the database to an open source content management system and conduct a meta-analysis of the global distribution of known active vent fields. The number of known active vent fields has almost doubled in the past decade (521 as of year 2009), with about half visually confirmed and others inferred active from physical and chemical clues. Although previously known mainly from mid-ocean ridges (MORs), active vent fields at MORs now comprise only half of the total known, with about a quarter each now known at volcanic arcs and back-arc spreading centers. Discoveries in arc and back-arc settings resulted in an increase in known vent fields within exclusive economic zones, consequently reducing the proportion known in high seas to one third. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. The purpose of the database now extends beyond academic research and education and into marine policy and management, with at least 18% of known vent fields in areas granted or pending applications for mineral prospecting and 8% in marine protected areas.

  18. Anomaly Geochemical Fields in Siberian Hydrothermal Gold Deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition and internal structure of geochemical fields associated to hydrothermal gold deposits within the Siberian territory were investigated. The concentric zonal structure of ore-forming geochemical fields embracing accumulations of Au, Ag, Bi, Pb, Zn, Cu, Te, As in ore bodies and their adjacent locations, and Ni, Co, V, Cr, Mn, Ba, Ti – within the external margin of gold ore formations were determined. The thermometric properties of gas-fluid inclusions in minerals of hydrothermal gold deposits were described. The results specified not only high-mineralized but also weakly-salted fluids are involved in the formation of the deposit. The latter is subjected to both retrogressive boiling and the mechanisms of direct and reverse osmosis. In this case, ascending and descending fluids produce eddy fluxes during Earth rotation, where minerals of different composition are formed in this flow path. Produced spiral mineral-geochemical fields can be observed on satellite images as hierarchy circular pattern system. Both the analysis of anomalous geochemical field structure and satellite images make it possible to predict the ore bodies of different grades in complicated landscape geological conditions

  19. Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30°N, MAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, Adélie; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Schaeffer, Philippe; Kelley, Deborah S.

    2008-08-01

    The carbon geochemistry of serpentinized peridotites and gabbroic rocks recovered at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) and drilled at IODP Hole 1309D at the central dome of the Atlantis Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N) was examined to characterize carbon sources and speciation in oceanic basement rocks affected by long-lived hydrothermal alteration. Our study presents new data on the geochemistry of organic carbon in the oceanic lithosphere and provides constraints on the fate of dissolved organic carbon in seawater during serpentinization. The basement rocks of the Atlantis Massif are characterized by total carbon (TC) contents of 59 ppm to 1.6 wt% and δ 13C TC values ranging from -28.7‰ to +2.3‰. In contrast, total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations and isotopic compositions are relatively constant (δ 13C TOC: -28.9‰ to -21.5‰) and variations in δ 13C TC reflect mixing of organic carbon with carbonates of marine origin. Saturated hydrocarbons extracted from serpentinites beneath the LCHF consist of n-alkanes ranging from C 15 to C 30. Longer-chain hydrocarbons (up to C 40) are observed in olivine-rich samples from the central dome (IODP Hole 1309D). Occurrences of isoprenoids (pristane, phytane and squalane), polycyclic compounds (hopanes and steranes) and higher relative abundances of n-C 16 to n-C 20 alkanes in the serpentinites of the southern wall suggest a marine organic input. The vent fluids are characterized by high concentrations of methane and hydrogen, with a putative abiotic origin of hydrocarbons; however, evidence for an inorganic source of n-alkanes in the basement rocks remains equivocal. We propose that high seawater fluxes in the southern part of the Atlantis Massif likely favor the transport and incorporation of marine dissolved organic carbon and overprints possible abiotic geochemical signatures. The presence of pristane, phytane and squalane biomarkers in olivine-rich samples associated with local faults at the central

  20. Two hydrothermal fields found on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO ChunHui; LEI JiJiang; WANG YeJian; DY115-21 Leg 4 Science Party; LI HuaiMing; YANG YaoMin; NI JianYu; CUI RuYong; CHEN YongShun; LI JiaBiao; HE YongHua; HUANG Wei

    2011-01-01

    In recent years,a series of cruises have been launched by China Ocean Mineral Resources Research and Development Association (COMRA) to conduct hydrothermal activity investigation at mid-ocean ridges (MOR).Since the first active hydrothermal field at 49.6°E Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) was found in 2007 by Chinese scientists on board R/V Dayangyihao,more hydrothermal fields have been found on the SWIR and equatorial East Pacific Rise (EPR)[1-4].From November to December 2009,two new hydrothermal fields were discovered at 13°-14°S South MidAtlantic Ridge (SMAR) during Cruise DYl15-21,representing the first discovery of hydrothermal fields on the MAR for China.They are also the southernmost hydrothermal fields known on the MAR at that time.

  1. Pathways for abiotic organic synthesis at submarine hydrothermal fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Jill M; Seewald, Jeffrey S; German, Christopher R; Sylva, Sean P

    2015-06-23

    Arguments for an abiotic origin of low-molecular weight organic compounds in deep-sea hot springs are compelling owing to implications for the sustenance of deep biosphere microbial communities and their potential role in the origin of life. Theory predicts that warm H2-rich fluids, like those emanating from serpentinizing hydrothermal systems, create a favorable thermodynamic drive for the abiotic generation of organic compounds from inorganic precursors. Here, we constrain two distinct reaction pathways for abiotic organic synthesis in the natural environment at the Von Damm hydrothermal field and delineate spatially where inorganic carbon is converted into bioavailable reduced carbon. We reveal that carbon transformation reactions in a single system can progress over hours, days, and up to thousands of years. Previous studies have suggested that CH4 and higher hydrocarbons in ultramafic hydrothermal systems were dependent on H2 generation during active serpentinization. Rather, our results indicate that CH4 found in vent fluids is formed in H2-rich fluid inclusions, and higher n-alkanes may likely be derived from the same source. This finding implies that, in contrast with current paradigms, these compounds may form independently of actively circulating serpentinizing fluids in ultramafic-influenced systems. Conversely, widespread production of formate by ΣCO2 reduction at Von Damm occurs rapidly during shallow subsurface mixing of the same fluids, which may support anaerobic methanogenesis. Our finding of abiogenic formate in deep-sea hot springs has significant implications for microbial life strategies in the present-day deep biosphere as well as early life on Earth and beyond.

  2. A data processing method for MAPR hydrothermal plume tur-bidity data and its application in the Precious Stone Mountain hydrothermal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Sheng; TAO Chunhui; LI Huaiming; CHEN Yongshun; ZHOU Jianping; WU Tao

    2014-01-01

    Hydrothermal plume is an important constituent of seabed hydrothermal circulation and is also one of the characteristics of active hydrothermal vents. Portable Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorders (MAPR) attached to a towed deep-sea instrument was used to search for hydrothermal plumes and hydrothermal vents. We introduced the basic principle of MAPR based on deep towing technology to detect plumes, then analyzed the factors affecting the quality of the MAPR data and presented a data correction method for MAPR, including instrument location correction, noise reduction processing, system error elimination and seawater background reduction. Finally we applied the method to analyze MAPR data obtained during the Chinese DY115-21 cruise on R/VDayang Iin the “Precious Stone Mountain” hydrothermal field on the Gala-pagos Microplate. The results provided a better understanding of the distribution of the hydrothermal activ-ity in this field, indicating the presence of a new hydrothermal vent.

  3. Variability in the microbial communities and hydrothermal fluid chemistry at the newly discovered Mariner hydrothermal field, southern Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Ken; Nunoura, Takuro; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Lupton, John; Suzuki, Ryohei; Hamasaki, Hiroshi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Gamo, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Yohey; Hirayama, Hisako; Horikoshi, Koki

    2008-06-01

    A newly discovered hydrothermal field called the Mariner field on the Valu Fa Ridge in the southern Lau Basin was explored and characterized with geochemical and microbiological analyses. The hydrothermal fluid discharging from the most vigorous vent (Snow Chimney, maximum discharge temperature 365°C) was boiling at the seafloor at a depth of 1908 m, and two distinct end-member hydrothermal fluids were identified. The fluid chemistry of the typical Cl-enriched and Cl-depleted hydrothermal fluids was analyzed, as was the mineralogy of the host chimney structures. The variability in the fluid chemistry was potentially controlled by the subseafloor phase-separation (vapor loss process) and the microbial community activities. Microbial community structures in three chimney structures were investigated using culture-dependent and -independent techniques. The small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene clone analysis revealed that both bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities on the chimney surfaces differed among three chimneys. Cultivation analysis demonstrated significant variation in the culturability of various microbial components among the chimneys, particularly of thermophilic H2-oxidizing (and S-oxidizing) chemolithoautotrophs such as the genera Aquifex and Persephonella. The physical and chemical environments of chimney surface habitats are still unresolved and do not directly extrapolate the environments of possible subseafloor habitats. However, the variability in microbial community found in the chimneys also provides an insight into the different biogeochemical interactions potentially affected by the phase separation of the hydrothermal fluids in the subseafloor hydrothermal habitats. In addition, comparison with other deep-sea hydrothermal systems revealed that the Mariner field microbial communities have unusual characteristics.

  4. Hydrothermal and magmatic couplings at mid-ocean ridges : controls on the locations of high-temperature hydrothermal vent fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Fabrice; Rabinowicz, Michel; Cannat, Mathilde; Escartin, Javier

    2013-04-01

    The heat output and thermal regime of oceanic spreading centers are strongly controlled by boundary layer processes between the hydrothermal system and the underlying crustal magma chamber, which remain to be fully understood. In thermal models, the dynamical interactions between the hydrothermal system and the deeper part of the lithosphere affected by processes such as magma chamber convection, magma crystallization and latent heat release, or simple conduction, is usually not considered and a ad-hoc temperature or heat flux is prescribed at the base of the hydrothermal layer. In this work we develop original two-dimensional numerical models of the interactions between a shallow cellular hydrothermal (porous) system at temperatures hydrothermal fields such as those discovered along the East Pacific Rise at 9°50'N or along the Juan de Fuca ridge/Endeavour segment for example. One hypothesis is that these fields require the formation of "elongated" hydrothermal convection cells that cool the crust on 5-10 kms, but the processes controlling the formation of such large aspect ratio (length/height) are poorly constrain. Our models show that such cells naturally arise from the dynamical coupling between a « low-viscosity », convecting lower-crust and a low-permeability upper hydrothermal layer. They also predict along-axis variations in the depth of the axial magma lens (AMC) seismic reflector of fast- and intermediate-spreading axes, and constrain lower oceanic crust cooling rates. They also suggest a dynamic link between upper oceanic crust along-axis permeability variations and stresses due to lower crust magmatic flow. We discuss the likelihood of this range of viscosity and permeability using available oceanic and ophiolites constraints and suggest that our work can motivate and help design future deep-sea experiments (e.g., drilling…).

  5. The characteristics of hydrothermal plumes observed in the Precious Stone Mountain hydrothermal field, the Galapagos spreading center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.; Tao, C.; Li, H.; Zhou, J.; Deng, X.; Tao, W.; Zhang, G.; Liu, W.; He, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Precious Stone Mountain hydrothermal field (PSMHF) is located on the southern rim of the Galapagos Microplate. It was found at the 3rd leg of the 2009 Chinese DY115-21 expedition on board R/V Dayangyihao. It is efficient to learn the distribution of hydrothermal plumes and locate the hydrothermal vents by detecting the anomalies of turbidity and temperature. Detecting seawater turbidity by MAPR based on deep-tow technology is established and improved during our cruises. We collected data recorded by MAPR and information from geological sampling, yielding the following results: (1)Strong hydrothermal turbidity and temperature anomalies were recorded at 1.23°N, southeast and northwest of PSMHF. According to the CTD data on the mooring system, significant temperature anomalies were observed over PSMHF at the depth of 1,470 m, with anomalies range from 0.2℃ to 0.4℃, which gave another evidence of the existence of hydrothermal plume. (2)At 1.23°N (101.4802°W/1.2305°N), the nose-shaped particle plume was concentrated at a depth interval of 1,400-1,600 m, with 200 m thickness and an east-west diffusion range of 500 m. The maximum turbidity anomaly (0.045 △NTU) was recorded at the depth of 1,500 m, while the background anomaly was about 0.01△NTU. A distinct temperature anomaly was also detected at the seafloor near 1.23°N. Deep-tow camera showed the area was piled up by hydrothermal sulfide sediments. (3) In the southeast (101.49°W/1.21°N), the thickness of hydrothermal plume was 300 m and it was spreading laterally at a depth of 1,500-1,800 m, for a distance about 800 m. The maximum turbidity anomaly of nose-shaped plume is about 0.04 △NTU at the depth of 1,600 m. Distinct temperature anomaly was also detected in the northwest (101.515°W/1.235°N). (4) Terrain and bottom current were the main factors controlling the distribution of hydrothermal plume. Different from the distribution of hydrothermal plumes on the mid-ocean ridges, which was mostly

  6. Microbial carbon cycling in Lost City hydrothermal chimneys and other serpentinite-hosted ecosystems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazelton, W. J.; Lang, S. Q.; Morrill, P. L.; Twing, K. I.; Crespo-Medina, M.; Morgan-Smith, D.; Früh-Green, G. L.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Ultramafic rocks formed in the Earth's mantle and uplifted into the crust represent an immense but poorly described reservoir of carbon. The biological availability of this rock-hosted carbon reservoir is unknown, but the set of geochemical reactions known as serpentinization can mobilize carbon from the subsurface and trigger the growth of dense microbial communities. Serpentinite-hosted ecosystems such as the chimney biofilms of the Lost City hydrothermal field can support dense populations of bacteria and archaea fueled by the copious quantities of H2 and methane (CH4) released by serpentinization (1-5). The metabolic pathways involved, however, remain unknown, and conventional interpretations of genomic and experimental data are complicated by the unusual carbon speciation in these environments. Carbon dioxide is scarce due to the highly reducing, high pH conditions. Instead, the predominant forms of carbon are CH4 and formate (5). Despite its natural abundance, however, direct evidence for CH4-derived biomass is lacking (1,4,5), and the role of formate is potentially significant but largely unexplored (1,5). To gain a more generalized perspective of carbon cycling in serpentinite-hosted ecosystems, we have recently investigated fluids and rocks collected from serpentinizing ophiolites in California, Canada, and Italy. Our results point to potentially H2-utilizing, autotrophic Betaproteobacteria thriving in shallow, oxic-anoxic transition zones and anaerobic Clostridia inhabiting anoxic, subsurface zones (1,6). The carbon sources utilized by the Clostridia are unknown, but preliminary metagenomic evidence is consistent with a fermentation-style metabolic strategy that may be conducive to an oxidant-limited, subsurface environment. Curiously, despite the abundance of H2 and CH4 in these continental springs, none of the geochemical, genomic, or experimental results obtained thus far contain any evidence for biological methanogenesis (1,6). This is in stark

  7. Spatial distribution of microbial communities in the shallow submarine alkaline hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay, New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéméneur, Marianne; Bes, Méline; Postec, Anne; Mei, Nan; Hamelin, Jérôme; Monnin, Christophe; Chavagnac, Valérie; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Guentas-Dombrowsky, Linda; Gérard, Martine; Pisapia, Céline; Gérard, Emmanuelle; Ménez, Bénédicte; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël

    2014-12-01

    The shallow submarine hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay (New Caledonia) discharges hydrogen- and methane-rich fluids with low salinity, temperature (microbial community structure, abundance and diversity depending on the location, water depth, and structure of the carbonate chimneys. The low archaeal diversity was dominated by few uncultured Methanosarcinales similar to those found in other serpentinization-driven submarine and subterrestrial ecosystems (e.g. Lost City, The Cedars). The most abundant and diverse bacterial communities were mainly composed of Chloroflexi, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Functional gene analysis revealed similar abundance and diversity of both Methanosarcinales methanoarchaea, and Desulfovibrionales and Desulfobacterales sulfate-reducers in the studied sites. Molecular studies suggest that redox reactions involving hydrogen, methane and sulfur compounds (e.g. sulfate) are the energy driving forces of the microbial communities inhabiting the Prony hydrothermal system.

  8. Petrology and Geochemistry of Hydrothermally Altered Volcanic Rocks in the Iheya North Hydrothermal Field, Middle Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Iheya North hydrothermal field is located in the middle Okinawa Trough, a young and actively spreading back-arc basin extending behind the Ryukyu arc-trench system in the southeastern margin of the East China Sea. In this hydrothermal field, two scientific drilling expeditions (IODP Exp 331 and SIP CK14-04) were conducted using a deep-sea drilling vessel "Chikyu," and samples from a total of 27 holes were taken. Through these expeditions, Kuroko-type volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits (VMS), hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks, and pumiceous and pelagic sediments were recovered. The recovered core provided important information about the relationship between hydrothermal activity, alteration, and ore mineralization. Whole-rock major element composition and trace element (TE) patterns of pumices were very similar to those of rhyolites in the middle Okinawa Trough (RMO). However, pumices were relatively enriched in chalcophile elements Sr and Nb, which suggest incipient mineralization. Volcanic rock generally demonstrated strong silicification and was greenish pale gray in color. Regardless of severe alteration, some rock displayed major element composition broadly similar to the RMO. Alteration was evidenced by an increase in the content of SiO2 and MgO, and decrease in Al2O3, Na2O, and K2O content. The most striking geochemical feature of altered volcanic rock was the discordance between texture and the degree of modification of TEs. Some samples showed decussate texture occupied by petal-like quartz with severe silicification, but no prominent disturbance of concentration and patterns of TEs were observed. In contrast, samples with well-preserved igneous porphyritic texture showed very low TE content and modification of TE patterns. These results suggest that the modification of texture and composition of TEs, as well as silicification, do not occur by a uniform process, but several processes. This may reflect the differences in temperature and the

  9. Geochronology of TAG and Snakepit hydrothermal fields, Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Witness to a long and complex hydrothermal history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochronological studies of a large number of precipitates from the TAG hydrothermal field and of few samples from Snakepit hydrothermal field of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge show intermittent repeated hydrothermal events at both sites. 210Pb/Pb and 230Th/234U measurements of sulfides, iron and manganese oxides, and 14C measurements of carbonates combined with observations of hydrothermal events recorded as discrete layers in sediment cores provide the basis for unravelling the temporal history of the fields. The TAG field shows intermittent activity over the past 120,000 years as evidenced by ages of low-temperature Mn oxides. The presently active black smoker mound first formed about 40,000-50,000 years ago with precipitation of massive sulfides. It has had intermittent, pulsed high-temperature activity every 5000-6000 years over the past 20,000 years which may reflect renewed magmatic actvity at the ridge axis. Fluid flow is focussed at the mound site by structural and tectonic control suggested by the intersection of N-S ridge parallel lystric normal faults and an E-W transform fault. Periods of inactivity are marked by covering of the mound with pelagic carbonate ooze which is probably partially dissolved and reprecipiated as aragonite at the end of each high-temperature event. The Snakepit field had an initial event about 4000 years ago, probably shortly after the eruption of the volcanic ridge on which it sits. A recent renewal, still presently active, was probably initiated by recent fissuring of the volcanic pile. (orig.)

  10. Sulfur isotopic composition of seafloor hydrothermal sediment from the Jade hydrothermal field in the central Okinawa Trough and its geological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾志刚; 李军; 蒋富清; 翟世奎; 秦蕴珊; 侯增谦

    2002-01-01

    --Eighteen samples of hydrothermal sediments from the Jade hydrotherrnal field in the central Okinawa Trough have been analyzed. Sulfur isotopic values for 10 sulfide samples vary from 5.2 ×10-3to 7.2× 10-3, δ34S valUes for 7 sulfate samples vary from 16.3 × 10-3 to 22.3 × 10-3, and 1 native sulphur sample has a δ34S value of 8.2 × 10-3. The major sources of sulfur for hydrothermal sediment are intermediate to acid volcanic rocks and sea water sulfate, and it is possible that the partial sulfur of hydrothermal sediment is from the pelagic sediment by the interaction between hydrothermal fluid and sediment. The reasons of causing the distinct differences in sulfur isotopic values for sulfide samples from hydrothermal sediment ( compared with other hydrothermal fields), are the differences in the sources of sulfur, the magmatic activity and the tectonic evolution in different hydrothermal fields. The sulfur evolution is a long and complex process in the seafloor hydrothermal system, involving the ascending of heating sea water, the interaction between fluid and volcanic rocks, the mixing of sea water sulfate and sulfur from intermediate to acid volcanic rocks, and the fluid/pelagic-sediment interaction. And the interaction between sea water and intermediate to acid volcanic rocks is an important mechanism for the sulfur evolution in the Jade hydrothermal field.

  11. Lead isotopic evidence on the origin of hydrothermal veins, Lake City, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, R.F.; Ludwig, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The 23-m.y. Lake City caldera (LCC) and enclosing 29-m.y. Uncompahgre caldera (UC) and associated Eureka graben (EG) are host to Ag-Pb-Zn epithermal veins. Lead isotopic data on 32 new galena samples and 12 previously measured galenas from these areas show that 206Pb/204Pb values for veins within the LCC are sharply lower than for veins outside the LCC. Thus, fluids that formed the two sets of veins derived their Pb from distinctly different sources. Veins in the UC-EG typically have 206Pb/204Pb values in the range 18.6-19.0, but four small areas around the LCC have higher values (up to 19.6). These hot spots, which include the two largest and most productive veins, may represent locally deeper circulation of fluids or locally shallower Precambrian basement. There are no systematic differences among the different areas in the UC-EG. Instead, the largest variations are within areas or districts. Likewise, the Pb isotopic values from different paragenetic assemblages are not distinctly different but show considerable overlap. Many 207Pb/204Pb values are higher relative to their 206Pb/204Pb than those from veins else wherein the San Juan Mountains and are also higher than these values in likely source rocks, which suggests that source rocks having higher 207Pb/206Pb values than are currently known in this area exist at depth. Thorogenic Pb (208Pb/204Pb) values are closely correlated positively with 206Pb/204Pb values and indicate a source that is relatively homogeneous with respect to its Th/U ratio. Thus, the data suggest at least two major hydrothermal systems corresponding to veins in the UC-EG and LCC, respectively. Local differences in source rocks, fluid circulation, and perhaps heat flow, contributed to locally different Pb signatures in closely spaced but separate hydrothermal cells within these areas.

  12. Comparison of intact polar lipid with microbial community composition of vent deposits of the Rainbow and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson, R.A.; van der Meer, M.T.J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Reysenbach, A.-L.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    The intact polar lipid (IPL) composition of twelve hydrothermal vent deposits from the Rainbow (RHF) and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields (LSHF) has been investigated in order to assess its utility as a proxy for microbial community composition associated with deep-sea hydrothermal locations. Gene-b

  13. Petrophysical characteristics of rocks and sulfides from the SWIR hydrothermal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Chunhui; WU Tao; JIN Xiaobing; DOU Bingjun; LI Huaiming; ZHOU Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Study of petrophysical properties of rocks in seafloor hydrothermal fields has great significance for inves-tigation of seafloor hydrothermal activities, especially for polymetallic sulfides prospecting. In the present study, based on the current experimental conditions, we conducted systematic experiments to measure the magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity, porosity, density, as well as acoustic wave velocity of seafloor rocks and sulfides. Subsequently, we measured the physical characteristics of hydrothermal sulfides, basalts and peridotites which were collected from newly discovered seafloor hydrothermal fields at 49.6°E, 50.5°E, 51°E, 63.5°E, and 63.9°E of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Previously available and newly collected data were combined to characterize the physical differences between polymetallic sulfides and rocks. We also discussed the impact of hydrothermal alteration on the bedrock and demonstrated how these petrophysical properties of rocks can help in geophysical prospecting of seafloor hydrothermal fields as indicators.

  14. Hydrothermal vent fields and chemosynthetic biota on the world's deepest seafloor spreading centre.

    OpenAIRE

    Connelly, D. P.; Copley, J.T.; Murton, B.J.; Stansfield, K.; Tyler, P. A.; German, C.R.; Van Dover, C.L.; Amon, D.; Furlong, M.; Grindlay, N.; Hayman, N; Huhnerbach, V.; Judge, M; Le Bas, T; McPhail, S

    2012-01-01

    The Mid-Cayman spreading centre is an ultraslow-spreading ridge in the Caribbean Sea. Its extreme depth and geographic isolation from other mid-ocean ridges offer insights into the effects of pressure on hydrothermal venting, and the biogeography of vent fauna. Here we report the discovery of two hydrothermal vent fields on the Mid-Cayman spreading centre. The Von Damm Vent Field is located on the upper slopes of an oceanic core complex at a depth of 2,300 m. High-temperature venting in this ...

  15. Hydrothermal vent fields and chemosynthetic biota on the world's deepest seafloor spreading centre

    OpenAIRE

    Connelly, Douglas P.; Copley, Jaonathan T.; Murton, Bramley J.; Stansfield, Kate; Tyler, Paul A.; German, Cristopher R.; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Amon, Diva; Furlong, Maaten; Grindlay, Nancy; Hayman, Nicholas; Hühnerbach, Veit; Judge, Maria; Le Bas, Tim; McPhail, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Mid-Cayman spreading centre is an ultraslow-spreading ridge in the Caribbean Sea. Its extreme depth and geographic isolation from other mid-ocean ridges offer insights into the effects of pressure on hydrothermal venting, and the biogeography of vent fauna. Here we report the discovery of two hydrothermal vent fields on the Mid-Cayman spreading centre. The Von Damm Vent Field is located on the upper slopes of an oceanic core complex at a depth of 2,300 m. High-temperature venting in this ...

  16. Thermaerobacter litoralis sp. nov., a strictly aerobic and thermophilic bacterium isolated from a coastal hydrothermal field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanaka, Reiji; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Hiroshi;

    2006-01-01

    A novel thermophilic bacterium, strain KW1T, was isolated from a coastal hydrothermal field on the Satsuma Peninsula, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. The variably Gram-stained cells were motile rods with flagella, did not form spores and proliferated at 52-78°C (optimum, 70°C), pH 5-8 (optimum, pH 7...

  17. Modeling Seafloor Deformation at the TAG Hydrothermal Field: Feedbacks between Permeability and Poroelastic Fluid Flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, T. J.; Sohn, R. A.; Barreyre, T.

    2014-12-01

    Recent measurements of ocean bottom pressure suggest that hydrothermal flow induces cm-scale periodic ground surface displacement (GSD) at the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) hydrothermal field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Sohn et al., 2009). The pressure measurements contain spectral peaks and harmonics with periods ranging from 22 to 53 min, none of which can be attributed to oceanographic or Earth tide processes. It is hypothesized that GSD cycles in this system may result from a nonlinear feedback between pore pressure and permeability in the hydrothermal system. To test this hypothesis we have developed a poroelastic convection model representing the upper crustal section at TAG that includes a "switching" type pressure-permeability feedback in the stockwork zone of the hydrothermal system. In this zone, the permeability increases when the pressure reaches a critical high value, and decreases when it reaches a critical low value. This behavior simulates the opening and closing of cracks within the hydrothermal system, and is similar to mechanisms that have been proposed for dike propagation in magmatic systems (Buck et al., 2006). Our modeling suggests that this mechanism can generate GSD that are similar to those observed at TAG. We are currently using these models to explore the sensitivity of inflation and deflation rates to system properties such as the geometry of the stockwork zone, the temperature of fluid in the upflow zone, the elastic properties of the lithosphere, and the relationship between pore pressure and permeability.

  18. Hydrothermal alteration of sediments associated with surface emissions from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valette-Silver, J.N.; Esquer P., I.; Elders, W.A.; Collier, P.C.; Hoagland, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the mineralogical changes associated with these hydrothermal vents was initiated with the aim of developing possible exploration tools for geothermal resources. The Cerro Prieto reservoir has already been explored by extensive deep drilling so that relationships between surface manifestations and deeper hydrothermal processes could be established directly. Approximately 120 samples of surface sediments were collected both inside and outside of the vents. The mineralogy of the altered sediments studied appears to be controlled by the type of emission. A comparison between the changes in mineralogy due to low temperature hydrothermal activity in the reservoir, seen in samples from boreholes, and mineralogical changes in the surface emission samples shows similar general trends below 180 C: increase of quartz, feldspar and illite, with subsequent disappearance of kaolinite, montmorillonite, calcite and dolomite. These mineral assemblages seem to be characteristic products of the discharge from high intensity geothermal fields.

  19. Decline of a Hydrothermal Vent Field - Escanaba Trough 12 Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierenberg, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Davis, A. S.; Lilley, M. D.; McClain, J. S.; Olson, E. S.; Ross, S. L.; Von Damm, K. L.

    2001-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting was discovered in Escanaba Trough, the southern sediment-covered portion of the Gorda Ridge, in 1988. Large pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide mounds are abundant at each of the volcanic/intrusive centers that have been investigated in Escanaba Trough, but the only area of known hydrothermal venting is the NESCA site along the ridge axis at 41\\deg N. Hydrothermal fluids venting at 217\\deg C and 108\\deg C were sampled in 1988 on two sulfide mounds separated by about 275 m. The end-member fluid compositions were indistinguishable within analytical errors. Several sulfide mounds were observed in 1988 which had diffusely venting low temperature (holes were drilled in the NESCA area in 1996 on ODP Leg 169, including Hole 1036I that penetrated to basaltic basement at 405 m below sea floor (mbsf). Surveys of the area using the drill string camera located only one area of active venting at the same mound where 217\\deg C vent fluids were sampled from two active vents in 1988. Drill hole 1036A was spudded between the two active vents on this sulfide mound (approximately 4 and 8 m away) and penetrated to 115 mbsf. The NESCA site was revisited in 2000 using MBARI's R/V Western Flyer and ROV Tiburon. The hydrothermal vents appeared essentially identical to observations made from the drill string camera in 1996 despite the presence of a drill hole within meters of the two vents. The maximum vent temperature measured in 2000 was 212\\deg C. Fluid samples have major element and isotopic compositions very similar to those collected in 1988. The vent fluids have higher methane ( ~19 mmol/kg) than those from the geologically similar Middle Valley vent field, but lower values than those at Guaymas Basin. Drill hole 1036A was weakly venting, but the diffuse hydrothermal fluids could not be sampled with the equipment available. The walls of the drill hole were colonized by palm worms, limpets, and snails. Four other drill holes showed no hydrothermal flow nor

  20. Study on the High Precision Acoustic Measurement Techniques for Determining Temperature Field Around Seafloor Hydrothermal Vent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Yong; FAN Wei; ZHOU Yan; FU Xian-qiao; FANG Hui; JIN Tao

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the basis of acoustic method used for temperature field measurement of seafloor hydrothermal vent and two techniques of the parabolic interpolation and the bending compensation of propagation paths of acoustic signal are introduced.Experimental research is performed to exactly rebuild the temperature field around hot springs on the floor of Qiezishan Lake,Yunnan,China.The accuracy of the travel time estimation has been improved based on the aforementioned technique and method.At the same time,by comparison of the results of temperature field with different means,the max absolute error,the maximum relative error and the root mean square error are given.It shows that the technique and the method presented in the paper can be applied to the temperature field measurement detector around the seafloor hydrothermal vent.It also has a good accuracy.

  1. Characteristics of Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of hydrothermal Si-Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides at the PACMANUS hydrothermal field, Eastern Manus Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Baoju; ZENG Zhigang; WANG Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Si-Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides dredged at the PACMANUS (Papua New Guinea–Australia–Canada–Manus) hydrothermal field, Eastern Manus Basin, have87Sr/86Sr=0.708 079–0.708 581;εNd=5.149 833–6.534 826;208Pb/204Pb=38.245–38.440;207Pb/204Pb=15.503–15.560;206Pb/204Pb=18.682–18.783.87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios are relatively homogeneous and close to the value of the surrounding seawater (0.709 16). The content of Sr in the samples contributed by seawater was estimated to be 76.7%–83.1% of total amount. The mixing temperature of hydrothermal fluids and seawater were ranging from 53.2°C to 72.2°C and the hydrothermal activities were unstable when the samples precipitated. TheεNd values of all the samples are positive, which differ from the values of ferromanganese nodules (crusts) with hydrogenic origin. Nd was mainly derived from substrate rocks leached by hydrothermal circulation and preserved the hydrothermal signature. Pb isotopic compositions of most samples show minor variability except Sample #9–2 that has relatively high values of Pb isotopes. The Pb may be derived from the Eastern Manus Basin rocks leached by the hydrothermal fluid. The slightly lower208Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb values of the samples indicated that the hydrothermal circulation in PACMANUS was not entire and sufficient, or that hydrothermal circulation had transient changes in the past. Si-Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides in the samples preserved the heterogeneities of local rocks.

  2. Field-based tests of geochemical modeling codes: New Zealand hydrothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will determine how the codes can be used to predict the chemical and mineralogical response of the environment to nuclear waste emplacement. Field-based exercises allow us to test the models on time scales unattainable in the laboratory. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei and Kawerau geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions

  3. Evaluation of nutrient sources for the sponges inhabited around seafloor hydrothermal fields in the Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashio, H.; Yamanaka, T.; Watanabe, H.; Yamagami, S.; Ise, Y.; Makita, H.

    2012-12-01

    Since discovery of seafloor hydrothermal vents, the dense and endemic animal communities inhabited around the hot vents have been the most impressive feature for many scientists. Such animals have been known as chemosynthesis-based species and studied many investigators. On the other hand, some benthic animals found on abyssal plain have been observed slightly high density at the adjacent area to active vent sites. It implies that those opportunistic benthoses may also rely on the chemosynthetic primary production and the hydrothermal chemosynthetic ecosystem may extend widely rather than previous expectation. In that case, it is an interesting issue how the dense sponge community is sustained around the hydrothermal fields. For clarifying the issue isotope geochemical study has been performed to evaluate food sources of the sponges and some other animals obtained from the deep seafloor in the Okinawa Trough. Stable isotope analysis for carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur of the sample organisms obtained from the Izena Hole, where active hydrothermal emission has been observed, show significant low d13C and d34S values for the sponge samples. Those results suggest plausible contribution of sulfur oxidizing bacteria as food source for the sponges because such low d13C and d34S values are often observed for thioautotrophic chemosynthesis-based animals. The sulfur isotopic ratios of the sponges are almost comparable with the ratio reported hydrogen sulfide emitted from the vents, implying that the source of sulfur for sulfur oxidizing bacteria is magmatic and/or hydrothermal in origin. On the other hand, the sponge sample obtained from the Tarama Knoll ,where active hydrothermal emission were not found yet, shows similar isotopic characteristics observed for the sponges from the Izena Hole. It may also imply the importance of sulfur oxidizing bacteria as food source for the sponge at the Tarama Knoll. Turbid water was often observed during dive studies by the ROV around the

  4. Particle dynamics in the rising plume at Piccard Hydrothermal Field, Mid-Cayman Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estapa, M. L.; Breier, J. A.; German, C. R.

    2015-09-01

    Processes active in rising hydrothermal plumes, such as precipitation, particle aggregation, and biological growth, affect particle size distributions and can exert important influences on the biogeochemical impact of submarine venting of iron to the oceans and their sediments. However, observations to date of particle size distribution within these systems are both limited and conflicting. In a novel buoyant hydrothermal plume study at the recently discovered high-temperature (398°C) Piccard Hydrothermal Field, Mid-Cayman Rise, we report optical measurements of particle size distributions (PSDs). We describe the plume PSD in terms of a simple, power-law model commonly used in studies of upper and coastal ocean particle dynamics. Observed PSD slopes, derived from spectral beam attenuation and laser diffraction measurements, are among the highest found to date anywhere in the ocean and ranged from 2.9 to 8.5. Beam attenuation at 650 nm ranged from near zero to a rarely observed maximum of 192 m-1 at 3.5 m above the vent. We did not find large (>100 μm) particles that would settle rapidly to the sediments. Instead, beam attenuation was well-correlated to total iron, suggesting the first-order importance of particle dilution, rather than precipitation or dissolution, in the rising plume at Piccard. Our observations at Piccard caution against the assumption of rapid deposition of hydrothermal, particulate metal fluxes, and illustrate the need for more particle size and composition measurements across a broader range of sites, globally.

  5. Hydrothermal vent fields and chemosynthetic biota on the world's deepest seafloor spreading centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Douglas P; Copley, Jonathan T; Murton, Bramley J; Stansfield, Kate; Tyler, Paul A; German, Christopher R; Van Dover, Cindy L; Amon, Diva; Furlong, Maaten; Grindlay, Nancy; Hayman, Nicholas; Hühnerbach, Veit; Judge, Maria; Le Bas, Tim; McPhail, Stephen; Meier, Alexandra; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi; Nye, Verity; Pebody, Miles; Pedersen, Rolf B; Plouviez, Sophie; Sands, Carla; Searle, Roger C; Stevenson, Peter; Taws, Sarah; Wilcox, Sally

    2012-01-01

    The Mid-Cayman spreading centre is an ultraslow-spreading ridge in the Caribbean Sea. Its extreme depth and geographic isolation from other mid-ocean ridges offer insights into the effects of pressure on hydrothermal venting, and the biogeography of vent fauna. Here we report the discovery of two hydrothermal vent fields on the Mid-Cayman spreading centre. The Von Damm Vent Field is located on the upper slopes of an oceanic core complex at a depth of 2,300 m. High-temperature venting in this off-axis setting suggests that the global incidence of vent fields may be underestimated. At a depth of 4,960 m on the Mid-Cayman spreading centre axis, the Beebe Vent Field emits copper-enriched fluids and a buoyant plume that rises 1,100 m, consistent with >400 °C venting from the world's deepest known hydrothermal system. At both sites, a new morphospecies of alvinocaridid shrimp dominates faunal assemblages, which exhibit similarities to those of Mid-Atlantic vents. PMID:22233630

  6. First Active Hydrothermal Vent Fields Discovered at the Equatorial Southern East Pacific Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, C.; Lin, J.; Wu, G.; German, C. R.; Yoerger, D. R.; Chen, Y. J.; Guo, S.; Zeng, Z.; Han, X.; Zhou, N.; Li, J.; Xia, S.; Wang, H.; Ding, T.; Gao, S.; Qian, X.; Cui, R.; Zhou, J.; Ye, D.; Zhang8, Y.; Zhang, D.; Li, L.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Wu, X.; Li, S.; He, Y.; Huang, W.; Wang, Y.; Wang, T.; Li, X.; Wang, K.; Gai, Y.; Science Party, D.; Baker, E. T.; Nakamura14, K.

    2008-12-01

    The third leg of the 2008 Chinese DY115-20 expedition on board R/V Dayangyihao has successfully discovered, for the first time, active hydrothermal vent fields on the fast-spreading Southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) near the equator. This expedition follows the work of a 2005 expedition by R/V Dayangyihao, during which water column turbidity anomalies were measured in the region. The newly discovered vent fields are located along a 22-km-long ridge segment of the SEPR at 102.655°W/2.22°S, 102.646°W/2.152°S, 102.619°W/2.078°S, and 102.62°W/2.02°S, respectively, as well as on an off-axial volcano near 102.456°W/1.369°S. A significant portion of the activity appears to be concentrated along the edges of a seafloor fissure system. Furthermore, water column turbidity anomalies were observed over off-axis volcanoes near 102.827°W/2.084°S and 102.58°W/2.019°S. Video footage of the vent fields and water column turbidity, temperature, and methane anomalies were recorded by a deep-towed integrated system consisting of video, still camera, CTD, and ADCP, and MAPR and METS sensors. Two active hydrothermal fields at 2.217°S and 2.023°S were then extensively photographed and surveyed using the autonomous underwater vehicle ABE of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Four samples of hydrothermal chimneys were successfully obtained by a TV-guided grab in three locations, showing evidence of high-temperature hydrothermal venting.

  7. On the global distribution of hydrothermal vent fields: One decade later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, S. E.; Baker, E. T.; German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Since the last global compilation one decade ago, the known number of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields has almost doubled. At the end of 2009, a total of 518 active vent fields was catalogued, with about half (245) visually confirmed and others (273) inferred active at the seafloor. About half (52%) of these vent fields are at mid-ocean ridges (MORs), 25% at volcanic arcs, 21% at back-arc spreading centers (BASCs), and 2% at intra-plate volcanoes and other settings. One third are in high seas, and the nations with the most known active vent fields within EEZs are Tonga, USA, Japan, and New Zealand. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. Here, we have comprehensively documented the percentage of strike length at MORs and BASCs that has been systematically explored for hydrothermal activity. As of the end of 2009, almost 30% of the ~60,000 km of MORs had been surveyed at least with spaced vertical profiles to detect hydrothermal plumes. A majority of the vents discovered at MORs in the past decade occurred at segments with Antarctic Ridge, and the intermediate spreading Pacific-Antarctic Ridge. Although a greater percentage of the ~11,000 km of BASCs has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity, the discoveries at BASCs in the past decade were mainly at segments with intermediate to fast spreading rates. Using the same equation for F_s vs. u_s, we predicted 71 vent fields remaining to be discovered at BASCs, and most are likely to be found at ultra-slow and slow spreading segments (e.g., Andaman Basin, and central to northern Mariana Trough). With 2/3 of our overall predicted total vent fields at spreading ridges remaining to be discovered, we expect that the next decade of exploration will continue to yield new discoveries, leading to new insights into biogeography of vent fauna and the global impacts of fluxes of heat and

  8. Diffuse-flow hydrothermal field in an oceanic fracture zone setting, Northeast Pacific: Deposit composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J.R.; Koski, R.A.; Embley, R.W.; Reid, J.; Chang, S.-W.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first reported occurrence of an active hydrothermal field in an oceanic fracture zone setting. The hydrothermal field occurs in a pull-apart basin within the Blanco Fracture Zone (BFZ), which has four distinct mineral deposit types: (1) barite mounds and chimneys, (2) barite stockwork breccia, (3) silica-barite beds, and (4) silica, barite, and Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide in sediments. All deposit types contain minor amounts of sulfides. In barite stockwork, silica-barite beds, and mineralized sediment, Ba, Ph, Ag, S, Au, Zn, Cu, Hg, TI, As, Mo, Sb, U, Cd, and Cu are enriched relative to unmineralized rocks and sediments of the BFZ. Fe and Mn are not enriched in the barite stockwork or silica-barite beds, but along with P, Co, and Mg are enriched in the mineralized sediments. Silver contents in deposits of the hydrothermal field range up to 86 ppm, gold to 0.7 ppm, zinc to 3.2%, copper to 0.8%, and barium to 22%. Mineralization occurred by diffuse, low to intermediate temperature (mostly Metallurgy and Petroleum. All rights reserved.

  9. Origin of a native sulfur chimney in the Kueishantao hydrothermal field, offshore northeast Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG; ZhiGang; LIU; ChangHua; CHEN; ChenTung; A; YIN; XueBo; CHEN; DaiGeng; WANG; XiaoYuan; WANG; XiaoMei; ZHANG; GuoLiang

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of rare earth and trace element concentrations of native sulfur samples from the Kueishantao hydrothermal field were performed at the Seafloor Hydrothermal Activity Laboratory of the Key Laboratory of Marine Geology and Environment,Institute of Oceanology,Chinese Academy of Sciences.Using an Elan DRC II ICP-MS,and combining the sulfur isotopic compositions of native sulfur samples,we studied the sources and formation of a native sulfur chimney.The results show,when comparing them with native sulfur from crater lakes and other volcanic areas,that the native sulfur content of this chimney is very high (99.96%),the rare earth element (REE) and trace element constituents of the chimney are very low (ΣREE<21×10-9),and the chondrite-normalized REE patterns of the native sulfur samples are similar to those of the Kueishantao andesite,implying that the interaction of subseafloor fluid-andesite at the Kueishantao hydrothermal field was of short duration.The sulfur isotopic compositions of the native sulfur samples reveal that the sulfur of the chimney,from H2S and SO2,originated by magmatic degassing and that the REEs and trace elements are mostly from the Kueishantao andesite and partly from seawater.Combining these results with an analysis of the thermodynamics,it is clear that from the relatively low temperature (<116℃),the oxygenated and acidic environment is favorable for formation of this native sulfur chimney in the Kueishantao hydrothermal field.

  10. Hydrothermal surface alteration in the Copahue Geothermal Field (Argentina)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Graciela R.; Mas, Luis C.; Bengochea, Leandro

    1996-01-24

    In the area of the Copahue Geothermal Field, there are five active geothermal manifestations, which mainly consist of fumaroles, hot springs and mud pots. Four of these manifestations are located in Argentina: Las Máquinas, Termas de Copahue, Las Maquinitas and El Anfiteatro, and the fifth on the Chilean side: Chancho Co. All of them present a strong acid sulfate country rock alteration, characterized by the assemblage alunite + kaolinite + quartz + cristobalite + pyrite + sulfur + jarosite, as the result of the base leaching by fluids concentrated in H2SO4 by atmospheric oxidation at the water table in a steam heated environment of H2S released by deeper boiling fluids. Another alteration zone in this area, called COP-2, is a fossil geothermal manifestation which shows characteristics of neutral to alkaline alteration represented mainly by the siliceous sinter superimposed over the acid alteration. The mineralogy and zoning of these alteration zones, and their relation with the hidrothermal solutions and the major structures of the area are analized.

  11. Bacterial and archaeal diversity in an iron-rich coastal hydrothermal field in Yamagawa, Kagoshima, Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaichi, Satoshi; Ito, Norihiro; Yoshida, Takashi;

    2013-01-01

    . The environmental settings of the coastal hydrothermal field were similar in some degree to those of deep-sea hydrothermal environments because of its emission of H2, CO2, and sulfide from the bottom of the hot spot. The results of clone analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene led us to speculate the presence...... of a chemo-synthetic microbial ecosystem, where chemolithoautotrophic thermophiles, primarily the bacterial order Aquificales, function as primary producers using H2 or sulfur compounds as their energy source and CO2 as their carbon source, and the organic compounds synthesized by them support the growth...... of chemoheterotrophic thermophiles, such as members of the order Thermales and the family Desulfurococcaceae. In addition, the dominance of members of the bacterial genus Herbaspirillum in the high temperature bottom layer led us to speculate the temporal formation of mesophilic zones where they can also function...

  12. Estimation of heat and chemical fluxes from a seafloor hydrothermal vent field using radon measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, N.D.; Lupton, J.E.; Kadko, D.; Collier, R.; Lilley, M.D.; Pak, H.

    1988-08-18

    The circulation of seawater through newly formed ocean crust at mid-ocean ridge spreading centres is important in the oceanic heat and chemical budgets. Here we introduce a geochemical approach to estimating the flux from a hydrothermal vent field based on radon (/sup 222/Rn) measurements in the overlying effluent plume. This method was applied successfully in 1986 during a 23-day expedition to an active vent field on the 170-km Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We estimate the heat flux from this site to be 1-5 x 10/sup 9/ W.

  13. Geology, sulfide geochemistry and supercritical venting at the Beebe Hydrothermal Vent Field, Cayman Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Alexander P.; Roberts, Stephen; Murton, Bramley J.; Hodgkinson, Matthew R. S.

    2015-09-01

    The Beebe Vent Field (BVF) is the world's deepest known hydrothermal system, at 4960 m below sea level. Located on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre, Caribbean, the BVF hosts high temperature (˜401°C) "black smoker" vents that build Cu, Zn and Au-rich sulfide mounds and chimneys. The BVF is highly gold-rich, with Au values up to 93 ppm and an average Au:Ag ratio of 0.15. Gold precipitation is directly associated with diffuse flow through "beehive" chimneys. Significant mass-wasting of sulfide material at the BVF, accompanied by changes in metal content, results in metaliferous talus and sediment deposits. Situated on very thin (2-3 km thick) oceanic crust, at an ultraslow spreading centre, the hydrothermal system circulates fluids to a depth of ˜1.8 km in a basement that is likely to include a mixture of both mafic and ultramafic lithologies. We suggest hydrothermal interaction with chalcophile-bearing sulfides in the mantle rocks, together with precipitation of Au in beehive chimney structures, has resulted in the formation of a Au-rich volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit. With its spatial distribution of deposit materials and metal contents, the BVF represents a modern day analogue for basalt hosted, Au-rich VMS systems.

  14. He, Ne and Ar isotope compositions of fluid inclusions in hy-drothermal sulfides from the TAG hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Helium, neon and argon isotope compositions of fluid inclusionshave been measured in hydrothermal sulfide samples from the TAG hydrothermal field at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Fluid-inclusion 3He/4He ratios are 2.2-13.3 times the air value (Ra), and with a mean of 7.2 Ra. Com-parison with the local vent fluids (3He/4He=7.5-8.2 Ra) and mid-ocean ridge basalt values (3He/4He=6-11 Ra) shows that the variation range of 3He/4He ratios from sulfide-hosted fluid inclu-sions is significantly large. Values for 20Ne/22Ne are from 10.2 to 11.4, which are significantly higher than the atmospheric ratio (9.8). And fluid-inclusion 40Ar/36Ar ratios range from 287 to 359, which are close to the atmospheric values (295.5). These results indicate that the noble gases of fluid inclu-sions in hydrothermal sulfides are a mixture of mantle- and seawater-derived noble gases; the partial mantle-derived components of trapped hydrothermal fluids may be from the lower mantle; the helium of fluid inclusions is mainly from upper mantle; and the Ne and Ar components are mainly from seawater.

  15. In Situ Raman Spectra from the SeaCliff Hydrothermal Field (Gorda Ridge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Sherman, A. D.; Freeman, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    MBARI's in situ laser Raman spectrometer (DORISS - Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) was deployed at the SeaCliff Hydrothermal Field on the Gorda Ridge in July 2004. The first in situ Raman spectra of hydrothermal minerals and high-temperature fluid venting from the seafloor were obtained. These spectra are analyzed and compared to laboratory measurements of samples collected from the site. Laser Raman spectroscopy is a proven, powerful geochemical technique for analyzing the chemical composition and molecular structure of solids, liquids, and gases. During an expedition to Gorda Ridge on the R/V Western Flyer in July 2004, DORISS was deployed successfully by the ROV Tiburon at hydrothermal vents on the seafloor ( ˜2700 m depth). Data were collected from hydrothermal fluids, chimney minerals (e.g., anhydrite and barite), and bacterial mats using two types of sampling optics: an immersion optic, and a non-contact optic. To collect spectra from opaque mineral samples, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to position the DORISS probe head. PUP is a stand-alone, three degree-of-freedom positioner capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm (required by the small focal volume of the sampling optic). Raman spectra were collected of ˜300° C vent fluids with both sampling optics. The Raman spectrum of seawater contains bands from the bending ( ˜1640 cm-1) and stretching (3000-3700 cm-1) vibrational modes of the water molecule and a small peak from the S-O stretch of the sulfate ion ( ˜981 cm-1). Compared to ˜2° C ambient seawater, vent fluid spectra show changes in the intensity ratios of the water bands due to the elevated temperature, and the sulfate peak is reduced. Additional components of hydrothermal fluid are present in such low concentrations that it is difficult to detect them with the current Raman system. The chimneys in the SeaCliff field are primarily anhydrite, and debris in the area also contains barite. We were

  16. He, Ne and Ar isotope compositions of fluid inclusions in hy-drothermal sulfides from the TAG hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG; Zhigang; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Rona, P. A. , Klinkhammer, G. , Nelsen, T. A. et al. , Black smokers, massive sulphides and vent biota at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Nature, 1986, 321: 33.[2]Edmonds, H. N. , German, C. R. , Green, D. R. H. et al. , Continuation of the hydrothermal fluid chemistry time series at TAG, and the effects of ODP drilling, Geophys. Res. Lett., 1996, 23: 3487.[3]Charlou, J. L. , Donval, J. P. , Jean-Baptiste, P. et al. , Gases and helium isotopes in high temperature solutions sampled before and after ODP Leg158 drilling at TAG hydrothermal field (26°N, MAR), Geophys. Res. Lett., 1996, 23: 3491. [4]Rudnicki, M. D. , Elderfield, H. , Helium, radon and manganese at the TAG and Snakepit hydrothermal vent fields, 26°and 23°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 1992, 113: 307. [5]Butterfield, D. A. , Massoth, G. J. , McDuff, R. E. et al. , Geochemistry of fluids from Axial Seamount hydrothermal emissions study vent field, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Subseafloor boiling and subsequent fluid-rock interaction, Journal of Geophysical Research, 1990, 95: 12895. [6]Baker, E. T. , Lupton, J. E. , Changes in submarine hydrothermal 3He/heat ratios as an indicator of magmatic/tectonic activity, Nature, 1990, 346: 556. [7]Jean-Baptiste, P. , Fouquet, Y. , Abundance and isotopic composition of helium in hydrothermal sulfides from the East Pacific Rise at 13°N, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 1996, 60: 87. [8]Stuart, F. M. , Turner, G. , Duckworth, R. C. et al. , Helium isotopes as tracers of trapped hydrothermal fluids in ocean-floor sulfides, Geology, 1994, 22: 823. [9]Stuart, F. M. , Duckworth, R. , Turner, G. et al. , Helium and sulfur isotopes in sulfide minerals from Middle Valley, Northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, 1994, 139: 387. [10]Turner, G. , Stuart, F. , Helium/heat ratios and deposition temperatures of sulphides from the ocean floor, Nature, 1992, 357: 581.[11

  17. High-resolution near-bottom vector magnetic anomalies over Raven Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Johnson, H. Paul; Salmi, Marie S.; Hutnak, Michael

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution, near-bottom vector magnetic data were collected by remotely operated vehicle Jason over the Raven hydrothermal vent field (47°57.3'N 129°5.75'W) located north of Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The survey was part of a comprehensive heat flow study of the Raven site using innovative thermal blanket technology to map the heat flux and crustal fluid pathways around a solitary hydrothermal vent field. Raven hydrothermal activity is presently located along the western axial valley wall, while additional inactive hydrothermal deposits are found to the NW on the upper rift valley wall. Magnetic inversion results show discrete areas of reduced magnetization associated with both active and inactive hydrothermal vent deposits that also show high conductive heat flow. Higher spatial variability in the heat flow patterns compared to the magnetization is consistent with the heat flow reflecting the currently active but ephemeral thermal environment of fluid flow, while crustal magnetization is representative of the static time-averaged effect of hydrothermal alteration. A general NW to SE trend in reduced magnetization across the Raven area correlates closely with the distribution of hydrothermal deposits and heat flux patterns and suggests that the fluid circulation system at depth is likely controlled by local crustal structure and magma chamber geometry. Magnetic gradient tensor components computed from vector magnetic data improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly source and indicate that the hydrothermally altered zone directly beneath the Raven site is approximately 15 × 106 m3 in volume.

  18. Hydrothermal alteration in the EPF replacement wells, Olkaria Geothermal field, Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mungania, J. [Kenya Power & Lighting Co. Ltd., Naivasha (Kenya)

    1996-12-31

    Olkaria Geothermal area is located in the central sector of the Kenya, Rift Valley. A 45MW Geothermal power station has been operational at Olkaria since 1985 supplied by 22 of the 26 wells drilled in the Eastern production field (EPF). Between 1988 and 1993, eight more wells referred to as {open_quote}replacement wells{close_quote} were drilled in the same field to boost steam supply to the station. Petrographic analyses of the drill cuttings is usually done to determine detail stratigraphy of the field, extends of hydrothermal activity, subsurface structures and other parameters which may influence production potential of a well. Analyses of the drill cuttings from the EPF wells show that: Variations in the whole rock alteration intensities correlate with differences in rocktypes. Permeable horizons, especially the productive feeder zones are well marked by enhanced hydrothermal minerals depositions, mainly quartz, calcite, pyrite and epidote. Other aspects of state of reservoir like boiling are signified by presence of bladed calcite.

  19. Field-emission stability of hydrothermally synthesized aluminum-doped zinc oxide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsang-Yen; Wang, Jyh-Liang; Yang, Po-Yu; Hwang, Chuan-Chou; Shye, Der-Chi

    2012-07-01

    The Al-doped ZnO (AZO) nanostructures field-emission arrays (FEAs) were hydrothermally synthesized on AZO/glass substrate. The samples with Al-dosage of 3 at.% show the morphology as nanowires vertically grown on the substrates and a structure of c-axis elongated single-crystalline wurtzite. The good field-emission (i.e., the large anode current and low fluctuation of 15.9%) can be found by AZO nanostructure FEAs with well-designed Al-dosage (i.e., 3 at.%) because of the vertical nanowires with the less structural defects and superior crystallinity. Moreover, the Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of near band-edge emission (NBE) decreased as the increase of annealing temperature, representing the compensated structural defects during oxygen ambient annealing. After the oxygen annealing at 500 degrees C, the hydrothermal AZO nanostructure FEAs revealed the excellent electrical characteristics (i.e., the larger anode current and uniform distribution of induced fluorescence) and enhanced field-emission stability (i.e., the lowest current fluctuation of 5.97%).

  20. Lipid biomarker and microbial community of 49.6°E hydrothermal field at Southwest Indian Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, J.; Chu, F.; Yu, X.; Li, X.; Tao, C.

    2012-12-01

    In 2007, Chinese Research Cruises Discovered the First Active Hydrothermal Vent Field at the Ultraslow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. This study intent to get composition, evolution and origin information of lipid compounds in SWIR, and recognize the style of lipid biomarkers which have obviously indicative significance for community structure.Soluble organic matter were extracted from geological samples (including chimney sulfide, oxide, around hydrothermal vents) in Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), and divided into hydrocarbon, fatty acid component by column chromatography. GC, GC-MS, HPLC-MS were applied for composition and abundance analysis. Lipid in hydrothermal sulfide contains obvious isoprenoidal hydrocarbon biomarkers (Sq, IS40) and GDGTs (m/z=653) that associated with methanogenic archaea which belongs to Euryarchaeota, and iso /anti-iso fatty acid (iC15:0, aiC15:0, iC17:0, aiC17:0)which may originated from sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB).Lipids extracted from hydrothermal oxide lack isoprenoidal hydrocarbon, and Ph/C18 (0.57) is much lower than sulfide (1.22). Fatty acid compound of oxide include abundant saturated fatty (C16:0, C18:0) acid and mono-unsaturated fatty acids (C16:1n7, C18:1n7), but much less iso/anti-iso was detected. Lipid composition of hydrothermal oxide showed that archaea activity was seldom in hydrothermal oxide, and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria was the main microbial community.Study of Jaeschke (2010) showed that high temperature hydrothermal venting encompassed different microbial community from low temperature hydrothermal venting. Our study showed that in different stage of hydrothermal, microbial community structure may be distinct.

  1. Multi-purpose utilization of hydrothermal resources within the City of El Centro. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, P.B.; Province, S.G.; Yamasaki, R.N.; Newman, K.L.

    1979-04-01

    The engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing geothermal heat from the Heber KGRA for space heating/cooling and water heating for domestic and industrial process applications within the City of El Centro was investigated. The analysis proceeds through an engineering survey of present conventional energy utilization within the City to identify and evaluate those end uses which could potentially utilize geothermal heat as a substitute for fossil fuel or electrically produced heating and cooling. A general engineering and economic evaluation of heat and cold delivery alternatives followed including evaluations of geothermal fluid transmission options, alternative refrigeration techniques, heat and cold transmission media options, probable systems interfaces, materials evaluations, projected conventional energy costs, life cycle costs for existing conventional systems, projected pricing requirements for privately and municipally developed geothermal resources, the relative distribution costs of heat delivery options, and estimated residential and commercial retrofit costs. A cost-effective plan for large-scale utilization of geothermal energy in El Centro for district heating/cooling and industrial applications was developed from this evaluation and preliminary conclusions drawn. Institutional barriers and environmental impacts associated with geothermal development in the City were also evaluated. Potentially adverse impacts were identified along with mitigating measures that should either completely eliminate or reduce these adverse effects to levels of insignificance.

  2. Stable Electron Field Emission from CeO2 Nanowires by Hydrothermal Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xing-Qiu; Feng, Ping; Wang, Chong; Wang, Tai-Hong

    2007-08-01

    CeO2 nanowires are successful synthesized by hydrothermal method and their field emission (FE) properties are investigated. The turn-on electric field is 5.8 V/μm at an emitter-anode spacing of 700 μm. The FE current is stable and the current fluctuations are less than 3% over 5 h. All the plotted Fowler-Nordheim curves yield straight lines, which are in agreement with the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The relationship between the field enhancement factor β and the emitter-anode spacing d follows a universal equation. Our results imply that the CeO2 nanowires are promising materials for fabricating FE cathodes.

  3. Stable Electron Field Emission from CeO2 Nanowires by Hydrothermal Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xing-Qiu; FENG Ping; WANG Chong; WANG Tai-Hong

    2007-01-01

    @@ CeO2 nanowires are successful synthesized by hydrothermal method and their field emission (FE) properties are investigated. The turn-on electric field is 5.8 V/μm at an emitter-anode spacing of 700μm. The FE current is stable and the current fluctuations are less than 3% over 5 h. All the plotted Fowler-Nordheim curves yield straight lines, which are in agreement with the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The relationship between the field enhancement factorβ and the emitter-anode spacing d follows a universal equation. Our results imply that the CeO2 nanowires are promising materials for fabricating FE cathodes.

  4. Chemical and biological interactions in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field, Galapagos spreading center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth S.; Childress, James J.; Hessler, Robert R.; Sakamoto-Arnold, Carole M.; Beehler, Carl L.

    1988-10-01

    The concentrations of a suite of redox reactive chemicals were measured in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field of the Galapagos spreading center. Sulfide, silicate, oxygen and temperature distributions were measured in situ with a submersible chemical analyser. In addition, 15 chemical species were measured in discrete samples. Variability in the slope of the temperature-silicate plots indicates that heat is lost from these relatively low temperatures (<15°C) solutions by conduction to the solid phase. Consumption of oxygen, sulfide and nitrate from the hydrothermal solution as it flows past the vent animals is apparent from the distributions measured in situ and in the discrete samples. The fraction of sulfide and nitrate removed from the solution by consumption appears to have increased between 1979-1985. Sulfide and oxygen appear to be consumed under different conditions: sulfide is removed primarily from the warmest solutions, and oxygen is consumed only from the cold seawater. This separation may be driven primarily by the increased gradients of each chemical under these conditions. There is no evidence for the consumption of significant amounts of manganese(II) by the vent organisms. The analysis of other data sets from this vent field indicate no significant consumption of methane by the vent organisms, as well.

  5. Detection of methane plumes in the water column of Logatchev hydrothermal vent field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU HuaiYang; WU ZiJun; PENG XiaoTong; JIANG Lei; TANG Song

    2007-01-01

    During DY105-17 cruise onboard the R/V "Da Yang Yi Hao" in 2005, methane concentrations in the water column above Logachev hydrothermal vent field were measured by applying stripping/trapping-gas chromatographic (GC) and the distinct methane plumes were detected. Results show that the background methane concentration within the Logachev area is from 1.05 nmol/L to 1.68 nmol/L, significantly higher than the background level of the Atlantic abyssal plain of 0.4-0.5 nmol/L, suggesting that hydrothermal venting is a major source of dissolved methane to the ocean. The highest anomalies of methane concentrations in the water column range from 7.14 nmol/L to 113.9 nmol/L and occur just at 180-500 m above the seafloor. The distribution of methane concentration and the structural characteristics of hydrothermal plumes are strongly influenced by the supply of underlying hydrothermal fluids, the mixing process of ocean bottom currents and the microbial oxidation. Furthermore, the differences in distribution of methane plume between the station MAR-CTD3 and the other stations indicate a probable unknown hydrothermal vent site nearby. There occurs high concentration of methane along with temperature and nephelometry anomalies, which strongly confirms that the subtle measurement of methane concentration in water column is one of the effective ways to locate active sites of hydrothermal venting.

  6. Hydrothermal flow at Main Endeavour Field imaged and measured with Cable Operated Vent Imaging Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, P. A.; Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Jones, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    Initial acoustic monitoring of hydrothermal flow in the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) captures the spatial distribution of diffuse and focused discharge and shows potential for flux determinations. Our Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) was connected to the NEPTUNE Canada Endeavour Observatory in September 2010. Using a customized Reson 7125 multi-beam sonar, COVIS acquired a 29 day time series of black smoker plume and associated diffuse hydrothermal flow from Grotto, a 30 m diameter vent cluster in the MEF, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Detection of the spatial patterns of diffuse flow utilizes phase decorrelation of the acoustic signal (200kHz) by buoyancy-driven turbulence (acoustic scintillation) to produce a time series of maps. Substantial fluctuation in the detected diffuse flow area (0.1 - 18 m^2) was observed over the 29 days of observation, although position remained stable. Acoustic imaging of focused flow (400 kHz) utilizes high volume backscatter (attributed to particles and turbulent sound speed fluctuations) to image in 3D the initial tens of meters of rise of buoyant plumes. Spectral analysis of bending inclination of a strong plume from multiple fast smokers on the NW end of Grotto (north tower) indicates that the dominant modes correspond with the ambient mixed semi-diurnal tide (based on current meter data at a mooring 2.9 km to the north and on a tidal model), with at least one secondary mode attributable to sub-inertial flow related to inflow to the axial valley. A weaker plume from several slower smokers is present on the NE end of Grotto. On first analysis, the bending inclination of the weaker plume appears to be affected by the stronger plume. Quantification of flow velocity and volume flux of plumes begins with measuring the Doppler phase shift through plume cross-sections beginning at 5 m above source vents where discharge merges. The volume flux measurements enable calculation of entrainment coefficients, which prior work on the same

  7. Sulfur metabolisms in epsilon- and gamma-Proteobacteria in deep-sea hydrothermal fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eYamamoto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In deep-sea hydrothermal systems, super hot and reduced vent fluids from the subseafloor blend with cold and oxidized seawater. Very unique and dense ecosystems are formed within these environments. Many molecular ecological studies showed that chemoautotrophic epsilon- and gamma-Proteobacteria are predominant primary producers in both free-living and symbiotic microbial communities in global deep-sea hydrothermal fields. Inorganic sulfur compounds are important substrates for the energy conservative metabolic pathways in these microorganisms. Recent genomic and metagenomic analyses and biochemical studies have contributed to the understanding of potential sulfur metabolic pathways for these chemoautotrophs. Epsilon-Proteobacteria use sulfur compounds for both electron-donors and -acceptors. On the other hand, gamma-Proteobacteria utilize two different sulfur-oxidizing pathways. It is hypothesized that differences between the metabolic pathways used by these two predominant proteobacterial phyla are associated with different ecophysiological strategies; extending the energetically feasible habitats with versatile energy metabolisms in the epsilon-Proteobacteria and optimizing energy production rate and yield for relatively narrow habitable zones in the gamma-Proteobacteria.

  8. Loki's Castle: A sediment-influenced hydrothermal vent field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumberger, T.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Pedersen, R.; Thorseth, I. H.; Lilley, M. D.; Moeller, K.

    2010-12-01

    The chemical composition as well as the stable and radiogenic isotope signatures of hydrothermal fluids from the Loki’s Castle vent field, located at the Mohns-Knipovich bend in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea (73°N), are substantially different from sediment-starved mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. Geochemical studies of the hydrothermal vent fluids and the adjacent rift valley sediments provide insights into the influence of sediments on the hydrothermal fluid composition and provide constraints on acting redox conditions. Additionally, they reflect the degree of fluid-rock-sediment interaction at this arctic hydrothermal vent field. Here we present an overview of the geochemical characteristics of the hydrothermal and sedimentary components at Loki’s Castle, obtained during expeditions in 2008, 2009 and 2010, with emphasis on the stable and radiogenic isotope signatures. We compare these data with other sediment-influenced and sediment-starved mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. The hydrothermal vent fluids are characterized by a pH of ˜ 5.5 and by elevated concentrations of methane, hydrogen and ammonia, which reflect a sedimentary contribution. δ13CDIC (dissolved inorganic carbon) are depleted relative to mantle carbon values, consistent with an organic carbon input. The δ18OH2O values of the vents fluids are enriched compared to background bottom seawater, whereas the δD values are not. 87Sr/86Sr ratios are more radiogenic than those characteristic of un-sedimented mid-ocean ridge vent fluids. S-isotope data reflect mixing of a MORB source with sulphide derived from reduced seawater sulphate. To document the background sediment input of the ridge system, short gravity cores and up to 18 m long piston cores were recovered from various localities in the rift valley. The pore-fluid isotope chemistries of the sediments show vertical gradients that primarily reflect diagenesis and degradation of organic matter. The vertical gradient is locally enhanced

  9. Replacive sulfide formation in anhydrite chimneys from the Pacmanus hydrothermal field, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Catharina; Bach, Wolfgang; Plümper, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal flow within the oceanic crust is an important process for the exchange of energy and mass between the lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. Infiltrated seawater heats up and interacts with wall rock, causing mineral replacement reactions. These play a large role in the formation of ore deposits; at the discharge zone, a hot, acidic and metal-rich potential ore fluid exits the crust. It mixes with seawater and forms chimneys, built up of sulfate minerals such as anhydrite (CaSO4), which are subsequently replaced by sulfide minerals. Sulfide formation is related to fluid pathways, defined by cracks and pores in the sulfate chimney. Over time, these systems might develop into massive sulfide deposits. The big question is then: how is sulfate-sulfide replacement related to the evolution of rock porosity? To address this question, sulfide-bearing anhydrite chimneys from the Pacmanus hydrothermal field (Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea) were studied using X-ray tomography, EMPA, FIB-SEM and -TEM. The apparently massive anhydrite turns out highly porous on the micro scale, with sulfide minerals in anhydrite cleavage planes and along grain boundaries. The size of the sulfide grains relates to the pores they grew into, suggesting a tight coupling between dissolution (porosity generation) and growth of replacive minerals. Some of the sulfide grains are hollow and apparently used the dissolving anhydrite as a substrate to start growth in a pore. Another mode of sulfide development is aggregates of euhedral pyrite cores surrounded by colloform chalcopyrite. This occurrence implies that fluid pathways have remained open for some time to allow several stages of precipitation during fluid evolution. To start the replacement and to keep it going, porosity generation is crucial. Our samples show that dissolution of anhydrite occurred along pathways where fluid could enter, such as cleavage planes and grain boundaries. It appears that fluids ascending within the inner

  10. Field emission behaviour of manganese oxide nanorods synthesized by hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankar, P. K.; Gavhane, D. S.; Kolhe, P. S.; Warule, S. S.; More, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    A facile, low temperature and single step hydrothermal method has been used to fabricate well defined manganese oxide (MnO2) nanorods over Si substrate. The structural and morphological studies reveal the formation of crystalline MnO2 nanostructures. The diameter of the MnO2 nanorods is estimated to be ~100 nm, with length in several micrometers. Field-emission properties of the as-synthesized MnO2 nanorods are investigated. The turn on field required to draw emission of 0.1 µA/cm2 current was observed to be ~ 3.2 V/μm and threshold field (corresponding to emission current density of 1 µA/cm2) was found to be 5.1 V/μm. The emission current was observed to be stable for more than three hours at a preset value 1 µA. These results are helpful for the design, fabrication and optimization of integrated field emitters using 1D nanostructure as cold cathode material.

  11. Mapping the Piccard Hydrothermal Field - The World's Deepest Known Vent Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, J. C.; German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    We report the recent mapping and exploration of the Piccard Hydrothermal Field on the Mid-Cayman Rise. Two previous expeditions in 2009 and 2010 led to the discovery of the site, which at 5000m hosts the world's deepest known vents. The site was mapped and explored in January 2012 and the Piccard Field was found to be larger than previously appreciated. The site includes 3 separate currently active hydrothermal mounts together with 4 additional extinct depo-centers. The 3 active centers are the Beebe Vents, Beebe Woods, and Beebe Sea sites. Beebe Vents is an active black smoker system with maximum temperatures of 400-403 degrees Celsius. Beebe Woods contains a set of tall beehive smokers with temperatures of approximately 353 degrees Celsius. Beebe Sea, the largest sulfide mound in the field, contains diffuse venting together with numerous extinct chimneys that indicate significant past active focused flow. Observations of the 4 extinct mounds indicate differences in their apparent ages based on the texture and morphology of the extinct sulfides at the summit of each mound. The entire field is located on top of an axial volcanic ridge with extrusive pillow mounds prominent. A major fault traverses the mound along its long axis, from Southwest to Northeast. Beebe Woods, Beebe Sea, and extinct Beebe mound D abut this fault directly with an apparent monotonic age progression from youngest (Beebe Woods) in the SW to relict mound 'D' in the NE. Similarly, the Beebe Vents site and mound is located at the SW limit of a parallel set of mounds, offset from the fault by approximately 100m, which also ages progressively through extinct Beebe Mounds 'E', 'F' and 'G'. The major fault that bisects the axial volcanic ridge at Piccard evidently serves as a controlling mechanism for the mounds abutting that fault however the mechanism for the second line of mounds remains to be determined. Bathymetry suggests the presence of a second, smaller fault which may serve as the control

  12. Microbial diversity of a sulfide black smoker in main endeavour hydrothermal vent field, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huaiyang; Li, Jiangtao; Peng, Xiaotong; Meng, Jun; Wang, Fengping; Ai, Yuncan

    2009-06-01

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are among the least-understood habitats on Earth but have been the intense focus of research in the past 30 years. An active hydrothermal sulfide chimney collected from the Dudley site in the Main Endeavour vent Field (MEF) of Juan de Fuca Ridge was investigated using mineralogical and molecular approaches. Mineral analysis indicated that the chimney was composed mainly of Fe-, Zn-and Cu-rich sulfides. According to phylogenetic analysis, within the Crenarchaeota, clones of the order Desulfurococcales predominated, comprising nearly 50% of archaeal clones. Euryarchaeota were composed mainly of clones belonging to Thermococcales and deep-sea hydrothermal vent Euryarchaeota (DHVE), each of which accounted for about 20% of all clones. Thermophilic or hyperthermophilic physiologies were common to the predominant archaeal groups. More than half of bacterial clones belonged to epsilon-Proteobacteria, which confirmed their prevalence in hydrothermal vent environments. Clones of Proteobacteria (gamma-, delta-, beta-), Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB) and Deinococcus-Thermus occurred as well. It was remarkable that methanogens and methanotrophs were not detected in our 16S rRNA gene library. Our results indicated that sulfur-related metabolism, which included sulfur-reducing activity carried out by thermophilic archaea and sulfur-oxidizing by mesophilic bacteria, was common and crucial to the vent ecosystem in Dudley hydrothermal site. PMID:19557339

  13. Quantifying dispersal from hydrothermal vent fields in the western Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, Satoshi; Watanabe, Hiromi; Nakajima, Yuichi; Shchepetkin, Alexander F; McWilliams, James C

    2016-03-15

    Hydrothermal vent fields in the western Pacific Ocean are mostly distributed along spreading centers in submarine basins behind convergent plate boundaries. Larval dispersal resulting from deep-ocean circulations is one of the major factors influencing gene flow, diversity, and distributions of vent animals. By combining a biophysical model and deep-profiling float experiments, we quantify potential larval dispersal of vent species via ocean circulation in the western Pacific Ocean. We demonstrate that vent fields within back-arc basins could be well connected without particular directionality, whereas basin-to-basin dispersal is expected to occur infrequently, once in tens to hundreds of thousands of years, with clear dispersal barriers and directionality associated with ocean currents. The southwest Pacific vent complex, spanning more than 4,000 km, may be connected by the South Equatorial Current for species with a longer-than-average larval development time. Depending on larval dispersal depth, a strong western boundary current, the Kuroshio Current, could bridge vent fields from the Okinawa Trough to the Izu-Bonin Arc, which are 1,200 km apart. Outcomes of this study should help marine ecologists estimate gene flow among vent populations and design optimal marine conservation plans to protect one of the most unusual ecosystems on Earth.

  14. Quantifying dispersal from hydrothermal vent fields in the western Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, Satoshi; Watanabe, Hiromi; Nakajima, Yuichi; Shchepetkin, Alexander F; McWilliams, James C

    2016-03-15

    Hydrothermal vent fields in the western Pacific Ocean are mostly distributed along spreading centers in submarine basins behind convergent plate boundaries. Larval dispersal resulting from deep-ocean circulations is one of the major factors influencing gene flow, diversity, and distributions of vent animals. By combining a biophysical model and deep-profiling float experiments, we quantify potential larval dispersal of vent species via ocean circulation in the western Pacific Ocean. We demonstrate that vent fields within back-arc basins could be well connected without particular directionality, whereas basin-to-basin dispersal is expected to occur infrequently, once in tens to hundreds of thousands of years, with clear dispersal barriers and directionality associated with ocean currents. The southwest Pacific vent complex, spanning more than 4,000 km, may be connected by the South Equatorial Current for species with a longer-than-average larval development time. Depending on larval dispersal depth, a strong western boundary current, the Kuroshio Current, could bridge vent fields from the Okinawa Trough to the Izu-Bonin Arc, which are 1,200 km apart. Outcomes of this study should help marine ecologists estimate gene flow among vent populations and design optimal marine conservation plans to protect one of the most unusual ecosystems on Earth. PMID:26929376

  15. Hydrothermally Processed Photosensitive Field-Effect Transistor Based on ZnO Nanorod Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Bhargava, Kshitij; Dixit, Tejendra; Palani, I. A.; Singh, Vipul

    2016-07-01

    Formation of a stable, reproducible zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod-network-based photosensitive field-effect transistor using a hydrothermal process at low temperature has been demonstrated. K2Cr2O7 additive was used to improve adhesion and facilitate growth of the ZnO nanorod network over the SiO2/Si substrate. Transistor characteristics obtained in the dark resemble those of the n-channel-mode field-effect transistor (FET). The devices showed I on/I off ratio above 8 × 102 under dark condition, field-effect mobility of 4.49 cm2 V-1 s-1, and threshold voltage of -12 V. Further, under ultraviolet (UV) illumination, the FET exhibited sensitivity of 2.7 × 102 in off-state (-10 V) versus 1.4 in on-state (+9.7 V) of operation. FETs based on such nanorod networks showed good photoresponse, which is attributed to the large surface area of the nanorod network. The growth temperature for ZnO nanorod networks was kept at 110°C, enabling a low-temperature, cost-effective, simple approach for high-performance ZnO-based FETs for large-scale production. The role of network interfaces in the FET performance is also discussed.

  16. Intra-field variability in microbial community associated with phase-separation-controlled hydrothermal fluid chemistry in the Mariner field, the southern Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, K.; Ishibashi, J.; Lupton, J.; Ueno, Y.; Nunoura, T.; Hirayama, H.; Horikoshi, K.; Suzuki, R.; Hamasaki, H.; Suzuki, Y.

    2006-12-01

    A newly discovered hydrothermal field called the Mariner field at the northernmost central Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Lau Basin was explored and characterized by geochemical and microbiological surveys. The hydrothermal fluid (max. 365 u^C) emitting from the most vigorous vent site (Snow chimney) was boiling just beneath the seafloor at a water depth of 1908 m and two end-members of hydrothermal fluid were identified. Mineral and fluid chemistry of typical brine-rich (Snow chimney and Monk chimney) and vapor-rich (Crab Restaurant chimney) hydrothermal fluids and the host chimney structures were analyzed. Microbial community structures in three chimney structures were also investigated by culture-dependent and - independent analyses. The 16S rRNA gene clone analysis revealed that both bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities at the chimney surface zones were different among three chimneys. The bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities of the Snow chimney surface were very similar with those in the dead chimneys, suggesting concurrence of metal sulfide deposition at the inside and weathering at the surface potentially due to its large structure and size. Cultivation analysis demonstrated the significant variation in culturability of various microbial components, particularly of thermophilic H2- and/or S-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs such as the genera Aquifex and Persephonella, among the chimney sites. The culturability of these chemolithoautotrophs might be associated with the input of gaseous energy and carbon sources like H2S, H2 and CH4 from the hydrothermal fluids, and might be affected by phase-separation- controlled fluid chemistry. In addition, inter-fields comparison of microbial community structures determined by cultivation analysis revealed novel characteristics of the microbial communities in the Mariner field of the Lau Basin among the global deep-sea hydrothermal systems.

  17. A seismic anisotropy study of the Dragon Flag hydrothermal field (49°39'E ) on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Zhao, M.; Tong, V. C. H.; Qiu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Dragon Flag hydrothermal field located at 49°39'E on the Southwest Indian Ridge contains the active hydrothermal vents firstly discovered on the ultraslow spreading ridge (Tao et al, 2012). Anisotropic study in this area will provide important information tectonic activities. 65634 traveltime residuals from the three-dimensional isotropic inversion (Zhao et al., 2013), were divided into three groups, which correspond to quasi ocean crustal Layer 2 (qL2), quasi ocean crustal Layer 3 (qL3) and quasi uppermost mantle (qUM), respectively. Traveltime residuals at different depths show that there are obvious cosine relationships between traveltime residuals and azimuth of qL2, qL3 and qUM, indicating anisotropy existed in both crust and mantle beneath Dragon Flag hydrothermal field. The best fitted cosine curves indicate that the fast directions (negative traveltime residuals) corresponding to the general trend of ridge axis of N104°E. According to these results, we propose that there may be prevalent cracks penetrating into lower crust or even uppermost mantle. We argue that the hydrothermal convection of Dragon Flag hydrothermal field not only occurs perpendicular to ridge axis, but also occurs parallel to ridge axis. We reveal for the first time anisotropic characteristics of the ultraslow spreading ridge, which has profound scientific significance for the future research on global ocean lithospheric anisotropy. This research was granted by the Natural Science Foundation of China (91028002, 41176053, 91428204). Keywords: ultraslow spreading ridge, Southwest Indian Ridge, Dragon Flag hydrothermal field, P wave traveltime residuals, anisotropy References: Tao C H, Lin J, Guo S, et al. First active hydrothermal vents on an ultraslow-spreading center: Southwest Indian Ridge. Geology, 2012, 40(1): 47~50. Zhao M H, Qiu X L, Li J B, et al. Three-dimensional seismic structure of the Dragon Flag oceanic core complex at the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (49°39

  18. Arsenic speciation in sinter mineralization from a hydrothermal channel of El Tatio geothermal field, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, Marco A.; Zanella, Luciana; Hoel, Cathleen; Pizarro, Gonzalo E.; Gaillard, Jean-François; Pasten, Pablo A.

    2014-10-01

    El Tatio geothermal field is the principal natural source of arsenic for the Loa River, the main surface water resource in the hyper-arid Atacama Desert (Antofagasta Region, Northern Chile). Prior investigations by bulk X-ray absorption spectroscopy have identified hydrous ferric oxides as the principal arsenic-containing phase in sinter material from El Tatio, suggesting sorption as the main mechanism for arsenic scavenging by the solid phases of these hot spring environments. Here we examine siliceous sinter material sampled from a hydrothermal channel using synchrotron based X-ray micro-probe techniques, including As and Fe Kα X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), As K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES), and X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD). Least-squares linear fitting of μ-XANES spectra shows that arsenic is predominantly present as arsenate sorbed on hydrous ferric oxides (63% molar proportion), but we also identify nodular arsenide micro-mineralizations (37% molar proportion) similar to loellingite (FeAs2), not previously detected during bulk-scale analysis of the sinter material. Presence of arsenide mineralizations indicates development of anoxic environments on the surface of the siliceous sinter, and suggests a more complex biogeochemistry for arsenic than previously observed for circum-neutral pH brine hot spring environments.

  19. Temporal and spatial variation in temperature experienced by macrofauna at Main Endeavour hydrothermal vent field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond W.; Robert, Katleen; Matabos, Marjolaine; Bates, Amanda E.; Juniper, S. Kim

    2015-12-01

    A significant focus of hydrothermal vent ecological studies has been to understand how species cope with various stressors through physiological tolerance and biochemical resistance. Yet, the environmental conditions experienced by vent species have not been well characterized. This objective requires continuous observations over time intervals that can capture environmental variability at scales that are relevant to animals. We used autonomous temperature logger arrays (four roughly parallel linear arrays of 12 loggers spaced every 10-12 cm) to study spatial and temporal variations in the thermal regime experienced by hydrothermal vent macrofauna at a diffuse flow vent. Hourly temperatures were recorded over eight months from 2010 to 2011 at Grotto vent in the Main Endeavour vent field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, a focus area of the Ocean Networks Canada cabled observatory. The conspicuous animal assemblages in video footage contained Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms, gastropods (primarily Lepetodrilus fucensis), and polychaetes (polynoid scaleworms and the palm worm Paralvinella palmiformis). Two dimensional spatial gradients in temperature were generally stable over the deployment period. The average temperature recorded by all arrays, and in some individual loggers, revealed distinctive fluctuations in temperature that often corresponded with the tidal cycle. We postulate that this may be related to changes in bottom currents or fluctuations in vent discharge. A marked transient temperature increase lasting over a period of days was observed in April 2011. While the distributions and behavior of Juan de Fuca Ridge vent invertebrates may be partially constrained by environmental temperature and temperature tolerance, except for the one transient high-temperature event, observed fluid temperatures were generally similar to the thermal preferences for some species, and typically well below lethal temperatures for all species. Average temperatures of the four arrays

  20. Geochemical characteristics of sinking particles in the Tonga arc hydrothermal vent field, southwestern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Jeek; Kim, Jonguk; Pak, Sang Joon; Ju, Se-Jong; Yoo, Chan Min; Kim, Hyun Sub; Lee, Kyeong Yong; Hwang, Jeomshik

    2016-10-01

    Studies of sinking particles associated with hydrothermal vent fluids may help us to quantify mass transformation processes between hydrothermal vent plumes and deposits. Such studies may also help us understand how various types of hydrothermal systems influence particle flux and composition. However, the nature of particle precipitation out of hydrothermal vent plumes in the volcanic arcs of convergent plate boundaries has not been well studied, nor have the characteristics of such particles been compared with the characteristics of sinking particles at divergent boundaries. We examined sinking particles collected by sediment traps for about 10 days at two sites, each within 200 m of identified hydrothermal vents in the south Tonga arc of the southwestern Pacific. The total mass flux was several-fold higher than in the non-hydrothermal southwest tropical Pacific. The contribution of non-biogenic materials was dominant (over 72%) and the contribution of metals such as Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn was very high compared to their average levels in the upper continental crust. The particle flux and composition indicate that hydrothermal authigenic particles are the dominant source of the collected sinking particles. Overall, our elemental ratios are similar to observations of particles at the divergent plate boundary in the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Thus, the nature of the hydrothermal particles collected in the south Tonga arc is probably not drastically different from particles in the EPR region. However, we observed consistent differences between the two sites within the Tonga arc, in terms of the contribution of non-biogenic material, the radiocarbon content of sinking particulate organic carbon, the ratios of iron to other metals (e.g. Cu/Fe and Zn/Fe), and plume maturity indices (e.g. S/Fe). This heterogeneity within the Tonga arc is likely caused by differences in physical environment such as water depth, phase separation due to subcritical boiling and associated sub

  1. Hydrocarbons and oxidized organic compounds in hydrothermal fluids from Rainbow and Lost City ultramafic-hosted vents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konn, C.; Charlou, J.L.; Donval, J.P.; Holm, N.G.; Dehairs, F.; Bouillon, S.

    2009-01-01

    The first building blocks of life could be produced in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems considering the large amounts of hydrogen and methane generated by serpentinisation and Fischer–Tropsch-Type synthesis, respectively, in those systems. The purpose of this study was to detect and characteri

  2. Pontibacter amylolyticus sp. nov., isolated from a deep-sea sediment hydrothermal vent field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue-Hong; Zhou, Peng; Jian, Shu-Ling; Liu, Zhen-Sheng; Wang, Chun-Sheng; Oren, Aharon; Xu, Xue-Wei

    2016-04-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, short rod-shaped bacterium, designated 9-2T, was isolated from a sediment sample collected from a hydrothermal vent field on the south-west Indian Ridge. It formed red colonies, produced carotenoid-like pigments and did not produce bacteriochlorophyll a. Strain 9-2T was positive for hydrolysis of DNA, gelatin and starch, but negative for hydrolysis of aesculin and Tween 60. The sole respiratory quinone was menaquinone-7 (MK-7). The main polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified phospholipid and two unidentified polar lipids. The principal fatty acids (>5%) were summed feature 4 (iso-C17:1 I and/or anteiso-C17:1 B), iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0 3-OH. The genomic DNA G+C content was 49.2 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain 9-2T should be assigned to the genus Pontibacter. Levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between the new isolate and the type strains of Pontibacter species with validly published names were in the range 94.0-96.5%. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data, strain 9-2T represents a novel species of the genus Pontibacter, for which the name Pontibacter amylolyticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 9-2T (=CGMCC 1.12749T=JCM 19653T=MCCC 1K00278T). PMID:26827710

  3. How Do Modern Extreme Hydrothermal Environments Inform the Identification of Martian Habitability? The Case of the El Tatio Geyser Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Barbieri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the success in knowledge gained by the Mars missions in the last two decades, the search for traces of life on Mars is still in progress. The reconstruction of (paleo- environments on Mars have seen a dramatic increase, in particular with regard to the potentially habitable conditions, and it is now possible to recognize a significant role to subaerial hydrothermal processes. For this reason, and because the conditions of the primordial Earth—when these extreme environments had to be common—probably resembled Mars during its most suitable time to host life, research on terrestrial extreme hydrothermal habitats may assist in understanding how to recognize life on Mars. A number of geological and environmental reasons, and logistics opportunities, make the geothermal field of El Tatio, in the Chilean Andes an ideal location to study.

  4. Comparison of intact polar lipid with microbial community composition of vent deposits of the Rainbow and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, R A; van der Meer, M T J; Hopmans, E C; Reysenbach, A-L; Schouten, S; Sinninghe Damsté, J S

    2013-01-01

    The intact polar lipid (IPL) composition of twelve hydrothermal vent deposits from the Rainbow (RHF) and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields (LSHF) has been investigated in order to assess its utility as a proxy for microbial community composition associated with deep-sea hydrothermal locations. Gene-based culture-independent surveys of the microbial populations of the same vent deposits have shown that microbial populations are different in the two locations and appear to be controlled by the geochemical and geological processes that drive hydrothermal circulation. Large differences in the IPL composition between these two sites are evident. In the ultramafic-hosted RHF, mainly archaeal-IPLs were identified, including those known to be produced by hyperthermophilic Euryarchaeota. More specifically, polyglycosyl derivatives of archaeol and macrocyclic archaeol indicate the presence of hyperthermophilic methanogenic archaea in the vent deposits, which are related to members of the Methanocaldococcaceae or Methanococcaceae. In contrast, bacterial IPLs dominate IPL distributions from LSHF, suggesting that bacteria are more predominant at LSHF than at RHF. Bacterial Diacyl glycerol (DAG) IPLs containing phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine or phosphoglycerol head groups were identified at both vent fields. In some vent deposits from LSHF ornithine lipids and IPLs containing phosphoaminopentanetetrol head groups were also observed. By comparison with previously characterized bacterial communities at the sites, it is likely the DAG-IPLs observed derive from Epsilon- and Gammaproteobacteria. Variation in the relative amounts of archaeal versus bacterial IPLs appears to indicate differences in the microbial community between vent sites. Overall, IPL distributions appear to be consistent with gene-based surveys.

  5. Crustal magnetization and the subseafloor structure of the ASHES vent field, Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for the investigation of hydrothermal sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caratori Tontini, Fabio; Crone, Timothy J.; Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Kinsey, James C.; Mittelstaedt, Eric; Tivey, Maurice

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution geophysical data have been collected using the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Sentry over the ASHES (Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emission Study) high-temperature (~348°C) vent field at Axial Seamount, on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Multiple surveys were performed on a 3-D grid at different altitudes above the seafloor, providing an unprecedented view of magnetic data resolution as a function of altitude above the seafloor. Magnetic data derived near the seafloor show that the ASHES field is characterized by a zone of low magnetization, which can be explained by hydrothermal alteration of the host volcanic rocks. Surface manifestations of hydrothermal activity at the ASHES vent field are likely controlled by a combination of local faults and fractures and different lava morphologies near the seafloor. Three-dimensional inversion of the magnetic data provides evidence of a vertical, pipe-like upflow zone of the hydrothermal fluids with a vertical extent of ~100 m.

  6. Molecular evidence for microorganisms participating in Fe, Mn, and S biogeochemical cycling in two low-temperature hydrothermal fields at the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiwei; Peng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Huaiyang; Li, Jiangtao; Sun, Zhilei

    2013-06-01

    We examined two low-temperature hydrothermal deposits rich in Fe-Si-Mn collected from the recently discovered hydrothermal fields at the Southwest Indian Ridge using mineralogical, geochemical, and molecular biological techniques. The mineralogical and geochemical analyses indicated that the low-temperature hydrothermal fields would provide a warm and chemical species-rich habitat for chemosynthetic-based hydrothermal ecosystems. Analyses of 16S rRNA sequences showed that ζ-Proteobacteria, Pseudoalteromonas, Leptothrix, and Pseudomonas were potential Fe and Mn oxidizers in the low-temperature hydrothermal environments, but they were not present in equal abundance among the subniches. Some potential Fe and Mn reducers were also recovered; they were more commonly found in the exterior black Fe-Mn oxides. The difference between the exterior black Fe-Mn oxides and the interior Opal-A could be related to differences in in situ physicochemical conditions. We also identified microbial players that may participate in sulfur (S) geochemical cycling in these low-temperature hydrothermal environments via analyses of 16S rRNA sequences and the aprA functional gene. The results indicated that members of γ-Proteobacteria and α-Proteobacteria were involved in the S oxidation process, while members of δ-Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae, Firmicutes, and Archaea might participate in the S reduction process. Fe, Mn, and S oxidizers and reducers might actively participate in hydrothermal biogeochemical processes, which could influence the transfer of chemical species and the formation of biogenic minerals.

  7. Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gilberto E; Campbell, James H; Kirshtein, Julie D; Meneghin, Jennifer; Podar, Mircea; Steinberg, Joshua I; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Tivey, Margaret Kingston; Voytek, Mary A; Yang, Zamin K; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37°17'N, 32°16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36°13'N, 33°54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

  8. Tectonic background of a unique hydrogen-rich Kairei Hydrothermal Field, Central Indian Ridge: Results from Taiga Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, K.; Nakamura, K.; Morishita, T.; SATO, H.; Sato, T.; Mochizuki, N.; Okamura, K.; Fukuba, T.; Sunamura, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Indian Ridge (CIR) is slow~intermediate spreading systems and its southern end forms a R-R-R triple junction with SWIR and SEIR. The southern CIR shows slow-spreading morphology, where the axial valley develops along the ridge crest and an oceanic core complex has been reported near the triple junction. Kairei Hydrothermal Field (KHF) is unique hydrothermal system, located at the southern end of CIR. The fluids venting from the KHF are characterized by its high concentration of hydrogen with low methane/hydrogen ratio, and a hydrogen-based hyperthermophilic subsurface lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystem was confirmed (Takai et al., 2004). The KHF lies on basaltic lava area on the shoulder of ridge axial wall, being different from other hydrogen-rich hydrothermal fields hosted by ultramafic rocks. We selected this area as an integrated site for the Taiga Project, and conducted series of research cruises to characterize this unique system and to understand how the tectonic setting controls the fluid and ecosystem. We discover that the KHF itself is located above basaltic lava field but gabbro and ultramafic rocks are widely exhumed around the KHF. Besides a previously known oceanic core complex, small oceanic core complexes exist just east of the KHF (Kumagai et al., 2008) and the NTO massif north of the KHF shows peridotite exposure on its top. The unique fluid geochemistry of the KHF can be attributed to serpentinization of troctolites around or beneath the KHF and subsequent hydrothermal reactions with basaltic wall rocks (Nakamura et al., 2009). We also find several small hills where we collect deep crustal and mantle rocks. These hills suggesting melt-limited environment extend mainly along 2nd order segment boundary from the axial valley to 30km off-axis, i.e. ~1.7 Ma. The regional surface geophysical mapping and deep-tow magnetic profiling show high mantle Bouguer anomaly and prominent asymmetric spreading in the southernmost CIR segment. These

  9. Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov., an anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (New Caledonia)

    OpenAIRE

    Bes, M. (Marta); Merrouch, M.; Joseph, Manon; Quéméneur, Marianne; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Erausol, G.; A. Postec

    2015-01-01

    A novel anaerobic bacterial strain, ST07-YET, was isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (PHF) in New Caledonia. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, straight rods (0.7-0.8 x 3.0-5.0 mu m) and motile by means of lateral flagella. Strain ST07-YET was mesophilic (optimum 35 degrees C), moderately alkaliphilic and halotolerant (optimum pH 8.7 and 5 gr l(-1) NaCl). Elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite were not used as terminal electron accepto...

  10. Temporal and spatial variation in temperature experienced by macrofauna at main endeavour Hydrothermal vent field

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Raymond W.; Robert, Katleen; Matabos, Marjolaine; Bates, Amanda E.; Juniper, S. Kim

    2015-01-01

    A significant focus of hydrothermal vent ecological studies has been to understand how species cope with various stressors through physiological tolerance and biochemical resistance. Yet, the environmental conditions experienced by vent species have not been well characterized. This objective requires continuous observations over time intervals that can capture environmental variability at scales that are relevant to animals. We used autonomous temperature logger arrays (four roughly parallel...

  11. Implication for horizontally-elongated fluid flow inferred from heat flow measurements in the Iheya-North hydrothermal field, Okinawa Trough back-arc basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Yuka; Kinoshita, Masataka; Kawada, Yoshifumi

    2010-05-01

    The Okinawa Trough is a back-arc basin located in the southwestern part of Japan. It is considered to be in the initial stage of rifting of continental crust, and the activity generates volcanic edifices in this area, accompanied by hydrothermal circulation. The Iheya-North is one of the most active hydrothermal fields among them. As a proposed drilling site for the Integrated ocean Drilling Program, extensive geophysical surveys have been carried out including single-channel seismic imaging, and precise side-scan sonar imaging by using autonomous underwater vehicle 'Urashima' of Japan Agency for Marine-Science and Technology. In the recent few years, we have measured heat flow in and around the Iheya-North hydrothermal field to understand the spatial of hydrothermal circulation in detail. 78 measurements show that heat flow is higher than 10 W/m2 with in 0.5 km of the hydrothermal vent complex, that it gradually decrease eastward to vs. ~a few hundreds meters vertical). We performed numerical calculations of fluid flow and heat transportation to give constraints on the depth of hydrothermal circulation, the magnitude of darcy velocity, and the permeability at depth. The simulated results will be compared with measured heat flow distribution and will be checked for the larger or smaller circulation scale proposed from heat flow or fluid geochemistry data.

  12. Characteristics of microbial communities in crustal fluids in a deep-sea hydrothermal field of the Suiyo Seamount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo eKato

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To directly access the sub-seafloor microbial communities, seafloor drilling has been done in a deep-sea hydrothermal field of the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Western Pacific. In the present study, crustal fluids were collected from the boreholes, and the bacterial and archaeal communities in the fluids were investigated by culture-independent molecular analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Bottom seawater, sands, rocks, sulfide mound and chimneys were also collected around the boreholes and analyzed for comparisons. Comprehensive analysis revealed the characteristics of the microbial community composition in the crustal fluids. Phylotypes closely related to cultured species, e.g., Alteromonas, Halomonas, Marinobacter, were relatively abundant in some crustal-fluid samples, whereas the phylotypes related to Pelagibacter and the SUP05-group were relatively abundant in the seawater samples. Phylotypes related to other uncultured environmental clones in Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were relatively abundant in the sand, rock, sulfide mound and chimney samples. Furthermore, comparative analysis with previous studies of the Suiyo Seamount crustal fluids indicates the change in the microbial community composition for three years. Our results provide novel insights into the characteristics of the microbial communities in crustal fluids beneath a deep-sea hydrothermal field.

  13. Geothermal-energy files in computer storage: sites, cities, and industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Dea, P.L.

    1981-12-01

    The site, city, and industrial files are described. The data presented are from the hydrothermal site file containing about three thousand records which describe some of the principal physical features of hydrothermal resources in the United States. Data elements include: latitude, longitude, township, range, section, surface temperature, subsurface temperature, the field potential, and well depth for commercialization. (MHR)

  14. CitySongs: Primary Prevention in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivnick, Helen Q.; Lymburner, Allison M.

    2009-01-01

    This case study describes CitySongs, a primary prevention, out-of-school program in the inner city that promotes social justice through integrated activities aimed at healthy youth development, arts achievement, and community vitality through diversity. Key ideas from social science and human service disciplines that inform the design and…

  15. Post-drilling changes in seabed landscape and megabenthos in a deep-sea hydrothermal system, the Iheya North field, Okinawa Trough.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Nakajima

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing interest in seafloor exploitation such as mineral mining in deep-sea hydrothermal fields, but the environmental impact of anthropogenic disturbance to the seafloor is poorly known. In this study, the effect of such anthropogenic disturbance by scientific drilling operations (IODP Expedition 331 on seabed landscape and megafaunal habitation was surveyed for over 3 years using remotely operated vehicle video observation in a deep-sea hydrothermal field, the Iheya North field, in the Okinawa Trough. We focused on observations from a particular drilling site (Site C0014 where the most dynamic change of landscape and megafaunal habitation was observed among the drilling sites of IODP Exp. 331. No visible hydrothermal fluid discharge had been observed at the sedimentary seafloor at Site C0014, where Calyptogena clam colonies were known for more than 10 years, before the drilling event. After drilling commenced, the original Calyptogena colonies were completely buried by the drilling deposits. Several months after the drilling, diffusing high-temperature hydrothermal fluid began to discharge from the sedimentary subseafloor in the area of over 20 m from the drill holes, 'artificially' creating a new hydrothermal vent habitat. Widespread microbial mats developed on the seafloor with the diffusing hydrothermal fluids and the galatheid crab Shinkaia crosnieri endemic to vents dominated the new vent community. The previously soft, sedimentary seafloor was hardened probably due to barite/gypsum mineralization or silicification, becoming rough and undulated with many fissures after the drilling operation. Although the effects of the drilling operation on seabed landscape and megafaunal composition are probably confined to an area of maximally 30 m from the drill holes, the newly established hydrothermal vent ecosystem has already lasted 2 years and is like to continue to exist until the fluid discharge ceases and thus the

  16. Post-drilling changes in seabed landscape and megabenthos in a deep-sea hydrothermal system, the Iheya North field, Okinawa Trough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Ryota; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Takaya, Yutaro; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Chen, Chong; Fujikura, Katsunori; Miwa, Tetsuya; Takai, Ken

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in seafloor exploitation such as mineral mining in deep-sea hydrothermal fields, but the environmental impact of anthropogenic disturbance to the seafloor is poorly known. In this study, the effect of such anthropogenic disturbance by scientific drilling operations (IODP Expedition 331) on seabed landscape and megafaunal habitation was surveyed for over 3 years using remotely operated vehicle video observation in a deep-sea hydrothermal field, the Iheya North field, in the Okinawa Trough. We focused on observations from a particular drilling site (Site C0014) where the most dynamic change of landscape and megafaunal habitation was observed among the drilling sites of IODP Exp. 331. No visible hydrothermal fluid discharge had been observed at the sedimentary seafloor at Site C0014, where Calyptogena clam colonies were known for more than 10 years, before the drilling event. After drilling commenced, the original Calyptogena colonies were completely buried by the drilling deposits. Several months after the drilling, diffusing high-temperature hydrothermal fluid began to discharge from the sedimentary subseafloor in the area of over 20 m from the drill holes, 'artificially' creating a new hydrothermal vent habitat. Widespread microbial mats developed on the seafloor with the diffusing hydrothermal fluids and the galatheid crab Shinkaia crosnieri endemic to vents dominated the new vent community. The previously soft, sedimentary seafloor was hardened probably due to barite/gypsum mineralization or silicification, becoming rough and undulated with many fissures after the drilling operation. Although the effects of the drilling operation on seabed landscape and megafaunal composition are probably confined to an area of maximally 30 m from the drill holes, the newly established hydrothermal vent ecosystem has already lasted 2 years and is like to continue to exist until the fluid discharge ceases and thus the ecosystem in the area has

  17. Rhythms and community dynamics of a hydrothermal tubeworm assemblage at main endeavour field - a multidisciplinary deep-sea observatory approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Cuvelier

    Full Text Available The NEPTUNE cabled observatory network hosts an ecological module called TEMPO-mini that focuses on hydrothermal vent ecology and time series, granting us real-time access to data originating from the deep sea. In 2011-2012, during TEMPO-mini's first deployment on the NEPTUNE network, the module recorded high-resolution imagery, temperature, iron (Fe and oxygen on a hydrothermal assemblage at 2186 m depth at Main Endeavour Field (North East Pacific. 23 days of continuous imagery were analysed with an hourly frequency. Community dynamics were analysed in detail for Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms, Polynoidae, Pycnogonida and Buccinidae, documenting faunal variations, natural change and biotic interactions in the filmed tubeworm assemblage as well as links with the local environment. Semi-diurnal and diurnal periods were identified both in fauna and environment, revealing the influence of tidal cycles. Species interactions were described and distribution patterns were indicative of possible microhabitat preference. The importance of high-resolution frequencies (<1 h to fully comprehend rhythms in fauna and environment was emphasised, as well as the need for the development of automated or semi-automated imagery analysis tools.

  18. Rhythms and community dynamics of a hydrothermal tubeworm assemblage at main endeavour field - a multidisciplinary deep-sea observatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvelier, Daphne; Legendre, Pierre; Laes, Agathe; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Sarrazin, Jozée

    2014-01-01

    The NEPTUNE cabled observatory network hosts an ecological module called TEMPO-mini that focuses on hydrothermal vent ecology and time series, granting us real-time access to data originating from the deep sea. In 2011-2012, during TEMPO-mini's first deployment on the NEPTUNE network, the module recorded high-resolution imagery, temperature, iron (Fe) and oxygen on a hydrothermal assemblage at 2186 m depth at Main Endeavour Field (North East Pacific). 23 days of continuous imagery were analysed with an hourly frequency. Community dynamics were analysed in detail for Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms, Polynoidae, Pycnogonida and Buccinidae, documenting faunal variations, natural change and biotic interactions in the filmed tubeworm assemblage as well as links with the local environment. Semi-diurnal and diurnal periods were identified both in fauna and environment, revealing the influence of tidal cycles. Species interactions were described and distribution patterns were indicative of possible microhabitat preference. The importance of high-resolution frequencies (<1 h) to fully comprehend rhythms in fauna and environment was emphasised, as well as the need for the development of automated or semi-automated imagery analysis tools. PMID:24810603

  19. How many vent fields? New estimates of vent field populations on ocean ridges from precise mapping of hydrothermal discharge locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Edward T.; Resing, Joseph A.; Haymon, Rachel M.; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Lavelle, J. William; Martinez, Fernando; Ferrini, Vicki; Walker, Sharon L.; Nakamura, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Decades of exploration for venting sites along spreading ridge crests have produced global datasets that yield estimated mean site spacings of ∼ 12- 220 km. This conclusion demands that sites where hydrothermal fluid leaks from the seafloor are improbably rare along the 66 000 km global ridge system, despite the high bulk permeability of ridge crest axes. However, to date, exploration methods have neither reliably detected plumes from isolated low-temperature, particle-poor, diffuse sources, nor differentiated individual, closely spaced (clustered within a few kilometers) sites of any kind. Here we describe a much lower mean discharge spacing of 3-20 km, revealed by towing real-time oxidation-reduction-potential and optical sensors continuously along four fast- and intermediate-rate (>55 mm/yr) spreading ridge sections totaling 1470 km length. This closer spacing reflects both discovery of isolated sites discharging particle-poor plumes (25% of all sites) and improved discrimination (at a spatial resolution of ∼1 km) among clustered discrete and diffuse sources. Consequently, the number of active vent sites on fast- and intermediate-rate spreading ridges may be at least a factor of 3-6 higher than now presumed. This increase provides new quantitative constraints for models of seafloor processes such as dispersal of fauna among seafloor and crustal chemosynthetic habitats, biogeochemical impacts of diffuse venting, and spatial patterns of hydrothermal discharge.

  20. Metagenomic comparison of two Thiomicrospira lineages inhabiting contrasting deep-sea hydrothermal environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Brazelton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most widespread bacteria in oxic zones of carbonate chimneys at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, belong to the Thiomicrospira group of sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. It is unclear why Thiomicrospira-like organisms thrive in these chimneys considering that Lost City hydrothermal fluids are notably lacking in hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe metagenomic sequences obtained from a Lost City carbonate chimney that are highly similar to the genome of Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, an isolate from a basalt-hosted hydrothermal vent in the Pacific Ocean. Even though T. crunogena and Lost City Thiomicrospira inhabit different types of hydrothermal systems in different oceans, their genomic contents are highly similar. For example, sequences encoding the sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation pathways (including a carbon concentration mechanism of T. crunogena are also present in the Lost City metagenome. Comparative genomic analyses also revealed substantial genomic changes that must have occurred since the divergence of the two lineages, including large genomic rearrangements, gene fusion events, a prophage insertion, and transposase activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show significant genomic similarity between Thiomicrospira organisms inhabiting different kinds of hydrothermal systems in different oceans, suggesting that these organisms are widespread and highly adaptable. These data also indicate genomic processes potentially associated with the adaptation of these lineages into strikingly different habitats.

  1. Stable isotope fractionation at a glacial hydrothermal field: implications for biogeochemistry and biosignatures on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, C.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M.; Cockell, C.; Crawford, I.; Gunn, M.; Karlsson, M. T.; Thorsteinsson, T.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrothermal environments that arise through the interaction between volcanogenic heat and glacial ice are ideal sites for understanding microbial biogeochemical processes on Earth, and also potentially on Mars where similar volcano-cryosphere interactions are thought to have occurred in the past. The Kverkfjöll subglacial basaltic volcano in central Iceland is geographically isolated, with little influence from flora, fauna, and human activity. Major environmental inputs include geothermal heat, meltwater from ice and snow, and outgassing of CO2, H2S, and SO2. Large physiochemical gradients exist, from steaming fumaroles and boiling hydrothermal pools, to frozen geothermal ground and glacial ice. Stable isotope measurements of total organic carbon, total sulphur, and total nitrogen were coupled with metagenomic analysis of the residing microbial communities, with the aim to identify biogeochemical relationships and processes operating within the Kverkfjöll geothermal environment, and also to identify any isotopic biosignatures that could be preserved within geothermal sediments. This study focused on a variety of samples taken along a hot spring stream that fed into a large ice-confined geothermal lake. Samples analysed range from unconsolidated hot spring sediments, well-developed microbial mats, and dissolved sulphate from hot spring fluids. From the anoxic spring source, the stream water increases in dissolved oxygen, decreases in temperature, yet maintains a pH of ~4. The spring environment is dominated by dissolved sulphate (~2.3 mM), with lower levels of nitrate (~50 μM), phosphorus (~5μM), and ammonium (~1.5 μM). Stable S isotope analysis reveals a fractionation of ~3.2 ‰ between sediment sulphide (as pyrite; δ34S ~0‰), and dissolved water sulphate (δ34S ~3.2 ‰) consistently along the hot spring stream, indicating the presence of an active sulphur cycle, although not one dominated by sulphate reduction (e.g. very negative sulphide δ34S). This

  2. Microbe-related precipitation of iron and silica in the Edmond deep-sea hydrothermal vent field on the Central Indian Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Microbial mats, several millimeters thick and brown-yellow to white in color, were collected in hollow inside of chimney structure from Edmond hydrothermal field on the Central Indian Ridge. Microbes with shapes of rod and helical stalk-like filaments were observed in the microbial mats, and are commonly characterized by their cells completely encrusted by thick mineralized layers, made up of large amounts of amorphous silica and minor amounts of iron oxides. Transmission Electron Microscope observation has demonstrated that the acicular Fe-bearing matter was not only heterogenously distributed on the surface of the cell wall, but also deposited in the inside of cell, suggesting that bio-precipitation of Fe had occurred both on the surface and in the interior of cell. Microbial silicification was also commonly found in the mats. Silica usually precipitated homogeneously on the surface of the microbes and forms micro-laminated layers, which might be controlled by the inorganic process of precipitation in hydrothermal environment. The biomineralization phenomenon in the microbial mats showed that the precipitation of Fe and Si was closely related to microbes in hydrothermal environment. Considering that hydrothermal activities provided required chemical elements for mineralization, it is suggested that this biomineralization process also might be driven by hydrothermal activities at the sea floor to some extent.

  3. Microbial anaerobic methane cycling in the subseafloor at the Von Damm hydrothermal vent field, Mid-Cayman Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, J. A.; Reveillaud, J. C.; Stepanauskas, R.; McDermott, J. M.; Sylva, S. P.; Seewald, J.

    2013-12-01

    methanogenic archaea are also present, including the hyperthermophile Methanopyrus, as well as methanogens that can use acetate, methanol, and other simple carbon compounds for methane generation, such as the genera Methanosaeta and Methermicoccus. In addition, uncultivated lineages related to putative anaerobic methane cycling archaea were detected in the fluids. These include the GOM Arc I clade within the Methanosarcinales, a group previously described from Gulf of Mexico methane seeps and thought to be methanogenic, as well as the ANME-1 and ANME-2 lineages, which are likely anaerobically oxidizing methane. On-going metagenomic sequencing of both mixed microbial communities and single cells from venting fluids will reveal the genomic repertoire, evolutionary relationships, and adaptations of these unique methane-cycling anaerobic archaea in the subseafloor at the Von Damm hydrothermal vent field.

  4. Platelet-like hexagonal SrFe12O19 particles: Hydrothermal synthesis and their orientation in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Peng, Xiaoling; Li, Jing; Yang, Yanting; Xu, Jingcai; Wang, Panfeng; Jin, Dingfeng; Jin, Hongxiao; Hong, Bo; Wang, Xinqing; Ge, Hongliang

    2016-08-01

    Platelet-like hexagonal SrFe12O19 particles were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis, and the effects of molar ratio of Fe/Sr (RFe/Sr) on the phase compositions, morphologies and magnetic properties of as-prepared samples were investigated. The optimum RFe/Sr is identified as 8:1. The hexagonal platelet-like particles are nano-scale in thickness and micro-scale in diameter. The low coercivity is a consequence of the large shape anisotropy of the as-synthesized particles. The platelet-like hexagonal SrFe12O19 particles were then dispersed in epoxy resin and formed ordered arrangement structure which took root in the curing epoxy matrix under an external magnetic field of 8000 Oe. The microstructures, morphologies and magnetic properties of the bulk samples orientated and nonaligned were studied. The platelet-like particles arrange with the platelet perpendicular to the magnetic field direction in the orientated samples. This demonstrates that the easy axis of the particle is perpendicular to the platelet, and that the magnetocrystalline anisotropy still plays a leading role in the changing effective anisotropy with the rapidly growing shape anisotropy. The remanence (Mr) of the bulk samples is changed obviously after orientation, while the coercivity nearly remains constant. That is, the maximum energy products (BH)max can be effectively adjusted by given a suitable magnetic field.

  5. Simple and effective monitoring of the electromagnetic field in the smart cities arena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares-Pena, Francisco J.; Franceschetti, Giorgio; Iodice, Antonio; Salas-Sánchez, Aarón A.

    2016-08-01

    A simple and economical method for monitoring the electromagnetic field intensity in built-up areas is presented. The method is based on the measurement of the field level over a limited number of points at street level in the city and their transmission to an operative control center, where the field values all over the city are correctly interpolated in real time. Citizens might obtain these values at their sites, via Internet, or by connecting with a dedicated call center. Numerical evaluations of the electromagnetic field intensity via the new developed model and confirming experimental results are finally presented.

  6. Hydrothermal vents near a mantle hot spot: the Lucky Strike vent field at 37°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmuir, C.; Humphris, S.; Fornari, D.; Van Dover, C.; Von Damm, K.; Tivey, M. K.; Colodner, D.; Charlou, J.-L.; Desonie, D.; Wilson, C.; Fouquet, Y.; Klinkhammer, G.; Bougault, H.

    1997-04-01

    The Lucky Strike hydrothermal field occurs in the summit basin of a large seamount that forms the shallow center of a 65 km long ridge segment near 37°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The depth and chemistry of the ridge segment are influenced by the Azores hot spot, and this hydrothermal field is the first Atlantic site found on crust that is dominated by a hot spot signature. Multiple hydrothermal vents occur over an area of at least 300 m by 700 m. Vent morphologies range from flanges and chimneys with temperatures of 200-212°C, to black smoker chimneys with temperatures up to 333°C. Cooler fluids from northern vents have higher chlorinities and lower gas volumes, while hotter, southern fluids have chlorinities 20% below seawater with higher gas volumes, suggesting phase separation has influenced their compositions. All gas volumes in fluids are higher than those at TAG and Snake Pit hydrothermal fields. Black smokers exhibit their typical mineralogy, except that barite is a major mineral, particularly at lower-temperature sites, which contrasts with previously investigated Atlantic sites. The fluid chemistry, distribution of the relict sulfide deposits on the seamount summit in the areas investigated using DSV Alvin, and contact relationships between active vent sites and surrounding basaltic and sulfide substrate suggest that the hydrothermal system has a long history and may have recently been rejuvenated. Fauna at the Lucky Strike vent sites are dominated by a new species of mussel, and include the first reported sea urchins. The Lucky Strike biological community differs considerably from other vent fauna at the species level and appears to be a new biogeographic province. The Lucky Strike field helps to constrain how variations in the basaltic substrate influence the composition of hydrothermal fluids and solids, because basalt compositions at Lucky Strike are 10-30 times enriched in incompatible elements compared to other Atlantic hydrothermal sites such as

  7. Microbial community structure and nitrogenase gene diversity of sediment from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent field on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yuehong; CAO Yi; WANG Chunsheng; WU Min; AHARON Oren; XU Xuewei

    2014-01-01

    A sediment sample was collected from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent field located at a depth of 2 951 m on the Southwest Indian Ridge. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on the prokaryotic community using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the 16S rRNA and nifH genes. Within the Archaea, the dominant clones were from marine benthic group E (MBGE) and marine group I (MGI) belonging to the phyla Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota, respectively. More than half of the bacterial clones belonged to the Proteobacteria, and most fell within the Gammaproteobacteria. No epsilonproteobacterial sequence was observed. Additional phyla were detected including the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, Nitrospirae, Chloroflexi, Chlorobi, Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia, and candidate divisions OD1, OP11, WS3 and TM6, confirming their existence in hydrothermal vent environments. The detection of nifH gene suggests that biological nitrogen fixation may occur in the hydrothermal vent field of the South-west Indian Ridge. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that only Clusters I and III NifH were present. This is consistent with the phylogenetic analysis of the microbial 16S rRNA genes, indicating that Bacteria play the main role in nitrogen fixation in this hydrothermal vent environment.

  8. Hydrothermal mixing: Fuel for life in the deep-sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentscher, M.; Bach, W.; Amend, J.; McCollom, T.

    2009-04-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems show a wide range of fluid compositions and temperatures. They reach from highly alkaline and reducing, like the Lost City hydrothermal field, to acidic and reducing conditions, (e. g., the Logatchev hydrothermal field) to acidic and oxidizing conditions (e. g., island arc hosted systems). These apparently hostile vent systems are generally accompanied by high microbial activity forming the base of a food-web that often includes higher organisms like mussels, snails, or shrimp. The primary production is boosted by mixing of chemically reduced hydrothermal vent fluids with ambient seawater, which generates redox disequilibria that serve as energy source for chemolithoautotrophic microbial life. We used geochemical reaction path models to compute the affinities of catabolic (energy-harvesting) and anabolic (biosynthesis) reactions along trajectories of batch mixing between vent fluids and 2 °C seawater. Geochemical data of endmember hydrothermal fluids from 12 different vent fields (Lost City, Rainbow, Logatchev, TAG, EPR 21 °N, Manus Basin, Mariana Arc, etc.) were included in this reconnaissance study of the variability in metabolic energetics in global submarine vent systems. The results show a distinction between ultramafic-hosted and basalt-hosted hydrothermal systems. The highest energy yield for chemolithotrophic catabolism in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems is reached at low temperature and under slightly aerobic to aerobic conditions. The dominant reactions, for example at Rainbow or Lost City, are the oxidation of H2, Fe2+ and methane. At temperatures >60 °C, anaerobic metabolic reactions, e. g., sulphate reduction and methanogenesis, become more profitable. In contrast, basalt-hosted systems, such as TAG and 21 °N EPR uniformly indicate H2S oxidation to be the catabolically dominant reaction over the entire microbial-relevant temperature range. Affinities were calculated for the formation of individual cellular

  9. Iron-based microbial ecosystem on and below the seafloor: a case study of hydrothermal fields of the southern mariana trough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shingo; Nakamura, Kentaro; Toki, Tomohiro; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Tsunogai, Urumu; Hirota, Akinori; Ohkuma, Moriya; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structures in deep-sea hydrothermal vents fields are constrained by available energy yields provided by inorganic redox reactions, which are in turn controlled by chemical composition of hydrothermal fluids. In the past two decades, geochemical and microbiological studies have been conducted in deep-sea hydrothermal vents at three geographically different areas of the Southern Mariana Trough (SMT). A variety of geochemical data of hydrothermal fluids and an unparalleled microbiological dataset of various samples (i.e., sulfide structures of active vents, iron-rich mats, borehole fluids, and ambient seawater) are available for comparative analyses. Here, we summarize the geochemical and microbiological characteristics in the SMT and assess the relationship between the microbial community structures and the fluid geochemistry in the SMT by thermodynamic modeling. In the high temperature vent fluids, aerobic sulfide-oxidation has the potential to yield large amounts of bioavailable energy in the vent fluids, which is consistent with the detection of species related to sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (such as Thiomicrospira in the Gammaproteobacteria and Sulfurimonas in the Epsilonproteobacteria). Conversely, the bioavailable energy yield from aerobic iron-oxidation reactions in the low-temperature fluids collected from man-made boreholes and several natural vents were comparable to or higher than those from sulfide-oxidation. This is also consistent with the detection of species related to iron-oxidizing bacteria (Mariprofundus in the Zetaproteobacteria) in such low-temperature samples. The results of combination of microbiological, geochemical, and thermodynamic analyses in the SMT provide novel insights into the presence and significance of iron-based microbial ecosystems in deep-sea hydrothermal fields.

  10. Iron-based microbial ecosystem on and below the seafloor: a case study of hydrothermal fields of the Southern Mariana Trough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo eKato

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial community structures in deep-sea hydrothermal vents fields are constrained by available energy yields provided by inorganic redox reactions, which are in turn controlled by chemical composition of hydrothermal fluids. In the past two decades, geochemical and microbiological studies have been conducted in deep-sea hydrothermal vents at three geographically different areas of the Southern Mariana Trough (SMT. A variety of geochemical data of hydrothermal fluids and an unparalleled microbiological dataset of various samples (i.e., sulfide structures of active vents, iron-rich mats, borehole fluids and ambient seawater are available for comparative analyses. Here, we summarize the geochemical and microbiological characteristics in the SMT and assess the relationship between the microbial community structures and the fluid geochemistry in the SMT by thermodynamic modeling. In the high-temperature vent fluids, aerobic sulfide-oxidation has the potential to yield large amounts of bioavailable energy in the vent fluids, which is consistent with the detection of species related to sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (such as Thiomicrospira in the Gammaproteobacteria and Sulfurimonas in the Epsilonproteobacteria. Conversely, the bioavailable energy yield from aerobic iron-oxidation reactions in the low-temperature fluids collected from man-made boreholes and several natural vents were comparable to or higher than those from sulfide-oxidation. This is also consistent with the detection of species related to iron-oxidizing bacteria (Mariprofundus in the Zetaproteobacteria in such low-temperature samples. The results of combination of microbiological, geochemical and thermodynamic analyses in the SMT provide novel insights into the presence and significance of iron-based microbial ecosystems in deep-sea hydrothermal fields.

  11. Composition and Formation of Gabbro-Peridotite Hosted Seafloor Massive Sulfide Deposits from the Ashadze-1 Hydrothermal Field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Firstova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents mineralogical and geochemical data on seafloor massive sulfides (SMS from the Ashadze-1 hydrothermal field at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR. The Ashadze-1 deposit is associated with the uplifted lower crust and upper mantle (oceanic core complex, OCC of the MAR segment characterized by asymmetric mode of accretion. The OCC is represented by deep-seated gabbro-peridotite rocks exhumed on the rift valley slope along the detachment fault, during seafloor spreading. Hydrothermal processes in OCC environments result in different deposit composition and morphology compared to basalt-hosted systems. Abundant chimneys and enrichment in particular metals, including copper, zinc, gold, cobalt and tin are typical for this type of SMS deposit. The Ashadze-1 deposit is considered an example of a hydrothermal system in the initial stage of evolution marked by the young age of the sulfides (<7.2 kyr. The mineralogy of Ashadze-1 reflects primary ore-forming processes unaffected by post formation alteration. We propose a model for the primary ore-forming hydrothermal process in an ultramafic-hosted environment on the modern seafloor.

  12. Seismic structure at the Kairei Hydrothermal vent field near the Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, H.; Sato, T.; Imai, Y.; Mori, T.; Noguchi, Y.; Kono, A.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.

    2014-12-01

    Central Indian Ridge is located at the north of the Rodriguez Triple Junction and shows slow-intermediate spreading rate. The Kairei hydrothermal Field (KHF) was discovered in the first segment of Central Indian Ridge near the Rodriguez Triple Junction. The vent fluid which is extruding at the KHF has higher H2 content compared with other hydrothermal vent fluid in the world. Although The KHF itself exists above a basaltic rock massif, gabbro and mafic rocks were discovered on the seafloor around the KHF. These deep-seated rocks may contribute to the high H2concentration of the Kairei vent fluid .To understand how gabbro and mafic rocks are uplifted and exhumed on the seafloor, we conducted a seismic refraction/reflection survey using ocean bottom seismograms (OBSs). We conducted the seismic refraction/reflection survey from January 27 to March 19 in 2013 using S/V Yokosuka of Jamstec. In the experiment, we used 21 OBSs, an air gun (G.I.gun) and a single channel steamer cable. We obtained 5 survey lines NNW-SSE direction parallel to the ridge axis, 5 lines E-W direction and 5 lines NNE-SSW direction. In addition to these lines, we acquired other 5 lines passing through the point above the KHF or Yokoniwa Rise, which is the north of the KHF. In analysis of refraction data, firstly, we estimated 2D velocity model under survey lines, which are parallel to the ridge axis, using the progressive model development method developed by Sato and Kennett (2000). Then, we constructed a 3D initial model and run the 3D tomographic method developed by Zelt and Barton (1998). The 1D velocity profile of the KHF seems to be similar to that of mid ocean ridges such as Mid Atlantic Ridge, East Pacific Rise. Seismic velocities under the KHF and Yokoniwa Rise reach about 6km/s at depth of 1~2 km below seafloor, probably indicating uplift of deep-seated rocks. In this presentation we will show 3D seismic structure of this area.

  13. Viral Genomics and Evolution in Subseafloor Diffuse Flow Viral Communities in the Main Endeavour Hydrothermal Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. E.; Baross, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    In the dynamic environment of hydrothermal vents, transduction may play a crucial role in microbial evolution. Metagenomic analysis of diffuse flow viral communities may elucidate the nature and extent of transduction in these ancient ecosystems.

  14. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Field Enhancement Behavior of ZnO Nanorods Pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Tang; Lin Du; Wen-hui Pang; Jing-jing Zheng; Xiao-chun Tian; Jin-liang Zhuang

    2011-01-01

    We provide a new way to prepare ZnO nanorods pattern from the solution composed of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and Zn(NO3)2.The substrate is ITO substrate covered by well ordered Au islands.Since Au and the underneath ITO substrate have two different nucleation rates in the initial stage of heterogeneous nucleation process,the subsequent ZnO growth on the quick nucleating area takes place under diffusion control and is able to confine the synthesis of ZnO nanorods to specific locations.The concentrations of zinc nitrate and HMT are well adjusted to show the possibility of the new route for the patterning of the ZnO nanorods.Furthermore,the nanorods pattern was characterized by X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence and the performance of field emission property from ZnO nanorod patterns was investigated.The ZnO nanorods pattern with a good alignment also shows a good field enhancement behavior with a high value of the field enhancement factor.

  15. Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov., an anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (New Caledonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bes, Méline; Merrouch, Mériem; Joseph, Manon; Quéméneur, Marianne; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Erauso, Gaël; Postec, Anne

    2015-08-01

    A novel anaerobic bacterial strain, ST07-YET, was isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (PHF) in New Caledonia. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, straight rods (0.7-0.8 × 3.0-5.0 μm) and motile by means of lateral flagella. Strain ST07-YET was mesophilic (optimum 35 °C), moderately alkaliphilic and halotolerant (optimum pH 8.7 and 5 g l- 1 NaCl). Elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite were not used as terminal electron acceptors. Yeast extract, peptone, tryptone, Casamino acids, crotonate, pyruvate, galactose, maltose, sucrose, ribose, trehalose and glucose were used as carbon sources. Glucose fermentation led to acetate, H2 and CO2 formation. Arginine, serine, histidine, lysine, methionine and cysteine improved growth, but the Stickland reaction was negative for the combinations of amino acids tested. The major metabolic products from yeast extract fermentation were H2, CO2, acetate, butyrate, isobutyrate, isovalerate and propionate. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C16  :  0, C16  :  1cis9, C14  :  0 and C16  :  1cis7 (>5 % of total fatty acids). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 32.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain ST07-YET was most closely related to Clostridium sticklandii DSM 519T and Acetoanaerobium noterae NOT-3T (96.7 % and 96.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). On the basis of phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, strain ST07-YET is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Acetoanaerobium (order Clostridiales, phylum Firmicutes) with the name Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov. The type strain is ST07-YET ( = DSM 27512T = JCM 19400T). PMID:25948619

  16. Time Series Measurements of Diffuse Hydrothermal Flow at the ASHES Vent Field Reveal Tidally Modulated Heat and Volume Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Fornari, D. J.; Crone, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Existing time-series measurements of temperature and velocity of diffuse hydrothermal fluids exhibit variability over a range of periods from seconds to days. Frequency analysis of these measurements reveals differences between studies and field locations including nearly white spectra, as well as spectra with peaks at tidal and inertial periods. Based upon these results, previous authors have suggested several processes that may control diffuse flow rates, including tidally induced currents and 'tidal pumping', and have also suggested that there are no systematic controls. To further investigate the processes that control variability in diffuse flow, we use data from a new, deep-sea camera and temperature measurement system, the Diffuse Effluent Measurement System (DEMS), deployed during the July, 2014 cruise of the R/V Atlantis. The DEMS was deployed with DSV Alvin above a fracture network at the Phoenix vent within the ASHES vent field (Axial Seamount, 1541 mbsl). The system collected 20 seconds of imagery at 20 Hz and 24 seconds of temperature measurements at 1 Hz each hour over the period between July 22 and August 2nd. Velocities of the upwelling fluids were calculated using Diffuse Fluid Velocimetry (DFV; Mittelstaedt et al., 2010). DFV is a cross correlation technique that tracks moving index of refraction anomalies (i.e., hot parcels of fluid) through time. Over the ~12 day deployment, median flow rates ranged from 0.5 cm/s to 6 cm/s and mean fluid temperature anomalies from 0°C up to ~6.5°C, yielding an average heat flux density of 0.23 MW/m2. Spectral analysis of both the measured temperatures and calculated velocities yield a peak in normalized power at the semi-diurnal lunar period (M2, 12.4hrs), but no other spectral peaks above the 95% confidence level. Here, we present these results and discuss their implications for the tidal current and tidal pressure models of diffuse flow variability at the ASHES vent field.

  17. Rare-earth elements and uranium in high-temperature solutions from East Pacific Rise hydrothermal vent field (130N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mobility of rare-earth elements (REE) and U during hydrothermal alteration of the basalts at spreading centres has long been a matter of concern because of its bearing on the evolution and recycling of the oceanic crust. Previous approaches to this problem have been indirect, through studies on altered dredged basalts or ophiolites. Sampling of hydrothermal vent waters from the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 130 N is reported. It provides the first direct evidence of REE-enriched solutions which, however, leave the budget of these elements in the crust and the ocean rather unmodified. In constrast, uranium, like magnesium, is quantitatively taken up from the seawater during the hydrothermal process. (author)

  18. A Paleoarchean coastal hydrothermal field inhabited by diverse microbial communities: the Strelley Pool Formation, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugitani, K; Mimura, K; Takeuchi, M; Yamaguchi, T; Suzuki, K; Senda, R; Asahara, Y; Wallis, S; Van Kranendonk, M J

    2015-11-01

    The 3.4-Ga Strelley Pool Formation (SPF) at the informally named 'Waterfall Locality' in the Goldsworthy greenstone belt of the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia, provides deeper insights into ancient, shallow subaqueous to possibly subaerial ecosystems. Outcrops at this locality contain a thin (hydrothermal activities, consistent with the previous studies. Carbonaceous, sulfide-rich massive black cherts with coniform structures up to 3 cm high are characterized by diverse rare earth elements (REE) signatures including enrichment of light [light rare earth elements (LREE)] or middle rare earth elements and by enrichment of heavy metals represented by Zn. The massive black cherts were likely deposited by mixing of hydrothermal and non-hydrothermal fluids. Coniform structures in the cherts are characterized by diffuse laminae composed of sulfide particles, suggesting that unlike stromatolites, they were formed dominantly through physico-chemical processes related to hydrothermal activity. The cherts yield microfossils identical to previously described carbonaceous films, small and large spheres, and lenticular microfossils. In addition, new morphological types such as clusters composed of large carbonaceous spheroids (20-40 μm across each) with fluffy or foam-like envelope are identified. Finely laminated carbonaceous cherts are devoid of heavy metals and characterized by the enrichment of LREE. This chert locally contains conical to domal structures characterized by truncation of laminae and trapping of detrital grains and is interpreted as siliceous stromatolite formed by very early or contemporaneous silicification of biomats with the contribution of silica-rich hydrothermal fluids. Biological affinities of described microfossils and microbes constructing siliceous stromatolites are under investigation. However, this study emphasizes how diverse the microbial community in Paleoarchean coastal hydrothermal environment was. We propose the diversity is at least

  19. SUB-SURFACE GEOLOGY, HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION AND 3D MODELING OF WELLS LA-9D AND LA-10D IN THE ALUTO LANGANO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, ETHIOPIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sisay, Selamawit Worku, 1987-

    2016-01-01

    Aluto Langano geothermal field is located in the Aluto Volcanic Complex (AVC), within the Central Main Ethiopian Rift System (CMERS). AVC is a silicic peralkaline complex, which is affected by Wonji Fault Belt (WFB), trending NNE-SSW. Ten exploratory wells (LA-1 to LA-10D) have been drilled in Aluto Langano geothermal field, with a maximum depth of 2500m and maximum measured temperature of 335°C. This study focused on sub-surface geology and hydrothermal alteration of wells LA-9D and LA-10...

  20. In situ chemistry and microbial community compositions in five deep-sea hydrothermal fluid samples from Irina II in the Logatchev field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Mirjam; Gonnella, Giorgio; Hourdez, Stephane; Böhnke, Stefanie; Kurtz, Stefan; Girguis, Peter

    2013-05-01

    We present data on the co-registered geochemistry (in situ mass spectrometry) and microbiology (pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes; V1, V2, V3 regions) in five fluid samples from Irina II in the Logatchev hydrothermal field. Two samples were collected over 24 min from the same spot and further three samples were from spatially distinct locations (20 cm, 3 m and the overlaying plume). Four low-temperature hydrothermal fluids from the Irina II are composed of the same core bacterial community, namely specific Gammaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, which, however, differs in the relative abundance. The microbial composition of the fifth sample (plume) is considerably different. Although a significant correlation between sulfide enrichment and proportions of Sulfurovum (Epsilonproteobacteria) was found, no other significant linkages between abiotic factors, i.e. temperature, hydrogen, methane, sulfide and oxygen, and bacterial lineages were evident. Intriguingly, bacterial community compositions of some time series samples from the same spot were significantly more similar to a sample collected 20 cm away than to each other. Although this finding is based on three single samples only, it provides first hints that single hydrothermal fluid samples collected on a small spatial scale may also reflect unrecognized temporal variability. However, further studies are required to support this hypothesis.

  1. An Assessment of Changes in Kunzea ericoides var . microflora and Other Hydrothermal Vegetation at the Wairakei-Tauhara Geothermal Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Saskia M.; Reeves, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Hydrothermal ecosystems are of high conservation and scientific value, but they are sensitive to external perturbations that result from development. This study examines the composition of vegetation at four plots at the Wairakei-Tauhara geothermal field, New Zealand, using the Scott height-frequency method, ground temperatures at 0.1- and 1-m depth, soil pH, and photographic surveys. It highlights the response of plant communities, in particular that of Kunzea ericoides var. microflora, in terms of composition, structure, and biomass index values, measures changes in ground temperature, as well as provides baseline data against which to compare future changes. It was found that optimal growing conditions for K. ericoides var. microflora are at temperatures above background conditions with a slightly acidic pH. Plots with cooler, less acidic conditions support more diverse plant communities, which also promote the establishment of invasive species. This suggests that the largest threats to thermotolerant vegetation in New Zealand, including K. ericoides var. microflora, are further decreases in ground temperature because the establishment of invasive species may result in thermolerant vegetation being out-competed in hydrothermal ecosystems. Recognising and understanding the ecological diversity and dynamics of hydrothermal ecosystems, as well as acknowledging the competing interests between development and conservation, is key to the management and protection of these areas.

  2. Deposition of talc - kerolite-smectite - smectite at seafloor hydrothermal vent fields: Evidence from mineralogical, geochemical and oxygen isotope studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekov, V.M.; Cuadros, J.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Koski, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Talc, kerolite-smectite, smectite, chlorite-smectite and chlorite samples from sediments, chimneys and massive sulfides from six seafloor hydrothermal areas have been analyzed for mineralogy, chemistry and oxygen isotopes. Samples are from both peridotite- and basalt-hosted hydrothermal systems, and basaltic systems include sediment-free and sediment-covered sites. Mg-phyllosilicates at seafloor hydrothermal sites have previously been described as talc, stevensite or saponite. In contrast, new data show tri-octahedral Mg-phyllosilicates ranging from pure talc and Fe-rich talc, through kerolite-rich kerolite-smectite to smectite-rich kerolite-smectite and tri-octahedral smectite. The most common occurrence is mixed-layer kerolite-smectite, which shows an almost complete interstratification series with 5 to 85% smectitic layers. The smectite interstratified with kerolite is mostly tri-octahedral. The degree of crystal perfection of the clay sequence decreases generally from talc to kerolite-smectite with lower crystalline perfection as the proportion of smectite layers in kerolite-smectite increases. Our studies do not support any dependence of the precipitated minerals on the type/subtype of hydrothermal system. Oxygen isotope geothermometry demonstrates that talc and kerolite-smectite precipitated in chimneys, massive sulfide mounds, at the sediment surface and in open cracks in the sediment near seafloor are high-temperature (> 250????C) phases that are most probably the result of focused fluid discharge. The other end-member of this tri-octahedral Mg-phyllosilicate sequence, smectite, is a moderate-temperature (200-250????C) phase forming deep within the sediment (??? 0.8??m). Chlorite and chlorite-smectite, which constitute the alteration sediment matrix around the hydrothermal mounds, are lower-temperature (150-200????C) phases produced by diffuse fluid discharge through the sediment around the hydrothermal conduits. In addition to temperature, other two

  3. Pourbaix diagrams to decipher precipitation conditions of Si-Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides at the PACMANUS hydrothermal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Baoju; ZENG Zhigang; WANG Xiaoyuan; YIN Xuebo; CHEN Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing Si, Fe and Mn concentrations within the end-member PACMANUS hydrothermal fluid, Si-Fe-Mn-H2O Pourbaix diagrams were constructed at 300°Cand 25°C. ThePourbaix diagrams show that the main Si, Fe and Mn oxides species precipitating from the hydrothermal fluid were SiO2, Fe(OH)3, Fe3(OH)8, Mn3O4, and Mn2O3at 25°C. During mixing of hydrothermal fluid with seawater, SiO2 precipitated earlier than Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides because of the lower stability boundary. Then Fe(OH)2 precipitated first, followed by Fe3(OH)8 and Fe(OH)3, and last, small amounts of Mn3O4 and Mn2O3 precipitated. Fe(OH)3was readily de-posited in alkaline solution with little influence by Eh. There were many Si-Fe-Mn-concentric particles in the polished sections of the massive precipitates collected from PACMANUS. In the concentric nucleus and ellipsoid, Si oxides precipitated first before the hydrothermal fluid had mixed with seawater. In the concen-tric nucleus, after the precipitation of Si oxides, the increase of pH and Eh promoted the precipitation of Mn oxides around the Si oxides. In the large ellipsoid, the precipitation of Fe was divided into two periods. In the early period, increase of pH value of hydrothermal fluid produced by low-temperature convection and an input of a small volume of seawater promoted a small amount of Fe(OH)3 to precipitate in the Si-rich core. In the late period, after complete mixing with seawater and the resultant fluid was close to neutral or slightly alkaline in pH, Fe(OH)3was easily precipitated from the solution and distributed around the Si-rich core.

  4. Hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field: Sulphur Springs and the Cochiti mining district

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WoldeGabriel, G.

    1989-03-01

    K/Ar dates and oxygen isotope data were obtained on 13 clay separates (<2 ..mu..m) of thermally altered mafic and silicic rocks from the Cochiti mining district (SE Jemez Mountains) and Continental Scientific Drilling Project (CSDP) core hole VC-2A (Sulphur Springs, Valles caldera). Illite with K/sub 2/O contents of 6.68%--10.04% is the dominant clay in the silicic rocks, whereas interstratified illite/smectites containing 1.4%--5.74% K/sub 2/O constitute the altered andesites. Two hydrothermal alteration events are recognized at the Cochiti area (8.07 m.y., n = 1, and 6.5--5.6 m.y., n = 6). The older event correlates with the waning stages of Paliza Canyon Formation andesite volcanism (greater than or equal to13 to less than or equal to8.5 m.y.), whereas the younger event correlates with intrusions and gold- and silver-bearing quartz veins associated with the Bearhead Rhyolite (7.54--5.8 m.y.). The majority of K/Ar dates in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A (0.83--0.66 m.y., n = 4) indicate that hydrothermal alteration developed contemporaneously with resurgence and ring fracture Valles Rhyolite domes (0.89--0.54 m.y.). One date of 0 +- 0.10 m.y. in acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole probably correlates with Holocene hydrothermal activity possibly associated with the final phases of the Valles Rhyolite (0.13 m.y.).

  5. High connectivity of animal populations in deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields in the Central Indian Ridge relevant to its geological setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Beedessee

    Full Text Available Dispersal ability plays a key role in the maintenance of species in spatially and temporally discrete niches of deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments. On the basis of population genetic analyses in the eastern Pacific vent fields, dispersal of animals in the mid-oceanic ridge systems generally appears to be constrained by geographical barriers such as trenches, transform faults, and microplates. Four hydrothermal vent fields (the Kairei and Edmond fields near the Rodriguez Triple Junction, and the Dodo and Solitaire fields in the Central Indian Ridge have been discovered in the mid-oceanic ridge system of the Indian Ocean. In the present study, we monitored the dispersal of four representative animals, Austinograea rodriguezensis, Rimicaris kairei, Alviniconcha and the scaly-foot gastropods, among these vent fields by using indirect methods, i.e., phylogenetic and population genetic analyses. For all four investigated species, we estimated potentially high connectivity, i.e., no genetic difference among the populations present in vent fields located several thousands of kilometers apart; however, the direction of migration appeared to differ among the species, probably because of different dispersal strategies. Comparison of the intermediate-spreading Central Indian Ridge with the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise and slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge revealed the presence of relatively high connectivity in the intermediate- and slow-spreading ridge systems. We propose that geological background, such as spreading rate which determines distance among vent fields, is related to the larval dispersal and population establishment of vent-endemic animal species, and may play an important role in controlling connectivity among populations within a biogeographical province.

  6. Barite in hydrothermal environments as a recorder of subseafloor processes: a multiple-isotope study from the Loki's Castle vent field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickmann, B; Thorseth, I H; Peters, M; Strauss, H; Bröcker, M; Pedersen, R B

    2014-07-01

    Barite chimneys are known to form in hydrothermal systems where barium-enriched fluids generated by leaching of the oceanic basement are discharged and react with seawater sulfate. They also form at cold seeps along continental margins, where marine (or pelagic) barite in the sediments is remobilized because of subseafloor microbial sulfate reduction. We test the possibility of using multiple sulfur isotopes (δ34S, Δ33S, ∆36S) of barite to identify microbial sulfate reduction in a hydrothermal system. In addition to multiple sulfur isotopes, we present oxygen (δ18O) and strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotopes for one of numerous barite chimneys in a low-temperature (~20 °C) venting area of the Loki's Castle black smoker field at the ultraslow-spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR). The chemistry of the venting fluids in the barite field identifies a contribution of at least 10% of high-temperature black smoker fluid, which is corroborated by 87Sr/86 Sr ratios in the barite chimney that are less radiogenic than in seawater. In contrast, oxygen and multiple sulfur isotopes indicate that the fluid from which the barite precipitated contained residual sulfate that was affected by microbial sulfate reduction. A sulfate reduction zone at this site is further supported by the multiple sulfur isotopic composition of framboidal pyrite in the flow channel of the barite chimney and in the hydrothermal sediments in the barite field, as well as by low SO4 and elevated H2S concentrations in the venting fluids compared with conservative mixing values. We suggest that the mixing of ascending H2- and CH4-rich high-temperature fluids with percolating seawater fuels microbial sulfate reduction, which is subsequently recorded by barite formed at the seafloor in areas where the flow rate is sufficient. Thus, low-temperature precipitates in hydrothermal systems are promising sites to explore the interactions between the geosphere and biosphere in order to evaluate the microbial impact on

  7. Polcyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the soil of irrigation fields by example of the city of Muenster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soil of irrigation fields of the City of Muenster were examined on the contents of 6 PAHs according to the drinking water regulations. The irrigation of waste water in the period from 1901 to 1975 lead to an average concentration of PAHs of 0,57 mg PAH/kg soil. The neighboring top soil just outside of the irrigation area reveals average values of 0.14 mg PAH/kg soil. (orig.)

  8. Sustainable carbon materials from hydrothermal processes

    CERN Document Server

    Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The production of low cost and environmentally friendly high performing carbon materials is crucial for a sustainable future. Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes describes a sustainable and alternative technique to produce carbon from biomass in water at low temperatures, a process known as Hydrothermal Carbonization (HTC). Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes presents an overview of this new and rapidly developing field, discussing various synthetic approaches, characterization of the final products, and modern fields of application fo

  9. 深海热液速度场测量重建算法比较%Comparison of reconstruction algorithm in deep-sea hydrothermal velocity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白燕; 毛洁; 樊炜; 潘华辰

    2011-01-01

    Aiming at measuring and reconstruction of the deep-sea hydrothermal velocity field, the basic theory of acoustic velocity field measurement in deep-sea hydrothermal vents was introduced. Based on single and double-peaked velocity field model, the reconstruction of velocity field via least square method and Fourier regularization mehods were presented. The absolute, the relative error and flow flux analysis of the reconstructed velocity fields were given. It shows that Fourier regularization method has a better result than least square method to single and double-peaked velocity field model.%针对深海热液中速度场的测量与重建的问题,介绍了利用声学方法测最深海热液速度场的基本原理.对单峰、双峰速度场模型,采用最小二乘法和傅里叶正则化方法分别进行了重建仿真,并对重建结果进行了流量分析.比较了最小二乘法与正则化方法对单峰、双峰速度场模型的重建效果.仿真重建的绝对误差、相对误差以及流量分析结果表明:正则化方法对单峰模型速度场和双峰模型速度场比最小二乘法有更好的还原效果.

  10. Multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity and epithermal mineralization in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and their relations to magmatic activity, volcanism and regional extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Jackson, M.C. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic rocks of middle Miocene age and underlying pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks host widely distributed zones of hydrothermal alteration and epithermal precious metal, fluorite and mercury deposits within and peripheral to major volcanic and intrusive centers of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF) in southern Nevada, near the southwestern margin of the Great Basin of the western United States. Radiometric ages indicate that episodes of hydrothermal activity mainly coincided with and closely followed major magmatic pulses during the development of the field and together spanned more than 4.5 m.y. Rocks of the SWNVF consist largely of rhyolitic ash-flow sheets and intercalated silicic lava domes, flows and near-vent pyroclastic deposits erupted between 15.2 and 10 Ma from vent areas in the vicinity of the Timber Mountain calderas, and between about 9.5 and 7 Ma from the outlying Black Mountain and Stonewall Mountain centers. Three magmatic stages can be recognized: the main magmatic stage, Mountain magmatic stage (11.7 to 10.0 Ma), and the late magmatic stage (9.4 to 7.5 Ma).

  11. Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

    1999-06-01

    This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

  12. Carbon Species in Serpentinites and Gabbros Underlying the Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Southern Atlantis Massif (30°N, MAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, A.; Schaeffer, P.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frueh-Green, G. L.

    2006-12-01

    Serpentinization of oceanic peridotites results in the production of volatile-rich (methane and hydrogen) fluids and other light hydrocarbons, and is characteristic of the low-temperature (squalane clearly indicate a biogenic origin, possibly incorporated into the serpentinites during fluid-rock interaction. Compound- specific C-isotope analyses show relatively constant compositions that overlap the bulk δ13CTOC values and are distinct from published values for methane in the LCHF fluids and experimental results for FTT synthesis of organic compounds. Our studies indicate that the ultramafic rocks of the LCHF may represent a significant reservoir of both abiogenic and biogenic carbon and that high seawater fluxes may greatly affect carbon speciation and budgets in these systems.

  13. Recent Investigation of In-Situ pH in Hydrothermal Vent Fluids at Main Endeavour Field (MEF) and ASHES Vent Field (ASHES): Implications for Dynamic Changes in Subseafloor Hydrothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Tan, C.; Schaen, A. T.; Luhmann, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    In-situ pH is among the key factors affecting chemical reactions involved with fluid-rock interaction and metal transport in hydrothermal systems. A small variation in pH will often result in a large difference in dissolved metal concentrations. For instance, at 400oC, a decrease of ~0.15 pH unit will cause dissolved Fe concentration to double in fluid coexisting with a Fe-bearing mineral assemblage. This parameter also offers us an opportunity to better understand processes controlling the temporal evolution of hydrothermal vent fluid chemistry at mid-ocean ridges. During our recent cruise AT 26-17 with newly upgraded DSV2 Alvin, in-situ measurements of pH were carried out along with gas-tight sampling of vent fluids. Our efforts were focused at MEF and ASHES on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These hydrothermal systems have been shown to be particularly responsive to subseafloor seismic and magmatic events. The measured fluid temperature was approximately 333˚C and 300˚C at Dante vent orifice of MEF and Inferno vent orifice of ASHES, respectively. The corresponding measured in-situ pH values for both vents are: 4.94 and 4.88, respectively. Dissolved gases and other species were also measured from gas-tight fluid samples providing a means of comparison with the in-situ data. As we have known the earthquake and magmatic activity often places the system at higher temperature and more reducing conditions in connection with a new evolutionary cycle. Comparing these relatively low in-situ pH values with those measured in the past, especially with the ones obtained at MEF in 1999 after an intense swarm of earthquakes, we see the system trending towards more acidic conditions along with decreasing temperature and dissolved H2 and H2S. Taking an example from Dante vent site, in-situ pH value of 5.15 was recorded with a measured temperature of 363oC two month after the event in 1999, which gives 0.2 pH unit greater than the more recent data. Measured dissolved H2 and H2S

  14. Thermal zonation of microbial biogeography in the hydrothermal fields of Guaymas Basin: insights into the limits of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, L. J.; Klokman, V.; Teske, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermally active sediments at Guaymas Basin are rich in organic substrates and host a wide range of shallow subsurface temperatures: from 3°C to 200°C in the upper 45 centimeters. High temperatures and hydrothermal flow cause upward compression of metabolic zones in Guaymas Basin seafloor sediments. Using push core samples collected by the Alvin submersible (Cruises AT15-40 and 56 in 2008 and 2009) we are investigating thermal structure and carbon and sulfur substrate utilization and their influence on microbial biogeography. As a proxy for viable microbial life total RNA is being extracted from seven high temperature cores that approach, and in three of the cores surpass the upper temperature limit for life at 122°C (Takai et al., 2008). We are using reverse transcription PCR and subsequent pyrosequencing of the V5-V8 region of 16S rRNA to determine key hyperthermophilic archaeal and bacterial groups as well as the upper thermal limit for microbial life in situ. Porewater concentrations of sulfur species and concentrations and isotopic values of carbon species have been investigated in parallel to our high temperature cores. A combination of pyrosequencing data and porewater geochemistry profiles of carbon and sulfur species will help to elucidate the boundaries of life and provide insight into physiological mechanisms under extreme environmental conditions.

  15. Helium,neon and argon isotope compositions of fluid inclu-sions in massive sulfides from the Jade hydrothermal field,the Okinawa Trough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Zhigang; QIN Yunshan; ZHAI Shikui

    2004-01-01

    Helium, neon and argon isotope compositions of fluid inclusions have been measured in massive sulfide samples from the Jade hydrothermal field in the central Okinawa Trough. Huid-inclusion 3He/4He ratios are between 6.2 and 10.1 times the air value (Ra), and with a mean of 7.8Ra, which are consistent with the mid-ocean ridge basalt values [3He/4He≈(6Ra~11Ra)]. Values for 20Ne/22Ne are from 10.7 to 11.3, which are significantly higher than the atmospheric ratio (9.8).And the fluid-inclusion 40Ar/36Ar ratios range from 287 to 334, which are close to the atmosperic values (295.5). These results indicate that the noble gases of trapped hydrothermal fluids in massive sulfides are a mixture of mantle- and seawater-derived components, and the helium of fluid inclusions is mainly from mantle, the nelium and argon isotope compositions are mainly from seawater.

  16. The Anatomy of a Fumarole inferred from a 3-D High-Resolution Electrical Resistivity Image of Solfatara Hydrothermal System (Phlegrean Fields, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresse, M.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Chiodini, G.; Byrdina, S.; Lebourg, T.; Johnson, T. C.

    2015-12-01

    Solfatara, the most active crater in the Phlegrean Fields volcanic complex, shows since ten years a remarkable renewal of activity characterized by an increase of CO2 total degassing from 1500 up to 3000 tons/day, associated with a large ground uplift (Chiodini et al., 2015). In order to precisely image the structure of the shallow hydrothermal system, we performed an extended electrical DC resistivity survey at Solfatara, with about 40 2-D profiles of length up to 1 km, as well as soil temperature and CO2 flux measurements over the area. We then realized a 3-D inversion from the ~40 000 resistivity data points, using E4D code (Johnson et al., 2010). At large scale, results clearly delineate two contrasted structures: - A very conductive body (resistivity < 5 Ohm.m) located beneath the Fangaia mud pools, and likely associated to a mineralized liquid rich plume. - An elongated more resistive body (20-30 Ohm.m) connected to the main fumarolic area and interpreted as the gas reservoir feeding the fumaroles. At smaller scale, our resistivity model originally highlights the 3-D anatomy of a fumarole and the interactions between condensate layers and gas chimneys. This high-resolution image of the shallow hydrothermal structure is a new step for the modeling of this system.

  17. Rhythms and Community Dynamics of a Hydrothermal Tubeworm Assemblage at Main Endeavour Field – A Multidisciplinary Deep-Sea Observatory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvelier, Daphne; Legendre, Pierre; Laes, Agathe; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Sarrazin, Jozée

    2014-01-01

    The NEPTUNE cabled observatory network hosts an ecological module called TEMPO-mini that focuses on hydrothermal vent ecology and time series, granting us real-time access to data originating from the deep sea. In 2011–2012, during TEMPO-mini’s first deployment on the NEPTUNE network, the module recorded high-resolution imagery, temperature, iron (Fe) and oxygen on a hydrothermal assemblage at 2186 m depth at Main Endeavour Field (North East Pacific). 23 days of continuous imagery were analysed with an hourly frequency. Community dynamics were analysed in detail for Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms, Polynoidae, Pycnogonida and Buccinidae, documenting faunal variations, natural change and biotic interactions in the filmed tubeworm assemblage as well as links with the local environment. Semi-diurnal and diurnal periods were identified both in fauna and environment, revealing the influence of tidal cycles. Species interactions were described and distribution patterns were indicative of possible microhabitat preference. The importance of high-resolution frequencies (<1 h) to fully comprehend rhythms in fauna and environment was emphasised, as well as the need for the development of automated or semi-automated imagery analysis tools. PMID:24810603

  18. Hydrothermal activity in Tertiary Icelandic crust: Implication for cooling processes along slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałgan, D.; Devey, C. W.; Yeo, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    Known hydrothermal activity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is mostly high-temperature venting, controlled by volcano-tectonic processes confined to ridge axes and neotectonic zones ~15km wide on each side of the axis (e.g. TAG or Snake Pit). However, extensive exploration and discoveries of new hydrothermal fields in off-axis regions (e.g. Lost City, MAR) show that hydrothermalism may, in some areas, be dominated by off-axis venting. Little is known about nature of such systems, including whether low-temperature "diffuse" venting dominates rather than high-temperature black-smokers. This is particularly interesting since such systems may transport up to 90% of the hydrothermal heat to the oceans. In this study we use Icelandic hot springs as onshore analogues for off-shore hydrothermal activity along the MAR to better understand volcano-tectonic controls on their occurrence, along with processes supporting fluid circulation. Iceland is a unique laboratory to study how new oceanic crust cools and suggests that old crust may not be as inactive as previously thought. Our results show that Tertiary (>3.3 Myr) crust of Iceland (Westfjords) has widespread low-temperature hydrothermal activity. Lack of tectonism (indicated by lack of seismicity), along with field research suggest that faults in Westfjords are no longer active and that once sealed, can no longer support hydrothermal circulation, i.e. none of the hot springs in the area occur along faults. Instead, dyke margins provide open and permeable fluid migration pathways. Furthermore, we suggest that the Reykjanes Ridge (south of Iceland) may be similar to Westfjords with hydrothermalism dominated by off-axis venting. Using bathymetric data we infer dyke positions and suggest potential sites for future exploration located away from neotectonic zone. We also emphasise the importance of biological observations in seeking for low-temperature hydrothermal activity, since chemical or optical methods are not sufficient.

  19. Hydrothermal minerals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.

    observations and robot controlled sampling 82 Table 1. A compilation of reported metallogenesis along the IORS (Soure: Banerjee & Ray, 2003... 31°04′S/58°58′E 31°11′S/58°30′E 18. 10°N to 11°40′N Anda- Evidence of hydrothermal activity in the Andaman Back arc Basin comprising broken parts of Man chimney structures and rocks with disseminated and vein type metal sulphides. Water depth...

  20. The Arctic Gakkel Vents (AGAVE) Expedition: Technology Development and the Search for Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Fields Under the Arctic Ice Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reves-Sohn, R. A.; Singh, H.; Humphris, S.; Shank, T.; Jakuba, M.; Kunz, C.; Murphy, C.; Willis, C.

    2007-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal fields on the Gakkel Ridge beneath the Arctic ice cap provide perhaps the best terrestrial analogue for volcanically-hosted chemosynthetic biological communities that may exist beneath the ice-covered ocean of Europa. In both cases the key enabling technologies are robotic (untethered) vehicles that can swim freely under the ice and the supporting hardware and software. The development of robotic technology for deep- sea research beneath ice-covered oceans thus has relevance to both polar oceanography and future astrobiological missions to Europa. These considerations motivated a technology development effort under the auspices of NASA's ASTEP program and NSF's Office of Polar Programs that culminated in the AGAVE expedition aboard the icebreaker Oden from July 1 - August 10, 2007. The scientific objective was to study hydrothermal processes on the Gakkel Ridge, which is a key target for global studies of deep-sea vent fields. We developed two new autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for the project, and deployed them to search for vent fields beneath the ice. We conducted eight AUV missions (four to completion) during the 40-day long expedition, which also included ship-based bathymetric surveys, CTD/rosette water column surveys, and wireline photographic and sampling surveys of remote sections of the Gakkel Ridge. The AUV missions, which lasted 16 hours on average and achieved operational depths of 4200 meters, returned sensor data that showed clear evidence of hydrothermal venting, but for a combination of technical reasons and time constraints, the AUVs did not ultimately return images of deep-sea vent fields. Nevertheless we used our wireline system to obtain images and samples of extensive microbial mats that covered fresh volcanic surfaces on a newly discovered set of volcanoes. The microbes appear to be living in regions where reducing and slightly warm fluids are seeping through cracks in the fresh volcanic terrain. These discoveries

  1. Diffuse venting at the ASHES hydrothermal field: Heat flux and tidally modulated flow variability derived from in situ time-series measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, Eric; Fornari, Daniel J.; Crone, Timothy J.; Kinsey, James; Kelley, Deborah; Elend, Mitch

    2016-04-01

    Time-series measurements of diffuse exit-fluid temperature and velocity collected with a new, deep-sea camera, and temperature measurement system, the Diffuse Effluent Measurement System (DEMS), were examined from a fracture network within the ASHES hydrothermal field located in the caldera of Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The DEMS was installed using the HOV Alvin above a fracture near the Phoenix vent. The system collected 20 s of 20 Hz video imagery and 24 s of 1 Hz temperature measurements each hour between 22 July and 2 August 2014. Fluid velocities were calculated using the Diffuse Fluid Velocimetry (DFV) technique. Over the ˜12 day deployment, median upwelling rates and mean fluid temperature anomalies ranged from 0.5 to 6 cm/s and 0°C to ˜6.5°C above ambient, yielding a heat flux of 0.29 ± 0.22 MW m-2 and heat output of 3.1± 2.5 kW. Using a photo mosaic to measure fracture dimensions, the total diffuse heat output from cracks across ASHES field is estimated to be 2.05 ± 1.95 MW. Variability in temperatures and velocities are strongest at semidiurnal periods and show significant coherence with tidal height variations. These data indicate that periodic variability near Phoenix vent is modulated both by tidally controlled bottom currents and seafloor pressure, with seafloor pressures being the dominant influence. These results emphasize the importance of local permeability on diffuse hydrothermal venting at mid-ocean ridges and the need to better quantify heat flux associated with young oceanic crust.

  2. Detection of active hydrothermal vent fields in the Pescadero Basin and on the Alarcon Rise using AUV multibeam and CTD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caress, D. W.; Troni, G.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.; Thomas, H. J.; Thompson, D.; Conlin, D.; Martin, E. J.; meneses-Quiroz, E.; Nieves-Cardoso, C.; Angel Santa Rosa del Rio, M.

    2015-12-01

    The MBARI AUV D. Allan B. collected high resolution bathymetry, sidescan, and subbottom profiles along the neovolcanic zone of the Alarcon Rise and across the southern Pescadero Basin during 2012 and 2015 MBARI expeditions to the Gulf of California (GOC). The combination of high resolution multibeam bathymetry and seawater temperature data has proven effective in identifying active high temperature vent fields, as validated by inspection and sampling during ROV dives. The AUV carries a 200 kHz multibeam sonar, 110 kHz chirp sidescan sonar, a 1-6 kHz chirp subbottom profiler, and a conductivity, temperature and depth (CTD) sensor for ~17-hour duration missions. Flying at 5.4 km/hr at 50 m altitude, the processed AUV bathymetry has a 0.1 m vertical precision and a 1 m lateral resolution. Chimneys taller than 1.5 m are sufficiently distinctive to allow provisional identification. The CTD temperature data have a nominal 0.002°C accuracy. Following calculation of potential temperature and correcting for average local variation of potential temperature with depth, anomalies greater than 0.05 °C can be reliably identified using a spike detection filter. MBARI AUV mapping surveys are typically planned using a 150 m survey line spacing, so the CTD data may be collected as much as 75 m away from any vent plume source. Five active high temperature vent fields were discovered in the southern GOC, with the Auka Field in the southern Pescadero Basin, and the Ja Sít, Pericú, Meyibó, and Tzab-ek Fields along the Alarcon Rise. In all five cases, hydrothermal vent chimneys are readily identifiable in the multibeam bathymetry, and temperature anomalies are observed above background variability. Other apparent hydrothermal chimneys were observed in the bathmetry that did not exhibit water temperature anomalies; most of these were visited during ROV dives and confirmed to be inactive sites. The maximum water column anomalies are 0.13°C observed above the Meyibó field and 0.25

  3. Abundance of volatile and organic species in intermediate temperature fluids from the Von Damm and Piccard deep sea hydrothermal fields, Mid-Cayman Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, J. M.; Seewald, J.; Reeves, E. P.; German, C. R.; Sylva, S. P.; Klein, F.

    2012-12-01

    Two recently discovered submarine hydrothermal systems at the ultra-slow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise provide a unique opportunity to investigate how mixing and cooling influence hydrothermal fluid chemistry at the deepest-yet discovered, basalt-hosted Piccard vent field (4960m) and at the Von Damm vent field (2300m), postulated to be ultramafic-hosted. Vent fluids were collected in January 2012 during R/V Atlantis cruise AT18-16 with gas-tight samplers deployed by the ROV Jason II, allowing the characterization and quantification of redox-reactive volatile species and organic compounds. Von Damm vent fluids ranged in temperature from 21 to 226°C, whereas Piccard fluids ranged from 45 to 398°C. A key feature of these systems is the variety of fluids that were actively venting from the seafloor at 100 to 200°C, substantially cooler than the hottest fluids observed at either site. The lower temperatures reflect subsurface seawater mixing and/or conductive heat loss. Fluids venting within this temperature range have rarely been sampled at other systems, and the Cayman fluids thus present an excellent opportunity to study the effect of cooling and mixing processes on enriched volatile species such as H2, H2S, CO2 and CH4. Three dominant processes are thought to affect volatile and organic species in intermediate temperature fluids. These include microbial consumption or production, thermal alteration of biomass, and abiotic reactions. The effect of these processes on fluid compositions carries implications for carbon utilization and metabolic activity of modern microbial populations hosted within hydrothermal mineral deposits and ascending plumes, carbon cycling within hydrothermal systems, and net geochemical fluxes to the ocean. Endmember CO2 concentrations at Von Damm range from slightly enriched relative to seawater in the highest temperature fluids, to measurably depleted in the cooler fluids. Such CO2 depletions have not been previously observed in other acidic

  4. Seismic delineation of Algal Mound Reservoirs, Humble City South Field, Lea County, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caughey, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pennsylvanian algal mounds near Lovington, New Mexico, typify the targets remaining for exploration in the Permian basin. The Strawn trend new Lovington comprises numerous small (200-800 ac) reservoirs of clean algal limestone encased in unfossiliferous carbonate mudrocks. Vuggy porosity occurs in algal micrites and sporadically in crinoidal or foraminiferal grainstones associated with the mound. Some of the Lovington area fields encountered downdip water, but difficulty in finding the mound facies remains the principal dry-hole hazard. Vague acoustical boundaries complicate seismic detection of relatively minor (50-150 ft) carbonate buildups at depths of 11,200-11,600 ft. Stratigraphic interpretation of high-resolution seismic data recently led to several new field discoveries and major extensions. Development drilling, however, can be an even greater challenge to reservoir prediction. Humble City South field illustrates the difficulty of developing a stratigraphic oil field in an area of poor seismic definition and sparse well control. A shooting program following the wildcat discovery only heightened confusion about the size and shape of the new reservoir. Two subsequent dry holes missed the mound entirely and provided only negative control. Seismic modeling, careful stratigraphic interpretation, and saturation coverage with a three-dimensional seismic project ultimately defined the existing reservoir and revealed the presence of a separate, nearby pool. Exact reservoir delineation remains difficult, but this program presented the first clear picture of overall mount geometry. The Humble City experience showed that three-dimensional seismic can be an important tool in the critical period following a wildcat discovery.

  5. Relations between electrical resistivity, carbon dioxide flux, and self-potential in the shallow hydrothermal system of Solfatara (Phlegrean Fields, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdina, Svetlana; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Cardellini, Carlo; Legaz, Aurelie; Camerlynck, Christian; Chiodini, Giovanni; Lebourg, Thomas; Letort, Jean; Motos, Ghislan; Carrier, Aurore; Bascou, Pascale

    2014-05-01

    In the frame of the Geo-Supersite Med-Suv project, we present the results of an electric resistivity tomography (ERT) survey, combined with mappings of diffuse carbon dioxide flux, ground temperature and self-potential (SP) at Solfatara, Phlegrean Fields, Italy. This ensemble of methods aims to image the hydrothermal system of Solfatara, understand the geometry of the fluid circulation, and precise the extension of the hydrothermal plume evidenced by Bruno et al. (2007). Solfatara is the most active crater of Phlegrean Fields, characterized by an intense carbon dioxide degassing, about 1500 T/day (Chiodini et al, 2005). Its main structures are Bocca Grande fumarole and several lesser fumaroles aligned along two normal faults, and Fangaia mud pool where the aquifer reaches the surface. Solfatara appears as a globally conductive structure, with resistivity in the range 1 - 100 Ohmm. Comparison between spatial variations of resistivity and gas flux rate indicates that resistivity changes at depth are related to gas ratio content and the fluid temperature. Broad negative anomaly of self-potential in the inner part of Solfatara with a minimum in the area of the Bocca Grande suggests a significant downward flow of condensing liquid water. Our results delineate several distinct zones: 1) a vegetation-covered area, relatively undisturbed by a hydrothermal activity and characterized by a high resistivity (up to 100 Ohm-m) of the shallow layer (vadose zone), and low carbon dioxide flux. In this area, self-potential takes zero or positive values with little spatial variations. 2) In the central part, below a superficial vadose zone, a resistive layer (20 - 100 Ohm-m), between 30 - 100 m depth, interpreted as a gas-saturated body, is systematically overlain by a conductive aquifer (1 - 5 Ohm-m). In this area, the self-potential displays a negative anomaly with an average value of -100 mV and the carbon dioxide flux is > 1000 g m-2day-1. 3) Close to Bocca Grande fumarole, the

  6. Novel barite chimneys at the Loki´s Castle Vent Field shed light on key factors shaping microbial communities and functions in hydrothermal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Helene eSteen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to fully understand the cycling of elements in hydrothermal systems it is critical to understand intra-field variations in geochemical and microbiological processes in both focused, high-temperature and diffuse, low-temperature areas. To reveal important causes and effects of this variation, we performed an extensive chemical and microbiological characterization of a low-temperature venting area in the Loki’s Castle Vent Field (LCVF. This area, located at the flank of the large sulfide mound, is characterized by numerous chimney-like barite (BaSO4 structures (≤ 1m high covered with white cotton-like microbial mats. Results from geochemical analyses, microscopy (FISH, SEM, 16S rRNA gene amplicon-sequencing and metatranscriptomics were compared to results from previous analyses of biofilms growing on black smoker chimneys at LCVF. Based on our results, we constructed a conceptual model involving the geochemistry and microbiology in the LCVF. The model suggests that CH4 and H2S are important electron donors for microorganisms in both high-temperature and low-temperature areas, whereas the utilization of H2 seems restricted to high-temperature areas. This further implies that sub-seafloor processes can affect energy-landscapes, elemental cycling, and the metabolic activity of primary producers on the seafloor. In the cotton-like microbial mats on top of the active barite chimneys, a unique network of single cells of Epsilonproteobacteria interconnected by threads of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS was seen, differing significantly from the long filamentous Sulfurovum filaments observed in biofilms on the black smokers. This network also induced nucleation of barite crystals and is suggested to play an essential role in the formation of the microbial mats and the chimneys. Furthermore, it illustrates variations in how different genera of Epsilonproteobacteria colonize and position cells in different vent fluid mixing zones within

  7. Novel Barite Chimneys at the Loki's Castle Vent Field Shed Light on Key Factors Shaping Microbial Communities and Functions in Hydrothermal Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Ida H; Dahle, Håkon; Stokke, Runar; Roalkvam, Irene; Daae, Frida-Lise; Rapp, Hans Tore; Pedersen, Rolf B; Thorseth, Ingunn H

    2015-01-01

    In order to fully understand the cycling of elements in hydrothermal systems it is critical to understand intra-field variations in geochemical and microbiological processes in both focused, high-temperature and diffuse, low-temperature areas. To reveal important causes and effects of this variation, we performed an extensive chemical and microbiological characterization of a low-temperature venting area in the Loki's Castle Vent Field (LCVF). This area, located at the flank of the large sulfide mound, is characterized by numerous chimney-like barite (BaSO4) structures (≤ 1 m high) covered with white cotton-like microbial mats. Results from geochemical analyses, microscopy (FISH, SEM), 16S rRNA gene amplicon-sequencing and metatranscriptomics were compared to results from previous analyses of biofilms growing on black smoker chimneys at LCVF. Based on our results, we constructed a conceptual model involving the geochemistry and microbiology in the LCVF. The model suggests that CH4 and H2S are important electron donors for microorganisms in both high-temperature and low-temperature areas, whereas the utilization of H2 seems restricted to high-temperature areas. This further implies that sub-seafloor processes can affect energy-landscapes, elemental cycling, and the metabolic activity of primary producers on the seafloor. In the cotton-like microbial mats on top of the active barite chimneys, a unique network of single cells of Epsilonproteobacteria interconnected by threads of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was seen, differing significantly from the long filamentous Sulfurovum filaments observed in biofilms on the black smokers. This network also induced nucleation of barite crystals and is suggested to play an essential role in the formation of the microbial mats and the chimneys. Furthermore, it illustrates variations in how different genera of Epsilonproteobacteria colonize and position cells in different vent fluid mixing zones within a vent field

  8. Using Acceleration Records as Diffuse Fields for Tomography of the Valley of Mexico City: Synthetic Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena, M.; Perton, M.; Molina-Villegas, J. C.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to improve the understanding of the seismic response of Mexico City Valley, we have proposed to perform a tomography study of the seismic wave velocities. For that purpose, we used a collection of acceleration seismograms (corresponding to earthquakes with magnitudes ranging from 4.5 to 8.1 and various epicentral distances to the City) recorded since 1985 in 83 stations distributed across the Valley. The H/V spectral ratios (obtained from average autocorrelations) strongly suggest these movements belong to a 3D generalized diffuse field. Thus, we interpret that cross-correlations between the signals of station pairs are proportional to the imaginary part of the corresponding Green function. Finally, the dispersion curves are constructed from the Green function which lead to the tomography. Other tomographies have already been made around the world using either the seismic coda or seismic noise. We used instead the ensemble of many earthquakes from distant sources that have undergone multiple scattering by the heterogeneities of the Earth and assume the wave fields are equipartitioned. The purpose of the present study is to describe the different steps of the data processing by using synthetic models. The wave propagation within an alluvial basin is simulated using the Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) in 2D configuration for the propagation of P and SV waves. The theoretical Green function for a station pair is obtained by placing a unit force at one station and a receiver at the other. The valley illumination is composed by incoming waves which are simulated using distant independent sources and several diffractors. Data process is validated by the correct retrieval the theoretical Green function. We present here the in-plane Green function for the P-SV case and show the dispersion curves constructed from the cross-correlations compared with analytic results for a layer over a half-space. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. This study is partially supported by AXA

  9. The influence of vent fluid chemistry on trophic structure at two deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields on the Mid-Cayman Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sarah; Van Dover, Cindy; Coleman, Max

    2014-05-01

    The two known deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields along the Mid-Cayman Rise are separated by a distance of only 21 km, yet their chemistry and faunal diversity are distinct. The deeper of the two vent fields, Piccard (with active venting from Beebe Vents, Beebe Woods and Beebe Sea), at 4980 m is basalt hosted. The shallower vent field, Von Damm, at 2300 m appears to have an ultramafic influence. The Von Damm vent field can be separated into two sites: The Spire and The Tubeworm Field. The dominant vent fluids at the Tubeworm Field are distinct from those at the Spire, as a result of fluid modification in the sub-surface. Von Damm and Piccard vent fields support abundant invertebrates, sharing the same biomass-dominant shrimp species, Rimicaris hybisae. Although there are some other shared species (squat lobsters (Munidopsis sp.) and gastropods (Provanna sp. and Iheyaspira sp.)) between the vent fields, they are much more abundant at one site than the other. In this study we have examined the bulk carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope composition of microbes and fauna at each vent field. With these data we have deduced the trophic structure of the communities and the influence of vent fluid chemistry. From stable isotope data and end-member vent fluid chemistry, we infer that the basis of the trophic structure at Piccard is dominated by sulfur, iron, and hydrogen-oxidizing microbial communities. In comparison, the basis of the Von Damm trophic structure is dominated by microbial communities of sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, sulfate reducers and methanotrophs. This microbial diversity at the base of the trophic structure is a result of chemical variations in vent fluids and processes in the sub-surface that alter the vent fluid chemistry. These differences influence higher trophic levels and can be used to explain some of the variability as well as similarity in fauna at the vent sites. Part of this work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California

  10. Development and field application of a 6-bottle serial gas-tight fluid sampler for collecting seafloor cold seep and hydrothermal vent fluids with autonomous operation capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.; Ding, K.; Yang, C.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Tan, C.; Schaen, A. T.; Luhmann, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    A 6-bottle serial gas-tight sampler (so-called "six-shooter") was developed for application with deep-sea vent fluids. The new device is composed of a custom-made 6-channel valve manifold and six sampling bottles which are circularly distributed around the valve manifold. Each valve channel consists of a high-pressure titanium cartridge valve and a motor-driven actuator. A sampling snorkel is connected to the inlet of the manifold that delivers the incoming fluid to different bottles. Each sampling bottle has a 160 ml-volume chamber and an accumulator chamber inside where compressed nitrogen is used to maintain the sample at near in-situ pressure. An electronics chamber that is located at the center of the sampler is used to carry out all sampling operations, autonomously, if desired. The sampler is of a compact circular configuration with a diameter of 26 cm and a length of 54 cm. During the SVC cruise AT 26-12, the sampler was deployed by DSV2 Alvin at a cold seep site MC036 with a depth of 1090 m in the Gulf of Mexico. The sampler collected fluid samples automatically following the tidal cycle to monitor the potential impact of the tide cycle on the fluid chemistry of cold seep in a period of two day. During the cruise AT 26-17, the sampler was used with newly upgraded DSV2 Alvin three times at the hydrothermal vent sites along Axial Seamount and Main Endeavor Field on Juan de Fuca Ridge. During a 4-day deployment at Anemone diffuse site (Axial Caldera), the sampler was set to work in an autonomous mode to collect fluid samples according to the preset interval. During other dives, the sampler was manually controlled via ICL (Inductively Coupled Link) communication through the hull. Gas-tight fluid samples were collected from different hydrothermal vents with temperatures between 267 ℃ and 335 ℃ at the depth up to 2200 m. The field results indicate unique advantages of the design. It can be deployed in extended time period with remote operation or working

  11. Barite from the Saf'yanovka VMS deposit (Central Urals) and Semenov-1 and Semenov-3 hydrothermal sulfide fields (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): a comparative analysis of formation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safina, Nataliya P.; Melekestseva, Irina Yu.; Nimis, Paolo; Ankusheva, Nataliya N.; Yuminov, Anatoly M.; Kotlyarov, Vasily A.; Sadykov, Sergey A.

    2016-04-01

    Different genetic types of barite from colloform and clastic pyrite-rich ores from the weakly metamorphic Saf'yanovka volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit (Central Urals) were studied in comparison with barite from the Semenov-1 and Semenov-3 seafloor hydrothermal fields (mid-Atlantic Ridge). Hydrothermal barite generally occurs as radial aggregates of tabular crystals in contrast to compact aggregates of tabular crystals with stylolite boundaries of anadiagenetic barite from the Saf'yanovka clastic ores. The Sr content in barite shows no relationship with the genetic types. The δ34S values of hydrothermal barite from both ancient and modern colloform sulfides match those of Silurian-Devonian and contemporary seawater, respectively. The lower δ34S (avg +19.6 ‰) of hydrothermal barite from the Semenov-3 clastic sulfides indicates light sulfur contribution from oxidation of fluid H2S. The higher δ34S (avg +28.1 ‰) of anadiagenetic barite from the Saf'yanovka clastic ores reflects partial thermochemical reduction of seawater sulfate. Hydrothermal barite from the Saf'yanovka and Semenov-1 colloform ores formed from low- to moderate- T (172-194 °C and 83-233 °C, respectively) relatively low salinity (1.6-4.5 and 0.6-3.8 wt% NaCleq, respectively) fluids, which underwent phase separation. Hydrothermal barite from Semenov-3 clastic sulfides associated with chalcopyrite crystallized from higher- T (266-335 °C) higher-salinity (4.8-9.2 wt% NaCleq.) fluids. The high salinity may indicate a contribution from a magmatic fluid. Anadiagenetic barite from Saf'yanovka was formed from moderate- T (140-180 °C), low- to moderate-salinity (1.4-5.4 wt% NaCleq) pore fluids. Combining our new data with those for other seafloor hydrothermal barite occurrences, the following systematics can be defined. Barite associated with pyrite-rich sulfides forms at relatively low to moderate temperatures (<230 °C), barite associated with polymetallic-rich sulfides forms at moderately

  12. Hydrothermal Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, E.; Havig, J.; Windman, T.; Meyer-Dombard, D.; Michaud, A.; Hartnett, H.

    2006-12-01

    Life in hot spring ecosystems is confronted with diverse challenges, and the responses to those challenges have dynamic biogeochemical consequences over narrow spatial and temporal scales. Within meters along hot spring outflow channels at Yellowstone, temperatures drop from boiling, and the near-boiling conditions of hot chemolithotrophic communities, to those that permit photosynthesis and on down to conditions where nematodes and insects graze on the edges of photosynthetic mats. Many major and trace element concentrations change only mildly in the water that flows through the entire ecosystem, while concentrations of other dissolved constituents (oxygen, sulfide, ammonia, total organic carbon) increase or decrease dramatically. Concentrations of metals and micronutrients range from toxic to inadequate for enzyme synthesis depending on the choice of hot spring. Precipitation of minerals may provide continuous growth of microbial niches, while dissolution and turbulent flow sweeps them away. Consequently, microbial communities change at the meter scale, and even more abruptly at the photosynthetic fringe. Isotopic compositions of carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass reflect dramatic and continuous changes in metabolic strategies throughout the system. Chemical energy sources that support chemolithotrophic communities can persist at abundant or useless levels, or change dramatically owing to microbial activity. The rate of temporal change depends on the selection of hot spring systems for study. Some have changed little since our studies began in 1999. Others have shifted by two or more units in pH over several years, with corresponding changes in other chemical constituents. Some go through daily or seasonal desiccation cycles, and still others exhibit pulses of changing temperature (up to 40°C) within minutes. Taken together, hydrothermal ecosystems provide highly manageable opportunities for testing how biogeochemical processes respond to the scale of

  13. Assessment of Human Exposure to Magnetic Field from Overhead High Voltage Transmission Lines in a City in South Western Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ponnle Akinlolu; Adedeji Kazeem

    2015-01-01

    The increase in electricity consumption, population, and land use has now forced high voltage transmission lines (HVTLs) either to pass or be installed around or through urban cities. This increases the level of human exposure to electromagnetic field radiation as this field produced around the HVTLs extends outwards covering some distance. This may cause a number of health hazards. It is even dangerous to a human who touch any metallic object in proximity of the HVTL, as it may have an appre...

  14. Scaling of Geographic Space from the Perspective of City and Field Blocks and Using Volunteered Geographic Information

    OpenAIRE

    Bin, Jiang; Xintao, Liu

    2010-01-01

    Scaling of geographic space refers to the fact that for a large geographic area its small constituents or units are much more common than the large ones. This paper develops a novel perspective to the scaling of geographic space using large street networks involving both cities and countryside. Given a street network of an entire country, we decompose the street network into individual blocks, each of which forms a minimum ring or cycle such as city blocks and field blocks. The block sizes de...

  15. Field Study of all GSM and WiFi Networks in Amman City from Geospatial Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawarey, Mosab; Alibrahim, Mustafa; Jetto, Hamza; Salah Mahmoud, Firas

    2016-04-01

    A thorough field study over multiple months has been conducted in the streets of Amman, the capital city of Jordan, in order to collect massive amounts of GSM and WiFi data and analyze them from geospatial perspective. Some interesting realities have been detected; e.g. the North and West of Amman are much better served by GSM operators than the East, South, and Center. Also, the security measures taken to protect WiFi networks in the North and West are much better than those in the East, South, and Center. This has led to the recognition of an interesting pattern that groups the North and West together, while the East, South, and Center constitute another group. Extremely interesting finding was found; the GSM signals are so strong at certain locations that they constitute direct lethal threat to human health; it is scientifically documented that such strengths would lead to certain human cell mutations and cancer. The exact locations and contributors of such hazards will be disclosed in this paper for the first time. Many tabular and graphical presentations of the data will be presented.

  16. Numerical modelling of the geochemical evolution of the near field under the hydrothermal conditions expected for a KBS-3 repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the KBS-3 concept for the nuclear waste repository, designed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB), the bentonite buffer is placed around the copper canisters that contain the spent nuclear fuel, isolating it of the host rock. In order to check - hypotheses for the evolution of the bentonite buffer under the thermo-hydraulic conditions expected in a KBS-3 repository, SKB is conducting a series of long term buffer material (LOT) tests at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). In the present work, numerical simulations are developed to simulate: i) thermo-hydraulic processes; ii) geochemical reactions and; iii) transport of solutes, that have been measured in the LOT A2 test, and, that are expected in the near-field of a KBS-3 repository. The numerical model for the LOT A2 test is based on analytical results and on field-scale experiments. The validation of this model allows us to implement it for the thermal period of the near field of the KBS-3 repository, based on previous modelling exercises. During the operation of a KBS-3 repository (after deposition of the copper canisters), the unsaturated bentonite will be submitted to a relatively high thermal gradient, induced by the radioactive decay of the spent nuclear fuel. On the other hand, the saturated host rock will provide aqueous solution to the unsaturated bentonite, induced by differential hydraulic pressures, under specific thermal and mechanic conditions. In this context, the bentonite will gradually become fully water saturated. Experimental results indicate that during the saturation period, the transport of solutes in the bentonite buffer will be influenced by water uptake from the surrounding host rock towards the wetting front, and also by a cyclic evaporation/condensation process, induced by the thermal gradient. Our numerical models take into account the transport of solutes and geochemical reactions under nonisothermal

  17. Mapping urban heat islands of arctic cities using combined data on field measurements and satellite images based on the example of the city of Apatity (Murmansk Oblast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, P. I.; Grishchenko, M. Y.; Varentsov, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the urban heat island (UHI) in the city of Apatity during winter that were obtained according to the data of field meteorological measurements and satellite images. Calculations of the surface layer temperature have been made based on the surface temperature data obtained from satellite images. The experimental data on air temperature were obtained as a result of expeditionary meteorological observations, and the experimental data on surface temperature were obtained based on the data of the space hyperspectral Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) system, channels 31 and 32 (10.78-11.28 and 11.77-12.27 micrometers, respectively). As a result of the analysis of temperature fields, an intensive heat island (up to 3.2°C) has been identified that was estimated based on the underlying surface temperature, and its mean intensity over the observation period significantly exceeds the representative data for European cities in winter. It has also been established that the air temperature calculated according to the MODIS data is systematically higher under winter conditions than the air temperature from direct measurement data.

  18. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international

  19. In-situ Chemistry of Hydrothermal Fluids from Black Smokers in Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E.; Zhang, Z.; Foustoukos, D.; Pester, N. J.

    2005-12-01

    After an off-axis earthquake swarm in 1999, dramatic changes were observed in vent fluids of Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Three month latter, we also recorded this sudden variation using a high temperature in-situ chemical sensor. The results at that time indicated some of the vent temperatures as high as 374°C. This change was also characterized by relatively high in-situ pH, high dissolved H2, and H2S concentrations in the fluids that were in excess of 5, 0.7 mmol/kg and 20 mmol/kg respectively. In order to further track time dependent changes over the past 6 years, we revisited Main Endeavour Field during the recent AT 11-31 cruise in Aug.~Sept. 2005. The high temperature chemical sensor was again used on selected dives with DSV Alvin to conduct in-situ measurements of pH, dissolved H2 and H2S concentrations along with temperatures. The data were obtained in a real time mode of 3 seconds per-reading from a series of measurements at high temperature conditions in the depth of 2200 m. Conventional gas-tight samples were also collected for verification and further study. In this study, Puffer, Sully and Bastille black smoker vent sites were specifically investigated owing to the high fluid temperatures that characterize these vents in comparison with other vents in the area. The measured temperatures for these vents were 362°C, 358°C, and 361°C respectively, which were generally about 20~30°C higher than the others currently in the area, but approximately 10°C lower than the highest temperatures measured in the aftermath of the 1999 seismic-magmatic event. Although the drops in vent temperatures were not substantial, the measured in-situ chemistry showed large departures from previous reported data. The in-situ pH values in these vents ranged from 4.43 to 4.89, in comparison with values above 5 in 1999. This difference may be linked directly to the decrease in temperature. The measured in-situ dissolved H2 and H2S concentrations were 0

  20. Acoustic monitoring of co-seismic changes in gas bubble rupture rate in a hydrothermal reservoir: field evaluation of a possible precursor and mechanism for remote seismic triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely triggered seismicity is a phenomenon in which an earthquake at one location triggers others over distances up to thousands of kilometers. The mechanism by which low-amplitude dynamic oscillations of the confining stress can produce such an effect, often after a time delay of minutes-to-days, is unclear, but a concentration of remotely triggered seismic events in carbon-dioxide-rich volcanic and geothermal regions suggests that an increase in pore fluid pressure associated with the nucleation and growth of carbon-dioxide gas bubbles may reduce the effective stress in critically loaded geologic faults. While this hypothesis has been tested in bench-scale laboratory experiments, field detection of seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater may provide further evidence for this remote triggering mechanism. In the present study, a hydrophone continuously records the acoustic power spectrum in CH-10B, a hydrothermal well located in Long Valley Caldera, California - a site that is susceptible to remotely seismic triggering. This well exhibits co-seismic changes in water level in response to near and distant earthquakes, including every magnitude-six or greater at any location on Earth. Exploiting the inverse relationship between gas bubble radius and the peak acoustic frequency emitted when a gas bubble ruptures, this investigation seeks to detect changes in the acoustic power spectrum arising from a shift in the size-distribution or count rate of rupturing gas bubbles, coincident with a distant earthquake. By resolving the timing and intensity of the onset of a change in gas bubble rupture rate after the passage of seismic wave from a distant source, it may be possible to establish the extent to which seismically initiated gas bubble growth contributes to co-seismic borehole water level response, pore fluid pressure perturbations, and the onset of remotely triggered seismicity.

  1. Anhydrite Solubility and Ca Isotope Fractionation in the Vapor-Liquid Field of the NaCl-H2O System: Implications for Hydrothermal Vent Fluids at Mid-ocean Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, P.; Syverson, D. D.; Higgins, J. A.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal experiments were performed at 410, 420 and 450°C between 180-450 bar to investigate anhydrite (CaSO4) solubility and Ca isotope fractionation in the liquid-vapor stability field of the NaCl-H2O system. Experiments were conducted in flexible gold reaction cells and a fixed volume Ti reactor to reach all pressures between the critical curve and three-phase boundary. During isothermal decompression at 410°C, anhydrite solubility in the liquid phase increases (1 to 9 mmol/kg Ca), whereas the solubility decreases in the vapor phase (130 to systems with implications for mass transfer reactions at/near the magma-hydrothermal boundary at mid-ocean ridges.

  2. Microbial life associated with low-temperature hydrothermal venting and formation of barite chimneys at Loki's Castle vent field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorseth, I. H.; Steen, I.; Roalkvam, I.; Dahle, H.; Stokke, R.; Rapp, H.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    A low-temperature diffuse venting area with numbers of small barite chimneys is located on the flank of the large sulphide mound of the Loki’s Castle black smoker vent field at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR). White cotton-like microbial mats on top of the barite chimneys and associated siboglinid tubeworms were observed. The temperature was determined to 20°C for the surface sediment and 0°C for the white microbial mats, just above the ambient bottom seawater temperature of -0.8°C. The microbial mats were sampled using a remote operating vehicle (ROV) equipped with a hydraulic sampling cylinder (biosyringe) and the chimneys using an aluminum scuffle box. Black colored interior flow channels surrounded by white outer sections of nearly pure barite, were observed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of mats showed numerous microbial cells and large amounts of extracellular thread-like material with attached barite crystals. Inside the chimneys microbial cells are partially embedded in barite, and individual crystals are also frequently covered by extracellular material. The microbial activity could thus have an important influence on the nucleation and growth of the barite crystals and thus on the formation of the chimneys. To reveal the microbial community structure, 16S rRNA gene sequence tag-encoded pyrosequencing (1.1 x 104 - 3.5 x 104 amplicons per library) followed by taxonomic classification of the reads using the MEGAN software, were performed. Organisms assigned to a genus of sulfide oxidizers (Sulfurimonas) within the e-Proteobacteria were abundant in each chimney structure; the white microbial mats (86-96% of the reads), the white barite (36% of total reads); the black flow channel (9.9%). The second most dominating taxon in the white chimney barite, including 26% of the reads, was anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME) of the ANME-1 clade, indicating anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) as a major microbial process. Furthermore, the novel AOM associated clade

  3. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  4. Comment on 'Consequences of phase separation on the distribution of hydrothermal fluids at ASHES vent field, axial volcano, Juan de Fuca ridge' by Christopher G. Fox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, M. A.; Ingebritsen, S. E.; Essaid, H. I.

    1993-02-01

    Fox (1990), in order to explain observations during the Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emissions Study (ASHES), proposed a conceptual model for a two-phase subsea hydrothermal system in which steam controlled flow patterns by blocking liquid flow. An attempt is made here to demonstrate with a very general model that relative permeability contrasts by themselves do not cause spatial isolation of phases in steam/liquid water systems and that density segregation, independent of relative permeability effects, should not be ruled out as an explanation for the observations at the ASHES site. Fox replies that density segregation is probably not the only mechanism at work.

  5. Assessment of Human Exposure to Magnetic Field from Overhead High Voltage Transmission Lines in a City in South Western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnle Akinlolu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The increase in electricity consumption, population, and land use has now forced high voltage transmission lines (HVTLs either to pass or be installed around or through urban cities. This increases the level of human exposure to electromagnetic field radiation as this field produced around the HVTLs extends outwards covering some distance. This may cause a number of health hazards. It is even dangerous to a human who touch any metallic object in proximity of the HVTL, as it may have an appreciable voltage induced on it due to inductive, capacitive or resistive interference from the line. This paper evaluates the magnetic field produced at mid-span by a 132kV, and a 330kV, 50Hz adjacent HVTLs with horizontal and vertical configuration in Akure, a city in South Western Nigeria using analytical method from electromagnetic field theory. This is then compared to the recommended standard limit of public exposure to magnetic field. The results of the computation showed that currently, the general public exposure to the magnetic field along the HVTLs is safe. However, right of way (ROW along the power lines is being violated as buildings and work places exist within the ROW.

  6. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which heat is useful in organic synthesis experiments are described, and experiments on the hydrothermal destruction and synthesis of organic compounds are discussed. It is pointed out that, if heat can overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of metastable states from reduced or oxidized starting materials, abiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions is a distinct possibility. However, carefully controlled experiments which replicate the descriptive variables of natural hydrothermal systems have not yet been conducted with the aim of testing the hypothesis of hydrothermal organic systems.

  7. The Scaling of Geographic Space from the Perspective of City and Field Blocks and Using Volunteered Geographic Information

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    The scaling of geographic space refers to the fact that for a large geographic area its small constituents or units are much more common than the large ones. This paper develops a novel perspective to the scaling of geographic space using large street networks involving both cities and countryside. Given a street network of an entire country, we decompose the street network into individual blocks, each of which forms a minimum ring or cycle such as city blocks and field blocks. The block sizes demonstrate the scaling property, i.e., there are far more small blocks than large ones. Interestingly, and to our surprise, we find that the mean of all the block sizes can easily separate between small and large blocks- a high percentage (e.g., 90%) of smaller ones and a low percentage (e.g., 10%) of larger ones. Based on this regularity, termed as the head/tail division rule, we propose a natural way of delineating city boundaries by grouping the smaller blocks. The extracted city sizes for the three largest European...

  8. Boundary-Layer Structure Upwind and Downwind of Oklahoma City during the Joint Urban 2003 Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wekker, Stephan; Berg, Larry K.; Allwine, K Jerry; Doran, J. C.; Shaw, William J.

    2004-08-25

    The Joint Urban 2003 field study in Oklahoma City in July 2003 provided a comprehensive data set that included measurements from sites upwind and downwind of Oklahoma City where sodars, radar wind profilers/RASSes, and radiosondes were deployed. Radiosonde measurements were taken during six daytime intensive observational periods (IOPs) and during four nighttime IOPs, while the sodars and radars operated almost continuously during the entire month of July. The upwind and downwind sites were located approximately 2 km south and 5 km north of downtown Oklahoma City, respectively. Boundary-layer heights and wind and temperature structure at both sites have been investigated and compared to determine effects of the urban area on mean boundary-layer structure. Initial results show that differences in boundary-layer structure between the upwind and downwind location are small, i.e., there is no detectable effect of downtown Oklahoma City on the mean boundary-layer structure 5 km downwind. These measurements are compared with a numerical model and simple analytical models such as those that predict the growth of an internal boundary layer after a roughness change, and an advective thermodynamic model used to determine mixing heights in an urban area.

  9. Ultramafic-hosted Hydrothermal Systems at Mid-Ocean Ridges: Serpentinization, Chloritization and Geochemical Controls on Mass-Transfer Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, W. E.; Pester, N. J.; Ding, K.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies of seafloor hydrothermal systems associated with the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge have provided a wealth of information on the complex interplay between tectonic and magmatic processes that ultimately govern the chemical and physical evolution of these systems. The Lost City hydrothermal field (LCHF)(30°N) and the Rainbow hydrothermal system (36°N), for example, provide contrasting styles of heat and mass transfer that result in very different constraints on the composition of hydrothermal fluids. Hydrothermal fluids were sampled and analyzed during a series of ROV (Jason II) supported dives in 2008 to these and related vent sites along the northern MAR. In addition to deployment of conventional vent fluid sampling devices, in-situ chemical sensor systems were also used to better constrain pH and redox reactions. The general characteristics of the Lost City hydrothermal field, which is offset approximately 15km from the MAR owing to tectonic effects imposed by the emplacement of the Atlantis Massif, have been extensively reviewed in recent years. Vent fluids issuing from this peridotite-hosted system reveal temperatures of approximately 90-100°C, high concentrations of dissolved hydrogen and methane, and pH measured (25°C) values that exceed 10. The relatively low vent fluid temperatures notwithstanding, phase equilibria constraints imposed by dissolved Ca and sulfate suggest temperatures of approximately 200°C at depth, below the seafloor. New data for dissolved silica indicate a hydrothermal "root zone" lacking brucite, but where fluid chemistry and pH is buffered by serpentine-diopside-fluid equilibria. Consistent with previously published strontium and boron isotope measurements, data reported here for trace alkali elements (Cs, Rb, Li) indicate high fluid/rock mass ratios. Variably low dissolved Fe concentrations are broadly consistent with constraints imposed by magnetite-fluid equilibria at the high measured dissolved H2

  10. Estimation of a "radiatively correct" black carbon specific absorption during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) 2003 field campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Barnard, J. C.; E. I. Kassianov; Ackerman, T. P.; K. Johnson; Zuberi, B.; L. T. Molina; M. J. Molina

    2007-01-01

    During the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) field campaign of 2003, measurements of the shortwave radiation field allowed the inference of the black carbon (BC) specific absorption, αλ, defined as the monochromatic absorption cross section per unit mass (with units of m2/g). The averaged values of αλ derived from the method here are either 8.9 m2/g or 8.2 m2/g at 500 nm, depending upon the physical and optical parameters assumed for BC. These re...

  11. Estimation of a "radiatively correct" black carbon specific absorption during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) 2003 field campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Barnard, J. C.; E. I. Kassianov; Ackerman, T. P.; K. Johnson; Zuberi, B.; L. T. Molina; M. J. Molina

    2007-01-01

    During the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) field campaign of 2003, measurements of the shortwave radiation field allowed the inference of the black carbon (BC) specific absorption, αλ, defined as the monochromatic absorption cross section per unit mass (with units of m2/g). The averaged values of αλ derived from the method here are either 8.9 m2/g or 8.2 m2/g at 500 nm, depending upon the physical and optical parameters assumed for BC. These results are reasonab...

  12. Intellectual Evolution in the Field of City and Regional Planning: A Personal Perspective Toward Holistic Planning Education, 1937-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Violich, Francis

    2001-01-01

    Throughout my sixty years of professional and academic experience in endeavoring to advance the field of city and regional planning, a critical deviation from its origins has taken place. In our youth in the 1950s, the problem-solving and future-oriented prospects for the new field, particularly here in California, captured our participation. In this paper, I seek to see clearly my own role in that direction and to understand how this was altered by the phenomenon of social science dominanc...

  13. Seawater bicarbonate removal during hydrothermal circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskurowski, G. K.; Seewald, J.; Sylva, S. P.; Reeves, E.; Lilley, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    High temperature fluids sampled at hydrothermal vents represent a complex alteration product of water-rock reactions on a multi-component mixture of source fluids. Sources to high-temperature hydrothermal samples include the 'original' seawater present in the recharge limb of circulation, magmatically influenced fluids added at depth as well as any seawater entrained during sampling. High-temperature hydrothermal fluids are typically enriched in magmatic volatiles, with CO2 the dominant species, characterized by concentrations of 10's-100's of mmol/kg (1, 2). Typically, the high concentration of CO2 relative to background seawater bicarbonate concentrations (~2.3 mmol/kg) obscures a full analysis of the fate of seawater bicarbonate during high-temperature hydrothermal circulation. Here we present data from a suite of samples collected over the past 15 years from high-temperature hydrothermal vents at 9N, Endeavour, Lau Basin, and the MAR that have endmember CO2 concentrations less than 10 mmol/kg. Using stable and radiocarbon isotope measurements these samples provide a unique opportunity to examine the balance between 'original' seawater bicarbonate and CO2 added from magmatic sources. Multiple lines of evidence from multiple hydrothermal settings consistently points to the removal of ~80% of the 'original' 2.3 mmol/kg seawater bicarbonate. Assuming that this removal occurs in the low-temperature, 'recharge' limb of hydrothermal circulation, this removal process is widely occurring and has important contributions to the global carbon cycle over geologic time. 1. Lilley MD, Butterfield DA, Lupton JE, & Olson EJ (2003) Magmatic events can produce rapid changes in hydrothermal vent chemistry. Nature 422(6934):878-881. 2. Seewald J, Cruse A, & Saccocia P (2003) Aqueous volatiles in hydrothermal fluids from the Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge: temporal variability following earthquake activity. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 216(4):575-590.

  14. Fracture hydraulic conductivity in the Mexico City clayey aquitard: Field piezometer rising-head tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Carlos; Ortega-Guerrero, Adrián

    A regional lacustrine aquitard covers the main aquifer of the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The aquitard's hydraulic conductivity (K') is fundamental for evaluating the natural protection of the aquifer against a variety of contaminants present on the surface and its hydraulic response. This study analyzes the distribution and variation of K' in the plains of Chalco, Texcoco and Mexico City (three of the six former lakes that existed in the Basin of Mexico), on the basis of 225 field-permeability tests, in nests of existing piezometers located at depths of 2-85 m. Tests were interpreted using the Hvorslev method and some by the Bouwer-Rice method. Results indicate that the distribution of K' fits log-Gaussian regression models. Dominant frequencies for K' in the Chalco and Texcoco plains range between 1E-09 and 1E-08 m/s, with similar population means of 1.19E-09 and 1.7E-09 m/s, respectively, which are one to two orders of magnitude higher than the matrix conductivity. In the Mexico City Plain the population mean is near by one order of magnitude lower; K'=2.6E-10 m/s. The contrast between the measured K' and that of the matrix is attributed to the presence of fractures in the upper 25-40 m, which is consistent with the findings of previous studies on solute migration in the aquitard. Un imperméable régional d'origine lacustre recouvre le principal aquifère de la zone urbaine de la ville de Mexico. La conductivité hydraulique K' de cet imperméable est fondamentale pour évaluer la protection naturelle de l'aquifère, contre les différents contaminants présents en surface, et sa réponse hydraulique. Cette étude analyse et les variations de K' dans les plaines de Chalco, Texcoco et Mexico (trois des six anciens lacs qui existaient dans le Bassin de Mexico), sur la base de 225 essais de perméabilité sur le terrain, réalisés en grappes dans des piézomètres existants entre 2 et 85 m de profondeur. Les essais ont été interprétés avec la m

  15. Hydrothermal Conditions and the Origin of Cellular Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, David W; Georgiou, Christos D

    2015-12-01

    The conditions and properties of hydrothermal vents and hydrothermal fields are compared in terms of their ability to support processes related to the origin of life. The two sites can be considered as alternative hypotheses, and from this comparison we propose a series of experimental tests to distinguish between them, focusing on those that involve concentration of solutes, self-assembly of membranous compartments, and synthesis of polymers. Key Word: Hydrothermal systems.

  16. Hydrothermal Conditions and the Origin of Cellular Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, David W; Georgiou, Christos D

    2015-12-01

    The conditions and properties of hydrothermal vents and hydrothermal fields are compared in terms of their ability to support processes related to the origin of life. The two sites can be considered as alternative hypotheses, and from this comparison we propose a series of experimental tests to distinguish between them, focusing on those that involve concentration of solutes, self-assembly of membranous compartments, and synthesis of polymers. Key Word: Hydrothermal systems. PMID:26684507

  17. First hydrothermal active vent discovered on the Galapagos Microplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, C.; Li, H.; Wu, G.; Su, X.; Zhang, G.; Chinese DY115-21 Leg 3 Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    The Galapagos Microplate (GM) lies on the western Gaplapagos Spreading Center (GSC), representing one of the classic Ridge-Ridge-Ridge (R-R-R) plate boundaries of the Nazca, Cocos, and Pacific plates. The presence of the 'black smoke' and hydrothermal vent community were firstly confirmed on the GSC. Lots of hydrothermal fields were discovered on the center and eastern GSC, while the western GSC has not been well investigated. During 17th Oct. to 9th Nov. 2009, the 3rd leg of Chinese DY115-21 cruise with R/V Dayangyihao has been launched along 2°N-5°S near equatorial East Pacific Rise (EPR). Two new hydrothermal fields were confirmed. One is named 'Precious Stone Mountain', which is the first hydrothermal field on the GM. The other is found at 101.47°W, 0.84°S EPR. The 'Precious Stone Mountain' hydrothermal field (at 101.49°W, 1.22°N) is located at an off-axial seamount on the southern GM boundary, with a depth from 1,450 to 1,700m. Hydrothermal fluids emitting from the fissures and hydrothermal fauna were captured by deep-tow video. Few mineral clasts of pyrite and chalcopyrite were separated from one sediment sample, but no sulfide chimney was found yet. Hydrothermal fauna such as alive mussels, crabs, shrimps, tubeworms, giant clams, as well as rock samples were collected by TV-Grab. The study of the seafloor classification with Simrad EM120 multi-beam echosounder has been conducted on the 'Precious Stone Mountain' hydrothermal field. The result indicates that seafloor materials around the hydrothermal field can be characterized into three types, such as the fresh lava, hydrothermal sediment, and altered rock.

  18. Ardenticatena maritima gen. nov., sp. nov., a ferric iron- and nitrate-reducing bacterium of the phylum 'Chloroflexi' isolated from an iron-rich coastal hydrothermal field, and description of Ardenticatenia classis nov

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaichi, Satoshi; Ito, Norihiro; Kamikawa, Ryoma;

    2013-01-01

    A novel thermophilic, chemoheterotrophic, Gram-negative-staining, multicellular filamentous bacterium, designated strain 110ST, was isolated from an iron-rich coastal hydrothermal field in Japan. The isolate is facultatively aerobic and chemoheterotrophic. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene...... sequences nested strain 110ST in a novel class-level clone cluster of the phylum 'Chloroflexi'. The isolate grows by dissimilatory iron- and nitrate-reduction under anaerobic conditions, which is the first report of these abilities in the phylum 'Chloroflexi'. The organism is capable of growth with oxygen...

  19. Free-living bacterial communities associated with tubeworm (Ridgeia piscesae) aggregations in contrasting diffuse flow hydrothermal vent habitats at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Forget, Nathalie L; Kim Juniper, S

    2013-01-01

    We systematically studied free-living bacterial diversity within aggregations of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae sampled from two contrasting flow regimes (High Flow and Low Flow) in the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Northeast Pacific). Eight samples of particulate detritus were recovered from paired tubeworm grabs from four vent sites. Most sequences (454 tag and Sanger methods) were affiliated to the Epsilonproteobacteria, ...

  20. ALTERNATIVE URBAN REGENERATION POLICIES OF BROWN FIELDS LIKE OLD MILITARY CAMPS FOR THE CITY OF ALEXANDROUPOLIS

    OpenAIRE

    Portokalidis, Costas; Zygouri, Foteini

    2011-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the lack of free public spaces in Greek cities, is one of the most severe urban planning problems, not only in the central urban areas but also in the peripheral neighbourhoods. Furthermore, it is a fact that through the land use legal framework there have been efforts towards the implementation of a number of planning tools, regulations, thresholds, methods etc in order to obtain and secure an appropriate level of acceptable urban public space mainly for parks, ...

  1. Forests, fields, and the edge of sustainability at the ancient Maya city of Tikal

    OpenAIRE

    Lentz, David L.; Dunning, Nicholas P.; Scarborough, Vernon L.; Magee, Kevin S.; Thompson, Kim M.; Weaver, Eric; Carr, Christopher; Terry, Richard E.; Islebe, Gerald; Tankersley, Kenneth B.; Grazioso Sierra, Liwy; Jones, John G.; Buttles, Palma; Valdez, Fred; Ramos Hernandez, Carmen E.

    2014-01-01

    The rise of complex societies and sustainable land use associated with urban centers has been a major focus for anthropologists, geographers, and ecologists. Here we present a quantitative assessment of the agricultural, agroforestry, and water management strategies of the inhabitants of the prominent ancient Maya city of Tikal, and how their land use practices effectively sustained a low-density urban population for many centuries. Our findings also reveal, however, that the productive lands...

  2. Behavioural study of two hydrothermal crustacean decapods: Mirocaris fortunata and Segonzacia mesatlantica, from the Lucky Strike vent field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matabos, M.; Cuvelier, D.; Brouard, J.; Shillito, B.; Ravaux, J.; Zbinden, M.; Barthelemy, D.; Sarradin, P. M.; Sarrazin, J.

    2015-11-01

    Identifying the factors driving community dynamics in hydrothermal vent communities, and in particular biological interactions, is challenged by our ability to make direct observations and the difficulty to conduct experiments in those remote ecosystems. As a result, we have very limited knowledge on species' behaviour and interactions in these communities and how they in turn influence community dynamics. Interactions such as competition or predation significantly affect community structure in vent communities, and video time-series have successfully been used to gain insights in biological interactions and species behaviour, including responses to short-term changes in temperature or feeding strategies. In this study, we combined in situ and ex situ approaches to characterise the behaviour and interactions among two key species encountered along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR): the shrimp Mirocaris fortunata and the crab Segonzacia mesatlantica. In situ, species small-scale distribution, interactions and behaviour were studied using the TEMPO observatory module deployed on the seafloor at the base of the active Eiffel Tower edifice in the Lucky Strike vent field as part of the EMSO-Açores MoMAR observatory. TEMPO sampled 2 min of video four times a day from July 2011 to April 2012. One week of observations per month was used for 'long-term' variations, and a full video data set was analysed for January 2012. In addition, observations of crab and shrimp individuals maintained for the first time under controlled conditions in atmospheric pressure (classic tank) and pressurised (AbyssBox) aquaria allowed better characterisation and description of the different types of behaviour and interactions observed in nature. While the identified in situ spatial distribution pattern was stable over the nine months, both species displayed a significant preference for mussel bed and anhydrite substrata, and preferentially occupied the area located directly in the fluid flow axis

  3. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Rudolf, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass with the aim of describing the current status of the technology. Hydrothermal liquefaction is a medium-temperature, high-pressure thermochemical process, which produces a liquid product, often called bio-oil or bi-crude. During...... the hydrothermal liquefaction process, the macromolecules of the biomass are first hydrolyzed and/or degraded into smaller molecules. Many of the produced molecules are unstable and reactive and can recombine into larger ones. During this process, a substantial part of the oxygen in the biomass is removed...... by dehydration or decarboxylation. The chemical properties of bio-oil are highly dependent of the biomass substrate composition. Biomass constitutes of various components such as protein; carbohydrates, lignin and fat, and each of them produce distinct spectra of compounds during hydrothermal liquefaction...

  4. Characterization of Alkaliphilus hydrothermalis sp nov., a novel alkaliphilic anaerobic bacterium, isolated from a carbonaceous chimney of the Prony hydrothermal field, New Caledonia

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Aissa, F.; Postec, A.; Erauso, G.; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Hamdi, M.; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A novel anaerobic, alkaliphilic, Gram-positive staining bacterium was isolated from a hydrothermal chimney in the Prony Bay, New Caledonia. This strain designated FatMR1(T) grew at temperatures from 20 to 55 A degrees C (optimum 37 A degrees C) and at pH between 7.5 and 10.5 (optimum 8.8-9). NaCl is not required for growth (optimum 0.2-0.5 %), but is tolerated up to 3 %. Sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite are not used as terminal electron acceptors. Strain Fa...

  5. Heat and mass flux estimation of modern seafloor hydrothermal activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Shikui; WANG Xingtao; YU Zenghui

    2006-01-01

    Research on heat and mass flux yielded by modern seafloor hydrothermal activity is very important, because it is involved not only in the base of ocean environment research, but also in the historical evolution of seawater properties. Currently, estimating heat flux is based on the observation data of hydrothermal smokers, low-temperature diffusive flow and mid-ocean ridge mainly. But there are some faults, for example, there is lack of a concurrent conductive item in estimating the heat flux by smokers and the error between the half-space cooling model and the observation data is too large. So, three kinds of methods are applied to re-estimating the heat flux of hydrothermal activity resepectively, corresponding estimation is 97.359 GW by hydrothermal smoker and diffusive flow, 84.895 GW by hydrothermal plume, and 4.11 TW by exponential attenuation method put forward by this paper. Research on mass flux estimation is relatively rare, the main reason for this is insufficient field observation data. Mass fluxes of different elements are calculated using hydrothermal vent fluid data from the TAG hydrothermal area on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge for the first time. Difference of estimations by different methods reflects the researching extent of hydrothermal activity, and systematically in-situ observation will help to estimate the contribution of hydrothermal activity to ocean chemical environment, ocean circulation and global climate precisely.

  6. 海底热液口温度场高精度声学测量方法研究%Study on high precision acoustic measurement techniques for determining temperature fields around seafloor hydrothermal vents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡勇; 潘宏; 周艳; 樊炜; 付现桥

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the basic principle of the acoustic method used for temperature field measurement of seafloor hydrothermal vents, which includes total least-squares algorithm and parabolic interpolation technique. Experiment research was performed to exactly rebuild the temperature fields around the hot springs on the floor of Lake Qiezishan, Yunnan. The accuracy of time of flight estimation has been improved based on the parabolic interpolation technique. At the same time, through comparing the two temperature fields obtained before and after parabolic interpolation, the max absolute error, the max relative error and the root mean square error are given. Experiment result shows that the total least-squares algorithm and the parabolic interpolation technique can be applied to temperature field measurement detection around seafloor hydrothermal vents, and good reconstruction accuracy is achieved.%介绍了海底热液口温度场原位声学测量的基本原理、总体最小二乘重建方法和抛物插值算法.在云南省龙陵县茄子山水库进行湖底试验研究,基于总体最小二乘重建方法准确地还原出湖底热泉的温度场原位分布;将抛物插值算法应用于声波飞渡时间延时估计,并对抛物插值前后重建出的温度场进行最大绝对误差、最大相对误差和均方根误差分析.实验表明:总体最小二乘重建方法和抛物插值算法可用于海底热液口温度场的原位测量,且重建精度比较高.

  7. Sulfur isotopic composition of modern seafloor hydrothermal sediment and its geological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾志刚; 李军; 蒋富清; 秦蕴珊; 翟世奎

    2002-01-01

    A total of 1 264 sulfur isotopic values for modem seafloor hydrothermel sediments from different hydrothermal fidds have been collected. On this basis, combining our sulfur isotpic data for surface hydrothermal sediments from the Jade hydrohtermal field in the Okinawa Trough and the TAG hydrothermal field in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, respectively, and comparing the sulfur isotopic compositions and analyzing their sources of sulfur in seafloor hydrothermal sediments from different geologic-tectonic setting, the results show that: ( 1 ) sulfur isotopic values of sulfides and sulfates in modern seafloor hydrothermal sediments are concentrated in a narrow range, δ34S values of sulfides vary from l × 10-3 to 9 × 10- 3, with a mean of 4.5 × 10- 3 ( n = 1 042), δ34S values of sulfates vary from 19 × 10- 3 to 24× 10-3, with a mean of 21.3× 10-3 (n =217); (2) comparing the sulfur isotopic compositions of hydrothermal sediments from the sediment-hosted hydrothermal fields, the range of sulfur isotopic values for hydrothermal sediments from the sediment-free hydrothermal fields is narrow relatively; (3) the differences of sulfur isotopic compositions in sulfides from different hydrothermal fields show the differences in the sources of sulfur. The sulfur of hydrothermal sulfides in the sediment-free mid-ocean ridges is mainly from mid-ocean ridge basalt, and partially from the reduced seawater sulfate, and it is the result of partially reduced seawater sulfate mixed with basaltic sulfur. In the sediment-hosted nid-ocean ridges and the back-arc basins, the volcanics, the sediments and the organic matters also can offer their sulfur for forming hydrothermal sulfides; (4) the variations of sulfur isotopic compositions and the different sources of sulfur for hydrothermal sediments may be attributed to the various physical-chemical characteristics of hydrothermal fluids, the magmatic evolution and the different geologic-tectonic settings of seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  8. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2015-05-31

    The term “hydrothermal” used here refers to the processing of biomass in water slurries at elevated temperature and pressure to facilitate the chemical conversion of the organic structures in biomass into useful fuels. The process is meant to provide a means for treating wet biomass materials without drying and to access ionic reaction conditions by maintaining a liquid water processing medium. Typical hydrothermal processing conditions are 523-647K of temperature and operating pressures from 4-22 MPa of pressure. The temperature is sufficient to initiate pyrolytic mechanisms in the biopolymers while the pressure is sufficient to maintain a liquid water processing phase. Hydrothermal gasification is accomplished at the upper end of the process temperature range. It can be considered an extension of the hydrothermal liquefaction mechanisms that begin at the lowest hydrothermal conditions with subsequent decomposition of biopolymer fragments formed in liquefaction to smaller molecules and eventually to gas. Typically, hydrothermal gasification requires an active catalyst to accomplish reasonable rates of gas formation from biomass.

  9. Forests, fields, and the edge of sustainability at the ancient Maya city of Tikal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, David L; Dunning, Nicholas P; Scarborough, Vernon L; Magee, Kevin S; Thompson, Kim M; Weaver, Eric; Carr, Christopher; Terry, Richard E; Islebe, Gerald; Tankersley, Kenneth B; Grazioso Sierra, Liwy; Jones, John G; Buttles, Palma; Valdez, Fred; Ramos Hernandez, Carmen E

    2014-12-30

    Tikal has long been viewed as one of the leading polities of the ancient Maya realm, yet how the city was able to maintain its substantial population in the midst of a tropical forest environment has been a topic of unresolved debate among researchers for decades. We present ecological, paleoethnobotanical, hydraulic, remote sensing, edaphic, and isotopic evidence that reveals how the Late Classic Maya at Tikal practiced intensive forms of agriculture (including irrigation, terrace construction, arboriculture, household gardens, and short fallow swidden) coupled with carefully controlled agroforestry and a complex system of water retention and redistribution. Empirical evidence is presented to demonstrate that this assiduously managed anthropogenic ecosystem of the Classic period Maya was a landscape optimized in a way that provided sustenance to a relatively large population in a preindustrial, low-density urban community. This landscape productivity optimization, however, came with a heavy cost of reduced environmental resiliency and a complete reliance on consistent annual rainfall. Recent speleothem data collected from regional caves showed that persistent episodes of unusually low rainfall were prevalent in the mid-9th century A.D., a time period that coincides strikingly with the abandonment of Tikal and the erection of its last dated monument in A.D. 869. The intensified resource management strategy used at Tikal-already operating at the landscape's carrying capacity-ceased to provide adequate food, fuel, and drinking water for the Late Classic populace in the face of extended periods of drought. As a result, social disorder and abandonment ensued.

  10. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Missouri River alluvial aquifer in the vicinity of the City of Independence, Missouri, well field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkison, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Source contributions to monitoring and supply wells, contributing recharge areas, groundwater travel times, and current (2012) understanding of alluvial water quality were used to develop a groundwater monitoring plan for the Missouri River alluvial aquifer in the vicinity of the City of Independence, Missouri well field. The plan was designed to evaluate long-term alluvial water quality and assess potential changes in, and threats to, well-field water quality. Source contributions were determined from an existing groundwater flow model in conjunction with particle-tracking analysis and verified with water-quality data collected from 1997 through 2010 from a network of 68 monitoring wells. Three conjunctive factors - well-field pumpage, Missouri River discharge, and aquifer recharge - largely determined groundwater flow and, therefore, source contributions. The predominant source of groundwater to most monitoring wells and supply wells is the Missouri River, and this was reflected, to some extent, in alluvial water quality. To provide an estimate of the maximum potential lead time available for remedial action, monitoring wells where groundwater travel times from the contributing recharge areas are less than 2 years and predominately singular sources (such as the Missouri River or the land surface) were selected for annual sampling. The sample interval of the remaining wells, which have varying travel times and intermediate mixtures of river and land-surface contributions, were staggered on a 2-, 3-, or 4-year rotation. This was done to provide data from similar contributing areas and account for inherent aquifer variability yet minimize sample redundancy.

  11. New records of caridean shrimp (Crustacea: Decapoda) from hydrothermally influenced fields off Futuna Island, Southwest Pacific, with description of a new species assigned to the genus Alvinocaridinides Komai & Chan, 2010 (Alvinocarididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Menot, Lenaick; Segonzac, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Five species of caridean shrimp, including four Alvinocarididae Christoffersen, 1986 and one thorid species of the genus Lebbeus White, 1847, are reported from the recently discovered hydrothermal vent field off Futuna Island in the Southwest Pacific (depths 1418-1478 m): Alvinocaridinides semidentatus n. sp., Alvinocaris komaii Zelnio & Hourdez, 2009, Nautilocaris saintlaurentae Komai & Segonzac, 2004, Rimicaris variabilis (Komai & Tsuchida, 2015), and Lebbeus wera Ahyong, 2009. The new species, provisionally assigned to Alvinocaridinides Komai & Chan, 2010, is readily distinguished from the type species of the genus, A. formosa Komai & Chan, 2010, by the characteristic armature of the rostrum and of the propodi of the third and fourth pereopods and the possession of ischial spines on the third and fourth pereopods. Identification of R. variabilis has been confirmed by morphology and sequence comparison of mitochondrial COI gene. The geographical range of L. wera is extended to the north from the Brothers Caldera in the Kermadec Ridge.

  12. The Lassen hydrothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Bergfeld, Deborah; Clor, Laura; Evans, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The active Lassen hydrothermal system includes a central vapor-dominated zone or zones beneath the Lassen highlands underlain by ~240 °C high-chloride waters that discharge at lower elevations. It is the best-exposed and largest hydrothermal system in the Cascade Range, discharging 41 ± 10 kg/s of steam (~115 MW) and 23 ± 2 kg/s of high-chloride waters (~27 MW). The Lassen system accounts for a full 1/3 of the total high-temperature hydrothermal heat discharge in the U.S. Cascades (140/400 MW). Hydrothermal heat discharge of ~140 MW can be supported by crystallization and cooling of silicic magma at a rate of ~2400 km3/Ma, and the ongoing rates of heat and magmatic CO2 discharge are broadly consistent with a petrologic model for basalt-driven magmatic evolution. The clustering of observed seismicity at ~4–5 km depth may define zones of thermal cracking where the hydrothermal system mines heat from near-plastic rock. If so, the combined areal extent of the primary heat-transfer zones is ~5 km2, the average conductive heat flux over that area is >25 W/m2, and the conductive-boundary length system or owe to various geologic events such as the eruption of Lassen Peak at 27 ka, deglaciation beginning ~18 ka, the eruptions of Chaos Crags at 1.1 ka, or the minor 1914–1917 eruption at the summit of Lassen Peak. However, there is a rich record of intermittent hydrothermal measurement over the past several decades and more-frequent measurement 2009–present. These data reveal sensitivity to climate and weather conditions, seasonal variability that owes to interaction with the shallow hydrologic system, and a transient 1.5- to twofold increase in high-chloride discharge in response to an earthquake swarm in mid-November 2014.

  13. Forests, fields, and the edge of sustainability at the ancient Maya city of Tikal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, David L.; Dunning, Nicholas P.; Scarborough, Vernon L.; Magee, Kevin S.; Thompson, Kim M.; Weaver, Eric; Terry, Richard E.; Islebe, Gerald; Tankersley, Kenneth B.; Grazioso Sierra, Liwy; Jones, John G.; Buttles, Palma; Valdez, Fred; Ramos Hernandez, Carmen E.

    2014-01-01

    Tikal has long been viewed as one of the leading polities of the ancient Maya realm, yet how the city was able to maintain its substantial population in the midst of a tropical forest environment has been a topic of unresolved debate among researchers for decades. We present ecological, paleoethnobotanical, hydraulic, remote sensing, edaphic, and isotopic evidence that reveals how the Late Classic Maya at Tikal practiced intensive forms of agriculture (including irrigation, terrace construction, arboriculture, household gardens, and short fallow swidden) coupled with carefully controlled agroforestry and a complex system of water retention and redistribution. Empirical evidence is presented to demonstrate that this assiduously managed anthropogenic ecosystem of the Classic period Maya was a landscape optimized in a way that provided sustenance to a relatively large population in a preindustrial, low-density urban community. This landscape productivity optimization, however, came with a heavy cost of reduced environmental resiliency and a complete reliance on consistent annual rainfall. Recent speleothem data collected from regional caves showed that persistent episodes of unusually low rainfall were prevalent in the mid-9th century A.D., a time period that coincides strikingly with the abandonment of Tikal and the erection of its last dated monument in A.D. 869. The intensified resource management strategy used at Tikal—already operating at the landscape’s carrying capacity—ceased to provide adequate food, fuel, and drinking water for the Late Classic populace in the face of extended periods of drought. As a result, social disorder and abandonment ensued. PMID:25512500

  14. The history of the airport; from grass fields to giant cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterse, H.

    2011-01-01

    In the early days of aviation airports where nothing more than a simple grass field from which airplanes could take off. These days there are airports that are enormous in size, and fulfil many more functions than simply allowing aircraft to take-off and land. The airport has shown a remarkable revo

  15. Complexing and hydrothermal ore deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Helgeson, Harold C

    1964-01-01

    Complexing and Hydrothermal Ore Deposition provides a synthesis of fact, theory, and interpretative speculation on hydrothermal ore-forming solutions. This book summarizes information and theory of the internal chemistry of aqueous electrolyte solutions accumulated in previous years. The scope of the discussion is limited to those aspects of particular interest to the geologist working on the problem of hydrothermal ore genesis. Wherever feasible, fundamental principles are reviewed. Portions of this text are devoted to calculations of specific hydrothermal equilibriums in multicompone

  16. The geophysical characteristics of hydrothermal plumes at the Logatchev vent field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge%大西洋中脊Logatchev热液区的地球物理场研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐勇; 和转; 吴招才; 黎明碧

    2012-01-01

    利用“大洋一号”首次环球科考获得的地球物理资料,通过对多波束地形和地磁异常的解译,对大西洋Logatchev热液区的地球物理场特征进行了研究,研究结果表明Logatchev热液喷口位于裂谷东侧的滑塌体上,处于南北地磁正负高值异常中心之间的缓冲带上,新发现的磁异常区与热液喷口区具有相似的特征,推测为未来的热液矿区.区内南西西-北东东和北-南向断裂不仅控制了基底深度和隆坳结构,也控制了超基性岩和热源磁性层的分布,因此它的形成与交叉切割的拆离断层、超基性岩、海洋核杂岩和重力滑塌有关.%Magnetic and multibeam data were collected from DAYANG No. 1 first world cruise at Mid Atlantic Ridge. The interpretation of magnetic anomalies and bathymetric data shows the geophysical characteristics of hy-drothermal plumes at the Logatchev vent field. Logatchev vent site is situated on the eastern inner flank of the rift valley and between the high value of positive and negative anomalies. NWW-SEE and NS trending fault not only control basement depth and upwelling-sag,but also dose the distribution of ultramafic rock and heat source. It is suggest that the Logatchev hydrothermal field is associated with ultramafic-hosted, off-axis location with detachment faulting, oceanic core complex, abundant gravitational landslides.

  17. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Hoffmann, Jessica;

    2014-01-01

    into biochemical/biotechnical methods and thermochemical methods; such as direct combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, liquefaction etc. This chapter will focus on hydrothermal liquefaction, where high pressures and intermediate temperatures together with the presence of water are used to convert biomass...... into liquid biofuels, with the aim of describing the current status and development challenges of the technology. During the hydrothermal liquefaction process, the biomass macromolecules are first hydrolyzed and/or degraded into smaller molecules. Many of the produced molecules are unstable and reactive...

  18. Free energy distribution and hydrothermal mineral precipitation in Hadean submarine alkaline vent systems: Importance of iron redox reactions under anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Takazo; Russell, Michael J.; Takai, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of mixing between hypothetical seawater and hydrothermal fluid in the Hadean deep ocean were carried out to predict saturation states of mineral precipitates and redox reactions that could occur in Hadean submarine alkaline hydrothermal systems associated with the serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. In the calculations, the seawater was assumed to be weakly acidic (pH = 5.5) and to include carbon dioxide, ferrous iron and silica, with or without nitrate, while the Hadean hydrothermal fluid was assumed to be highly alkaline (pH = 11) and to contain abundant molecular hydrogen, methane and bisulfide, based on the Archean geologic record, the modern low-temperature alkaline hydrothermal vent fluid (Lost City field), and experimental and theoretical considerations. The modeling indicates that potential mineral precipitates in the mixing zone (hydrothermal chimney structures) could consist mainly of iron sulfides but also of ferrous serpentine and brucite, siderite, and ferric iron-bearing minerals such as goethite, hematite and/or magnetite as minor phases. The precipitation of ferric iron-bearing minerals suggests that chemical iron oxidation would be made possible by pH shift even under anoxic condition. In the mixing zone, comprising an inorganic barrier precipitated at the interface of the two contrasting solutions, various redox reactions release free energy with the potential to drive endergonic reactions, assuming the involvement of coupling inorganic protoenzymes. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis - long considered the most ancient forms of biological energy metabolisms - are able to achieve higher maximum energy yield (>0.5 kJ/kg hydrothermal fluid) than those in the modern serpentinization-associated seafloor hydrothermal systems (e.g., Kairei field). Furthermore, the recently proposed methanotrophic acetogenesis pathway was also thermodynamically investigated. It is known that methanotrophic acetogenesis would

  19. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knezevic, Dragan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents research of hydrothermal conversion of biomass (HTC). In this process, hot compressed water (subcritical water) is used as the reaction medium. Therefore this technique is suitable for conversion of wet biomass/ waste streams. By working at high pressures, the evaporation of wat

  20. Characterization of Alkaliphilus hydrothermalis sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic anaerobic bacterium, isolated from a carbonaceous chimney of the Prony hydrothermal field, New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Aissa, Fatma; Postec, Anne; Erauso, Gaël; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Hamdi, Moktar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A novel anaerobic, alkaliphilic, Gram-positive staining bacterium was isolated from a hydrothermal chimney in the Prony Bay, New Caledonia. This strain designated FatMR1(T) grew at temperatures from 20 to 55 °C (optimum 37 °C) and at pH between 7.5 and 10.5 (optimum 8.8-9). NaCl is not required for growth (optimum 0.2-0.5%), but is tolerated up to 3%. Sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite are not used as terminal electron acceptors. Strain FatMR1(T) fermented pyruvate, yeast extract, peptone and biotrypcase and used fructose as the only sugar. The main fermentation products from fructose and proteinaceous compounds (e.g. peptone and biotrypcase) were acetate, H2 and CO2. Crotonate was disproportionated to acetate and butyrate. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14:0 and C16:0. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 37.1 mol%. On the basis of phylogenetic, genetic, and physiological properties, strain FatMR1(T) (=DSM 25890(T), =JCM 18390(T)) belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, class Clostridia, order Clostridiales, is proposed as a novel species of the genus Alkaliphilus, A. hydrothermalis sp. nov. PMID:25319677

  1. Free-living bacterial communities associated with tubeworm (Ridgeia piscesae) aggregations in contrasting diffuse flow hydrothermal vent habitats at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Nathalie L; Kim Juniper, S

    2013-04-01

    We systematically studied free-living bacterial diversity within aggregations of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae sampled from two contrasting flow regimes (High Flow and Low Flow) in the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Northeast Pacific). Eight samples of particulate detritus were recovered from paired tubeworm grabs from four vent sites. Most sequences (454 tag and Sanger methods) were affiliated to the Epsilonproteobacteria, and the sulfur-oxidizing genus Sulfurovum was dominant in all samples. Gammaproteobacteria were also detected, mainly in Low Flow sequence libraries, and were affiliated with known methanotrophs and decomposers. The cooccurrence of sulfur reducers from the Deltaproteobacteria and the Epsilonproteobacteria suggests internal sulfur cycling within these habitats. Other phyla detected included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Statistically significant relationships between sequence library composition and habitat type suggest a predictable pattern for High Flow and Low Flow environments. Most sequences significantly more represented in High Flow libraries were related to sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, while mainly heterotrophic groups were more represented in Low Flow libraries. Differences in temperature, available energy for metabolism, and stability between High Flow and Low Flow habitats potentially explain their distinct bacterial communities.

  2. Biosignatures in chimney structures and sediment from the Loki's Castle low-temperature hydrothermal vent field at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeschke, Andrea; Eickmann, Benjamin; Lang, Susan Q; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Strauss, Harald; Früh-Green, Gretchen L

    2014-05-01

    We investigated microbial life preserved in a hydrothermally inactive silica–barite chimney in comparison with an active barite chimney and sediment from the Loki's Castle low-temperature venting area at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) using lipid biomarkers. Carbon and sulfur isotopes were used to constrain possible metabolic pathways. Multiple sulfur (dδ34S, Δ33S) isotopes on barite over a cross section of the extinct chimney range between 21.1 and 22.5 % in δ34S, and between 0.020 and 0.034 % in Δ33S, indicating direct precipitation from seawater. Biomarker distributions within two discrete zones of this silica–barite chimney indicate a considerable difference in abundance and diversity of microorganisms from the chimney exterior to the interior. Lipids in the active and inactive chimney barite and sediment were dominated by a range of 13C-depleted unsaturated and branched fatty acids with δ13C values between -39.7 and -26.7 %, indicating the presence of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria. The majority of lipids (99.5 %) in the extinct chimney interior that experienced high temperatures were of archaeal origin. Unusual glycerol monoalkyl glycerol tetraethers (GMGT) with 0–4 rings were the dominant compounds suggesting the presence of mainly (hyper-) thermophilic archaea. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons with δ13C values as low as -46 % also indicated the presence of methanogens and possibly methanotrophs.

  3. The Speciation of Particulate Iron and Carbon in the East Pacific Rise 15oS Near-field Hydrothermal Plume and Underlying Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, B. M.; Lam, P. J.; Nicholas, S. L.; Ohnemus, D.; Hoffman, C. L.; Fitzsimmons, J. N.; Sherrell, R. M.; German, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate iron and carbon speciation were measured for water column and sediment samples collected at the East Pacific Rise ridge axis (15oS; Station 18) and approximately 80 km down-current (Station 20) during the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect cruise. Water column particles were collected by in situ filtration (0.2 micron, polycarbonate) from above, within, and below the hydrothermal plume. Water column samples were handled in an anaerobic chamber and stored frozen under inert gas shipboard, and protected from ambient oxygen during analysis. The flocculant, top-layer of the sediments was sampled shipboard under ambient conditions and stored frozen until analysis. Iron and carbon speciation were measured using X-ray microprobe (10.3.2) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) instruments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA. Iron (1s and 2p) and carbon (1s) X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and imaging for particles revealed that: (1) in comparison to the above plume sample, organic carbon is abundant in particles within and below the plume, as well as in surface sediments; (2) iron sulfides are not detectable in any water column sample investigated so far; (3) the fraction of non-sulfide reduced iron is highest in the below plume samples; and (4) the below plume sample is rich in free-living microbial cells.

  4. Free-living bacterial communities associated with tubeworm (Ridgeia piscesae) aggregations in contrasting diffuse flow hydrothermal vent habitats at the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Nathalie L; Kim Juniper, S

    2013-04-01

    We systematically studied free-living bacterial diversity within aggregations of the vestimentiferan tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae sampled from two contrasting flow regimes (High Flow and Low Flow) in the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Northeast Pacific). Eight samples of particulate detritus were recovered from paired tubeworm grabs from four vent sites. Most sequences (454 tag and Sanger methods) were affiliated to the Epsilonproteobacteria, and the sulfur-oxidizing genus Sulfurovum was dominant in all samples. Gammaproteobacteria were also detected, mainly in Low Flow sequence libraries, and were affiliated with known methanotrophs and decomposers. The cooccurrence of sulfur reducers from the Deltaproteobacteria and the Epsilonproteobacteria suggests internal sulfur cycling within these habitats. Other phyla detected included Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Statistically significant relationships between sequence library composition and habitat type suggest a predictable pattern for High Flow and Low Flow environments. Most sequences significantly more represented in High Flow libraries were related to sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, while mainly heterotrophic groups were more represented in Low Flow libraries. Differences in temperature, available energy for metabolism, and stability between High Flow and Low Flow habitats potentially explain their distinct bacterial communities. PMID:23401293

  5. Estimation of a "radiatively correct" black carbon specific absorption during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA 2003 field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Barnard

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA field campaign of 2003, measurements of the shortwave radiation field allowed the inference of the black carbon (BC specific absorption, αλ, defined as the monochromatic absorption cross section per unit mass (with units of m2/g. The averaged values of αλ derived from the method here are either 8.9 m2/g or 8.2 m2/g at 500 nm, depending upon the physical and optical parameters assumed for BC. These results are reasonably consistent with those of Schuster et al. (2005, 9.5 m2/g, and Baumgartner et al. (2002, 7.0 m2/g, both measured at 550 nm. The αλ values reported in this paper should only be considered effective, "radiatively correct" values because when used in radiative transfer calculations the calculated irradiances match the measured irradiances at 500 nm. The specific absorption so defined can assume a wide range of values, depending upon: (1 the assumptions made prior to the retrieval (e.g., shell/core aerosol configuration, and (2 values chosen for BC density and refractive index. The range of possible values is large, corresponding to a "worst case" uncertainty of about ±70%, assuming that all errors are additive and of the same sign so that no error cancellation occurs.

  6. Anhydrite precipitation in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Rüpke, Lars H.

    2016-04-01

    The composition and metal concentration of hydrothermal fluids venting at the seafloor is strongly temperature-dependent and fluids above 300°C are required to transport metals to the seafloor (Hannington et al. 2010). Ore-forming hydrothermal systems and high temperature vents in general are often associated with faults and fracture zones, i.e. zones of enhanced permeabilities that act as channels for the uprising hydrothermal fluid (Heinrich & Candela, 2014). Previous numerical models (Jupp and Schultz, 2000; Andersen et al. 2015) however have shown that high permeabilities tend to decrease fluid flow temperatures due to mixing with cold seawater and the resulting high fluid fluxes that lead to short residence times of the fluid near the heat source. A possible mechanism to reduce the permeability and thereby to focus high temperature fluid flow are mineral precipitation reactions that clog the pore space. Anhydrite for example precipitates from seawater if it is heated to temperatures above ~150°C or due to mixing of seawater with hydrothermal fluids that usually have high Calcium concentrations. We have implemented anhydrite reactions (precipitation and dissolution) in our finite element numerical models of hydrothermal circulation. The initial results show that the precipitation of anhydrite efficiently alters the permeability field, which affects the hydrothermal flow field as well as the resulting vent temperatures. C. Andersen et al. (2015), Fault geometry and permeability contrast control vent temperatures at the Logatchev 1 hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Geology, 43(1), 51-54. M. D. Hannington et al. (2010), Modern Sea-Floor Massive Sulfides and Base Metal Resources: Toward an Estimate of Global Sea-Floor Massive Sulfide Potential, in The Challenge of Finding New Mineral Resources: Global Metallogeny, Innovative Exploration, and New Discoveries, edited by R. J. Goldfarb, E. E. Marsh and T. Monecke, pp. 317-338, Society of Economic Geologists

  7. Modeling ozone plumes observed downwind of New York City over the North Atlantic Ocean during the ICARTT field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.-H.; Kim, S.-W.; Trainer, M.; Frost, G. J.; McKeen, S. A.; Cooper, O. R.; Flocke, F.; Holloway, J. S.; Neuman, J. A.; Ryerson, T.; Senff, C. J.; Swanson, A. L.; Thompson, A. M.

    2011-07-01

    Transport and chemical transformation of well-defined New York City (NYC) urban plumes over the North Atlantic Ocean were studied using aircraft measurements collected on 20-21 July 2004 during the ICARTT (International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation) field campaign and WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry) model simulations. The strong NYC urban plumes were characterized by carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios of 350-400 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) and ozone (O3) levels of about 100 ppbv near New York City on 20 July in the WP-3D in-situ and DC-3 lidar aircraft measurements. On 21 July, the two aircraft captured strong urban plumes with about 350 ppbv CO and over 150 ppbv O3 (~160 ppbv maximum) about 600 km downwind of NYC over the North Atlantic Ocean. The measured urban plumes extended vertically up to about 2 km near New York City, but shrank to 1-1.5 km over the stable marine boundary layer (MBL) over the North Atlantic Ocean. The WRF-Chem model reproduced ozone formation processes, chemical characteristics, and meteorology of the measured urban plumes near New York City (20 July) and in the far downwind region over the North Atlantic Ocean (21 July). The quasi-Lagrangian analysis of transport and chemical transformation of the simulated NYC urban plumes using WRF-Chem results showed that the pollutants can be efficiently transported in (isentropic) layers in the lower atmosphere (dynamic vertical decoupling by cessation of turbulence in the stable MBL. The O3 mixing ratio in the NYC urban plumes remained at 80-90 ppbv during nocturnal transport over the stable MBL, then grew to over 100 ppbv by daytime oxidation of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) with mixing ratios on the order of 1 ppbv. Efficient transport of reactive nitrogen species (NOy), specifically nitric acid (HNO3), was confirmed through the comparison of the CO/NOy ratio in photochemically fresh and aged NYC plumes, implying the possibility

  8. Temperature and volume estimation of under-seafloor fluid from the logging-while-drilling data beneath an active hydrothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Y.; Saito, S.; Sanada, Y.; Masaki, Y.; Moe, K.; Kido, Y. N.; Kumagai, H.; Takai, K.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-12-01

    In July of 2014, offshore drillings on Iheya-North Knoll, Okinawa Trough, was executed as part of Next-generation technology for ocean resources survey, which is a research program in Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP). In this expedition, logging-while- drilling (LWD) and measuring-while-drilling (MWD) were inserted into 6 holes (C9011 - C9016) to investigate spatial distribution of hydrothermal deposit and geothermal fluid reservoir. Both of these tools included annular pressure-while-drilling (APWD). Annular pressure and temperature were monitored by the APWD to detect possible exceedingly-high-temperature geofluid. In addition, drilling fluid was continuously circulated at sufficient flow rate to protect LWD tools against high temperature (non-stop driller system). At C9012 and C9016, the LWD tool clearly detected pressure and temperature anomaly at 234 meter below the seafloor (mbsf) and 80 mbsf, respectively. Annular pressure and temperature quickly increases at that depth and it would reflect the injection of high-temperature fluid. During the drilling, however, drilling water was continuously circulated at high flow-rate (2600L/min) and the measured temperature is not exactly in-situ temperature. To investigate the detail of the heat source, such as in-situ temperature and quantity of heat, we performed numerical analyses of thermal fluid and energy-balance assuming injection of high-temperature fluid. We combined pressure loss theory of double cylinders and temperature equation to replicate the fluid flow and its temperature between borehole wall and drilling pipe during the thermofluid injection. As the result, we estimated the temperature and the volume of injected fluid to be 115oC~ and 17.3 m3, respectively (at C9012) from the calculation. This temperature is lower than that of a hydrothermall vent which had been found near the hole (300oC).

  9. THE NEW YORK CITY URBAN DISPERSION PROGRAM MARCH 2005 FIELD STUDY: TRACER METHODS AND RESULTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATSON, T.B.; HEISER, J.; KALB, P.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; WIESER, R.; VIGNATO, G.

    2005-10-01

    The Urban Dispersion Program March 2005 Field Study tracer releases, sampling, and analytical methods are described in detail. There were two days where tracer releases and sampling were conducted. A total of 16.0 g of six tracers were released during the first test day or Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 1 and 15.7 g during IOP 2. Three types of sampling instruments were used in this study. Sequential air samplers, or SAS, collected six-minute samples, while Brookhaven atmospheric tracer samplers (BATS) and personal air samplers (PAS) collected thirty-minute samples. There were a total of 1300 samples resulting from the two IOPs. Confidence limits in the sampling and analysis method were 20% as determined from 100 duplicate samples. The sample recovery rate was 84%. The integrally averaged 6-minute samples were compared to the 30-minute samples. The agreement was found to be good in most cases. The validity of using a background tracer to calculate sample volumes was examined and also found to have a confidence level of 20%. Methods for improving sampling and analysis are discussed. The data described in this report are available as Excel files. An additional Excel file of quality assured tracer data for use in model validation efforts is also available. The file consists of extensively quality assured BATS tracer data with background concentrations subtracted.

  10. A Comparative Field Based Study of Katz and Barthel Indices in North Indian City of Dehradun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Luthra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elderly persons are one of the most vulnerable groups of society and have more chances of disease and disabilities (restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being. It reflects how well an individual is able to function in general areas of life. Magnitude of disability has become an important indicator in measuring disease burden along with morbidity and mortality rates. Katz and Barthel Indices have been largely used to assess disability in activities of daily living among elderly people.Aim & objectives: This community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among persons aged 60 years and above in urban field practice area of SGRRIM&HS, Dehradun, Uttarakhand with the aim of comparing these two indices in community setting. The specific objectives were to find ADL dependence by both the indices, find the factors which significantly affect ADL dependence and to find the degree of agreement which is not by chance between Katz and Barthel Indices.Material methods: An interview schedule was developed and administered to participants in Hindi, by trained investigators. Information on age, marital status, living status education, occupation and economic dependence was recorded. House-to-house visits were conducted in the selected area to collect the data. All elderly persons residing in the selected area were included in the study.Results: Prevalence of ADL dependence was 8.23% as per Katz Index and 28.45% as per Barthel Index, taking a score of less than 20 for BI and less than 6 for KI as criterion for ADL dependence. That there is a moderate degree of agreement between Katz and Barthel Scores which is not by chance was estimated by Kappa Statistic.Conclusion: Katz Index is better suited for ADL estimation in a community setting.

  11. Voltammetric Investigation Of Hydrothermal Iron Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte eKleint

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal vent fluids are highly enriched in iron (Fe compared to ambient seawater, and organic ligands may play a role in facilitating the transport of some hydrothermal Fe into the open ocean. This is important since Fe is a limiting micronutrient for primary production in large parts of the world`s surface ocean. We have investigated the concentration and speciation of Fe in several vent fluid and plume samples from the Nifonea vent field, Coriolis Troughs, New Hebrides Island Arc, South Pacific Ocean using competitive ligand exchange - adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE - AdCSV with salicylaldoxime (SA as the artificial ligand. Our results for total dissolved Fe (dFe in the buoyant hydrothermal plume samples showed concentrations up to 3.86 µM dFe with only a small fraction between 1.1% and 11.8% being chemically labile. Iron binding ligand concentrations ([L] were found in µM level with strong conditional stability constants up to log K[L],Fe3+ of 22.9. Within the non-buoyant hydrothermal plume above the Nifonea vent field, up to 84.7% of the available Fe is chemically labile and [L] concentrations up to 97 nM were measured. [L] was consistently in excess of Felab, indicating that all available Fe is being complexed, which in combination with high Felab values in the non-buoyant plume, signifies that a high fraction of hydrothermal dFe is potentially being transported away from the plume into the surrounding waters, contributing to the global oceanic Fe budget.

  12. 声学法深海热液速度场测量重建算法研究%Reconstruction algorithm for acoustic measurement of velocity field of deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白燕; 毛洁; 樊炜; 潘华辰; 刘云峰

    2011-01-01

    介绍了利用声学法测量深海热液速度场的基本原理.利用往返飞渡时间差与流场速度的关系,应用反问题求解技术重建测量区域的速度场.应用最小二乘法对两种典型的热液口速度场模型进行了仿真重建,分析了换能器数量、实验测量误差以及换能器的布放对重建结果的影响,并对重建结果进行了流量分析.仿真重建的绝对误差、相对误差以及流量分析结果表明,最小二乘法具有较高重建精度,增加声学换能器及细化网格可提高重建精度,换能器对称分布时具有最优重建结果.最后对声学法深海热液温度场速度场测量系统进行了介绍和说明.深海热液速度场的测量重建可为热液热通量的测量奠定基础.%The basic theory of acoustic velocity field measurement in deep-sea hydrothermal vents was introduced.The time of flight (TOF) of acoustic signals through hydrothermal vents was dependent on temperature and velocity.The velocity field was reconstructed by inverse problem solving techniques based on the relationship between the round-trip TOF difference and velocity of flow. The reconstruction of velocity field using the least square method was presented. At the same time, flow flux of reconstruction results was analyzed. The results show that the least square method has good accuracy. Increase of the number of acoustic transducers and mesh density can improve the reconstruction accuracy effectively.

  13. A Study into the Impact of Physical Structures on the Runway Velocity Field at the Atlantic City International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David, Jr.; Manson, Russell; Trout, Joseph; Decicco, Nicholas; Rios, Manny

    2015-04-01

    Wake vortices are generated by airplanes in flight. These vortices decay slowly and may persist for several minutes after their creation. These vortices and associated smaller scale turbulent structures present a hazard to incoming flights. It is for this reason that incoming flights are timed to arrive after these vortices have dissipated. Local weather conditions, mainly prevailing winds, can affect the transport and evolution of these vortices; therefore, there is a need to fully understand localized wind patterns at the airport-sized mircoscale. Here we have undertaken a computational investigation into the impacts of localized wind flows and physical structures on the velocity field at Atlantic City International Airport. The simulations are undertaken in OpenFOAM, an open source computational fluid dynamics software package, using an optimized geometric mesh of the airport. Initial conditions for the simulations are based on historical data with the option to run simulations based on projected weather conditions imported from the Weather Research & Forcasting (WRF) Model. Sub-grid scale turbulence is modeled using a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach. The initial results gathered from the WRF Model simulations and historical weather data analysis are presented elsewhere.

  14. On-Road Measurement of Vehichle VOC Emission Measurements During the 2003 Mexico City Metropolitan Area Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, W. B.; Rogers, T.; Grimsrud, E.; Herndon, S.; Allwine, E.; Lamb, B.; Velasco, E.; Westberg, H.

    2004-12-01

    In the spring of 2003 (April 1-May 5), a multinational team of experts conducted an intensive, five-week field campaign in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). The overall goal of this effort was to contribute to the understanding of the air quality problem in megacities. As part of the campaign the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory was equipped with state-of-the-art analytical instruments and deployed for measuring a variety of vehicle emissions in real time including CO2, NO2, NH3, HCHO, VOC's and volatile (at 600 °C) aerosol. The on-road measurement of vehicle VOC emissions were performed using a commercial version of the IONICON PTR-MS modified to operate onboard the mobile lab platform. A summary of the PTR-MS results from these and supporting laboratory experiments will be presented and discussed. In particular, selected chase events will be presented to illustrate the utility of the PTR-MS technique for characterizing vehicle VOC emission profiles in real time. VOC emission profiles for different vehicle engine types which include gasoline, diesel and compressed natural gas will be discussed and compared to the measurements from other high time response instruments deployed on the Aerodyne mobile van.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earl, J S; Wood, D J; Milne, S J [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-22

    A hydrothermal method of synthesizing hydroxyapatite by heating a precipitate, formed by mixing Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} with distilled water, in a hydrothermal reactor at 200 deg. C for 24-72 hrs is described. A treatment time of 24 hrs produced single phase (as shown by XRD) hydroxyapatite powder, however for longer treatment times XRD patterns were indicative of the presence of a secondary phase, monetite (CaHPO{sub 4}). SEM examination of the treated powders displayed particles of rod-like morphology with dimensions 100-500 nm in length and 10-60 nm in diameter. Preliminary results on the use of the particles for the infiltration of dentine tubules are presented.

  16. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Knezevic, Dragan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents research of hydrothermal conversion of biomass (HTC). In this process, hot compressed water (subcritical water) is used as the reaction medium. Therefore this technique is suitable for conversion of wet biomass/ waste streams. By working at high pressures, the evaporation of water and high energy consumption that it requires can be avoided. The main focus of this work was HTC process aiming at production of transportation fuel intermediates. For this study, a new experime...

  17. Commercial real estate investment in Ho Chi Minh City: a level playing field for foreign and domestic investors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, B.T.; Krabben, E. van der; Samsura, D.A.A.

    2014-01-01

    In Vietnam, similarly to other countries with the same system, transformation of the economy from one based on central planning into one founded on market principles, provides incomplete property rights in land and property markets. Nonetheless, cities like Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) are experiencing s

  18. Measurements of Black Carbon Specific Absorption in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MCMA 2003 Field Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Barnard

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available During the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA field campaign of 2003, measurements of the shortwave radiation field, lidar backscatter, and atmospheric concentrations of black carbon (BC permitted the inference of the BC carbon specific absorption, αλ, defined as the absorption cross section per unit mass (with units of m2/g. This diverse set of measurements allowed us to determine αλ in two ways. These methods – labeled I and II – are distinguished from one another in the manner that the columnar concentration of BC (with units of mg/m2 is determined. This concentration is found by using either surface measurements of BC concentration and lidar estimates of aerosol mixing heights, or a more rigorous method that relies on the columnar aerosol size distribution. The averaged values of αλ derived from these methods agree to about 20%, although we expect that the values obtained from method I are underestimated. These results, along with those of Schuster et al. (2005, suggest that in the MCMA, αλ is in a range of 8 to 10 m2/g at a wavelength of 550 nm. This range is somewhat lower than the commonly accepted value of 10 m2/g for a wavelength of 550 nm, but is consistent with the calculations of Fuller et al. (1999, who suggest that this value is too high.

  19. Elemental geochemical records of seafloor hydrothermal activities in the sediments from the Okinawa Trough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Shikui; YU Zenghui; DU Tongjun

    2007-01-01

    The major and minor element contents in the sediment core H9 from the hydrothermal fields of the Okinawa Trough show a sharp change at the depth of 80 cm. The elements enriched in the upper 80 cm core are those enriched in the hydrothermal deposits and in the surface sediments recovered from the hydrothermal fields in the trough, which indicates the input of hydrothermal materials. Comparing with other hydrothermal sediments from Mid-ocean Ridges or the Lau Basin, the degree of the enrichment of elements iron, copper, cobalt, and nickel is relatively low. However, the enrichment of elements manganese, lead, arsenic, antimony and mercury is remarkable. The average contents of these elements in the upper 80 cm core sediments are three to six times those in the lower section, and 3 ~ 12 times those in the surface sediments which are not influenced by hydrothermal activities. Hydrothermal activities have contributed significant manganese, lead, arsenic, antimony and mercury to the sediments, and these elements are distinct indicators for the hydrothermal activity in the Okinawa Trough. The significant enrichment of these elements in Core H9 upward from the depth 80 cm indicates the start or the significant enhancing of the hydrothermal activity in this area at about 5 740 aB. P. The average accumulation rate of manganese during this period is about 40 461 μg/( cm2 · ka), which is similar to the hydrothermal sediments in the Lau Basin or the East Pacific Rise.

  20. The momentum flux-gradient relations derived from field measurements in the urban roughness sublayer in three cities in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Liu, Gang; Sun, Jianning; Zhang, Hongsheng; Yuan, Renmin

    2015-10-01

    Field measurements of the momentum flux and wind velocity gradient were carried out at three urban sites in the cities of Nanjing, Changzhou, and Suzhou, China. The observational data in the urban roughness sublayer are analyzed to derive the momentum flux-gradient relations in terms of framework of the local similarity theory with a least squares fit, and the relations are then compared to the classical similarity relations of Businger et al. (1971). The results show that the momentum flux varies with height; thus, the constant-flux assumption in the Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory is not met in the urban roughness sublayer. However, the dimensionless wind velocity gradient may be described by the local similarity theory, and the derived flux-gradient relations have the same form as the classical similarity relations do. Under stable conditions, the coefficient βm in the fitted relations increases with height and gradually approaches the value of 4.7 in the classical similarity relations. The trend suggests that the turbulent flow may be described by the classical similarity relations once the height increases and reaches the top of the urban roughness sublayer, and thus, the height of the top of the urban roughness sublayer may be estimated by linear extrapolation of the derived relations in this study. The relation between the critical Richardson number Ric and the coefficient βm is derived as Ric = Prt/βm, where Prt is the turbulent Prandtl number. In the urban roughness sublayer, the value of Ric is larger than 0.2.

  1. Radionuclides in hydrothermal systems as indicators of repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrothermal systems in tuffaceous and older sedimentary rocks contain evidence of the interaction of radionuclides in fluids with rock matrix minerals and with materials lining fractures, in settings somewhat analogous to the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. Earlier studies encompassed the occurrences of U and Th in a ''fossil'' hydrothermal system in tuffaceous rock of the San Juan Mountains volcanic field, CO. More recent and ongoing studies examine active hydrothermal systems in calderas at Long Valley, CA and Valles, NM. At the Nevada Test Site, occurrences of U and Th in fractured and unfractured rhyolitic tuff that was heated to simulate the introduction of radioactive waste are also under investigation. Observations to date suggest that U is mobile in hydrothermal systems, but that localized reducing environments provided by Fe-rich minerals and/or carbonaceous material concentrate U and thus attenuate its migration. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. Metagenomic and PCR-Based Diversity Surveys of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases Combined with Isolation of Alkaliphilic Hydrogen-Producing Bacteria from the Serpentinite-Hosted Prony Hydrothermal Field, New Caledonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Nan; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Pelletier, Bernard; Payri, Claude E.; Ménez, Bénédicte; Frouin, Eléonore; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    High amounts of hydrogen are emitted in the serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay (PHF, New Caledonia), where high-pH (~11), low-temperature (< 40°C), and low-salinity fluids are discharged in both intertidal and shallow submarine environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and distribution of potentially hydrogen-producing bacteria in Prony hyperalkaline springs by using metagenomic analyses and different PCR-amplified DNA sequencing methods. The retrieved sequences of hydA genes, encoding the catalytic subunit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and, used as a molecular marker of hydrogen-producing bacteria, were mainly related to those of Firmicutes and clustered into two distinct groups depending on sampling locations. Intertidal samples were dominated by new hydA sequences related to uncultured Firmicutes retrieved from paddy soils, while submarine samples were dominated by diverse hydA sequences affiliated with anaerobic and/or thermophilic submarine Firmicutes pertaining to the orders Thermoanaerobacterales or Clostridiales. The novelty and diversity of these [FeFe]-hydrogenases may reflect the unique environmental conditions prevailing in the PHF (i.e., high-pH, low-salt, mesothermic fluids). In addition, novel alkaliphilic hydrogen-producing Firmicutes (Clostridiales and Bacillales) were successfully isolated from both intertidal and submarine PHF chimney samples. Both molecular and cultivation-based data demonstrated the ability of Firmicutes originating from serpentinite-hosted environments to produce hydrogen by fermentation, potentially contributing to the molecular hydrogen balance in situ. PMID:27625634

  3. Metagenomic and PCR-Based Diversity Surveys of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases Combined with Isolation of Alkaliphilic Hydrogen-Producing Bacteria from the Serpentinite-Hosted Prony Hydrothermal Field, New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Nan; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Pelletier, Bernard; Payri, Claude E; Ménez, Bénédicte; Frouin, Eléonore; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    High amounts of hydrogen are emitted in the serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay (PHF, New Caledonia), where high-pH (~11), low-temperature (metagenomic analyses and different PCR-amplified DNA sequencing methods. The retrieved sequences of hydA genes, encoding the catalytic subunit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and, used as a molecular marker of hydrogen-producing bacteria, were mainly related to those of Firmicutes and clustered into two distinct groups depending on sampling locations. Intertidal samples were dominated by new hydA sequences related to uncultured Firmicutes retrieved from paddy soils, while submarine samples were dominated by diverse hydA sequences affiliated with anaerobic and/or thermophilic submarine Firmicutes pertaining to the orders Thermoanaerobacterales or Clostridiales. The novelty and diversity of these [FeFe]-hydrogenases may reflect the unique environmental conditions prevailing in the PHF (i.e., high-pH, low-salt, mesothermic fluids). In addition, novel alkaliphilic hydrogen-producing Firmicutes (Clostridiales and Bacillales) were successfully isolated from both intertidal and submarine PHF chimney samples. Both molecular and cultivation-based data demonstrated the ability of Firmicutes originating from serpentinite-hosted environments to produce hydrogen by fermentation, potentially contributing to the molecular hydrogen balance in situ. PMID:27625634

  4. Empirical Research on Factors that Influence the Behavior Decision of Repeated Seed Purchase for Farmers – Field investigation based on 519 vegetable farmers in Wuhan City

    OpenAIRE

    Kang Guoguang; Cai Fang; Zhang Shengyong

    2015-01-01

    This article makes an analysis on the factors and impact on decision of repeated seed purchase behavior for farmers by using the field investigation data from 519 vegetable farmers around Wuhan City and the binary Logit model and ordered Logit model. It is found from the research that: repeated seed purchase is a common phenomenon as 84% of sample farmers have this behavior: the factors, such as education degree, risk attitude, Perceived Value, seed quality, seed purchase convenience, relatio...

  5. Influence of Hydrothermal Temperature on Phosphorus Recovery Efficiency of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Guan; Fangying Ji; Qingkong Chen; Peng Yan; Weiwei Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Porous calcium silicate hydrate (PCSH) was synthesized by carbide residue and white carbon black. The influence of hydrothermal temperature on phosphorus recovery efficiency was investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Hydrothermal temperature exerted significant influence on phosphorus recovery performance of PCSH. Hydrothermal temperature 170°C for PCSH was more proper to recover phosphorus. PCSH could re...

  6. Potential plant biomass estimation through field measurement and vegetation cover mapping using ALOS satellite imagery: Case study of Fujiyoshida City, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomass is a renewable energy source that is produced from living or recently living biological material. Vegetation type and biomass are considered important components that affect biosphere-atmosphere interactions. The ground assessment of biomass, however, has been found to be insufficient due to the limited spatial extent of surveys. This study aims to integrate field measurements with satellite remote sensing data for regional biomass mapping in Fujiyoshida City, Japan. Fujiyoshida City is situated on the northern slope of Mt. Fuji and includes a large area of forest land, named Onshirin Forest. From 2011 to 2012, a field survey was conducted to calculate the biomass potential in situ as ground-truthed data. After fieldwork, ortho-rectified ALOS data with an AVNIR-2 scene (22 May 2008) was used to map the vegetation cover types. Japanese larch, Japanese red pine, mixed forest, other forest, grass, bare soil and roads, and buildings were identified using supervised classification. The total plant biomass was 163,252 tons. The biomass potential estimate from field measurements was extrapolated to the large forest area in Fujiyoshida City to estimate the potential plant biomass of specific vegetation cover types

  7. City 2020+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, C.; Buttstädt, M.; Merbitz, H.; Sachsen, T.; Ketzler, G.; Michael, S.; Klemme, M.; Dott, W.; Selle, K.; Hofmeister, H.

    2010-09-01

    several public transport units running all across the city. This is accompanied by an analysis of probability density functions (PDF) for heat waves based on recent climate data and climate projections. A dense net of 40 PM measurement sites is operated in order to obtain the spatial pattern of PM concentration as depending on meteorological condition and location. It is lined out how this climate related sub-projects interact with investigations on social networks, governance issues, buildings structure development and health outcome. Related to the later the chemical composition of PM is analyzed in more detail and related to the spatial patterns of health deficiencies. At a later stage City2020+ will propose new strategies based on cooperation from the fields of medicine, geography, sociology, history, civil engineering, and architecture for adapting the city for future needs. The Project CITY 2020+ is part of the interdisciplinary Project House HumTec (Human Sciences and Technology) at RWTH Aachen University funded by the Excellence Initiative of the German federal and state governments through the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation, DFG).

  8. Free-living nematode species (Nematoda) dwelling in hydrothermal sites of the North Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesunov, Alexei V.

    2015-12-01

    Morphological descriptions of seven free-living nematode species from hydrothermal sites of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge are presented. Four of them are new for science: Paracanthonchus olgae sp. n. (Chromadorida, Cyatholaimidae), Prochromadora helenae sp. n. (Chromadorida, Chromadoridae), Prochaetosoma ventriverruca sp. n. (Desmodorida, Draconematidae) and Leptolaimus hydrothermalis sp. n. (Plectida, Leptolaimidae). Two species have been previously recorded in hydrothermal habitats, and one species is recorded for the first time in such an environment. Oncholaimus scanicus (Enoplida, Oncholaimidae) was formerly known from only the type locality in non-hydrothermal shallow milieu of the Norway Sea. O. scanicus is a very abundant species in Menez Gwen, Lucky Strike and Lost City hydrothermal sites, and population of the last locality differs from other two in some morphometric characteristics. Desmodora marci (Desmodorida, Desmodoridae) was previously known from other remote deep-sea hydrothermal localities in south-western and north-eastern Pacific. Halomonhystera vandoverae (Monhysterida, Monhysteridae) was described and repeatedly found in mass in Snake Pit hydrothermal site. The whole hydrothermal nematode assemblages are featured by low diversity in comparison with either shelf or deep-sea non-hydrothermal communities. The nematode species list of the Atlantic hydrothermal vents consists of representatives of common shallow-water genera; the new species are also related to some shelf species. On the average, the hydrothermal species differ from those of slope and abyssal plains of comparable depths by larger sizes, diversity of buccal structures, presence of food content in the gut and ripe eggs in uteri.

  9. Hydrothermal iron flux variability following rapid sea level changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Jennifer L.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; McManus, Jerry F.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.

    2016-04-01

    Sea level changes associated with Pleistocene glacial cycles have been hypothesized to modulate melt production and hydrothermal activity at ocean ridges, yet little is known about fluctuations in hydrothermal circulation on time scales longer than a few millennia. We present a high-resolution record of hydrothermal activity over the past 50 ka using elemental flux data from a new sediment core from the Mir zone of the TAG hydrothermal field at 26°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Mir sediments reveal sixfold to eightfold increases in hydrothermal iron and copper deposition during the Last Glacial Maximum, followed by a rapid decline during the sea level rise associated with deglaciation. Our results, along with previous observations from Pacific and Atlantic spreading centers, indicate that rapid sea level changes influence hydrothermal output on mid-ocean ridges. Thus, climate variability may discretize volcanic processing of the solid Earth on millennial time scales and subsequently stimulate variability in biogeochemical interactions with volcanic systems.

  10. The magnetic signature of hydrothermal systems in slow spreading environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Dyment, Jérôme

    Slow spreading mid-ocean ridges like the Mid-Atlantic Ridge host a remarkable diversity of hydrothermal systems including vent systems located on the neovolcanic axis, large axial volcanoes, in transform faults and nontransform offsets, and associated with low-angle detachment faults, now recognized as a major tectonic feature of slow spreading environments. Hydrothermal systems are hosted in various lithologies from basalt to serpentinized peridotite and exposed lower oceanic crust. The substantial variations of hydrothermal processes active in these environments have important implications for the magnetic structure of oceanic crust and upper mantle. Hydrothermal processes can both destroy the magnetic minerals in basalt, diabase, and gabbro and create magnetic minerals by serpentinization of ultramafic rocks and deposition of magnetic minerals. We report on the diversity of magnetic anomaly signatures over the vent systems at slow spreading ridges and show that the lateral scale of hydrothermal alteration is fundamentally a local phenomenon. This highly focused process leads to magnetic anomalies on the scale of individual vent fields, typically a few hundreds of meters or less in size. To detect such features, high-resolution, near-bottom magnetic surveys are required rather than sea surface surveys. High-resolution surveys are now more tractable with deep-towed systems, dynamically positioned ships, and with the recent development of autonomous underwater vehicles, which allow detailed mapping of the seafloor on a scale relevant to hydrothermal activity. By understanding these present-day active hydrothermal systems, we can explore for yet to be discovered buried deposits preserved off-axis, both to determine past history of hydrothermal activity and for resource assessment.

  11. Cities and human security

    OpenAIRE

    Szpak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Cities have been researched mostly in terms of their economic, technological, and social value and significance. Despite some changes in this respect there is still a need to research cities as a fascinating phenomenon, also in respect of its capabilities to increase human security on a local and global scale. The article examines the role of cities for human security in the selected and representative fields such as sustainable development, human rights and environmental protection which are...

  12. Microbiological production and ecological flux of northwestern subduction hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunamura, M.; Okamura, K.; Noguchi, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Fukuba, T.; Yanagawa, K.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal system is one of the most important sources for heat and chemical flux from the oceanic crust to the global ocean. The rich biological community around the hydrothermal vent shows chemolithoautotrophic microbial production are important in deep sea ecosystems. More than 99% of microbiological available chemical components in hydrothermal vent fluid, e.g. sulfide, methane, hydrogen, Fe2+, and Mn2+, is released into surrounding seawater to construct hydrothermal plume, suggesting that the chemolithoautotrophic-microbial primary production in the hydrothermal plume is huge and important in the whole hydrothermal ecosystems. To understand the impact of hydrothermal plume to a microbial ecosystem and a connectivity with zooplankton, we targeted and investigated a total of 16 hydrothermal fileds (7 sites in Okinawa trough, 3 sites in Ogasawara arc, and 6 sites in Mariana arc and back arc) and investigated in several cruises under the TAIGA project in Japan. Hydrothermal fluids in the subduction system are rich in sulfide. The hydrothermal fluids in the Okinawa trough, Ogasawara arc. and Mariana trough are characterized by rich in methane, poor in other reduced chemicals, and rich in iron, respectively. The major microbial composition was a potential sulfur oxidizing microbes SUP05 in the plume ecosystems, while an aerobic methanotrophic bacteria was secondary major member in methane-rich hydrothermal systems in Okinawa trough. Microbial quantitative and spatial distribution analyses of each plume site showed that the microbial population size and community structures are influenced by original chemical components of hydrothermal fluid, e.g. sulfide, methane and iron concentration. Microbial quantitative data indicated the removal/sedimentation of microbial cells from the plume and effect of phase separation in a same vent field through construction of gas-rich or gas-poor plumes. After the correlation of plume mixing effect, we estimates that the

  13. The Production of Methane, Hydrogen, and Organic Compounds in Ultramafic-Hosted Hydrothermal Vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Konn, C.; Charlou, J.L.; Holm, N.G.; Mousis, O.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Both hydrogen and methane are consistently discharged in large quantities in hydrothermal fluids issued from ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal fields discovered along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Considering the vast number of these fields discovered or inferred, hydrothermal fluxes represent a significant input of H2 and CH4 to the ocean. Although there are lines of evidence of their abiogenic formation from stable C and H isotope results, laboratory experiments, and thermodynamic data, nei...

  14. The Production of Methane, Hydrogen, and Organic Compounds in Ultramafic-Hosted Hydrothermal Vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Konn, Cecile; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Holm, N.G.; Mousis, O.

    2015-01-01

    Both hydrogen and methane are consistently discharged in large quantities in hydrothermal fluids issued from ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal fields discovered along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Considering the vast number of these fields discovered or inferred, hydrothermal fluxes represent a significant input of H-2 and CH4 to the ocean. Although there are lines of evidence of their abiogenic formation from stable C and H isotope results, laboratory experiments, and thermodynamic data, neither the...

  15. Sustainable Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georg, Susse; Garza de Linde, Gabriela Lucía

    Judging from the number of communities and cities striving or claiming to be sustainable and how often eco-development is invoked as the means for urban regeneration, it appears that sustainable and eco-development have become “the leading paradigm within urban development” (Whitehead 2003......). But what is it that is driving these urban transformations? Clearly, there are many probable answers to this complex question and in what follows we will focus on one particular catalyst of change – urban design competitions. Considered as field changing events (Lampel and Meyer 2008, Anand and Jones 2008......), urban design competitions are understudied mechanisms for bringing about field level changes. Drawing on actor network theory, this paper examines how urban design competitions may bring about changes within the professional field through the use of intermediaries such as a sustainable planning...

  16. Where are the undiscovered hydrothermal vents on oceanic spreading ridges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-11-01

    In nearly four decades since the discovery of deep-sea vents, one-third of the length of global oceanic spreading ridges has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity. Active submarine vent fields are now known along the boundaries of 46 out of 52 recognized tectonic plates. Hydrothermal survey efforts over the most recent decade were sparked by national and commercial interests in the mineral resource potential of seafloor hydrothermal deposits, as well as by academic research. Here we incorporate recent data for back-arc spreading centers and ultraslow- and slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to revise a linear equation relating the frequency of vent fields along oceanic spreading ridges to spreading rate. We apply this equation globally to predict a total number of vent fields on spreading ridges, which suggests that ~900 vent fields remain to be discovered. Almost half of these undiscovered vent fields (comparable to the total of all vent fields discovered during 35 years of research) are likely to occur at MORs with full spreading rates less than 60 mm/yr. We then apply the equation regionally to predict where these hydrothermal vents may be discovered with respect to plate boundaries and national jurisdiction, with the majority expected to occur outside of states' exclusive economic zones. We hope that these predictions will prove useful to the community in the future, in helping to shape continuing ridge-crest exploration.

  17. Respondent-Driven Sampling in a Study of Drug Users in New York City: Notes from the Field

    OpenAIRE

    McKnight, Courtney; Des Jarlais, Don; Bramson, Heidi; Tower, Lisa; Abu S Abdul-Quader; Nemeth, Chris; Heckathorn, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Beth Israel Medical Center (BIMC), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in a study of HIV seroprevalence among drug users in New York City in 2004. We report here on operational issues with RDS including recruitment, coupon distribution, storefront operations, police and community relations, and the overall lessons we learned. Project staff recruited eight seeds from a syringe ex...

  18. Discussion About City Field Based on Econophysics%从经济物理学到城市场略论

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张刚; 张爱英; 左大杰

    2016-01-01

    In recent years,many of the important theoretical achievements of physics have been used to econom-ic research,which have enormously promoted the development of economics.In this paper, the econophysics re-search method have been well adopted while the Theory of City Fields have been comparatively demonstrated based on Electromagnetic Fields Theory and Model,which have scientific rationality and have promoted and developed the vision and height of existing research field of interaction between cities.%经济物理学已经发展成为一门新的交叉学科,物理学的许多重要理论成果被运用到经济研究中,极大地促进了经济学的发展。经济系统与物理系统具有共同的基点,共同服从某种普适的规律,运用经济物理学的研究方法,以电磁场理论和模型为研究工具,构建城市场理论及其模型研究城市间相互作用的机理和效应,具有科学合理性,拓展和提升了现有研究的视野和高度。

  19. Image city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities.......Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities....

  20. Chaotic thermohaline convection in low-porosity hydrothermal systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoofs, Stan; Spera, Frank J.; Hansen, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    Fluids circulate through the Earth's crust perhaps down to depths as great as 5^15 km, based on oxygen isotope systematics of exhumed metamorphic terrains, geothermal fields, mesozonal batholithic rocks and analysis of obducted ophiolites. Hydrothermal flows are driven by both thermal and chemical b

  1. City of El Centro geothermal energy utility core field experiment. Final report, February 16, 1979-November 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Province, S.G.; Sherwood, P.B.

    1984-11-01

    The City of El Centro was awarded a contract in late 1978 to cost share the development of a low to moderate temperature geothermal resource in the City. The resource would be utilized to heat, cool and provide hot water to the nearby Community Center. In December 1981, Thermal 1 (injector) was drilled to 3970 feet. In January 1982, Thermal 2 (producer) was drilled to 8510 feet. Before testing began, fill migrated into both wells. Both wells were cleaned out. A pump was installed in the producer, but migration of fill again into the injector precluded injection of produced fluid. A short term production test was undertaken and results analyzed. Based upon the analysis, DOE decided that the well was not useful for commercial production due to a low flow rate, the potential problems of continued sanding and gasing, and the requirement to lower the pump setting depth and the associated costs of pumping. There was no commercial user found to take over the wells. Therefore, the wells were plugged and abandoned. The site was restored to its original condition.

  2. Geophysical characterization of subaerial hydrothermal manifestations in Punta Banda, Baja California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Marquez, L.; Prol-Ledesma, R. M.; Arango, C.; Canet, C.

    2009-04-01

    Important growth of population in Baja California Peninsula has triggered the need for energy and fresh water. The most sustainable possibility for increasing the availability of fresh water is the use of renewable energy sources in desalination plants. The abundance of geothermal manifestations in the peninsula provides a reliable energy source for desalination purposes. Geothermal development of the Baja California Peninsula dates from the 70's, when the Cerro Prieto geothermal field started producing electricity. Two important cities, Tijuana and Ensenada, are located in the north-western area of Baja California. The city of Ensenada has a desalination plant that is due to be replaced and the geothermal resources of the area could be an option for the new desalination plant. Punta Banda, a region near Ensenada, was specially investigated to determine its geothermal potential. Subaerial springs and the submarine vents were sampled and studied in this work, also geological and geochemical studies were performed, moreover geoelectrical surveys were accomplished to characterize the hydrothermal system at depth. Even though saline intrusion is a severe problem in Ensenada (TDS higher than 3000), thermal springs away from the coast and coastal springs have salinities lower than sea water. According to the geoelectrical models obtained from profiles, the inferred conductive features can be related to thermal anomalies. The existence of hot springs located along a trend suggests that the dynamic of the thermal fluid is restricted by secondary faults.

  3. Vertical Cable Seismic Survey for Hydrothermal Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Sekino, Y.; Okamoto, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Tsukahara, H.; Shimura, T.

    2012-04-01

    . We have carried out two field surveys in FY2011. One is a 3D survey with a boomer for a high-resolution surface source and the other one for an actual field survey in the Izena Cauldron an active hydrothermal area in the Okinawa Trough. Through these surveys, the VCS will become a practical exploration tool for the exploration of seafloor hydrothermal deposits.

  4. Hydrothermal systems and volcano geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, R.O.

    2007-01-01

    The upward intrusion of magma from deeper to shallower levels beneath volcanoes obviously plays an important role in their surface deformation. This chapter will examine less obvious roles that hydrothermal processes might play in volcanic deformation. Emphasis will be placed on the effect that the transition from brittle to plastic behavior of rocks is likely to have on magma degassing and hydrothermal processes, and on the likely chemical variations in brine and gas compositions that occur as a result of movement of aqueous-rich fluids from plastic into brittle rock at different depths. To a great extent, the model of hydrothermal processes in sub-volcanic systems that is presented here is inferential, based in part on information obtained from deep drilling for geothermal resources, and in part on the study of ore deposits that are thought to have formed in volcanic and shallow plutonic environments.

  5. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Silicates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lii Kwang-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Organically templated metal phosphates have been extensively studied because of interesting structural chemistry and potential applications in catalysis. However, in most cases the organic templates cannot be removed without collapse of the frameworks. This is in contrast to the high thermal stability and extensive applications of zeolites in refinery and petrochemical processes.Therefore, studies have been directed to the synthesis of transition metal silicates to produce more stable frameworks. Our synthetic methods are twofold, namely mild hydrothermal reactions in Teflon-lined autoclaves at 100-200 ℃ using organic amines as templates and high-temperature,high-pressure hydrothermal reactions in gold ampoules contained in a high-pressure reaction vessel at ca. 550 ℃ and 150 Mpa using alkali metal cations as templates. In this presentation I will report the high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structures, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a number of new silicates of indium, uranium, and transition metals.

  6. Hydrothermalism in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, P. R.; Stüben, D.; Varnavas, S. P.

    1999-08-01

    Hydrothermalism in the Mediterranean Sea results from the collision of the African and European plates, with the subduction of the oceanic part of the African plate below Europe. High heat flows in the resulting volcanic arcs and back-arc extensional areas have set-up hydrothermal convection systems. Most of the known hydrothermal sites are in shallow coastal waters, <200 m depth, so that much of the reported fluid venting is of the gasohydrothermal type. The hydrothermal liquids are of varying salinities, both because of phase separation as a result of seawater boiling at the low pressures and because of significant inputs of rainfall into the hydrothermal reservoirs at some sites. The major component of the vented gas is carbon dioxide, with significant quantities of sulphur dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, methane and hydrogen also being released. Acid leaching of the underlying rocks leads to the mobilisation of heavy metals, many of which are deposited sub-surface although there is a conspicuous enrichment of metals in surficial sediments in venting areas. Massive polymetalic sulphides have been reported from some sites. No extant vent-specific fauna have been described from Mediterranean sites. There is a reduced diversity of fauna within the sediments at the vents. In contrast, a high diversity of epifauna has been reported and the vent sites are areas of settlement for exotic thermophilic species. Large numbers of novel prokaryotes, especially hyperthermophilic crenarchaeota, have been isolated from Mediterranean hydrothermal vents. However, their distribution in the subsurface biosphere and their role in the biogeochemistry of the sites has yet to be studied.

  7. Verification of a Mesoscale Data-Assimilation and Forecasting System for the Oklahoma City Area during the Joint Urban 2003 Field Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubao; Chen, Fei; Warner, Thomas; Basara, Jeffrey

    2006-07-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command have developed a multiscale, rapid-cycling, real-time, four-dimensional data-assimilation and forecasting system that has been in operational use at five Army test ranges since 2001. This system was employed to provide operational modeling support for the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) Dispersion Experiment, conducted in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during July 2003. To better support this mission, modifications were made to the nonlocal boundary layer (BL) parameterization (known as the Medium Range Forecast scheme) of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University NCAR Mesoscale Model, in order to improve BL forecasts. The NCEP Oregon State University Air Force Hydrologic Research Laboratory land surface model was also improved to better represent urban forcing. Verification of the operational model runs and retrospectively simulated cases show 1) a significantly reduced low bias in the forecast surface wind speed and 2) more realistic daytime BL heights. During JU2003, the forecast urban heat island, urban dry bubble, and urban BL height agree reasonably well with observations and conceptual models. An analysis of three-dimensional atmospheric structures, based on model analyses for eight clear-sky days during the field program, reveals some interesting features of the Oklahoma City urban BL, including complex thermally induced circulations and associated convergence/divergence zones, a nocturnal thermal shadow downwind of the urban area, and the reduction of low-level jet wind speeds by more vigorous nocturnal mixing over the city.

  8. City PLANTastic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The city is going green. From New York to Copenhagen vegetables are enthusiastically planted on city squares, and buildings are turning green everywhere . The word “plant” is on everyone’s lips, reflecting a growing desire to solve ecological, technical and social challenges in the city. Hovever......, any attempt to create a green city is motivated by certain ecological, political and esthetical perspectives. Therefore the role of plants in tomorrows cities is everything but straightforward. Rather, a broad range of possibilities unfolds. City PLANTastic is the title of the 8th World in Denmark...

  9. [Evaluation of the levels of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in the territory of the city of Bari in outside and inside environments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Abbate, N; Pranzo, S; Martucci, V; Rella, C; Vitucci, L; Salamanna, S

    2004-01-01

    In this study we measured the levels of the high frequency field in the proximity of non-ionizing radiation sources (wireless transmitting stations for mobile telephones and radio and television transmitters) in nine districts of the city of Bari. The measurements were taken both inside and outside closed environments. For the indoor measurements we took into account electromagnetic field generating equipment (VDT, electric domestic appliances, mobile telephones) in working and non-working order and with the windows open and shut respectively. We carried out these measurements according to the methods laid down in the Italian regulation CEI ENV 50166-2 of May 1995, as shown in the enclosure to the Ministerial Decree of 10.9.98 n.381. The electromagnetic field levels near wireless transmitting stations for mobile telephones are certainly modest when we consider that they never exceeded the limits established by the aforesaid Ministerial Decree. On the contrary radio and television equipment creates a much greater source of exposure. The electromagnetic field levels are certainly superior to those of the wireless transmitting stations although they never exceed, except in one isolated case, the values established by the Ministerial Decree 381/98.

  10. Microwave Hydrothermal Synthesis PZT of Nanometer Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongxing LIU; Hong DENG; Yan LI; Yanrong LI

    2004-01-01

    It was focused on the applications and developments of microwave hydrothermal synthesis piezoelectric ceramic powder. The microwave hydrothermal vessel was designed and manufactured. The microwave hydrothermal synthesis system was established and the PZT piezoelectric ceramic powder was synthesized. XRD and TEM have been used to characterize the products in detail. The diameter of the PZT powder particle is from 40 to 60 nm.

  11. Universities Scale Like Cities

    CERN Document Server

    van Raan, Anthony F J

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the gross university income in terms of total number of citations over size in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its ...

  12. Beer City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Shandong Province’s Qingdao is becoming China’s great beer city sicenically located on a peninsula over-looking the Pacific Ocean, Qingdao, |or Tsingtao, is a coastal city soaked in two kinds of foam. One floats in

  13. Ideal Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Meitner, Erika

    2012-01-01

    Erika Meitner discusses her new book: Ideal Cities. This collection of autobiographical narrative and lyric poems explores the relationship between body and place—specifically the pleasures and dangers of women’s corporeal experiences. Ideal Cities is guided by an epigraph from Song of Songs, and the metaphorical idea of bodies as cities, and cities as bodies. How do women’s bodies become sites of inscription via sex, childbirth, and other highly physical acts? These poems also investigate ur...

  14. Hit from both sides: tracking industrial and volcanic plumes in Mexico City with surface measurements and OMI SO2 retrievals during the MILAGRO field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Wood

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Large sulfur dioxide plumes were measured in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA during the MILAGRO field campaign. This paper seeks to identify the sources of these plumes and the meteorological processes that affect their dispersion in a complex mountain basin. Surface measurements of SO2 and winds are analysed in combination with radar wind profiler data to identify transport directions. Satellite retrievals of vertical SO2 columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI reveal the dispersion from both the Tula industrial complex and the Popocatepetl volcano. Numerical simulations are used to identify possible transport scenarios. The analysis suggests that both Tula and Popocatepetl contribute to SO2 levels in the MCMA, sometimes on the same day due to strong vertical wind shear. The evaluation of simulations with known sources and pollutants suggests that the combination of observations and meteorological models will be useful in identifying sources and transport processes of other plumes observed during MILAGRO.

  15. Hydrothermal precipitation of artificial violarite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, W. H.; Toftlund, H.; Warner, T. E.

    2012-01-01

    The nonstoichiometric nickel-ore mineral, violarite, (Ni,Fe)3S4 was prepared as a phase-pure fine powder by a comparatively quick hydrothermal method from an aqueous solution of iron(II) acetate, nickel(II) acetate and DL-penicillamine in an autoclave at 130 °C for 45 h. Powder-XRD showed that th...

  16. HYDROTHERMAL CRACKING OF RESIDUAL OILS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The hydrothermal cracking of heavy oils, such as Canadian oil sand bitumen and Arabian heavy vacuum residue, as well as their model compound were performed over sulfided Ni/Al2O3 and NiMo/Al2O3 catalysts under 663~703 K and 6.0~8.0 MPa of hydrogen pressure in a batch autoclave reactor. According to the reaction mechanism of hydrothermal cracking, a small amount of free redical initiators, such as di-tert-peroxide, sulfur, etc., was added into the feed to generate free redicals at lower temperature, and obviously showed promotional effect on the conversion of hydrocarbons. The reaction mechanisms of hydrothermal cracking as well as the enhancing effect of initiators were studied by a probe reaction with 1-phenyldodecane as a model compound. The hydrothermal cracking of hydrocarbon proceeded via free redical mechanism and hydrogenating quench. The initiators might easily generate free redicals under reaction temperature, these redicals might abstract H from hydrocarbon molecule and reasonably initiate the chain reactions, therefore, promote the conversion of hydrocarbon even at lower reaction temperature.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis as a route to mineralogically-inspired structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Colin D; Kolis, Joseph W

    2016-02-21

    The use of high temperature hydrothermal reactions to prepare crystals having mineralogically-related structures is described. Complex naturally occurring minerals can have fascinating structures and exhibit important features like low dimensionality, noncentrosymmetry, or ion channels that can provide excellent guideposts for the designed synthesis of new materials. Actual minerals, even though they may have intriguing physical properties, are often unsuitable for study because of the persistent impurities inevitably present in natural samples. Hydrothermal fluids at relatively high temperatures provide access to large, high quality single crystals of structures with mineral-like structures. This enables the study of physical properties like ionic conduction, magnetic spin frustration and non-linear optical behavior. Some fundamental considerations of the hydrothermal technique are discussed in the context of synthesizing mineralogically-inspired materials. The metal vanadates provide a surprisingly rich and diversified range of compounds and are selected to illustrate many of the concepts described here. A series of low dimensional mineral analogs featuring isolated units, chains, and layers have been prepared in the laboratory as large single crystals using a high temperature hydrothermal synthetic methods, and their physical properties are under investigation. The metal silicates are also highlighted as another promising field of exploration, since their hydrothermal synthesis surprisingly lags behind the enormous literature of the natural silicate minerals. The introduction of heteroelements, such as boron to make borosilicates, appears to also open the door to additional new materials. Many of these new materials have direct equivalents in the mineral kingdom, while others have no known analogs but are reminiscent of minerals and can be classified in the same ways. From these initial results there appears to be a very rich vein of synthetic minerals waiting

  18. Sin City?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarer, Michael; Gautier, Pieter A.; Teulings, Coen n.

    , the ones who stay in the city have significant higher divorce rates. Similarly, for the couples who married outside the city, the ones who move to the city are more likely to divorce. This correlation can be explained by both a causal and a sorting effect. We disentangle them by using the timing...

  19. Hit from both sides: tracking industrial and volcanic plumes in Mexico City with surface measurements and OMI SO2 retrievals during the MILAGRO field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Molina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Large sulfur dioxide plumes were measured in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA during the MILAGRO field campaign. This paper seeks to identify the sources of these plumes and the meteorological processes that affect their dispersion in a complex mountain basin. Surface measurements of SO2 and winds are analysed in combination with radar wind profiler data to identify transport directions. Satellite retrievals of vertical SO2 columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI reveal the dispersion from both the Tula industrial complex and the Popocatepetl volcano. Oversampling the OMI swath data to a fine grid (3 by 3 km and averaging over the field campaign yielded a high resolution image of the average plume transport. Numerical simulations are used to identify possible transport scenarios. The analysis suggests that both Tula and Popocatepetl contribute to SO2 levels in the MCMA, sometimes on the same day due to strong vertical wind shear. During the field campaign, model estimates suggest that the volcano accounts for about one tenth of the SO2 in the MCMA, with a roughly equal split for the rest between urban sources and the Tula industrial complex. The evaluation of simulations with known sources and pollutants suggests that the combination of observations and meteorological models will be useful in identifying sources and transport processes of other plumes observed during MILAGRO.

  20. Hydrothermal systems on Mars: an assessment of present evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, J D

    1996-01-01

    gravitational field, declining atmospheric pressure, and widespread, permeable megaregolith on Mars, volatile outgassing and magmatic cooling would have been more effective than on Earth. Thus, hydrothermal systems are likely to have had much lower average surface temperatures than comparable geological settings on Earth. The likely predominance of basaltic crust on Mars suggests that hydrothermal fluids and associated deposits should be enriched in Fe, Mg, Si and Ca, with surficial deposits being dominated by lower temperature, mixed iron oxide and carbonate mineralogies. PMID:9243021

  1. Coupled cycling of Fe and organic carbon in submarine hydrothermal systems: Impacts on Ocean Biogeochemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Christopher; Sander, Sylvia; Legendre, Louis; Niquil, Nathalie; Working Group 135

    2014-05-01

    Submarine hydrothermal venting was first discovered in the late 1970s. For decades the potential impact that vent-fluxes could have on global ocean budgets was restricted to consideration of processes in hydrothermal plumes in which the majority of chemical species are incorporated into polymetallic sulfide and/or oxyhydroxide particles close to the ridge-crest and sink to the underlying seafloor. This restricted view of the role that hydrothermal systems might play in global-ocean budgets has been challenged, more recently, by the recognition that there might also be a significant flux of dissolved Fe from hydrothermal systems to the oceans that is facilitated through thermodynamically stable nanoparticles and organic complexation. The latest results from the recently completed US GEOTRACES program, which has traced high concentrations of dissolved Fe over long distances off-axis from the Southern East Pacific Rise near 15°S, only help to confirm the potential that such fluxes might be important at the global scale. In this paper we review field-based and modeling results, including investigations that we have carried out under the auspices of SCOR-InterRidge Working Group 135, that reveal potential relationships between organic carbon (Corg) and Fe in hydrothermal plumes and allow us to investigate the roles that hydrothermal systems may play in the global biogeochemical cycles of both Fe and Corg. Using the particularly well-studied EPR 9N hydrothermal system as our "type locality" - even though we recognize that no one site can adequately represent the diversity of all hydrothermal systems worldwide - our modeling efforts allow us to reach some significant conclusions concerning: the predicted partitioning of heat fluxes between focused and diffuse flow at ridge axes; and the recognition that while Corg fluxes associated with hydrothermal plume removal may be small on the global scale, they are likely to result in extremely pronounced fluxes, locally, to the

  2. Medición de Campos Electromagnéticos en la Ciudad de Cali, Colombia Electromagnetic Field Measurement in the City of Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R Pinedo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta una metodología de medición del campo electromagnético producido por instalaciones de radio y telecomunicaciones y se presentan los resultados obtenidos en la evaluación de 50 sitios en la ciudad de Cali-Colombia. Este trabajo se originó por la preocupación pública causada por la proliferación de estaciones base de telefonía celular en el ámbito urbano y por los temores acerca de los posibles efectos nocivos de los campos electromagnéticos en la salud. La evaluación de los sitios se realizó con el propósito de conocer y cuantificar los niveles de campo electromagnético existentes en el medio ambiente de la ciudad. En general, los valores encontrados fueron inferiores al 0.5% del límite establecido por la Comisión Internacional para la Protección de las Radiaciones No Ionizantes, ICNIRP (0.2 mW/cm². Sin embargo, en dos casos los niveles encontrados superaron dicho límite.This paper shows a measurement methodology of the electromagnetic field produced by radio and telecommunications installations and presents results obtained in the evaluation of 50 measurement sites in the city of Cali in Colombia. This work was done because people’s concern about proliferation of radio base stations in urban areas, and their fear about the possible dangerous effects of the electromagnetic fields on human health. The evaluation was carried out to determine and quantify the levels of electromagnetic field that exist in the environment of the city. In general, the values found were lower than 0.5% of the limit established by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, ICNIRP (0.2 mW/cm². However, in two sites the measured values exceeded this limit.

  3. The geothermal field below the city of Berlin, Germany: Results from structurally and parametrically improved 3D Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Maximilian; Sippel, Judith; Cacace, Mauro; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the influence of the geological structure and geophysical parametrization of model units on the geothermal field as calculated by 3D numerical simulations of coupled fluid and heat transport for the subsurface of Berlin, Germany. The study area is located in the Northeast German Basin which is filled with several kilometers of sediments. This sedimentary infill includes the clastic sedimentary units Middle Buntsandstein and Sedimentary Rotliegend which are of particular interest for geothermal exploration. Previous studies conducted in the Northeast German Basin have already shown the geometries and properties of the geological units majorly control the distribution of subsurface temperatures. In this study we followed a two-step approach, where we first improved an existing structural model by integrating newly available 57 geological cross-sections, well data and deep seismics (down to ~4 km). Secondly, we performed a sensitivity analysis investigating the effects of varying physical fluid and rock properties on the subsurface temperature field. The results of this study show, that the structural configuration of model units exerts the highest influence on the geothermal field (up to ± 23 K at 1000 m below sea level). Here, the Rupelian clay aquitard, displaying a heterogeneous thickness distribution, locally characterized by hydrogeological windows (i.e. domains of no thickness) enabling intra-aquifer groundwater circulation has been identified as major controlling factor. The new structural configuration of this unit (more continuous, less numerous hydrogeological windows) also leads to a reduction of the influence of different boundary conditions and heat transport mechanisms considered. Additionally, the models results show that calculated temperatures highly depend on geophysical properties of model units whereas the hydraulic conductivity of the Cenozoic succession was identified as most dominant, leading to changes

  4. 苏州市麦田草害现状及防除对策%Current Status and Control Strategies of Weeds in Wheat Field of Suzhou City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国彪; 沈晴

    2014-01-01

    加重江苏省苏州市麦田杂草发生的原因包括免耕栽培的推广、稻草全量还田、草相变化、除草剂使用不科学等。要实现控草目标,必须坚持综合治理,立足“一封一杀”的化除策略并科学把好麦田化除技术关。%Weed problems in wheat field of Suzhou City have become more serious in association with changes in the cul -tural practices , including the promotion of no -tillage cultivation , leaving all the straw in the field from rotational rice crop, weed population shifts , and improper use of herbicides .For effective weed control , farmers should adhere to inte-grated practices based on prevention and management , including the judicious use of chemical methods available in wheat .

  5. Air temperature field distribution estimations over a Chinese mega-city using MODIS land surface temperature data: the case of Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weichun; Zhou, Liguo; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Yan; Dai, Xiaoyan

    2016-03-01

    The capability of obtaining spatially distributed air temperature data from remote sensing measurements is an improvement for many environmental applications focused on urban heat island, carbon emissions, climate change, etc. This paper is based on the MODIS/Terra and Aqua data utilized to study the effect of the urban atmospheric heat island in Shanghai, China. The correlation between retrieved MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and air temperature measured at local weather stations was initially studied at different temporal and spatial scales. Secondly, the air temperature data with spatial resolutions of 250 m and 1 km were estimated from MODIS LST data and in-situ measured air temperature. The results showed that there is a slightly higher correlation between air temperature and MODIS LST at a 250m resolution in spring and autumn on an annual scale than observed at a 1 km resolution. Although the distribution pattern of the air temperature thermal field varies in different seasons, the urban heat island (UHI) in Shanghai is characterized by a distribution pattern of multiple centers, with the central urban area as the primary center and the built-up regions in each district as the subcenters. This study demonstrates the potential not only for estimating the distribution of the air temperature thermal field from MODIS LST with 250 m resolution in spring and autumn in Shanghai, but also for providing scientific and effective methods for monitoring and studying UHI effect in a Chinese mega-city such as Shanghai.

  6. Hydraulic characterization of hydrothermally altered Nopal tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the mechanics of variably saturated flow in fractured-porous media is of fundamental importance to evaluating the isolation performance of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository for the Yucca Mountain site. Developing that understanding must be founded on the analysis and interpretation of laboratory and field data. This report presents an analysis of the unsaturated hydraulic properties of tuff cores from the Pena Blanca natural analog site in Mexico. The basic intent of the analysis was to examine possible trends and relationships between the hydraulic properties and the degree of hydrothermal alteration exhibited by the tuff samples. These data were used in flow simulations to evaluate the significance of a particular conceptual (composite) model and of distinct hydraulic properties on the rate and nature of water flow

  7. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  8. Contributing recharge areas, groundwater travel time, and groundwater water quality of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the City of Independence, Missouri, well field, 1997-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    The City of Independence, Missouri, operates a well field in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer. Contributing recharge areas (CRA) were last determined for the well field in 1996. Since that time, eight supply wells have been installed in the area north of the Missouri River and well pumpage has changed for the older supply wells. The change in pumping has altered groundwater flow and substantially changed the character of the CRA and groundwater travel times to the supply wells. The U.S Geological Survey, in a cooperative study with the City of Independence, Missouri, simulated steady-state groundwater flow for 2007 well pumpage, average annual river stage, and average annual recharge. Particle-tracking analysis was used to determine the CRA for supply wells and monitoring wells, and the travel time from recharge areas to supply wells, recharge areas to monitoring wells, and monitoring wells to supply wells. The simulated CRA for the well field is elongated in the upstream direction and extends to both sides of the Missouri River. Groundwater flow paths and recharge areas estimated for monitoring wells indicate the origin of water to each monitoring well, the travel time of that water from the recharge area, the flow path from the vicinity of each monitoring well to a supply well, and the travel time from the monitoring well to the supply well. Monitoring wells 14a and 14b have the shortest groundwater travel time from their contributing recharge area of 0.30 years and monitoring well 29a has the longest maximum groundwater travel time from its contributing recharge area of 1,701 years. Monitoring well 22a has the shortest groundwater travel time of 0.5 day to supply well 44 and monitoring well 3b has the longest maximum travel time of 31.91 years to supply well 10. Water-quality samples from the Independence groundwater monitoring well network were collected from 1997 to 2008 by USGS personnel during ongoing annual sampling within the 10-year contributing

  9. Monitoring and Prevention the Smart Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Berná Martínez, José Vicente; Maciá Pérez, Francisco; Sánchez Bernabeu, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the intensive use of Technology Information (TI) provide solutions to problems of the high population density, energy conservation and cities management. This produces a newest concept of the city, Smart City. But the inclusion of TI in the city brings associated new problems, specifically the generation of electromagnetic fields from the available and new technological infrastructures installed in the city that did not exist before. This new scenario produces a negative effect on a...

  10. Hydrothermal carbonization of waste biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Basso, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (in acronym, HTC) is a thermochemical conversion process through which it is possible to directly transform wet organic substrates into a carbonaceous material, referred as hydrochar. Hydrochar has chemical and physical characteristics that make it similar to fossil peats and lignite. Depending on the process conditions, mostly temperature and residence time, this material can be enriched in its carbon content, modifying its structure and providing it interesting ch...

  11. Salt effects in hydrothermal synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Avola, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    This work focuses on hydrothermal water as solvent and reaction medium. Water is abundant, non-toxic and environmentally benign, but at room temperature it does not dissolve most of the materials used in organic chemistry. When raising the temperature, though, its strong hydrogen bonds are weakened. At supercritical conditions water behaves similar to an unpolar solvent. However, high pressure, temperature and corrosion are technical challenges when reaching supercritical conditions. Al...

  12. Evidences for seawater-rock hydrothermal interaction in the serpentinites from Northern Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    to be exposed at rift valley, transform fault or at detachment fault zones. Till date, the chemical conditions and style of hydrothermal alteration of the oceanic lithosphere along segments of the Indian Ocean ridges are poorly understood. Serpenti- nization... fields, e.g. Rainbow and Logatchev at MAR 10,18 . Additional study in the near future is required to trace the exact hydrothermal discharge zone, and also to better understand the alteration style of the NCIR upper mantle rocks. 1. Rehkamper, M...

  13. Evolution evidence of a basic fluid to an acid based in the analysis of hydrothermal alteration of the geothermic field of the Azufres, Michoacan; Evidencias de evolucion de un fluido basico a acido a partir del analisis de la alteracion hidrotermal del campo geotermico de los Azufres, Michoacan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Partida, Eduardo [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Hydrothermal alteration at the Los Azufres geothermal field is mostly composed of calc-silicate minerals that define a propylitic alteration zone, which shows progressive dehydration with depth and temperature increase. A generalized zoning of the calc-silicate zone can be observed, with zeolites in the upper part and epidote-clinozoisite at the deepest levels. An argillic alteration zone overlies the calc-silicate zone and is the dominant surface manifestation of the hydrothermal alteration. In some parts, there is a mineral assemblage composed of kaolinite-alunite-native sulfur-quartz (advanced argillic zone) formed by the interaction of vapor and shallow groundwater. The proto-fluid at the Los Azufres geothermal system is related to a neutral sodium chlorine brine, which favors deep propyllitic alteration (productive zone). This zone is characterized by secondary permeability due to fracturing. At depth the geothermal field is dominated by a pressurized liquid, yielding to vapor at more shallow zone. The gradual change from a liquid to a vapor phase occurs through boiling at depths between 1,200 and 1,500 m, and is accompanied by changes in the hydrothermal alteration mineralogy. The type of alteration passes from proylitic to argillic by means of an oxidation-acidification process, which includes the participation of a gas, particularly CO{sub 2}. Considering the physicochemical characteristic of the brine and the evolution of the paragenetic sequence, the Los Azufres geothermal field could de considered a model for hydrothermal behavior at ore deposits which develop by boiling and oxidation of low sulfidation fossil hydrothermal fluids. [Spanish] En el campo geotermico de Los Azufres la zona de alteracion hidrotermal esta formada en su mayor parte por calcosilicatos (que definen una zona paragenetica del tipo propilitico), los cuales muestran una deshidratacion progresiva conforme se va profundizando e incrementandose la temperatura. Se puede generalizar un

  14. Logatchev热液场附近表层沉积物中有机质的组成特征、来源及其影响因素%Characteristics of organic composition and source of organic matter in surface sediments near the Logatchev hydrothermal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨伟芳; 杨群慧; 潘安阳

    2011-01-01

    利用2005年"大洋一号"科学考察船电视抓斗采样器采集的表层沉积物样品,对大西洋洋中脊Logatchev热液场附近7个站位表层沉积物样品中的烷烃组分进行了定量分析,并结合总有机碳(TOC)及C稳定同位素(δ13C值)分析,探讨了表层沉积物中有机质的组成及可能的来源和影响因素.结果表明:表层沉积物中正构烷烃组分以低碳数化合物为主,nC16、nC18以及nC11(仅在部分样品中)的含量较高,姥鲛烷与植烷的比值(Pr/Ph)普遍较低;表层沉积物中的有机质以细菌来源为主,浮游植物和浮游动物也有一定的贡献,而陆源有机质的贡献极小;另外,表层沉积物中的有机质可能遭受了一定程度的热液蚀变作用.%Surface sediments collected from the Logatchev hydrothermal field of Mid-Atlantic Ridge have been analyzed for element C of total organic matter (TOC), stable isotopes (δ13C) and alkanes. The compositions and distributions of alkanes are studied and the possible sources of the organic matter of the sediments have preliminary been discussed. The contents of total organic carbon vary from 0. 12% to 0. 30%. And δ13 C ranges from -23.5‰ to-20. 1‰. The contents of n-alkanes vary from 0. 78× 10-6 to 10.29 × 10-6. The carbon number ranges from nC11 ~nC31. The low carbon number compounds of n-alkanes of the sediments are the main compounds, and the contents of nC16 or nC18in most samples and nC11 in some samples are relatively high. The Pr/Ph ratios are generally very low. Unresolved complex mixture (UCM) exists in almost every sample of studying area. The contents of total organic carbon of some samples near the hydrothermal vents may indicate the productivity of chemosynthetic-based communities. The contents of nC11 in some samples are relatively high may show that the organic matter have been influenced by thermal cracking. And UCM may indicate that the organic matter have been influenced by biodegradation and

  15. Tectonic and Hydrothermal Activities in Debagh, Guelma Basin (Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Maouche

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quaternary and Pliocene travertines, deposited from hot springs, can reveal much about neotectonic and hydrothermal activity. The aim of this work is the understanding of the actual tectonic activity in the Guelma Basin and in one of its spa structures. Gravity data were collected during a field study in the Hammam Debagh (HD area and then analyzed to better highlight the architecture of its subsurface underlying structures. This analysis was performed by means of a Bouguer anomaly, upward continuations, and residual and derivative maps. Comparison of gravity maps, field geology, geomorphic observations, and structural maps allowed us to identify the major structural features in the Hammam Debagh. As a result, we confirm the position of the Hammam Debagh active fault which is superimposed to the hydrothermal active source in the NW-SE direction characterized by a negative gravity anomaly.

  16. Naked in toxic fluids: A nudibranch mollusc from hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Ángel; Bouchet, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    A new species of the nudibranch genus Dendronotus (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia) is reported from a hydrothermal vent at the Lucky Strike area, on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This is the first species of nudibranch recorded with certainty from a vent site. Other species of Dendronotus are distributed in temperate waters on the continental shelf of the northern hemisphere. Two factors that probably account for the occurrence of a nudibranch in this hydrothermal field are that the Lucky Strike area presents potential hydroid prey, and that nudibranchs apparently inhabit a lower activity area. It is hypothesized that the new species, which lacks eyes, is a permanent resident of vent fields on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, but is probably not restricted to that environment.

  17. Microbial diversity in a submarine carbonate edifice from the serpentinizing hydrothermal system of the Prony Bay (New Caledonia over a 6-year period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne ePostec

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Active carbonate chimneys from the shallow marine serpentinizing Prony Hydrothermal Field were sampled 3 times over a 6 years period at site ST09. Archaeal and bacterial communities composition was investigated using PCR-based methods (clone libraries, Denaturating Gel Gradient Electrophoresis, quantitative PCR targeting 16S rRNA genes, methyl coenzyme M reductase A and dissimilatory sulfite reductase subunit B genes. Methanosarcinales (Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaea were the main archaeal members. The Methanosarcinales, also observed by epifluorescent microscopy and FISH, consisted of two phyotypes that were previously solely detected in two other serpentinitzing ecosystems (The Cedars and Lost City Hydrothermal Field. Surprisingly, members of the hyperthermophilic order Thermococcales were also found which may indicate the presence of a hot subsurface biosphere. The bacterial community mainly consisted of Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Alpha-, Gamma-, Beta- and Delta-proteobacteria and of the candidate division NPL-UPA2. Members of these taxa were consistently found each year and may therefore represent a stable core of the indigenous bacterial community of the PHF chimneys. Firmicutes isolates representing new bacterial taxa were obtained by cultivation under anaerobic conditions. Our study revealed diverse microbial communities in PHF ST09 related to methane and sulfur compounds that share common populations with other terrestrial or submarine serpentinizing ecosystems.

  18. Microbial diversity in a submarine carbonate edifice from the serpentinizing hydrothermal system of the Prony Bay (New Caledonia) over a 6-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postec, Anne; Quéméneur, Marianne; Bes, Méline; Mei, Nan; Benaïssa, Fatma; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Monnin, Christophe; Guentas-Dombrowsky, Linda; Ollivier, Bernard; Gérard, Emmanuelle; Pisapia, Céline; Gérard, Martine; Ménez, Bénédicte; Erauso, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Active carbonate chimneys from the shallow marine serpentinizing Prony Hydrothermal Field were sampled 3 times over a 6 years period at site ST09. Archaeal and bacterial communities composition was investigated using PCR-based methods (clone libraries, Denaturating Gel Gradient Electrophoresis, quantitative PCR) targeting 16S rRNA genes, methyl coenzyme M reductase A and dissimilatory sulfite reductase subunit B genes. Methanosarcinales (Euryarchaeota) and Thaumarchaea were the main archaeal members. The Methanosarcinales, also observed by epifluorescent microscopy and FISH, consisted of two phylotypes that were previously solely detected in two other serpentinitzing ecosystems (The Cedars and Lost City Hydrothermal Field). Surprisingly, members of the hyperthermophilic order Thermococcales were also found which may indicate the presence of a hot subsurface biosphere. The bacterial community mainly consisted of Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Alpha-, Gamma-, Beta-, and Delta-proteobacteria and of the candidate division NPL-UPA2. Members of these taxa were consistently found each year and may therefore represent a stable core of the indigenous bacterial community of the PHF chimneys. Firmicutes isolates representing new bacterial taxa were obtained by cultivation under anaerobic conditions. Our study revealed diverse microbial communities in PHF ST09 related to methane and sulfur compounds that share common populations with other terrestrial or submarine serpentinizing ecosystems. PMID:26379636

  19. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Ni/Al Layered Double Hydroxide Nanorods

    OpenAIRE

    Yun Zhao; Fenfei Xiao; Qingze Jiao

    2011-01-01

    Ni/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanorods were successfully synthesized by the hydrothermal reaction. The crystal structure of the products was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The morphology of the products was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The influences of reaction time and pH value on the morphology of the Ni/Al LDHs were investigated. The result showed that the well-crystallized nanorods of Ni/Al ...

  20. Methanethiol abundance in high-temperature hydrothermal fluids from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, E.; Seewald, J. S.; Saccocia, P.; van der Meer, M.

    2008-12-01

    The formation of aqueous organic sulfur compounds in hydrothermal systems remains poorly constrained, despite their potential significance in 'prebiotic' chemistry and the origin of life. The simplest - methanethiol (CH3SH) - has been implicated as a critical abiogenic precursor to the establishment of primitive microbial metabolism in early Earth hydrothermal settings. It also represents a readily-utilized substrate for microbial sulfate-reducing communities and a potential intermediate species in abiotic CH4 formation. To assess the abundance of CH3SH and factors regulating its stability under hydrothermal conditions we measured CH3SH concentrations in a suite of hydrothermal fluids collected from the Rainbow, Lucky Strike, TAG and Lost City hydrothermal sites located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Fluids were collected using isobaric gas-tight samplers and analyzed for CH3SH by shipboard purge-and-trap gas chromatography. Measured concentrations at Rainbow (1.2 -- 223nM), Lucky Strike (1.1 -- 26nM), TAG (8.5 -- 11nM) and Lost City (1.6 -- 3.0nM) are all substantially lower than predicted for thermodynamic equilibrium with CO2, H2 and H2S at measured vent conditions. The highest concentrations (91 -- 223nM), however, were observed at Rainbow in intermediate temperature (128 -- 175°C) H2-rich fluids that may have undergone conductive cooling. Increased concentrations with decreasing temperature is consistent with the thermodynamic drive for the formation from CO2, suggesting a possible abiotic origin for CH3SH in some fluids. Substantially lower concentrations in the low temperature fluids at Lost City are consistent with the extremely low levels of CO2 and H2S in these fluids. Other possible sources of CH3SH to vent fluids must be considered, however, and include thermal alteration of biomass present in low-temperature environments and microbial consortia that produce CH3SH as a byproduct of anaerobic methane oxidation. Current models for the emergence of primordial

  1. Selenium Isotopes as Biosignatures in Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, O.; Ludden, J.; Fouquet, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Chemically similar to sulphur, Se occurs as +6, +4, 0 and -2 valences in a variety of organic compounds and geological settings. This makes the study of Se stable isotope ratios a potential indicator of geological and biological processes. Se isotopes were first determined in the early 60's (Krouse and Thode, 1962; Rashid et al., 1978) using gas-source MS and recently by N-TIMS (Herbel et al., 2000; Johnson et al., 1999) using the double spike technique. The previous results showed that the 82Se/76Se ratio vary by as much as 15‰ and indicate that abiotic and bacterial reduction of soluble oxyanions is the dominant cause of Se isotope fractionation. Our isotopic analyses of Se were performed using a continuous flow hydride generation system coupled to a Micromass MC-ICP-MS after chemical purification. The estimated external precision of the 82Se/76Se isotope ratio is 0.25‰ (2σ ) for a quantity of Se per analysis as low as 50 ng and the data are reported relative to our internal standards (MERCK elemental standard solution). In this study we have used Se isotopes in conjunction with S isotopes to provide additional constraints on the fractionation processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems. Several fields were studied along the Mid Atlantic Ridge and include the Lucky Strike field where the setting is in a caldera system with abundant low-permeability layers of cemented breccia which result in fluid cooling and mixing below the hydrothermal vents. Based on vent structures, mineral abundance, and geochemistry, two types of hydrothermal deposits were identified: (1) high-T vents with δ 34S between 1.5 and 4.5‰ and Se values up to 2000 ppm; (2) low-T vents where pyrite and marcasite generally have lower δ 34S values (down to -1.0‰ ) and low concentration of Se (hydrothermal deposits is interpreted as a result of subsurface precipitation of sulfides (scavenging Se from the fluid) during the conductive cooling of the hydrothermal fluid beneath the impermeable

  2. Hydrothermal sulfide accumulation along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Clague, D. A.; Hannington, M. D.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits that form on the seafloor are often located by the detection of hydrothermal plumes in the water column, followed by exploration with deep-towed cameras, side-scan sonar imaging, and finally by visual surveys using remotely-operated vehicle or occupied submersible. Hydrothermal plume detection, however, is ineffective for finding hydrothermally-inactive sulfide deposits, which may represent a significant amount of the total sulfide accumulation on the seafloor, even in hydrothermally active settings. Here, we present results from recent high-resolution, autonomous underwater vehicle-based mapping of the hydrothermally-active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Analysis of the ridge bathymetry resulted in the location of 581 individual sulfide deposits along 24 km of ridge length. Hydrothermal deposits were distinguished from volcanic and tectonic features based on the characteristics of their surface morphology, such as shape and slope angles. Volume calculations for each deposit results in a total volume of 372,500 m3 of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica material, for an equivalent mass of ∼1.2 Mt of hydrothermal material on the seafloor within the ridge's axial valley, assuming a density of 3.1 g/cm3. Much of this total volume is from previously undocumented inactive deposits outside the main active vent fields. Based on minimum ages of sulfide deposition, the deposits accumulated at a maximum rate of ∼400 t/yr, with a depositional efficiency (proportion of hydrothermal material that accumulates on the seafloor to the total amount hydrothermally mobilized and transported to the seafloor) of ∼5%. The calculated sulfide tonnage represents a four-fold increase over previous sulfide estimates for the Endeavour Segment that were based largely on accumulations from within the active fields. These results suggest that recent global seafloor sulfide resource estimates, which were based mostly

  3. In situ Remediation of Petroleum Contaminated Groundwater by Permeable Reactive Barrier with Hydrothermal Palygorskite as Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Sheng-yu; ZHANG Yu-ling; SU Xiao-si; ZHANG Ying

    2013-01-01

    The permeable reactive barrier(PRB) has proven to be a cost-effective technique to remediate the petroleum contaminated groundwater at a northeast field site in China.In this study,the geology,hydrogeology and contamination characterization of the field site were investigated and the natural hydrothermal palygorskite was chosen as a reactive medium.Furthermore,the adsorption of the total petroleum hydrocarbons(TPH) in the groundwater onto hydrothermal palygorskite and the adsorption kinetics were investigated.The results indicate that the removal rates of TPH,benzene,naphthalene and phenantharene could all reach up to 90% by hydrothermal palygorskite with a diameter of 0.25-2.00 mm that had been thermally pretreated at 140 ℃.The adsorption of TPH onto hydrothermal palygorskite after pretreatment followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and a Langmuir adsorption isotherm,suggesting that the theoretic adsorption capacity of hydrothermal palygorskite for adsorbate could be 4.2 g/g.Scanning electron microscopy(SEM),infrared spectroscopy(IR),X-ray diffraction(XRD) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy(XRF) were carried out to analyze the adsorption mechanism.The results reveal that hydrothermal palygorskite is a fibrous silicate mineral enriched in Mg and A1 with large surface area and porosity.The dense cluster acicular and fibrous crystal of hydrothermal palygorskite,and its effect polar group —OH played an important role in the physical and chemical adsorption processes of it for contaminants.This study has demonstrated hydrothermal palygorskite is a reliable reactive medium for in situ remediation of petroleum contaminated groundwater at field sites.

  4. Universities scale like cities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony F J van Raan

    Full Text Available Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the 'gross university income' in terms of total number of citations over 'size' in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities--the top-100 European universities--we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment.

  5. Empirical Research on Factors that Influence the Behavior Decision of Repeated Seed Purchase for Farmers – Field investigation based on 519 vegetable farmers in Wuhan City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Guoguang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article makes an analysis on the factors and impact on decision of repeated seed purchase behavior for farmers by using the field investigation data from 519 vegetable farmers around Wuhan City and the binary Logit model and ordered Logit model. It is found from the research that: repeated seed purchase is a common phenomenon as 84% of sample farmers have this behavior: the factors, such as education degree, risk attitude, Perceived Value, seed quality, seed purchase convenience, relationship trust and obstacle transfer, will influence the behavior or willingness of farmers to repeatedly purchase the seeds. The farmers with higher education degree or risk preference are more willing to try out new varieties; Improving farmer’s Perceived Value for the purchased seeds and the trust in distributors, as well as the relatively high seed quality, will increase farmer’s willingness for repeated seed purchase; While the higher costs for information seeking, costs for technical study and other transfer obstacle factors have a significant prohibitive effect on the farmers to prevent them from purchasing new varieties of seeds, and they tend to make decision of repeated seed purchase.

  6. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P. M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. The Lucky Strike segment hosts three active hydrothermal fields: Capelinhos, Ewan, and the known Main Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Field (MLSHF). Capelinhos is located 1.3 km E of the axis and the MLSHF, and consists of a ~20 m sulfide mound with black smoker vents. Ewan is located ~1.8 km south from the MLSHF along the axial graben, and displays only diffuse flow along and around scarps of collapse structures associated with fault scarps. At the MLSHF we have identified an inactive site, thus broadening the extent of this field. Heat flux estimates from these new sites are relatively low and correspond to ~10% of the heat flux estimated for the Main field, with an integrated heatflux of 200-1200 MW. Overall, most of the flux (up to 80-90%) is associated with diffuse outflow, with the Ewan site showing solely diffuse flow and Capelinhos mostly focused flow. Microbathymetry also reveals a large, off-axis (~2.4 km) hydrothermal field, similar to the TAG mound in size, on the flanks of a rifted volcano. The association of these fields to a central volcano, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the ridge segment, suggest that sustained hydrothermal activity is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build central volcanoes. Hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust exploits permeable fault zones. Central volcanoes are thus associated with long-lived hydrothermal activity, and these sites may play a major role in the distribution and biogeography of vent communities.

  7. Air temperature field distribution estimations over a Chinese mega-city using MODIS land surface temperature data: the case of Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weichun MA; Liguo ZHOU; Hao ZHANG; Yan ZHANG; Xiaoyan DAI

    2016-01-01

    The capability of obtaining spatially distributed air temperature data from remote sensing measurements is an improvement for many environmental applications focused on urban heat island,carbon emissions,climate change,etc.This paper is based on the MODIS/Terra and Aqua data utilized to study the effect of the urban atmospheric heat island in Shanghai,China.The correlation between retrieved MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and air temperature measured at local weather stations was initially studied at different temporal and spatial scales.Secondly,the air temperature data with spatial resolutions of 250 m and 1 km were estimated from MODIS LST data and in-situ measured air temperature.The results showed that there is a slightly higher correlation between air temperature and MODIS LST at a 250 m resolution in spring and autumn on an annual scale than observed at a 1 km resolution.Although the distribution pattern of the air temperature thermal field varies in different seasons,the urban heat island (UHI) in Shanghai is characterized by a distribution pattern of multiple centers,with the central urban area as the primary center and the built-up regions in each district as the subcenters.This study demonstrates the potential not only for estimating the distribution of the air temperature thermal field from MODIS LST with 250 m resolution in spring and autumn in Shanghai,but also for providing scientific and effective methods for monitoring and studying UHI effect in a Chinese mega-city such as Shanghai.

  8. Hydrothermal evolution of repository groundwaters in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwaters in the near field of a radioactive waste repository in basalt will change their chemical composition in response to reactions with the basalt. These reactions will be promoted by the heat generated by the decaying waste. It is important to predict both the rate and the extent of these reactions, and the secondary minerals produced, because the alteration process controls the chemical environment affecting the corrosion of the canister, the solubility and complexation of migrating radionuclides, the reactivity of the alteration products to radionuclides sorption, and the porosity and permeability of the host rock. A comprehensive review of the literature leads to the preliminary finding that hydrothermally altering basalts in geothermal regions such as Iceland lead to a secondary mineralogy and groundwater composition similar to that expected to surround a repository. Furthermore, laboratory experiments replicating the alteration conditions approximate those observed in the field and expected in a repository. Preliminary estimates were made of the rate of hydration and devitrification of basaltic glass and the zero-order dissolution rate of basaltic materials. The rates were compared with those for rhyolitic glasses and silicate minerals. Preliminary calculations made of mixed process alteration kinetics, involving pore diffusion and surface reaction suggest that at temperatures greater than 1500C, alteration proceeds so rapidly as to become pervasive in normally fractured basalt exposed to higher temperatures in the field. 70 references

  9. Characterization of Magma-Driven Hydrothermal Systems at Oceanic Spreading Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farough, A.; Lowell, R. P.; Corrigan, R.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid circulation in high-temperature hydrothermal systems involves complex water-rock chemical reactions and phase separation. Numerical modeling of reactive transport in multi-component, multiphase systems is required to obtain a full understanding of the characteristics and evolution of hydrothermal vent systems. We use a single-pass parameterized model of high-temperature hydrothermal circulation at oceanic spreading centers constrained by observational parameters such as vent temperature, heat output, and vent field area, together with surface area and depth of the sub-axial magma chamber, to deduce fundamental hydrothermal parameters such as mass flow rate, bulk permeability, conductive boundary layer thickness at the base of the system, magma replenishment rate, and residence time in the discharge zone. All of these key subsurface characteristics are known for fewer than 10 sites out of 300 known hydrothermal systems. The principal limitations of this approach stem from the uncertainty in heat output and vent field area. For systems where data are available on partitioning of heat and chemical output between focused and diffuse flow, we determined the fraction of high-temperature vent fluid incorporated into diffuse flow using a two-limb single pass model. For EPR 9°50` N and ASHES, the diffuse flow temperatures calculated assuming conservative mixing are nearly equal to the observed temperatures indicating that approximately 80%-90% of the hydrothermal heat output occurs as high-temperature flow derived from magmatic heat even though most of the heat output appears as low-temperature diffuse discharge. For the Main Endeavour Field and Lucky Strike, diffuse flow fluids show significant conductive cooling and heating respectively. Finally, we calculate the transport of various geochemical constituents in focused and diffuse flow at the vent field scale and compare the results with estimates of geochemical transports from the Rainbow hydrothermal field where

  10. The hydrothermal wave of large-Prandtl- number fluid in a shallow cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG; ZeMei

    2007-01-01

    The hydrothermal wave was investigated numerically for large-Prandtl-number fluid (Pr = 105.6) in a shallow cavity with different heated sidewalls. The traveling wave appears and propagates in the direction opposite to the surface flow (upstream) in the case of zero gravity when the applied temperature difference grows and over the critical value. The phase relationships of the disturbed velocity, temperature and pressure demonstrate that the traveling wave is driven by the disturbed temperature, which is named hydrothermal wave. The hydrothermal wave is so weak that the oscillatory flow field and temperature distribution can hardly be observed in the liquid layer. The exciting mechanism of hydrothermal wave is analyzed and discussed in the present paper.  ……

  11. The hydrothermal wave of large-Prandtl- number fluid in a shallow cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The hydrothermal wave was investigated numerically for large-Prandtl-number fluid (Pr = 105.6) in a shallow cavity with different heated sidewalls. The traveling wave appears and propagates in the direction opposite to the surface flow (upstream) in the case of zero gravity when the applied temperature difference grows and over the critical value. The phase relationships of the disturbed velocity, temperature and pressure demonstrate that the traveling wave is driven by the disturbed temperature, which is named hydrothermal wave. The hydrothermal wave is so weak that the oscillatory flow field and temperature distribution can hardly be observed in the liquid layer. The exciting mechanism of hydrothermal wave is analyzed and discussed in the present paper.

  12. Influence of permeability on hydrothermal circulation in the sediment-buried oceanic crust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xingtao; ZHAI Shikui; MENG Fanshun; LI Huaiming; YU Zenghui; SUN Ge; XUE Gang

    2006-01-01

    Hydrothermal convection in the upper oceanic crust has been inferred to be a common and important process. Under the simplified conditions of planar boundaries, permeability provides a strong constraint on the pattern of circulation, the dimensions of convective cells and flow field of hydrothermal circulation. By applying an advanced numerical modeling method, to our knowledge, it is the first time to investigate convection as it is influenced by different strata permeability structures,formational anisotropy, fracture zone and cooling intrusion. The simplified geological model is composed of 3 layers, sedimentary layer, high permeable basement layer and low permeable basement layer from top to bottom. When permeability in high permeable layer is 10 times larger than that in sedimentary layer, convection occurs in high permeable layer. The pattern of hydrothermal circulation and flow velocity of hydrothermal fluid are strongly influenced by strata permeability structures,changes of permeability in high permeable basement layer, fracture zone and cooling intrusion.However, formational anisotropy relatively exerts weak influence on hydrothermal circulation, with the ratio up to 1.5 of vertical permeability to lateral permeability in high permeable layer. Fracture zone existing in basement is the most important factor affecting the circulation field. The effects of a local intrusion are limited to convection intensity above the intrusion and have little impact on the fluid flow on a regional scale. As the result of numerical modelling, key factors affecting the hydrothermal circulation are good permeable zone and long-term heat source, not including fluid source.

  13. Excite City:Designing the Experience City

    OpenAIRE

    Marling, Gitte; Kiib, Hans; Jensen, Ole B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper takes its point of departure in the pressure of the experience economy on European cities - a pressure which in recent years has found its expression in a number of comprehensive transformations of the physical and architectural environments, and new eventscapes related to fun and cultural experience are emerging. The physical, cultural and democratic consequences of this development are discussed in the paper, which concludes with a presentation of a new field of research that hig...

  14. 中印度洋海岭Edmond热液区块状硫化物中自然金的发现及其意义%The discovery of native gold in massive sulfides from the Edmond hydrothermal field, Central Indian Ridge and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴仲玮; 孙晓明; 戴瑛知; 石贵勇; 王琰; 芦阳; 梁业恒

    2011-01-01

    There are three types of hydrothermal precipitates sampled from the Edmond hydrothermal field, Central Indian Ridge; Fe-rich massive sulfides mainly composed of pyrite and chalcopyrite, silica-rich hydrothermal precipitates, and anhydrite-dominated sulfate ore samples. Irregular-shaped or tabular grains of native gold ( <20μm) mainly associated with anhydrite and sphalerite have been identified in sulfate ore samples and Fe-rich massive sulfides by SEM/EDS observation and XPS analysis. This is the first documented occurrence of native gold grains in seafloor hydrothermal precipitates from the Edmond vent field, CIR. To a lesser extent, gold occurs as submicroscopic particles deposited on the surface of coarse-grained pyrite. EPMA results indicate that high gold contents (with an average of 6700 × 10-6 Au) are associated with late-stage, low-temperature ( Fe-poor) sphalerite, and silver is significantly enriched in sulfosalt minerals (5.0% -6.7% Ag) occurring at the margins of exsolved chalcopyrite grains within sphalerite. In conclusion, the mineralization of precious metals in polymetallic massive sulfides is closely related to late-stage, low to moderate temperature hydrothermal ore-forming processes at the seafloor. Evaluation of possible complexes of gold indicates that AuCl2 - or AuHS° is the dominant complex, which is consistent with the high temperature and chlorinity of acidic end-member hydrothermal fluids in the Edmond vent field. Mixing of hydrothermal fluids and seawater, together with conductive cooling and/or phase separation may be important factors controlling gold precipitation and enrichment.%位于中印度洋中速扩张洋脊的Edmond热液区块状硫化物矿石样品主要分为以黄铁矿-黄铜矿为主的富Fe块状硫化物、热水沉积成因的富含硅质块状矿石和以硬石膏为主的硫酸盐矿石等3种不同类型.通过扫描电镜观察和X射线光电子能谱分析,在硫酸盐矿石和富Fe块状硫化物中首次

  15. Flying Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbelin, Bruno; Lasserre, Sebastien; Ciger, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Flying Cities is an artistic installation which generates imaginary cities from the speech of its visitors. Thanks to an original interactive process analyzing people's vocal input to create 3D graphics, a tangible correspondence between speech and visuals opens new possibilities of interaction....... This cross-modal interaction not only supports our artistic messages, but also aims at providing anyone with a pleasant and stimulating feedback from her/his speech activity. As the feedback we have received when presenting Flying Cities was very positive, our objective is now to cross the bridge between art...

  16. Flying Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciger, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The Flying Cities artistic installation brings to life imaginary cities made from the speech input of visitors. In this article we describe the original interactive process generating real time 3D graphics from spectators' vocal inputs. This example of cross-modal interaction has the nice property....... As the feedback we have received when presenting Flying Cities was very positive, our objective now is to cross the bridge between art and the potential applications to the rehabilitation of people with reduced mobility or for the treatment of language impairments....

  17. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  18. Sustainability and dynamics of outcrop-to-outcrop hydrothermal circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Dustin M.; Fisher, Andrew T.

    2015-06-01

    Most seafloor hydrothermal circulation occurs far from the magmatic influence of mid-ocean ridges, driving large flows of water, heat and solutes through volcanic rock outcrops on ridge flanks. Here we create three-dimensional simulations of ridge-flank hydrothermal circulation, flowing between and through seamounts, to determine what controls hydrogeological sustainability, flow rate and preferred flow direction in these systems. We find that sustaining flow between outcrops that penetrate less-permeable sediment depends on a contrast in transmittance (the product of outcrop permeability and the area of outcrop exposure) between recharging and discharging sites, with discharge favoured through less-transmissive outcrops. Many simulations include local discharge through outcrops at the recharge end of an outcrop-to-outcrop system. Both of these characteristics are observed in the field. In addition, smaller discharging outcrops sustain higher flow rates than larger outcrops, which may help to explain how so much lithospheric heat is extracted globally by this process.

  19. INSTANT CITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marling, Gitte; Kiib, Hans

    2013-01-01

    emphasis has been laid on creating a vivid, and engaging social environment in order to create a lab for social, and architectural experi- ments. These goals challenge the city planning as well as the urban sce- nography. The article addresses the research questions: What kind of city life and social......This article analyses Roskilde Festival as an Instant City. For more than 40 years, Roskilde Festival has had many thousands participants for a weeklong festival on music, performances and cultural experiences in a layout designed as an urban environment. During the last ten years, in- creasing...... experiments are taking place in ‘the instant city’, and how can it be characterized? It also emphasizes the relation between city life, urban design, and the aesthetics of architecture and urban spaces. The question here is, in what way architecture and urban scenography are used as tools to support the goal...

  20. City Streets

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set contains roadway centerlines for city streets found on the USGS 1:24,000 mapping series. In some areas, these roadways are current through the 2000...

  1. Beautiful city

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald A. Carlino

    2009-01-01

    Proponents of the City Beautiful movement advocated for sizable public investments in monumental spaces, street beautification, and classical architecture. Today, economists and policymakers see the provision of consumer leisure amenities as a way to attract people and jobs to cities. But past studies have provided only indirect evidence of the importance of leisure amenities for urban growth and development. In this article, Jerry Carlino uses a new data set on the number of leisure tourist ...

  2. City Beautiful

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald A. Carlino; Saiz, Albert

    2008-01-01

    The City Beautiful movement, which in the early 20th century advocated city beautification as a way to improve the living conditions and civic virtues of the urban dweller, had languished by the Great Depression. Today, new urban economic theorists and policymakers are coming to see the provision of consumer leisure amenities as a way to attract population, especially the highly skilled and their employers. However, past studies have provided only indirect evidence of the importance of leisur...

  3. Model cities

    OpenAIRE

    M Batty

    2007-01-01

    The term ?model? is now central to our thinking about how weunderstand and design cities. We suggest a variety of ways inwhich we use ?models?, linking these ideas to Abercrombie?sexposition of Town and Country Planning which represented thestate of the art fifty years ago. Here we focus on using models asphysical representations of the city, tracing the development ofsymbolic models where the focus is on simulating how functiongenerates form, to iconic models where the focus is on representi...

  4. Sustainable cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sustainable City Project, a collaboration among the cities of Portland, Oregon, and San Francisco and San Jose, California, aims at developing and implementing sustainable energy planning methods and programs for cites. For a period of two years (1989-90), the three project cities worked in parallel, yet pursued independent courses to develop appropriate sustainable urban energy practices to meet local needs and aspirations. Central to the Sustainable City Project was finding ways to manage today's urban energy needs without jeopardizing the needs of future generations. Sustainability implies that nothing should go to waste, but rather should contribute to the proper balance between the natural environment and the built environment Sustainable urban energy systems encompass more than energy efficiency and energy conservation measures: they must be diverse, flexible, self-reliant, renewable, and integrated. Since local governments make decisions affecting land use, building codes, transportation systems, waste disposal, and power plants--all of which impact energy resource use--local jurisdictions can do much to ensure their own sustainable future. This paper will present an accounting of the specific steps that each city took to determine and begin implementation of their respective approaches to sustainable energy planning, with a specific focus on the City of San Jose activities. Useful tools for facilitating community process, program planning and implementation, and quantitative analysis will also be discussed

  5. Hydrothermal Fe cycling and deep ocean organic carbon scavenging: Model-based evidence for significant POC supply to seafloor sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, C. R.; Legendre, L. L.; Sander, S. G.; Niquil, N.; Luther, G. W.; Bharati, L.; Han, X.; Le Bris, N.

    2015-06-01

    Submarine hydrothermal venting has recently been identified to have the potential to impact ocean biogeochemistry at the global scale. This is the case because processes active in hydrothermal plumes are so vigorous that the residence time of the ocean, with respect to cycling through hydrothermal plumes, is comparable to that of deep ocean mixing caused by thermohaline circulation. Recently, it has been argued that seafloor venting may provide a significant source of bio-essential Fe to the oceans as the result of a close coupling between Fe and organic carbon in hydrothermal plumes. But a complementary question remains to be addressed: does this same intimate Fe-Corg association in hydrothermal plumes cause any related impact to the global C cycle? To address this, SCOR-InterRidge Working Group 135 developed a modeling approach to synthesize site-specific field data from the East Pacific Rise 9°50‧ N hydrothermal field, where the range of requisite data sets is most complete, and combine those inputs with global estimates for dissolved Fe inputs from venting to the oceans to establish a coherent model with which to investigate hydrothermal Corg cycling. The results place new constraints on submarine Fe vent fluxes worldwide, including an indication that the majority of Fe supplied to hydrothermal plumes should come from entrainment of diffuse flow. While this same entrainment is not predicted to enhance the supply of dissolved organic carbon to hydrothermal plumes by more than ∼10% over background values, what the model does indicate is that scavenging of carbon in association with Fe-rich hydrothermal plume particles should play a significant role in the delivery of particulate organic carbon to deep ocean sediments, worldwide.

  6. Thiogranum longum gen. nov., sp. nov., an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium of the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal field, and an emended description of the genus Thiohalomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koji; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Yamaguchi, Kaoru; Urabe, Tetsuro; Hanada, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    A novel, obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterial strain, designated strain gps52(T), was isolated from a rock sample collected near the hydrothermal vents of the Suiyo Seamount in the Pacific Ocean. The cells possessed a Gram-stain-negative-type cell wall and contained menaquinone-8(H4) and menaquinone-9(H4) as respiratory quinones, and C16 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω7c as major cellular fatty acids. Neither storage compounds nor extensive internal membranes were observed in the cells. Strain gps52(T) grew using carbon dioxide fixation and oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds with oxygen as electron acceptor. Optimal growth was observed at 32 °C, pH 6.5 and with 3 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain gps52(T) belongs to the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae and is different from any other known bacteria, with sequence similarities of less than 93 %. Based on phenotypic and phylogenetic findings, the isolate is considered to represent a novel genus and species in the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae, and the name Thiogranum longum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is gps52(T) ( = NBRC 101260(T) = DSM 19610(T)). An emended description of the genus Thiohalomonas is also proposed.

  7. Formation of hydrothermal deposits at Kings Triple Junction, northern Lau back-arc basin, SW Pacific: The geochemical perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paropkari, Anil L.; Ray, Durbar; Balaram, V.; Surya Prakash, L.; Mirza, Imran H.; Satyanarayana, M.; Gnaneshwar Rao, T.; Kaisary, Sujata

    2010-04-01

    An inactive hydrothermal field was discovered near Kings Triple Junction (KTJ) in northern Lau back-arc basin during 19th cruise of R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in 1990. The field consisted of a large elongated basal platform 'the pedestal' with several 'small' chimneys on its periphery and one 'main mound' superposed over it. The surrounding region is carpeted with lava pillows having ferromanganese 'precipitate' as infillings. The adjoining second field consisted of small chimney like growths termed as 'Christmas Tree' Field. The basal pedestal, the peripheral chimneys and small 'Christmas Tree' like growths (samples collected by MIR submersibles), though parts of the same hydrothermal field, differ significantly in their mineralogy and elemental composition indicating different history of formation. The pedestal slab consisting of chalcopyrite and pyrite as major minerals and rich in Cu is likely to have formed at higher temperatures than sphalerite dominated peripheral chimney. Extremely low concentration of high field strength elements (e.g. Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta) and enrichment of light REE in these sulfides indicate prominent influence of aqueous arc-magma, rich in subduction components. The oxide growths in the 'Christmas Tree' Field have two distinct layers, Fe rich orange-red basal part which seems to have formed at very low temperature as precipitates from diffused hydrothermal flows from the seafloor whereas Mn rich black surface coating is formed from hydrothermal fluids emanated from the seafloor during another episode of hydrothermal activity. Perhaps this is for the first time such unique hydrothermal oxide growths are being reported in association with hydrothermal system. Here, we discuss the possible processes responsible for the formation of these different hydrothermal deposits based on their mineralogy and geochemistry.

  8. The City Mouse and the Country Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Once two mice (老鼠) were good friends. One lived in the city, the other lived in the country (乡村). After many years, the city mouse came to see the country mouse. The country mouse took him to his house in a field. He gave him the nicest food that he could find. The city mouse said,

  9. Coupled cycling of Fe and organic carbon in submarine hydrothermal systems: Modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Louis; German, Christopher R.; Sander, Sylvia G.; Niquil, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    It has been recently proposed that hydrothermal plumes may be a significant source of dissolved Fe to the oceans. In order to assess this proposal, we investigated the fate of dissolved Fe released from hydrothermal systems to the overlying ocean using an approach that combined modelling and field values. We based our work on a consensus conceptual model developed by members of SCOR-InterRidge Working Group 135. The model was both complex enough to capture the main processes of dissolved Fe released from hydrothermal systems and chemical transformation in the hydrothermal plume, and simple enough to be parameterized with existing field data. It included the following flows: Fe, water and heat in the high temperature vent fluids, in the fluids diffusing around the vent, and in the entrained seawater in the buoyant plume; Fe precipitation in polymetallic sulphides near the vent; transport of Fe in the non-buoyant plume, and both its precipitation in particles onto the sea bottom away from the vent and dissolution into deep-sea waters. In other words, there were three Fe input flows into the buoyant hydrothermal plume (vent-fluids; entrained diffuse flow; entrained seawater) and three Fe output flows (sedimentation from the buoyant plume as polymetallic sulfides; sedimentation from the non-buoyant plume in particulate form; export to the deep ocean in dissolved or nanoparticulate form). The output flows balanced the input flows. We transformed the conceptual model into equations, and parameterized these with field data. To do so, we assumed that all hydrothermal systems, globally, can be represented by the circumstances that prevail at the EPR 9°50'N hydrothermal field, although we knew this assumption not to be accurate. We nevertheless achieved, by following this approach, two important goals, i.e. we could assemble into a coherent framework, for the first time, several discrete data sets acquired independently over decades of field work, and we could obtain model

  10. CityGML - Interoperable semantic 3D city models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröger, Gerhard; Plümer, Lutz

    2012-07-01

    CityGML is the international standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) for the representation and exchange of 3D city models. It defines the three-dimensional geometry, topology, semantics and appearance of the most relevant topographic objects in urban or regional contexts. These definitions are provided in different, well-defined Levels-of-Detail (multiresolution model). The focus of CityGML is on the semantical aspects of 3D city models, its structures, taxonomies and aggregations, allowing users to employ virtual 3D city models for advanced analysis and visualization tasks in a variety of application domains such as urban planning, indoor/outdoor pedestrian navigation, environmental simulations, cultural heritage, or facility management. This is in contrast to purely geometrical/graphical models such as KML, VRML, or X3D, which do not provide sufficient semantics. CityGML is based on the Geography Markup Language (GML), which provides a standardized geometry model. Due to this model and its well-defined semantics and structures, CityGML facilitates interoperable data exchange in the context of geo web services and spatial data infrastructures. Since its standardization in 2008, CityGML has become used on a worldwide scale: tools from notable companies in the geospatial field provide CityGML interfaces. Many applications and projects use this standard. CityGML is also having a strong impact on science: numerous approaches use CityGML, particularly its semantics, for disaster management, emergency responses, or energy-related applications as well as for visualizations, or they contribute to CityGML, improving its consistency and validity, or use CityGML, particularly its different Levels-of-Detail, as a source or target for generalizations. This paper gives an overview of CityGML, its underlying concepts, its Levels-of-Detail, how to extend it, its applications, its likely future development, and the role it plays in scientific research. Furthermore, its

  11. Hydrothermal fountains imaged by high resolution side-scan sonar equipped on a cruising AUV, URASHIMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, H.; Tsukioka, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Shitashima, K.; Yamamoto, F.; Sawa, T.; Hyakudome, T.; Kasaya, T.; Kinoshita, M.

    2007-12-01

    Mapping of an area and intensities of activity at a particular hydrothermal field has required huge effort so far, typically several tens of dives of manned submersibles and/or ROVs to obtain detailed locality map with needed resolutions. Thus, appropriate remote sensing techniques have been desired since the discovery of seafloor hydrothermal field. A series of successful trials has been performed by ABE of WHOI equipped with a Eh-sensor (Yoerger et al., Oceanography, 2007). A 100kHz side-scan sonar (SSS) equipped on a cruising AUV, URASHIMA, caught detailed structural image of hydrothermal fountains rooting active chimneys during YK07-07 Cruise off Okinawa Isl. (May 6-18, 2007). The URASHIMA AUV is a 10-m-length cylindrical-shaped one that originally optimized to long distance cruise. In the expedition, she cruised near the sea floor with 50-100 m altitude, at the area of 1000-1500 m in WD. She has currently basic oceanographic/CTD sensors, a 400kHz echo-sounder and sonars of 100400 kHz side-scan sonar and up to 6 kHz sub-bottom profiler. In this operation, pH and ORP sensors (CRIEPI) were also attached in front of AUV. On the pre-processing image of SSS, numbers of filament-shape echoes were recorded within water column zone. The reason why they should be the echo from hydrothermal plumes are as folows; 1) the echoes in the water column were limitedly recorded above the active hydrothermal field; 2) CTD and pH sensors show temperature and pH anomaly corresponding to the record of echoes; 3) some of the root of the filament-shape echoes correspond to the hydrothermal mound recognized in the detailed bathymetry obtained with SeaBat7125 MNBES. This-like technique should revolute the mapping work prior to the sampling at the particular hydrothermal site.

  12. Sulfur metabolizing microbes dominate microbial communities in Andesite-hosted shallow-sea hydrothermal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Zihao; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Tang, Kai; Su, Jianqiang; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2012-01-01

    To determine microbial community composition, community spatial structure and possible key microbial processes in the shallow-sea hydrothermal vent systems off NE Taiwan's coast, we examined the bacterial and archaeal communities of four samples collected from the water column extending over a redoxocline gradient of a yellow and four from a white hydrothermal vent. Ribosomal tag pyrosequencing based on DNA and RNA showed statistically significant differences between the bacterial and archaeal communities of the different hydrothermal plumes. The bacterial and archaeal communities from the white hydrothermal plume were dominated by sulfur-reducing Nautilia and Thermococcus, whereas the yellow hydrothermal plume and the surface water were dominated by sulfide-oxidizing Thiomicrospira and Euryarchaeota Marine Group II, respectively. Canonical correspondence analyses indicate that methane (CH(4)) concentration was the only statistically significant variable that explains all community cluster patterns. However, the results of pyrosequencing showed an essential absence of methanogens and methanotrophs at the two vent fields, suggesting that CH(4) was less tied to microbial processes in this shallow-sea hydrothermal system. We speculated that mixing between hydrothermal fluids and the sea or meteoric water leads to distinctly different CH(4) concentrations and redox niches between the yellow and white vents, consequently influencing the distribution patterns of the free-living Bacteria and Archaea. We concluded that sulfur-reducing and sulfide-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs accounted for most of the primary biomass synthesis and that microbial sulfur metabolism fueled microbial energy flow and element cycling in the shallow hydrothermal systems off the coast of NE Taiwan.

  13. Sulfur metabolizing microbes dominate microbial communities in Andesite-hosted shallow-sea hydrothermal systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Zhang

    Full Text Available To determine microbial community composition, community spatial structure and possible key microbial processes in the shallow-sea hydrothermal vent systems off NE Taiwan's coast, we examined the bacterial and archaeal communities of four samples collected from the water column extending over a redoxocline gradient of a yellow and four from a white hydrothermal vent. Ribosomal tag pyrosequencing based on DNA and RNA showed statistically significant differences between the bacterial and archaeal communities of the different hydrothermal plumes. The bacterial and archaeal communities from the white hydrothermal plume were dominated by sulfur-reducing Nautilia and Thermococcus, whereas the yellow hydrothermal plume and the surface water were dominated by sulfide-oxidizing Thiomicrospira and Euryarchaeota Marine Group II, respectively. Canonical correspondence analyses indicate that methane (CH(4 concentration was the only statistically significant variable that explains all community cluster patterns. However, the results of pyrosequencing showed an essential absence of methanogens and methanotrophs at the two vent fields, suggesting that CH(4 was less tied to microbial processes in this shallow-sea hydrothermal system. We speculated that mixing between hydrothermal fluids and the sea or meteoric water leads to distinctly different CH(4 concentrations and redox niches between the yellow and white vents, consequently influencing the distribution patterns of the free-living Bacteria and Archaea. We concluded that sulfur-reducing and sulfide-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs accounted for most of the primary biomass synthesis and that microbial sulfur metabolism fueled microbial energy flow and element cycling in the shallow hydrothermal systems off the coast of NE Taiwan.

  14. Nitrogen-doped hydrothermal carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; White, Robin J. [Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany). Dept. of Colloid Chemistry; Zhao, Li [Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany). Dept. of Colloid Chemistry; National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-01

    Nitrogen doped carbon materials are now playing an important role in cutting edge innovations for energy conversion and storage technologies such as supercapacitors and proton exchange membrane fuel cells as well as in catalytic applications, adsorption and CO{sub 2} capture. The production of such materials using benign aqueous based processes, mild temperatures and renewable precursors is of great promise in addressing growing environmental concerns for cleaner power sources at a time of increasing global demand for energy. In this perspective, we show that nitrogen doped carbons prepared using sustainable processes such as ''Hydrothermal Carbonisation'' has advantages in many applications over the conventional carbons. We also summarize an array of synthetic strategies used to create such nitrogen doped carbons, and discuss the application of these novel materials. (orig.)

  15. Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2002-01-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  16. Ecology of deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Richard A.; Kennish, Michael J.

    1993-08-01

    Studies of the many active and inactive hydrothermal vents found during the past 15 years have radically altered views of biological and geological processes in the deep sea. The biological communities occupying the vast and relatively stable soft bottom habitats of the deep sea are characterized by low population densities, high species diversity, and low biomass. In contrast, those inhabiting the generally unstable conditions of hydrothermal vent environments exhibit high densities and biomass, low species diversity, rapid growth rates, and high metabolic rates. Biological processes, such as rates of metabolism and growth, in vent organisms are comparable to those observed in organisms from shallow-water ecosystems. An abundant energy source is provided by chemosynthetic bacteria that constitute the primary producers sustaining the lush communities at the hydrothermal sites. Fluxes in vent flow and fluid chemistry cause changes in growth rates, reproduction, mortality, and/or colonization of vent fauna, leading to temporal and spatial variation of the vent communities. Vent populations that cannot adapt to modified flow rates are adversely affected, as is evidenced by high mortality or lower rates of colonization, growth, or reproduction. Substantial changes in biota have been witnessed at several vents, and successional cycles have been proposed for the Galapagos vent fields. Dramatic temporal and spatial variations in vent community structure may also relate to variations in larval dispersal and chance recruitment, as well as biotic interactions.

  17. Rapid growth of mineral deposits at artificial seafloor hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Shimada, Kazuhiko; Nagase, Toshiro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watsuji, Tomoo; Shibuya, Takazo; Yamada, Ryoichi; Saruhashi, Tomokazu; Kyo, Masanori; Takai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Seafloor massive sulphide deposits are potential resources for base and precious metals (Cu-Pb-Zn ± Ag ± Au), but difficulties in estimating precise reserves and assessing environmental impacts hinder exploration and commercial mining. Here, we report petrological and geochemical properties of sulphide chimneys less than 2 years old that formed where scientific boreholes vented hydrothermal fluids in the Iheya-North field, Okinawa Trough, in East China Sea. One of these infant chimneys, dominated by Cu-Pb-Zn-rich sulphide minerals, grew a height of 15 m within 25 months. Portions of infant chimneys are dominated by sulphate minerals. Some infant chimneys are sulphide-rich similar to high-grade Cu-Pb-Zn bodies on land, albeit with relatively low As and Sb concentrations. The high growth rate reaching the 15 m height within 25 months is attributed to the large hydrothermal vent more than 50 cm in diameter created by the borehole, which induced slow mixing with the ambient seawater and enhanced efficiency of sulphide deposition. These observations suggest the possibility of cultivating seafloor sulphide deposits and even controlling their growth and grades through manipulations of how to mix and quench hydrothermal fluids with the ambient seawater. PMID:26911272

  18. Origin of magnetic highs at ultramafic hosted hydrothermal systems: Insights from the Yokoniwa site of Central Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Masakazu; Okino, Kyoko; Sato, Taichi; Sato, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution vector magnetic measurements were performed on an inactive ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal vent field, called Yokoniwa Hydrothermal Field (YHF), using a deep-sea manned submersible Shinkai6500 and an autonomous underwater vehicle r2D4. The YHF has developed at a non-transform offset massif of the Central Indian Ridge. Dead chimneys were widely observed around the YHF along with a very weak venting of low-temperature fluids so that hydrothermal activity of the YHF was almost finished. The distribution of crustal magnetization from the magnetic anomaly revealed that the YHF is associated with enhanced magnetization, as seen at the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow and Ashadze-1 hydrothermal sites of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The results of rock magnetic analysis on seafloor rock samples (including basalt, dolerite, gabbro, serpentinized peridotite, and hydrothermal sulfide) showed that only highly serpentinized peridotite carries high magnetic susceptibility and that the natural remanent magnetization intensity can explain the high magnetization of Yokoniwa. These observations reflect abundant and strongly magnetized magnetite grains within the highly serpentinized peridotite. Comparisons with the Rainbow and Ashadze-1 suggest that in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, strongly magnetized magnetite and pyrrhotite form during the progression of hydrothermal alteration of peridotite. After the completion of serpentinization and production of hydrogen, pyrrhotites convert into pyrite or nonmagnetic iron sulfides, which considerably reduces their levels of magnetization. Our results revealed origins of the magnetic high and the development of subsurface chemical processes in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems. Furthermore, the results highlight the use of near-seafloor magnetic field measurements as a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  19. Catastrophic volcanic collapse: relation to hydrothermal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, D L; Williams, S N

    1993-06-18

    Catastrophic volcanic collapse, without precursory magmatic activity, is characteristic of many volcanic disasters. The extent and locations of hydrothermal discharges at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia, suggest that at many volcanoes collapse may result from the interactions between hydrothermal fluids and the volcanic edifice. Rock dissolution and hydrothermal mineral alteration, combined with physical triggers such as earth-quakes, can produce volcanic collapse. Hot spring water compositions, residence times, and flow paths through faults were used to model potential collapse at Ruiz. Caldera dimensions, deposits, and alteration mineral volumes are consistent with parameters observed at other volcanoes.

  20. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Chown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  1. Excite City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marling, Gitte; Kiib, Hans; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper takes its point of departure in the pressure of the experience economy on European cities - a pressure which in recent years has found its expression in a number of comprehensive transformations of the physical and architectural environments, and new eventscapes related to fun and cult...... attention is put on a new research project called "Experience City - hybrid cultural projects and performative urban spaces". The thesis and research themes are presented and related to the general framework of present cultural planning and post industrial urban transformation.......This paper takes its point of departure in the pressure of the experience economy on European cities - a pressure which in recent years has found its expression in a number of comprehensive transformations of the physical and architectural environments, and new eventscapes related to fun...

  2. City Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trads, Søren Frimann; Stigel, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    Succesful corporate branding requires that questions related to communication, publicity, and organizational structures are adressed. An uncritical adoption of approaches known from tradition product branding will inevitable give problems as the properties of tangible commodities and services......, problems seem to multiply in what has becom known as city branding. This analysis of the communicational aspects of two Danish provincial towns´ branding efforts examines both their internally and externally directed communication. It demonstrates that an insufficient understanding of - or willingness...... to face - these differences will inevitably hamper such branding efforts because of the consequential inconsistencies. Finally, paths to more effective city branding are indicated...

  3. Hydrothermal circulation within the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, H. Paul; Tivey, Maurice A.; Bjorklund, Tor A.; Salmi, Marie S.

    2010-05-01

    Areas of the seafloor at mid-ocean ridges where hydrothermal vents discharge are easily recognized by the dramatic biological, physical, and chemical processes that characterize such sites. Locations where seawater flows into the seafloor to recharge hydrothermal cells within the crustal reservoir are by contrast almost invisible but can be indirectly identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measurements. An array of conductive heat flow stations in the Endeavour axial valley of the Juan de Fuca Ridge has identified recharge zones that appear to represent a nested system of fluid circulation paths. At the scale of an axial rift valley, conductive heat flow data indicate a general cross-valley fluid flow, where seawater enters the shallow subsurface crustal reservoir at the eastern wall of the Endeavour axial valley and undergoes a kilometer of horizontal transit beneath the valley floor, finally exiting as warm hydrothermal fluid discharge on the western valley bounding wall. Recharge zones also have been identified as located within an annular ring of very cold seafloor around the large Main Endeavour Hydrothermal Field, with seawater inflow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive heat flow data are consistent with previous models where high-temperature fluid circulation cells beneath large hydrothermal vent fields may be composed of narrow vertical cylinders. Subsurface fluid circulation on the Endeavour Segment occurs at various crustal depths in three distinct modes: (1) general east to west flow across the entire valley floor, (2) in narrow cylinders that penetrate deeply to high-temperature heat sources, and (3) supplying low-temperature diffuse vents where seawater is entrained into the shallow uppermost crust by the adjacent high-temperature cylindrical systems. The systematic array of conductive heat flow measurements over the axial valley floor averaged ˜150 mW/m2, suggesting that only about 3% of

  4. COVIS Detects Interconnections Between Atmospheric, Oceanic and Geologic systems at a Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.; Lee, R.

    2015-12-01

    COVIS (Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar) is an innovative sonar system designed to quantitatively monitor focused and diffuse flows from deep-sea hydrothermal vent clusters. From 9/2010 to 9/2015, COVIS was connected to the NEPTUNE observatory at Grotto vent in the Main Endeavour Field, JdFR. COVIS monitored plumes and diffuse discharge by transmitting high-frequency (200-400 kHz), pulsed acoustic waves and recording the backscattered signals to yield time series of plume heat and volume transports, plume bending, and diffuse flow area. Temporal variations indicate the rate of hydrothermal plume mixing with the ambient seawater increases with the magnitude of ocean currents. Such current-driven entrainment links the dynamics of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume with oceanic and atmospheric processes. We estimate the direction and relative amplitude of the local bottom currents from the bending angles of the plumes. A comparison with currents from an ADCP (~80 m south of Grotto) reveals significant complexity in the mean bottom flow structure within a hydrothermal vent field. Diffuse flow area, temperature, and faunal densities vary periodically reflecting some combination of tidal pressure and current interactions. The heat transport time series suggests the heat source driving the plume remained relatively steady for 41 months. Local seismic data reveals that increased heat transport in 2000 followed seismic events in 1999 and 2000 and the steady heat flux from 10/2011 to 2/2015 coincided with quiescent seismicity. Such a correlation points to the close linkage of a seafloor hydrothermal system with geological processes. These findings demonstrate the intimate interconnections of seafloor hydrothermal systems with processes spanning the Earth's interior to the sea surface. Further, they (and the time-series acquired by COVIS) testify to the effectiveness and robustness of employing an acoustic-imaging sonar for long-term monitoring of a seafloor hydrothermal

  5. Simulation of groundwater flow, effects of artificial recharge, and storage volume changes in the Equus Beds aquifer near the city of Wichita, Kansas well field, 1935–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Pickett, Linda L.; Hansen, Cristi V.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    The Equus Beds aquifer is a primary water-supply source for Wichita, Kansas and the surrounding area because of shallow depth to water, large saturated thickness, and generally good water quality. Substantial water-level declines in the Equus Beds aquifer have resulted from pumping groundwater for agricultural and municipal needs, as well as periodic drought conditions. In March 2006, the city of Wichita began construction of the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project to store and later recover groundwater, and to form a hydraulic barrier to the known chloride-brine plume near Burrton, Kansas. In October 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Wichita, began a study to determine groundwater flow in the area of the Wichita well field, and chloride transport from the Arkansas River and Burrton oilfield to the Wichita well field. Groundwater flow was simulated for the Equus Beds aquifer using the three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater-flow model MODFLOW-2000. The model simulates steady-state and transient conditions. The groundwater-flow model was calibrated by adjusting model input data and model geometry until model results matched field observations within an acceptable level of accuracy. The root mean square (RMS) error for water-level observations for the steady-state calibration simulation is 9.82 feet. The ratio of the RMS error to the total head loss in the model area is 0.049 and the mean error for water-level observations is 3.86 feet. The difference between flow into the model and flow out of the model across all model boundaries is -0.08 percent of total flow for the steady-state calibration. The RMS error for water-level observations for the transient calibration simulation is 2.48 feet, the ratio of the RMS error to the total head loss in the model area is 0.0124, and the mean error for water-level observations is 0.03 feet. The RMS error calculated for observed and simulated base flow gains or losses for the

  6. Dissolubility of Hydroxyapatite Powder under Hydrothermal Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The dissolubility of hydroxyapatite(HA) in the hydrothermal solution was investigated in Morey-type autoclave over a temperature range of 150 to 350 ℃ and the pH value range of 5 to 9. It is shown that the dissolubility of HA is determined as a function of temperature and time under a constant filling ratio of autoclave, and the temperature coefficient for the solubility of HA is positive. The equilibrium time attained in the hydrothermal solution is shortened with the increase of hydrothermal temperature, and the effect of temperature on the solubility is obviously stronger than that of pH value. The solubility data suggest that HA has higher dissolubility in the HA-H2O system under the hydrothermal condition than that under the normal temperature-pressure.

  7. Fun City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Once the blues guitarist B.B. King sang that when he "didn't wanna live no more", he would go shopping instead. Now, however, shopping has become a lifestyle... The city of today has become "Disneyfied" and "Tivolized". It has become a scene for events. The aim of the book is to encircle and pin ...

  8. Vacant city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marzot, N.

    2013-01-01

    Abandoned places that the crisis has multiplied, unaware wrecks of a project of civilization that has consumed its thrust and life-giving function, are waiting for new desirable interpretations, they are an expression of a possible city in opposition to the existing, even if not recognized by any in

  9. Sin City?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautier, Pieter A.; Svarer, Michael; Teulings, Coen N.

    2007-01-01

    Is moving to the countryside a credible commitment device for couples? We investigate whether lowering the arrival rate of potential alternative partners by moving to a less populated area lowers the dissolution risk for a sample of Danish couples. We find that of the couples who married in the city

  10. Drone City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper address the phenomenon of drones and their potential relationship with the city from the point of view of the so-called “mobilities turn”. This is done in such a way that turns attention to a recent redevelopment of the “turn” towards design; so the emerging perspective of “mobilities...... design” will be used as a background perspective to reflect upon the future of drones in cities. The other perspective used to frame the phenomenon is the emerging discourse of the “smart city”. A city of proliferating digital information and data communication may be termed a smart city as shorthand...... on the block” that will potentially be a game-changer for urban governance, economics and everyday life. Here we are thinking of the unmanned aerial vehicle or drone as the popular term has it. Therefore, the paper asks how life in “drone city” may play out. Drones may alter the notion of surveillance by means...

  11. City Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle, Sandra

    1989-01-01

    This article provides information on the evolution of the building material, concrete, and suggests hands-on activities that allow students to experience concrete's qualities, test the heat absorbency of various ground surface materials, discover how an area's geology changes, and search for city fossils. A reproducible activity sheet is included.…

  12. Hydrothermal plumes and processes in Indian Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Sands, Carla Marie

    2006-01-01

    The predicted cycling of the whole ocean through hydrothermal plumes is comparable to the mixing time of the oceans (few thousand years). Hence, understanding hydrothermal plume processes is crucial if their impact on the global geochemical cycles of elements is to be assessed. One of the most important processes that has been demonstrated to modify the gross chemical flux from venting to the oceans is the oxidative precipitation of dissolved Fe (II). It has been hypothesised t...

  13. Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

  14. Research Review of the Archives Work Issues under the Visual Field of Smart City%智慧城市视野下档案工作问题研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    步尧

    2015-01-01

    The journal articles are much more in the study of the problems of archives work under the visual field of the smart city, to discusse the periodical function prominently;High rate of interdisciplinarity, the research level is high;Mild rising trend, overall smooth; Prolific authors published literature nearly half number of significant research findings in colleges and universities, research focus. Research questions included: smart in the urban construction archives work, smart archives and the smart city under the background of archives informatization, smart city archives information re-sources co-construction and sharing, and develop into smart city archives service, the smart city and urban construction archives.%智慧城市视野下档案工作问题研究中期刊文献多,档案学期刊作用突出;学科交叉率高,研究水平高;上升趋势温和,总体平稳;高产作者发表文献数量近半,高校研究成果明显,研究主题集中。研究问题包括:智慧城市建设中的档案工作、智慧档案、面向智慧城市的档案信息化、智慧城市背景下的档案信息资源开发与共建共享、融入智慧城市的档案服务、智慧城市与城建档案。

  15. Spatial distribution pattern of seafloor hydrothermal vents to the southeastern Kueishan Tao offshore Taiwan Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Chenhua; YE Ying; PAN Yiwen; QIN Huawei; WU Guanghai; CHEN Chen-Tung Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of the diffusion activities both within and outside the seafloor hydrothermal vents, as well as related mineral genesis, have been one of the key focuses of ocean biogeochemistry studies. Many hy-drothermal vents are distributed close to the southern Okinawa Trough on the less-than-30-m deep shal-low seafloor off Kueishan Tao, northeast of Taiwan Island. Investigations of temperature, pH and Eh at four depths of hydrothermal plume were carried out near Kueishan Tao at the white (24.83°N, 121.96°E) and yellow (24.83°N, 121.96°E) vents. An 87 h of temperature time series observation-undertaken near the white vent showed that tide is the main factor affecting the background environment. Based on the observed data, 3-dimensional sliced diffusion fields were obtained and analyzed. It was concluded that the plume diffused mainly from north to south due to ebb tide. The yellow vent’s plume could effect as far as the white vent surface. From the temperature diffusion field, the vortices of the plume were observed. The Eh negative abnormality was a better indicator to search for hydrothermal plumes and locate hydrothermal vents than high temperature and low pH abnormalities.

  16. Hydrothermal plumes over the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, D.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Baker, E.T.; Rao, A.S.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Lupton, J.E.; SuryaPrakash, L.; Gawas, R.B.; VijayaKumar, T.

    Institute, Hyderabad, India [1] Indian Ocean ridges north of the Rodriguez Triple Junction remain poorly explored for seafloor hydrothermal activity, with only two active sites confirmed north of 25°S. We conducted water column surveys and sampling... to the Rainbow and Logatchev fields on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. 2 1. Introduction [2] The Central Indian, Carlsberg, and Sheba ridges bisect the Indian Ocean from the Rodriguez Triple Junction at 25°S to the entrance of the Gulf of Aden at 15°N...

  17. Microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of lead zirconate fine powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apinpus Rujiwatra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid synthesis of lead zirconate fine powders by microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique is reported. The influences of type of lead precursor, concentration of potassium hydroxide mineraliser, applied microwave power and irradiation time are described. The synthesised powders were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic microanalysis and light scattering technique. The merits of the microwave application in reducing reaction time and improving particle mono-dispersion and size uniformity as well as the drawbacks, viz. low purity of the desired phase and increasing demand of mineraliser, are discussed in relation to conventional heating method.

  18. Discovery of new hydrothermal activity and chemosynthetic fauna on the Central Indian Ridge at 18°-20° S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Nakamura

    Full Text Available Indian Ocean hydrothermal vents are believed to represent a novel biogeographic province, and are host to many novel genera and families of animals, potentially indigenous to Indian Ocean hydrothermal systems. In particular, since its discovery in 2001, much attention has been paid to a so-called 'scaly-foot' gastropod because of its unique iron-sulfide-coated dermal sclerites and the chemosynthetic symbioses in its various tissues. Despite increasing interest in the faunal assemblages at Indian Ocean hydrothermal vents, only two hydrothermal vent fields have been investigated in the Indian Ocean. Here we report two newly discovered hydrothermal vent fields, the Dodo and Solitaire fields, which are located in the Central Indian Ridge (CIR segments 16 and 15, respectively. Chemosynthetic faunal communities at the Dodo field are emaciated in size and composition. In contrast, at the Solitaire field, we observed faunal communities that potentially contained almost all genera found at CIR hydrothermal environments to date, and even identified previously unreported taxa. Moreover, a new morphotype of 'scaly-foot' gastropod has been found at the Solitaire field. The newly discovered 'scaly-foot' gastropod has similar morphological and anatomical features to the previously reported type that inhabits the Kairei field, and both types of 'scaly-foot' gastropods genetically belong to the same species according to analyses of their COI gene and nuclear SSU rRNA gene sequences. However, the new morphotype completely lacks an iron-sulfide coating on the sclerites, which had been believed to be a novel feature restricted to 'scaly-foot' gastropods. Our new findings at the two newly discovered hydrothermal vent sites provide important insights into the biodiversity and biogeography of vent-endemic ecosystems in the Indian Ocean.

  19. Hydrothermal Plume Geochemistry along the East Lau Spreading Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resing, J. A.; Baker, E.; Martinez, F.; Buck, N.; Walker, S.; Seewald, J.; Proskurowski, G.; Lupton, J.; Wheat, G.

    2008-12-01

    In 2004 and 2008, we conducted extensive surveys of hydrothermal plumes along the East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) in the Lau Back Arc Basin. The survey in 2008 is the most comprehensive plume survey conducted on any ridge to date. It covered 100 km2 by towing the 120 kHz side scan sonar and associated sensors from 19.9 to 21° S at 1 km intervals extending 5km on each side of the ridge crest. This part of the survey encompassed the known vent fields, Tow Cam, ABE, and Kila Moana. A fourth major vent field north of ABE was also identified. Near the ABE vent field survey lines were done at 0.5km intervals. The Valu Fa Ridge from 21.9 to 22.4°S was also surveyed using 7 lines at 0.7km spacing. The side scan sonar was towed ~ 100m above the sea floor with plume sensing instruments on the towline, clump weight, sonar, and on a line extended below the clump weight. Plume sensors included the Vents In Situ Analyzer, optical backscatter, Oxidation Reduction Potential, and CTD. Vertical and towed hydrocasts were located in areas of interest to collect sea water samples for chemical characterization of the plumes. While the surveys indicate that robust (high temperature) venting was restricted to an area within 1km of the ridge axis, there was some limited evidence of lower temperature venting further form the axis. The plume data from the sensors and discrete samples will be used to chemically characterize the hydrothermal plumes found along the ELSC. Emphasis will be placed on known vent fields and the North ABE field. 3He and Mn in the plumes will be compared to vent fluid data at the known sites. Although the N. ABE field appears to be the largest of the vent fields in this region, vent fluids from it have not yet been collected. The plumes above N. ABE have the most elevated levels of 3He and Mn of all of the plumes sampled along the ELSC and Valu Fa Ridges. This vent field is located closer to the transitions between andesitic rocks in the south and basaltic rocks in

  20. 河北省安国市药材田与粮作田土壤硝酸盐的累积特征%Characteristic of Soil Nitrate Accumulation on Herbal Field and Grain Field in Anguo City, Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵姣姣; 刘文科; 刘义飞

    2013-01-01

    In order to provide scientific guidance for reasonable nitrogen fertilizer application,the soil nitrate accumulation of croplands under Chinese medicinal plants and food crops in Anguo city,Heibei province was investigated by field sampling and chemical analysis.The results showed that ranges of nitrate contents in 0-20,20-40 and 40-60cm layers of herbal fields were 37.96-436.86,26.27-435.64 and 12.91-383.23mg · kg-1,while ranges of nitrate contents in0-20,20-40 and 40-60cm layers of grain fields were 3.71-184.65,8.14-198.11 and 6.04-145.81mg · kg-1,respectively.The results indicated that (1) nitrate content in 0-20cm soil layer of herbal fields were higher than that of 20-40cm (P < 0.01) and 40-60cm soil layers (P < 0.05),while soil nitrate contents between 20-40 and 40-60cm soil layers showed no significant difference; (2) Soil nitrate content in 20-40cm soil layer of grain fields were slightly higher than that of,but no difference was found between 0-20 and 40-60cm soil layers; (3) Soil nitrate content decreased with the soil depth for two kinds of croplands,and soil nitrate content in herbal fields was significantly higher than that of grain fields at the same soil layer (P <0.01).There were 35% that their nitrate contents topsoil had exceeded critical value of safety.Also,about 10% herbal fields had been seriously polluted by nitrate.The data showed that soil nitrate of grain fields were in safe range basically.To conclude,nitrate accumulation of herbal fields was more severe than grain fields,which posed potential problems for sustainable production.%通过田间取样,研究分析河北省安国市耕地土壤中硝酸盐含量累积特征,以了解当前耕作条件下药材田与粮作田土壤中硝酸盐含量现状,为科学合理施用氮肥提供依据.经分析测定,在所选药材田中0-20、20-40和40-60cm土层中硝酸盐含量分别为37.96 ~436.86、26.27~435.64和12.91~383.23mg·kg-1,粮作田相应土层

  1. An exploration for hydrothermal plume evolution using the AUV "URASHIMA" with fluid sampling system at southern Mariana Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, T.; Sunamura, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Fukuba, T.; Okino, K.; Sugiyama, T.; Okamura, K.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrothermal fluids contain high concentration of anoxic chemical species, i.e. methane and hydrogen sulfide, helium-3, and heavy metals derived from the rock-water interaction. During the hydothermal plume spreading, it is known that several chemical species are oxidized which include available energy source for microorganism, however, few results have been reported on the spatial variation of both of chemical and microbiological concentration and species. In the southern Mariana Trough, some site surveys have been conducted with CTD hydrocasts, the manned submersible, and ROVs since 2003. In this field, three hydrothermal vent sites were discovered within the small area, where the chemistry of each hydrothermal fluid was different from each other. These differences of chemistry are prospected to affect the individual plume evolution. In order to discuss the each hydrothermal plume evolution, we conducted high-resolution plume mapping by the AUV "URASHIMA" with some chemical sensors. Additionally, we loaded 24 bottles of water sampler for the geochemical and microbial analysis. During this cruise, we detected hydrothermal plume anomalies derived from each hydrothermal site with the highly precise topographic results. Based on the results, we will discuss the relationships between the spreading of hydrothermal plume (geochemical evolution) and the ecology of plume microbes.

  2. The city of the merchant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnow, Niels Finn

    2003-01-01

    The City of the Merchant deals with cities, towns and villages in the European medieval period - i.e. in post-antique and pre-industrial Europe. In actual fact, the book mainly deals with Denmark and Northern Italy (the City States), with digressions to other "feudal" localities in France on Sici......, in the middle East, the Crusades, in Germany (the Hansatic League) and, finally, as far a field as the Danish West Indies. The book is part of a larger project that comprises other historical environments....

  3. Magnetic Structure of Backarc Spreading Axis with Hydrothermal Vents; the Southern Mariana Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, M.; Okino, K.; Mochizuki, N.; Honsho, C.; Szitkar, F.; Dyment, J.; Nakamura, K.

    2012-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems are important in relation to global heat and chemical fluxes as well as habitat of microbial communities. The substantial variation of hydrothermal systems in various tectonic settings has important implications for the magnetic structure of oceanic crust. It has been very difficult to detect the geophysical signature of hydrothermal systems from sea-surface data because the small scale of hydrothermal systems is below the limit of resolution. The advance of near-bottom survey methods using a submersible, deep-tow, ROV and AUV has made possible high-resolution geophysical mapping around hydrothermal areas. Near-bottom magnetic surveys can provide direct information on the magnetization of the shallower oceanic crust, implying hydrothermal alteration both in active and fossil vent sites. Near-bottom three component magnetic measurements on submersible Shinkai 6500 were carried out at hydrothermal fields in the Southern Mariana Trough, a slow spreading backarc basin. Fourteen dive surveys were conducted during cruises YK11-10 and YK10-11. We investigated the magnetic structure of four hydrothermal systems located at on- and off-axis to clarify how the geophysical and geological setting controls the fluid circulation at small scale. Recent researches at slow spreading ridges showed a relationship between crustal magnetic structure and host rock around hydrothermal vents (e.g. Tivey and Dyment, 2010), but no observation at backarc spreading axis has been reported so far. We carefully corrected the effects of induced and permanent magnetizations of the submersible by applying the method of Isezaki [1986] with dumped least-square method (Honsho et al., 2009). After subtracting the IGRF from the corrected observed data, we obtained geomagnetic vector anomalies in geographical coordinate. For three transects of the axis, we applied three methods; 2D inversion technique (Parker and Huestis, 1972), 2D forward modeling technique (Honsho et al

  4. Serpentinization-assisted deformation processes and characterization of hydrothermal fluxes at mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Gence

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems play a significantly important role in Earth’s energy and geochemical budgets and support the existence and development of complex biological ecosystems by providing nutrient and energy to microbial and macrafaunal ecosystems through geochemical fluxes. Heat output and fluid flow are key parameters which characterize hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers by constraining models of hydrothermal circulation. Although integrated measurements of heat flux in plumes are critically important as well, quantification of heat flux at discrete sources (vent orifices versus patches of seafloor shimmering diffuse flow) from direct measurements is particularly essential for examining the partitioning of heat flow into focused and diffuse components of venting and determining geochemical fluxes from these two modes of flow. Hydrothermal heat output also constrains the permeability of young oceanic crust and thickness of the conductive boundary layer that separates magmatic heat source from overlying hydrothermal circulation. This dissertation will be fundamentally focused on three main inter-connected topics: (1) the design and development of direct high- or low-temperature heat flow measuring devices for hydrothermal systems, (2) the collection of new heat output results on four cruises between 2008 and 2010 at several distinct hydrothermal sites along mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to estimate total heat output from individual vent structures such as Dante, Hulk or the whole vent field (e.g., Main Endeavour Vent Field (MEF)), the partitioning between focused and diffuse hydrothermal venting in MEF, and determination of initial estimates of geochemical flux from diffuse hydrothermal fluids which may be influenced by the activity in subsurface biosphere and finally (3) the deformation and uplift associated with serpentinization at MORs and subduction zones. Despite extensive efforts spent for the last couple of decades on heat flow measurement

  5. Hydrothermal plume anomalies along the Central Indian Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jian; LIN Jian; GUO ShiQin; CHEN YongShun

    2008-01-01

    Water column turbidity and temperature were investigated along the Central Indian Ridge (CIR) from 25°19'S to 23°48'S during a December 2005 cruise on board Chinese P/V DayangYihao.Measurements were made using NOAA's MAPR (Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorder) sensors during CTD casts,TV grabber operations,and tow-yo profiles,yielding the following results on hydrothermal plume anomalies:(1) Strong hydrothermal turbidity and temperature anomalies were recorded over the pre-viously discovered Kairei (25°19.2'S,70°02.4'E) and Edmond (23°52.7'S,69°35.8"E) vent fields,with the plume anomalies concentrated at depths of 2150-2300 m and 2700-2900 m,respectively.The maxi-mum height of the turbidity anomalies near the Kairei vent field recorded in December 2005 was slightly below 2100 m,which is consistent with the plume depth measured in June 2001,indicating that the Kairei plume may have maintained its buoyancy flux in the intervening 4.5 years.(2) The water column beneath the Kairei plume has background anomalies of about 0.005△NTU,whereas no such back-ground turbidity anomalies were observed below the Edmond hydrothermal plume.(3) No visible tur-bidity anomalies were detected from 24°42'S to 24°12'S including the Knorr Seamount.Thus 24°12'S marks the southern end of the hydrothermal plume.(4) Significant turbidity anomalies were observed at four individual sections from 24°12'S to 23°56'S at the depth of 2500-3000 m along the eastern rift valley wall.Whether the individual sections of anomalies are connected is still unknown due to the absence of data at the intervening gaps.If the four sections are connected with each other and are linked to the Edmond vent field farther to the north,the total along-axis length of the plume anomaly would be more than 37 km,implying a plume incidence value Ph of 0.38,greater than the predicted Ph of 0.21-0.25 based on the spreading rate of the Central Indian Ridge.

  6. Parameterization of and Brine Storage in MOR Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, J.; Lowell, R. P.; Cummings, K. B.

    2009-12-01

    Single-pass parameterized models of high-temperature hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers use observational constraints such as vent temperature, heat output, vent field area, and the area of heat extraction from the sub-axial magma chamber to deduce fundamental hydrothermal parameters such as total mass flux Q, bulk permeability k, and the thickness of the conductive boundary layer at the base of the system, δ. Of the more than 300 known systems, constraining data are available for less than 10%. Here we use the single pass model to estimate Q, k, and δ for all the seafloor hydrothermal systems for which the constraining data are available. Mean values of Q, k, and δ are 170 kg/s, 5.0x10-13 m2, and 20 m, respectively; which is similar to results obtained from the generic model. There is no apparent correlation with spreading rate. Using observed vent field lifetimes, the rate of magma replenishment can also be calculated. Essentially all high-temperature hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers undergo phase separation, yielding a low chlorinity vapor and a high salinity brine. Some systems such as the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the 9°50’N sites on the East Pacific Rise vent low chlorinity vapor for many years, while the high density brine remains sequestered beneath the seafloor. In an attempt to further understand the brine storage at the EPR, we used the mass flux Q determined above, time series of vent salinity and temperature, and the depth of the magma chamber to determine the rate of brine production at depth. We found thicknesses ranging from 0.32 meters to ~57 meters over a 1 km2 area from 1994-2002. These calculations suggest that brine maybe being stored within the conductive boundary layer without a need for lateral transport or removal by other means. We plan to use the numerical code FISHES to further test this idea.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of La(OH)3 Nanorods by Hydrothermal Microemulsion Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Dong YIN; Guang Yan HONG

    2005-01-01

    La(OH)3 nanorods with diameters of 20-40 nm and lengths of 200-300 nm were synthesized by a hydrothermal microemulsion method. The structure and morphology of the final products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy(TEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM).

  8. Geophysical characterization of hydrothermal systems and intrusive bodies, El Chichón volcano (Mexico)

    OpenAIRE

    Jutzeler, Martin; Varley, Nick; Roach, Michael

    2011-01-01

    [1] The 1982 explosive eruptions of El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) destroyed the inner dome and created a 1-km-wide and 180-m-deep crater within the somma crater. A shallow hydrothermal system was exposed to the surface of the new crater floor and is characterized by an acid crater lake, a geyser-like Cl-rich spring (soap pool), and numerous fumarole fields. Multiple geophysical surveys were performed to define the internal structure of the volcanic edifice and its hydrothermal system. ...

  9. Web based hybrid volumetric visualisation of urban GIS data. Integration of 4D Temperature and Wind Fields with LoD-2 CityGML models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congote, J.; Moreno, A.; Kabongo, L.; Pérez, J.-L.; San-José, R.; Ruiz, O.

    2012-10-01

    City models visualisation, buildings, structures and volumetric information, is an important task in Computer Graphics and Urban Planning. The different formats and data sources involved in the visualisation make the development of applications a big challenge. We present a homogeneous web visualisation framework using X3DOM and MEDX3DOM for the visualisation of these urban objects. We present an integration of different declarative data sources, enabling the utilization of advanced visualisation algorithms to render the models. It has been tested with a city model composed of buildings from the Madrid University Campus, some volumetric datasets coming from Air Quality Models and 2D layers wind datasets. Results show that the visualisation of all the urban models can be performed in real time on the Web. An HTML5 web interface is presented to the users, enabling real time modifications of visualisation parameters.

  10. The hydrothermal alteration in the context of geologic evolution from Pocos de Caldas Alkaline Massif, MG-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pocos de Caldas Alkaline Massif covers 800 km2, a quarter of which is hydrothermally altered. Such proportion is uncommon, when compared to the know alkaline massifs of the world. The hydrothermal alteration is associated with Zr, U and Mo mineralizations which are predominantly located in the central-southern portion of the massif, in the central-eastern circular structure. The colour of the altered rock (and its soil) in that area is typically whitish beige to yellowish white and is regionally called potassic rock. The Osamu Utsumi Mine, also referred to as the uranium ore of Campo do Cercado, is located 25 Km to the south of Pocos de Caldas City and was explored, from 1977 to 1989, through the open pit method. A sequence of alteration minerals adapted to lowering temperatures should be expected; however, only illite and alkaline feldspar are observed in the hydrothermally altered portions of the massif, and their formation must have been controlled mainly by kinetic, other than thermal factors. The irrestrict circulation of relatively hotter hydrothermal fluids must have happened at the beginning of the process, diminishing immediately after the cooling of the brecciated areas (and the subjacent magmatic body), leading the system to kinetics levels that made subsequent hydrothermal alteration impossible. (author)

  11. Hydrothermal bitumen generated from sedimentary organic matter of rift lakes - Lake Chapala, Citala Rift, western Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarate del Valle, Pedro F. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Guadalajara - CUCEI, Ap. Postal 4-021, Guadalajara, Jalisco CP 44410 (Mexico); Simoneit, Bernd R.T. [Environmental and Petroleum Geochemistry Group, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Building 104, Corvallis, OR 97331-5503 (United States)]. E-mail: simoneit@coas.oregonstate.edu

    2005-12-15

    Lake Chapala is in the Citala Rift of western Mexico, which in association with the Tepic-Zacoalco and Colima Rifts, form the well-known neotectonic Jalisco continental triple junction. The rifts are characterized by evidence for both paleo- and active hydrothermal activity. At the south shore of the lake, near the Los Gorgos sublacustrine hydrothermal field, there are two tar emanations that appear as small islands composed of solid, viscous and black bitumen. Aliquots of tar were analyzed by GC-MS and the mixtures are comprised of geologically mature biomarkers and an UCM. PAH and n-alkanes are not detectable. The biomarkers consist mainly of hopanes, gammacerane, tricyclic terpanes, carotane and its cracking products, steranes, and drimanes. The biomarker composition and bulk C isotope composition ({delta} {sup 13}C = -21.4%) indicate an organic matter source from bacteria and algae, typical of lacustrine ecosystems. The overall composition of these tars indicates that they are hydrothermal petroleum formed from lacustrine organic matter in the deeper sediments of Lake Chapala exceeding 40 ka ({sup 14}C) in age and then forced to the lakebed by tectonic activity. The absence of alkanes and the presence of an UCM with mature biomarkers are consistent with rapid hydrothermal oil generation and expulsion at temperatures of 200-250 deg. C. The occurrence of hydrothermal petroleum in continental rift systems is now well known and should be considered in future energy resource exploration in such regions.

  12. High-pressure homogenization associated hydrothermal process of palygorskite for enhanced adsorption of Methylene blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhifang [Center of Eco-materials and Green Chemistry, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Wenbo [Center of Eco-materials and Green Chemistry, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); R& D Center of Xuyi Attapulgite Applied Technology, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xuyi 211700 (China); Wang, Aiqin, E-mail: aqwang@licp.cas.cn [Center of Eco-materials and Green Chemistry, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); R& D Center of Xuyi Attapulgite Applied Technology, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xuyi 211700 (China)

    2015-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Palygorskite was modified by a homogenization associated hydrothermal process. • The crystal bundles of PAL were disaggregated efficiently after modification. • The adsorption of palygorskite for Methylene blue was greatly enhanced. • MB-loaded palygorskite exhibits excellent resistance to acid and alkali solution. - Abstract: Palygorskite (PAL) was modified by a high-pressure homogenization assisted hydrothermal process. The effects of modification on the morphology, structure and physicochemical properties of PAL were systematically investigated by Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Zeta potential analysis techniques, and the adsorption properties were systematically evaluated using Methylene blue (MB) as the model dye. The results revealed that the crystal bundles were disaggregated and the PAL nanorods became more even after treated via associated high-pressure homogenization and hydrothermal process, and the crystal bundles were dispersed as nanorods. The intrinsic crystal structure of PAL was remained after hydrothermal treatment, and the pore size calculated by the BET method was increased. The adsorption properties of PAL for MB were evidently improved (from 119 mg/g to 171 mg/g) after modification, and the dispersion of PAL before hydrothermal reaction is favorable to the adsorption. The desorption evaluation confirms that the modified PAL has stronger affinity with MB, which is benefit to fabricate a stable organic–inorganic hybrid pigment.

  13. Hydrothermal bitumen generated from sedimentary organic matter of rift lakes - Lake Chapala, Citala Rift, western Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake Chapala is in the Citala Rift of western Mexico, which in association with the Tepic-Zacoalco and Colima Rifts, form the well-known neotectonic Jalisco continental triple junction. The rifts are characterized by evidence for both paleo- and active hydrothermal activity. At the south shore of the lake, near the Los Gorgos sublacustrine hydrothermal field, there are two tar emanations that appear as small islands composed of solid, viscous and black bitumen. Aliquots of tar were analyzed by GC-MS and the mixtures are comprised of geologically mature biomarkers and an UCM. PAH and n-alkanes are not detectable. The biomarkers consist mainly of hopanes, gammacerane, tricyclic terpanes, carotane and its cracking products, steranes, and drimanes. The biomarker composition and bulk C isotope composition (δ 13C = -21.4%) indicate an organic matter source from bacteria and algae, typical of lacustrine ecosystems. The overall composition of these tars indicates that they are hydrothermal petroleum formed from lacustrine organic matter in the deeper sediments of Lake Chapala exceeding 40 ka (14C) in age and then forced to the lakebed by tectonic activity. The absence of alkanes and the presence of an UCM with mature biomarkers are consistent with rapid hydrothermal oil generation and expulsion at temperatures of 200-250 deg. C. The occurrence of hydrothermal petroleum in continental rift systems is now well known and should be considered in future energy resource exploration in such regions

  14. Influence of Hydrothermal Temperature on Phosphorus Recovery Efficiency of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous calcium silicate hydrate (PCSH) was synthesized by carbide residue and white carbon black. The influence of hydrothermal temperature on phosphorus recovery efficiency was investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Hydrothermal temperature exerted significant influence on phosphorus recovery performance of PCSH. Hydrothermal temperature 170°C for PCSH was more proper to recover phosphorus. PCSH could recover phosphorus with content of 18.51%. The law of Ca2+ and OH− release was the key of phosphorus recovery efficiency, and this law depended upon the microstructure of PCSH. When the temperature of synthesis reached to 170°C, the reactions between CaO and amorphous SiO2 were more efficient. Solubility of SiO2 was a limiting factor.

  15. Influence of Hydrothermal Temperature on Phosphorus Recovery Efficiency of Porous Calcium Silicate Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous calcium silicate hydrate (PCSH was synthesized by carbide residue and white carbon black. The influence of hydrothermal temperature on phosphorus recovery efficiency was investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. Hydrothermal temperature exerted significant influence on phosphorus recovery performance of PCSH. Hydrothermal temperature 170°C for PCSH was more proper to recover phosphorus. PCSH could recover phosphorus with content of 18.51%. The law of Ca2+ and OH− release was the key of phosphorus recovery efficiency, and this law depended upon the microstructure of PCSH. When the temperature of synthesis reached to 170°C, the reactions between CaO and amorphous SiO2 were more efficient. Solubility of SiO2 was a limiting factor.

  16. Hydrothermal processing of new fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, W.; Roy, D.M. (Materials Research Lab., Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    1992-04-01

    The recent Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption in the Philippines, in which at least 268 people died, shows that volcanic eruptions can be highly destructive. The eruption shot ash and debris over the countryside; six towns near the volcano faced a high risk of devastating mudslides, and nearly 2000 U.S. service members and their families were evacuated from two nearby military bases. However, this paper reports that not all the consequences of volcanic eruptions are bad. Under hydrothermal conditions, volcanic ash can be transformed into zeolitic tuff and, eventually, into clay minerals that constitute agricultural soils. The Materials Research Laboratory (MRL) has recently used some artificial pozzolanas (fly ash) that when mixed with lime, under hydrothermal conditions, also produced a new type of cementitious material. This was categorized as a new fly ash cement. The formation of a new hydrothermally treated wood-fiber-reinforced composite has also been demonstrated. It is apparent, however, that with respect to concerns about detailed knowledge of the reactivity of calcium silicate-based materials under hydrothermal conditions, the application of the technology far outweighs the understanding of the underlying principles of reactivity. It would seem that an understanding of reactions on the molecular level is just beginning, and that work on hydrothermal reactions is still a potentially lucrative area of research.

  17. The hydrothermal power of oceanic lithosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Grose

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We have estimated the power of ventilated hydrothermal heat transport, and its spatial distribution, using a set of recently developed plate models which highlight the effects of hydrothermal circulation and thermal insulation by oceanic crust. Testing lithospheric cooling models with these two effects, we estimate that global advective heat transport is about 6.6 TW, significantly lower than previous estimates, and that the fraction of that extracted by vigorous circulation on the ridge axes (<1 Ma is about 50% of the total, significantly higher than previous estimates. This low hydrothermal power estimate originates from the thermally insulating properties of oceanic crust in relation to the mantle. Since the crust is relatively insulating, the effective properties of the lithosphere are "crust dominated" near ridge axes (yielding lower heat flow, and gradually approach mantle values over time. Thus, cooling models with crustal insulation predict low heat flow over young seafloor, implying that the difference of modeled and measured heat flow is due to the heat transport properties of the lithosphere, in addition to ventilated hydrothermal circulation as generally accepted. These estimates may bear on important problems in the physics and chemistry of the Earth because the magnitude of hydrothermal power affects chemical exchanges between the oceans and the lithosphere, thereby affecting both thermal and chemical budgets in the oceanic crust and lithosphere, the subduction factory, and convective mantle.

  18. The production of methane, hydrogen, and organic compounds in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konn, C; Charlou, J L; Holm, N G; Mousis, O

    2015-05-01

    Both hydrogen and methane are consistently discharged in large quantities in hydrothermal fluids issued from ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal fields discovered along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Considering the vast number of these fields discovered or inferred, hydrothermal fluxes represent a significant input of H2 and CH4 to the ocean. Although there are lines of evidence of their abiogenic formation from stable C and H isotope results, laboratory experiments, and thermodynamic data, neither their origin nor the reaction pathways generating these gases have been fully constrained yet. Organic compounds detected in the fluids may also be derived from abiotic reactions. Although thermodynamics are favorable and extensive experimental work has been done on Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, for instance, nothing is clear yet about their origin and formation mechanism from actual data. Since chemolithotrophic microbial communities commonly colonize hydrothermal vents, biogenic and thermogenic processes are likely to contribute to the production of H2, CH4, and other organic compounds. There seems to be a consensus toward a mixed origin (both sources and processes) that is consistent with the ambiguous nature of the isotopic data. But the question that remains is, to what proportions? More systematic experiments as well as integrated geochemical approaches are needed to disentangle hydrothermal geochemistry. This understanding is of prime importance considering the implications of hydrothermal H2, CH4, and organic compounds for the ocean global budget, global cycles, and the origin of life.

  19. Hydrothermal Vents at 5000m on the Mid-Cayman Rise: The Deepest and Hottest Hydrothermal Systems Yet Discovered!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, B. J.; Connelly, D. P.; Copley, J. T.; Stansfield, K. L.; Tyler, P. A.; Cruise Jc044 Sceintific Party

    2010-12-01

    site hosts vigorous medium-temperature fluid discharge from sulphide chimneys at the summit of an 80m diameter sulphide mound. Exiting vent fluids are mostly clear with only traces of sulphide particulates. The chimneys are composed predominately of iron sulphides and calcium sulphate, with estimated fluid temperatures in the region of 150-250°C. The vent site is located on a peridotite ± gabbro massif (Mt Dent), forming the western flank of the MCR. The morphology and lithology of Mt Dent indicates that it is an oceanic core complex, but in a ‘dying’ stage. The axial volcanic ridge to the north has propagated into the OCC foot-wall and probably supplies the heat driving the hydrothermal system. The only detectable signature from this vent field is its low Eh plume. As a result, we believe that this style of venting has hitherto been overlooked, and thus its global significance for the cooling and alteration of slow-spread oceanic crust may be greatly underestimated.

  20. A Palaeoproterozoic multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robin-Marie; Kolb, Jochen; Waight, Tod Earle; Bagas, Leon; Thomsen, Tonny B.

    2016-07-01

    Nalunaq is an orogenic, high gold grade deposit situated on the Nanortalik Peninsula, South Greenland. Mineralisation is hosted in shear zone-controlled quartz veins, located in fine- and medium-grained amphibolite. The deposit was the site of Greenland's only operating metalliferous mine until its closure in 2014, having produced 10.67 t of gold. This study uses a combination of field investigation, petrography and U/Pb zircon and titanite geochronology to define a multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq. A clinopyroxene-plagioclase-garnet(-sulphide) alteration zone (CPGZ) developed in the Nanortalik Peninsula, close to regional peak metamorphism and prior to gold-quartz vein formation. The ca. 1783-1762-Ma gold-quartz veins are hosted in reactivated shear zones with a hydrothermal alteration halo of biotite-arsenopyrite-sericite-actinolite-pyrrhotite(-chlorite-plagioclase-löllingite-tourmaline-titanite), which is best developed in areas of exceptionally high gold grades. Aplite dykes dated to ca. 1762 Ma cross-cut the gold-quartz veins, providing a minimum age for mineralisation. A hydrothermal calcite-titanite alteration assemblage is dated to ca. 1766 Ma; however, this alteration is highly isolated, and as a result, its field relationships are poorly constrained. The hydrothermal alteration and mineralisation is cut by several generations of ca. 1745-Ma biotite granodiorite accompanied by brittle deformation. A ca. 1745-Ma lower greenschist facies hydrothermal epidote-calcite-zoisite alteration assemblage with numerous accessory minerals forms halos surrounding the late-stage fractures. The contrasting hydrothermal alteration styles at Nalunaq indicate a complex history of exhumation from amphibolite facies conditions to lower greenschist facies conditions in an orogenic belt which resembles modern Phanerozoic orogens.

  1. Sinking coastal cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkens, Gilles; Bucx, Tom; Dam, Rien; De Lange, Ger; Lambert, John

    2014-05-01

    In many coastal and delta cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs. This effects roads and transportation networks, hydraulic infrastructure - such as river embankments, sluice gates, flood barriers and pumping stations -, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. Excessive groundwater extraction after rapid urbanization and population growth is the main cause of severe land subsidence. In addition, coastal cities are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. Because of ongoing urbanization and population growth in delta areas, in particular in coastal megacities, there is, and will be, more economic development in subsidence-prone areas. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by extreme weather events (short term) and rising sea levels (long term).Consequently, detrimental impacts will increase in the near future, making it necessary to address subsidence related problems now. Subsidence is an issue that involves many policy fields, complex technical aspects and governance embedment. There is a need for an integrated approach in order to manage subsidence and to develop appropriate strategies and measures that are effective and efficient on both the short and long term. Urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management and related spatial planning strategies are just examples of the options available. A major rethink is needed to deal with the 'hidden' but urgent

  2. Near-bottom magnetic surveys around hydrothermal sites in the southern Mariana Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogi, Y.; Mochizuki, N.; Okino, K.; Asada, M.

    2011-12-01

    Near-bottom magnetic survey is an effective method to reveal detailed magnetic anomaly features of seafloor. The measurements of three-components of the geomagnetic field by using AUV "URASHIMA" were conducted during the YK-09-08 cruise in the southern Mariana Trough in order to detect signals of hydrothermally altered rocks. During the cruise, vector geomagnetic field are successfully obtained along the all dive tracks with the information of the vehicle's attitude. Total intensities of geomagnetic field by the overhauser magnetometer were also conducted, but the data are only collected along almost E-W oriented observation lines due to the sensitivity of the sensor. The distribution of crustal magnetization are estimated using downward component of magnetic anomalies by the inversion method. The distribution of low crustal magnetization are almost coincide with the area around hydrothermal vent sites from on ridge to off ridge area, and most likely indicate signs of hydrothermally altered rocks. The distribution of low crustal magnetization on ridge are almost parallel to the the strike of ridge axis implying tectonic control of hydrothermal vent sites.

  3. Characterization of advanced preprocessed materials (Hydrothermal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel Emerson; Garold Gresham

    2012-09-01

    The initial hydrothermal treatment parameters did not achieve the proposed objective of this effort; the reduction of intrinsic ash in the corn stover. However, liquid fractions from the 170°C treatments was indicative that some of the elements routinely found in the ash that negatively impact the biochemical conversion processes had been removed. After reviewing other options for facilitating ash removal, sodium-citrate (chelating agent) was included in the hydrothermal treatment process, resulting in a 69% reduction in the physiological ash. These results indicated that chelation –hydrothermal treatment is one possible approach that can be utilized to reduce the overall ash content of feedstock materials and having a positive impact on conversion performance.

  4. Hydrothermal treatment of electric arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing-Sheng; Wang, Yuh-Ruey; Chang, Tien-Chin

    2011-06-15

    In this study, ZnO crystals were fabricated from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) after alkaline leaching, purification and hydrothermal treatment. The effects of temperature, duration, pH, and solid/liquid ratio on ZnO crystal morphology and size were investigated. Results show a high reaction temperature capable of accelerating the dissolution of ZnO precursor, expediting the growth of 1D ZnO, and increasing the L/D ratio in the temperature range of 100-200°C. ZnO crystals with high purity can also be obtained, using the one-step hydrothermal treatment with a baffle that depends on the different solubility of zincite and franklinite in the hydrothermal conditions.

  5. The BGU/CERN solar hydrothermal reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Caspers, Fritz; Garb, Yaakov; Gross, Amit; Pauletta, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel solar hydrothermal reactor (SHR) under development by Ben Gurion University (BGU) and the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. We describe in broad terms the several novel aspects of the device and, by extension, of the niche it occupies: in particular, enabling direct off-grid conversion of a range of organic feedstocks to sterile useable (solid, liquid) fuels, nutrients, products using only solar energy and water. We then provide a brief description of the high temperature high efficiency panels that provide process heat to the hydrothermal reactor, and review the basics of hydrothermal processes and conversion taking place in this. We conclude with a description of a simulation of the pilot system that will begin operation later this year.

  6. The influence of isotropic and anisotropic crustal permeability on hydrothermal flow at fast spreading ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Rüpke, Lars; Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Morgan, Jason

    2016-04-01

    We use 3-D numerical models of hydrothermal fluid flow to assess the magnitude and spatial distribution of hydrothermal mass and energy fluxes within the upper and lower oceanic crust. A better understanding of the hydrothermal flow pattern (e.g. predominantly on-axis above the axial melt lens vs. predominantly off-axis and ridge-perpendicular over the entire crustal thickness) is essential for quantifying the volume of oceanic crust exposed to high-temperature fluid flow and the associated leaching and redistribution of economically interesting metals. The initial setup of all 3-D models is based on our previous 2-D studies (Theissen-Krah et al., 2011), in which we have coupled numerical models for crustal accretion and hydrothermal fluid flow. One result of these 2-D calculations is a crustal permeability field that leads to a thermal structure in the crust that matches seismic tomography data at the East Pacific Rise. Our reference 3-D model for hydrothermal flow at fast-spreading ridges predicts the existence of a hybrid hydrothermal system (Hasenclever et al., 2014) with two interacting flow components that are controlled by different physical mechanisms. Shallow on-axis flow structures develop owing to the thermodynamic properties of water, whereas deeper off-axis flow is strongly shaped by crustal permeability, particularly the brittle-ductile transition. About ˜60% of the discharging fluid mass is replenished on-axis by warm (up to 300oC) recharge flow surrounding the hot thermal plumes. The remaining ˜40%, however, occurs as colder and broader recharge up to several kilometres away from the ridge axis that feeds hot (500-700oC) deep off-axis flow in the lower crust towards the ridge. Both flow components merge above the melt lens to feed ridge-centred vent sites. In a suite of 3-D model calculations we vary the isotropic crustal permeability to quantify its influence on on-axis vs. off-axis hydrothermal fluxes as well as on along-axis hydrothermal

  7. Ampharetidae (Annelida: Polychaeta) from cold seeps off Pakistan and hydrothermal vents off Taiwan, with the description of three new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuscher, Michael G; Fiege, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The new ampharetid species Eclysippe yonaguniensis sp. nov. and Glyphanostomum bilabiatum sp. nov. from the Yonaguni Knoll IV hydrothermal field off the coast of Taiwan and Pavelius makranensis sp. nov. from the cold seeps in the Makran accretionary prism off the coast of Pakistan are described. Amage cf. ehlersi Reuscher, Fiege & Imajima, 2015 and Anobothrus dayi Imajima, Reuscher & Fiege, 2013 are newly recorded from the Yonaguni Knoll IV hydrothermal field. PMID:27470798

  8. Branding Cities, Changing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Societal changes are seldom discussed in the literature on city branding. The time element is important because it highlights the fluctuating reality of society. The city brand message freezes the place but in fact, the city branding exercise is a continuous process. Society emerges too. City...... brands are supposed to accentuate the uniqueness of the city, be built from the bottom-up and reflect the city's identity. This paper highlights three paradoxes, pointing out that city branding processes can also make cities more alike, bring about societal changes and forge new city identities. A city...... branding campaign does not just present the city, it may change the city. The relationships between the branding exercise and the city are intertwined in the evolution of the place....

  9. Learning Cities as Healthy Green Cities: Building Sustainable Opportunity Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a new generation of learning cities we have called EcCoWell cities (Economy, Community, Well-being). The paper was prepared for the PASCAL International Exchanges (PIE) and is based on international experiences with PIE and developments in some cities. The paper argues for more holistic and integrated development so that…

  10. Formation of hydrothermal deposits at Kings Triple Junction, northern Lau back-arc basin, SW Pacific: The geochemical perspectives

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A.L.; Ray, D.; Balaram, V.; Prakash, L.S.; Mirza, I.H.; Satyanarayana, M.; Rao, T.G.; Kaisary, S.

    An inactive hydrothermal field was discovered near Kings Triple Junction (KTJ) in northern Lau back-arc basin during 19th cruise of R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in 1990. The field consisted of a large elongated basal platform ‘the pedestal...

  11. In situ chemical sensing for hydrothermal plume mapping and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuba, T.; Kusunoki, T.; Maeda, Y.; Shitashima, K.; Kyo, M.; Fujii, T.; Noguchi, T.; Sunamura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Detection, monitoring, and mapping of biogeochemical anomalies in seawater such as temperature, salinity, turbidity, oxidation-reduction potential, and pH are essential missions to explore undiscovered hydrothermal sites and to understand distribution and behavior of hydrothermal plumes. Utilization of reliable and useful in situ sensors has been widely accepted as a promised approach to realize a spatiotemporally resolved mapping of anomalies without water sampling operations. Due to remarkable progresses of sensor technologies and its relatives, a number of highly miniaturized and robust chemical sensors have been proposed and developed. We have been developed, evaluated, and operated a compact ISFET (Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor)-based chemical sensors for ocean environmental sensing purposes. An ISFET has advantages against conventional glass-based electrodes on its faster response, robustness, and potential on miniaturization, and thus variety of chemical sensors has been already on the market. In this study, ISFET-based standalone pH sensors with a solid-state Cl-ISE as a reference electrode were mounted on various platforms and operated to monitor the pH anomalies in deep-sea environment at the Kairei, Edmond, and surrounding hydrothermal sites in the southern Central Indian Ridge area during KH10-06 scientific cruise (Nov. 2010), supported by project TAIGA (Trans-crustal Advection and In situ biogeochemical processes of Global sub-seafloor Aquifer). Up to three pH sensors were mounted on a wire-lined CTD/RMS (Rosette Multiple Sampler), dredge sampler, a series of MTD plankton nets, and VMPS (Vertical Multiple-operating Plankton Sampler). A standalone temperature sensor was bundled and operated with the pH sensor when they were mounted on the dredge sampler, MTD plankton nets, and VMPS. An AUV equipped with the pH sensor was also operated for hydrothermal activity survey operations. As a result of Tow-Yo intersect operations of the CTD

  12. The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment

    OpenAIRE

    Trajano, Heather L.; Engle, Nancy L.; Foston, Marcus; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Effective enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass benefits from lignin removal, relocation, and/or modification during hydrothermal pretreatment. Phase transition, depolymerization/repolymerization, and solubility effects may all influence these lignin changes. To better understand how lignin is altered, Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides wood samples and cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL) isolated from P. trichocarpa x P. de...

  13. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of the Microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigaard Christensen, Per; Peng, Gaël; Vogel, Frédéric;

    2014-01-01

    The microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum was processed by hydrothermal liquefaction in order to assess the influence of reaction temperature and reaction time on the product and elemental distribution. The experiments were carried out at different reaction times (5 and 15 min) and over a wide range...

  14. Formation of zirconia polymorphs under hydrothermal conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Yanqing(郑燕青); SHl; Erwei(施尔畏); Li; Wenjun(李汶军); CHEN; Zhizhan(陈之战); ZHONG; Weizhuo(仲维卓); HUXingfang(胡行方)

    2002-01-01

    Using zirconium oxychloride solution as precursor, monoclinic zirconia crystallites withnarrow distribution of nanosize were obtained in the hydrothermal reaction. However, when thereaction was in weak acidic medium or base medium, whether directly using the colloidal precipi-tate prepared from zirconium salt solutions with base solution as precursor added, or using theprecipitate after filtrating, washing and drying treatments as precursor, the product of the hydro-thermal reaction was the mixture of both monoclinic and tetragonal polymorphs. As the pH of themedium rises, the content of tetragonal phase in the product, the morphologies and size of thecrystallites all change. There are three types of formation mechanisms under hydrothermal condi-tion, which can be called as saturation-precipitation mechanism in homogeneous solution, dissolu-tion-crystallization mechanism and in-situ crystallization mechanism, respectively. The formationmechanism of crystallites varies with different hydrothermal conditions, such as the states of theprecursor and the pH of the medium, which lead to changes in the phases, morphologies andsizes of the resulting crystallites.

  15. Dissolved organic carbon in ridge-axis and ridge-flank hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Susan Q.; Butterfield, David A.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Paul Johnson, H.; Hedges, John I.

    2006-08-01

    The circulation of hydrothermal fluid through the upper oceanic crustal reservoir has a large impact on the chemistry of seawater, yet the impact on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean has received almost no attention. To determine whether hydrothermal circulation is a source or a sink for DOC in the oceans, we measured DOC concentrations in hydrothermal fluids from several environments. Hydrothermal fluids were collected from high-temperature vents and diffuse, low-temperature vents on the basalt-hosted Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and also from low-temperature vents on the sedimented eastern flanks. High-temperature fluids from Main Endeavour Field (MEF) and Axial Volcano (AV) contain very low DOC concentrations (average = 15 and 17 μM, respectively) compared to background seawater (36 μM). At MEF and AV, average DOC concentrations in diffuse fluids (47 and 48 μM, respectively) were elevated over background seawater, and high DOC is correlated with high microbial cell counts in diffuse fluids. Fluids from off-axis hydrothermal systems located on 3.5-Ma-old crust at Baby Bare Seamount and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 1026B had average DOC concentrations of 11 and 13 μM, respectively, and lowered DOC was correlated with low cell counts. The relative importance of heterotrophic uptake, abiotic sorption to mineral surfaces, thermal decomposition, and microbial production in fixing the DOC concentration in vent fluids remains uncertain. We calculated the potential effect of hydrothermal circulation on the deep-sea DOC cycle using our concentration data and published water flux estimates. Maximum calculated fluxes of DOC are minor compared to most oceanic DOC source and sink terms.

  16. Energy landscapes shape microbial communities in hydrothermal systems on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, Håkon; Økland, Ingeborg; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Pederesen, Rolf B; Steen, Ida H

    2015-07-01

    Methods developed in geochemical modelling combined with recent advances in molecular microbial ecology provide new opportunities to explore how microbial communities are shaped by their chemical surroundings. Here, we present a framework for analyses of how chemical energy availability shape chemotrophic microbial communities in hydrothermal systems through an investigation of two geochemically different basalt-hosted hydrothermal systems on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge: the Soria Moria Vent field (SMVF) and the Loki's Castle Vent Field (LCVF). Chemical energy landscapes were evaluated through modelling of the Gibbs energy from selected redox reactions under different mixing ratios between seawater and hydrothermal fluids. Our models indicate that the sediment-influenced LCVF has a much higher potential for both anaerobic and aerobic methane oxidation, as well as aerobic ammonium and hydrogen oxidation, than the SMVF. The modelled energy landscapes were used to develop microbial community composition models, which were compared with community compositions in environmental samples inside or on the exterior of hydrothermal chimneys, as assessed by pyrosequencing of partial 16S rRNA genes. We show that modelled microbial communities based solely on thermodynamic considerations can have a high predictive power and provide a framework for analyses of the link between energy availability and microbial community composition.

  17. A novel large filamentous deltaproteobacterium on hydrothermally inactive sulfide chimneys of the Southern Mariana Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shingo; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2016-04-01

    Unusual large filamentous bacteria (LFB) have been found on the deep seafloor environments. They play a significant role in geochemical cycling in the dark environments. However, our knowledge of the spatial distribution and phylogenetic diversity of the LFB on the deep seafloor are still limited due to the inaccessibility to these environments. Here, we report the discovery of a novel LFB on a hydrothermally inactive sulfide chimney in a deep-sea hydrothermal field of the Southern Mariana Trough. Light and electron microscopic observation showed that the width and total length of the LFB were >8 μm and >100 μm, respectively, of which morphology was similar to that of other known LFB such as "cable bacteria" of the Desulfobulbaceae. Analyses of a 16S rRNA gene clone library and fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that this LFB belongs to the Desulfobulbaceae. The 16S rRNA gene of the LFB showed 94% similarity to those of the reported cable bacteria and cultured deltaproteobacterial species, suggesting that the LFB is a novel cable bacterium of the Desulfobulbaceae. The novel LFB potentially play a role in sulfur cycling on sulfide chimneys at the hydrothermally ceasing or even ceased deep-sea hydrothermal fields.

  18. Pittsburgh City Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Pittsburgh City FacilitiesIncludes: City Administrative Buildings, Police Stations, Fire Stations, EMS Stations, DPW Sites, Senior Centers, Recreation Centers,...

  19. Hydrothermal activity on the summit of Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, H.; Tsubota, H.; Nakai, T.; Ishibashi, J.; Akagi, T.; Gamo, T.; Tilbrook, B.; Igarashi, G.; Kodera, M.; Shitashima, K.

    1987-01-01

    Loihi Seamount is located about 30km southeast of the Island of Hawaii; it rises from the sea floor at a depth of 4000m and reaches a maximum elevation of 1000m blow sea level. Oceanographic studies including CTD survey of warm sites and bottom photography confirmed several hydrothermal fields on the summit of the seamount. The summit is covered with hydrothermal plumes which are extremely rich in methane, helium, carbon dioxide, iron and manganese; the maximum concentration of helium is 91.8 n1/1, the highest so far reported for open-ocean water. The /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio of helium injected into seawater is 14 times the atmospheric level. The 3He/heat and CO/sub 2//heat ratios in the plumes are one to two orders of magnitude greater than those at oceanic spreading centers, implying a more primitive source region for hotspot volcanism. The plumes also show negative pH anomalies up to half a pH unit from ambient owing to the high injection rate of CO/sub 2/. (4 figs, 3 photos, 1 tab, 31 refs)

  20. Smart Cities need architects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Architects and urban planners have always been at the forefront of technical and social innovation processes, researching and proposing new urban models and buildings based on cognitive materials from both their own and other fields of knowledge. In fact, current society, including our ways of life and habits, could not be comprehended without the open, curious minds and progressive even defiant attitudes of architects such as Brunelleschi, Violletle- Duc, Perret, Le Corbusier and Fuller, who defied the threshold of conceptual and vital convention and staked everything on exploring and applying the characteristic technological breakthroughs of their day to architecture and the design of cities. (Author)

  1. Towards Smart City Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Stan, Catalin; Wøldike, Niels Peter;

    2015-01-01

    , the concept of smart city learning is exploited to situate learning about geometric shapes in concrete buildings and thus make them more accessible for younger children. In close collaboration with a local school a game for 3rd graders was developed and tested on a field trip and in class. A mixed measures......We present an approach to geometry learning that is based on a didactic theory, which builds on play in order to discover and learn about geometry. Inspired by this theory, a mobile and location-aware game has been developed that aims at embodying geometric concepts in the real world. To this end...

  2. Element enrichment and U-series isotopic characteristics of the hydrothermal sulfides at Jade site in the Okinawa Trough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The geochemical and U-series isotopic characteristics of hydrothermal sulfide samples from the Jade site (127°04.5′E, 27°15′N, water depth 1300-1450 m) at Jade site in the Okinawa Trough were analyzed. In the hydrothermal sulfide samples bearing sulfate (samples HOK1 and HOK2), the LREEs are relatively enriched. All the hydrothermal sulfide samples except HOK1 belong to Zn-rich hydrothermal sulfide. In comparison with Zn-rich hydrothermal sulfides from other fields, the contents of Zn, Pb, Ag, Cd, Au and Hg are higher, the contents of Fe, Al, Cr, Co, Ni, Sr, Te, Cs, Ti and U lower, and the 210Pb radioactivity ratios and 210Pb/Pb ratios very low. In the hydrothermal sulfide mainly composed of sphalerite, the correlations between rare elements Hf and U, and Hf and Mn as well as that between dispersive elements Ga and Zn, are strongly positive; also the contents of Au and Ag are related to Fe-sulfide, because the low temperature promotes enrichment of Au and Ag. Meanwhile, the positive correlations between Fe and Bi and between Zn and Cd are not affected by the change of mineral assemblage. Based on the 210Pb/Pb ratios of hydrothermal sulfide samples (3.99×10-5-5.42×10?5), their U isotopic composition (238U content 1.15-2.53 ppm, 238U activity 1.07-1.87 dpm/g, 234U activity 1.15-2.09 dpm/g and 234U/238U ratio 1.07-1.14) and their 232Th and 230Th contents are at base level, and the chronological age of hydrothermal sulfide at Jade site in the Okinawa Trough is between 200 and 2000 yr.

  3. Element enrichment and U-series isotopic characteristics of the hydrothermal sulfides at Jade site in the Okinawa Trough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG ZhiGangi; YU ShaoXiong; YIN XueBo; WANG XiaoYuan; ZHANG GuoLiang; WANG XiaoMei; CHEN DaiGeng

    2009-01-01

    The geochemical and U-series isotopic characteristics of hydrothermal sulfide samples from the Jade site (127°04.5'E, 27°15'N, water depth 1300-1450 m) at Jade site in the Okinawa Trough were analyzed. In the hydrothermal sulfide samples bearing sulfate (samples HOK1 and HOK2), the LREEs are rela- tively enriched. All the hydrothermal sulfide samples except HOK1 belong to Zn-rich hydrothermal sul- fide. In comparison with Zn-rich hydrothermal sulfides from other fields, the contents of Zn, Pb, Ag, Cd, Au and Hg are higher, the contents of Fe, Al, Cr, Co, Ni, Sr, Te, Ca, Ti and U lower, and the 210Pb radio- activity ratios and 210Pb/Pb ratios very low. In the hydrothermal sulfide mainly composed of sphalerite, the correlations between rare elements Hf and U, and Hf and Mn as well as that between dispersive elements Ga and Zn, are strongly positive; also the contents of Au and Ag are related to Fe-aulfide, because the low temperature promotes enrichment of Au and Ag. Meanwhile, the positive correlations between Fe and Bi and between Zn and Cd are not affected by the change of mineral assemblage. Based on the 210Pb/Pb ratios of hydrothermal sulfide samples (3.99x10-5-.42x10-5), their U isotopic composition (238 U content 1.15-2.53 ppm, 238U activity 1.07-1.87 dpm/g, 234U activity 1.15-2.09 dpm/g and 234U/238U ratio 1.07-1.14) and their 222Th and 230Th contents are at base level, and the chronological age of hydrothermal sulfide at Jade site in the Okinawa Trough is between 200 and 2000 yr.

  4. Cities, Towns and Villages - City Limit (polygon)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Data available online through GeoStor at http://www.geostor.arkansas.gov. Arkansas Cities: This data set contains all of the city limit boundaries within the state...

  5. Application of DD6180S city bus field bus technology%DD6180S城市客车总线技术应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董秀芳; 王日新

    2011-01-01

    Emphatically introduced the CAN network composition of Huanghai DD6180S articulated city bus, combine with vehicle electric sub-control system,introduce the design of CAN circuit,expound the function definition of CAN control module interface in bus electric control system and connection to vehicle device.%着重介绍了黄海DD6180S铰接城市客车CAN总线网络构成,结合整车电器分控系统,介绍了CAN总线电路设计,阐述了CAN总线在客车电器控制系统中控制模块接口功能定义及与车辆设备连接。

  6. Geochemical studies on the biodiversity and hydrothermal activity; mineralogy, chemistry, and age determination of hydrothermal chimney collected from Suiyo seamount, Izu-Bonin arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, T.; Oomori, T.; Taira, N.; Takada, J.; Urabe, T.

    2004-12-01

    Hydrothermal chimney structure has the steep environmental gradients of temperature, redox potential, pH and chemical concentration, which will provide diverse microhabitats for microbial communities (K.Takai et al. 2001, Hermie J.M. Harmsen et al. 1997). It is important for detailed understanding of the biodiversity to determine the chimney structural environment. Suiyo seamount is located 28.57° N, 140.66° E, where is suitable to compare with the Mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal field, because of few influence of terrestrial sediment. It was reported that the magma chamber below the seamount was very shallow ( ˜1 km), and high temperature hydrothermal fluid chamber was underlying just below the seafloor sealed with anhydrite and barite. Chimney samples used in this study were collected by Dive 1222-1225 of SHINKAI 2000 (JAMSTEC) in 2000. We measured the chemical composition with neutron activation analysis (NAA) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), mineral composition with X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and the precipitation age measurements ( ˜200 years) of these chimneys with γ -ray spectrometry (210Pb/Pb method, 228Th/228Ra method, and 210Pb/226Ra method). The mineral composition of the Suiyo seamount chimney were contained barite (BaSO4), sphalerite ((Zn,Fe)S), pyrite (FeS2), and chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) as a major mineral constituents. The chemical composition shows that gold contents in the chimney collected from Suiyo seamount were much higher (maximum 166 ppm) than other hydrothermal field. The chronological study showed that the precipitation ages of sulfide chimney samples (ranged in 37.2-79.6 years before 2002 by 210Pb/Pb method) were older than barite chimney ((ranged in 2.9-8.2 years before 2002 by 228Th/228Ra method). We will discuss about the process of chimney formation, the temporal variation of the past hydrothermal activity and the difference from other submarine hydrothermal fields (EPR, MAR, Okinawa trough, Loihi seamount).

  7. Sister Cities Flourish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Building sister city relation,also known as friendsh ip city,is a common channel for cities in different countries to keep a closer tie and communication.According to the statistics from China International Friendship Cities Association,up to the end of 2007,1087 provinces and states and 314 cities from 120 countries in the world have found their sister cities in China.Among them,Japan has the largest amount of Chinese sister cities,that is 200 provinces and 33 cities,and takes up almost 17 percent of the total number.

  8. City positioning theories and city core competencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinquan; Zhu

    2007-01-01

    Gity positioning The Chinese city in a decision develops the topic of the destiny. Since the 90's of 20 centuries, the economic integral and globalization developed rapidly. The development make national boundary become not so important, the function of the city is increasingly outstanding. In other words, national competition ability is morally now on the city competition ability. At the same time, this development result that the industry is divided internationally and is divided in cities. Therefore, under the condition of globalization, if the city wants the superior development, it must take advantages and avoid shortage, to position the city accurately, establish the competition and development the strategy. The city positioning is clearly defined the city competition ability, more important it indicated the direction of the city development. Trough the analysis of the resource and environment of the city, decide an accurate position of the best function of the city, well configure the inner and outside resource, catch the opportunities,face the challenges, maximized the market share in order to maximized the wealth and city competition ability.

  9. Geographic Learning Objects in Smart Cities Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Del Fatto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many cities around the world are trying to find smarter ways to manage challenges such as ensuring livable conditions in a context of rapid urban population growth. These cities are often referred to as Smart Cities. In the last years, researchers from many disciplines have contributed to the Smart Cities definition and implementation. In this paper we investigate how topics from two particular fields, such as Geographic Information and E-learning Systems, can be mixed in order to contribute to the Smart Cities cause. In particular, we introduce the Geographic Learning Object and discuss how such Geographic Learning Objects can be used in a Geographic Information System in order to provide information and learning content to the citizens of a Smart City.

  10. Evidence for Hydrothermal Vents as "Biogeobatteries" (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, M. E.; Girguis, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents are unique systems that play an important role in oceanic biogeochemical cycles. As chemically reduced hydrothermal fluid mixes with cold oxic seawater, minerals precipitate out of solution resulting in chimney structures composed largely of metal sulfides and anhydrite. Pyrite, which is a natural semi-conductor, is the primary sulfide mineral, but other minerals within chimneys are also conductive (e.g. chalcopyrite, wurtzite, and some iron oxides). Sulfide chimneys are also known to host an extensive endolithic microbial community. Accordingly, submarine hydrothermal systems appear to be examples of biogeobatteries, wherein conductive mineral assemblages span naturally occuring redox gradients and enable anaerobic microbes to access oxygen as an oxidant via extracellular electron transfer (or EET). To test this hypothesis, we ran a series of electrochemical laboratory experiments in which pyrite was used as an anode (in a vessel flushed with hydrothermal-like fluid). When placed in continuity with a carbon fiber cathode, pyrite was found to accept and conduct electrons from both abiotic and biological processes (microbial EET). Specifically, electrical current increased 4-fold (5 nA/m2 to 20 nA/m2) in response to inoculation with a slurry prepared from a hydrothermal vent sample. Inspection of the pyrite anode with SEM revealed ubiquitous coverage by microbes. DNA was extracted from the anodes and the inoculum, and was subjected to pyrosequencing to examine prokaryotic diversity. These data suggest that key microbial phylotypes were enriched upon the pyrite, implicating them in EET. In addition, we deployed an in situ experiment based on microbial fuel cell architecture with a graphite anode inserted into a vent wall coupled to a carbon fiber cathode outside the vent. We observed current production over the course of one year, implying microbial EET in situ. Via pyrosequencing, we observed that the microbial community on the anode was

  11. Pyrite Recrystallization Experiments With Circulating Hydrothermal Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.; Abe, A.; Tanaka, K.

    2007-12-01

    Pyrite is one of the most common sulfide minerals found in hydrothermal deposits and sea-floor sediments from hydrothermal fumaroles. Hydrothermal fluid flow plays an important role in crystallization of sulfide minerals. In this study, we tried to reproduce pyrite crystallization with one-way flowing hydrothermal fluid. We designed a circuit circulating hydrothermal fluid by thermal convection. A rectangular circuit (42.6 cm by 17.3 cm) of SUS316 pressure tubes with 5 mm in inner diameter was used as a reaction vessel. In the circuit, pyrite dissolves to acidic fluid in upstream region. Then, pyrite will crystallize again in downstream region as temperature decreases. The rectangular plane was held to be 20 degrees inclination to generate thermal convection. One of the long sides of the rectangular was heated by an electric furnace. Starting materials were put in a tube to be heated. Upper half, approximately 20 cm, of the tube was filled with quartz sand. Next quarter was filled with equivalent mass mixture of quartz sand and powdered pyrite crystals. The lowest quarter was filled with mixture of quartz sand, pyrite, anhydrite and sulfur, those mass are equivalent. The solution was a mixture of 0.5mol/l HCl and 3.0mol/l NaCl. Maximum temperature was controlled to approximately 350°C at the center of the heated tube. Experimental durations were up to 9 days. Fluid pressure increased to approximately 6 MPa as heating. After the experiments, the run products were fixed with resin in a sample tube, and vertical sections were observed by SEM. In the run products, pyrite dissolved at the lower part of the starting material. In the upper half of the sample tube, pyrite crystals precipitated on quartz surface. Crystallization density depends on temperature gradient of the fluid. Predominant morphology of the pyrite crystals consists (100) plains. Tiny framboidal aggregates and crystals with (210) plains also occur. In the run products of longer than 3 days run durations

  12. For the Smarter Good of Cities? On Cities, Complexity and Slippages in the Smart City Discourse’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Henriette; Veel, Kristin Eva Albrechtsen

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Cities for Smart Environmental and Energy Futures presents works written by eminent international experts from a variety of disciplines including architecture, engineering and related fields. Due to the ever-increasing focus on sustainable technologies, alternative energy sources, and gl...

  13. Thermophilic hydrogen-producing bacteria inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal environments represented by Caloranaerobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijing; Xu, Hongxiu; Zeng, Xiang; Wu, Xiaobing; Long, Minnan; Shao, Zongze

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen is an important energy source for deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems. However, little is known about microbes and their role in hydrogen turnover in the environment. In this study, the diversity and physiological characteristics of fermentative hydrogen-producing microbes from deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields were described for the first time. Seven enrichments were obtained from hydrothermal vent sulfides collected from the Southwest Indian Ocean, East Pacific and South Atlantic. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that members of the Caloranaerobacter genus were the dominant component in these enrichments. Subsequently, three thermophilic hydrogen producers, strains H363, H53214 and DY22619, were isolated. They were phylogenetically related to species of the genus Caloranaerobacter. The H2 yields of strains H363, H53214, DY22619 and MV107, which was the type species of genus Caloranaerobacter, were 0.11, 1.21, 3.13 and 2.85 mol H2/mol glucose, respectively. Determination of the main soluble metabolites revealed that strains H363, H53214 and MV107 performed heterolactic fermentations, while strain DY22619 performed butyric acid fermentation, indicating distinct fermentation patterns among members of the genus. Finally, a diversity of forms of [FeFe]-hydrogenase with different modular structures was revealed based on draft genomic data of Caloranaerobacter strains. This highlights the complexity of hydrogen metabolism in Caloranaerobacter, reflecting adaptations to environmental conditions in hydrothermal vent systems. Collectively, results suggested that Caloranaerobacter species might be ubiquitous and play a role in biological hydrogen generation in deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields.

  14. Notes from the field: outbreak of tuberculosis associated with a newly identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotype--New York City, 2010-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    In January 2010, the New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) identified a tuberculosis (TB) case caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis with a genotype not reported previously in the United States. The patient was evaluated for TB while incarcerated but was released before the diagnosis was confirmed and before beginning TB treatment. The patient, who had a history of homelessness and clinical characteristics suggesting infectiousness, could not be located by DOHMH for 13 months. Numerous efforts were made to locate the patient, including queries to shelters, jails, and infection-control staff members at local hospitals. The patient was located after he had an abnormal chest radiograph result following referral by a local jail to a hospital emergency department (ED) for symptoms of alcohol withdrawal; he died from complications of liver cirrhosis 5 days later, without having started TB treatment. During February 2012-May 2013, DOHMH identified four additional patients with the same TB genotype. All five patients were U.S.-born black men aged 52-57 years. Four had a history of substance abuse; three had a history of homelessness; and two had a history of incarceration. All patients had drug-susceptible TB and were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. Three patients completed TB treatment. One patient, who was homeless at the time of diagnosis, began TB treatment but was lost to follow-up by DOHMH. PMID:24226629

  15. Water changed the cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elle, Morten; Jensen, Marina Bergen

    An improvement in water infrastructure and cleaning up the waters changed many harbour cities in Denmark at the beginning of the 90s. The harbour cities changed from drity, run-down industrial harbours to clean and attractive harbour dwelling creating new city centres and vital city areas...

  16. Special fractal growth of dendrite copper using a hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Zhang, Zhejuan; Guo, Pingsheng; He, Pingang; Sun, Zhuo

    2011-08-01

    Special fractal dendrite Cu nanostructures have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal method, and the effects of the volume ratio between glycerol and water and the concentration of H 3PO 3 on the morphologies of dendrite Cu have been studied in detail. The Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to characterize these Cu products. The results indicate that rhombic diamond and different morphologies of fractal dendrite were prepared because of the accumulation of Cu nuclei based on the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) and the nucleation-limited aggregation (NLA) model. Fortunately, symmetrical leaf-like dendrite Cu nanostructures different from Cu dendrites reported before have been obtained. Additionally, an explanation for the growth of fractal dendrite Cu has been discussed carefully.

  17. Hydrothermal vent flow and turbulence measurements with acoustic scintillation instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Iorio, D.; Xu, G.

    2009-12-01

    Acoustically derived measurements of hydrothermal vent flow and turbulence were obtained from the active black smoker Dante in the Main Endeavour vent field, using scintillation analysis from one-way transmissions. The scintillation transmitter and receiver array formed a 93 m acoustic path through the buoyant plume 20 m above the structure. The acoustic path was parallel to the valley sidewall where the M2 tidal currents are approximately aligned along ridge due to topographic steering by the valley walls and hence most of the plume displacement is expected to occur along the acoustic path. On one deployment, data were collected for 6.5 weeks and vertical velocities range from 0.1 to 0.2 m/s showing a strong dependence on the spring/neap tidal cycle. The refractive index fluctuations which can be paramaterized in terms of the root-mean-square temperature fluctuations also shows a strong tidal modulation during spring tide.

  18. Characterizing the distribution and rates of microbial sulfate reduction at Middle Valley hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Daniel R; Olins, Heather C; Vidoudez, Charles; Girguis, Peter R

    2013-07-01

    Few studies have directly measured sulfate reduction at hydrothermal vents, and relatively little is known about how environmental or ecological factors influence rates of sulfate reduction in vent environments. A better understanding of microbially mediated sulfate reduction in hydrothermal vent ecosystems may be achieved by integrating ecological and geochemical data with metabolic rate measurements. Here we present rates of microbially mediated sulfate reduction from three distinct hydrothermal vents in the Middle Valley vent field along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, as well as assessments of bacterial and archaeal diversity, estimates of total biomass and the abundance of functional genes related to sulfate reduction, and in situ geochemistry. Maximum rates of sulfate reduction occurred at 90 °C in all three deposits. Pyrosequencing and functional gene abundance data revealed differences in both biomass and community composition among sites, including differences in the abundance of known sulfate-reducing bacteria. The abundance of sequences for Thermodesulfovibro-like organisms and higher sulfate reduction rates at elevated temperatures suggests that Thermodesulfovibro-like organisms may have a role in sulfate reduction in warmer environments. The rates of sulfate reduction presented here suggest that--within anaerobic niches of hydrothermal deposits--heterotrophic sulfate reduction may be quite common and might contribute substantially to secondary productivity, underscoring the potential role of this process in both sulfur and carbon cycling at vents.

  19. Hydrothermal preparation of fluorinated graphene hydrogel for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Haoran; Li, Yu; Long, Peng; Gao, Yi; Qin, Chengqun; Cao, Chen; Feng, Yiyu; Feng, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Fluorinated graphene hydrogels (FGHs) are synthesized through a one-step hydrothermal process and applied as the binder/additive-free electrode materials for supercapacitors. Along with the reduction of graphene oxide (GO), fluorine atoms incorporate into the graphene framework through the substitution process with the residual phenol, ether or carbonyl groups, forming different fluorine species subsequently. The fluorine content and the Csbnd F bond configuration are easily adjusted by the hydrothermal temperature. X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra indicate the mainly existent of semi-ionic Csbnd F bonds in the prepared FGHs. The semi-ionic Csbnd F bonds in FGHs facilitate the ion transport, enhance the electrical conductivity and provide active sites for the faradic reaction. Therefore, the electrochemical performances of FGHs are better than the fluorine-free graphene hydrogel prepared by the same hydrothermal process. FGH prepared at the hydrothermal temperature of 150 °C exhibit the highest specific capacitance (227 F g-1) and the best rate capability. The corresponding symmetric supercapacitor delivers the power density as high as 50.05 kW kg-1 at the current density of 50 A g-1. These results indicate the FGHs are the ideal electrode materials with the great potential in the field of high-power supercapacitors.

  20. Numerical 3D models support two distinct hydrothermal circulation systems at fast spreading ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Rüpke, Lars

    2013-04-01

    We present 3D numerical calculations of hydrothermal fluid flow at fast spreading ridges. The setup of the 3D models is based our previous 2D studies, in which we have coupled numerical models for crustal accretion and hydrothermal fluid flow. One result of these calculations is a crustal permeability field that leads to a thermal structure in the crust that matches seismic tomography data of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). The 1000°C isotherm obtained from the 2D results is now used as the lower boundary of the 3D model domain, while the upper boundary is a smoothed bathymetry of the EPR. The same permeability field as in the 2D models is used, with the highest permeability at the ridge axis and a decrease with both depth and distance to the ridge. Permeability is also reduced linearly between 600 and 1000°C. Using a newly developed parallel finite element code written in Matlab that solves for thermal evolution, fluid pressure and Darcy flow, we simulate the flow patterns of hydrothermal circulation in a segment of 5000m along-axis, 10000m across-axis and up to 5000m depth. We observe two distinct hydrothermal circulation systems: An on-axis system forming a series of vents with a spacing ranging from 100 to 500m that is recharged by nearby (100-200m) downflows on both sides of the ridge axis. Simultaneously a second system with much broader extensions both laterally and vertically exists off-axis. It is recharged by fluids intruding between 1500m to 5000m off-axis and sampling both upper and lower crust. These fluids are channeled in the deepest and hottest regions with high permeability and migrate up-slope following the 600°C isotherm until reaching the edge of the melt lens. Depending on the width of the melt lens these off-axis fluids either merge with the on-axis hydrothermal system or form separate vents. We observe separate off-axis vent fields if the magma lens half-width exceeds 1000m and confluence of both systems for half-widths smaller than 500m. For

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of sodium titanate nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From suspension of nanoparticles TiO2 in concentrated water solution of NaOH were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis sodium titanates particles with different shapes. Influence of synthesis duration under temperature 180 grad C on the change of particles shapes was observed. The result of experiment showed that one day synthesis resulted to obtained product with high content of nanotubes, but the extension of this period led to the transformation of product's shape into stripes. From the results of experiment follows that as a precursor for TiO2 nanotubes preparation may be used only products of hydrothermal synthesis, which duration of pressure synthesis was not longer than 24 hours. (authors)

  2. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  3. Measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO field campaign: a comparison of results from the T0 and T1 sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Marley

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering were obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations field campaign in March 2006. A comparison of aerosol absorption and scattering was obtained in Mexico City at site T0 located in the northern part of Mexico City at the Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo Laboratories and at site T1 located at the Universidad Tecnológica de Tecamac, 18 miles northwest of T0. Hourly averages of aerosol absorption were similar at both sites, ranging from 6–93 Mm−1 with an average of 31 Mm−1 at T0; and from 2–104 Mm−1 with an average of 19 Mm−1 at T1. Aerosol scattering at T0 ranged from 16–344 Mm−1 with an average of 105 Mm−1; while the scattering values at T1 were lower than T0 ranging from 2–136 with an average of 53 Mm−1. Aerosol single scattering albedos (SSAs were determined at both sites using these data. SSAs at T1 ranged from 0.44–0.90 with an average 0.75 as compared to hose at T0, range 0.51–0.93 with an average of 0.77.

    Broadband UV-B intensity was found to be higher at site T0, with an average of 64 μW/cm2 at solar noon, than at site T1, which had an average of 54 μW/cm2 at solar noon. Comparisons of clear-sky modeled UV-B intensities with the simultaneous UV-B measurements obtained at site T0 and at site T1 for cloudless days indicate a larger diffuse radiation field at site T0 than at site T1. The determination of aerosol scattering Ångstrom coefficient at T0 suggests the larger diffuse radiation is due to the predominance of submicron aerosols at T0 with aerosol scattering of UV-B radiation peaked in the forward direction, leading to the enhancement observed at ground level.

  4. Measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO field campaign: a comparison of results from the T0 and T1 sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Castro, T.; Salcido, A.; Frederick, J.

    2008-07-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering were obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) field campaign in March 2006. A comparison of aerosol absorption and scattering was obtained in Mexico City at site T0 located in the northern part of Mexico City at the Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo Laboratories and at site T1 located at the Universidad Tecnológica de Tecamac, 18 miles northwest of T0. Hourly averages of aerosol absorption were similar at both sites, ranging from 6 93 Mm-1 with an average of 31 Mm-1 at T0; and from 2 104 Mm-1 with an average of 19 Mm-1 at T1. Aerosol scattering at T0 ranged from 16 344 Mm-1 with an average of 105 Mm-1; while the scattering values at T1 were lower than T0 ranging from 2 136 with an average of 53 Mm-1. Aerosol single scattering albedos (SSAs) were determined at both sites using these data. SSAs at T1 ranged from 0.44 0.90 with an average 0.75 as compared to hose at T0, range 0.51 0.93 with an average of 0.77. Broadband UV-B intensity was found to be higher at site T0, with an average of 64 μW/cm2 at solar noon, than at site T1, which had an average of 54 μW/cm2 at solar noon. Comparisons of clear-sky modeled UV-B intensities with the simultaneous UV-B measurements obtained at site T0 and at site T1 for cloudless days indicate a larger diffuse radiation field at site T0 than at site T1. The determination of aerosol scattering Ångstrom coefficient at T0 suggests the larger diffuse radiation is due to the predominance of submicron aerosols at T0 with aerosol scattering of UV-B radiation peaked in the forward direction, leading to the enhancement observed at ground level.

  5. Hydrothermal pretreatments of macroalgal biomass for biorefineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Héctor A.; Rodríguez-Jasso, Rosa M.; Aguedo, Mario;

    2015-01-01

    in accordance with the integrated biorefineries. Furthermore, biorefinery concept requires processes that allow efficient utilization of all components of the biomass. The pretreatment step in a biorefinery is often based on hydrothermal principles of high temperatures in aqueous solution. Therefore......ecently, macroalgal biomass is gaining wide attention as an alternative in the production of biofuels (as bioetanol and biogas) and compounds with high added value with specific properties (antioxidants, anticoagulants, anti–inflammatories) for applications in food, medical and energy industries...

  6. Stable light isotope biogeochemistry of hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of the elements O, H, S and C in minerals and other chemical species can indicate the existence, extent, conditions and the processes (including biological activity) of hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermal alteration of the 18O/16O and D/H values of minerals can be used to detect fossil systems and delineate their areal extent. Water-rock interactions create isotopic signatures which indicate fluid composition, temperature, water-rock ratios, etc. The 18O/16O values of silica and carbonate deposits tend to increase with declining temperature and thus help to map thermal gradients. Measurements of D/H values can help to decipher the origin(s) of hydrothermal fluids. The 34S/32S and 13C/12C values of fluids and minerals reflect the origin of the S and C as well as oxygen fugacities and key redox processes. For example, a wide range of 34S/32S values which are consistent with equilibration below 100 degrees C between sulfide and sulfate can be attributed to sulfur metabolizing bacteria. Depending on its magnitude, the difference in the 13C/12C value of CO2 and carbonates versus organic carbon might be attributed either to equilibrium at hydrothermal temperatures or, if the difference exceeds 1% (10/1000), to organic biosynthesis. Along the thermal gradients of thermal spring outflows, the 13C/12C value of carbonates and 13C-depleted microbial organic carbon increases, principally due to the outgassing of relatively 13C-depleted CO2.

  7. Islamic city and urbanism, an obvious example of sustainable architecture and city

    OpenAIRE

    SHOJAEE, Farshid; PAEEZEH, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Urbanism entered a new phase by the arrival of Islam so that the formed foundation of urban life changed in the Sassanid era. Urban communities experienced major developments in accordance with Islamic rules in social and economic dimensions. Also, establishment of mosques resulted in physical alteration of cities. By gradual dominance of Islam in Iran, the fields were ready concerning rapid growth of cities and creation of new cities with transformed form and modern culture. Follow...

  8. Surface roughened zirconia: towards hydrothermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camposilvan, Erik; Flamant, Quentin; Anglada, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Surface roughness is needed in several yttria-stabilized zirconia components used in restorative dentistry for osseointegration or adhesion purposes. This can be achieved by different treatments, which may also modify the microstructure of the surface. Among them, sandblasting and chemical etching are widely used, but their effect on hydrothermal aging of zirconia is not fully understood. In the present work, the zirconia long-term stability of rough surfaces prepared by these techniques is analyzed and a method is proposed for preventing hydrothermal aging while maintaining the original surface appearance and mechanical properties. The method involves pressure infiltration of a Cerium salt solution on the roughened surfaces followed by a thermal treatment. The solution, trapped by surface defects and small pores, is decomposed during thermal treatment into Cerium oxide, which is diffused at high temperature, obtaining Ce co-doping in the near-surface region. In addition, the microstructural changes induced in the near-surface by sandblasting or chemical etching are removed by the thermal treatment together with surface defects. No color modification was observed and the final roughness parameters were in the range of existing implants of proved good osseointegration. The aging resistance of Ce co-doped materials was strongly enhanced, showing the absence of aging after artificial degradation, increasing in this way the surface mechanical integrity. The proposed treatment is easily applicable to the current manufacturing procedures of zirconia dental posts, abutments, crowns and dentures, representing a solution to hydrothermal aging in these and other biomedical applications.

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis of zeolites from natural stellerite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李酽; 汪信; 董元彩; 朱俊武

    2002-01-01

    Y and P zeolites were synthesized hydrothermally from natural stellerite under different conditions and were characterized via XRD and FT-IR.The results show that the higher crystallinity of Y zeolite can be obtained in hydrothermal system with low alkalinity,low Ca2+/Na+ ratio,and high SiO2/Al2O3 ratio.The lattice space of the samples decreases as crystallization time increases.P Zeolite is prompted under condition of higher alkalinity and higher Ca2+/Na+ ratio.The intensity and number of bands in the range of 400 cm-1~900 cm-1 increases with reaction time.Bands at 680 cm-1,760 cm-1 and 860 cm-1 corresponding to Y zeolite appear during the crystallization stage.Most of these bands shift to higher wavenumbers when SiO2/Al2O3 ratio increases generally.In the hydrothermal system with reverse condition above,bands at 600 cm-1,420 cm-1~470 cm-1 hardly change as the crystallization time increases and the main crystal phase of P zeolite is obtained.

  10. Surface roughened zirconia: towards hydrothermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camposilvan, Erik; Flamant, Quentin; Anglada, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Surface roughness is needed in several yttria-stabilized zirconia components used in restorative dentistry for osseointegration or adhesion purposes. This can be achieved by different treatments, which may also modify the microstructure of the surface. Among them, sandblasting and chemical etching are widely used, but their effect on hydrothermal aging of zirconia is not fully understood. In the present work, the zirconia long-term stability of rough surfaces prepared by these techniques is analyzed and a method is proposed for preventing hydrothermal aging while maintaining the original surface appearance and mechanical properties. The method involves pressure infiltration of a Cerium salt solution on the roughened surfaces followed by a thermal treatment. The solution, trapped by surface defects and small pores, is decomposed during thermal treatment into Cerium oxide, which is diffused at high temperature, obtaining Ce co-doping in the near-surface region. In addition, the microstructural changes induced in the near-surface by sandblasting or chemical etching are removed by the thermal treatment together with surface defects. No color modification was observed and the final roughness parameters were in the range of existing implants of proved good osseointegration. The aging resistance of Ce co-doped materials was strongly enhanced, showing the absence of aging after artificial degradation, increasing in this way the surface mechanical integrity. The proposed treatment is easily applicable to the current manufacturing procedures of zirconia dental posts, abutments, crowns and dentures, representing a solution to hydrothermal aging in these and other biomedical applications. PMID:25867636

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of xonotlite from carbide slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Cao; Fei Liu; Qian Lin; Yu Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Carbide slag was used as the calcareous materials for the first time to prepare xonotlite via dynamic hydrothermal synthesis.The effects of influential factors including different calcination temperatures,pretreatment methods of the carbide slag and process param-eters of hydrothermal synthesis on the microstructure and morphology of xonotlite were explored using XRD and SEM techniques.The results indicate that the carbide slag after proper calcination could be used to prepare pure xonotlite;and different calcination tern-peratures have little effect on the crystallinity of synthesized xonotlitc,but have great impact on the morphology of secondary particles.The different pretreatment methods of the carbide slag pose great impact on the crystallinity and morphology of secondary particles of xonotlite.Xonotlite was also synthesized from pure CaO under the salne experimental conditions as that prepared from calcined carbide slag for comparison.Little amount of impurities in carbide slag has no effect on the mechanism of hydrothermal synthesizing xonotlite from carbide slag.

  12. Trace elements mobility in soils from the hydrothermal area of Nisyros (Greece)

    OpenAIRE

    Kyriaki Daskalopoulou; Sergio Calabrese; Silvia Milazzo; Lorenzo Brusca; Sergio Bellomo; Walter D'Alessandro; Konstantinos Kyriakopoulos; Franco Tassi; Francesco Parello

    2015-01-01

    Nisyros Island, Greece, is a stratovolcano known for its intense hydrothermal activity. On June 2013, during a multidisciplinary field campaign, soil samples were collected in the caldera area to determinate the main mineralogical assemblages and to investigate the distribution of trace element concentrations and the possible relationship to the contribution of fluids of deep origin. Soil samples were analysed with XRD and for the chemical composition of their leachable (deionized water) and ...

  13. Electromagnetic fields levels measurement in the vicinity of Vodafone's cellular base stations located in the cities of Tirana, Durres and Librazhd in Albania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, B.; Arapi, S. [Institute of Public Health, Tirana (Albania). Radiation Protection Office

    2004-07-01

    The instrument can record and store instantaneous, maximum and mean values of electric and magnetic field values. According to all European and international standards, the measured values in the frequency range 100 kHz - 10 GHz should be expressed in any 6 minute time period. In the measuring set up used, aquisition, storage and processing of the measurements data is controlled with portable pc via a double optical interface and a special software. (orig.)

  14. Interaction between the geothermal outflow of southern Negros geothermal field and the shallow groundwater aquifer in Dumaguete City, Negros Oriental, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    minor dilution effect from precipitation. Drawdown in the deep geothermal reservoir have induced more than 500 meters of drawdown in the center of the resource but not enough to revert the naturally outflowing fluids from the Palinpinon thermal springs. Hence, there exists continuous natural migration of slightly mineralized geothermal fluids into the shallow groundwater aquifer of Dumaguete City. (author)

  15. Heat flux measured acoustically at Grotto Vent, a hydrothermal vent cluster on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several decades, quantifying the heat output has been a unanimous focus of studies at hydrothermal vent fields discovered around the global ocean. Despite their importance, direct measurements of hydrothermal heat flux are very limited due to the remoteness of most vent sites and the complexity of hydrothermal venting. Moreover, almost all the heat flux measurements made to date are snapshots and provide little information on the temporal variation that is expected from the dynamic nature of a hydrothermal system. The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS, https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/covis/) is currently connected to the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) to monitor the hydrothermal plumes issuing from a vent cluster (Grotto) on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS is acquiring a long-term (20-months to date) time series of the vertical flow rate and volume flux of the hydrothermal plume above Grotto through the Doppler analysis of the acoustic backscatter data (Xu et al., 2013). We then estimate the plume heat flux from vertical flow rate and volume flux using our newly developed inverse method. In this presentation, we will briefly summarize the derivation of the inverse method and present the heat-flux time series obtained consequently with uncertainty quantification. In addition, we compare our heat-flux estimates with the one estimated from the plume in-situ temperatures measured using a Remotely Operative Vehicle (ROV) in 2012. Such comparison sheds light on the uncertainty of our heat flux estimation. Xu, G., Jackson, D., Bemis, K., and Rona, P., 2013, Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar, Geochemistry, Geophysics Geosystems, 2013 (in press).

  16. Age, Episodicity and Migration of Hydrothermal Activity within the Axial Valley, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Kelley, D. S.; Clague, D. A.; Holden, J. F.; Tivey, M. K.; Delaney, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits record the history of high-temperature venting along the Endeavour Segment. Active venting is currently located within five discreet vent fields, with minor diffuse venting occurring between the fields. However, inactive and/or extinct sulfide structures are found throughout the entire axial valley of the ridge segment, suggesting that hydrothermal activity has been more vigorous in the past or focused venting has migrated with time. Here, we present age constraints from U-series dating of 44 sulfide samples collected by manned submersible from between the Mothra Field in the south to Sasquatch in the north. Samples are dated using 226Ra/Ba ratios from hydrothermal barite that precipitates along with the sulfide minerals. Most samples have been collected from within or near the active vent fields. Fifteen samples from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) show a spectrum of ages from present to 2,430 years old, indicating that this field has been continuously active for at least ~2,400 years. MEF appears to be oldest currently active field. This minimum value for the age of hydrothermal activity also provides a minimum age of the axial valley itself. Ages from thirteen samples from the High-Rise Field indicate continuous venting for at least the past ~1,250 years. These age data are used in conjunction with age constraints of the volcanic flows to develop an integrated volcanic, hydrothermal and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment. The total volume of hydrothermal sulfide within the axial valley, determined from high-resolution bathymetry, is used in conjunction with the age constraints of the sulfide material to determine the mass accumulation rates of sulfide along the Endeavour Segment. These data can be used to calibrate the efficiency of sulfide deposition from the hydrothermal vents, and provide a time-integrated history of heat, fluid and chemical fluxes at the ridge-segment scale. The comparison of time-integrated rates with

  17. A survey on factors influencing city branding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Mahmoudzadeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the issue of “globalization” is entering to all areas in the world. In addition to products and companies, cities and countries also have the opportunity to see themselves as important actors in international arena. Places define their positions in different fields like business, leisure and recreation, educational opportunities, living, etc. This paper presents an empirical study to introduce city branding as one of the solutions to join globalization process. The method of this research is based on the “descriptive-analytic” and utilize the available literature and experts’ opinions to prioritize the influencing factors of city branding. We use Delphi consensus methods and technique of analytical hierarchy process to evaluate the factors. Finally, the results of the study indicate that security, transportation and mental creativity are the weakest fields and business and shopping facilities are strong fields of city branding in metropolitan of Tehran.

  18. Hydrothermal alteration zones and present reservoir conditions: an approach to define production zones at the eastern portion of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, BC; Zonas de alteracion hidrotermal y condiciones actuales del yacimiento: un enfoque para determinar zonas productoras al oriente del campo geotermico de Cerro Prieto, BC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho Hernandez, Juan Manuel [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Residencia General de Cerro Prieto, Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico)]. E-mail: juan.camacho02@cfe.gob.mx

    2009-07-15

    Geological factors are as essential for locating new wells as they are for defining the production zones of these wells. At the Cerro Prieto geothermal field (CGCP), one of the most important geological factors is identification of the hydrothermal alteration zones (ZAH). These are divided into silica and epidote mineralogical zones (ZMSE), without CaCO{sub 3}, and silica and epidote mineralogical transition zones (ZTMSE), with CaCO{sub 3}. It has been observed that the continuous variation of reservoir thermodynamic conditions (temperature, pressure and enthalpy) is due mainly to the exploitation of geothermal resources. The presence of new thermodynamic conditions recorded at the reservoir has led to the re-location of production wells originally located during the drilling campaign of 2004 to 2006. At the geological sections on the eastern part of the CGCP, adjustments made to the well completions lie on the limits between the ZMSE and ZTMSE zones. In turn, this is related to the current, superior, thermodynamic reservoir conditions. Based on this, a new geologic approach is proposed to define possible production zones for new wells, relating the ZAH zones to current thermodynamic reservoir conditions. [Spanish] Los factores geologicos son determinantes, tanto para establecer nuevos sitios de perforacion como para determinar el intervalo productor de un pozo nuevo. En el campo geotermico de Cerro Prieto (CGCP) una de los factores mas importantes es la determinacion de las zonas de alteracion hidrotermal (ZAH) que se dividen en dos: zona mineralogica de silice y epidota (ZMSE), sin presencia de CaCO{sub 3}, y zona de transicion mineralogica de silice y epidota (ZTMSE), con presencia de CaCO{sub 3}. Por otra parte, tambien se ha constatado que la continua variacion de las condiciones termodinamicas del yacimiento (temperatura, presion y entalpia) es originada en buena medida por la explotacion del recurso geotermico. La ocurrencia de nuevas condiciones

  19. The Mobility of Rare—Earth Elements During Hydrothermal Activity:A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊永良; 翟裕生

    1991-01-01

    The mobility of the rare-earth elements(REE)during hydrothermal activities is increasingly documented.Geological and experimental evidence suggests that REE may be mobile in solutions rich in F-,Cl-,HCO3-,CO2- 3,HPO42-,PO43-,or in combinations of the above ligands,even though little has been known about which ligand or which combination is most effective in mobilizing REE. The fractionation of REE resulting from hydrothermal activities is inconsistent.One set of field data implies the prererential mobility of the light rare-earth elements(LREE).whereas another set of field observations indicates the dominant mobilization of the heavy rare earth elements(HREE),and some theoretical prediction is comtradictory to the field evidence.The Eu anomalies due to hydrothermal activities are complex and plausible explanation is not available.The existing experimental approaches dealing with REE are not adequate for explanation ofREE behaviour in aqueous solutions.Systematic experimental approaches are suggested.

  20. Nature and extent of electrogenic microbial communities recovered from Juan de Fuca hydrothermal sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girguis, P. R.; Nielsen, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    Microbes have evolved a variety of metabolic strategies to survive in anaerobic environments, including extracellular electron transfer (EET). Here we present laboratory and in situ experiments revealing that hydrothermal vent microbes employ and depend upon EET to access spatially remote oxidants via semi-conductive pyrite. To simulate the physical and electrochemical conditions in vent sulfides, we constructed a two-chamber flow-through bioelectrochemical reactor in which a pyrite electrode was enclosed in one chamber and subject to simulated hydrothermal conditions. Electroactive biofilms formed solely on pyrite in electrical continuity with oxygenated water. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses revealed a diversity of autotrophic and heterotrophic archaea and bacteria, markedly different in composition from the control (pyrite without electrical continuity). To further characterize this phenomenon, we deployed a bioelectrochemical experiment in situ at the hydrothermal vent sulfide "Roane" (2200 m water depth, at the Mothra hydrothermal field, Juan de Fuca ridge). A graphite anode was inserted into a borehole drilled into the base of a hydrothermal sulfide, and connected through a potentiostat to a carbon-fiber cathode on the outside of the vent structure. The in situ experiment produced sustained current and enriched for a distinct microbial community likely associated with EET. The data presented herein reveal the nature and extent of microbial communities that use conductive minerals such as pyrite, though fully reduced, to facilitate the reduction of spatially remote oxidants while maintaining chemical discontinuity. Thus EET, by enabling sustained access to terminal electron acceptors while maintaining the functioning of strictly anaerobic metabolisms, may alleviate the limitations commonly associated with anaerobic environs, namely the depletion of oxidants.

  1. Geophysical characterization of hydrothermal systems and intrusive bodies, El Chichón volcano (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzeler, Martin; Varley, Nick; Roach, Michael

    2011-04-01

    The 1982 explosive eruptions of El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) destroyed the inner dome and created a 1-km-wide and 180-m-deep crater within the somma crater. A shallow hydrothermal system was exposed to the surface of the new crater floor and is characterized by an acid crater lake, a geyser-like Cl-rich spring (soap pool), and numerous fumarole fields. Multiple geophysical surveys were performed to define the internal structure of the volcanic edifice and its hydrothermal system. We carried out a high-resolution ground-based geomagnetic survey in the 1982 crater and its surroundings and 38 very low frequency (VLF) transects around the crater lake. A 3-D inversion of the ground-based magnetic data set highlighted three high-susceptibility isosurfaces, interpreted as highly magnetized bodies beneath the 1982 crater floor. Inversion of a digitized regional aeromagnetic map highlighted four major deeply rooted cryptodomes, corresponding to major topographic highs and massive lava dome outcrops outside and on the somma rim. The intracrater magnetic bodies correspond closely to the active hydrothermal vents and their modeled maximum basal depth matches the elevation of the springs on the flanks of the volcano. Position, dip, and vertical extent of active and extinct hydrothermal vents identified by VLF-EM surveys match the magnetic data set. We interpret the shallow lake spring hydrothermal system to be mostly associated with buried remnants of the 550 BP dome, but the Cl-rich soap pool may be connected to a small intrusion emplaced at shallow depth during the 1982 eruption.

  2. Absolute Magnetization Distribution on Back-arc Spreading Axis Hosting Hydrothermal Vents; Insight from Shinkai 6500 Magnetic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, M.; Okino, K.; Honsho, C.; Mochizuki, N.; Szitkar, F.; Dyment, J.

    2013-12-01

    Near-bottom magnetic profiling using submersible, deep-tow, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) and Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) make possible to conduct high-resolution surveys and depict detailed magnetic features reflecting, for instance, the presence of fresh lavas or hydrothermal alteration, or geomagnetic paleo-intensity variations. We conducted near-bottom three component magnetic measurements onboard submersible Shinkai 6500 in the Southern Mariana Trough, where five active hydrothermal vent fields (Snail, Yamanaka, Archean, Pica, and Urashima sites) have been found in both on- and off-axis areas of the active back-arc spreading center, to detect signals from hydrothermally altered rock and to distinguish old and new submarine lava flows. Fourteen dives were carried out at an altitude of 1-40 m during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-10 and YK10-11 cruises in 2010. We carefully corrected the effect of the induced and permanent magnetizations of the submersible by applying the correction method for the shipboard three-component magnetometer measurement modified for deep-sea measurement, and subtracted the IGRF values from the corrected data to obtain geomagnetic vector anomalies along the dive tracks. We then calculated the synthetic magnetic vector field produced by seafloor, assumed to be uniformly magnetized, using three dimensional forward modeling. Finally, values of the absolute magnetizations were estimated by using a linear transfer function in the Fourier domain from the observed and synthetic magnetic anomalies. The distribution of estimated absolute magnetization generally shows low values around the five hydrothermal vent sites. This result is consistent with the equivalent magnetization distribution obtained from previous AUV survey data. The areas of low magnetization are also consistent with hydrothermal deposits identified in video records. These results suggest that low magnetic signals are due to hydrothermal alteration zones where host rocks are

  3. Towards a greater understanding of hydrothermally grown garnets and sesquioxide crystals for laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Cheryl Ann

    The hydrothermal method of crystal growth offers many benefits over traditional melt-based techniques such as lower temperature requirements relieving detrimental high temperature effects such as stress fracturing and a closed-environment, which limits impurities. The continued study of this type of growth including hydrothermal epitaxy is crucial in our world of constant miniaturization. Presented in this thesis is the hydrothermal growth of crystals of LuAG and Lu2O3 doped with a variety of dopants. Their room-temperature and cryogenic absorption spectra are also presented. Much like Nature uses heat, pressure, water and a nutrient-rich feedstock we have used this hydrothermal technique to produce synthetic crystals of grossular, Ca3Al2(SiO4)3, a naturally occurring garnet as well as other aluminosilicates related to grossular, including a new type of vesuvianite. Other garnets important to the laser industry have also been grown using the hydrothermal technique, such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG), lutetium aluminum garnet (LuAG) and the related sesquioxide Lu2O3, (lutetia). The growth and characteristics of Yb-doped lutetia and LuAG, Nd-doped lutetia, and Dy-doped lutetia and YAG are presented herein. These laser crystals have been analyzed by high-resolution absorption spectroscopy at room temperature as well as 250K, 200K, 150K and 80K and absorption coefficients are presented. A coprecipitation technique common in the ceramics field has been adapted for use creating precursors for hydrothermal crystal growth, including phase-pure polycrystalline anorthite and phase-pure gehlenite. Coprecipitation has also been utilized to gain greater control of dopants to create pre-doped feedstocks used for the growth of laser crystal. The versatility of the hydrothermal growth method is also highlighted in a novel epitaxial technique, core growth, which coats the internal surfaces of a seed crystal as well as external surfaces. This can result in multifunctional

  4. Electromagnetic, geochemical and thermal anomalies related to the hydrothermal activity of Taal volcano (Philippines)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. On volcanoes which display hydrothermal/magmatic unrests, Electromagnetic (EM) methods can be combined with geochemical (GC) and thermal methods. The integration of these methods allows to image in detail hydrothermal systems, to find out possible scenarios of volcanic unrest, and to monitor the on-going activity with knowledge on the sources of heat, gas and fluid transfers. In the frame of 'Electromagnetic Studies of Earthquakes and Volcanoes (ESMEV)' working group activities and the joint EMSEV-PHIVOLCS ('Philippines Institute of Volcanology and Seismology') cooperation supported by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics ('IUGG'), an international joint program started in 2005 on Taal volcano. This volcano can exhibit phreatic, phreatomagmatic and plinian eruptions. Since the 1990's the volcano shows recurrent periods of seismic activity, ground deformation, hydrothermal activity, and surface activity (geysers). Combined EM and GC methods noticeably contribute to map in detail the hydrothermal system and to analyse the sources of the activity: - Total magnetic field mapping evidences demagnetised zones over the two main areas forming the hydrothermal system (in the northern part of Main crater (MC)). These low magnetized areas are ascribed to thermal sources located at some hundreds metres of depth, - Self-potential surveys, delineate the contours of the fluids-heat transfer, and find out the northern and southern structural discontinuities enclosing the hydrothermal system, - Ground temperature gradient measurements evidence the distinctive heat transfer modes, from low fluxes related to soil temperature dominated by solar input to extremely high temperature gradients of 1200 deg C m-1 or to more related to magmatic fluids. - Ground temperature and surface temperature of central acidic lake calculated by Thermal Aster imaging highlight the location of the most active ground fissures, outcrops and diffuse areas

  5. Fractures, Faults, and Hydrothermal Systems of Puna, Hawaii, and Montserrat, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenedi, Catherine Lewis

    The focus of this work is to use geologic and geophysical methods to better understand the faults and fracture systems at Puna, in southeastern Hawaii, and southern Montserrat, in the Lesser Antilles. The particular interest is understanding and locating the deep fracture networks that are necessary for fluid circulation in hydrothermal systems. The dissertation first presents a study in which identification of large scale faulting places Montserrat into a tectonic context. Then follow studies of Puna and Montserrat that focus on faults and fractures of the deep hydrothermal systems. The first chapter consists of the results of the SEA-CALIPSO experiment seismic reflection data, recorded on a 48 channel streamer with the active source as a 2600 in3 airgun. This chapter discusses volcaniclastic debris fans off the east coast of Montserrat and faults off the west coast. The work places Montserrat in a transtensional environment (influenced by oblique subduction) as well as in a complex local stress regime. One conclusion is that the stress regime is inconsistent with the larger arc due to the influence of local magmatism and stress. The second chapter is a seismic study of the Puna hydrothermal system (PHS) along the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone. The PHS occurs at a left step in the rift, where a fracture network has been formed between fault segments. It is a productive geothermal field, extracting steam and reinjecting cooled, condensed fluids. A network of eight borehole seismometers recorded >6000 earthquakes. Most of the earthquakes are very small (Puna the transfer zone is a relay ramp. The results from the PHS are used as an example to examine the proposed hydrothermal system at St. George's Hill, Montserrat. In southern Montserrat, hot springs and fumaroles suggest a deep hydrothermal system heated by local magmatism. A magnetotelluric study obtained resistivity data that suggest focused alteration under southeastern Montserrat that is likely to be along

  6. Statistical analysis of lake levels and field study of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015: Chapter A of Water levels and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Diekoff, Aliesha L.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; White, Eric A.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Morel, Daniel L.; Heck, Jessica M.

    2016-10-19

    Water levels declined from 2003 to 2011 in many lakes in Ramsey and Washington Counties in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota; however, water levels in other northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes increased during the same period. Groundwater and surface-water exchanges can be important in determining lake levels where these exchanges are an important component of the water budget of a lake. An understanding of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area has been limited by the lack of hydrologic data. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Council and Minnesota Department of Health, completed a field and statistical study assessing lake-water levels and regional and local groundwater and surface-water exchanges near northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. This report documents the analysis of collected hydrologic, water-quality, and geophysical data; and existing hydrologic and geologic data to (1) assess the effect of physical setting and climate on lake-level fluctuations of selected lakes, (2) estimate potential percentages of surface-water contributions to well water across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, (3) estimate general ages for waters extracted from the wells, and (4) assess groundwater inflow to lakes and lake-water outflow to aquifers downgradient from White Bear Lake. Statistical analyses of lake levels during short-term (2002–10) and long-term (1925–2014) periods were completed to help understand lake-level changes across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. Comparison of 2002–10 lake levels to several landscape and geologic characteristics explained variability in lake-level changes for 96 northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. Application of several statistical methods determined that (1) closed-basin lakes (without an active outlet) had larger lake-level declines than flow-through lakes with an outlet; (2

  7. Statistical analysis of lake levels and field study of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015: Chapter A of Water levels and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Diekoff, Aliesha L.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; White, Eric A.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Morel, Daniel L.; Heck, Jessica M.

    2016-10-19

    Water levels declined from 2003 to 2011 in many lakes in Ramsey and Washington Counties in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota; however, water levels in other northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes increased during the same period. Groundwater and surface-water exchanges can be important in determining lake levels where these exchanges are an important component of the water budget of a lake. An understanding of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area has been limited by the lack of hydrologic data. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Council and Minnesota Department of Health, completed a field and statistical study assessing lake-water levels and regional and local groundwater and surface-water exchanges near northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. This report documents the analysis of collected hydrologic, water-quality, and geophysical data; and existing hydrologic and geologic data to (1) assess the effect of physical setting and climate on lake-level fluctuations of selected lakes, (2) estimate potential percentages of surface-water contributions to well water across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, (3) estimate general ages for waters extracted from the wells, and (4) assess groundwater inflow to lakes and lake-water outflow to aquifers downgradient from White Bear Lake. Statistical analyses of lake levels during short-term (2002–10) and long-term (1925–2014) periods were completed to help understand lake-level changes across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. Comparison of 2002–10 lake levels to several landscape and geologic characteristics explained variability in lake-level changes for 96 northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. Application of several statistical methods determined that (1) closed-basin lakes (without an active outlet) had larger lake-level declines than flow-through lakes with an outlet; (2

  8. Photocatalytic Degradation of Rhodamine B Dye with High Purity Anatase Nano-TiO2 Synthesized by a Hydrothermal Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiaoliang; YANG Xingyong; WANG Shuwei; WANG Sheng; ZHANG Qiaoxin; WANG Yufu

    2011-01-01

    High purity anatase nano-TiO2 powders with high photocatalytic activity were prepared by a hydrothermal synthesis method.X-ray diffraction(XRD),field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM),ultraviolet-visible(UV-Vis)light absorption spectrum and photoluminescence(PL)spectrum were adopted to characterize the catalyst.Effects of temperature,time and sol concentration of hydrothermal synthesis on particle size and phases were investigated.Photocatalytic activities in the degradation of Rhodamine B Dye were studied.The experimental results indicated that photocatalytic activity of the nano-TiO2 powers was much higher than that of P25(Degussa).

  9. Characterization of on-road vehicle emissions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using a mobile laboratory in chase and fleet average measurement modes during the MCMA-2003 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, M.; Herndon, S. C.; Slott, R. S.; Dunlea, E. J.; Marr, L. C.; Shorter, J. H.; Zahniser, M.; Knighton, W. B.; Rogers, T. M.; Kolb, C. E.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    2006-11-01

    A mobile laboratory was used to measure on-road vehicle emission ratios during the MCMA-2003 field campaign held during the spring of 2003 in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). The measured emission ratios represent a sample of emissions of in-use vehicles under real world driving conditions for the MCMA. From the relative amounts of NOx and selected VOC's sampled, the results indicate that the technique is capable of differentiating among vehicle categories and fuel type in real world driving conditions. Emission ratios for NOx, NOy, NH3, H2CO, CH3CHO, and other selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are presented for chase sampled vehicles in the form of frequency distributions as well as estimates for the fleet averaged emissions. Our measurements of emission ratios for both CNG and gasoline powered "colectivos" (public transportation buses that are intensively used in the MCMA) indicate that - in a mole per mole basis - have significantly larger NOx and aldehydes emissions ratios as compared to other sampled vehicles in the MCMA. Similarly, ratios of selected VOCs and NOy showed a strong dependence on traffic mode. These results are compared with the vehicle emissions inventory for the MCMA, other vehicle emissions measurements in the MCMA, and measurements of on-road emissions in U.S. cities. We estimate NOx emissions as 100 600±29 200 metric tons per year for light duty gasoline vehicles in the MCMA for 2003. According to these results, annual NOx emissions estimated in the emissions inventory for this category are within the range of our estimated NOx annual emissions. Our estimates for motor vehicle emissions of benzene, toluene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde in the MCMA indicate these species are present in concentrations higher than previously reported. The high motor vehicle aldehyde emissions may have an impact on the photochemistry of urban areas.

  10. Characterization of on-road vehicle emissions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using a mobile laboratory in chase and fleet average measurement modes during the MCMA-2003 field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zavala

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A mobile laboratory was used to measure on-road vehicle emission ratios during the MCMA-2003 field campaign held during the spring of 2003 in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA. The measured emission ratios represent a sample of emissions of in-use vehicles under real world driving conditions for the MCMA. From the relative amounts of NOx and selected VOC's sampled, the results indicate that the technique is capable of differentiating among vehicle categories and fuel type in real world driving conditions. Emission ratios for NOx, NOy, NH3, H2CO, CH3CHO, and other selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs are presented for chase sampled vehicles in the form of frequency distributions as well as estimates for the fleet averaged emissions. Our measurements of emission ratios for both CNG and gasoline powered "colectivos" (public transportation buses that are intensively used in the MCMA indicate that – in a mole per mole basis – have significantly larger NOx and aldehydes emissions ratios as compared to other sampled vehicles in the MCMA. Similarly, ratios of selected VOCs and NOy showed a strong dependence on traffic mode. These results are compared with the vehicle emissions inventory for the MCMA, other vehicle emissions measurements in the MCMA, and measurements of on-road emissions in U.S. cities. We estimate NOx emissions as 100 600±29 200 metric tons per year for light duty gasoline vehicles in the MCMA for 2003. According to these results, annual NOx emissions estimated in the emissions inventory for this category are within the range of our estimated NOx annual emissions. Our estimates for motor vehicle emissions of benzene, toluene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde in the MCMA indicate these species are present in concentrations higher than previously reported. The high motor vehicle aldehyde emissions may have an impact on the photochemistry of urban areas.

  11. Characterization of on-road vehicle emissions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using a mobile laboratory in chase and fleet average measurement modes during the MCMA-2003 field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zavala

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A mobile laboratory was used to measure on-road vehicle emission ratios during the MCMA-2003 field campaign held during the spring of 2003 in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA. The measured emission ratios represent a sample of emissions of in-use vehicles under real world driving conditions for the MCMA. From the relative amounts of NOx and selected VOC's sampled, the results indicate that the technique is capable of differentiating among vehicle categories and fuel type in real world driving conditions. Emission ratios for NOx, NOy, NH3, H2CO, CH3CHO, and other selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs are presented for chase sampled vehicles and fleet averaged emissions. Results indicate that colectivos, particularly CNG-powered colectivos, are potentially significant contributors of NOx and aldehydes in the MCMA. Similarly, ratios of selected VOCs and NOy showed a strong dependence on traffic mode. These results are compared with the vehicle emissions inventory for the MCMA, other vehicle emissions measurements in the MCMA, and measurements of on-road emissions in US cities. Our estimates for motor vehicle emissions of benzene, toluene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde in the MCMA indicate these species are present in concentrations higher than previously reported. The high motor vehicle aldehyde emissions may have an impact on the photochemistry of urban areas.

  12. Zinc oxide flower-like synthesized under hydrothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One-dimensional zinc oxide with flower like configuration was synthesized onto a conductor glass substrate (fluorine-doped tin oxide — FTO) at 90 °C during 4 and 16 h. The zinc oxide formation occurs without any use of pre-seed layer or reactants to increase ionic strength of medium, neither addition of surfactant to act as capping agents for controlling morphology or special treatment on the commercial FTO substrate, making this an efficient and inexpensive procedure. X-ray diffraction analysis evidences a structure composed by single crystal in the wurtzite phase. The flower-like configuration observed by field emission scanning electronic microscopy images was promoted by the interaction between the reactant used to prepare the initial solution with pH adjusted at 10.5. This pH value is found, by titration study (triplicate) and in agreement with many reports in the literature, to promote the powder formation of zinc oxide with flower-like configuration. Tubular ZnO flower-like formation on the FTO was attributed to etching caused by ammonia in high concentration during the hydrothermal synthesis. In addition, our experimental results combined with theoretical ab initio calculation lead us to propose that the formation of tubular flower-like zinc oxide films proceeds in three steps, when prepared by hydrothermal process at different times (at T = 90 °C). - Highlights: • Mechanism of fast growth 1D zinc oxide nanostructure onto conductor glass substrate. • Tubular ZnO formation attributed to etching caused by ammonia in high concentration. • Three steps growth mechanism proposed for Zinc oxide tubular flower-like formation. • Theoretical calculation evidenced ZnO neck formation due hexagonal face dissolution

  13. The Origin of Life in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo, Victor; Herschy, Barry; Whicher, Alexandra; Camprubí, Eloi; Lane, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 70 years, prebiotic chemists have been very successful in synthesizing the molecules of life, from amino acids to nucleotides. Yet there is strikingly little resemblance between much of this chemistry and the metabolic pathways of cells, in terms of substrates, catalysts, and synthetic pathways. In contrast, alkaline hydrothermal vents offer conditions similar to those harnessed by modern autotrophs, but there has been limited experimental evidence that such conditions could drive prebiotic chemistry. In the Hadean, in the absence of oxygen, alkaline vents are proposed to have acted as electrochemical flow reactors, in which alkaline fluids saturated in H2 mixed with relatively acidic ocean waters rich in CO2, through a labyrinth of interconnected micropores with thin inorganic walls containing catalytic Fe(Ni)S minerals. The difference in pH across these thin barriers produced natural proton gradients with equivalent magnitude and polarity to the proton-motive force required for carbon fixation in extant bacteria and archaea. How such gradients could have powered carbon reduction or energy flux before the advent of organic protocells with genes and proteins is unknown. Work over the last decade suggests several possible hypotheses that are currently being tested in laboratory experiments, field observations, and phylogenetic reconstructions of ancestral metabolism. We analyze the perplexing differences in carbon and energy metabolism in methanogenic archaea and acetogenic bacteria to propose a possible ancestral mechanism of CO2 reduction in alkaline hydrothermal vents. Based on this mechanism, we show that the evolution of active ion pumping could have driven the deep divergence of bacteria and archaea.

  14. The Origin of Life in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo, Victor; Herschy, Barry; Whicher, Alexandra; Camprubí, Eloi; Lane, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 70 years, prebiotic chemists have been very successful in synthesizing the molecules of life, from amino acids to nucleotides. Yet there is strikingly little resemblance between much of this chemistry and the metabolic pathways of cells, in terms of substrates, catalysts, and synthetic pathways. In contrast, alkaline hydrothermal vents offer conditions similar to those harnessed by modern autotrophs, but there has been limited experimental evidence that such conditions could drive prebiotic chemistry. In the Hadean, in the absence of oxygen, alkaline vents are proposed to have acted as electrochemical flow reactors, in which alkaline fluids saturated in H2 mixed with relatively acidic ocean waters rich in CO2, through a labyrinth of interconnected micropores with thin inorganic walls containing catalytic Fe(Ni)S minerals. The difference in pH across these thin barriers produced natural proton gradients with equivalent magnitude and polarity to the proton-motive force required for carbon fixation in extant bacteria and archaea. How such gradients could have powered carbon reduction or energy flux before the advent of organic protocells with genes and proteins is unknown. Work over the last decade suggests several possible hypotheses that are currently being tested in laboratory experiments, field observations, and phylogenetic reconstructions of ancestral metabolism. We analyze the perplexing differences in carbon and energy metabolism in methanogenic archaea and acetogenic bacteria to propose a possible ancestral mechanism of CO2 reduction in alkaline hydrothermal vents. Based on this mechanism, we show that the evolution of active ion pumping could have driven the deep divergence of bacteria and archaea. PMID:26841066

  15. Development of micro-flow hydrothermal monitoring systems and their applications to the origin of life study on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    Continuous extensive studies on thermophilic organisms have suggested that life emerged on hydrothermal systems on primitive Earth. Thus, it is well known that hydrothermal reactions are, therefore, very important to study fields deeply related to the origin-of-life study. Furthermore, the importance of hydrothermal and solvothermal systems is now realized in both fundamental and practical areas. Here, our recent investigations are described for the development of real-time and in situ monitoring systems for hydrothermal reactions. The systems were primarily developed for the origin-of-life study, but it was also applicable to fundamental and practical areas. The present techniques are based on the concept that a sample solution is injected to a narrow tubing flow reactor at high temperatures, where the sample is rapidly heated up in a very short time by exposure at to a high-temperature narrow tubing flow reactor with a very short time scale. This enables millisecond to second time-scale monitoring in real time and/or in situ at temperatures of up to 400°C. By using these techniques, a series of studies on the hydrothermal origin-of-life have been successfully carried out.

  16. Targeting organic molecules in hydrothermal environments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, J.; Bowden, S. A.; Lindgren, P.; Wilson, R.; Cooper, J. M.

    2008-09-01

    Hydrothermal deposits on Mars Hydrothermal systems are proposed as environments that could support organic synthesis, the evolution of life or the maintenance of life [1,2,3]. They have therefore been suggested as primary targets for exploration on Mars [1,2,4,].There is now confidence that hydrothermal deposits occur at the martian surface. This is based on a range of criteria that could point towards hydrothermal activity, including volcanic activity, magmatic-driven tectonism, impact cratering in icy terrains, hydrous alteration of minerals and typical hydrothermal mineralogies [4]. The proposals to search for evidence of life at martian hydrothermal sites have been focussed on seeking morphological evidence of microbial activity [5]. Here we discuss the potential to seek a chemical signature of organic matter in hydrothermal systems. Organics in terrestrial hydrothermal systems Terrestrial hydrothermal systems can have large quantities of organic matter because they intersect organic-rich sedimentary rocks or oil reservoirs. Thus the signatures that they contain reflect some preexisting concentration of fossil organic compounds, rather than life which was active in the hydrothermal system. If any extant life was incorporated in these hydrothermal systems, it is swamped by the fossil molecules. Examples of environments where organic materials may become entrained include subsurface hydrothermal mineral deposits, generation of hydrothermal systems by igneous intrusions, and hot fluid venting at the seafloor. Nevertheless, there is value in studying the interactions of hydrothermal systems with fossil organic matter, for information about the survivability of organic compounds, phase relationships between carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous materials, and where in hydrothermal deposits to find evidence of organic matter. Microbial colonization of hot spring systems is feasible at depth within the systems and at the surface where the hydrothermal waters discharge

  17. Effects of ionic conduction on hydrothermal hydrolysis of corn starch and crystalline cellulose induced by microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubaki, Shuntaro; Oono, Kiriyo; Onda, Ayumu; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Mitani, Tomohiko; Azuma, Jun-ichi

    2016-02-10

    This study investigated the effects of ionic conduction of electrolytes under microwave field to facilitate hydrothermal hydrolysis of corn starch and crystalline cellulose (Avicel), typical model biomass substrates. Addition of 0.1M NaCl was effective to improve reducing sugar yield by 1.61-fold at unit energy (kJ) level. Although Avicel cellulose was highly recalcitrant to hydrothermal hydrolysis, addition of 0.1M MgCl2 improved reducing sugar yield by 6.94-fold at unit energy (kJ). Dielectric measurement of the mixture of corn starch/water/electrolyte revealed that ionic conduction of electrolytes were strongly involved in facilitating hydrothermal hydrolysis of polysaccharides.

  18. European Cities in the World City Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Taylor (Peter)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis is primarily an empirical paper that brings together selected results from the GaWC research programme. The latter studies inter-city relations at a global scale. Empirical research is based upon a model of world city network network formation as a product of the location strategies

  19. City Car = The City Car / Andres Sevtshuk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sevtshuk, Andres, 1981-

    2008-01-01

    Massachusettsi Tehnoloogiainstituudi (MIT) meedialaboratooriumi juures tegutseva Targa Linna Grupi (Smart City Group) ja General Motorsi koostööna sündinud kaheistmelisest linnasõbralikust elektriautost City Car. Nimetatud töögrupi liikmed (juht William J. Mitchell, töögruppi kuulus A. Sevtshuk Eestist)

  20. Modeling Heat Transfer, Fluid Circulation and Permeability Alteration in Hydrothermal Systems with Loose Coupling to Magmatic Intrusion Modeling in the Lower Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taron, J.; Karakas, O.; Mangan, M.; Dufek, J.; Ingebritsen, S.; Hickman, S. H.; Williams, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of large scale hydrothermal systems entails spatially and temporally evolving permeability fields. During hydrothermal circulation, thermo-elastic stress and fluid pressure changes act upon partially open or hydrothermally altered fracture sets to modify permeability within the system, thereby shifting the patterns of circulation. To explore these interactions we are developing a thermo-hydromechanical (THM) simulator capable of coupling the dominant physics of the hydrothermal system and allowing flexibility in the use of monolithic or staggered numerical schemes. Permeability is allowed to evolve under several constitutive models tailored to both porous media and fractures, considering the influence of thermo-hydromechanical stress, creep, and elasto-plastic shear and dilation in a ubiquitously fractured medium. To expand our understanding of the long-term evolution of these systems, simulations incorporate information gleaned from the modeling of magmatic processes in the lower crust, where characteristics of the heat source are crucial in defining hydrothermal evolution. Results of a stochastic dike intrusion model are fed into the hydrothermal simulator to explore sensitivity relative to characteristics of the magmatic source. This is a first step to examining feedback mechanisms between heat transfer within geothermal fields and heat supply from the lower crust in a rigorous manner. We compare several simulations that elucidate the relative importance of magma intrusion rate and spatial distribution on overall heat transfer characteristics.

  1. Mixing from below in hydrothermal ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bons, Paul D.; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Markl, Gregor; Walter, Bejamin

    2014-05-01

    Unconformity-related hydrothermal ore deposits typically show indications of mixing of two end-member fluids: (a) hot, deep, rock-buffered basement brines and (b) colder fluids derived from the surface or overlying sediments. The hydromechanics of bringing these fluids together from above and below remain unclear. Classical percolative Darcy-flow models are inconsistent with (1) fluid overpressure indicated by fracturing and brecciation, (2) fast fluid flow indicated by thermal disequilibrium, and (3) strong fluid composition variations on the mm-scale, indicated by fluid inclusion analyses (Bons et al. 2012; Fusswinkel et al. 2013). We propose that fluids first descend, sucked down by desiccation reactions in exhumed basement. Oldest fluids reach greatest depths, where long residence times and elevated temperatures allow them the extensively equilibrate with their host rock, reach high salinity and scavenge metals, if present. Youngest fluids can only penetrate to shallower depths and can (partially) retain signatures from their origin, for example high Cl/Br ratios from the dissolution of evaporitic halite horizons. When fluids are released from all levels of the crustal column, these fluids mix during rapid ascent to form hydrothermal ore deposits. Mixing from below provides a viable hydromechanical mechanism to explain the common phenomenon of mixed shallow and deep fluids in hydrothermal ore deposits. Bons, P.D., Elburg, M.A., Gomez-Rivas, E. 2012. A review of the formation of tectonic veins and their microstructures. J. Struct. Geol. doi:10.1016/j.jsg.2012.07.005 Fusswinkel, T., Wagner, T., Wälle, M., Wenzel, T., Heinrich, C.A., Markl, M. 2013. Fluid mixing forms basement-hosted Pb-Zn deposits: Insight from metal and halogen geochemistry of individual fluid inclusions. Geology. doi:10.1130/G34092.1

  2. A Crowded City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Over 4 million vehicles on road challenge Beijing’s city management Beijing, the city once known as the kingdom of bicycles, has become clogged with automobiles, the Beijing Municipal Government Publicity Office said on December 18.

  3. Bright Lights, Big Cities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Overabundant lighting has become another pollution source in the Chinese cities The glow of electric lights illuminating the nights of ever-brighter cities has been regarded as one of the signs of prosperity and modern civilization.

  4. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  5. A New Tool for Detecting Hydrothermal Plumes: an ORP Sensor for the PMEL MAPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S. L.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Nakamura, K.; McLain, P. D.

    2007-12-01

    Mapping hydrothermal plumes in the water column above mid-ocean ridges, submarine arc volcanoes, and back- arc spreading centers has lead to the discovery of many seafloor hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermal plumes can be identified by strong optical backscattering anomalies, which indicate particulates injected into the water above the seafloor by the vents, and by chemical anomalies coincident with the particulate signal. The chemical anomalies are often characterized by increased concentrations of dissolved reduced species such as iron, manganese, and sulfur that decrease the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of the plume relative to ambient seawater. Some of these reduced chemical species are short-lived relative to the particulates, so having a method for measuring the ORP along with optical backscattering has improved efforts to locate source vent fields. Greater ORP anomalies indicate "younger" or "fresher" parts of the plume, which are closer to the source. Additionally, some low temperature vent fields often have minimal particle signatures, yet their above-bottom plumes can be detected by changes in ORP. The PMEL Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorder (MAPR), an instrument with pressure, temperature and optical backscatter sensors, has been used extensively in explorations for hydrothermal systems. We have now enhanced MAPRs to include a newly-designed platinum electrode paired with a silver/silver chloride reference electrode and high impedance circuit for the measurement of ORP in seawater. Results from the laboratory and field demonstrate this new sensor system effectively detects ORP anomalies associated with hydrothermal plumes. Laboratory experiments with Fe(II) and sulfide (dissolved Na2S) show that changes in OPR are rapid when the sensors are exposed to reduced species in solution, and the magnitude of the change is proportional to the concentration of the reduced species. In the field, intercomparison of several individual OPR-capable MAPRs

  6. Education and Human Capital Management in a World City: The Case of Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K. C.; Ge, Yun

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable evidence to suggest that the human capital needs of the world city differ from what Robinson calls "ordinary cities" or what Markusen and associates term as "second tier cities". This path is blazed most notably in the field of world cities and the flow of skilled labour, in the work by Sassen and with case examples (finance,…

  7. Resistivity structure and geochemistry of the Jigokudani Valley hydrothermal system, Mt. Tateyama, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Kaori; Kanda, Wataru; Tanbo, Toshiya; Ohba, Takeshi; Ogawa, Yasuo; Takakura, Shinichi; Nogami, Kenji; Ushioda, Masashi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Saito, Zenshiro; Matsunaga, Yasuo

    2016-10-01

    This study clarifies the hydrothermal system of Jigokudani Valley near Mt. Tateyama volcano in Japan by using a combination of audio-frequency magnetotelluric (AMT) survey and hot-spring water analysis in order to assess the potential of future phreatic eruptions in the area. Repeated phreatic eruptions in the area about 40,000 years ago produced the current valley morphology, which is now an active solfatara field dotted with hot springs and fumaroles indicative of a well-developed hydrothermal system. The three-dimensional (3D) resistivity structure of the hydrothermal system was modeled by using the results of an AMT survey conducted at 25 locations across the valley in 2013-2014. The model suggests the presence of a near-surface highly conductive layer of < 50 m in thickness across the entire valley, which is interpreted as a cap rock layer. Immediately below the cap rock is a relatively resistive body interpreted as a gas reservoir. Field measurements of temperature, pH, and electrical conductivity (EC) were taken at various hot springs across the valley, and 12 samples of hot-spring waters were analyzed for major ion chemistry and H2O isotopic ratios. All hot-spring waters had low pH and could be categorized into three types on the basis of the Cl-/SO 42 - concentration ratio, with all falling largely on a mixing line between magmatic fluids and local meteoric water (LMW). The geochemical analysis suggests that the hydrothermal system includes a two-phase zone of vapor-liquid. A comparison of the resistivity structure and the geochemically inferred structure suggests that a hydrothermal reservoir is present at a depth of approximately 500 m, from which hot-spring water differentiates into the three observed types. The two-phase zone appears to be located immediately beneath the cap rock structure. These findings suggest that the hydrothermal system of Jigokudani Valley exhibits a number of factors that could trigger a future phreatic eruption.

  8. A sampling system for collecting gas-tight time-series hydrothermal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.; Yang, C.; Ding, K.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that the hydrothermal venting has temporal variations associated with tectonic and geochemical processes. To date, the methods for long-term monitoring of the seafloor hydrothermal systems are rare. A new sampling system has been designed to be deployed at seafloor for long term to collect gas-tight time-series samples from hydrothermal vents. Based on the modular design principle, the sampling system is currently composed of a control module and six sampling modules, which is convenient to be upgraded by adding more sampling modules if needed. The control module consists of a rechargeable battery pack and a circuit board with functions of sampling control, temperature measurement, data storage and communication. Each sampling module has an independent sampling valve, a valve actuator and a sampling cylinder. The sampling cylinder consists of a sample chamber and an accumulator chamber. Compressed nitrogen gas is used to maintain the sample at in-situ pressure. A prototype of the sampling system has been constructed and tested. First, the instrument was tested in a high-pressure vessel at a pressure of 40 MPa. Six sampling modules were successfully triggered and water samples were collected and kept at in-situ pressure after experiment. Besides, the instrument was field tested at the shallow hydrothermal field near off Kueishantao islet (24°51'N, 121°55'E), which is located offshore of northeastern Taiwan, from May 25 to May 28, 2011. The sampling system worked at an automatic mode. Each sampling module was triggered according to the preset time. Time-series hydrothermal fluids have been collected from a shallow hydrothermal vent with a depth of 16 m. The preliminary tests indicated the success of the design and construction of the prototype of the sampling system. Currently, the sampling system is being upgraded by integration of a DC-DC power conversion and serial-to-Ethernet conversion module, so that it can utilize the continuous power supply and

  9. Imagineering the city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van den Berg

    2015-01-01

    Cities today are products. The urban experience is commodified into marketable items by urban entrepreneurs. Urban administrations, city marketers, politicians, local businesses and other actors all over the world are developing entrepreneurial strategies to sell their city. From "‘I ♥ New York"’ to

  10. The Creative Cities Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The Creative Cities Network, started by UNESCO in 2004, is one of the world’s highest-level non-governmental organizations in creative industry. The network focuses on the excellence of its member cities as its main product, and finds ways to maintain relevance in city life, local economy

  11. Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal-magma systems: energy transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardee, H.C.

    1980-09-01

    A comparative assessment of five sites is being prepared as part of a Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) review of thermal regimes for the purpose of scoping areas for future research and drilling activities. This background report: discusses the various energy transport processes likely to be encountered in a hydrothermal-magma system, reviews related literature, discusses research and field data needs, and reviews the sites from an energy transport viewpoint. At least three major zones exist in the magma-hydrothermal transport system: the magma zone, the hydrothermal zone, and the transition zone between the two. Major energy transport questions relate to the nature and existence of these zones and their evolution with time. Additional energy transport questions are concerned with the possible existence of critical state and super-critical state permeable convection in deep geothermal systems. A review of thermal transport models emphasizes the fact that present transport models and computational techniques far outweigh the scarcity and quality of deep field data.

  12. Predicting the response of the deep-ocean microbiome to geochemical perturbations by hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Daniel C; Breier, John A; Jiang, Houshuo; Anantharaman, Karthik; Klausmeier, Christopher A; Toner, Brandy M; Hancock, Cathrine; Speer, Kevin; Thurnherr, Andreas M; Dick, Gregory J

    2015-08-01

    Submarine hydrothermal vents perturb the deep-ocean microbiome by injecting reduced chemical species into the water column that act as an energy source for chemosynthetic organisms. These systems thus provide excellent natural laboratories for studying the response of microbial communities to shifts in marine geochemistry. The present study explores the processes that regulate coupled microbial-geochemical dynamics in hydrothermal plumes by means of a novel mathematical model, which combines thermodynamics, growth and reaction kinetics, and transport processes derived from a fluid dynamics model. Simulations of a plume located in the ABE vent field of the Lau basin were able to reproduce metagenomic observations well and demonstrated that the magnitude of primary production and rate of autotrophic growth are largely regulated by the energetics of metabolisms and the availability of electron donors, as opposed to kinetic parameters. Ambient seawater was the dominant source of microbes to the plume and sulphur oxidisers constituted almost 90% of the modelled community in the neutrally-buoyant plume. Data from drifters deployed in the region allowed the different time scales of metabolisms to be cast in a spatial context, which demonstrated spatial succession in the microbial community. While growth was shown to occur over distances of tens of kilometers, microbes persisted over hundreds of kilometers. Given that high-temperature hydrothermal systems are found less than 100 km apart on average, plumes may act as important vectors between different vent fields and other environments that are hospitable to similar organisms, such as oil spills and oxygen minimum zones.

  13. Biodiversity and biogeography of hydrothermal vent species in the western Pacific: a biological perspective of TAIGA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nakamura, M.; Sasaki, T.; Ogura, T.; Yahagi, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Ishibashi, J.; Kojima, S.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are scientifically interesting environments where strong interactions of geology, chemistry, and biology can be observed. The hydrothermal vents are geologically controlled in association with magmatic activities while diversity of chemicals (such as hydrogen sulfide) contained in hydrothermal fluid is controlled by geochemical interaction between heated seawater and surrounding rocks. In addition to those geological and chemical characters of hydrothermal vents, high biomasses of chemosynthetic community have been known around many vents since the first discovery in the 1970s. To understand the unique system and diversity of biological communities associated with vents is highly valuable in geological, chemical, and biological sciences. As an activity of the research project "TAIGA (Trans-crustal Advection & In-situ bio-geochemical processes of Global sub-seafloor Aquifer)" (Representative: Tetsuro Urabe, Department of Earth & Planetary Science, the University of Tokyo), we analyzed population structures and connectivity as well as larval ecology of various hydrothermal vent species in the Okinawa Trough and the Mariana Trough in an attempt to estimate faunal transitional history associated with hydrothermal activities. The specimens analyzed in the present study were collected by R/V Yokosuka with manned submersible Shinkai6500 and R/V Natsushima with ROV Hyper-Dolphin during YK10-11 and NT11-20 cruises, respectively. In the Mariana Trough (YK10-11), benthic and planktonic faunas were investigated by multiple sampling and use of plankton samplers in three hydrothermal vents (Snail, Archaean, and Urashima-Pika fields). Faunal compositions were then compared as well as size compositions and genetic diversities of major vent species among local populations. In the Okinawa Trough (NT11-20), multiple quantitative sampling was made with simultaneous environmental measurements at more than two sites in five hydrothermal vents (Minami

  14. PRACTICAL AND PREDICTIVE MODELLING OF ORE DEPOSITS IN HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chong-bin; B.E.Hobbs; H.B.Muhlhaus; A.Ord

    2001-01-01

    @@ Over the past five years,we have been making efforts to develop a practical and predictive tool to explore for giant ore deposits in hydrothermal systems.Towards this goal,a significant progress has been made towards a better understanding of the basic physical and chemical processes behind ore body formation and mineralization in hydrothermal systems.

  15. Mats of Giant Sulfur Bacteria on Deep-Sea Sediments due to Fluctuating Hydrothermal Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    GUNDERSEN, JK; JØRGENSEN, BB; LARSEN, E.;

    1992-01-01

    FILAMENTOUS sulphide-oxidizing bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., commonly grow as submillimetre-thin white films on anoxic marine sediments. Unusually thick mats (> 1 cm) of giant Beggiatoa filaments, 41-120 mum wide and 2-10 mm long, were observed at 2,000 m water depth in the hydrothermal vent fields...... in Beggiatoa mats directly on the sea floor. We report here the discovery of small-scale hydrothermal fluid circulations around patches of the bacteria, causing a pulsatory seawater flow into the mats and thereby enhancing the supply of oxygen and sulphide to the bacteria....... of Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California1-4. We investigated how such dense communities of the largest known bacteria overcome severe diffusion limitation of their substrate supply, and what advantage they may have by developing such large cell sizes. Oxygen, sulphide, pH and temperature were therefore measured...

  16. A Palaeoproterozoic multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bell, Robin-Marie; Kolb, Jochen; Waight, Tod Earle;

    2016-01-01

    Nalunaq is an orogenic, high gold grade deposit situated on the Nanortalik Peninsula, South Greenland. Mineralisation is hosted in shear zone-controlled quartz veins, located in fine- and medium-grained amphibolite. The deposit was the site of Greenland’s only operating metalliferous mine until its...... closure in 2014, having produced 10.67 t of gold. This study uses a combination of field investigation, petrography and U/Pb zircon and titanite geochronology to define a multistage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq. A clinopyroxene-plagioclase-garnet(-sulphide) alteration zone (CPGZ) developed in...... the Nanortalik Peninsula, close to regional peak metamorphism and prior to gold-quartz vein formation. The ca. 1783–1762-Ma gold-quartz veins are hosted in reactivated shear zones with a hydrothermal alteration halo of biotite...

  17. Microbial Activity and Volatile Fluxes in Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, R. S.; Lowell, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding geographically and biologically the production or utilization of volatile chemical species such as CO2, CH4, and H2 is crucial not only for understanding hydrothermal processes but also for understanding life processes in the oceanic crust. To estimate the microbial effect on the transport of these volatiles, we consider a double-loop single pass model as shown in Figure 1 to estimate the mass fluxes shown. We then use a simple mixing formulation: C4Q4 = C3 (Q1 -Q3)+ C2Q2, where C2 is the concentration of the chemical in seawater, C3 is the average concentration of the chemical in high temperature focused flow, C4 is the expected concentration of the chemical as a result of mixing, and the relevant mass flows are as shown in Figure 1. Finally, we compare the calculated values of CO2, CH4, and H2 in diffuse flow fluids to those observed. The required data are available for both the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the East Pacific Rise 9°50' N systems. In both cases we find that, although individual diffuse flow sites have observed concentrations of some elements that are greater than average, the average concentration of these volatiles is smaller in all cases than the concentration that would be expected from simple mixing. This indicates that subsurface microbes are net utilizers of these chemical constituents at the Main Endeavour Field and at EPR 9°50' N on the vent field scale. Figure 1. Schematic of a 'double-loop' single-pass model above a convecting, crystallizing, replenished AMC (not to scale). Heat transfer from the vigorously convecting, cooling, and replenished AMC across the conductive boundary layer δ drives the overlying hydrothermal system. The deep circulation represented by mass flux Q1 and black smoker temperature T3 induces shallow circulation noted by Q2. Some black smoker fluid mixes with seawater resulting in diffuse discharge Q4, T4, while the direct black smoker mass flux with temperature T3 is reduced

  18. Smart Cities: A Survey on Security Concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Ijaz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A smart city is developed, deployed and maintained with the help of Internet of Things (IoT. The smart cities have become an emerging phenomena with rapid urban growth and boost in the field of information technology. However, the function and operation of a smart city is subject to the pivotal development of security architectures. The contribution made in this paper is twofold. Firstly, it aims to provide a detailed, categorized and comprehensive overview of the research on security problems and their existing solutions for smart cities. The categorization is based on several factors such as governance, socioeconomic and technological factors. This classification provides an easy and concise view of the security threats, vulnerabilities and available solutions for the respective technologies areas that are proposed over the period 2010-2015. Secondly, an IoT testbed for smart cities architecture, i.e., SmartSantander is also analyzed with respect to security threats and vulnerabilities to smart cities. The existing best practices regarding smart city security are discussed and analyzed with respect to their performance, which could be used by different stakeholders of the smart cities.

  19. Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 High-Volume Filter Sampling: Atmospheric Particulate Matter of an Amazon Tropical City and its Relationship to Population Health Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, C. M. [Federal Univ. of Amazonas (Brazil); Santos, Erickson O. [Federal Univ. of Amazonas (Brazil); Fernandes, Karenn S. [Federal Univ. of Amazonas (Brazil); Neto, J. L. [Federal Univ. of Amazonas (Brazil); Souza, Rodrigo A. [Univ. of the State of Amazonas (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    Manaus, the capital of the Brazilian state of Amazonas, is developing very rapidly. Its pollution plume contains aerosols from fossil fuel combustion mainly due to vehicular emission, industrial activity, and a thermal power plant. Soil resuspension is probably a secondary source of atmospheric particles. The plume transports from Manaus to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility ARM site at Manacapuru urban pollutants as well as pollutants from pottery factories along the route of the plume. Considering the effects of particulate matter on health, atmospheric particulate matter was evaluated at this site as part of the ARM Facility’s Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) field campaign. Aerosol or particulate matter (PM) is typically defined by size, with the smaller particles having more health impact. Total suspended particulate (TSP) are particles smaller than 100 μm; particles smaller than 2.5 μm are called PM2.5. In this work, the PM2.5 levels were obtained from March to December of 2015, totaling 34 samples and TSP levels from October to December of 2015, totaling 17 samples. Sampling was conducted with PM2.5 and TSP high-volume samplers using quartz filters (Figure 1). Filters were stored during 24 hours in a room with temperature (21,1ºC) and humidity (44,3 %) control, in order to do gravimetric analyses by weighing before and after sampling. This procedure followed the recommendations of the Brazilian Association for Technical Standards local norm (NBR 9547:1997). Mass concentrations of particulate matter were obtained from the ratio between the weighted sample and the volume of air collected. Defining a relationship between particulate matter (PM2.5 and TSP) and respiratory diseases of the local population is an important goal of this project, since no information exists on that topic.

  20. Hydrothermal carbonization and torrefaction of grape pomace: a comparative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Mehmet; Kantarli, Ismail Cem; Buyukisik, Hasan Baha; Yanik, Jale

    2014-06-01

    Grape pomace was treated by hydrothermal carbonization (sub-critical water, 175-275°C) and torrefaction (nitrogen atmosphere, 250 and 300°C), with mass yield of solid product (char) ranging between 47% and 78%, and energy densification ratio to 1.42-1.15 of the original feedstock. The chars were characterised with respect to their fuel properties, morphological and structural properties and combustion characteristics. The hydrothermal carbonization produced the char with greater energy density than torrefaction. The chars from torrefaction were found to be more aromatic in nature than that from hydrothermal carbonization. Hydrothermal carbonization process produced the char having high combustion reactivity. Most interesting was the finding that aqueous phase from hydrothermal carbonization had antioxidant activity. The results obtained in this study showed that HTC appears to be promising process for a winery waste having high moisture content.

  1. Nutritional strategies of the hydrothermal ecosystem bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pennec, Marcel; Donval, Anne; Herry, Angèle

    Studies of deep-sea hydrothermal bivalves have revealed that the species, which are strictly dependent upon the interstitial fluid emissions, derive their food indirectly via symbiotic relationships with chemosynthetic bacteria present in their gill tissues. As the gill plays the main trophic role, structural and ultrastructural modifications occur in the digestive tract. Scanning and transmission electron microscope studies reveal that the digestive system of species belonging to the genera Calyptogena, Bathymodiolus and Bathypecten have anatomical differences. In Calyptogena, the reduction of several parts of the digestive tract and the stomach content which is either empty or full, according to the various species examined indicate that the digestive system is hardly if at all functional. In Bathymodiolus, the labial palps are well developed, the stomach is always full with particles and the two cellular types, digestive and secretory, are present in the digestive gland. All these characteristics indicate that the digestive system is functional. In Bathypecten, the digestive tract is well developed and it seems that it plays the main trophic role. We conclude that the nutritional strategies of the hydrothermal vents bivalves are quite varied. They range from a normal trophic process, through a mixotrophic diet, to one based purely on chemoautotrophic bacteria. The strategy of each species is adapted to and influences its distribution.

  2. On the domestic standards for Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Namiot

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the development and use of standards for Smart Cities. This paper considers the current ecosystem of standards in this area, and analyzes the possible development of work in this direction. The article provides the analysis of the works of the British standards Institute, which are quite far advanced in this area. Also provides a critical assessment of the state of affairs in Russia with the standardization in the field of Smart Cities and Internet of Things. In conclusion, the authors offer their vision of development work on Smart City in Russia.

  3. Macrofauna of shallow hydrothermal vents on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge at 71N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schander, C.; Rapp, H. T.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2007-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are usually associated with a highly specialized fauna and since their discovery in 1977, more than 400 species of animals have been described. Specialized vent fauna includes various animal phyla, but the most conspicuous and well known are annelids, mollusks and crustaceans. We have investigated the fauna collected around newly discovered hydrothermal vents on the Mohns Ridge north of Jan Mayen. The venting fields are located at 71°N and the venting takes place within two main areas separated by 5 km. The shallowest vent area is at 500-550 m water depth and is located at the base of a normal fault. This vent field stretches approximately 1 km along the strike of the fault, and it is composed of 10-20 major vent sites each with multiple chimney constructions discharging up to 260°C hot fluids. A large area of diffuse, low- temperature venting occurs in the area surrounding the high-temperature field. Here, partly microbial mediated iron-oxide-hydroxide deposits are abundant. The hydrothermal vent sites do not show any high abundance of specialized hydrothermal vent fauna. Single groups (i.e. Porifera and Mollusca) have a few representatives but groups otherwise common in hydrothermal vent areas (e.g. vestimentifera, Alvinellid worms, mussels, clams, galathaeid and brachyuran crabs) are absent. Up until now slightly more than 200 species have been identified from the vent area. The macrofauna found in the vent area is, with few exceptions, an assortment of bathyal species known in the area. One endemic, yet undescribed, species of mollusc has been found so far, an gastropod related to Alvania incognita Warén, 1996 and A. angularis Warén, 1996 (Rissoidae), two species originally described from pieces of sunken wood north and south of Iceland. It is by far the most numerous mollusc species at the vents and was found on smokers, in the bacterial mats, and on the ferric deposits. A single specimen of an undescribed tanaidacean has also

  4. poverty and poverty alleviation in globalised cities

    OpenAIRE

    Verena Ast

    2014-01-01

    In the light of increasing "division of the cities" and its underlying process of socio-spatial segregation researches focus more and more on the consequences of this process: the development of advantaged and disadvantaged districts within contemporary cities. Thereby especially poverty alleviation respectively poverty eradication in disadvantaged districts becomes an emerging and central field of intervention in social policies. This is due to the broad impact of poverty like higher risk of...

  5. Outdoor thermal environmental research of the mountainous city by GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The study of urban outdoor thermal environment was carried out in one of the mountainous cities by using geography information system(GIS) technique which is connected with predicting and evaluating models for the outdoor thermal environment, monitoring data and simulating data. A prediction and evaluation system were set up.A typical mountainous city, i. e. , Yunyang city in Chongqing in China, was taken as an example, its urbanization trend and population growth was predicted and evaluated. The heat island intensity and its trend were simulated, the temperature field, velocity field and the humidity field were analyzed. The results show that GIS is an effective tool to deal with the outdoor thermal environment, especially for the mountainous cities with special geographical particularities. GIS can be used in the environmental management and the city planning especially for the mountainous cities.

  6. Current state of the hydrothermal geochemistry studies at Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fausto L, J.J.; Jimenez S, M.E.; Esquer P, I.

    1981-01-01

    The current state of hydrothermal geochemistry studies being carried out at the field are reported. These studies are based on the results of chemical analysis of water samples collected during 1979 and 1980 at the geothermal wells of the area known as Cerro Prieto I, as well as from those located in the Cerro Prieto II and Cerro Prieto III areas, some of which have only recently started flowing. Data are presented on the chemical variations of the main chemical constituents dissolved in the waters, as well as on the Na/K and Na-K-Ca chemical relations and the temperatures calculated from them and from SiO/sub 2/. Fluid recharge into the reservoir and its direction of flow are interpreted from isotherm contour maps of the field prepared from Na/K and Na-K-Ca geothermometry and from concentration contour maps of some of the main chemical constituents. Well M-43 is discussed as an example of a well affected by well completion problems in its production casing. Its behavior is explained on the basis of the chemical characteristics of the produced water. The chemical changes that have taken place in some of the wells during production are explained by correlating the chemistry with the production mechanisms of the well (steam-water production rates).

  7. Me, the City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Lidin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The search for identity of cities looks rather urgent and attracts attention of many researchers. Addressing this issue, the article draws an analogy between a human person and a city. Like a city, a human being needs to comprehend his self-identity in order to resist depressive tendencies. It is shown that a person’s depressive symptoms are similar to those of cities. The city identity necessary to resist depression can be searched for both historically and geographically. The historical aspect consists of local myths and legends about the city and the citizens. The geographical aspect of identity comprises features of the terrain, climate, flora and fauna of the region where the city is located.

  8. The Guaymas Basin Hiking Guide to Hydrothermal Mounds, Chimneys, and Microbial Mats: Complex Seafloor Expressions of Subsurface Hydrothermal Circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; McKay, Luke J; Tivey, Margaret K; Biddle, Jennifer F; Hoer, Daniel; Lloyd, Karen G; Lever, Mark A; Røy, Hans; Albert, Daniel B; Mendlovitz, Howard P; MacGregor, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    The hydrothermal mats, mounds, and chimneys of the southern Guaymas Basin are the surface expression of complex subsurface hydrothermal circulation patterns. In this overview, we document the most frequently visited features of this hydrothermal area with photographs, temperature measurements, and selected geochemical data; many of these distinct habitats await characterization of their microbial communities and activities. Microprofiler deployments on microbial mats and hydrothermal sediments show their steep geochemical and thermal gradients at millimeter-scale vertical resolution. Mapping these hydrothermal features and sampling locations within the southern Guaymas Basin suggest linkages to underlying shallow sills and heat flow gradients. Recognizing the inherent spatial limitations of much current Guaymas Basin sampling calls for comprehensive surveys of the wider spreading region.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Multiphase Fluid Flow in Ore-Forming Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, P.; Driesner, T.; Coumou, D.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2007-12-01

    Two coexisting fluid phases - a variably saline liquid and a vapor phase - are ubiquitous in ore-forming and other hydrothermal systems. Understanding the dynamics of phase separation and the distinct physical and chemical evolution of the two fluids probably plays a key role in generating different ore deposit types, e.g. porphyry type, high and low sulfidation Cu-Mo-Au deposits. To this end, processes within hydrothermal systems have been studied with a refined numerical model describing fluid flow in transient porous media (CSP~5.0). The model is formulated on a mass, energy and momentum conserving finite-element-finite-volume (FEFV) scheme and is capable of simulating multiphase flow of NaCl-H20 fluids. Fluid properties are computed from an improved equation of state (SOWAT~2.0). It covers conditions with temperatures of up to 1000 degrees~C, pressures of up to 500 MPa, and fluid salinities of 0~to 100%~NaCl. In particular, the new set-up allows for a more accurate description of fluid phase separation during boiling of hydrothermal fluids into a vapor and a brine phase. The geometric flexibility of the FEFV-meshes allows for investigations of a large variety of geological settings, ranging from ore-forming processes in magmatic hydrothermal system to the dynamics of black smokers at mid-ocean ridges. Simulations demonstrated that hydrothermal convection patterns above cooling plutons are primarily controlled by the system-scale permeability structure. In porphyry systems, high fluid pressures develop in a stock rising from the magma chamber which can lead to rock failure and, eventually, an increase in permeability due to hydrofracturing. Comparisons of the thermal evolution as inferred from modeling studies with data from fluid inclusion studies of the Pb-Zn deposits of Madan, Bulgaria are in a strikingly good agreement. This indicates that cross-comparisons of field observations, analytical data and numerical simulations will become a powerful tool towards a

  10. Basic mathematical model for the normal black smoker system and the hydrothermal megaplume formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A tube model to simulate the normal black smoker system has been built, where the Darcy flow equation, the Ergun equation and the turbulent pipe flow equation are used respectively to describe the dynamic process of different key areas in the hydrothermal circulation system. At the same time, a convection-diffuse Equation for the temperature field is used for describe the exchange of thermal energy and the law of temperature variation. Combining the above facts and using efficient mathematical algorithms and programming with the MatLab programming language, the variation curves of temperature, pressure and mass flow rate are determined, while also the dynamic heat equilibrium and pressure equilibrium within the black smoker system are analyzed. On the basis of the model of the normal black smoker system, a megaplume formation model is further built. For instance, the hydrothermal venting plume on the Juan de Fuca Ridge has been simulated and the simulation results are fairly consistent with Baker's imputed data in 1986. On the basis of the above productive simulation, a series of factors for megaplume formation and the effectiveness of the main parameters of the periodicity of the megaplume formation, temperature and the maximum mass flow rate are systematically discussed. Main conclusions are as follows: The normal black smoker system can evolve into a megaplum eruption. In fact, the passageway of the hydrothermal discharge is blocked by the hydrothermal sediments during the black smoker period, which leads to a hydrothermal fluid accumulation, rise of temperature and increase of buoyancy pressure under the seabed. After a period of 2~3 a, the megaplume hydrothermal eruption will occur when the increasing buoyancy pressure is high enough to crack the blockage (cap).Meanwhile, the temperature of the heat source must exceed 500 ℃, while the highest temperature of the eruption fluid may be high up to 413 ℃, which is fairly consistent with the surveying data

  11. Geology of a vigorous hydrothermal system on the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaney, J.R.; Robigou, V.; McDuff, R.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Tivey, M.K. (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States))

    1992-12-10

    A high-precision, high-resolution geologic map explicitly documents relationships between tectonic features and large steep-sided, sulfide-sulfate-silica deposits in the vigorously venting Endeavour hydrothermal field near the northern end of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Location of the most massive sulfide structures appears to be controlled by intersections of ridge-parallel normal faults and other fracture-fissure sets that trend oblique to, and perpendicular to the overall structural fabric of the axial valley. As presently mapped, the field is about 200 by 400 m on a side and contains at least 15 large (> 1,000 m[sup 3]) sulfide edifices and many tens of smaller, commonly inactive, sulfide structures. The larger sulfide structures are also the most vigorously venting features in the field; they are commonly more than 30 m in diameter and up to 20 m in height. Maximum venting temperatures of 375[degrees]C are associated with the smaller structures in the northern portion of the field are consistently 20[degrees]-30[degrees]C lower. Hydrothermal output from individual active sulfide features varies from no flow in the lower third of the edifice to vigorous output from fracture-controlled black smoker activity near the top of the structures. Two types of diffuse venting in the Endeavour field include a lower temperature 8[degrees]-15[degrees]C output through colonies of large tubeworms and 25[degrees]-50[degrees]C vent fluid that seems to percolate through the tops of overhanging flanges. The large size and steep-walled nature of these structures evidently results from sustained venting in a mature hydrothermal system, coupled with dual mineral depositional mechanisms involving vertical growth by accumulation of chimney sulfide debris and lateral growth by means of flange development.

  12. Entropy Production in Convective Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersing, Nele; Wellmann, Florian; Niederau, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Exploring hydrothermal reservoirs requires reliable estimates of subsurface temperatures to delineate favorable locations of boreholes. It is therefore of fundamental and practical importance to understand the thermodynamic behavior of the system in order to predict its performance with numerical studies. To this end, the thermodynamic measure of entropy production is considered as a useful abstraction tool to characterize the convective state of a system since it accounts for dissipative heat processes and gives insight into the system's average behavior in a statistical sense. Solving the underlying conservation principles of a convective hydrothermal system is sensitive to initial conditions and boundary conditions which in turn are prone to uncertain knowledge in subsurface parameters. There exist multiple numerical solutions to the mathematical description of a convective system and the prediction becomes even more challenging as the vigor of convection increases. Thus, the variety of possible modes contained in such highly non-linear problems needs to be quantified. A synthetic study is carried out to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in a finite porous layer heated from below. Various two-dimensional models are created such that their corresponding Rayleigh numbers lie in a range from the sub-critical linear to the supercritical non-linear regime, that is purely conductive to convection-dominated systems. Entropy production is found to describe the transient evolution of convective processes fairly well and can be used to identify thermodynamic equilibrium. Additionally, varying the aspect ratio for each Rayleigh number shows that the variety of realized convection modes increases with both larger aspect ratio and higher Rayleigh number. This phenomenon is also reflected by an enlarged spread of entropy production for the realized modes. Consequently, the Rayleigh number can be correlated to the magnitude of entropy production. In cases of moderate

  13. Physical controls on mixing and transport within rising submarine hydrothermal plumes: A numerical simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Houshuo; Breier, John A.

    2014-10-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate the turbulent flow and species transport of deep-sea high temperature hydrothermal plumes. The model solves numerically the density weighted unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and energy equation and the species transport equation. Turbulent entrainment and mixing is modeled by a k-ε turbulence closure model. The CFD model explicitly considers realistic vent chimney geometry, vent exit fluid temperature and velocity, and background stratification. The model uses field measurements as model inputs and has been validated by field data. These measurements and data, including vent temperature and plume physical structure, were made in the ABE hydrothermal field of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center. A parametric sensitivity study based on this CFD model was conducted to determine the relative importance of vent exit velocity, background stratification, and chimney height on the mixing of vent fluid and seawater. The CFD model was also used to derive several important scalings that are relevant to understanding plume impact on the ocean. These scalings include maximum plume rise height, neutrally buoyant plume height, maximum plume induced turbulent diffusivity, and total plume vertically transported water mass flux. These scaling relationships can be used for constructing simplified 1-dimensional models of geochemistry and microbial activity in hydrothermal plumes. Simulation results show that the classical entrainment assumptions, typically invoked to describe hydrothermal plume transport, only apply up to the vertical level of ~0.6 times the maximum plume rise height. Below that level, the entrainment coefficient remains relatively constant (~0.15). Above that level, the plume flow consists of a pronounced lateral spreading flow, two branches of inward flow immediately above and below the lateral spreading, and recirculation flanking the plume cap region. Both turbulent kinetic energy

  14. Application of AUVs in the Exploration for and Characterization of Arc Volcano Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ronde, C. E. J.; Walker, S. L.; Caratori Tontini, F.; Baker, E. T.; Embley, R. W.; Yoerger, D.

    2014-12-01

    The application of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) in the search for, and characterization of, seafloor hydrothermal systems associated with arc volcanoes has provided important information at a scale relevant to the study of these systems. That is, 1-2 m resolution bathymetric mapping of the seafloor, when combined with high-resolution magnetic and water column measurements, enables the discharge of hydrothermal vent fluids to be coupled with geological and structural features, and inferred upflow zones. Optimum altitude for the AUVs is ~70 m ensuring high resolution coverage of the area, maximum exposure to hydrothermal venting, and efficency of survey. The Brothers caldera and Clark cone volcanoes of the Kermadec arc have been surveyed by ABE and Sentry. At Brothers, bathymetric mapping shows complex features on the caldera walls including embayment's, ridges extending orthogonal to the walls and the location of a dominant ring fault. Water column measurements made by light scattering, temperature, ORP and pH sensors confirmed the location of the known vent fields on the NW caldera wall and atop the two cones, and discovered a new field on the West caldera wall. Evidence for diffuse discharge was also seen on the rim of the NW caldera wall; conversely, there was little evidence for discharge over an inferred ancient vent site on the SE caldera wall. Magnetic measurements show a strong correlation between the boundaries of vent fields determined by water column measurements and observed from manned submersible and towed camera surveys, and donut-shaped zones of magnetic 'lows' that are focused along ring faults. A magnetic low was also observed to cover the SE caldera site. Similar surveys over the NW edifice of Clark volcano also show a strong correlation between active hydrothermal venting and magnetic lows. Here, the survey revealed a pattern resembling Swiss cheese of magnetic lows, indicating more widespread permeability. Moreover, the magnetic survey

  15. ConnectiCity, augmented perception of the city

    CERN Document Server

    Iaconesi, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    As we move through cities in our daily lives, we are in a constant state of transformation of the spaces around us. The form and essence of urban space directly affects people's behavior, describing in their perception what is possible or impossible, allowed or prohibited, suggested or advised against. We are now able to fill and stratify space/time with digital information layers, completely wrapping cities in a membrane of information and of opportunities for interaction and communication. Mobile devices, smartphones, wearables, digital tags, near field communication devices, location based services and mixed/augmented reality have gone much further in this direction, turning the world into an essentially read/write, ubiquitous publishing surface. The usage of mobile devices and ubiquitous technologies alters the understanding of place. In this process, the definition of (urban) landscape powerfully shifts from a definition which is purely administrative (e.g.: the borders of the flower bed in the middle of...

  16. City Carbon Footprint Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwu Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Progressive cities worldwide have demonstrated political leadership by initiating meaningful strategies and actions to tackle climate change. However, the lack of knowledge concerning embodied greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of cities has hampered effective mitigation. We analyse trans-boundary GHG emission transfers between five Australian cities and their trading partners, with embodied emission flows broken down into major economic sectors. We examine intercity carbon footprint (CF networks and disclose a hierarchy of responsibility for emissions between cities and regions. Allocations of emissions to households, businesses and government and the carbon efficiency of expenditure have been analysed to inform mitigation policies. Our findings indicate that final demand in the five largest cities in Australia accounts for more than half of the nation’s CF. City households are responsible for about two thirds of the cities’ CFs; the rest can be attributed to government and business consumption and investment. The city network flows highlight that over half of emissions embodied in imports (EEI to the five cities occur overseas. However, a hierarchy of GHG emissions reveals that overseas regions also outsource emissions to Australian cities such as Perth. We finally discuss the implications of our findings on carbon neutrality, low-carbon city concepts and strategies and allocation of subnational GHG responsibility.

  17. Tuning photoluminescence of organic rubrene nanoparticles through a hydrothermal process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hyunjung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Light-emitting 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene nanoparticles (NPs prepared by a reprecipitation method were treated hydrothermally. The diameters of hydrothermally treated rubrene NPs were changed from 100 nm to 2 μm, depending on hydrothermal temperature. Photoluminescence (PL characteristics of rubrene NPs varied with hydrothermal temperatures. Luminescence of pristine rubrene NPs was yellow-orange, and it changed to blue as the hydrothermal temperature increased to 180°C. The light-emitting color distribution of the NPs was confirmed using confocal laser spectrum microscope. As the hydrothermal temperature increased from 110°C to 160°C, the blue light emission at 464 to approximately 516 nm from filtered-down NPs was enhanced by H-type aggregation. Filtered-up rubrene NPs treated at 170°C and 180°C exhibited blue luminescence due to the decrease of intermolecular excimer densities with the rapid increase in size. Variations in PL of hydrothermally treated rubrene NPs resulted from different size distributions of the NPs.

  18. Tuning photoluminescence of organic rubrene nanoparticles through a hydrothermal process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Light-emitting 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene) nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by a reprecipitation method were treated hydrothermally. The diameters of hydrothermally treated rubrene NPs were changed from 100 nm to 2 μm, depending on hydrothermal temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of rubrene NPs varied with hydrothermal temperatures. Luminescence of pristine rubrene NPs was yellow-orange, and it changed to blue as the hydrothermal temperature increased to 180°C. The light-emitting color distribution of the NPs was confirmed using confocal laser spectrum microscope. As the hydrothermal temperature increased from 110°C to 160°C, the blue light emission at 464 to approximately 516 nm from filtered-down NPs was enhanced by H-type aggregation. Filtered-up rubrene NPs treated at 170°C and 180°C exhibited blue luminescence due to the decrease of intermolecular excimer densities with the rapid increase in size. Variations in PL of hydrothermally treated rubrene NPs resulted from different size distributions of the NPs. PMID:21711925

  19. Deep-Sea Hydrothermal-Vent Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Venkateswaran, Kasthur; Matthews, Jaret B.

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus is being developed for sampling water for signs of microbial life in an ocean hydrothermal vent at a depth of as much as 6.5 km. Heretofore, evidence of microbial life in deep-sea hydrothermal vents has been elusive and difficult to validate. Because of the extreme conditions in these environments (high pressures and temperatures often in excess of 300 C), deep-sea hydrothermal- vent samplers must be robust. Because of the presumed low density of biomass of these environments, samplers must be capable of collecting water samples of significant volume. It is also essential to prevent contamination of samples by microbes entrained from surrounding waters. Prior to the development of the present apparatus, no sampling device was capable of satisfying these requirements. The apparatus (see figure) includes an intake equipped with a temperature probe, plus several other temperature probes located away from the intake. The readings from the temperature probes are utilized in conjunction with readings from flowmeters to determine the position of the intake relative to the hydrothermal plume and, thereby, to position the intake to sample directly from the plume. Because it is necessary to collect large samples of water in order to obtain sufficient microbial biomass but it is not practical to retain all the water from the samples, four filter arrays are used to concentrate the microbial biomass (which is assumed to consist of particles larger than 0.2 m) into smaller volumes. The apparatus can collect multiple samples per dive and is designed to process a total volume of 10 L of vent fluid, of which most passes through the filters, leaving a total possibly-microbe-containing sample volume of 200 mL remaining in filters. A rigid titanium nose at the intake is used for cooling the sample water before it enters a flexible inlet hose connected to a pump. As the water passes through the titanium nose, it must be cooled to a temperature that is above a mineral

  20. Hydrothermal pretreatment of biomass for pellet production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tooyserkani, Z. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Clean Energy Research Centre, Biomass and Bioenergy Research Group

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed innovative technologies for the production of wood pellets using the hydrothermal pre-treatment of biomass. Conventional techniques use low-cost mill residues, such as saw dust and shavings, as feedstock to produce durable, low-ash pellets. However, mill residues are becoming less available as a result of fewer saw mills, increased pellet production, and increased competition for saw dust. Advanced techniques use mixed biomass such as logging residue as feedstock, creating pellets that are durable for handling and long-term storage, of a higher energy density for transport and mixing with coal for co-firing, and a choice feedstock for biofuels. Advanced pellet production uses steam explosion/pre-treatment in which biomass receives a short-term high-pressure steam treatment followed by sudden decompression. Mild torrefaction seems to have positive feedback, and steam-treated pellets are durable with superior hydrophobicity. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Evolutionary origins of hydrothermal vents metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samadi Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the oases associated with hydrothermal vents in the deep sea, is probably the most fascinating discovery of oceanography of the last century. In this habitat, contrary to all expectations, a thriving development of unknown organisms was observed. At that time the knowledge about the deep sea organisms was very scarce and the accepted hypotheses about their evolutionary origins, their physiology or their ecology were very speculative. Almost forty years later, exploration of the deep-sea realm, but also of paleontological data together with the improvements in the phylogenetic methods, allowed the rejection of the hypothesis of an evolutionary history cut off the rest of the marine realm.

  2. The city in the information and communication technology age: a comparative study on path dependecy

    OpenAIRE

    Jonkhoff, Wouter; NIJKAMP Peter

    2001-01-01

    The role of the city in the modem electronic age is rapidly changing. Cities are no longer closed islands of local opportunities, but are open nodal points in a global network environment. The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has lifted the traditional physical - geographical constraints which kept cities imprisoned since the early genesis of modem cities. More openness means also more actors in the global economic playing field, so that cities tend to become increasingly compet...

  3. Using environmental tracers and numerical simulation to investigate regional hydrothermal basins—Norris Geyser Basin area, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, W. Payton; Susong, David D.; Solomon, D. Kip; Heasler, Henry P.

    2013-06-01

    Heat and fluid flow fields are simulated for several conceptual permeability fields and compared to processes inferred from environmental tracers in springs around Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park. Large hydrothermal basins require specific permeability distributions in the upper crust. High permeability connections must exist between the land surface and high-temperature environments at depths of up to 5 km. The highest modeled temperatures are produced with a vertical conduit permeability of 10-15m2. Permeability at depths of 3-5 km must be within one order of magnitude of the near-surface permeability and must be ≥10-16m2. Environmental tracers from springs are used to develop a plausible numerical model of the local to regional groundwater flow field for the Norris Geyser Basin area. The model simulations provide insight into the dynamics of heat and fluid flow in a large regional hydrothermal system.

  4. Geochemistry of the Koshelev Volcano-Hydrothermal System, Southern Kamchatka, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Y.; Kalacheva, E.

    2015-12-01

    Koshelev is the southernmost volcano of the Kamchatkan volcanic front where magmatic plumbing systems of the Kamchatkan subduction zone cross a thick layer of the oil-gas-bearing Neogene sedimentary strata of Western Kamchatka. The volcanic massive hosts a powerful hydrothermal system, which has been drilled in early 1980s. Deep wells tapped a hot (ca. 300ºC) saline solution (up to 40 g/L of Cl), whereas the upper part of the system is a typical steam cap with temperature close to 240ºC. Two hydrothermal fields of the volcano (Upper and Lower) discharge saturated or super-heated (up to 150ºC) steam and are characterized by numerous hot pools and low flow-rate springs of steam-heated waters