WorldWideScience

Sample records for city emergency department

  1. Recent Suicidal Ideation among Patients in an Inner City Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgen, Mark A.; Walton, Maureen A.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Barry, Kristen L.; Chermack, Steve T.; De Chavez, Peter; Blow, Frederic C.

    2009-01-01

    The rates and associated features of suicidal ideation among 5,641 patients seeking routine, nonsuicide related care in an inner-city emergency department were examined. Approximately 8% of patients seeking routine care in the emergency department reported some form of suicidal ideation within the past 2 weeks. Suicidal ideation was common in…

  2. Ill, Itinerant, and Insured: The Top 20 Users of Emergency Departments in Baltimore City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Y. DiPietro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to document the clinical and demographic characteristics of the 20 most frequent users of emergency departments (EDs in one urban area. We reviewed administrative records from three EDs and two agencies providing services to homeless people in Baltimore City. The top 20 users accounted for 2,079 visits at the three EDs. Their mean age was 48, and median age was 51. Nineteen patients visited at least 2 EDs, 18 were homeless, and 13 had some form of public insurance. The vast majority of visits (86% were triaged as moderate or high acuity. The five most frequent diagnoses were limb pain (n=9, lack of housing (n=6, alteration of consciousness (n=6, infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV (n=5, and nausea/vomiting (n=5. Hypertension, HIV infection, diabetes, substance abuse, and alcohol abuse were the most common chronic illnesses. The most frequent ED users were relatively young, accounted for a high number of visits, used multiple EDs, and often received high triage scores. Homelessness was the most common characteristic of this patient group, suggesting a relationship between this social factor and frequent ED use.

  3. Unscheduled return visits to a Dutch inner-city emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. van der Linden (M. Christien); R. Lindeboom (Robert); R.J. de Haan (Rob); N. van der Linden (Naomi); E.R. de Deckere (Ernie RJT); C. Lucas (Cees); S. Rhemrev (Steven); J.C. Goslings (Carel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Unscheduled return visits to the emergency department (ED) may reflect shortcomings in care. This study characterized ED return visits with respect to incidence, risk factors, reasons and post-ED disposition. We hypothesized that risk factors for unscheduled return and reasons

  4. Profile of frequent attenders to a Dublin inner city emergency department

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramasubbu, B

    2016-04-01

    A retrospective review of the demographics, co-morbidities and substance misuse of the 20 most frequent presenters to the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital emergency department during 2014 was carried out in an attempt to better understand the epidemiology of their presentations. Eighty-five percent were male and 15% female (p<0.001). The average age was 40.6 years with a median 38.5 years. All were unemployed and 7 (35%) had no fixed abode. Thirteen patients (65%) lived an average of 4.5 kilometres from the ED. In this study the presence of a mental illness, homelessness, alcohol or drug misuse were associated with significantly higher attendance rates (p=0.001, p<0.001, p<0.05, p<0.001 respectively). Early identification of these patients and targeting them for effective case-based community-led treatment strategies could improve their quality of life, decrease their cost of care and ultimately lead to more effective utilisation of our already overburdened emergency departments.

  5. Effect of a Targeted Women's Health Intervention in an Inner-City Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Houry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of an Emergency Department (ED based, educational intervention for at-risk health behaviors. Methods. A randomized trial over a one-year period. African American women, aged 21–55, presenting to the ED waiting room were eligible. Each participant took a computer-based survey on health risk behaviors. Participants who screened positive on any of four validated scales (for IPV, nicotine, alcohol, or drug dependence were randomized to standard information about community resources (control or to targeted educational handouts based upon their screening results (intervention. Participants were surveyed at 3 months regarding contacts with community resources and harm-reduction actions. Results. 610 women were initially surveyed; 326 screened positive (13.7% for IPV, 40.1% for nicotine addiction, 26.6% for alcohol abuse, and 14.4% for drug abuse. 157 women were randomized to intervention and 169 to control. Among women who completed follow-up (=71, women in the Intervention Group were significantly more likely to have contacted local resources (37% versus 9%, =0.04 and were more likely to have taken risk-reducing action (97% versus 79%, =0.04. Conclusion. Targeted, brief educational interventions may be an effective method for targeting risk behaviors among vulnerable ED populations.

  6. Emergency Department Visits for Homelessness or Inadequate Housing in New York City before and after Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Kelly M; McCormack, Ryan P; Johns, Eileen L; Carr, Brendan G; Smith, Silas W; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Lee, David C

    2016-04-01

    Hurricane Sandy struck New York City on October 29, 2012, causing not only a large amount of physical damage, but also straining people's health and disrupting health care services throughout the city. In prior research, we determined that emergency department (ED) visits from the most vulnerable hurricane evacuation flood zones in New York City increased after Hurricane Sandy for several medical diagnoses, but also for the diagnosis of homelessness. In the current study, we aimed to further explore this increase in ED visits for homelessness after Hurricane Sandy's landfall. We performed an observational before-and-after study using an all-payer claims database of ED visits in New York City to compare the demographic characteristics, insurance status, geographic distribution, and health conditions of ED patients with a primary or secondary ICD-9 diagnosis of homelessness or inadequate housing in the first week after Hurricane Sandy's landfall versus the baseline weekly average in 2012 prior to Hurricane Sandy. We found statistically significant increases in ED visits for diagnosis codes of homelessness or inadequate housing in the week after Hurricane Sandy's landfall. Those accessing the ED for homelessness or inadequate housing were more often elderly and insured by Medicare after versus before the hurricane. Secondary diagnoses among those with a primary ED diagnosis of homelessness or inadequate housing also differed after versus before Hurricane Sandy. These observed differences in the demographic, insurance, and co-existing diagnosis profiles of those with an ED diagnosis of homelessness or inadequate housing before and after Hurricane Sandy suggest that a new population cohort-potentially including those who had lost their homes as a result of storm damage-was accessing the ED for homelessness or other housing issues after the hurricane. Emergency departments may serve important public health and disaster response roles after a hurricane, particularly for

  7. Drinking water turbidity and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in New York City, 2002-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Hsieh

    Full Text Available Studies have examined whether there is a relationship between drinking water turbidity and gastrointestinal (GI illness indicators, and results have varied possibly due to differences in methods and study settings.As part of a water security improvement project we conducted a retrospective analysis of the relationship between drinking water turbidity and GI illness in New York City (NYC based on emergency department chief complaint syndromic data that are available in near-real-time.We used a Poisson time-series model to estimate the relationship of turbidity measured at distribution system and source water sites to diarrhea emergency department (ED visits in NYC during 2002-2009. The analysis assessed age groups and was stratified by season and adjusted for sub-seasonal temporal trends, year-to-year variation, ambient temperature, day-of-week, and holidays.Seasonal variation unrelated to turbidity dominated (~90% deviance the variation of daily diarrhea ED visits, with an additional 0.4% deviance explained with turbidity. Small yet significant multi-day lagged associations were found between NYC turbidity and diarrhea ED visits in the spring only, with approximately 5% excess risk per inter-quartile-range of NYC turbidity peaking at a 6 day lag. This association was strongest among those aged 0-4 years and was explained by the variation in source water turbidity.Integrated analysis of turbidity and syndromic surveillance data, as part of overall drinking water surveillance, may be useful for enhanced situational awareness of possible risk factors that can contribute to GI illness. Elucidating the causes of turbidity-GI illness associations including seasonal and regional variations would be necessary to further inform surveillance needs.

  8. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  9. Effects of emergency department crowding on the delivery of timely care in an inner-city hospital in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van der Linden (Naomi); M.C. van der Linden (M. Christien); J. Richards (John); R. Derlet (Robert); Grootendorst, D.C. (Diana C.); C.L. van den Brand (Crispijn)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground The impact of delays in emergency department (ED) care has not been described in European countries where ED crowding is not universally recognized. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship of ED crowding with delays in triage and treatment, and 24-h mortality i

  10. Air pollution and emergency department visits for cardiac and respiratory conditions: a multi-city time-series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe Brian H

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively few studies have been conducted of the association between air pollution and emergency department (ED visits, and most of these have been based on a small number of visits, for a limited number of health conditions and pollutants, and only daily measures of exposure and response. Methods A time-series analysis was conducted on nearly 400,000 ED visits to 14 hospitals in seven Canadian cities during the 1990s and early 2000s. Associations were examined between carbon monoxide (CO, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, ozone (O3, sulfur dioxide (SO2, and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5, and visits for angina/myocardial infarction, heart failure, dysrhythmia/conduction disturbance, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and respiratory infections. Daily and 3-hourly visit counts were modeled as quasi-Poisson and analyses controlled for effects of temporal cycles, weather, day of week and holidays. Results 24-hour average concentrations of CO and NO2 lag 0 days exhibited the most consistent associations with cardiac conditions (2.1% (95% CI, 0.0–4.2% and 2.6% (95% CI, 0.2–5.0% increase in visits for myocardial infarction/angina per 0.7 ppm CO and 18.4 ppb NO2 respectively; 3.8% (95% CI, 0.7–6.9% and 4.7% (95% CI, 1.2–8.4% increase in visits for heart failure. Ozone (lag 2 days was most consistently associated with respiratory visits (3.2% (95% CI, 0.3–6.2%, and 3.7% (95% CI, -0.5–7.9% increases in asthma and COPD visits respectively per 18.4 ppb. Associations tended to be of greater magnitude during the warm season (April – September. In particular, the associations of PM10 and PM2.5with asthma visits were respectively nearly three- and over fourfold larger vs. all year analyses (14.4% increase in visits, 95% CI, 0.2–30.7, per 20.6 μg/m3 PM10 and 7.6% increase in visits, 95% CI, 5.1–10.1, per 8.2 μg/m3 PM2.5. No consistent associations were observed between three hour average pollutant

  11. Hypoglycemia in Emergency Department

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jang Su; Chia-Jung Liao

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the epidemiology, etiologies and prognostic factors of hypoglycemia. Methods:A retrospective chart review of hypoglycemic cases from December, 2009 to February, 2012 was conducted to gather the following patient data: age, gender, vital signs at triage, white blood cell count, serum glucose, C-reactive protein, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, creatinine, sodium, potassium, past history of liver cirrhosis, uremia, concomitant infection, concomitant cancer/malignancy, length of stay, lack of recent meal, status of acute renal failure and concomitant stroke. A total of 186 cases were enrolled in our study. We analyzed the data using commercial statistics software (SPSS for Windows, version 11.0, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). We used the Student's t-test andχ2 test for the statistical analyses, and significance was set at a P value less than 0.05. Results: Hypoglycemia is related to several co-morbidities. In total, 10.2%of the patients had liver cirrhosis and 7.0% had uremia. More than half (55.4%) were bacterial infection during hospitalization. Acute renal failure accounted for 26.3%of the hypoglycemic episodes. In addition to the etiology of infection, the lack of a recent meal accounted for 44.6%hypoglycemic episodes. A total of 2.2%of the cases resulted from an acute cerebrovascular accident. Approximately 8.6%were concomitant with malignancy. Conclusions: When hypoglycemic patients present in the emergency department, physicians should pay attention to the presence of infection, malignancy, liver diseases (liver cirrhosis and biliary tract infection), and acute renal failure.

  12. Emergency teams in Danish emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafrenz, Thomas; Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; La Cour, Jeppe Lerche;

    2012-01-01

    The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs....

  13. Prevalence of Exposure to Risk Factors for Violence among Young Adults Seen in an Inner-City Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Hankin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To assess the prevalence of risk factors for violent injury among young adults treated at an urban emergency department (ED.Methods: This study is a cross-sectional analysis of data collected as part of a longitudinal study. Enrollment took place in an urban ED in a Level 1 trauma center, June through December 2010. All patients aged 18–24 years were eligible. Patients were excluded if they were incarcerated, critically ill, or unable to read English. Study participants completed a 10-minute multiple-choice questionnaire using previously validated scales: a aggression, b perceived likelihood of violence, c recent violent behavior, d peer behavior, and e community exposure to violence.Results: 403 eligible patients were approached, of whom 365 (90.1% consented to participate. Average age was 21.1 (95% confidence interval: 20.9, 21.3 years, and participants were 57.2% female, 85.7% African American, and 82.2% were educated at the high school level or beyond. Among study participants, rates of high-risk exposure to individual risk factors ranged from 7.4% (recent violent behavior to 24.5% (exposure to community violence, with 32.3% of patients showing high exposure to at least one risk factor. When comparing participants by ethnicity, no significant differences were found between White, African-American, and Hispanic participants. Males and females differed significantly only on 1 of the scales – community violence, (20.4% of males vs. 30.3% of females, p¼0.03. Selfreported hostile/aggressive feelings were independently associated with initial presentation for injury associated complaint after controlling for age, sex, and race (odds ratio 3.48 (1.49-8.13.Conclusion: Over 30% of young adults presenting to an urban ED reported high exposure to risk factors for violent injury. The high prevalence of these risk factors among ED patients highlights the potential benefit of a survey instrument to identify youth who might benefit from

  14. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  15. The Emergence of City Logistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Many city logistics projects in Europe have failed. The purpose of this article is to increase understanding of how city logistics emerge. A better understanding of the complex organizational processes with many actors and stakeholders in city logistics projects may prevent further...... failures. Design/methodology/approach: Theory on organizational change is applied to capture the processes leading to emergence of city logistics. The methodology is process analysis on a single longitudinal case. Findings: The emergence of the Copenhagen city logistics project can be understood....... The study aims at understanding the social processes towards reduced congestion and greenhouse gas emissions from goods transport in inner cities. Originality/value: By better understanding the organization processes leading to implementation of city logistics, other projects in other cities may learn from...

  16. Impact of the ABCDE triage in primary care emergency department on the number of patient visits to different parts of the health care system in Espoo City

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    Kantonen Jarmo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Finnish emergency departments (ED serve both primary and secondary health care patients and are therefore referred to as combined emergency departments. Primary care doctors are responsible for the initial assessment and treatment. They, thereby, also regulate referral and access to secondary care. Primary health care EDs are easy for the public to access, leading to non-acute patient visits to the emergency department. This has caused increased queues and unnecessary difficulties in providing immediate treatment for urgent patients. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether the flow of patients was changed by implementing the ABCDE-triage system in the EDs of Espoo City, Finland. Methods The numbers of monthly visits to doctors were recorded before and after intervention in Espoo primary care EDs. To study if the implementation of the triage system redirects patients to other health services, the numbers of monthly visits to doctors were also scored in the private health care, the public sector health services of Espoo primary care during office hours and local secondary health care ED (Jorvi hospital. A face-to-face triage system was applied in the primary care EDs as an attempt to provide immediate treatment for the most acute patients. It is based on the letters A (patient sent directly to secondary care, B (to be examined within 10 min, C (to be examined within 1 h, D (to be examined within 2 h and E (no need for immediate treatment for assessing the urgency of patients' treatment needs. The first step was an initial patient assessment by a health care professional (triage nurse. The introduction of this triage system was combined with information to the public on the "correct" use of emergency services. Results After implementation of the ABCDE-triage system the number of patient visits to a primary care doctor decreased by up to 24% (962 visits/month as compared to the three previous years in the EDs

  17. The Emergence of City Logistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: – Many city logistics projects in Europe have failed. A better understanding of the complex organizational change processes in city logistics projects with many stakeholders may expand city logistics capabilities and thereby help prevent future failures. The purpose of this paper...... is therefore to increase understanding of how city logistics emerge, and secondarily, to investigate whether such processes can be managed at all. Design/methodology/approach: – A paradigm shift in urban planning creates new ways of involving stakeholders in new sustainability measures such as city logistics....... Organizational change theory is applied to capture the social processes leading to emergence of city logistics. The methodology is a qualitative processual analysis of a single longitudinal case. Findings: – The change process took different forms over time. At the time of concluding the analysis, positive...

  18. Emergency department overcrowding: the Emergency Department Cardiac Analogy Model (EDCAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Sandra K; Ardagh, Michael; Gee, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Increasing patient numbers, changing demographics and altered patient expectations have all contributed to the current problem with 'overcrowding' in emergency departments (EDs). The problem has reached crisis level in a number of countries, with significant implications for patient safety, quality of care, staff 'burnout' and patient and staff satisfaction. There is no single, clear definition of the cause of overcrowding, nor a simple means of addressing the problem. For some hospitals, the option of ambulance diversion has become a necessity, as overcrowded waiting rooms and 'bed-block' force emergency staff to turn patients away. But what are the options when ambulance diversion is not possible? Christchurch Hospital, New Zealand is a tertiary level facility with an emergency department that sees on average 65,000 patients per year. There are no other EDs to whom patients can be diverted, and so despite admission rates from the ED of up to 48%, other options need to be examined. In order to develop a series of unified responses, which acknowledge the multifactorial nature of the problem, the Emergency Department Cardiac Analogy model of ED flow, was developed. This model highlights the need to intervene at each of three key points, in order to address the issue of overcrowding and its associated problems.

  19. Hypernatremia in the Emergency Department

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    Neslihan YÜCE

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To determine the symptoms, clinical characteristics, prevalence and outcome of patients with hypernatremia who presented at the emergency department. MATERIAL and METHODS: We retrospectively studied patients who presented at the emergency department with hypernatremia (Na>148 meq/l from January 2008 to December 2008. RESULTS: A total of 25.545 cases presented at the Emergency Department and hypernatremia was seen in 86 patients. The prevalence of hypernatremia was 0.34%. The mean age was 69.5±15.2 (20- 96, median age: 75 years and 51 of them (59% were male. Forty percent of the patients died. There were no significant differences according to age, gender and admission Na levels. A comorbid disease were seen 99% of patients. Cerebrovascular disease(CVD, dementia/Alzheimer and hypertension were the most common co-morbid diseases (respectively, 34%, 34%,and 27%. Central neurological system disorders (such as thrombotic or hemorrhagic CVD, Alzheimer, etc. were seen in 72% of the cases. Fifty patients had acute infection at the time of admission. Acute urinary infection, pneumonia and acute CVD were the most common acute illnesses. CONCLUSION: Hypernatremia is usually seen in the geriatric population and associated with a high mortality and morbidity rate and the majority of patients with hypernatremia have a comorbid disease. The prevalence of hypernatremia was 0.34% in our emergency department.

  20. Catatonia in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimes-Albornoz, Walter; Serra-Mestres, Jordi

    2012-11-01

    Disturbances of the level of awareness are a frequent motive of attendance to emergency departments where the initial assessment and management will determine the direction of their outcome. The syndrome of catatonia must be taken into consideration and although it is normally associated with psychiatric diagnoses, it is also very often found in a great variety of neurological and medical conditions. Due to the clinical complexity of catatonia, there are still difficulties in its correct identification and initial management, something that leads to diagnostic delays and increased morbidity and mortality. In this article, a review of the literature on catatonia is presented with the aim of assisting emergency department doctors (and clinicians assessing patients in emergency situations) in considering this condition in the differential diagnosis of stupor due to its high frequency of association with organic pathology.

  1. The emergency department medical director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, T A

    1987-02-01

    This article has presented an overview of the duties, responsibilities, and management roles of the emergency department Medical Director, a position that can be among the most challenging, stimulating, and exciting in medicine. However, prior to accepting a position as an Emergency Department medical director, one should have a clear understanding of what the job entails. Careful discussions with the hospital administration, medical staff, nursing personnel, and staff emergency physicians should be undertaken to learn the perceptions of these people and expectations of the position. Once the job has been accepted, using the roles, responsibilities, and duties detailed herein may be of benefit--but should always be applied with good judgment, tactful cooperation, and common sense. Finally, it should not be surprising to a medical director to find, as Spinoza did many years ago, that the excellent thing he aspires to are as difficult as they are rare.

  2. Health information exchange, biosurveillance efforts, and emergency department crowding during the spring 2009 H1N1 outbreak in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Jason S; Genes, Nicholas; Kuperman, Gilad; Chason, Kevin; Richardson, Lynne D

    2010-03-01

    Novel H1N1 influenza spread rapidly around the world in spring 2009. Few places were as widely affected as the New York metropolitan area. Emergency departments (EDs) in the region experienced daily visit increases in 2 distinct temporal peaks, with means of 36.8% and 60.7% over baseline in April and May, respectively, and became, in a sense, the "canary in the coal mine" for the rest of the country as we braced ourselves for resurgent spread in the fall. Biosurveillance efforts by public health agencies can lead to earlier detection, potentially forestalling spread of outbreaks and leading to better situational awareness by frontline medical staff and public health workers as they respond to a crisis, but biosurveillance has traditionally relied on manual reporting by hospital administrators when they are least able: in the midst of a public health crisis. This article explores the use of health information exchange networks, which enable the secure flow of clinical data among otherwise unaffiliated providers across entire regions for the purposes of clinical care, as a tool for automated biosurveillance reporting. Additionally, this article uses a health information exchange to assess H1N1's effect on ED visit rates and discusses preparedness recommendations and lessons learned from the spring 2009 H1N1 experience across 11 geographically distinct EDs in New York City that participate in the health information exchange.

  3. The Emerging City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    The paper explores how urban bodies such as architecture, urban design, art works and social action can be drawn together in as urban assemblages producing “a movement of generalised deterritorialization”(Deleuze & Guattari 2004:78) in relation to the city. The first example, “The Elbæk bench” – ......, Capitalism and Schizofrenia. Transl. Massumi Continuum, New York, London Whitehead, A.N. (1978) Process and Reality, corrected edition, Eds. Griffin, David Ray & Sherburne, Donald. W. The Free Press, New York...

  4. Electronic Emergency-Department Whiteboards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Many emergency departments (EDs) are in a process of transitioning from dry-erase to electronic whiteboards. This study investigates differences in ED clinicians’ perception and assessment of their electronic whiteboards across departments and staff groups and at two points in time. Method....... We conducted a survey consisting of a questionnaire administered when electronic whiteboards were introduced and another questionnaire administered when they had been in use for 8-9 months. The survey involved two EDs and, for reasons of comparison, a paediatric department. Results. The ED...... respondents consider the whiteboard information important to their overview, and they approve of the introduction of electronic whiteboards. With the electronic whiteboards, the ED respondents experience a better overall overview of their work than with dry-erase whiteboards. They also experience...

  5. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... strongly influences patient morbidity and mortality. Prolonged transport times or inadequate prehospital care increases the requirement for early rapid restoration of tissue perfusion and reversal of physiologic disturbances on patient arrival. On the other hand, in urban areas, rapid emergency medical...... services (EMS) response times and advanced prehospital care increase the number of critically injured patients surviving sufficiently long to reach a hospital “in extremis.” Both scenarios provide challenges in the management of traumatized patients. This article addresses the management of severely...

  6. Pediatric Ingestions: Emergency Department Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarango Md, Stacy M; Liu Md, Deborah R

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric ingestions present a common challenge for emergency clinicians. Each year, more than 50,000 children aged less than 5 years present to emergency departments with concern for unintentional medication exposure, and nearly half of all calls to poison centers are for children aged less than 6 years. Ingestion of magnetic objects and button batteries has also become an increasing source of morbidity and mortality. Although fatal pediatric ingestions are rare, the prescription medications most responsible for injury and fatality in children include opioids, sedative/hypnotics, and cardiovascular drugs. Evidence regarding the evaluation and management of common pediatric ingestions is comprised largely of case reports and retrospective studies. This issue provides a review of these studies as well as consensus guidelines addressing the initial resuscitation, diagnosis, and treatment of common pediatric ingestions. Also discussed are current recommendations for decontamination, administration of antidotes for specific toxins, and management of ingested foreign bodies.

  7. Advertising emergency department wait times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Scott G

    2013-03-01

    Advertising emergency department (ED) wait times has become a common practice in the United States. Proponents of this practice state that it is a powerful marketing strategy that can help steer patients to the ED. Opponents worry about the risk to the public health that arises from a patient with an emergent condition self-triaging to a further hospital, problems with inaccuracy and lack of standard definition of the reported time, and directing lower acuity patients to the higher cost ED setting instead to primary care. Three sample cases demonstrating the pitfalls of advertising ED wait times are discussed. Given the lack of rigorous evidence supporting the practice and potential adverse effects to the public health, caution about its use is advised.

  8. Forecasting the Emergency Department Patients Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afilal, Mohamed; Yalaoui, Farouk; Dugardin, Frédéric; Amodeo, Lionel; Laplanche, David; Blua, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) have become the patient's main point of entrance in modern hospitals causing it frequent overcrowding, thus hospital managers are increasingly paying attention to the ED in order to provide better quality service for patients. One of the key elements for a good management strategy is demand forecasting. In this case, forecasting patients flow, which will help decision makers to optimize human (doctors, nurses…) and material(beds, boxs…) resources allocation. The main interest of this research is forecasting daily attendance at an emergency department. The study was conducted on the Emergency Department of Troyes city hospital center, France, in which we propose a new practical ED patients classification that consolidate the CCMU and GEMSA categories into one category and innovative time-series based models to forecast long and short term daily attendance. The models we developed for this case study shows very good performances (up to 91,24 % for the annual Total flow forecast) and robustness to epidemic periods.

  9. Evaluation of emergency department performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter; Forberg, Jakob Lundager

    2013-01-01

    literature regard as being most relevant in assessing overall ED performance. Methods Following the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic literature review of review articles reporting accentuated ED performance measures was conducted in the databases of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. Study......Background Evaluation of emergency department (ED) performance remains a difficult task due to the lack of consensus on performance measures that reflects high quality, efficiency, and sustainability. Aim To describe, map, and critically evaluate which performance measures that the published...... eligibility criteria includes: 1) the main purpose was to discuss, analyse, or promote performance measures best reflecting ED performance, 2) the article was a review article, and 3) the article reported macro-level performance measures, thus reflecting an overall departmental performance level. Results...

  10. Managing hypopituitarism in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Jeanette

    2015-10-01

    Healthcare professionals manage patients with a vast range of conditions, but often specialise and acquire expertise in specific disease processes. Emergency and pre-hospital clinicians care for patients with various conditions for short periods of time, so have less opportunity to become familiar with more unusual conditions, yet it is vital that they have some knowledge and understanding of these. Patients with rare conditions can present at emergency departments with common complaints, but the effect of their original diagnosis on the presenting complaint may be overlooked or underestimated. This article uses a case study to describe the experience of one patient who presented with vomiting, but who also had hypopituitarism and therefore required specific management she did not at first receive. The article describes hypopituitarism and the initial management of patients with this condition who become unwell, and discusses how the trust responded to the patient's complaint to improve patient safety and care. It has been written with the full participation and consent of the patient and her husband.

  11. Shock in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The knowledge of the frequency and associated mortality of shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, all-cause mortality and factors associated with death among patients suffering shock in the ED. METHODS: Population......-based cohort study at an University Hospital ED in Denmark from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. All patients aged ≥18 years living in the hospital catchment area with a first time ED presentation with shock (n = 1646) defined as hypotension (systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤100 mmHg)) and ≥1 organ...... failures. Outcomes were annual incidence per 100,000 person-years at risk (pyar), all-cause mortality at 0-7, and 8-90 days and risk factors associated with death. RESULTS: We identified 1646 of 438,191 (0.4 %) ED patients with shock at arrival. Incidence of shock increased from 53.8 to 80.6 cases per 100...

  12. Improving emergency department patient flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Paul Richard Edwin

    2016-06-01

    Emergency departments (ED) face significant challenges in delivering high quality and timely patient care on an ever-present background of increasing patient numbers and limited hospital resources. A mismatch between patient demand and the ED's capacity to deliver care often leads to poor patient flow and departmental crowding. These are associated with reduction in the quality of the care delivered and poor patient outcomes. A literature review was performed to identify evidence-based strategies to reduce the amount of time patients spend in the ED in order to improve patient flow and reduce crowding in the ED. The use of doctor triage, rapid assessment, streaming and the co-location of a primary care clinician in the ED have all been shown to improve patient flow. In addition, when used effectively point of care testing has been shown to reduce patient time in the ED. Patient flow and departmental crowding can be improved by implementing new patterns of working and introducing new technologies such as point of care testing in the ED.

  13. Hand washing frequency in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meengs, M R; Giles, B K; Chisholm, C D; Cordell, W H; Nelson, D R

    1994-06-01

    Objectives Previous studies, conducted mainly in ICUs, have shown low compliance with hand-washing recommendations, with failure rates approaching 60%. Hand washing in the emergency department has not been studied. We examined the frequency and duration of hand washing in one emergency department and the effects of three variables: level of training, type of patient contact (clean, dirty, or gloved), and years of staff clinical experience. Design Observational. Setting ED of a 1100-bed tertiary referral, central city, private teaching hospital. Participants Emergency nurses, faculty, and resident physicians. Participants were informed that their activities were being monitored but were unaware of the exact nature of the study. Interventions An observer recorded the number of patient contacts and activities for each participant during 3-hour observation periods. Activities were categorized as either clean or dirty according to a scale devised by Fulkerson. The use of gloves was noted and hand-washing technique and duration were recorded. A hand-washing break in technique was defined as failure to wash hands after a patient contact and before proceeding to another patient or activity. Results Eleven faculty, 11 resident physicians, and 13 emergency nurses were observed. Of 409 total contacts, 272 were clean, 46 were dirty, and 91 were gloved. Hand washing occurred after 32.3% of total contacts (SD, 2.31%). Nurses washed after 58.2% of 146 contacts (SD, 4.1%), residents after 18.6% of 129 contacts (SD, 3.4%), and faculty after 17.2% of 134 contacts (SD, 3.3%). Nurses had a significantly higher hand washing frequency than either faculty (p < 0.0001) or resident physicians (p < 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Leadership and the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSalle, Gar

    2004-02-01

    Emergency medicine, as the nation's health care system's safety net, is facing ever increasing demands on its resources and infrastructure. Classic and modern theories of leadership, which include broader based models that in corporate team responsibilities, should be studied by anyone wearing the mantle of leadership in emergency medicine, and the Realpolitik of the modern hospital must be accommodated if leadership efforts are to succeed.

  15. Asthma Medication Ratio Predicts Emergency Depart...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Asthma Medication Ratio Predicts Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations in Children with Asthma, published in Volume 3,...

  16. Examination of Migraine Management in Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satnam S Nijjar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite advances in treatment, patients with migraine have been underdiagnosed and undertreated, specifically in emergency departments. In addition, great variability exists with respect to the diagnosis, management and treatment of migraine patients in emergency departments. In particular, migraine-specific treatments, including serotonin receptor agonists, appear to be rarely used.

  17. Smart City Governance: A Local Emergent Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a local emergent perspective on smart city governance. Smart city governance is about using new technologies to develop innovative governance arrangements. Cities all around the world are struggling to find smart solutions to wicked problems and they hope to learn from successf

  18. Emergency department triage: an ethical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastmans Chris

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency departments across the globe follow a triage system in order to cope with overcrowding. The intention behind triage is to improve the emergency care and to prioritize cases in terms of clinical urgency. Discussion In emergency department triage, medical care might lead to adverse consequences like delay in providing care, compromise in privacy and confidentiality, poor physician-patient communication, failing to provide the necessary care altogether, or even having to decide whose life to save when not everyone can be saved. These consequences challenge the ethical quality of emergency care. This article provides an ethical analysis of "routine" emergency department triage. The four principles of biomedical ethics - viz. respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice provide the starting point and help us to identify the ethical challenges of emergency department triage. However, they do not offer a comprehensive ethical view. To address the ethical issues of emergency department triage from a more comprehensive ethical view, the care ethics perspective offers additional insights. Summary We integrate the results from the analysis using four principles of biomedical ethics into care ethics perspective on triage and propose an integrated clinically and ethically based framework of emergency department triage planning, as seen from a comprehensive ethics perspective that incorporates both the principles-based and care-oriented approach.

  19. Adherence to the guideline 'Triage in emergency departments': a survey of Dutch emergency departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.J.; Achterberg, T. van; Adriaansen, M.J.M.; Kampshoff, C.S.; Mintjes-de Groot, J.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the adherence to the 2004 guideline Triage in emergency departments three years after dissemination in Dutch emergency departments. BACKGROUND: In 2004, a Dutch guideline Triage in emergency departments was developed. Triage is the first ste

  20. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  1. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  2. Study of patients of road traffic accidents a rriving in emergency department [ED] of V.S hospital at Ahmedabad city, single centre pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharnish Shah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives of the study According to the latest world status report on road safety released by WHO, we are now the world leaders in road traffic accident rate & related mortality. Our study intends to find out the epidemiological factors, risk factors, use of safety measures, compliance with traffic laws, presenting injuries & ED intervention required, in patients with road traffic accidents. Materials & methods Our study is a cross sectional observational study in which data was obtained from 150 patients of road traffic accidents arriving at any time to emergency department. Collected data included information about basic details, basic crash characteristics, risk factors, use of safety measures, injuries sustained, ED intervention required & disposition. Results Approximately 77% of the patients belong to 11-50 yr age group. The most common time of RTA is between 6 am to 12 noon [36.67%]. However accidents requiring admission were more during night time [62.74%]. Innocent passengers & pedestrians contributed to 41% of the accident cases. Non compliance with traffic laws & safety measures like driving without license [20%], using mobile phones while driving [10%], not using headlights at night [26%], not using seatbelts [80%], not using helmets [91%], etc were found in a substantial number of cases. Intracranial bleed & skull fractures were significantly (31.2% v/s 0% more in drivers without helmets than those with helmets. ED intervention required in decreasing order were dressing ( 38%, laceration repair (27.33%, splinting (24%, crash intubation (10%, ICD (2.66%. Conclusion: Well equipped secondary & tertiary level trauma centres, specially dedicated to management of trauma patients, with a proper triage plan, are necessary for proper management of trauma patients & better utilisation of resources. Our study shows that an ER physician should be trained in l aceration repair, dressing, splint/slab application, fracture/dislocation reduction

  3. Emergency Department Presentations following Tropical Cyclone Yasi

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Aitken; Richard Charles Franklin; Jenine Lawlor; Rob Mitchell; Kerrianne Watt; Jeremy Furyk; Niall Small; Leone Lovegrove; Peter Leggat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Emergency departments see an increase in cases during cyclones. The aim of this study is to describe patient presentations to the Emergency Department (ED) of a tertiary level hospital (Townsville) following a tropical cyclone (Yasi). Specific areas of focus include changes in: patient demographics (age and gender), triage categories, and classification of diseases. Methods Data were extracted from the Townsville Hospitals ED information system (EDIS) for three periods in 2009, 2...

  4. Child maltreatment, parents & the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoytema van Konijnenburg, E.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on the evaluation of several methods of screening for child maltreatment at the emergency department, with an emphasis on screening based on parental risk factors (‘child check’). The use of a screening checklist (mandatory in all Dutch emergency departm

  5. Evaluation of Performance Indexes of Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Baratloo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of evaluating performance indicators in the emergency department, as one of the most important departments of hospital, is obvious to everyone. Therefore, in this study we aimed to appraise the five performance indicators, approved by the ministry of health, in Shohadaye Tajrish hospital, Tehran, Iran. Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional study based on the profiles of all the patients admitted to the emergency department, performance indicators in the emergency department were evaluated. The study was divided into 2 parts about the establishment of emergency medicine system and training the medical staff: the first 6 months of 1392 and the second. Then these 2 periods were compared using Mann-Whitney U test while P< 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: Of the studied indicators, mean triage time was 6.04 minutes in the first 6 months which was reduced to 1.5 minutes in the second 6 months (p=0.016. In addition, the percentage of patients who moved out of the department in 12 hours was lowered from 97.3% in the first period to 90.4% in the second (p=0.004. While, the percentage of patients who were decided upon in 6 hours (p=0.2, unsuccessful CPR percentage (p=0.34 and patients discharged against medical advice (p=0.42 showed no significant difference. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the establishment of the emergency medicine system in the emergency department could lead to more efficient triage. Due to the differences made after their establishment including: different pattern of the patients admitted, increased stay of the patients in the department due to their need for prolonged intensive care, a raise in patient referral to the hospital by pre-hospital services and a higher percentage of occupied hospital beds, other indicators have not shown a significant improvement.

  6. Emergency department crowding: Factors influencing flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on emergency department (ED) crowding. In the first part (ED crowding in the Netherlands) the current state of EDs regarding patients’ length of stay and ED managers’ experiences of crowding are described. Part two (input factors) contains three studies which describe the case lo

  7. Assigning treatment rooms at the Emergency Department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, van de Maartje; Boucherie, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing efficiency at the Emergency Department (ED) reduces overcrowding. At the ED in typical Dutch Hospitals treatment rooms are mostly shared by two residents of different specialties: a Surgeon and an Internist. Each resident uses multiple rooms in parallel; while one patient awaits test resu

  8. Prediction of bacteremia in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Kristine Jessen; Mackenhauer, Julie; Hvass, Anne Mette Sondrup Wulff;

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to validate a previously published clinical decision rule for predicting a positive blood culture in emergency department (ED) patients with suspected infection on the basis of major and minor criteria and a total score (Shapiro et al., J Emerg Med, 2008......; 35:255–264). Methods This is a retrospective matched cohort study of adult ED patients with blood cultures obtained from 1 January 2011 through to 31 December 2011. ED patients with blood culture-confirmed bacteremia were matched 1 : 3 with patients with negative cultures. The outcome was ‘true...

  9. Emergency Department Management Of Acute Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Steven G; Pfaff, James A; Cuenca, Peter John

    2014-11-01

    Infective endocarditis has a high rate of mortality, and most patients suspected of having the disease will require hospital admission. This review examines the literature as it pertains specifically to emergency clinicians who must maintain vigilance for risk factors and obtain a thorough history, including use of intravenous drugs, in order to guide the workup and treatment. Properly obtained cultures are critical during the evaluation, as they direct the course of antibiotic therapy. Although transthoracic echocardiography is widely available in United States emergency departments, it is not sensitive or specific enough to rule out a diagnosis of infective endocarditis. In high-risk patients, transesophageal echocardiography should be considered.

  10. Enhanced monitoring of abnormal emergency department demands

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2016-06-13

    This paper presents a statistical technique for detecting signs of abnormal situation generated by the influx of patients at emergency department (ED). The monitoring strategy developed was able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations caused by abnormal patient arrivals to the ED. More specifically, This work proposed the application of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models combined with the generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test for anomaly-detection. ARMA was used as the modelling framework of the ARMA-based GLR anomaly-detection methodology. The GLR test was applied to the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the ARMA model to detect anomalies when the data did not fit the reference ARMA model. The ARMA-based GLR hypothesis testing scheme was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France. © 2015 IEEE.

  11. Approach to dizziness in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Ileok; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Acute dizziness/vertigo is among the most common causes for visiting the emergency department. The traditional approach to dizziness starts with categorizing dizziness into four types: vertigo, presyncope, disequilibrium, and nonspecific dizziness. However, a recently proposed approach begins with classifying dizziness/vertigo as acute prolonged spontaneous dizziness/vertigo, recurrent spontaneous dizziness/vertigo, recurrent positional vertigo, or chronic persistent dizziness and imbalance. ...

  12. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: diagnosis in an emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mancini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC is a reversible cardiomyopathy characterized by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricle (LV in the absence of significant obstructive coronary disease. In emergency departments the diagnosis remains a challenge because clinical and electrocardiographic presentation of Takotsubo is quite similar to ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. We conducted a retrospective descriptive study on 1654 patients admitted to our emergency department from 2006 to 2009 who had a left heart catheterization for a suspected acute coronary syndrome and among them we evaluated characteristics on admission of 14 patients with a clinical picture suggestive for a TC. All patients were postmenopausal female. Ten patients (71% had preceding stressful events and four patients (29% did not have identifiable stressors. Thirteen patients (93% presented chest pain and one (7% syncope. ST-segment elevation was present in six patients (43%. One patient (7% presented an episode of ventricular fibrillation. All patients presented increased cardiac Troponin T. Initial LV ejection fraction, evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography was 44±10%. Follow-up LV ejection fraction was 61±10%. Six patients (43% had characteristic apical ballooning and eight patients (57% had hypokinesia or akinesia of the apical or/and midventricular region of the LV without ballooning. Coronary angiography was normal in nine patients (64% and five (36% had stenosis <50%. None had complete obstruction of a coronary. Takotsubo syndrome should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients admitted in an emergency department with a suspected diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. Emergency physicians should recognize salient aspects of the medical history at presentation in order to organize appropriate investigations and avoid inappropriate therapies.

  13. Design Methods in the Emergent City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    The paper seeks to define urban design in relation to the specific challenges of emerging cities. Through a case study of Mudo Coletivos temporary structure, Bolha Imobiliaria, and the making of it, I wish to outline a design approach for urban design in cities lacking public spaces. Urban design...... is understood in a broad sense, not as architectural design but as spatial design and artistic interventions in public space. Through the paper I will address how the designer can co-create and reassemble existing urban spaces through design acts. The approach suggests a situated design methodology but is based...

  14. HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) contain the universe of emergency department visits in participating States. Restricted access data files are...

  15. HCUP Nationwide Emergency Department Database (NEDS) Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) was created to enable analyses of emergency department (ED) utilization patterns and support public health...

  16. International perspectives on emergency department crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jesse M; Hilton, Joshua A; Weber, Ellen J; Alkemade, Annechien J; Al Shabanah, Hasan; Anderson, Philip D; Bernhard, Michael; Bertini, Alessio; Gries, André; Ferrandiz, Santiago; Kumar, Vijaya Arun; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Hogan, Barbara; Madsen, Bo; Mason, Suzanne; Ohlén, Gunnar; Rainer, Timothy; Rathlev, Niels; Revue, Eric; Richardson, Drew; Sattarian, Mehdi; Schull, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    The maturation of emergency medicine (EM) as a specialty has coincided with dramatic increases in emergency department (ED) visit rates, both in the United States and around the world. ED crowding has become a public health problem where periodic supply and demand mismatches in ED and hospital resources cause long waiting times and delays in critical treatments. ED crowding has been associated with several negative clinical outcomes, including higher complication rates and mortality. This article describes emergency care systems and the extent of crowding across 15 countries outside of the United States: Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Iran, Italy, The Netherlands, Saudi Arabia, Catalonia (Spain), Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The authors are local emergency care leaders with knowledge of emergency care in their particular countries. Where available, data are provided about visit patterns in each country; however, for many of these countries, no national data are available on ED visits rates or crowding. For most of the countries included, there is both objective evidence of increases in ED visit rates and ED crowding and also subjective assessments of trends toward higher crowding in the ED. ED crowding appears to be worsening in many countries despite the presence of universal health coverage. Scandinavian countries with robust systems to manage acute care outside the ED do not report crowding is a major problem. The main cause for crowding identified by many authors is the boarding of admitted patients, similar to the United States. Many hospitals in these countries have implemented operational interventions to mitigate crowding in the ED, and some countries have imposed strict limits on ED length of stay (LOS), while others have no clear plan to mitigate crowding. An understanding of the causes and potential solutions implemented in these countries can provide a lens into how to mitigate ED crowding in the United States

  17. Treating pain in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kuan, Samuel C

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this audit was to evaluate the impact of brief educational intervention on prompt recognition and treatment of pain in the emergency department. The audit was performed on all patients in the emergency department with pain presenting over a 24-h period on three occasions: preintervention, 1-week postintervention and at 4 months. In 151 patients, pain severity scores were mild (24%), moderate (42%), severe (16%) and unknown (18%). Pain score documentation at triage improved from 72 to 94% during the audit (P = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the number of patients treated within 20 min for severe pain (P = 0.076) and within 60 min for moderate pain (P = 0.796) between audits. The likelihood of receiving analgesia within 20 min increased with the patients\\' pain category (relative risk: 1.8 95% confidence interval: 1.4-2.3). Documentation of pain assessment and the use of pain scores at triage improved after a brief educational intervention but there was no measurable impact on treatment times.

  18. Perception of Noise by Emergency Department Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Graneto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noise in the emergency department (ED may be perceived to be high by both patients and nurses alike. This increased noise level is hypothesized to be responsible for communication interference and subsequent disruption of complex procedures and decision-making. The objective of this study is to quantify ambient noise level in an ED while obtaining coincident subjective surveys from nurses in the assessment of actual versus perceived noise.Methods: Data collected from surveys of ED nurses on each of 3 different dates revealed that sound levels within the selected ED were consistently at or below 70 decibels (dB of sound as measured by a sound level meter. This level of sound is of the same decibel of normal conversation at a 3-5 foot distance. Nurses surveyed overwhelmingly rated noise as “low” or “not loud” irrespective of a variance (though predominantly within a 10 dB range in actual sound decibel measurements.Results: Years of experience of work within emergency departments proved the most consistent predictor of nurses’ opinions on the frequency with which noise levels within the ED were louder than they should be, with more experienced nurses all ranking noise levels as “frequently” or “always” louder than they should be.Conclusion: Individual variance existed in how nurses felt that noise level affected work function. ED nurses��� perception of noise is perceived to be low and generally not interfering with their cognitive function. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:547–550.

  19. Big Data Cognition for City Emergency Rescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Chen, Yongxin; Wang, Weisheng

    2016-11-01

    There are many kinds of data produced in the city daily life, which operates as an elementary component of the citizen life support system. The city unexpected incidents occurs in a seemingly unpredictable patterns. With the Big Data analysis the emergency rescue can be carried out efficiently. In this paper, the Big Data cognition for city emergency rescue is studied from four perspectives. From the data volume perspective, the spatial data analysis technology is divided into two parts, the indoor data and the outdoor data. From the data velocity perspective, the big data is collected from the eyes in the sky and objects on-the-ground networks, together with demographic data. From the data variety analysis perspective, the population distribution data, the socio-economic data and model estimates are included. From the data value mining perspective, the crime model estimates are studied. In the end, the application in the big public venues emergency rescue is introduced, which is located in Urumqi, Xinjiang, China.

  20. Physician Assistants Contribution to Emergency Department Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Brook, MD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this report is to determine physician assistant (PA productivity in anacademic emergency department (ED and to determine whether shift length or department censusimpact productivity.Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted at a tertiary ED during June and July of 2007.Productivity was calculated as the mean number of patients seen each hour. Analysis of variance wasused to compare the productivity of different length shifts, and linear regression analysis was used toassess the relationship between productivity and department volume.Results: One hundred sixty PA shifts were included. Shifts ranged from 4 to 13 hours. Meanproductivity was 1.16 patients per hour (95% confidence interval [CI] ¼ 1.12–1.20. Physicianassistants generated a mean of 2.35 relative value units (RVU per hour (95% CI¼1.98–2.72. Therewas no difference in productivity on different shift lengths (P¼0.73. There was no correlation betweendepartmental census and productivity, with an R2 (statistical term for the coefficient of determination of0.01.Conclusion: In the ED, PAs saw 1.16 patients and generated 2.35 RVUs per hour. The length of theshift did not affect productivity. Productivity did not fluctuate significantly with changing departmentalvolume.

  1. Factors influencing adherence to an emergency department national protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebben, R.H.A.; Vloet, L.C.M.; Groot, J.M. de; Achterberg, T. van

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors that influence emergency nurses' adherence to an emergency department national protocol (EDNP). A survey of emergency nurses (n=200) and physicians with medical end responsibility on an emergency department (n=103) was carried out. Emergency nurses

  2. Etiology of Shock in the Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Jensen, Helene Kildegaard; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The knowledge of the etiology and associated mortality of undifferentiated shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. We aimed to describe the etiology based proportions and incidence rates (IR) of shock, as well as the associated mortality in the ED. METHODS: Population......-based cohort study at an University Hospital ED in Denmark from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. Patients aged ≥18 years living in the ED-catchment area (N = 225,000) with a first time ED presentation with shock (n = 1,646) defined as hypotension (systolic blood pressure ≤100 mmHg)) and ≥1 organ failures...... were included. Discharge diagnoses defined the etiology and were grouped as; distributive septic shock (SS), distributive non-septic shock (NS)), cardiogenic shock (CS), hypovolemic shock (HS), obstructive shock (OS) and other conditions (OC). Outcomes were etiology-based characteristics, annual IR per...

  3. Incidental Rickets in the Emergency Department Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Zurlo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency rickets is a childhood osteomalacia, with impaired skeletal development and potentially skeletal deformities. The radiographic findings of rickets are many but include widening, fraying, and cupping of the metaphysis. Developmental delay and related complications of seizure and tetany have also been reported. This medical entity is often thought of as a classic medical disease of the past. However, it persists, and the recognition of rickets is on the rise. The reemergence of rickets correlates with the increase in the number of children exclusively breastfed and with the frequent use of sun block in the pediatric population. We present two cases of rickets, diagnosed through a visit to the Emergency Department made for unrelated symptoms. These two cases illustrate the importance of diagnosing rickets as an “incidental” finding. With early detection, dietary supplementation can be initiated potentially sparing the patient symptomatic disease.

  4. Optimizing emergency department front-end operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiler, Jennifer L; Gentle, Christopher; Halfpenny, James M; Heins, Alan; Mehrotra, Abhi; Mikhail, Michael G; Fite, Diana

    2010-02-01

    As administrators evaluate potential approaches to improve cost, quality, and throughput efficiencies in the emergency department (ED), "front-end" operations become an important area of focus. Interventions such as immediate bedding, bedside registration, advanced triage (triage-based care) protocols, physician/practitioner at triage, dedicated "fast track" service line, tracking systems and whiteboards, wireless communication devices, kiosk self check-in, and personal health record technology ("smart cards") have been offered as potential solutions to streamline the front-end processing of ED patients, which becomes crucial during periods of full capacity, crowding, and surges. Although each of these operational improvement strategies has been described in the lay literature, various reports exist in the academic literature about their effect on front-end operations. In this report, we present a review of the current body of academic literature, with the goal of identifying select high-impact front-end operational improvement solutions.

  5. Therapy Dogs in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolas Nahm

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study examined acceptance by staff and patients of a therapy dog (TD in the emergency department (ED.Methods: Immediately after TD visits to a University Hospital ED, all available ED staff, patients, and their visitors were invited to complete a survey.Results: Of 125 ‘‘patient’’ and 105 staff responses, most were favorable. Ninety-three percent of patients and 95% of staff agreed that TDs should visit EDs; 87.8% of patients and 92% of staff approved of TDs for both adult and pediatric patients. Fewer than 5% of either patients or staff were afraid of the TDs. Fewer than 10% of patients and staff thought the TDs posed a sanitary risk or interfered with staff work.Conclusion: Both patients and staff approve of TDs in an ED. The benefits of animal-assisted therapy should be further explored in the ED setting.

  6. Emergency Department Presentations following Tropical Cyclone Yasi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Aitken

    Full Text Available Emergency departments see an increase in cases during cyclones. The aim of this study is to describe patient presentations to the Emergency Department (ED of a tertiary level hospital (Townsville following a tropical cyclone (Yasi. Specific areas of focus include changes in: patient demographics (age and gender, triage categories, and classification of diseases.Data were extracted from the Townsville Hospitals ED information system (EDIS for three periods in 2009, 2010 and 2011 to coincide with formation of Cyclone Yasi (31 January 2011 to six days after Yasi crossed the coast line (8 February 2012. The analysis explored the changes in ICD10-AM 4-character classification and presented at the Chapter level.There was a marked increase in the number of patients attending the ED during Yasi, particularly those aged over 65 years with a maximum daily attendance of 372 patients on 4 Feb 2011. The most marked increases were in: Triage categories--4 and 5; and ICD categories--diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00-L99, and factors influencing health care status (Z00-Z99. The most common diagnostic presentation across all years was injury (S00-T98.There was an increase in presentations to the ED of TTH, which peaked in the first 24-48 hours following the cyclone and returned to normal over a five-day period. The changes in presentations were mostly an amplification of normal attendance patterns with some altered areas of activity. Injury patterns are similar to overseas experience.

  7. [Emergency department triage: independent nursing intervention?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corujo Fontes, Sergio José

    2014-03-01

    The branch hospital triage aimed at, as well as exercised by nurses, has evolved to meet their needs to organize and make visible the nurses' duties. However, it is still not properly considered as independent nursing intervention. Evidencing practice triage nurse in hospital as experienced by their protagonists disclosed the possible causes of this paradoxical competence. In a sample of 41 nurses, of the 52 possible with previous experience in hospital triage in the Emergency Department of the Hospital General Dr. José Molina Orosa in Lanzarote, the nurses themselves carried out an opinion survey that group together statements about different aspects of the triaje nurse. In its results, 65.8% of those polled thought the triaje nursing training to be deficient and even though nearly half 48.7%, was considered competent to decide the level of emergency, 46.3% disagreed to take this task part of their duty. It is conclusive that the training received in hospital triage, regulated and sustained, is deficient, that is the main reason why professionals have their doubts to take on an activity they are not familiar with. Triage systems do not record the entire outcome of the nursing work and nursing methodology does not seem to be quite indicative for this task.

  8. Tumor lysis syndrome in the emergency department: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ñamendys-Silva SA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Silvio A Ñamendys-Silva,1,2 Juan M Arredondo-Armenta,1 Erika P Plata-Menchaca,2 Humberto Guevara-García,1 Francisco J García-Guillén,1 Eduardo Rivero-Sigarroa,2 Angel Herrera-Gómez,1 1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico Abstract: Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS is the most common oncologic emergency. It is caused by rapid tumor cell destruction and the resulting nucleic acid degradation during or days after initiation of cytotoxic therapy. Also, a spontaneous form exists. The metabolic abnormalities associated with this syndrome include hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia, hyperuricemia, and acute kidney injury. These abnormalities can lead to life-threatening complications, such as heart rhythm abnormalities and neurologic manifestations. The emergency management of overt TLS involves proper fluid resuscitation with crystalloids in order to improve the intravascular volume and the urinary output and to increase the renal excretion of potassium, phosphorus, and uric acid. With this therapeutic strategy, prevention of calcium phosphate and uric acid crystal deposition within renal tubules is achieved. Other measures in the management of overt TLS are prescription of hypouricemic agents, renal replacement therapy, and correction of electrolyte imbalances. Hyperkalemia should be treated quickly and aggressively as its presence is the most hazardous acute complication that can cause sudden death from cardiac arrhythmias. Treatment of hypocalcemia is reserved for patients with electrocardiographic changes or symptoms of neuromuscular irritability. In patients who are refractory to medical management of electrolyte abnormalities or with severe cardiac and neurologic manifestations, early dialysis is recommended.Keywords: tumor lysis syndrome, emergency department, emergency

  9. The Reasons of Emergency Department Patients’ Dissatisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Rahmati

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evaluating the reasons of emergency patient dissatisfaction and trying to eliminate them is a step towards increasing the quality of care and profitability. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the reasons of patient dissatisfaction in the emergency department of Shohadaye Tajrish Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was done in the time interval between March 2012 and October 2014. All the patients who had declared their dissatisfaction, whether written, verbal, or by phone, were included. Using a pre-designed checklist, data were gathered regarding characteristics of dissatisfaction including: type, reference, presentation, subject, and outcome and analyzed using SPSS version 21. Significance level was considered as p<0.05. Results: 123 cases of dissatisfaction were detected. In 31 (25.2% cases the patient was right, in 41 (33.3% the hospital was right and 51 (41.5% cases had no outcome. The dissatisfactions were written in 23 (18.7% cases, by phone in 17 (13.8%, and verbal in 83 (67.5%, which showed no significant correlation with the outcome (p=0.277. Only 31 (25.2% cases were declared by the patients themselves which had no correlation with the outcome (p=0.747. However, there was a significant correlation between the type (p=0.025 and subject (p<0.001 of dissatisfaction with the outcome. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that most cases of dissatisfaction were assigned to the surgery group and nursing service. Low quality care and bad behavior of the staff were among the most common causes of patients’ dissatisfaction. In all cases of dissatisfaction regarding the neurosurgery service, internal medicine service, and admission unit, the patients have been right. In contrast, in all cases of triage and laboratory unit, the hospital has been right.

  10. The Financial Impact of Emergency Department Crowding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foley, Mathew

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The economic benefits of reducing emergency department (ED crowding are potentially substantial as they may decrease hospital length of stay. Hospital administrators and public officials may therefore be motivated to implement crowding protocols. We sought to identify a potential cost of ED crowding by evaluating the contribution of excess ED length of stay (LOS to overall hospital length of stay. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of administrative data of adult patients from two urban hospitals (one county and one university in Brooklyn, New York from 2006-2007. Data was provided by each facility. Extrapolating from prior research (Krochmal and Riley, 2005, we determined the increase in total hospital LOS due to extended ED lengths of stay, and applied cost and charge analyses for the two separate facilities. Results: We determined that 6,205 (5.0% admitted adult patients from the county facility and 3,017 (3.4% patients from the university facility were held in the ED greater than one day over a one-year period. From prior research, it has been estimated that each of these patient’s total hospital length of stay was increased on average by 11.7% (0.61 days at the county facility, and 0.71 days at the university facility. The increased charges over one year at the county facility due to the extended ED LOS was therefore approximately $9.8 million, while the increased costs at the university facility were approximately $3.9 million. Conclusion: Based on extrapolations from Krochmal and Riley applied to two New York urban hospitals, the county hospital could potentially save $9.8 million in charges and the university hospital $3.9 million in costs per year if they eliminate ED boarding of adult admitted patients by improving movement to the inpatient setting. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(2:192-197.

  11. Critical care in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Gabrielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The volume and duration of stay of the critically ill in the emergency department (ED) is increasing and is affected by factors including case-mix, overcrowding, lack of available and staffed intensive care beds and an ageing population. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical activity associated with these high-acuity patients and to quantify resource utilization by this patient group. METHODS: The study was a retrospective review of ED notes from all patients referred directly to the intensive care team over a 6-month period from April to September 2004. We applied a workload measurement tool, Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (TISS)-28, which has been validated as a surrogate marker of nursing resource input in the intensive care setting. A nurse is considered capable of delivering nursing activities equal to 46 TISS-28 points in each 8-h shift. RESULTS: The median score from our 69 patients was 19 points per patient. Applying TISS-28 methodology, we estimated that 3 h 13 min nursing time would be spent on a single critically ill ED patient, with a TISS score of 19. This is an indicator of the high levels of personnel resources required for these patients in the ED. ED-validated models to quantify nursing and medical staff resources used across the spectrum of ED care is needed, so that staffing resources can be planned and allocated to match service demands.

  12. Referral patterns in elderly emergency department visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Buja

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess elderly individuals' demand for emergency department (ED care, in terms of the characteristics, processes, outcomes, costs by referral pattern. DATA SOURCE: All ED visits involving patients aged 65 and older, extracted from the 2010 dataset of an Local Health Agency, in North-Eastern Italy (no. = 18 648. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patients were referred by primary care professionals (PCPs in 43.1% of cases, 1.4% came from nursing homes (NH, and 55.5% were self-referred (SR. The SR group had a higher adjusted odds ratio (aOR for non-urgent conditions (1.98 CI 1.85-2.12, but a lower aOR for conditions amenable to ambulatory care (0.53 CI 0.48-0.59, and a lower consumption of resources. The SR group tend to occur more frequently out of hours, and to coincide with a shorter stay at the ED, lower observation unit activation rates, lower hospitalization rates and a lower consumption of services than other two groups. The average costs for all procedures were lower for the SR patients (mean = 106.04 € ± SD 84.90 € than for those referred by PCPs (mean = 138.14 € ± SD 101.17 € or NH (mean = 143.48 € ± SD 95.28 €. CONCLUSION: Elderly patients coming in ED have different characteristics, outcomes and recourses consume by referral pattern.

  13. Use of Emergency Department by Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Akpinar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Using of EDs by the geriatric population is being increased in parallel to increase of our geriatric population. Objective of this study was to demonstrate what can be done for the EDs to be more effectively benefited by evaluating clinical and demographic data of the patients over 65 years old who presented to an emergency department. Material and Method: Recordings of the patients who presented to Isparta Public Hospital, ED in 2011 were retrospectively screened. All the data were evaluated through SPSS 17.0 software. Results: Of total 114,522 patients who presented to our ED during the study, 14,645 (12.7% were geriatrics. Mean age was found as 74,6 ± 6 years. The most common cause of presentation was found as cardiologic problems as 3,120 (21.3%, followed by respiratory system problems as 2,040 (13.9%, gastrointestinal problems as 1,875 (12.8%, neurological problems as 1,512 (10.3% and musculo-skeletal system problems as 1,230 (8.4% patients. While 71% of these patients were treated in basis of outpatients, 1,877 patients (12.8% were hospitalized and 9 patients were lost in the ED. Discussion: Some regional differences may be seen in the follow-up of geriatric patients. We recommend that, each hospital should arrange its ED services considering its patient profile.

  14. Paediatric analgesia in an Emergency Department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hawkes, C

    2012-02-03

    Timely management of pain in paediatric patients in the Emergency Department (ED) is a well-accepted performance indicator. We describe an audit of the provision of analgesia for children in an Irish ED and the introduction of a nurse-initiated analgesia protocol in an effort to improve performance. 95 children aged 1-16 presenting consecutively to the ED were included and time from triage to analgesia, and the rate of analgesia provision, were recorded. The results were circulated and a nurse initiated analgesia protocol was introduced. An audit including 145 patients followed this. 55.6% of patients with major fractures received analgesia after a median time of 54 minutes, which improved to 61.1% (p = 0.735) after 7 minutes (p = 0.004). Pain score documentation was very poor throughout, improving only slightly from 0% to 19.3%. No child had a documented pain score, which slightly improved to 19.3%. We recommend other Irish EDs to audit their provision of analgesia for children.

  15. Geriatric Homelessness: Association with Emergency Department Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategan, Ana; Tisi, Daniel; Abdurrahman, Mariam; Bourgeois, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Homeless adults frequently use emergency departments (EDs), yet previous studies investigating ED utilization by the older segment received little attention. This study sought to characterize older homeless adults who utilized local urban EDs. Methods ED encounters at three hospitals in Hamilton (Ont.) were analyzed, and demographic and clinical characteristics of the older homeless (age > 50) vs. younger counterparts (age ≤ 50) were compared during a 24-month period. Results Of all adults, 1,330 were homeless, of whom 66% were above age 50. Older homeless adults sought less acute care within 30 days from an index visit compared with their younger counterparts. Non-acute illnesses constituted only 18% of triaged cases. Older homeless women with access to a primary care physician (PCP) were 3.3 times more likely to return to ED within 30 days, whereas older homeless men (irrespective of PCP access) were less likely to return to ED. Conclusions Despite high homeless patient acuity, a lesser number of ED visits with increasing age remains concerning because of previously reported high morbidity and mortality rates. Access to primary care may not be enough to reduce ED utilization. Further research is needed to evaluate acute care interventions and their effectiveness in ED, and to identify homeless patients requiring more targeted services. PMID:28050223

  16. Understanding communication networks in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braithwaite Jeffrey

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency departments (EDs are high pressure health care settings involving complex interactions between staff members in providing and organising patient care. Without good communication and cooperation amongst members of the ED team, quality of care is at risk. This study examined the problem-solving, medication advice-seeking and socialising networks of staff working in an Australian hospital ED. Methods A social network survey (Response Rate = 94% was administered to all ED staff (n = 109 including doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, administrative staff and ward assistants. Analysis of the network characteristics was carried out by applying measures of density (the extent participants are concentrated, connectedness (how related they are, isolates (how segregated, degree centrality (who has most connections measured in two ways, in-degree, the number of ties directed to an individual and out-degree, the number of ties directed from an individual, betweenness centrality (who is important or powerful, degree of separation (how many ties lie between people and reciprocity (how bi-directional are interactions. Results In all three networks, individuals were more closely connected to colleagues from within their respective professional groups. The problem-solving network was the most densely connected network, followed by the medication advice network, and the loosely connected socialising network. ED staff relied on each other for help to solve work-related problems, but some senior doctors, some junior doctors and a senior nurse were important sources of medication advice for their ED colleagues. Conclusions Network analyses provide useful ways to assess social structures in clinical settings by allowing us to understand how ED staff relate within their social and professional structures. This can provide insights of potential benefit to ED staff, their leaders, policymakers and researchers.

  17. Measuring social contacts in the emergency department.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas W Lowery-North

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infectious individuals in an emergency department (ED bring substantial risks of cross infection. Data about the complex social and spatial structure of interpersonal contacts in the ED will aid construction of biologically plausible transmission risk models that can guide cross infection control. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We sought to determine the number and duration of contacts among patients and staff in a large, busy ED. This prospective study was conducted between 1 July 2009 and 30 June 2010. Two 12-hour shifts per week were randomly selected for study. The study was conducted in the ED of an urban hospital. There were 81 shifts in the planned random sample of 104 (78% with usable contact data, during which there were 9183 patient encounters. Of these, 6062 (66% were approached to participate, of which 4732 (78% agreed. Over the course of the year, 88 staff members participated (84%. A radiofrequency identification (RFID system was installed and the ED divided into 89 distinct zones structured so copresence of two individuals in any zone implied a very high probability of contact <1 meter apart in space. During study observation periods, patients and staff were given RFID tags to wear. Contact events were recorded. These were further broken down with respect to the nature of the contacts, i.e., patient with patient, patient with staff, and staff with staff. 293,171 contact events were recorded, with a median of 22 contact events and 9 contacts with distinct individuals per participant per shift. Staff-staff interactions were more numerous and longer than patient-patient or patient-staff interactions. CONCLUSIONS: We used RFID to quantify contacts between patients and staff in a busy ED. These results are useful for studies of the spread of infections. By understanding contact patterns most important in potential transmission, more effective prevention strategies may be implemented.

  18. A subtle mimicker in emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Maria Vittoria De; Giacomo, Roberta Di; Muzio, Antonio Di; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Movement disorder emergencies include any movement disorder which develops over hours to days, in which failure to appropriately diagnose and manage can result in patient morbidity or mortality. Movement disorder emergencies include acute dystonia: sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements. Acute dystonia is a serious challenge for emergency room doctors and neurologists, because of the high probability of misdiagnosis, due to the presence of several mimickers including partial seizures, meningitis, localized tetanus, serum electrolyte level abnormalities, strychnine poisoning, angioedema, malingering, catatonia, and conversion. Methods: We describe 2 examples, accompanied by videos, of acute drug-induced oro-mandibular dystonia, both subsequent to occasional haloperidol intake. Results: Management and treatment of this movement disorder are often difficult: neuroleptics withdrawal, treatment with benzodiazepines, and anticholinergics are recommended. Conclusion: Alternative treatment options are also discussed. PMID:27741141

  19. Emergency Department Utilization in the Texas Medicaid...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — There were 44,246 individuals enrolled in TexKat in 2005. Roughly 13 percent of these enrollees had at least one ED visit during the sample period, with one quarter...

  20. Adherence to the guideline ‘Triage in emergency departments’ : A survey of Dutch emergency departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.A.P.; Achterberg, Theo van; Adriaansen, Marian; Mintjes, Joke; Kampshoff, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adherence to the 2004 guideline Triage in emergency departments three years after dissemination in Dutch emergency departments. In 2004, a Dutch guideline Triage in emergency departments was developed. Triage is the first step performed by nurses when a pati

  1. Screening for child abuse at emergency departments : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwers, Eveline C. F. M.; Affourtit, Marjo J.; Moll, Henriette A.; de Koning, Harry J.; Korfage, Ida J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Child abuse is a serious problem worldwide and can be difficult to detect. Although children who experience the consequences of abuse will probably be treated at an emergency department, detection rates of child abuse at emergency departments remain low. Objective To identify effective

  2. Emergency department usage by uninsured patients in Galveston County, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Jacques; Paar, David; Giordano, Thomas P; Zachariah, Brian; Rudkin, Laura L; Wu, Z Helen; Raimer, Ben G

    2008-07-01

    The number of uninsured Texas residents who rely on the medical emergency department as their primary health care provider continues to increase. Unfortunately, little information about the characteristics of this group of emergency department users is available. Using an administrative billing database, we conducted a descriptive study to examine the demographic and clinical features of 17,110 consecutive patients without medical insurance who presented to the emergency department of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston over a 12-month period. We also analyzed the risk of multiple emergency department visits or hospitalization according to demographic characteristics. Twenty percent of the study population made two or more emergency department visits during the study period; 19% of the population was admitted to the hospital via the emergency department. The risk of multiple emergency department visits was significantly elevated among African Americans and increased in a stepwise fashion according to age. The risk of being hospitalized was significantly reduced among females, African Americans, and Hispanics. There was an age-related monotonic increase in the risk of hospitalization. Abdominal pain, cellulitis, and spinal disorders were the most common primary diagnoses in patients who made multiple emergency department visits. Hospitalization occurred most frequently in patients with a primary diagnosis of chest pain, nonischemic heart disease, or an affective disorder. Additional studies of emergency department usage by uninsured patients from other regions of Texas are warranted. Such data may prove helpful in developing effective community-based alternatives to the emergency department for this growing segment of our population. Local policymakers who are responsible for the development of safety net programs throughout the state should find this information particularly useful.

  3. MANAGEMENT OF EXTRIMITY FRACTURE IN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Sukma Parahita

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Fracture injuries in the extremities are accounted for 40% of the incidence of fractures in the United States and causes high morbidity (physical suffering, lost time, and mental stress. High-energy fractures of the lower limbs can also cause life threatening condition like major vascular injury, crush syndrome, and compartment syndrome. Initial treatment in the emergency room is essential to save lives and to save the fractured extremities. Primary survey (securing the airway, breathing and circulation and the secondary survey will be able to quickly and accurately identify dangerous early complication of fractures, such as major arterial injury, crush syndrome and compartment syndrome. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  4. The San Bernardino, California, Terror Attack: Two Emergency Departments' Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carol; Walters, Elizabeth; Borger, Rodney; Clem, Kathleen; Fenati, Gregory; Kiemeney, Michael; Seng, Sakona; Yuen, Ho-Wang; Neeki, Michael; Smith, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs), what occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) or Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC). These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared for and coordinated the medical care of these victims. In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were minor in nature and did not affect patient care. MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country. Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in management of future MCIs.

  5. Time series modelling and forecasting of emergency department overcrowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Farid; Harrou, Fouzi; Chaabane, Sondès; Tahon, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Efficient management of patient flow (demand) in emergency departments (EDs) has become an urgent issue for many hospital administrations. Today, more and more attention is being paid to hospital management systems to optimally manage patient flow and to improve management strategies, efficiency and safety in such establishments. To this end, EDs require significant human and material resources, but unfortunately these are limited. Within such a framework, the ability to accurately forecast demand in emergency departments has considerable implications for hospitals to improve resource allocation and strategic planning. The aim of this study was to develop models for forecasting daily attendances at the hospital emergency department in Lille, France. The study demonstrates how time-series analysis can be used to forecast, at least in the short term, demand for emergency services in a hospital emergency department. The forecasts were based on daily patient attendances at the paediatric emergency department in Lille regional hospital centre, France, from January 2012 to December 2012. An autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) method was applied separately to each of the two GEMSA categories and total patient attendances. Time-series analysis was shown to provide a useful, readily available tool for forecasting emergency department demand.

  6. Asthma-related emergency department use: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Laurie H; Chambers, Patricia; Dexheimer, Judith W

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic pediatric diseases. Patients with asthma often present to the emergency department for treatment for acute exacerbations. These patients may not have a primary care physician or primary care home, and thus are seeking care in the emergency department. Asthma care in the emergency department is multifaceted to treat asthma patients appropriately and provide quality care. National and international guidelines exist to help drive clinical care. Electronic and paper-based tools exist for both physicians and patients to help improve emergency, home, and preventive care. Treatment of patients with asthma should include the acute exacerbation, long-term management of controller medications, and controlling triggers in the home environment. We will address the current state of asthma research in emergency medicine in the US, and discuss some of the resources being used to help provide a medical home and improve care for patients who suffer from acute asthma exacerbations.

  7. Wait Time for Treatment in Hospital Emergency Departments: 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Aff 27(2):W84–95. 2008. American College of Emergency Physicians Crowding Resources Task Force. Responding to emergency department crowding: A guidebook for chapters. Dallas, TX. 2002. National Center for Health Statistics. NHAMCS Micro-data File Documentation. 2009. [PDF - 1. ...

  8. Emergency department radiology: reality or luxury? An international comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, D.R.; Blickman, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in society and developments within emergency care affect imaging in the emergency department. It is clear that radiologists have to be pro-active to even survive. High quality service is the goal, and if we are to add value to the diagnostic (and therapeutic) chain of healthcare, sub-special

  9. Emergency department visits during an Olympic gold medal television broadcast

    OpenAIRE

    Donald A Redelmeier; Vermeulen, Marian J

    2011-01-01

    Background Practice pattern variations are often attributed to physician decision-making with no accounting for patient preferences. Objective To test whether a mass media television broadcast unrelated to health was associated with changes in the rate and characteristics of visits for acute emergency care. Design Time-series analysis of emergency department visits for any reason. Subjects Population-based sample of all patients seeking emergency care in Ontario, Canada. Measures The broadcas...

  10. The Emergence of a Modern City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Henriette

    This book is an exploration of how urban life in Copenhagen, in the period known as the Golden Age (c. 1800 to 1850), was experienced and structured socially, institutionally, and architecturally. It draws on a broad historical source material - spanning urban anecdotes, biography, philosophy...... citizens: the philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, the novelist Thomasine Gyllembourg, and the criminal Ole Kollerød, who all take an interest in the city's institutional and urban structures as well as their own place in it. From these different sources, a picture is painted of urban life and thought at a time...... when the city began to take on characteristics of ambiguity and alienation in European thinking, while at the same time the city itself retained some pre-modern motifs of a symbolic order. This transformation is set in a larger process of cultural re-orientation, from traditional Baroque culture...

  11. Asthma-related emergency department use: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson LH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Laurie H Johnson,1 Patricia Chambers,1 Judith W Dexheimer1,2 1Division of Emergency Medicine, 2Division of Biomedical Informatics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Asthma is one of the most common chronic pediatric diseases. Patients with asthma often present to the emergency department for treatment for acute exacerbations. These patients may not have a primary care physician or primary care home, and thus are seeking care in the emergency department. Asthma care in the emergency department is multifaceted to treat asthma patients appropriately and provide quality care. National and international guidelines exist to help drive clinical care. Electronic and paper-based tools exist for both physicians and patients to help improve emergency, home, and preventive care. Treatment of patients with asthma should include the acute exacerbation, long-term management of controller medications, and controlling triggers in the home environment. We will address the current state of asthma research in emergency medicine in the US, and discuss some of the resources being used to help provide a medical home and improve care for patients who suffer from acute asthma exacerbations. Keywords: asthma, pediatric, emergency department

  12. Managing the advanced cancer patient in the Australian emergency department environment : Findings from a national survey of emergency department clinicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Weiland (Tracey); Lane, H. (Heather); G.A. Jelinek; C.H.L. Marck (Claudia); Weil, J. (Jennifer); M. Boughey (Mark); Philip, J. (Jennifer)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Delivery of care to people with advanced cancer in the emergency department (ED) is complicated by competing service demands, workloads and physical design constraints. We explored emergency clinicians’ attitudes to the ED environment when caring for patients who present with

  13. Emergency Department Management of Delirium in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn E.J. Gower, DO

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of elderly patients are presenting to the emergency department. Numerousstudies have observed that emergency physicians often fail to identify and diagnose delirium in theelderly. These studies also suggest that even when emergency physicians recognized delirium, theystill may not have fully appreciated the import of the diagnosis. Delirium is not a normal manifestation ofaging and, often, is the only sign of a serious underlying medical condition. This article will review thesignificance, definition, and principal features of delirium so that emergency physicians may betterappreciate, recognize, evaluate, and manage delirium in the elderly.

  14. Public Health Emergency Management Within the Department of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    communication messages and products include instructions pertaining to where to receive care in the event of a public health emergency. c. As in any...major cities and metropolitan areas to respond to a large-scale bioterrorist event by dispensing antibiotics and other medical supplies to the entire...infectious agent or its toxic products that arises through transmission of that agent or its products from an infected and/or affected individual, animal

  15. Emergency Department: Basic Prerequisites for the Upgrade of the NHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Charalambous

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Emergency Department is an autonomous hospital unit comprised of doctors, nurses and paramedics, who deliver emergency care on a 24-hour basis. It provides an interface between patients and their specialized treatment, as well as a point of contact between primary and tertiary care. The need for medical services has increased disproportionately to the available resources for medical care; a fact that has given rise to difficulties in maintaining the effective function of the Emergency Department. As a result, the provision of high standard services is not ensured. In order to help establish and maintain the effective operation of the Emergency Department, new methods should be established which efficiently utilize existing and up-and-coming information and communication technologies. This will allow for the acceleration of the Department’s operational procedures, more effective treatment of emergency cases, and ultimately assists in maintaining a high level of patient satisfaction. The expansion and development of specific services offered by the ED will also assist in the Department becoming a system of qualitative assessment for primary care. This would lead to a better outcome for emergency cases as a result of fast, spherical and effective treatment.

  16. Strategic emergency department design: An approach to capacity planning in healthcare provision in overcrowded emergency rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S; Wullschleger, Marcel; Bürki, Leo; Zimmermann, Heinz

    2008-11-17

    Healthcare professionals and the public have increasing concerns about the ability of emergency departments to meet current demands. Increased demand for emergency services, mainly caused by a growing number of minor and moderate injuries has reached crisis proportions, especially in the United Kingdom. Numerous efforts have been made to explore the complex causes because it is becoming more and more important to provide adequate healthcare within tight budgets. Optimisation of patient pathways in the emergency department is therefore an important factor.This paper explores the possibilities offered by dynamic simulation tools to improve patient pathways using the emergency department of a busy university teaching hospital in Switzerland as an example.

  17. Emergency nurse practitioner services in major accident and emergency departments: a United Kingdom postal survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Tye, C C; Ross, F.; Kerry, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the current and predicted distribution of formal emergency nurse practitioner services in major accident and emergency departments in the United Kingdom; to determine organisational variations in service provision, with specific reference to funding, role configuration, training, and scope of clinical activity. METHODS: Postal survey of senior nurses of all major accident and emergency departments in the United Kingdom (n = 293) in May/June 1996. RESULTS: There were 27...

  18. Asthma-related emergency department use: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Laurie H Johnson,1 Patricia Chambers,1 Judith W Dexheimer1,2 1Division of Emergency Medicine, 2Division of Biomedical Informatics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Asthma is one of the most common chronic pediatric diseases. Patients with asthma often present to the emergency department for treatment for acute exacerbations. These patients may not have a primary care physician or primary care home, and thus are seeking care in the emergenc...

  19. A generic method for evaluating crowding in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiset, Andreas Halgreen; Erlandsen, Mogens; Møllekær, Anders Brøns;

    2016-01-01

    Background Crowding in the emergency department (ED) has been studied intensively using complicated non-generic methods that may prove difficult to implement in a clinical setting. This study sought to develop a generic method to describe and analyse crowding from measurements readily available......, a ‘carry over’ effect was shown between shifts and days. Conclusions The presented method offers an easy and generic way to get detailed insight into the dynamics of crowding in an ED. Keywords Crowding, Emergency department, ED, Generic, Method, Model, Queue, Patient flow...

  20. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  1. Prognostic value of infrared thermography in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper K; Kellett, John G; Jensen, Nadia H

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aimed to investigate the prognostic potential of infrared thermography in a population of medical patients admitted to the emergency department. Central-to-peripheral temperature gradients were analyzed for association with 30-day mortality. METHODS: This prospective...

  2. Predictors of Emergency Department Utilization Among Children in Vulnerable Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Colin; Sheehan, Karen; Crandall, Marie

    2016-03-08

    Preventable visits to the emergency department (ED) are estimated to represent as much as 56% of overall annual ED utilization and contribute to the high cost of health care in the United States. There are more than 25 million annual pediatric ED visits.

  3. Five easy equations for patient flow through an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Thomas Lill; Kofoed-Enevoldsen, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Queue models are effective tools for framing management decisions and Danish hospitals could benefit from awareness of such models. Currently, as emergency departments (ED) are under reorganization, we deem it timely to empirically investigate the applicability of the standard "M/M/1" queue model...

  4. Emergency department crowding in The Netherlands: managers’ experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van der Linden (Christien); R. Reijnen (Resi); R. Derlet (Robert); N. van der Linden (Naomi); R. Lindeboom (Robert); C. Lucas (Cees); J. Richards (John)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ __Background__ In The Netherlands, the state of emergency department (ED) crowding is unknown. Anecdotal evidence suggests that current ED patients experience a longer length of stay (LOS) compared to some years ago, which is indicative of ED crowding. However, no multi

  5. Injury patterns in children with frequent emergency department visits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, B

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare injury patterns in children with many and few emergency department (ED) visits in order to reveal the causes for the frequent visits. METHODS: Three cohorts of Danish children (total 579 721 children) were followed for three years when their ages were 0-2, 6-8, and 12...

  6. Models of emergency departments for reducing patient waiting times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Marek; McLeod, Robert D; Friesen, Marcia R; Podaima, Blake W; Alfa, Attahiru S

    2009-07-02

    In this paper, we apply both agent-based models and queuing models to investigate patient access and patient flow through emergency departments. The objective of this work is to gain insights into the comparative contributions and limitations of these complementary techniques, in their ability to contribute empirical input into healthcare policy and practice guidelines. The models were developed independently, with a view to compare their suitability to emergency department simulation. The current models implement relatively simple general scenarios, and rely on a combination of simulated and real data to simulate patient flow in a single emergency department or in multiple interacting emergency departments. In addition, several concepts from telecommunications engineering are translated into this modeling context. The framework of multiple-priority queue systems and the genetic programming paradigm of evolutionary machine learning are applied as a means of forecasting patient wait times and as a means of evolving healthcare policy, respectively. The models' utility lies in their ability to provide qualitative insights into the relative sensitivities and impacts of model input parameters, to illuminate scenarios worthy of more complex investigation, and to iteratively validate the models as they continue to be refined and extended. The paper discusses future efforts to refine, extend, and validate the models with more data and real data relative to physical (spatial-topographical) and social inputs (staffing, patient care models, etc.). Real data obtained through proximity location and tracking system technologies is one example discussed.

  7. Development and Testing of Emergency Department Patient Transfer Communication Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals. The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality…

  8. Evaluation of Head Trauma Cases in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alim Cokuk

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we aimed to determine the epidemiological characteristics, morbidity and mortality rates of patients admitted to the emergency department with head trauma. Material and Methods: In this study, ambulatory and hospitalized patients over the age of 18 brought to the Emergency Department because of head trauma between 01.12.2009 - 31.12.2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Patient data were recorded to standard data entry form. SPSS 17.0 package program was used for statistical analysis of data. The statistical significance level of all tests was p <0.05. Results: 5200 patients were included in this study. The average age of the patients was 39.97 ± 16.66 years. 4682'si patients (90 % were discharged from the emergency department. The most common reason for admission to the emergency department was falls (41.81 % in the discharged patients. 518 (10 % patients were hospitalized. Gender of these patients was 110 female (21:24% and 408 male (78.76%. 256 patients (48.35% were injured as a result of a traffic accident. 201(38.8% of the cerebral CT were reported as normal and 89 (17.2% of the cerebral CT were reported as traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in hospitalized patients. The fracture of lumbar spine (12 % was detected as an additional pathological disease in patients. 75 patients hospitalized because of head trauma (14.5% had died (1.44 % of all patients. Cervical spine fracture was the most common (14 patients, 18.68 % additional pathology in patients who died. Thoracic trauma was detected as the second most common (13 patients, 17.33 % additional pathology. Conclusion: Most of the patients admitted to the emergency department with head injury had a minor trauma. Patients can be discharged from the emergency department after a thorough physical examination and simple medical intervention. Most of the head injury patients admitted to hospital were male. The most common reason of the patients with head injury admitted to

  9. Investigation of the triage model in the emergency department consists of 35 triple A comprehensive hospitals in Guangzhou city%广州市35家三甲综合医院急诊分诊模式调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青艳; 王根群; 赖晓娟; 贾海娜; 李雪英; 朱慧瑜

    2014-01-01

    目的:了解广州市三甲综合医院急诊科的分诊模式,为完善广州市三甲综合医院急诊科的分诊体系提供依据。方法:通过自行设计的广州市三甲综合医院急诊分诊模式调查表,对广州市35家三甲综合医院急诊科进行调查。结果:54.3%的医院有参照卫生部的分诊指导原则统一分诊标准;74.3%的医院制定分诊流程;65.7%的医院有分诊护士准入制度;48.6%的医院对分诊质量进行评价;各大医院对急诊设施的配备欠统一。结论:我们应在卫生部公布的《急诊病人病情分级试点指导原则》的指导下,结合本地区的具体情况,借鉴国内外先进经验,进一步完善分诊体系,统一标准,为患者提供便捷、高效、安全的急诊护理服务。%Object:Study the triage model of emergency departments , and provide basis for improving this triage system of triple A comprehensive hospitals in the Guangzhou city.Method:Though filling out and analysing self-designed the questionnaire to the triage mode in emergency department of triple A comprehensive hospitals in Guangzhou city,we investigate the triage model in the emergency department consists of 35 triple A comprehensive hospitals in the Guangzhou city.Result:It shows that 54.3% of the hospitals involved setup uniform triage standards referencing to the Ministry of Health hospital triage guidelines; 74.3% of hospitals have developed triage process; 65.7% of hospital nurses attend access system; 48.6% of hospitals have performed triage quality evaluation;hospitals for emergency facilities remain Not uniform.Conclusion:It should setup a Unified standard and improve the triage system though following the direction of Guiding Principle of Grading Pilot Emergency Patients published by the Ministry of Health,combining with the specific circumstances of the region,referring to the domestic and foreign advanced experience. And provide patients with convenient

  10. Evolving prehospital, emergency department, and "inpatient" management models for geriatric emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2013-02-01

    Alternative management methods are essential to ensure high-quality and efficient emergency care for the growing number of geriatric adults worldwide. Protocols to support early condition-specific treatment of older adults with acute severe illness and injury are needed. Improved emergency department care for older adults will require providers to address the influence of other factors on the patient's health. This article describes recent and ongoing efforts to enhance the quality of emergency care for older adults using alternative management approaches spanning the spectrum from prehospital care, through the emergency department, and into evolving inpatient or outpatient processes of care.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy clean cities five-year strategic plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambridge Concord Associates

    2011-02-15

    Clean Cities is a government-industry partnership sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program, which is part of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Working with its network of about 100 local coalitions and more than 6,500 stakeholders across the country, Clean Cities delivers on its mission to reduce petroleum consumption in on-road transportation. In its work to reduce petroleum use, Clean Cities focuses on a portfolio of technologies that includes electric drive, propane, natural gas, renewable natural gas/biomethane, ethanol/E85, biodiesel/B20 and higher-level blends, fuel economy, and idle reduction. Over the past 17 years, Clean Cities coalitions have displaced more than 2.4 billion gallons of petroleum; they are on track to displace 2.5 billion gallons of gasoline per year by 2020. This Clean Cities Strategic Plan lays out an aggressive five-year agenda to help DOE Clean Cities and its network of coalitions and stakeholders accelerate the deployment of alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles, while also expanding the supporting infrastructure to reduce petroleum use. Today, Clean Cities has a far larger opportunity to make an impact than at any time in its history because of its unprecedented $300 million allocation for community-based deployment projects from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) (see box below). Moreover, the Clean Cities annual budget has risen to $25 million for FY2010 and $35 million has been requested for FY2011. Designed as a living document, this strategic plan is grounded in the understanding that priorities will change annually as evolving technical, political, economic, business, and social considerations are woven into project decisions and funding allocations. The plan does not intend to lock Clean Cities into pathways that cannot change. Instead, with technology deployment at its core, the plan serves as a guide for decision-making at both the

  12. Carotid artery blowout producing massive hematemesis in the emergency department

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harrison K Borno; Richard J Menendez; John C Chaloupka; Michael T Dalley; David A Farcy

    2016-01-01

    Carotid blowout syndrome (CBS) is a rare and fatal complication which arises from patients who have been treated for head and neck cancer. The incidence of CBS is rare and not commonly seen by emergency physicians. We review a case of a 68-year-old woman with a history of laryngectomy and chemo-radiation therapy presenting with massive oral bleeding and hypotension. Her course and treatments are highlighted, literature referring to CBS are described and we reintroduce the approach of managing such a patient in the emergency department.

  13. An integration of Emergency Department Information and Ambulance Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Nada; El-Masri, Samir; Saddik, Basema

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose an Emergency Department Information System that will be integrated with the ambulance system to improve the communication, enhance the quality of provided emergency services and facilitate information sharing. The proposed system utilizes new advanced technologies such as mobile web services that overcome the problems of interoperability between different systems, HL7 and GPS. The system is unique in that it allows ambulance officers to locate the nearest specialized hospital and allows access to the patient's electronic health record as well as providing the hospital with required information to prepare for the incoming patient.

  14. Medical Identity Theft in the Emergency Department: Awareness is Crucial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelino Mancini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Medical Identity theft in the emergency department (ED can harm numerous individuals, and many frontline healthcare providers are unaware of this growing concern. The two cases described began as typical ED encounters until red flags were discovered upon validating the patient’s identity. Educating all healthcare personnel within and outside the ED regarding the subtle signs of medical identity theft and implementing institutional policies to identify these criminals will discourage further fraudulent behavior. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:–0.

  15. Carotid artery blowout producing massive hematemesis in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison K. Borno

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carotid blowout syndrome (CBS is a rare and fatal complication which arises from patients who have been treated for head and neck cancer. The incidence of CBS is rare and not commonly seen by emergency physicians. We review a case of a 68-year-old woman with a history of laryngectomy and chemo-radiation therapy presenting with massive oral bleeding and hypotension. Her course and treatments are highlighted, literature referring to CBS are described and we reintroduce the approach of managing such a patient in the emergency department.

  16. Low compliance with a validated system for emergency department triage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthea; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Maaløe, Rikke;

    2011-01-01

    Bispebjerg Hospital has introduced a triage system at the Emergency Department (ED) based on "primary criteria" and a physiological scoring system named the Bispebjerg Early Warning Score (BEWS). A BEWS is calculated on the basis of five vital signs which are accessible bedside. Patients who have...... a "primary criterion" or a BEWS ≥ 5 are presumed to be critically ill or severely injured and should be received by a multidisciplinary team, termed the Emergency Call (EC) and Trauma Call (TC), respectively. The aim of this study was to examine compliance with this triage system at Bispebjerg Hospital....

  17. Low compliance with a validated system for emergency department triage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthea; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Maaløe, Rikke;

    2011-01-01

    Bispebjerg Hospital has introduced a triage system at the Emergency Department (ED) based on "primary criteria" and a physiological scoring system named the Bispebjerg Early Warning Score (BEWS). A BEWS is calculated on the basis of five vital signs which are accessible bedside. Patients who have...... a "primary criterion" or a BEWS = 5 are presumed to be critically ill or severely injured and should be received by a multidisciplinary team, termed the Emergency Call (EC) and Trauma Call (TC), respectively. The aim of this study was to examine compliance with this triage system at Bispebjerg Hospital....

  18. Emergency department patient characteristics: Potential impact on emergency medicine residency programs in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshove-Bolk, J.; Mencl, F.; Rijswijck, B.T. van; Weiss, I.M.; Simons, M.P.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We set out to study emergency department patient characteristics at a busy level-2 trauma center, to gain insight into the practise of emergency medicine, which is not yet recognized as a specialty in the Netherlands. METHODS: From May 27 to July 4 2001, the following data were recorded

  19. Epidemiology of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Utilization in Four Indian Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesekera, Olindi; Reed, Amanda; Chastain, Parker S; Biggs, Shauna; Clark, Elizabeth G; Kole, Tamorish; Chakrapani, Anoop T; Ashish, Nandy; Rajhans, Prasad; Breaud, Alan H; Jacquet, Gabrielle A

    2016-12-01

    Introduction Without a universal Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system in India, data on the epidemiology of patients who utilize EMS are limited. This retrospective chart review aimed to quantify and describe the burden of disease and patient demographics of patients who arrived by EMS to four Indian emergency departments (EDs) in order to inform a national EMS curriculum.

  20. Hyponatremia in older adults presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Joan M; Robinson, Marylou V

    2012-10-01

    Hyponatremia is a common disorder seen in the emergency department and is more prevalent in older adults than in other adult populations (Miller, 2009). Though often discovered by accident, through routine bloodwork, even mild hyponatremia has been shown to have potentially dangerous consequences for older adults, increasing their risks for falls, altered mental status, osteoporosis and fractures, and gastrointestinal disturbances (Soiza and Talbot, 2011). Optimal management of older adults with hyponatremia in the ED involves not only treatment of serum sodium levels and the immediate consequence of the disorder, but exploration and reversal of the causes of the hyponatremia to avoid recurrence. This case study illustrates the clinical presentation, complications and management of hyponatremia in the setting of the emergency department.

  1. Real-time demand forecasting in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Spencer S

    2007-10-11

    Shifts in the supply of and demand for emergency department (ED) services have led to ED overcrowding and make the efficient allocation of ED resources increasingly important. Reliable means of modeling and forecasting the demand for resources are critical to any ED resource planning strategy. Vector Autoregression (VAR) is a flexible multivariate time-series forecasting methodology that is well suited to modeling demand for resources in the ED.

  2. Improving Emergency Department Door to Doctor Time and Process Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mazen J.; El-Eid, Ghada R.; Saliba, Miriam; Jabbour, Rima; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of using lean management methods on improving emergency department door to doctor times at a tertiary care hospital. We performed a before and after study at an academic urban emergency department with 49,000 annual visits after implementing a series of lean driven interventions over a 20 month period. The primary outcome was mean door to doctor time and the secondary outcome was length of stay of both admitted and discharged patients. A convenience sample from the preintervention phase (February 2012) was compared to another from the postintervention phase (mid-October to mid-November 2013). Individual control charts were used to assess process stability. Postintervention there was a statistically significant decrease in the mean door to doctor time measure (40.0 minutes ± 53.44 vs 25.3 minutes ± 15.93 P < 0.001). The postintervention process was more statistically in control with a drop in the upper control limits from 148.8 to 72.9 minutes. Length of stay of both admitted and discharged patients dropped from 2.6 to 2.0 hours and 9.0 to 5.5 hours, respectively. All other variables including emergency department visit daily volumes, hospital occupancy, and left without being seen rates were comparable. Using lean change management techniques can be effective in reducing door to doctor time in the Emergency Department and improving process reliability. PMID:26496278

  3. Successful Introduction of an Emergency Department Electronic Heal th Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A. Propp

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Our emergency department had always relied on a paper-based infrastructure. Our goal was to convert to a paperless, efficient, easily accessible, technologically advanced system to support optimal care. We outline our sequential successful transformation, and describe the resistance, costs, incentives and benefits of the change. Critical factors contributing to the significant change included physician leadership, training and the rate of the endorsed change. We outline various tactics, tools, challenges and unintended benefits and problems.

  4. Simulation for Operational Readiness in a New Freestanding Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Kerner, Robert L.; Gallo, Kathleen; Cassara,Michael; D'Angelo, John.; Egan, Anthony; Simmons, John Galbraith

    2016-01-01

    Summary Statement Simulation in multiple contexts over the course of a 10-week period served as a core learning strategy to orient experienced clinicians before opening a large new urban freestanding emergency department. To ensure technical and procedural skills of all team members, who would provide care without on-site recourse to specialty backup, we designed a comprehensive interprofessional curriculum to verify and regularize a wide range of competencies and best practices for all clini...

  5. Automated electronic medical record sepsis detection in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Su Q. Nguyen; Edwin Mwakalindile; Booth, James S.; Vicki Hogan; Jordan Morgan; Prickett, Charles T; Donnelly, John P; Wang, Henry E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. While often first treated in the emergency department (ED), identification of sepsis is difficult. Electronic medical record (EMR) clinical decision tools offer a novel strategy for identifying patients with sepsis. The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of an EMR-based, automated sepsis identification system. Methods. We tested an EMR-based sepsis identification tool at a major academic, urban ED with 64,000 annual visits. The EMR system collected vital sign and lab...

  6. [Care for the dying patient in emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, M L; Lafuente, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide professionals in the hospital emergency departments with sufficient tools to face, according to the organisation and possibilities of each hospital, the admission of patients in the final days of life. It is primordial to provide a professional, technical and human environment based on concepts, attitudes and skills that make it possible to deal with the demands of comfort and the emotional and psycho-social requirements generated by these situations.

  7. Hand hygiene and aseptic technique in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Damouk, M; Pudney, E; Bleetman, A

    2004-02-01

    Hand hygiene and simple aseptic measures before invasive procedures are effective in reducing rates of healthcare-associated infection. The perceived urgency of a clinical situation in the emergency department, however, may influence medical staff's compliance with good practice in infection control. The aims of this prospective, single-blinded, observational study were twofold. First, to assess doctors' compliance with good practice in hand hygiene between patient episodes and asepsis during invasive procedures in the emergency department. Second, to assess the effect of clinical urgency on compliance with good practice in hand hygiene and asepsis during invasive procedures. Good practice standards for asepsis in invasive procedures and hand hygiene between patient episodes were compiled from a literature search. Doctors' compliance with these standards was observed in two emergency departments (UK and New Zealand). Observed clinical cases were classified as immediate, urgent and non-urgent based on the triage system. There was poor compliance with good practice guidelines for asepsis in invasive procedures in both centres. Staff achieved high compliance with the guidelines in only 27% of cases in the UK and 58% of cases in New Zealand. Clinical urgency did not appear to adversely affect compliance with aseptic good practice. Hand hygiene between patient consultations was very low at 14% in the UK and 12% in New Zealand. Asepsis and hand hygiene was poor in both the UK and New Zealand emergency departments. There may be a need for some compromise in standards of asepsis in very sick patients due to the urgency of the clinical situation. Compliance in all situations especially non-urgent procedures needs to be improved.

  8. Medical identity theft in the emergency department: awareness is crucial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Michelino

    2014-11-01

    Medical identity theft in the emergency department (ED) can harm numerous individuals, and many frontline healthcare providers are unaware of this growing concern. The two cases described began as typical ED encounters until red flags were discovered upon validating the patient's identity. Educating all healthcare personnel within and outside the ED regarding the subtle signs of medical identity theft and implementing institutional policies to identify these criminals will discourage further fraudulent behavior.

  9. A National Survey of Emergency Department Triage in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göransson, Katarina; Ehrenberg, Anna; Ehnfors, Margareta

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the organisation of and knowledge about triage work in Swedish emergency departments (ED) as a first step to understanding what is necessary for decision support in ED triage systems in Sweden. A national survey using telephone interviews for data collection was used. Results showed great variety in how work regarding ED triage is organised and performed. The variety occurs in several areas including education, personnel performing triage, facilities available and scales used. PMID:14728356

  10. Hepatorenal Syndrome in the Emergency Department: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win Jim Tan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatorenal syndrome is a condition where there is functional renal failure in a background of liver disease. It is relatively common in patients with liver cirrhosis and is associated with a high mortality rate if untreated. Results: This is a case report of an 88-year-old Chinese man presenting from a community hospital with a new onset of abdominal distension on a background of cryptogenic liver cirrhosis diagnosed on computed tomography scan. Clinical history and physical findings were consistent with that of fluid overload. Investigations performed indicated acute kidney injury together with liver failure secondary to liver cirrhosis. The patient was diagnosed with hepatorenal syndrome in accordance with the criteria established by the International Ascites Club and managed with an infusion of vasopressin and albumin in the emergency department. He was subsequently admitted to the general ward (gastrology, where he was managed for hepatorenal syndrome, improved clinically and was discharged to the nursing home. Conclusion: Hepatorenal syndrome can be managed effectively with albumin and vasopressin, and such treatment can be started as early as in the emergency department. Acute care physicians should not be hesitant in diagnosing and treating hepatorenal syndrome as early as in the emergency department for appropriate patients.

  11. Management of angioedema without urticaria in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Maria; Prieto-García, Alicia; Sala-Cunill, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Angioedema refers to a localized, transient swelling of the deep skin layers or the upper respiratory or gastrointestinal mucosa. It develops as a result of mainly two different vasoactive peptides, histamine or bradykinin. Pathophysiology, as well as treatment, is different in each case; nevertheless, the resulting signs and symptoms may be similar and difficult to distinguish. Angioedema may occur at any location. When the affected area involves the upper respiratory tract, both forms of angioedema can lead to an imminent upper airway obstruction and a life-threatening emergency. Emergency physicians must have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology underlying this process. Angioedema evaluation in the emergency department (ED) should aim to distinguish between histamine- and bradykinin-induced angioedema, in order to provide appropriate treatment to patients. However, diagnostic methods are not available at the ED setting, neither to confirm one mechanism or the other, nor to identify a cause. For this reason, the management of angioedema should rely on clinical data depending on the particular features of the episode and the patient in each case. The history-taking should be addressed to identify a possible etiology or triggering agent, recording complete information for an ulterior diagnostic study in the outpatient clinic. It is mandatory quickly to recognize and treat a potential life-threatening upper airway obstruction or anaphylaxis. This review focuses on the underlying mechanisms and management of histamine- and bradykinin-induced angioedema at the emergency department and provides an update on the currently available treatments.

  12. Emergency Department and Older Adult Motor Vehicle Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfipour, Shahram

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported there were 33 million licensed drivers 65 years and older in the U.S. This represents a 23 percent increase from 1999, number that is predicted to double by 2030. Although, motor vehicle collisions (MVC-related to emergency department (ED visits for older adults are lower per capita than for younger adults, the older-adults MVCs require more resources, such as additional diagnostic imaging and increased odds of admission. Addressing the specific needs of older-adults could lead to better outcomes yet not enough research currently exists. It is important to continue training emergency physicians to treat the increasing older-patient population, but its also imperative we increase our injury prevention and screening methodology. We review research findings from the article: Emergency Department Visits by Older Adults for Motor Vehicle Collisions: A Five-year national study, with commentary on current recommendation and policies for the growing older-adult driving population. [West J Emerg Med.2013;14(6:582–584.

  13. Strategic emergency department design: An approach to capacity planning in healthcare provision in overcrowded emergency rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bürki Leo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Healthcare professionals and the public have increasing concerns about the ability of emergency departments to meet current demands. Increased demand for emergency services, mainly caused by a growing number of minor and moderate injuries has reached crisis proportions, especially in the United Kingdom. Numerous efforts have been made to explore the complex causes because it is becoming more and more important to provide adequate healthcare within tight budgets. Optimisation of patient pathways in the emergency department is therefore an important factor. This paper explores the possibilities offered by dynamic simulation tools to improve patient pathways using the emergency department of a busy university teaching hospital in Switzerland as an example.

  14. Consequences of peritonism in an emergency department setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørsum-Meyer, Thomas; Schmidt, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In patients who were referred to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain, it is crucial to determine the presence of peritonism to allow for appropriate handling and subsequent referral to stationary departments. We aimed to assess the incidence of perceived peritonism...... on the patients with abdominal pain. Following a physical examination, the patients with abdominal pain were divided into those who had clinical signs of peritonism and those who did not. Results: Among the 1,270 patients admitted to the ED, 10% had abdominal pain. In addition, 41% of these patients were found...... to have signs indicative of peritonism, and 90% were admitted to the Department of Surgery (DS). Also, 24% of those patients with signs of peritonism and admission to the DS underwent surgical intervention in terms of laparotomy/laparoscopy. Five of the patients without peritonism underwent surgery...

  15. Hypoglycemic treatment of diabetic patients in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Caballero Requejo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze if the hypoglycemic therapy prescribed in the Emergency Department adapts to the consensus recommendations available, as well as to assess its clinical impact. Methods: A descriptive observational study, which included patients awaiting hospital admission, who were in the Observation Ward of the Emergency Department and had been previously diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, and were receiving treatment with hypoglycemic drugs at home. The management of antidiabetic treatment and its clinical impact were assessed. Results: 78 patients were included. At admission to the Emergency Department, treatment was modified for 91% of patients, and omitted for 9%. The most prescribed treatment was sliding scale insulin (68%. The treatments prescribed coincided in a 16.7% with the recommendations by the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine. After intervention by the Pharmacist, the omission descended to 1.3%, and the adaptation to the recommendations increased to 20.5%. Comparing patients whose treatment coincided with the recommendations and those who did not, the clinical impact was respectively: mean glycemia at 24 hours: 138.3 } 49.5 mg/dL versus 182.7 } 97.1 mg/dL (p = 0.688; mean rescues with insulin lispro: } 1.6 versus 1.5 } 1.8 (p = 0.293; mean units of insulin lispro administered: 4.6 } 12.7 IU versus 6.6 } 11.3 IU (p = 0.155. Conclusions: We found antidiabetic prescriptions to have a low adaptation to consensus recommendations. These results are in line with other studies, showing an abuse of sliding scale regimen as single hypoglycemic treatment

  16. The impact of a temporary ice-rink on an emergency department service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clarke, Heather J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: A temporary ice-rink opened close to Cork city for 6 weeks from 30 November 2003. During this time, a number of patients presented to the local emergency departments with ice-skating-related injuries. We documented these injuries. METHODS: All patients presenting to emergency departments in Cork city with ice-skating-related complaints were included. Information on age and sex, mechanism of injury, diagnosis, follow-up\\/disposition and ambulance service utilization was recorded. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-five ice-rink-related attendances were reported at Cork emergency departments, representing 1.25% of total attendances. One hundred and twenty-three patients presented with skating-related injuries and two with medical complaints occurring at the ice-rink: 70.8% were female patients and 29.2% were male patients. In the 4-14-year age group, however, 48.5% were girls and 51.5% were boys. Most injuries were directly due to falls; 5.6% were due to skate blades. The commonest site of injury was the upper limb. Fractures and dislocations accounted for 53.9% of injuries, with 20.5% of these requiring orthopaedic admission. Lacerations and digital injuries accounted for 7.1%, with 11% of these required admission for surgery. One minor head injury was reported. 38.1% had soft tissue injuries. Fifteen patients were transported by ambulance. These attendances represented a minimum overall cost of 77,510 euro to the local health service. CONCLUSIONS: A temporary ice-rink had a significant impact on local emergency departments. Currently, there is no specific legislation in Ireland relating to public health and safety in ice-rinks. We recommend consultation with local public bodies before opening such facilities, and appropriate regulation.

  17. Chloramphenicol and acute esophagitis in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad T Andicochea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Even with its broad spectrum and low cost, concern over chloramphenicol′s adverse effects limited its use in the United States during the 1980s. Reports from United Kingdom and China in the 1990s demonstrated a low incidence of blood dyscrasias with the topical preparation of chloramphenicol, and showed continued good efficacy and low cost. Today, topical chloramphenicol is being used by some groups within otolaryngology and ophthalmology in the United States. As a result, emergency physicians are once again considering chloramphenicol-induced side effects in patients presenting to the emergency department. To date, there have been no published reports associating chest pain, dyspnea with chloramphenicol use, and there has only been one report of fungal esophagitis associated with topical chloramphenicol. We present a 31-year-old woman, 4 months status post tympanoplasty with a modified radical canal wall down mastoidectomy due to a cholesteatoma involving the epitympanum who had a residual tympanic membrane defect. She presented to the emergency department with chest "burning", with no other symptoms shortly after starting treatment with an insufflated combination antibiotic containing chloramphenicol. After ruling out cardiopulmonary or vascular etiology, she was treated successfully with a gastrointestinal cocktail cocktail for presumed esophagitis secondary to newly prescribed chloramphenicol.

  18. Coarse particles and respiratory emergency department visits in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malig, Brian J; Green, Shelley; Basu, Rupa; Broadwin, Rachel

    2013-07-01

    Although respiratory disease has been strongly connected to fine particulate air pollution (particulate matter effects of coarse particles (particulate matter from 2.5 to 10 μm in diameter), possibly because of the greater spatial heterogeneity of coarse particles. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between coarse particles and respiratory emergency department visits, including common subdiagnoses, from 2005 to 2008 in 35 California counties. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to help control for time-invariant confounders and seasonal influences, and the study population was limited to those residing within 20 km of pollution monitors to mitigate the influence of spatial heterogeneity. Significant associations between respiratory emergency department visits and coarse particle levels were observed. Asthma visits showed associations (for 2-day lag, excess risk per 10 μg/m³ = 3.3%, 95% confidence interval: 2.0, 4.6) that were robust to adjustment by other common air pollutants (particles acute respiratory infection visits were not associated, although some suggestion of a relationship with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease visits was present. Our results indicate that coarse particle exposure may trigger asthma exacerbations requiring emergency care, and reducing exposures among asthmatic persons may provide benefits.

  19. Administration Medication Errors in Emergency Department in Level III Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia González Gómez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available • Objective: To determine the prevalence of medication errors associated with the administration in the emergency room of University Hospital Marques de Valdecilla. • Introduction: Adverse events related to health care, are increasingly common, it is estimated that between 44000 and 98000 people served in U.S. hospitals die from adverse events related to health care. In 7000 these deaths are caused by medication errors. In Spain the studies speak of similar figures. The emergency services are excluded usually in these studies because of its particular characteristics, but also are well known that these are characteristics (speed of decision-making, not having systems in unit dose dispensing ... what is expected that mistakes can be produced in larger numbers in emergency services in the areas of Spain hospitalization. • Method: This is a descriptive study in which cross-examine a sample of 627 administrations made in different areas of attention of the Emergency Department Valdecilla Hospital, in different time slots, months of the year and days a week. Between the months of January and December 2009.• Results: Have detected 119 errors in 627 observations, the most common error is log.• Conclusions: We have found a lower incidence of error 2.7%, comparing with other work (10%. While most of the studies reviewed speak of medication errors in general, including prescription, transcription, and administration.

  20. Acute Hemolysis in the Emergency Department: Think about Clostridium perfringens!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roustit Cécilia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens (CP gives several clinical settings, from an asymptomatic to a massive intravascular hemolysis. We report a case of fatal intravascular hemolysis due to CP septicemia having a hepatic supposed starting point in the emergency department. Like in many cases, the diagnosis was made when patient had already gone into shock and died. The CP septicemia often complicated the course of the digestive or genital pathologies. The alpha toxin can damage the structural integrity of the red cell membrane by means of a phospholipase activity. Nevertheless, a massive intravascular hemolysis arises only rarely in this septicemia, only from 7 to 15% of the cases. The emergency physician has to think about this complication in case of hemoglobinuria and/or signs of hemolysis associated with a septic syndrome. An immediate antibiotic treatment adapted as well as the symptomatic treatment of the spread intravascular coagulation could improve the survival of these patients.

  1. Tenecteplase to treat pulmonary embolism in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Hernandez-Nino, Jackeline; Jones, Alan E

    2007-04-01

    Tenecteplase, a mutant form of alteplase, possesses pharmacological properties that might favor its use for emergent fibrinolysis of acute pulmonary embolism. Contemporaneous search of the World's literature reveals 14 humans with acute pulmonary embolism treated with tenecteplase. Here, we summarize those cases and report the presentation features, dosing details and outcomes of eight additional patients with acute pulmonary embolism treated with tenecteplase in an academic emergency department. None of our eight patients had a significant hemorrhagic event after tenecteplase, and the outcomes of all eight appear to be acceptable. Taken together, we submit that the present case report and prior case reports are sufficient to comprise a phase I study of the safety and efficacy of tenecteplase to treat acute pulmonary embolism.

  2. Elevated Intracranial Pressure Diagnosis with Emergency Department Bedside Ocular Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Amin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bedside sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter can aid in the diagnosis of elevated intracranial pressure in the emergency department. This case report describes a 21-year-old female presenting with 4 months of mild headache and 2 weeks of recurrent, transient binocular vision loss. Though limited by patient discomfort, fundoscopic examination suggested the presence of blurred optic disc margins. Bedside ocular ultrasound (BOUS revealed wide optic nerve sheath diameters and bulging optic discs bilaterally. Lumbar puncture demonstrated a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF opening pressure of 54 cm H2O supporting the suspected diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Accurate fundoscopy can be vital to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected elevated intracranial pressure, but it is often technically difficult or poorly tolerated by the photophobic patient. BOUS is a quick and easily learned tool to supplement the emergency physician’s fundoscopic examination and help identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure.

  3. Critical challenges in establishing emergency physician driven emergency departments – A Durban experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maharaj*

    2013-12-01

    The Western Cape experience has demonstrated the utility of an Emergency Physician led Emergency Department in improving the outcome of acute illness and trauma, which are strongly dependent on the early recognition of severity and the need for early intervention. We believe that a similar mind-set needs to be developed to service the increasing needs of the urban and peri-urban population served by eThekwini hospitals.

  4. Stress in emergency departments: experiences of nurses and doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, Sonya

    2012-01-31

    The effects of stressful incidents on emergency department (ED) staff can be profound. Witnessing aggression, violence or the death of patients, or participating in resuscitation, can be emotionally and physically demanding. Despite the frequency of these events, ED staff do not become immune to the stress they cause, and are often ill prepared and under supported to cope with them. This article reports on a study of nurses\\' and doctors\\' attitudes to, and experiences of, workplace stress in three EDs in Ireland, and offers some suggestions on how stress among ED staff can be reduced.

  5. Procedures and Collaborative Information Seeking: A Study of Emergency Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Reddy, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Information seeking is a central and inherently collaborative activity in the emergency department (ED) which is the common entry point to hospitals for nearly all acute patients. In this paper, we investigate how ED clinicians’ collabo-rative information seeking (CIS) is shaped by the procedures...... that the clinicians follow in the ED. Based on observations in two Danish EDs, we identify four pro-cedures prominent to how CIS is accomplished: the triage procedure, the timeouts, the coordinating nurse, and the recurrent opportunities for information seeking at the whiteboard. We then discuss how CIS activities...

  6. Marketing and public relations in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, T A; Tilson, W; Hemingway, J

    1987-02-01

    This article outlines the elements of successful ED marketing, as well as providing definitions for terms used within the marketing process. In today's competition and rapidly changing environment, marketing and public relations are tools that every ED Medical Director may want to consider. Because the marketing process requires a great deal of time and effort, as well as a high degree of intellectual honesty, it should never be entered into without a strong commitment. However, marketing the ED can be among the most productive, stimulating, and gratifying experiences for the ED Medical Director, the emergency department physicians, and all ED service personnel.

  7. Emergency department management of the sexual assault victim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobernick, M E; Seifert, S; Sanders, A B

    1985-01-01

    The optimal management of the sexual assault victim involves a multidisciplinary effort on the part of all legal, police, medical, and support personnel who interface in the emergency department. History, general physical examination, and pelvic examination are performed methodically, keeping in mind that the primary goal is to tend to the patient's medical needs. The gathering of evidence proceeds simultaneously with the physical examination. Evidence to be obtained and techniques are reviewed. Treatment entails attention to physical injuries, potential venereal disease and pregnancy, and psychiatric intervention. Management of the male rape victim or child victim of sexual abuse requires special attention to the peculiarities of those problems.

  8. Medication errors of nurses in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Seyyedeh Roghayeh; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Nejati, Amir; Salari, Amir; Esmaeilpoor, Ayeshe Haji; Nejad, Esmaeil Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Patient safety is one of the main concepts in the field of healthcare provision and a major component of health services quality. One of the important stages in promotion of the safety level of patients is identification of medication errors and their causes. Medical errors such as medication errors are the most prevalent errors that threaten health and are a global problem. Execution of medication orders is an important part of the treatment and care process and is regarded as the main part of the nurses' performance. The purpose of this study was to explore the medication error reporting rate, error types and their causes among nurses in the emergency department. In this descriptive study, 94 nurses of the emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex were selected based on census in 2010-2011. Data collection tool was a researcher-made questionnaire consisting of two parts: demographic information, and types and causes of medication errors. After confirming content-face validity, reliability of the questionnaire was determined to be 0.91 using Cronbach's alpha test. Data analyses were performed by descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. SPSS-16 software was used in this study and P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. The mean age of the nurses was 27.7 ± 3.4 years, and their working experience was 7.3 ± 3.4 years. Of participants 46.8% had committed medication errors in the past year, and the majority (69.04%) had committed the errors only once. Thirty two nurses (72.7%) had not reported medication errors to head nurses or the nursing office. The most prevalent types of medication errors were related to infusion rates (33.3%) and administering two doses of medicine instead of one (23.8%). The most important causes of medication errors were shortage of nurses (47.6%) and lack of sufficient pharmacological information (30.9%). This study showed that the risk of medication errors among nurses is high and medication errors are a

  9. Process Improvements to Reform Patient Flow in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Shawn D; Leung, Alexander K; Duic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) function to diagnose, stabilize, manage and dispose patients as efficiently as possible. Although problems may be suspected at triage, ED physician input is required at each step of the patient journey through the ED, from diagnosis to disposition. If we want timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment and great outcomes, then ED processes should connect patients and physicians as quickly as possible. This article discusses the key concepts of ED patient flow, value and efficiency. Based on these fundamentals, it describes the significant impact of ED process improvements implemented on measures of ED efficiency at a large community ED in Ontario, Canada.

  10. A GIS-based Earthquake and Tsunami Emergency Command System for Seaside Cities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Youhai; FENG Qimin; JIA Jing

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the geographical information system (GIS) is applied to earthquake and tsunami emergency work and an earthquake and tsunami emergency command system (ETECS) for seaside cities is developed which is composed of a basic database and six subsystems. By employing this system, the responsible municipal departments can make rapid prediction before the occurrence of earthquake or tsunami, make commanding decisions concerning the disaster-fight during the disastrous event, and make rapid estimates of the casualties and economic losses. So that the government could conduct relief work in time and planning for future disaster reduction and prevention.

  11. Early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2015-10-21

    Overcrowding is one of the most crucial issues confronting emergency departments (EDs) throughout the world. Efficient management of patient flows for ED services has become an urgent issue for most hospital administrations. Handling and detection of abnormal situations is a key challenge in EDs. Thus, the early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at EDs plays an important role from the point of view of improving management of the inspected EDs. It allows the EDs mangers to prepare for high levels of care activities, to optimize the internal resources and to predict enough hospitalization capacity in downstream care services. This study reports the development of statistical method for enhancing detection of abnormal daily patient arrivals at the ED, which able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations. The autoregressive moving average (ARMA)-based exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) anomaly detection scheme proposed was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France.

  12. Building an automated SOAP classifier for emergency department reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowery, Danielle; Wiebe, Janyce; Visweswaran, Shyam; Harkema, Henk; Chapman, Wendy W

    2012-02-01

    Information extraction applications that extract structured event and entity information from unstructured text can leverage knowledge of clinical report structure to improve performance. The Subjective, Objective, Assessment, Plan (SOAP) framework, used to structure progress notes to facilitate problem-specific, clinical decision making by physicians, is one example of a well-known, canonical structure in the medical domain. Although its applicability to structuring data is understood, its contribution to information extraction tasks has not yet been determined. The first step to evaluating the SOAP framework's usefulness for clinical information extraction is to apply the model to clinical narratives and develop an automated SOAP classifier that classifies sentences from clinical reports. In this quantitative study, we applied the SOAP framework to sentences from emergency department reports, and trained and evaluated SOAP classifiers built with various linguistic features. We found the SOAP framework can be applied manually to emergency department reports with high agreement (Cohen's kappa coefficients over 0.70). Using a variety of features, we found classifiers for each SOAP class can be created with moderate to outstanding performance with F(1) scores of 93.9 (subjective), 94.5 (objective), 75.7 (assessment), and 77.0 (plan). We look forward to expanding the framework and applying the SOAP classification to clinical information extraction tasks.

  13. Scombrotoxinism: Protracted Illness following Misdiagnosis in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghan-Shyam Lohiya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Scombrotoxinism is an acute toxin-induced illness caused primarily by bacterial synthesis of histamine in decomposed fish. Case Report. Immediately after taking 2-3 bites of cooked salmon, a clerical worker developed oral burning, urticaria, and asthma. In the emergency department, she was diagnosed with “allergies”; scombrotoxinism was never considered. She then developed wide-ranging symptoms (e.g., chronic fatigue, asthma, anxiety, multiple chemical sensitivity, and paresthesiae and saw many specialists (in pulmonology, otorhinolaryngology, allergy, toxicology, neurology, psychology, and immunology. During the next 500+ days, she had extensive testing (allergy screens, brain MRI, electroencephalogram, electromyogram, nerve conduction velocity, heavy metal screen, and blood chemistry with essentially normal results. She filed a workers’ compensation claim since this injury occurred following a business meal. She was evaluated by a Qualified Medical Evaluator (GL on day 504, who diagnosed scombrotoxinism. Comment. Scombrotoxinism should be considered in all patients presenting to the emergency department with “oral burning” or allergy symptoms following “fish consumption.” Initial attention to such history would have led to a correct diagnosis and averted this patient’s extended illness. Specialist referrals and tests should be ordered only if clinically indicated and not for diagnostic fishing expedition. Meticulous history is crucial in resolving clinical dilemmas.

  14. Clinical Aspects and Emergent Management of Snake Bites Presented to Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedriye Sonmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Evaluating the epidemiologic characteristics and management of snake bites presenting to emergency departments. Material and Method: In this retrospective study 74 cases of snakebites admitted to Emergency Department of Diyarbakir Training and Research Hospital between 2008 and 2009 were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Fourty-six (62.2% of patients were male and 28 (37.8% were female. Mean age of the study population was 34.85±19.17 (min 7- max 80 years. Most of the snakebites occurred between 18.00 to 06.00 hours and at home (73%. 79.7% of snake bites occurred to upper extremities. %93 of cases had intravenous administration of antivenin (one dose. Neither none of the patients needed recurrent administration. Discussion: Snake bites are still a major public health problem especially in rural areas. Particularly emergency care physicians should be adequately capable and sophisticated in multidisciplinary management of snake bites.

  15. Patient satisfaction with triage nursing in a rural hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Regina; Neal, Carolyn; Davis, Barbara A; Almes, Elizabeth; Whitledge, Lynn; Littlepage, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    This study examined what relationships or differences exist between patient and nurse characteristics, satisfaction with triage nurse caring behaviors, general satisfaction with the triage nurse, and intent to return to a rural hospital emergency department (ED). The ED, located at a 401-bed teaching hospital in a small southern city, averages 28,000 visits annually. Samples of ED nurses (N = 11) and ED patients (N = 65) were asked to respond to demographic forms and the Consumer Emergency Care Satisfaction Scale (CECSS) Adapted. Findings indicated that the nurse's acuity rating and the patient's perception of condition had a positive relationship. The patient's perception of condition, patient satisfaction, and caring satisfaction were predictors of intent to return. When patients perceived themselves as seriously ill or injured, they expressed less intent to return to that ED.

  16. Cycling Injuries Presenting to an Irish Emergency Department

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    J Foley, J

    2016-06-01

    There is little published data on cycling injuries in Ireland and the present study aims to describe the cycling related injuries presenting to the emergency department (ED), of a tertiary urban university hospital. This is a retrospective review of cycling-related injuries presenting to the ED of St. Vincent’s University Hospital (SVUH) from 1st of January to 31st of December 2014. There were 534 cycling related injuries presenting to the ED during the study period. Just over 71% of the patients were male, and 14.8% of patients presented following a collision with a motor vehicle. Forty patients required admission to hospital following their injury with 6 of these patients spending time in the intensive care unit. Cycling is now a very popular means of transport and exercise activity in Ireland and using hospital based data, it is possible that EDs may provide a vector for guiding injury prevention strategies in the future

  17. Integrated simulation and data envelopment analysis models in emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminuddin, Wan Malissa Wan Mohd; Ismail, Wan Rosmanira

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to determine the best resource allocation and to increase the efficiency service of an emergency department in a public hospital in Kuala Lumpur. We integrate Discrete Event Simulation (DES) and three models of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA); Input-oriented CCR model, Input-oriented BCC model and Super-Efficiency model to fulfill such objective. Based on the comparison of results taken from the DEA models, the combination of DES, Input-oriented BCC model and Super-Efficiency BCC model is seen to be the best resource allocation technique to be used for enhancing the hospital efficiency. The combination has reduced patients waiting time while improving the average utilization rate of hospital resources compared to the current situation.

  18. Process-Improvement Cost Model for the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyas, Sheila R; Greenfield, Eric; Messimer, Sherri; Thotakura, Swati; Gholston, Sampson; Doughty, Tracy; Hays, Mary; Ivey, Richard; Spalding, Joseph; Phillips, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present a simplified, activity-based costing approach for hospital emergency departments (EDs) to use with Lean Six Sigma cost-benefit analyses. The cost model complexity is reduced by removing diagnostic and condition-specific costs, thereby revealing the underlying process activities' cost inefficiencies. Examples are provided for evaluating the cost savings from reducing discharge delays and the cost impact of keeping patients in the ED (boarding) after the decision to admit has been made. The process-improvement cost model provides a needed tool in selecting, prioritizing, and validating Lean process-improvement projects in the ED and other areas of patient care that involve multiple dissimilar diagnoses.

  19. Geriatric nursing assessment and intervention in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Wagner, Lis; Hendriksen, Carsten;

    2012-01-01

    assessment, the nurse made relevant referrals to the geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, general practitioner or made arrangements with next of kin. Results. One hundred and fifty people participated, mean age was 81.7. At discharge, they had a mean of 1.9 unresolved problems, after 1 month......To describe and test a model for structured nursing assessment and intervention to older people discharged from emergency department (ED). Background. Older people recently discharged from hospital are at high risk of readmission. This risk may increase when they are discharged straight home from...... an ED as time pressure requires staff to focus on the presenting problem although many have complex, unresolved, care needs. Method. A prospective descriptive pilot study was conducted. Older people aged 70 and over and at risk of adverse health and functional outcome were included. Intervention...

  20. Structured nursing intervention to geriatric patients discharged from Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie

    2010-01-01

    % of geriatric patients have complex and often unresolved caring needs. Objective: To investigate a structured nursing intervention’s impact on geriatric patients’ unresolved problems and their use of help from the community health centre. Method: We conducted a prospective descriptive study of selected...... the nurse made relevant referrals to geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, primary physician or arrangements with next-of-kin. Results: 150 geriatric patients participated, mean age 81.7 (70-99). At discharge they had in mean 2 (0-9) unresolved problems, after 1 month 0.8 (0-5), and after 6......Background: Geriatric patients recently discharged from hospital are at risk of unplanned readmissions and admission to nursing home. When discharged directly from Emergency Department (ED) the risk increases, as time pressure often requires focus on the presenting problem, although 80...

  1. Skull Base Osteomyelitis in the Emergency Department: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Burak Sayhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Skull base osteomyelitis (SBO is a rare clinical presentation and usually occurs as a complication of trauma or sinusitis. A 5-year-old child presented to the emergency department with a three-week history of fever associated with drowsiness and left parietal headache, and a week's history of swelling on the left frontoparietal soft tissue. He had suffered a penetrating scalp injury four month ago. On physical examination, there was a tender swelling with purulent stream on the lateral half of his scalp. His vital signs are within normal limits. Plain X-ray of the skull showed a lytic lesion on the left frontoparietal bone. A cranial computed tomography (CT scan demonstrated a large subgaleal abscess at the left frontoparietal region. SBO possesses a high morbidity and mortality; therefore, prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are mandatory to prevent further complications and to reduce morbidity and mortality significantly.

  2. Child abuse diagnosis and the emergency department chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C F; Apolo, J; Joseph, J A; Corbitt, T

    1986-03-01

    Failure to uncover and report nonaccidental injury may have serious consequences for the child and the physician. To determine if the information recorded in the emergency department record was adequate to eliminate the possibility of nonaccidental injury, the charts of 333 children under five years of age were reviewed. No charts contained all the information deemed necessary; in 12.6% a diagnosis of nonaccidental injury could not be eliminated. In three cases, the injury was inconsistent with the history. Missing historical information included where the injury occurred, the presence of witnesses, notation of previous injuries, and old chart review. Information regarding size, color, and age of the injury was incomplete. A complete examination was recorded 22.3% of the time. The private-pay category charts and those recorded by staff were most complete. Remedial actions, guided by periodic chart reviews, are suggested.

  3. Management of oral and genital herpes in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mell, Howard K

    2008-05-01

    The epidemiology of oral and genital herpes has dramatically changed over the past decade. Herpes simplex virus-1, traditionally associated with oral herpes, is now implicated in an increasing percentage of genital herpes cases. The possibility of "autoinoculation" (or self-infection) of anatomic sites other than that of the primary infection has been recognized. New methods of suppression therapy are being examined. These changes have led to a revision in the recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This review discusses herpes infections of the oral and genital mucosa and the suggested approach to the infected patient who presents in the emergency department. Specific attention is given to the CDC's 2006 guidelines for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases.

  4. Transient Global Amnesia: Emergency Department Evaluation And Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Jeremy Samuel; Nemes, Andreea

    2016-08-01

    Transient global amnesia is a clinically distinct syndrome characterized by the acute inability to form new memories. It can last up to 24 hours. The diagnosis is dependent on eliminating other more serious etiologies including toxic ingestions, acute strokes, complex partial seizures, and central nervous system infections. Transient global amnesia confers no known long-term risks; however, when abnormal signs or symptoms are present, they take precedence and guide the formulation of a differential diagnosis and investigation. In witnessed transient global amnesia with classic features, a minimalist approach is reasonable, avoiding overtesting, inappropriate medication, and medical interventions in favor of observation, ensuring patient safety, and reassuring patients and their families. This review provides a detailed framework for distinguishing transient global amnesia from its dangerous mimics and managing its course in the emergency department.

  5. Diagnosing Achilles tendon injuries in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, Lynda

    2013-09-01

    Achilles tendon (AT) injury is an overuse injury often seen in professional and recreational athletes. It tends to affect men, particularly those in their thirties and forties, more than women, and is typically seen in people who are intermittently active. To ensure AT ruptures are identified and treated effectively, early intervention in emergency departments (EDs) is crucial. This article discusses how advanced nurse practitioners can use their comprehensive problem-solving, clinical decision-making and clinical judgement skills to manage patients who present with suspected AT injury. It also describes the anatomy of tendon rupture, the aetiology and mechanism of injuries, and the importance of assessment and diagnostic tools, therapeutic techniques and management strategies. Finally, it considers the psychological effect this injury can have on patients, while in the ED and after discharge. A case study is included as an example of ED management.

  6. The Effect of Emergency Department Overcrowding on Efficiency of Emergency Medicine Residents’ Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Sabzghabaei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Creating a calm and stress-free environment affects education significantly. The effects of the emergency department overcrowding (EDO on the training of emergency medicine residents (EMR is a highly debated subject. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of EDO on efficiency of EMR’s education. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the effects of overcrowding on EMR’s education in the resuscitation room and acute care unit. Data collection was done using a questionnaire, which was filled out by the second year EMRs.  The crowding level was calculated based on the national emergency department overcrowding scale (NEDOCS. The relationship between the two studied variables was evaluated using independent sample t-test and SPSS 21 statistical software. Results: 130 questionnaires were filled out during 61 shifts. 47 (77.05% shifts were overcrowded. The attend’s ability to teach was not affected by overcrowding in the resuscitation room (p=0.008. The similar results were seen regarding the attend’s training ability in the acute care unit. Conclusion: It seems that the emergency department overcrowding has no effect on the quality of education to the EMRs.

  7. Referral Criteria from Community Clinics to Pediatric Emergency Departments

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    Jacob Urkin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Referral of patients to a pediatric emergency department (PED should be medically justified and the need for referral well communicated. The objectives of this paper were (1 to create a list of criteria for referral from the community to the PED, (2 to describe how community physicians categorize their need for referral, and (3 to determine agreement between the physician's referral letter and the selected criteria. We present a descriptive study of referrals to the PED of Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel, during February to April 2003. A list of 22 criteria for referral was created, using the Delphi method for reaching consensus. One or more criteria could be selected from this list for each referral, by the referring community physicians and, independently, based on the physicians' referral letters, by two consultants, and compared. There were 140 referrals included in the study. A total of 262 criteria for referral were selected by the referring community physicians. The criteria most frequently selected were: “Need for same-day consultation/laboratory/imaging result not available in the community” (32.1%, “Suspected life- or organ-threatening infection” (16.4%, and “Need for hospitalization” (15.7%. Rates of agreement regarding criteria for referral between the referring physicians and the two consultants, and a senior community pediatrician and a senior PED pediatrician, were 57.9 and 48.6%, respectively. We conclude that the standard referral letter does not convey in full the level of need for referral to the PED. A list of criteria for referral could augment efficient utilization of emergency department services and improve communication between community physicians and the PED.

  8. Analysis of Adult Trauma Patients Admitted to Emergency Department

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    Sema Puskulluoglu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Trauma is one of the most common reason of admissions to emergency departments. In this study, it was aimed to determine the demographic characteristics, etiology, morbidity and mortality rates and prognosis of adult trauma patients admitted to our emergency department (ED. Materials and Methods: Patients over the age of 18 years, who admitted to ED between 01 March 2011 and 31 August 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Patient examination cards, hospitalization files and records entered with ICD 10 codes to hospital automation system were analyzed. Patients with inaccessible data were excluded from the study. Results: During the study period, total number of 110495 patients admitted to ED, and 13585 (12,29% of them admitted with trauma. Simple extremity injuries (38,28% and falls (31,7% were most common etiological factors. Glasgow coma scales of 99,71% of the patients were between 13 and 15. Of the patients with trauma, 9,6% had a Computed Tomography (CT scan, and 84,5% of CT scans were evaluated as normal, and cranial CT was the most requested one. Only 6% of the patients were hospitalized, and 0,9% of the trauma patients died. Falls from height in females and traffic accidents in males were the leading causes of death. Conclusion: Most of the patients with simple traumas admitted to ED can be discharged from the hospital with a complete history and careful examination. The rate of unnecessary medical tests, loss of time and waste money should be reduced, and the time and labor allocated to severe patients can be increased by this way. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 569-579

  9. Characteristics of frequent emergency department presenters to an Australian emergency medicine network

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    Markham Donna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To describe the characteristics of emergency department (ED patients defined as frequent presenters (FP presenting to an Australian emergency department network and compare these with a cohort of non-frequent presenters (NFP. Method A retrospective chart review utilising an electronic emergency medicine patient medical record database was performed on patients presenting to Southern Health EDs from March 2009 to March 2010. Non-frequent presenters were defined as patients presenting less than 5 times and frequent presenters as presenting 8 or more times in the study period. Characteristics of both groups were described and compared. Results During the 12-month study period there were 540 FP patients with 4549 admissions and 73,089 NFP patients with 100,943 admissions. FP patients were slightly older with a significant increase in frequency of patients between the ages of 70 to 79 years and they were more likely to be divorced or separated than NFP patients. Frequent presenters to the emergency department were more likely to utilise the ambulance service to arrive at the hospital, or in the custody of police than NFP patients. FPs were more likely to be admitted to hospital, more likely to have an admission to a mental health bed than NFP patients and more likely to self-discharge from the emergency department while waiting for care. Conclusions There are major implications for the utilisation of limited ED resources by frequent presenters. By further understanding the characteristics of FP we may be able to address the specific health care needs of this population in more efficient and cost effective ways. Further research analysing the effectiveness of targeted multidisciplinary interventions aiming to reduce the frequency of ED attendances may be warranted.

  10. Patients who leave the emergency department against medical advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choung Ah; Cho, Joon Pil; Choi, Sang Cheon; Kim, Hyuk Hoon; Park, Ju Ok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Discharge against medical advice (DAMA) from the emergency department (ED) accounts for 0.1% to 2.7% of all ED discharges. DAMA carries a risk of increased mortality and readmissions. Our aim was to investigate the general characteristics of DAMA patients and the differences between them and non-DAMA patients. Methods We reviewed data collected by the National Emergency Medical Center between 2010 and 2011. Subjects were categorized into 2 groups, namely, the DAMA group and the non-DAMA group. We compared these groups with respect to age, gender, trauma or non-trauma status, type of hospital, health insurance, level of consciousness on admission, and diagnosis. Results Of 8,000,529 patients, 222,389 (2.78%) left against medical advice. The risk factors for DAMA across all age groups were as follows: no medical insurance (odds ratio [OR], 1.993), initial response to voice (OR, 2.753) or pain (OR, 2.101), trauma admission (OR, 1.126), admission to a local emergency medical center (OR, 1.215), and increased age. A high risk of DAMA was observed among patients with immune, endocrine, psychiatric, neurological, circulatory diseases, and external causes of morbidity and mortality. Conclusion Although DAMA cases account for only a small percentage of hospital discharges, they are important because DAMA patients have high readmission and mortality rates. It is therefore important to understand the general characteristics and predictors of DAMA in order to improve patient outcome and minimize the economic burden on the healthcare system.

  11. Does Limiting Oral Contrast Decrease Emergency Department Length of Stay?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Barton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact on emergency department (EDlength of stay (LOS of a new protocol for intravenous (IV-contrast only abdominal/pelvic computedtomography (ABCT compared to historical controls.Methods: This was a retrospective case-controlled study performed at a single academic medicalcenter. Patients ≥ 18 undergoing ABCT imaging for non-traumatic abdominal pain were included inthe study. We compared ED LOS between historical controls undergoing ABCT imaging with PO/IVcontrast and study patients undergoing an IV-contrast-only protocol. Imaging indications were thesame for both groups and included patients with clinical suspicion for appendicitis, diverticulitis, smallbowel obstruction, or perforation. We identified all patients from the hospital’s electronic storehouse(imaging code, ordering department, imaging times, and we abstracted ED LOS and dispositionfrom electronic medical records.Results: Two hundred and eleven patients who underwent PO/IV ABCT prep were compared to 184patients undergoing IV-contrast only ABCT prep. ED LOS was shorter for patients imaged with theIV-contrast only protocol (4:35 hrs vs. 6:39 hrs, p < 0.0001.Conclusion: Implementation of an IV-contrast only ABCT prep for select ED patients presentingfor evaluation of acute abdominal pain significantly decreased ED LOS.

  12. The Impact of Psychiatric Patient Boarding in Emergency Departments

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    B. A. Nicks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1% requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years, with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039–1140 versus 340 min, CI (304–375; <0.001 when compared to non-psychiatric admissions. The financial impact of psychiatric boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198 compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue.

  13. 75 FR 32855 - Safety Zone; Pierce County, WA, Department of Emergency Management, Regional Water Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... Management, Regional Water Exercise AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Pierce County, Washington, Department of Emergency Management is sponsoring a Regional Water Rescue... County, Washington, Department of Emergency Management is sponsoring a Regional Water Rescue Exercise...

  14. Compact city development: High ideals and emerging practices

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    Hege Hofstad

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Compact city development has, over the last 20 years or so, emerged as the preferred response to the goal of sustainable development. As such, it is pertinent to examine planning practices to see whether the traditional economic bias in planning is now balanced by aims and practices in support of environmental and social sustainability. In this light the social, environmental, and economic goals linked to densification and mixed use development will be the main focus of this article. In addition, the article assesses whether distinct institutional practices support the balancing of these goals. The empirical basis is formed by urban plans in four Scandinavian cities in combination with qualitative interview data. The article concludes that on a discursive level, social, environmental and economic goals are represented in compact city strategies. Institutionalised practices, however, show that economic goals remain at the core of planning. Environmental and social aims still play second fiddle, but new measures are in development that may gradually strengthen their influence over urban development practices.

  15. Impact of an Expeditor on Emergency Department on Patient Throughput

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    Handel, Daniel A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our hypothesis was that an individual whose primary role was to assist with patient throughput would decrease emergency department (ED length of stay (LOS, elopements and ambulance diversion. The objective of this study was to measure how the use of an expeditor affected these throughput metrics.Methods: This pre- and post-intervention study analyzed ED patients > 21-years-old between June 2008 and June 2009, at a level one trauma center in an academic medical center with an annual ED census of 40,000 patients. We created the expeditor position as our study intervention in December 2008, by modifying the job responsibilities of an existing paramedic position. An expeditor was on duty from 1PM-1AM daily. The pre-intervention period was June to November 2008, and the post-intervention period was January to June 2009. We used multivariable to assess the impact of the expeditor on throughput metrics after adjusting for confounding variables.Results: We included a total of 13,680 visits in the analysis. There was a significant decrease in LOS after expeditor implementation by 0.4 hours, despite an increased average daily census (109 vs. 121, p<0.001. The expeditor had no impact on elopements. The probability that the ED experienced complete ambulance diversion during a 24-hour period decreased from 55.2% to 16.0% (OR:0.17, 95%CI:0.05-0.67.Conclusion: The use of an expeditor was associated with a decreased LOS and ambulance diversion. These findings suggest that EDs may be able to improve patient flow by using expeditors. This tool is under the control of the ED and does not require larger buy-in, resources, or overall hospital changes. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(2:198-203.

  16. Does Young Age Merit Increased Emergency Department Trauma Team Response?

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    Holmes, James F.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: To determine if increased trauma team response results in alterations in resource use in a population of children<6 years, especially in those least injured. Methods: We conducted a retrospective before and after study of children <6 years sustaining blunt trauma and meeting defined prehospital criteria. We compared hospitalization rates and missed injuries (injuries identified after discharge from the emergency department/hospital among patients with and without an upgraded trauma team response. We compared the computed tomography (CT rate and laboratory testing rate among minimally injured patients (Injury Severity Score [ISS] 6. Results: We enrolled 352 patients with 180 (mean age 2.7 ± 1.5 years in the upgrade cohort and 172 (mean age 2.6 ± 1.5 years in the no-upgrade cohort. Independent predictors of hospital admission in a regression analysis included: Glasgow Coma Scale <14 (odds ratio [OR]=11.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.3, 56, ISS (OR=1.55, 95% CI 1.33, 1.81, and evaluation by the upgrade trauma team (OR=5.66, 95% CI 3.14, 10.2. In the 275 patients with ISS < 6, CT (relative risk=1.34, 95% CI 1.09, 1.64 and laboratory tests (relative risk=1.71, 95% CI 1.39, 2.11 were more likely to be obtained in the upgrade cohort as compared to the no-upgrade cohort. We identified no cases of a missed diagnosis. Conclusion: Increasing the trauma team response based upon young age results in increased resource use without altering the rate of missed injuries. In hospitals with ED physicians capable of evaluating and treating injured children, increasing ED trauma team resources solely for young age of the patient is not recommended. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(6:569–575.

  17. Emergency Department Use Among Older Adults With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMantia, Michael A; Stump, Timothy E; Messina, Frank C; Miller, Douglas K; Callahan, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Although persons with dementia are frequently hospitalized, relatively little is known about the health profile, patterns of health care use, and mortality rates for patients with dementia who access care in the emergency department (ED). We linked data from our hospital system with Medicare and Medicaid claims, Minimum Data Set, and Outcome and Assessment Information Set data to evaluate 175,652 ED visits made by 10,354 individuals with dementia and 15,020 individuals without dementia over 11 years. Survival rates after ED visits and associated charges were examined. Patients with dementia visited the ED more frequently, were hospitalized more often than patients without dementia, and had an increased odds of returning to the ED within 30 days of an index ED visit compared with persons who never had a dementia diagnosis (odds ratio, 2.29; Pdementia status (Pdementia. These results show that older adults with dementia are frequent ED visitors who have greater comorbidity, incur higher charges, are admitted to hospitals at higher rates, return to EDs at higher rates, and have higher mortality after an ED visit than patients without dementia.

  18. Ambient Ozone and Emergency Department Visits for Cellulitis

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    Mieczysław Szyszkowicz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives were to assess and estimate an association between exposure to ground-level ozone and emergency department (ED visits for cellulitis. All ED visits for cellulitis in Edmonton, Canada, in the period April 1992–March 2002 (N = 69,547 were examined. Case-crossover design was applied to estimate odds ratio (OR, and 95% confidence interval per one interquartile range (IQR increase in ozone concentration (IQR = 14.0 ppb. Delay of ED visit relating to exposure was probed using 0- to 5-day exposure lags. For all patients in the all months (January–December and lags 0 to 2 days, OR = 1.05 (1.02, 1.07. For male patients during the cold months (October-March: OR = 1.05 (1.02, 1.09 for lags 0 and 2 and OR = 1.06 (1.02, 1.10 for lag 3. For female patients in the warm months (April-September: OR = 1.12 (1.06, 1.18 for lags 1 and 2. Cellulitis developing on uncovered (more exposed skin was analyzed separately, observed effects being stronger. Cellulitis may be associated with exposure to ambient ground level ozone; the exposure may facilitate cellulitis infection and aggravate acute symptoms.

  19. Emergency department crowding and risk of preventable medical errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Stephen K; Huckins, David S; Liu, Shan W; Pallin, Daniel J; Sullivan, Ashley F; Lipton, Robert I; Camargo, Carlos A

    2012-04-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the association between emergency department (ED) crowding and preventable medical errors (PME). This was a retrospective cohort study of 533 ED patients enrolled in the National ED Safety Study (NEDSS) in four Massachusetts EDs. Individual patients' average exposure to ED crowding during their ED visit was compared with the occurrence of a PME (yes/no) for the three diagnostic categories in NEDSS: acute myocardial infarction, asthma exacerbation, and dislocation requiring procedural sedation. To accommodate site-to-site differences in available administrative data, ED crowding was measured using one of three previously validated crowding metrics (ED Work Index, ED Workscore, and ED Occupancy). At each site, the continuous measure was placed into site-specific quartiles, and these quartiles then were combined across sites. We found that 46 (8.6%; 95% confidence interval, 6.4-11.3%) of the 533 patients experienced a PME. For those seen during higher levels of ED crowding (quartile 4 vs. quartile 1), the occurrence of PMEs was more than twofold higher, both on unadjusted analysis and adjusting for two potential confounders (diagnosis, site). The association appeared non-linear, with most PMEs occurring at the highest crowding level. We identified a direct association between high levels of ED crowding and risk of preventable medical errors. Further study is needed to determine the generalizability of these results. Should such research confirm our findings, we would suggest that mitigating ED crowding may reduce the occurrence of preventable medical errors.

  20. Posttraumatic stress symptomatology among emergency department workers following workplace aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Gordon Lee; Bresler, Scott; Gates, Donna M; Succop, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Workplace aggression has the potential to adversely affect the psychological health of emergency department (ED) workers. The purpose of this study was to compare posttraumatic stress symptomatology based on verbal and verbal plus physical aggression. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample (n = 208) of ED workers who completed a three-component survey. Descriptive statistics were computed to compare traumatic stress scores based on type of aggression. Two-way analysis of variance statistics were computed to determine if scores differed on the demographic variables. Fewer than half of the ED workers reported traumatic stress symptomatology; however, workplace aggression has the potential to adversely affect the mental health of ED workers. Occupational health nurses can establish or maintain a nurturing and protective environment open to discussing the personal thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of ED workers related to their experiences of workplace aggression. This open and more positive work environment may aid in reducing the negative impact of posttraumatic stress symptoms among those ED workers who have been victimized.

  1. Approach to decreasing emergency department ambulance diversion hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilke, Gary M; Brown, Lana; Skogland, Patty; Simmons, Charles; Guss, David A

    2004-02-01

    Analysis between two local Emergency Departments (EDs) suggested an oscillatory phenomenon for ambulance diversion: When one hospital went on diversion it led to a disproportionate flow of ambulance traffic to a neighboring facility that subsequently was forced to go on divert. We hypothesized if one hospital could avoid diversion status, the need for diversion could be averted in the neighboring facility. ED A secured additional resources and made a commitment to no diversion for 1 week. No changes in operations occurred in hospital B. We found no differences in ambulance runs or ED census at either facility comparing the week before, during, and after the trial. There was a dramatic decline in diversion hours from 19.7 to 1.4 and 27.7 to 0 at hospitals A and B, respectively, during the trial period (p < 0.05) compared to the weeks before and after. We conclude that reciprocating effects can be decreased with one institution's commitment to avoid diversion, thus decreasing the need for diversion at a neighboring facility.

  2. Somnambulism: Emergency Department Admissions Due to Sleepwalking-Related Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Thomas C.; Veerakatty, Sajitha; Haider, Dominik G.; Geiser, Thomas; Ricklin, Meret E.; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Somnambulism is a state of dissociated consciousness, in which the affected person is partially asleep and partially awake. There is pervasive public opinion that sleepwalkers are protected from hurting themselves. There have been few scientific reports of trauma associated with somnambulism and no published investigations on the epidemiology or trauma patterns associated with somnambulism. Methods We included all emergency department (ED) admissions to University Hospital Inselspital, Berne, Switzerland, from January 1, 2000, until August 11, 2015, when the patient had suffered a trauma associated with somnambulism. Demographic data (age, gender, nationality) and medical data (mechanism of injury, final diagnosis, hospital admission, mortality and medication on admission) were included. Results Of 620,000 screened ED admissions, 11 were associated with trauma and sleepwalking. Two patients (18.2%) had a history of known non-rapid eye movement parasomnias. The leading cause of admission was falls. Four patients required hospital admission for orthopedic injuries needing further diagnostic testing and treatment (36.4%). These included two patients with multiple injuries (18.2%). None of the admitted patients died. Conclusion Although sleepwalking seems benign in the majority of cases and most of the few injured patients did not require hospitalization, major injuries are possible. When patients present with falls of unknown origin, the possibility should be evaluated that they were caused by somnambulism. PMID:27833677

  3. Essential documentation elements: quality tool for the emergency department nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Gayla; Peschel, Laura; Burgess, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The use of real-time feedback about documentation may improve compliance with best practice standards, provide immediate rewards for high-quality documentation, and present an opportunity to make instantaneous improvements to the documentation. This project was conducted in a large, urban emergency department (ED) to enhance patient safety, improve documentation quality, and increase timeliness of documentation. The PDSA (Plan, Do, Study, Act) model was used to develop a valid and reliable process to enhance the clinical care process. Passive electronic visual cues with real-time feedback to the clinician were developed. Between March 2011 and 2012, a total of 89,521 ED records were reviewed for compliance with 16 documentation elements. Documentation improvements were achieved with seven elements. There was a slight decrease in compliance for four elements, and equivalent levels of compliance in five elements were noted. Staff reported that the program was helpful in providing reminders and that passive cues were more helpful than hard stops. Areas for software refinement were also identified. This process demonstrated that the data collection burden was reduced and sampling error was eliminated. Although additional study is needed, the electronic health record can provide passive visual cues to enhance nursing care, improve regulatory compliance and data collection, and provide immediate feedback to the clinician.

  4. Lung ultrasound for diagnosis of pneumonia in emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Antonio; Numis, Fabio Giuliano; Visone, Giuseppe; Pirozzi, Concetta; Masarone, Mario; Olibet, Marinella; Nasti, Rodolfo; Schiraldi, Fernando; Paladino, Fiorella

    2015-10-01

    Lung ultrasound (LUS) in the emergency department (ED) has shown a significant role in the diagnostic workup of pulmonary edema, pneumothorax and pleural effusions. The aim of this study is to assess the reliability of LUS for the diagnosis of acute pneumonia compared to chest X-ray (CXR) study. The study was conducted from September 2013 to March 2015. 107 patients were admitted to the ED with a clinical appearance of pneumonia. All the patients underwent a CXR study, read by a radiologist, and an LUS, performed by a trained ED physician on duty. Among the 105 patients, 68 were given a final diagnosis of pneumonia. We found a sensitivity of 0.985 and a specificity of 0.649 for LUS, and a sensitivity of 0.735 and specificity of 0.595 for CXR. The positive predictive value for LUS was 0.838 against 0.7 for CXR. The negative predictive value of LUS was 0.960 versus 0.550 for CXR. This study has shown sensitivity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of LUS compared to the CXR study for the diagnosis of acute pneumonia. These results suggest the use of bedside thoracic US first-line diagnostic tool in patients with suspected pneumonia.

  5. Nurse-patient/visitor communication in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Constance; Fielden, Nina M; Meyer, Kate H; Albert, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Patients and visitors need to be encouraged to express their needs and be provided with enough relevant information so that treatment and recovery from illness are optimized. In the emergency department, it is important for nurses to create an environment of trust, respect, and acceptance. Using a survey design, a convenience sample of nurses and patients/visitors described patient/visitor communication needs and determined if needs were met during the ED encounter. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Mantel Haenszel chi(2) tests were used to determine associations between patient-rated importance of nurse communication needs and nursing communication performance. Sixty-four nurses and 123 patients/visitors completed a communication needs survey. More than 80% of patients answered "excellent" or "very good" to 6 of the top 10 important communication needs. Patient and nurse importance differed significantly on only 2 communication needs: calm voice and social status (nurses rated these needs of higher importance than patients; P = .01, P = .006). Patient-ranked importance was positively associated with patient opinion of how well needs were met in 6 of 19 patient/visitor communication needs; that is, not making assumptions about social status (P = .0006), offering reassurance to calm fears (P = .004), and teaching about primary medical concerns/conditions (P = .01). Nurse and patient/visitor perceptions of important communication are similar. Educating nurses about patient/visitor communication needs is the first step in enhancing how well nurses meet those needs.

  6. Systematic review of emergency department crowding: causes, effects, and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoot, Nathan R; Aronsky, Dominik

    2008-08-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding represents an international crisis that may affect the quality and access of health care. We conducted a comprehensive PubMed search to identify articles that (1) studied causes, effects, or solutions of ED crowding; (2) described data collection and analysis methodology; (3) occurred in a general ED setting; and (4) focused on everyday crowding. Two independent reviewers identified the relevant articles by consensus. We applied a 5-level quality assessment tool to grade the methodology of each study. From 4,271 abstracts and 188 full-text articles, the reviewers identified 93 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. A total of 33 articles studied causes, 27 articles studied effects, and 40 articles studied solutions of ED crowding. Commonly studied causes of crowding included nonurgent visits, "frequent-flyer" patients, influenza season, inadequate staffing, inpatient boarding, and hospital bed shortages. Commonly studied effects of crowding included patient mortality, transport delays, treatment delays, ambulance diversion, patient elopement, and financial effect. Commonly studied solutions of crowding included additional personnel, observation units, hospital bed access, nonurgent referrals, ambulance diversion, destination control, crowding measures, and queuing theory. The results illustrated the complex, multifaceted characteristics of the ED crowding problem. Additional high-quality studies may provide valuable contributions toward better understanding and alleviating the daily crisis. This structured overview of the literature may help to identify future directions for the crowding research agenda.

  7. Decreased health care quality associated with emergency department overcrowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, O; Antonio, M T; Jiménez, S; De Dios, A; Sánchez, M; Borrás, A; Millá, J

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the influence of overcrowding on health care quality provided by emergency departments (ED). The study was carried out in an urban, university tertiary care hospital. All patients seen at the internal medicine unit (IMU) of the ED who returned during the following 72 hours, and those who died in the ED rooms were included in the study. During a consecutive period of 2 years (104 weeks), we prospectively quantified the number of weekly visits, revisits and deaths. We calculated revisit and mortality rates (in respect of percentage of all visited patients) for each week. Correlation between the number of weekly visits, and revisit and mortality rates was assessed using a simple linear regression model. We consigned 81,301 visits, 1137 revisits and 648 deaths; mean (+/- SD) number of weekly visits, revisits and deaths were 782 (68), 10.93 (3.97) and 6.23 (3.04) respectively; weekly revisit rate was 1.40% (0.48%) and weekly mortality rate was 0.79% (0.36%). We observed a significant, positive correlation between mortality rates and weekly number of visits (p = 0.01). Although a similar trend was also found for revisit rates, such an increase did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.06). It is concluded that since revisit and mortality rates constitute good health care quality markers, present data demonstrate that ED overcrowding implies a decrease in the health care quality provided by it.

  8. Recognition and management of seizures in children in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Edward; Dey, Indranil; Scammell, Andrea; Burnage, Katy; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is defined as 'a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain, which usually affects how a person appears or acts for a short time'. Children who have experienced seizures commonly present to emergency departments (EDs), and detailed history taking will usually help differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic events. ED nurses are often the first health professionals to manage children with seizures, and this is best done by following the ABCDE approach. Treatment involves termination of seizures with anticonvulsants, and children may need other symptomatic management. Seizures in children can be an extremely distressing experience for parents, who should be supported and kept informed by experienced ED nurses. Nurses also play a vital role in educating parents on correct administration of anticonvulsants and safety advice. This article discusses the aetiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of children with seizures, with particular emphasis on epilepsy. It includes two reflective case studies to highlight the challenges faced by healthcare professionals managing children who present with convulsions.

  9. Telehealth-Enabled Emergency Medical Services Program Reduces Ambulance Transport to Urban Emergency Departments

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    James R. Langabeer II

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency medical services (EMS agencies transport a significant majority of patients with low acuity and non-emergent conditions to local emergency departments (ED, affecting the entire emergency care system’s capacity and performance. Opportunities exist for alternative models that integrate technology, telehealth, and more appropriately aligned patient navigation. While a limited number of programs have evolved recently, no empirical evidence exists for their efficacy. This research describes the development and comparative effectiveness of one large urban program. Methods: The Houston Fire Department initiated the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN program in 2014. ETHAN combines telehealth, social services, and alternative transportation to navigate primary care-related patients away from the ED where possible. Using a case-control study design, we describe the program and compare differences in effectiveness measures relative to the control group. Results: During the first 12 months, 5,570 patients participated in the telehealth-enabled program, which were compared against the same size control group. We found a 56% absolute reduction in ambulance transports to the ED with the intervention compared to the control group (18% vs. 74%, P<.001. EMS productivity (median time from EMS notification to unit back in service was 44 minutes faster for the ETHAN group (39 vs. 83 minutes, median. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality or patient satisfaction. Conclusion: We found that mobile technology-driven delivery models are effective at reducing unnecessary ED ambulance transports and increasing EMS unit productivity. This provides support for broader EMS mobile integrated health programs in other regions.

  10. Emergency Department Visits by Older Adults for Motor Vehicle Collisions

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    Vogel, Jody A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To describe the epidemiology and characteristics of emergency department (ED visits by older adults for motor vehicle collisions (MVC in the United States (U.S..Methods: We analyzed ED visits for MVCs using data from the 2003–2007 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS. Using U.S. Census data, we calculated annual incidence rates of driver or passenger MVC-related ED visits and examined visit characteristics, including triage acuity, tests performed and hospital admission or discharge. We compared older (65+ years and younger (18-64 years MVC patients and calculated odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs to measure the strength of associations between age group and various visit characteristics. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of admissions for MVC-related injuries among older adults.Results: From 2003–2007, there were an average of 237,000 annual ED visits by older adults for MVCs. The annual ED visit rate for MVCs was 6.4 (95% CI 4.6-8.3 visits per 1,000 for older adults and 16.4 (95% CI 14.0-18.8 visits per 1,000 for younger adults. Compared to younger MVC patients, after adjustment for gender, race and ethnicity, older MVC patients were more likely to have at least one imaging study performed (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.46-9.36. Older MVC patients were not significantly more likely to arrive by ambulance (OR 1.47; 95% CI 0.76–2.86, have a high triage acuity (OR 1.56; 95% CI 0.77-3.14, or to have a diagnosis of a head, spinal cord or torso injury (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.42-2.23 as compared to younger MVC patients after adjustment for gender, race and ethnicity. Overall, 14.5% (95% CI 9.8-19.2 of older MVC patients and 6.1% (95% CI 4.8-7.5 of younger MVC patients were admitted to the hospital. There was also a non-statistically significant trend toward hospital admission for older versus younger MVC patients (OR 1.78; 95% CI 0.71-4.43, and admission to the ICU if

  11. Cognitive Impairment among Older Adults in the Emergency Department

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    Hirschman, Karen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Within the next 30 years, the number of visits older adults will make to emergency departments (EDs is expected to double from 16 million, or 14% of all visits, to 34 million and comprise nearly a quarter of all visits.Objective: The objectives of this study were to determine prevalence rates of cognitive impairment among older adults in the ED and to identify associations, if any, between environmental factors unique to the ED and rates of cognitive impairment.Methods: A cross-sectional observational study of adults 65 and older admitted to the ED of a large, urban, tertiary academic health center was conducted between September 2007 and May 2008. Patients were screened for cognitive impairment in orientation, recall and executive function using the Six-Item Screen (SIS and the CLOX1, clock drawing task. Cognitive impairment among this ED population was assessed and both patient demographics and ED characteristics (crowding, triage time, location of assessment, triage class were compared through adjusted generalized linear models.Results: Forty-two percent (350/829 of elderly patients presented with deficits in orientation and recall as assessed by the SIS. An additional 36% of elderly patients with no impairment in orientation or recall had deficits in executive function as assessed by the CLOX1. In full model adjusted analyses patients were more likely to screen deficits in orientation and recall (SIS if they were 85 years or older (Relative Risk [RR]=1.63, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI]=1.3-2.07, black (RR=1.85, 95% CI=1.5-2.4 and male (RR=1.42, 95% CI=1.2-1.7. Only age was significantly associated with executive functioning deficits in the ED screened using the clock drawing task (CLOX1 (75-84 years: RR=1.35, 95% CI= 1.2-1.6; 85+ years: RR=1.69, 95% CI= 1.5-2.0.Conclusion: These findings have several implications for patients seen in the ED. The SIS coupled with a clock drawing task (CLOX1 provide a rapid and simple method for

  12. Informed Consent Documentation for Lumbar Puncture in the Emergency Department

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    Pankaj B. Patel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Informed consent is a required process for procedures performed in the emergency department (ED, though it is not clear how often or adequately it is obtained by emergency physicians. Incomplete performance and documentation of informed consent can lead to patient complaints, medico-legal risk, and inadequate education for the patient/guardian about the procedure. We undertook this study to quantify the incidence of informed consent documentation in the ED setting for lumbar puncture (LP and to compare rates between pediatric (<18 years and adult patients. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, we reviewed the ED electronic health records (EHR for all patients who underwent successful LPs in three EDs between April 2010 and June 2012. Specific elements of informed consent documentation were reviewed. These elements included the presence of general ED and LP-specific consent forms, signatures of patient/guardian, witness, and physician, documentation of purpose, risks, benefits, alternatives, and explanation of the LP. We also reviewed the use of educational material about the LP and LP-specific discharge information. Results: Our cohort included 937 patients; 179 (19.1% were pediatric. A signed general ED consent form was present in the EHR for 809 (86% patients. A consent form for the LP was present for 524 (56% patients, with signatures from 519 (99% patients/guardians, 327 (62% witnesses, and 349 (67% physicians. Documentation rates in the EHR were as follows: purpose (698; 74%, risks (742; 79%, benefits (605; 65%, alternatives (635; 68%, and explanation for the LP (57; 6%. Educational material about the LP was not documented as having been given to any of the patients and LP-specific discharge information was documented as given to 21 (2% patients. No significant differences were observed in the documentation of informed consent elements between pediatric and adult patients. Conclusion: General ED consent was obtained in

  13. Emergency team calls for critically ill non-trauma patients in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Marker; Do, Hien Quoc; Rasmussen, Søren W.

    2015-01-01

    consultation calls for non-ED specialist physicians. Emergency team calls were two-tiered with 'orange' and 'red' calls. Additionally, intensive care unit (ICU) admission charts were reviewed to identify the total number of adult non-trauma and non-cardiac arrest patients admitted to the ICU from the ED during......BACKGROUND: Handling critically ill patients is a complex task for Emergency Department (ED) personnel. Initial treatment is of major importance and requires adequately experienced ED doctors to initiate and decide for the right medical or surgical treatment. Our aim was, with regard to clinical.......2 %) patients were admitted to the ICU, while 20/109 (18.3 %) patients were deemed ineligible for ICU admission. 30-day mortality was 34/109 (31.2 %), and circulatory problems were the most frequent cause of death (61.8 %, p = 0.02). Patients who died were significantly older than those who survived (p = 0...

  14. Prognostic factors in outcome of angioedema in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Sarah; Curtis, R Mason; Ball, Ian; Borici-Mazi, Rozita

    2014-01-01

    Angioedema is a transient, localized swelling caused by two distinct mechanisms, mediated by histamine and bradykinin, respectively, although a proportion of cases remain idiopathic. Studies that characterize undifferentiated angioedema presenting in emergency departments (EDs) are limited. This study investigates the presentation patterns of undifferentiated angioedema in the ED based on the presumed mechanism of swelling. Medical records from all ED visits to two tertiary care hospitals from July 2007 to March 2012 were electronically reviewed. Records with documented visible swelling on general inspection and/or fiberoptic laryngoscopy and a diagnostic code for anaphylactic shock, angioneurotic edema, allergy unspecified, defects in the complement system, or unspecified drug adverse effects were included. Demographic, clinical, and outcome data were collected via a standardized form. Data were analyzed descriptively, including frequencies and percentages for categorical data and means and SDs for continuous data. Predictors for admission were identified using multivariate logistic regression models. ED records from 527 visits for angioedema by 455 patients were included in the study. Annual rate of angioedema was 1 per 1000 ED visits. Urticaria was associated with peripheral (p = 0.008) and lip angioedema (p = 0.001), and the absence of urticaria correlated with tongue angioedema (p = 0.001) and trended toward correlation with pharyngeal angioedema (p = 0.056). Significant predictors of admission included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced angioedema (odds ratio [OR], 15.3), epinephrine treatment (OR, 8.34), hypotension (OR, 15.7), multiple-site angioedema (OR, 4.25), and pharyngeal (OR, 1.23) and tongue angioedema (OR, 4.62). Concomitant urticaria was associated with a significant longer stay in the ED (p urticaria correlated with the location of angioedema, need for airway management, length of ED visit, and recurrence. A detailed drug and family

  15. Adverse events related to emergency department care: a systematic review.

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    Antonia S Stang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the literature regarding the prevalence, preventability, severity and types of adverse events (AE in the Emergency Department (ED. METHODS: We systematically searched major bibliographic databases, relevant journals and conference proceedings, and completed reference reviews of primary articles. Observational studies (cohort and case-control, quasi-experimental (e.g. before/after studies and randomized controlled trials, were considered for inclusion if they examined a broad demographic group reflecting a significant proportion of ED patients and described the proportion of AE. Studies conducted outside of the ED setting, those examining only a subpopulation of patients (e.g. a specific entrance complaint or receiving a specific intervention, or examining only adverse drug events, were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed study eligibility, completed data extraction, and assessed study quality with the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. RESULTS: Our search identified 11,624 citations. Ten articles, representing eight observational studies, were included. Methodological quality was low to moderate with weaknesses in study group comparability, follow-up, and outcome ascertainment and reporting. There was substantial variation in the proportion of patients with AE related to ED care, ranging from 0.16% (n = 9308 to 6.0% (n = 399. Similarly, the reported preventability of AE ranged from 36% (n = 250 to 71% (n = 24. The most common types of events were related to management (3 studies, diagnosis (2 studies and medication (2 studies. CONCLUSIONS: The variability in findings and lack of high quality studies on AE in the high risk ED setting highlights the need for research in this area. Further studies with rigorous, standardized outcome assessment and reporting are required.

  16. Safety and efficiency of emergency department interrogation of cardiac devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, James F.; Peacock, W. Frank; Migeed, Madgy; Hunter, Sara A.; Daughtery, John C.; McCleese, Ian C.; Hiestand, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with implanted cardiac devices may wait extended periods for interrogation in emergency departments (EDs). Our purpose was to determine if device interrogation could be done safely and faster by ED staff. Methods Prospective randomized, standard therapy controlled, trial of ED staff device interrogation vs. standard process (SP), with 30-day follow-up. Eligibility criteria: ED presentation with a self-report of a potential device related complaint, with signed informed consent. SP interrogation was by company representative or hospital employee. Results Of 60 patients, 42 (70%) were male, all were white, with a median (interquartile range) age of 71 (64 to 82) years. No patient was lost to follow up. Of all patients, 32 (53%) were enrolled during business hours. The overall median (interquartile range) ED vs. SP time to interrogation was 98.5 (40 to 260) vs. 166.5 (64 to 412) minutes (P=0.013). While ED and SP interrogation times were similar during business hours, 102 (59 to 138) vs. 105 (64 to 172) minutes (P=0.62), ED interrogation times were shorter vs. SP during non-business hours; 97 (60 to 126) vs. 225 (144 to 412) minutes, P=0.002, respectively. There was no difference in ED length of stay between the ED and SP interrogation, 249 (153 to 390) vs. 246 (143 to 333) minutes (P=0.71), regardless of time of presentation. No patient in any cohort suffered an unplanned medical contact or post-discharge adverse device related event. Conclusion ED staff cardiac device interrogations are faster, and with similar 30-day outcomes, as compared to SP. PMID:28168230

  17. The Effect of Anthrax Bioterrorism on Emergency Department Presentation

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    Rodriguez, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective: From September through December 2001, 22 Americans were diagnosed with anthrax, prompting widespread national media attention and public concern over bioterrorism. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the threat of anthrax bioterrorism on patient presentation to a West Coast emergency department (ED. Methods: This survey was conducted at an urban county ED in Oakland, CA between December 15, 2001 and February 15, 2002. During random 8-hour blocks, all adult patients presenting for flu or upper respiratory infection (URI symptoms were surveyed using a structured survey instrument that included standard visual numerical and Likert scales. Results: Eighty-nine patients were interviewed. Eleven patients (12% reported potential exposure risk factors. Eighty percent of patients watched television, read the newspaper, or listened to the radio daily, and 83% of patients had heard about anthrax bioterrorism. Fifty-five percent received a chest x-ray, 10% received either throat or blood cultures, and 28% received antibiotics. Twenty-one percent of patients surveyed were admitted to the hospital. Most patients were minimally concerned that they may have contracted anthrax (mean=3.3±3.3 where 0=no concern and 10=extremely concerned. Patient concern about anthrax had little influence on their decision to visit the ED (mean=2.8±3.0 where 0=no influence and 10=greatly influenced. Had they experienced their same flu or URI symptoms one year prior to the anthrax outbreak, 91% of patients stated they would have sought medical attention. Conclusions: After considerable exposure to media reports about anthrax, most patients in this urban West Coast ED population were not concerned about anthrax infection. Fear of anthrax had little effect on decisions to come to the ED, and most would have sought medical help prior to the anthrax outbreak.

  18. Multimedia Education Increases Elder Knowledge of Emergency Department Care

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    Thomas E. Terndrup

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elders who utilize the emergency department (ED may have little prospectiveknowledge of appropriate expectations during an ED encounter. Improving elder orientation toED expectations is important for satisfaction and health education. The purpose of this study wasto evaluate a multi-media education intervention as a method for informing independently livingelders about ED care. The program delivered messages categorically as, the number of tests,providers, decisions and disposition decision making.Methods: Interventional trial of representative elders over 59 years of age comparing pre andpost multimedia program exposure. A brief (0.3 hour video that chronicled the key events after ahypothetical 911 call for chest pain was shown. The video used a clinical narrator, 15 ED healthcare providers, and 2 professional actors for the patient and spouse. Pre- and post-video testsresults were obtained with audience response technology (ART assessed learning using a 4point Likert scale.Results: Valid data from 142 participants were analyzed pre to post rankings (Wilcoxon signedranktests. The following four learning objectives showed significant improvements: number oftests expected [median differences on a 4-point Likert scale with 95% confidence intervals: 0.50(0.00, 1.00]; number of providers expected 1.0 (1.00, 1.50; communications 1.0 (1.00, 1.50;and pre-hospital medical treatment 0.50 (0.00, 1.00. Elders (96% judged the intervention asimproving their ability to cope with an ED encounter.Conclusion: A short video with graphic side-bar information is an effective educational strategy toimprove elder understanding of expectations during a hypothetical ED encounter following calling911.

  19. Diagnostic Implications of an Elevated Troponin in the Emergency Department

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    Maame Yaa Yiadom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the proportion of initial troponin (cTn elevations associated with Type I MI versus other cardiovascular and noncardiovascular diagnoses in an emergency department (ED and whether or not a relationship exists between the cTn level and the likelihood of Type I MI. Background. In the ED, cTn is used as a screening test for myocardial injury. However, the differential diagnosis for an initial positive cTn result is not clear. Methods. Hospital medical records were retrospectively reviewed for visits associated with an initial positive troponin I-ultra (cTnI, ≥0.05 μg/L. Elevated cTnI levels were stratified into low (0.05–0.09, medium (0.1–0.99, or high (≥1.0. Discharge diagnoses were classified into 3 diagnostic groups (Type I MI, other cardiovascular, or noncardiovascular. Results. Of 23,731 ED visits, 4,928 (21% had cTnI testing. Of those tested, 16.3% had initial cTnI ≥0.05. Among those with elevated cTn, 11% were classified as Type I MI, 34% had other cardiovascular diagnoses, and 55% had a noncardiovascular diagnosis. Type I MI was more common with high cTnI levels (41% incidence than among subjects with medium (9% or low (6%. Conclusion. A positive cTn is most likely a noncardiovascular diagnosis, but Type I MI is far more common with cTnI levels ≥1.0.

  20. Characteristics of patients returning to emergency departments in Naples, Italy

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    Marinelli Paolo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crowding in hospital Emergency Departments (EDs is a problem in several countries. We evaluated the number and characteristics of patients who make repeated visits to the EDs in Naples, Italy. Methods All patients (≥ 16 years who presented to the EDs of three randomly selected non-academic acute care public hospitals, within randomly selected week periods, were studied. The two outcomes of interest were the re-utilization, within 72 hours, of the ED and the number of visits in the previous year. Results Of the 1430 sampled patients, 51.9% self-reported multiple visits in the previous year and 10.9% and 1.6% used the ED for 3 and ≥4 times, respectively. The number of visits in the previous year was significantly higher in those who live closer to hospital, with a more severe burden of overall comorbidity, and who were on pharmacological treatment. Overall, 72-hours return visits were found in 215 patients (15.8%. Patients were more likely to re-use within 72 hours the ED if younger, were not on pharmacological treatment, attended the ED more times in the previous year, were referred by a physician, arrived at the ED by car driven by other person, had problems of longer duration prior to arrival at the ED, had a surgical ED discharge diagnosis, and were admitted to the hospital. Conclusion The data may assist policymakers in the development and implementation of protocols to track changes in the re-utilization of the ED for the high financial impact and for the benefit of the patients.

  1. Emergency department thoracotomy: too little, too much, or too late.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote, Allan; Michael, Andrew; Almodovar, Jorge; Chan, Patricia; Skinner, Ruby; Martin, Maureen

    2013-10-01

    Emergency department thoracotomy (EDT) is a dramatic lifesaving procedure demanding timely surgical intervention, technical expertise, and coordinated resuscitation efforts. Inappropriate use is costly and futile. All patients admitted to a Level II trauma center who underwent EDT from January 2003 to July 2012 were studied. The primary end point was appropriateness of EDT. Secondary end points were staff exposure, survival, and return to normal function. Eighty-seven patients including 59 patients with penetrating wounds had a mean loss of vital signs (LOV) 11.6 ±10.6 minutes and Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 45.8 ± 16.1, whereas 28 blunt injury patients had a mean LOV of 10.4 ± 11.5 minutes and ISS of 50.4 ± 19.4. Mortality was 81 per cent (48 of 59) in penetrating injury and 93 per cent (26 of 28) in blunt injury patients, respectively (odds ratio [OR] 2.99; P 0.21). Fifty-five EDTs were indicated with 10 survivors (18.2%) and 32 not indicated with three survivors (9.4%). Surgeons adhered to guidelines more compared with ED physicians (OR, 4.9; P = 0.03) whose patients were more likely to die (OR, 3.52; P = 0.124). Survivors (11 of 13 [84.6%]) were discharged home without significant long-term neurologic disability. EDT is lifesaving when performed for penetrating injury by experienced surgeons following established guidelines but futile in blunt injury or when performed by nonsurgeons regardless of mechanism.

  2. Delayed Complications of Emergency Airway Management: A Study of 533 Emergency Department Intubations

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    Keim, Samuel M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Airway management is a critical procedure performed frequently in emergency departments (EDs. Previous studies have evaluated the complications associated with this procedure but have focused only on the immediate complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence and nature of delayed complications of tracheal intubation performed in the ED at an academic center where intubations are performed by emergency physicians (EPs.METHODS: All tracheal intubations performed in the ED over a one-year period were identified; 540 tracheal intubations were performed during the study period. Of these, 523 charts (96.9% were available for review and were retrospectively examined. Using a structured datasheet, delayed complications occurring within seven days of intubation were abstracted from the medical record. Charts were scrutinized for the following complications: acute myocardial infarction (MI, stroke, airway trauma from the intubation, and new respiratory infections. An additional 30 consecutive intubations were examined for the same complications in a prospective arm over a 29-day period.RESULTS: The overall success rate for tracheal intubation in the entire study group was 99.3% (549/553. Three patients who could not be orally intubated underwent emergent cricothyrotomy. Thus, the airway was successfully secured in 99.8% (552/553 of the patients requiring intubation. One patient, a seven-month-old infant, had unanticipated subglottic stenosis and could not be intubated by the emergency medicine attending or the anesthesiology attending. The patient was mask ventilated and was transported to the operating room for an emergent tracheotomy. Thirty-four patients (6.2% [95% CI 4.3 - 8.5%] developed a new respiratory infection within seven days of intubation. Only 18 patients (3.3% [95% CI 1.9 - 5.1%] had evidence of a new respiratory infection within 48 hours, indicating possible aspiration pneumonia secondary to airway

  3. Emergency department utilization rates and modalities among immigrant population. A 5-year survey in a large Italian urban emergency department

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    Marcello Zinelli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The rates and modalities of healthcare services utilization for migrant population may differ from natives, since the health needs of the former are influenced by some factors such as health status, self-perceived needs, healthseeking behavior, language barriers and cultural differences. Only scarce and often conflicting data have been published so far on migrants’ utilization of healthcare services in Europe, and even less data are available on emergency departments (EDs. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare utilization rates and modalities of presentation to the large urban ED of the University Hospital of Parma, Italy (averaging 85,000 visits per year, by Italian native and foreign-born populations during 2008-2012. Throughout the study period 424,466 ED visits were recorded, 64,435 (15.4% of which by foreign-born patients. A significant difference between utilization rates was observed for all the triage-codes, with higher rates for foreign-born low-acuity codes (green plus white codes: 87.5 vs 73.9, P<0.0001 and lower rates for high-acuity codes (yellow plus red codes: 12.5 vs 26.1%, P<0.0001. The utilization rate was 253.9 visits per 1000 inhabitants for the Italian-native group and 309.7 per 1000 for the foreign-born group (odds ratio 1.23; 95% CI: 1.01-1.48; P=0.034. Different modalities of presentation were also observed, with a high rate of selfreferrals (82.3 vs 71.4%, P<0.001. The results of this study suggest that a better knowledge of available Italian healthcare services among immigrants is advisable and should be encouraged.

  4. Return to the emergency department after ventricular shunt evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, Samir; Simon, Harold K; Hirsh, Daniel A; Wang, Andrew; Shane Tubbs, R; Chern, Joshua J

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Patients with CSF shunts are medically complex and frequently present to the emergency department (ED) with suspected shunt malfunction. After adequate evaluation in the ED and proper disposition, some patients return to the ED within a short period of time. In this study, the authors examined the reasons for ED revisits within 7 days of the index ED visit to discern possible preventable returns. METHODS There were 3080 index ED visits made by patients with shunted hydrocephalus between 2010 and 2013. Index ED visits preceded by another ED visit or neurosurgical procedure within 60 days were excluded. Index ED visits for reasons unrelated to shunt function and those that led directly to admissions and shunt revision surgeries were also excluded. The remaining 1509 ED visits were eligible for analysis in this study. Final dispositions from the index ED visit included home (1176 cases), admission to the neurosurgery service for observation (134 cases), and admission to other services (199 cases). Subsequent events within 7 days, including ED revisits, hospital admissions, and shunt-related surgery were recorded, and reasons for the ED revisits were categorized based on whether the visit was related to shunt function concerns. Clinical and socioeconomic factors were analyzed for their association with ED revisits by using statistical methods. RESULTS Of the 1176 patients discharged home from the ED after shunt function evaluation, 101 (8.6%) returned to the ED within 7 days. Of the 134 patients admitted to the neurosurgery service for observation only, 8 (6.0%) returned to the ED within 7 days of discharge. Of the 199 patients admitted to hospital services other than neurosurgery, 13 (6.5%) returned to the ED within 7 days of discharge. The reasons for ED revisits vary (total of 122 visits combining the 3 groups), but at least 60% of the revisits were clearly unrelated to shunt function. A younger age, daytime arrival to the ED, and living within the

  5. Medication Overdoses at a Public Emergency Department in Santiago, Chile

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    Pablo Aguilera, MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While a nationwide poison control registry exists in Chile, reporting to the center is sporadic and happens at the discretion of the treating physician or by patients’ self-report. Moreover, individual hospitals do not monitor accidental or intentional poisoning in a systematic manner. The goal of this study was to identify all cases of intentional medication overdose (MO that occurred over two years at a large public hospital in Santiago, Chile, and examine its epidemiologic profile. Methods: This study is a retrospective, explicit chart review conducted at Hospital Sótero del Rio from July 2008 until June 2010. We included all cases of identified intentional MO. Alcohol and recreational drugs were included only when they were ingested with other medications. Results: We identified 1,557 cases of intentional MO and analyzed a total of 1,197 cases, corresponding to 0.51% of all emergency department (ED presentations between July 2008 and June 2010. The median patient age was 25 years. The majority was female (67.6%. Two peaks were identified, corresponding to the spring of each year sampled. The rate of hospital admission was 22.2%. Benzodiazepines, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA were the causative agents most commonly found, comprising 1,044 (87.2% of all analyzed cases. Acetaminophen was involved in 81 (6.8% cases. More than one active substance was involved in 35% of cases. In 7.3% there was ethanol co-ingestion and in 1.0% co-ingestion of some other recreational drug (primarily cocaine. Of 1,557 cases, six (0.39% patients died. TCA were involved in two of these deaths. Conclusion: Similar to other developed and developing nations, intentional MO accounts for a significant number of ED presentations in Chile. Chile is unique in the region, however, in that its spectrum of intentional overdoses includes an excess burden of tricyclic antidepressant and benzodiazepine overdoses, a

  6. Adolescents' interhospital transfers from a pediatric emergency department

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    Cláudia Arriaga

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The maternal-infant referral network, established in Portugal since 2001, allows a complementarity between all healthcare units, providing universal access to healthcare. Aim: To characterize adolescents interhospital transfers from the Pediatric Urgency (PU of a B1 hospital.. Methods: Retrospective analytic study. Data from clinical files of adolescents transferred from the PU in 2011 were collected. We defined and compared two age groups: 10 to 14 years old (G1 and 15 to 18 years old (G2 and characterized these about demographics, diagnosis, diagnostic procedures and reason for transfer. Statistical analysis was performed with PASW 18.0® software (p<0,05. Results: There were 43.409 admissions to the PU, 24,2%(n=10.498 from adolescents, with an average age of 14,5 (±2,1 years; 67% were males. Around 1,2% (n=131 of the adolescents were transferred, which counted for 46% of all transfers in pediatric age. When analyzing admissions by age group, 65,8% belonged to G1 from all transfers and 57,3% to G2 (p<0,001. The reason for transfer was trauma in 45%, medical in 37,4%, and surgical in 17,6%. The main diagnosis of the adolescents transferred were ear-nose-throat problems, urologic and psychiatric conditions. Diagnostic procedures were performed in 42,7% of the adolescents and 82,1% were imaging exams. The lack of specialities, in the emergency department, in the local hospital was the reason for the transfer in 90,8%, and the missing speciality was surgical in 72,2%. Psychiatric conditions were more frequently diagnosed in adolescents transferred from G2 (22,7% than G1 (9,1%, p=0,037. Of all the adolescents transferred to A1 hospital, 28,2% were admitted for hospitalization. Conclusions: Although adolescents comprised only a quarter of the admissions of the PU, they represented an important percentage of all transfers, mainly the older ones. The main reason for transfers was the lack of medical and surgical specialities in the PU

  7. Evaluation of Cases with Rabies Risk Presenting to Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fevzi Yilmaz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: All around the world 10-12 million people/year receive rabies prophylaxis. Rabies is an acute fatal central nervous system viral enfection. The virus can infect all warm-blooded animals and almost in all cases the enfection results with fatal encephalitis. The aim of this study is to determine the demographic characteristics of cases with rabies risk exposures and behind this to emphasise the significance of cooperation between the institutions to perform effective and accurate treatment. Material and Method: This study was performed with retrospective analysis of 1429 cases who attended to Emergency Department of Diyarbakir Goverment Hospital between January 2007-2010 for animal bites and exposures with the risk of rabies. Statistical analysis of data was performed SPSS V16 pocket programme. Data were defined as frequency and %. For statistical analysis Chi-Square and Fischer exact test was used. A value of P<0.05 was accepted statistically significant. Results: A total of 1055 (73.8% were male, 374 (26.2% were female and the mean age was 21.75 ± 16.9 (6 months-87 years. The major group in children was 6-11 years old and 651 (% 45.5 of the cases attended to hospital were under 18 years old. The vast majority (39.3% in adults were between 19-49 years. In our study 808 (56.5% of the cases  were bitten, 597 (41.8% of the cases  were scrabbled by the animal and 24 (1.7%of them  had indirect contact with the animal Both of them were taken into prophylactic vaccination programme (p<0.05. The vast majority of animal bites were dog (67%  and cat (28%. 3 doses of Human diploid cell vaccine-HDCV were administered to 1001 (70% of the patients and 5 doses to 428 (30% of patients. Human rabies immune globulin-HRIG were administered to 475 (33,3% of the patients in addition to vaccine. Discussion:  In our region rabies risk exposure is an important public health problem. Public oriented education should be given about attending to health care

  8. Health Services Utilization Patterns Associated with Emergency Department Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Enemark, Ulrika; Foldspang, Anders

    2011-01-01

    , 1997-2003. Data were extracted from administrative registries including information on individual use of emergency services and other hospital care, contact with GPs and socioeconomic background. Health services' use by the Morsø population was measured before reduction in emergency room opening hours......, during a period of reduced opening hours and after closure, compared with the rest of Viborg County. RESULTS: Emergency service use did not change among Morsø municipality residents compared to other Viborg County residents. Compared to men in other parts of the county, Morsø men did not change their use...

  9. 广州市三甲医院急诊科护理人员共情能力与工作环境相关性研究%A study on the correlation between empathy ability of nursing staff and working environment in the emergency department of the hospitals at the level of grade Ⅲclass A in Guangzhou city

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐彩虹

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨广州市三级甲等医院急诊科护士共情能力及护士工作环境感知的现状,分析不同人口社会学因素对护士共情能力的影响,探讨护士工作环境与护士共情能力的相关性。方法:采用非实验设计的描述性研究方法,对广州市8家三甲医院急诊科300名在岗临床一线护士进行问卷调查,采用 SPSS19.0软件对所收集资料进行统计分析。结果:广州市三级甲等医院急诊科护士不同学历、不同人事情况的护士共情能力差异有统计学意义(P ﹤0.05);护士工作环境感知各维度得分及总分均与护理人员共情能力呈正相关(P ﹤0.05),进一步多元线性回归分析,得出护士共情能力与医护关系、患者信息交流、团队合作、冲突处理方式有线性回归关系,呈正相关(P ﹤0.05)。结论:广州市三级甲等医院急诊科护士的共情能力及工作环境感知在中等水平,护士的共情能力受多种因素影响;护理管理者应制定管理计划,采取有针对性的、有效的培训措施,增强护士的共情能力,促进护患沟通,建立良好护患关系,提高护理质量。%Objective:To study the correlation between empathy ability of nursing staff and working environment in the emergency de-partment of the hospitals at the level of grade Ⅲclass A in Guangzhou city through the investigation on the perception of the nursing staff. Methods:A questionnaire survey was conducted on 300 on - the - job clinical nurses in the emergency department of 8 hospitals at the lev-el of grade Ⅲclass A in Guangzhou city and the collected data were statistically processed and analyzed by using SPSS19. 0 software. Re-sults:There was statistically significant difference in the comparison of empathy ability between the nurses with different educational back-ground and different employment forms(P ﹤ 0. 05);the score of each dimension of the nurse

  10. Emergency department crowding in Singapore: Insights from a systems thinking approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenenberger, Lukas K; Bayer, Steffen; Ansah, John P; Matchar, David B; Mohanavalli, Rajagopal L; Lam, Sean SW; Ong, Marcus EH

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Emergency Department crowding is a serious and international health care problem that seems to be resistant to most well intended but often reductionist policy approaches. In this study, we examine Emergency Department crowding in Singapore from a systems thinking perspective using causal loop diagramming to visualize the systemic structure underlying this complex phenomenon. Furthermore, we evaluate the relative impact of three different policies in reducing Emergency Department crowding in Singapore: introduction of geriatric emergency medicine, expansion of emergency medicine training, and implementation of enhanced primary care. Methods: The construction of the qualitative causal loop diagram is based on consultations with Emergency Department experts, direct observation, and a thorough literature review. For the purpose of policy analysis, a novel approach, the path analysis, is applied. Results: The path analysis revealed that both the introduction of geriatric emergency medicine and the expansion of emergency medicine training may be associated with undesirable consequences contributing to Emergency Department crowding. In contrast, enhancing primary care was found to be germane in reducing Emergency Department crowding; in addition, it has apparently no negative side effects, considering the boundary of the model created. Conclusion: Causal loop diagramming was a powerful tool for eliciting the systemic structure of Emergency Department crowding in Singapore. Additionally, the developed model was valuable in testing different policy options. PMID:27757231

  11. Ethnic Disparities in Emergency Severity Index Scores among U.S. Veteran's Affairs Emergency Department Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M Vigil

    Full Text Available The goal of these analyses was to determine whether there were systematic differences in Emergency Severity Index (ESI scores, which are intended to determine priority of treatment and anticipate resource needs, across categories of race and ethnicity, after accounting for patient-presenting vital signs and examiner characteristics, and whether these differences varied among male and female Veterans Affairs (VA ED patients.We used a large national database of electronic medical records of ED patients from twenty-two U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs ED stations to determine whether ESI assignments differ systematically by race or ethnicity. Multi-level, random effects linear modeling was used to control for demographic characteristics and patient's vital signs (heart rate, respiratory rate, and pain level, as well as age, gender, and experience of triage nurses. The dataset included 129,991 VA patients presenting for emergency care between 2008 and 2012 (91% males; 61% non-Hispanic White, 28% Black, 7% Hispanic, 2% Asian, <1% American Indian/Alaska Native, 1% mixed ethnicity and 774 nurses for a total of 359,642 patient/examiner encounters. Approximately 13% of the variance in ESI scores was due to patient characteristics and 21% was due to the nurse characteristics. After controlling for characteristics of nurses and patients, Black patients were assigned less urgent ESI scores than White patients, and this effect was more prominent for Black males compared with Black females. A similar interaction was found for Hispanic males. It remains unclear how these results may generalize to EDs and patient populations outside of the U.S. VA Health Care system.The findings suggest the possibility that subgroups of VA patients receive different ESI ratings in triage, which may have cascading, downstream consequences for patient treatment quality, satisfaction with care, and trust in the health equity of emergency care.

  12. Emergency department evaluation and treatment of cervical spine injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, Rajdeep; Delasobera, Bronson E; Hudson, Korin; Frohna, William

    2015-05-01

    Most spinal cord injuries involve the cervical spine, highlighting the importance of recognition and proper management by emergency physicians. Initial cervical spine injury management should follow the ABCDE (airway, breathing, circulation, disability, exposure) procedure detailed by Advanced Trauma Life Support. NEXUS (National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study) criteria and Canadian C-spine Rule are clinical decision-making tools providing guidelines of when to obtain imaging. Computed tomography scans are the preferred initial imaging modality. Consider administering intravenous methylprednisolone after discussion with the neurosurgical consultant in patients who present with spinal cord injuries within 8 hours.

  13. Tattoos and Piercing: A Review for the Emergency Department Physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William K. Mallon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tattoos and piercings are increasingly part of everyday life for large sections of the population, and more emergency physicians are seeing these body modifications (BM adorn their patients. In this review we elucidate the most common forms of these BMs, we describe how they may affect both the physical and psychological health of the patient undergoing treatment, and also try to educate around any potential pitfalls in treating associated complications. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:393–398.

  14. SMART CITY: FUTURISTIC VISION OF THE KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY IN SUCRE DEPARTMENT-COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkin Quiñones

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze Smart City as a strategy of futuristic vision of the knowledge society-Colombia Sucre department. This item is theoretically centered on the concepts of Nunez (2011, Godet and Durance (2011, Rodriguez and Lamb (2007, Lopez and Correa (2007, among others. Methodologically it is based on a positivist scientific paradigm descriptive with a non-experimental, cross-sectional design field. The population consisted of (22 subject to the following characteristics: active in the academic, business and political sectors in the Department of Sucre Colombia. Among the results it was concluded that there weaknesses in the knowledge of universities, businesses and government in the full development of the characteristics and categorization of Smart City, which are essential to know the sustainability and growth of these cities boasting technology to solve situations of communities.

  15. Entropic Management: Restructuring District Office Culture in the New York City Department of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Fanon John

    2014-01-01

    Although a growing body of literature is produced on reform of urban school districts, few studies examine shifts in the culture of managers resulting from reorganization in these bureaucracies. This article engages an analysis of central office managerial culture in the New York City Department of Education during a culminating moment of district…

  16. Electroencephalography in the pediatric emergency department: when is it most useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Iván Sánchez; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Datta, Anita; Kothare, Sanjeev; Riviello, James J; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the indications in which electroencephalography in the pediatric emergency department is most useful. We retrospectively reviewed the influence that the results of the emergent electroencephalogram had on the eventual disposition of patients at our pediatric emergency department. Sixty-eight children (mean age, 7.3 years; 32 males) underwent 70 emergent electroencephalograms. Fifty-seven emergent electroencephalograms were performed for the suspicion of ongoing seizures or status epilepticus. Thirteen of the 22 children (59.1%) discharged from the emergency department were sent home mainly based on the results of the emergent electroencephalogram, which prevented an admission. In particular, 11 of 38 children with frequent and recurrent paroxysmal events concerning for seizures and 2 of 19 children with suspected ongoing status epilepticus were discharged after excluding an epileptic disturbance. The emergent electroencephalogram provided meaningful clinical information that influenced disposition, especially in patients with ongoing events in which the clinical picture was clarified by a rapidly acquired electroencephalogram.

  17. The Consumer Quality Index in an accident and emergency department : Internal consistency, validity and discriminative capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Nanne; Sturms, Leontien M.; Stellato, Rebecca K.; Schrijvers, Augustinus J P; van Stel, Henk F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients' experiences are an indicator of health-care performance in the accident and emergency department (A&E). The Consumer Quality Index for the Accident and Emergency department (CQI A&E), a questionnaire to assess the quality of care as experienced by patients, was investigated. Th

  18. Factors influencing the implementation of the guideline triage in emergency departments: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.A.M.; Achterberg, T. van; Adriaansen, M.J.M.; Kampshoff, C.S.; Schalk, D.M.; Mintjes-de Groot, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The objectives are: (1) to identify factors that influence the implementation of the guideline Triage in emergency departments [2004] in emergency departments in the Netherlands, and (2) to develop tailored implementation strategies for implementation of this guideline. BACKGROU

  19. Current use of intraosseous infusion in Danish emergency departments: a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Rune; Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel;

    2010-01-01

    Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is recommended when intravenous access cannot be readily established in both pediatric and adult resuscitation. We evaluated the current use of IOI in Danish emergency departments (EDs).......Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is recommended when intravenous access cannot be readily established in both pediatric and adult resuscitation. We evaluated the current use of IOI in Danish emergency departments (EDs)....

  20. Nurses' evaluation of a new formalized triage system in the emergency department - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mette Brehm; Forberg, Jakob Lundager

    2011-01-01

    Formalized triage in the emergency department (ED) is not widely used in Denmark; this study explores the effects of introducing a five-level process triage system in a Danish ED.......Formalized triage in the emergency department (ED) is not widely used in Denmark; this study explores the effects of introducing a five-level process triage system in a Danish ED....

  1. Discharge from an emergency department observation unit and a surgical assessment unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Helen; Qvist, Niels; Backer Mogensen, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the experiences of patients with acute abdominal pain at discharge from an emergency department observation unit compared with discharge from a surgical assessment unit.......To investigate the experiences of patients with acute abdominal pain at discharge from an emergency department observation unit compared with discharge from a surgical assessment unit....

  2. Spatial hierarchy and emerging typologies inside world city network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chubarov Ilya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The first part of the paper provides a new approach to measuring a spatial structure of world city network (WCN. Based upon the results of media- popular ‘global city rankings’ produced by several international think tanks, our calculation allowed to reveal global urban hierarchy and identify several subnetworks inside of world cities. The second part of the paper devotes to recent discussions on nature of globalization and urban macrosystems, bearing in mind ranking results. It is shown that a typological approach can provide more insights to a role of city as part of WCN from functional and relationships prospective.

  3. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities.

  4. CRANIO MAXILLOFACIAL INJURIES Demanding Aspect in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perwez Aslam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Craniorofacial trauma often manifests itself as a multisystem injury in 20-50% of the cases. Midface and zygomatic bone fractures are the most commonly occurring injuries together in developing countries due to inadequate road traffic legislations while mandible fractures are common due to its most predominant position in face and also due to interpersonal conflicts/assaults. Neurosurgeons and oral & maxillofacial surgeons play a very vital role along with neurologists and ophthalmologists in managing a craniorofacial trauma patient. The emergency physicians must be an expertise to manage the situation and stabilize a patient with severe traumatic injuries of craniorofacial region.

  5. Review article: Emergency Department implications of the TASER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Megan; Close, Benjamin; Furyk, Jeremy; Aitken, Peter

    2009-08-01

    The TASER is a conducted electricity device currently being introduced to the Australian and New Zealand police forces as an alternative to firearms in dealing with violent and dangerous individuals. It incapacitates the subject by delivering rapid pulses of electricity causing involuntary muscle contraction and pain. The use of this device might lead to cardiovascular, respiratory, biochemical, obstetric, ocular and traumatic sequelae. This article will summarize the current literature and propose assessment and management recommendations to guide emergency physicians who will be required to review these patients.

  6. Collegiate-Based Emergency Medical Service: Impact on Alcohol-Related Emergency Department Transports at a Small Liberal Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Joshua B.; Olson, Mark H.; Kelly, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the impact of a collegiate-based emergency medical service (CBEMS) on the frequency of emergency department (ED) transports. Participants: Students transported to the ED for acute alcohol intoxication during the Fall 2008 and the Fall 2009 semesters (N = 50). Methods: The frequency of students receiving…

  7. Analysis of dentoalveolar trauma incidents treated in the emergency services department at a healthcare teaching institution in Medellin (Colombia) 2007-2012

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: dental trauma is considered a dental emergency and it occurs frequently, especially among young people. The aim of this research was to analyze dentoalveolar trauma incidents treated in the emergency services department of a university clinic in the city of Medellin (Colombia), between 2007 and 2012. Methods: this was a retrospective, descriptive study in which 7.555 clinical histories were revised, the final sample comprising the 549 cases that met inclusion and exclusion crite...

  8. Characteristics of Real-Time, Non-Critical Incident Debriefing Practices in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir, Nur-Ain; Bentley, Suzanne; Papanagnou, Dimitrios; Bajaj, Komal; Rinnert, Stephan; Sinert, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Benefits of post-simulation debriefings as an educational and feedback tool have been widely accepted for nearly a decade. Real-time, non-critical incident debriefing is similar to post-simulation debriefing; however, data on its practice in academic emergency departments (ED), is limited. Although tools such as TeamSTEPPS® (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety) suggest debriefing after complicated medical situations, they do not teach debriefing skills suited to this purpose. Anecdotal evidence suggests that real-time debriefings (or non-critical incident debriefings) do in fact occur in academic EDs;, however, limited research has been performed on this subject. The objective of this study was to characterize real-time, non-critical incident debriefing practices in emergency medicine (EM). Methods We conducted this multicenter cross-sectional study of EM attendings and residents at four large, high-volume, academic EM residency programs in New York City. Questionnaire design was based on a Delphi panel and pilot testing with expert panel. We sought a convenience sample from a potential pool of approximately 300 physicians across the four sites with the goal of obtaining >100 responses. The survey was sent electronically to the four residency list-serves with a total of six monthly completion reminder emails. We collected all data electronically and anonymously using SurveyMonkey.com; the data were then entered into and analyzed with Microsoft Excel. Results The data elucidate various characteristics of current real-time debriefing trends in EM, including its definition, perceived benefits and barriers, as well as the variety of formats of debriefings currently being conducted. Conclusion This survey regarding the practice of real-time, non-critical incident debriefings in four major academic EM programs within New York City sheds light on three major, pertinent points: 1) real-time, non-critical incident debriefing

  9. Impact of the ABCDE triage on the number of patient visits to the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menezes Ricardo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Finnish emergency departments (ED serve both primary and secondary health care patients and are therefore referred to as combined emergency departments. Primary care specialists are responsible for the initial assessment and treatment. They, thereby, also regulate referral and access to tertiary care. Primary health care EDs are easy for the public to access, leading to non-acute patient visits to the emergency department. This has caused increased queues and unnecessary difficulties in providing immediate treatment for those patients who need it the most. Methods A face-to-face triage system based on the letters A (patient directly to secondary care, B (to be examined within 10 min, C (to be examined within 1 h, D (to be examined within 2 h and E (no need for immediate treatment for assessing the urgency of patients' treatment needs was applied in the main ED in the City of Vantaa, Finland (Peijas Hospital as an attempt to provide immediate treatment for the most acute patients. The first step was an initial patient assessment by a health care professional (triage nurse. If the patient was not considered to be in need of immediate care (i.e. A-D he was allocated to group E and examined after the more urgent patients were treated. The introduction of this triage system was combined with information to the public on the "correct" use of emergency services. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether the flow of patients was changed by implementing the ABCDE-triage system in the combined ED. To study the effect of the intervention on patient flow, numbers monthly visits to doctors were recorded before and after intervention in Peijas ED and, simultaneously, in control EDs (Myyrmäki in Vantaa, Jorvi and Puolarmetsä in Espoo. To study does the implementation of the triage system redirect patients to other health services, numbers of monthly visits to doctors were also scored in the private health care and public

  10. Managing Emergency Situations in the Smart City: The Smart Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Ángel; Blanco, Teresa; Blasco, Rubén; Marco, Álvaro; Casas, Roberto

    2015-06-18

    In a city there are numerous items, many of them unnoticed but essential; this is the case of the signals. Signals are considered objects with reduced technological interest, but in this paper we prove that making them smart and integrating in the IoT (Internet of Things) could be a relevant contribution to the Smart City. This paper presents the concept of Smart Signal, as a device conscious of its context, with communication skills, able to offer the best message to the user, and as a ubiquitous element that contributes with information to the city. We present the design considerations and a real implementation and validation of the system in one of the most challenging environments that may exist in a city: a tunnel. The main advantages of the Smart Signal are the improvement of the actual functionality of the signal providing new interaction capabilities with users and a new sensory mechanism of the Smart City.

  11. Managing Emergency Situations in the Smart City: The Smart Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Asensio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In a city there are numerous items, many of them unnoticed but essential; this is the case of the signals. Signals are considered objects with reduced technological interest, but in this paper we prove that making them smart and integrating in the IoT (Internet of Things could be a relevant contribution to the Smart City. This paper presents the concept of Smart Signal, as a device conscious of its context, with communication skills, able to offer the best message to the user, and as a ubiquitous element that contributes with information to the city. We present the design considerations and a real implementation and validation of the system in one of the most challenging environments that may exist in a city: a tunnel. The main advantages of the Smart Signal are the improvement of the actual functionality of the signal providing new interaction capabilities with users and a new sensory mechanism of the Smart City.

  12. Interventions to reduce the risk of violence toward emergency department staff: current approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Ramacciati N; Ceccagnoli A; Addey B; Lumini E; Rasero L

    2016-01-01

    Nicola Ramacciati,1,2 Andrea Ceccagnoli,2 Beniamino Addey,3 Enrico Lumini,4 Laura Rasero1,5 1Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, 2Emergency Department, S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, 3Emergency Medical System, S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia, 4Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, 5Research and Development Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy Introduction: The phenomenon of workplace viole...

  13. 78 FR 69861 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency...: Department of Homeland Security, Privacy Office. ACTION: Notice of Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, the Department of Homeland Security proposes to update and reissue...

  14. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan, U.S. Department of Energy Region 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsha Keister

    2010-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Region 6 Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan (TEPP Plan) operates within the framework of the DOE emergency management system for developing, coordinating, and directing emergency planning, preparedness, and readiness assurance activities for radiological transportation incidents. The DOE Region 6 TEPP Plan is a narrative description of the DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program activities, training and technical assistance provided to states and tribes along DOE's transportation corridors in DOE Region 6.

  15. Dispelling an urban legend: frequent emergency department users have substantial burden of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, John; Raven, Maria C

    2013-12-01

    Urban legend has often characterized frequent emergency department (ED) patients as mentally ill substance users who are a costly drain on the health care system and who contribute to ED overcrowding because of unnecessary visits for conditions that could be treated more efficiently elsewhere. This study of Medicaid ED users in New York City shows that behavioral health conditions are responsible for a small share of ED visits by frequent users, and that ED use accounts for a small portion of these patients' total Medicaid costs. Frequent ED users have a substantial burden of disease, and they have high rates of primary and specialty care use. They also have linkages to outpatient care that are comparable to those of other ED patients. It is possible to use predictive modeling to identify who will become a repeat ED user and thus to help target interventions. However, policy makers should view reducing frequent ED use as only one element of more-comprehensive intervention strategies for frequent health system users.

  16. Evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, R L; Kontos, M C

    1997-04-01

    The evaluation of chest pain in the emergency setting should be systematic, risk based, and goal driven. An effective program must be able to evaluate all patients with equal thoroughness under the assumption that any patient with chest pain could potentially be having an MI. The initial evaluation is based on the history, a focused physical examination, and the ECG. This information is sufficient to categorize patients into groups at high, moderate, and low risk. Table 14 is a template for a comprehensive chest-pain evaluation program. Patients at high risk need rapid initiation of appropriate therapy: thrombolytics or primary angioplasty for the patients with MIs or aspirin/heparin for the patients with unstable angina. Patients at moderate risk need to have an acute coronary syndrome ruled in or out expediently and additional comorbidities addressed before discharge. Patients at low risk also need to be evaluated, and once the likelihood of an unstable acute coronary syndrome is eliminated, they can be discharged with further evaluation performed as outpatients. Subsequent evaluation should attempt to assign a definitive diagnosis while also addressing issues specific to risk reduction, such as cholesterol lowering and smoking cessation. It is well documented that 4% to 5% of patients with MIs are inadvertently missed during the initial evaluation. This number is surprisingly consistent among many studies using various protocols and suggests that an initial evaluation limited to the history, physical examination, and ECG will fail to identify the small number of these patients who otherwise appear at low risk. The solution is to improve the sensitivity of the evaluation process to identify these patients. It appears that more than simple observation is required, and at the present time, no simple laboratory test can meet this need. However, success has been reported with a number of strategies including emergency imaging with either radionuclides such as

  17. Implementation of a Team-based Physician Staffing Model at an Academic Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose V. Nable

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is scant literature regarding the optimal resident physician staffing model of academic emergency departments (ED that maximizes learning opportunities. A department of emergency medicine at a large inner-city academic hospital initiated a team-based staffing model. Its pre-interventional staffing model consisted of residents and attending physicians being separately assigned patients, resulting in residents working with two different faculty providers in the same shift. This study aimed to determine if the post-interventional team-based system, in which residents were paired with a single attending on each shift, would result in improved residents’ learning and clinical experiences as manifested by resident evaluations and the number of patients seen. Methods: This retrospective before-and-after study at an academic ED with an annual volume of 52,000 patients examined the mean differences in five-point Likert-scale evaluations completed by residents assessing their ED rotation experiences in both the original and team-based staffing models. The residents were queried on their perceptions of feeling part of the team, decision-making autonomy, clinical experience, amount of supervision, quality of teaching, and overall rotational experience. We also analyzed the number of patients seen per hour by residents. Paired sample t-tests were performed. Residents who were in the program in the year preceding and proceeding the intervention were eligible for inclusion. Results: 34 of 38 eligible residents were included (4 excluded for lack of evaluations in either the pre- or post-intervention period. There was a statistically significant improvement in resident perception of the quality and amount of teaching, 4.03 to 4.27 (mean difference=0.24, p=0.03. There were non-statistically significant trends toward improved mean scores for all other queries. Residents also saw more patients following the initiation of the team-based model

  18. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2007-11-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban settings, that are confronted with these exposures. It is important for emergency departments to be aware of the large underground presence of exotic venomous reptile pets and to utilise the expertise of regional poison centres that will also assist in the procurement of exotic antivenoms.

  19. The legal and ethical implications of social media in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Rachel; Reinisch, Courtney

    2013-01-01

    Social media is a growing and popular means of communication. It is understandable that health care providers may not share identifying information on patients through these sources. Challenges arise when patients and family members wish to record the care provided in the emergency department. The health care provider may be faced with an ethical and possibly legal dilemma when social media is present in the emergency department. This article seeks to discuss the legal and ethical principles surrounding social media in the emergency department.

  20. The introduction of the Manchester triage scale to an emergency department in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, J G

    2012-02-03

    Triage is an integral part of the modern emergency department. The use of a recognised triage system has many advantages for the emergency department including reference to a recognised decision-making structure and support in the form of a professionally accepted and validated system. As part of a programme of internal change the Manchester triage system (MTS) was introduced to an emergency department in the Republic of Ireland. This article outlines the introduction of this method of triage and cites the domestic and international drivers of the change.

  1. Physicians' and nurses' perceptions of patient safety risks in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källberg, Ann-Sofie; Ehrenberg, Anna; Florin, Jan; Östergren, Jan; Göransson, Katarina E

    2017-02-28

    The emergency department has been described as a high-risk area for errors. It is also known that working conditions such as a high workload and shortage off staff in the healthcare field are common factors that negatively affect patient safety. A limited amount of research has been conducted with regard to patient safety in Swedish emergency departments. Additionally, there is a lack of knowledge about clinicians' perceptions of patient safety risks. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe emergency department clinicians' experiences with regard to patient safety risks.

  2. Self-referrals in the emergency department: reasons why patients attend the emergency department without consulting a general practitioner first-a questionnaire study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijvanger, N.; Rijpsma, D.; Leeuwen, H. van; Edwards, M.J.R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To influence self-referral, it is crucial to know a patient's motives to directly visit the emergency department (ED). The goal of this study is to examine motives for self-referral to the ED and compare these motives in relation to appropriateness. METHODS: All self-referred patients vi

  3. Emergency department overcrowding: the impact of resource scarcity on physician job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau, Kent V; Francescutti, Louis H

    2005-01-01

    Emergency departments in most developed countries have been experiencing significant overcrowding under a regime of severe resource constraints. Physicians in emergency departments increasingly find themselves toiling in workplaces that are characterized by diminished availability of, limited access to, and decreased stability of critical resources. Severe resource constraints have the potential to greatly weaken the overall job satisfaction of emergency physicians. This article examines the impact of hospital resource constraints on the job satisfaction of a large sample of emergency physicians in Canada. After controlling for workflow and patient characteristics and for various institutional and physician characteristics, institutional resource constraints are found to be major contributors to emergency physician job dissatisfaction. Resource factors that have the greatest impact on job satisfaction include availability of emergency room physicians, access to hospital technology and emergency beds, and stability of financial (investment) resources.

  4. Modeling factors influencing the demand for emergency department services in ontario: a comparison of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaney Christopher

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency departments are medical treatment facilities, designed to provide episodic care to patients suffering from acute injuries and illnesses as well as patients who are experiencing sporadic flare-ups of underlying chronic medical conditions which require immediate attention. Supply and demand for emergency department services varies across geographic regions and time. Some persons do not rely on the service at all whereas; others use the service on repeated occasions. Issues regarding increased wait times for services and crowding illustrate the need to investigate which factors are associated with increased frequency of emergency department utilization. The evidence from this study can help inform policy makers on the appropriate mix of supply and demand targeted health care policies necessary to ensure that patients receive appropriate health care delivery in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The purpose of this report is to assess those factors resulting in increased demand for emergency department services in Ontario. We assess how utilization rates vary according to the severity of patient presentation in the emergency department. We are specifically interested in the impact that access to primary care physicians has on the demand for emergency department services. Additionally, we wish to investigate these trends using a series of novel regression models for count outcomes which have yet to be employed in the domain of emergency medical research. Methods Data regarding the frequency of emergency department visits for the respondents of Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS during our study interval (2003-2005 are obtained from the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS. Patients' emergency department utilizations were linked with information from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS which provides individual level medical, socio-demographic, psychological and behavioral information for

  5. Integrating Emerging Technologies in Teaching Ugandan Traditional Dances in K-12 Schools in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabingo, Alfdaniels

    2015-01-01

    Schools in New York City have made attempts to embrace and support the strand of "making connections", which is laid out in the New York City Department of Dance blueprint for teaching and learning in dance for grades PreK-12. Accordingly, some schools have integrated Ugandan traditional dances into the dance curriculum, and dance…

  6. Psychiatric service users, experiences of emergency departments: a CERQual review oaf qualitative studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte Groth; Carstensen, Kathrine; Lou, Stina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: There is increased clinical and political attention towards integrating general and psychiatric emergency departments (ED). However, research into psychiatric service users’ experiences regarding general EDs is limited. Aim: To identify and summarize current, qualitative...

  7. Osteoporosis among Fallers without Concomitant Fracture Identified in an Emergency Department: Frequencies and Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Hesse, Ulrik; Houe, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether the Emergency Department (ED) is a suitable entrance point for osteoporosis screening among fallers without concomitant fracture compared to referral from general practice. Furthermore, to identify factors associated with osteoporosis among fallers. Methods. Patients...

  8. Encountering anger in the emergency department: identification, evaluations and responses of staff members to anger displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Cheshin; A. Rafaeli; A. Eisenman

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anger manifestations in emergency departments (EDs) occur daily, interrupting workflow and exposing staff to risk. Objectives. How staff assess and recognize patients’ angry outbursts in EDs and elucidate responses to anger expressions, while considering effects of institution guidelines

  9. Complaints and Diagnoses of Emergency Department Patients in the Netherlands: A Comparative Study of Integrated Primary and Emergency Care

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the Netherlands, an increasing number of emergency departments (EDs) and general practitioner cooperatives collaborate by creating one Emergency-Care-Access-Point (ECAP). This has resulted in fewer patients at ECAP EDs. The objective of this study was to explore differences in patient characteristics, presented complaints and ED discharge diagnoses between EDs with an ECAP and EDs without an ECAP. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was performed with 1800 consecutive p...

  10. Folic acid use in pregnant patients presenting to the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Steenblik, Jacob; Schroeder, Erika; Hatch, Burke; Groke, Steven; Broadwater-Hollifield, Camille; Mallin, Michael; Ahern, Matthew; Madsen, Troy

    2011-01-01

    Background The US Preventive Services Task Force has recommended daily folic acid supplementation for women planning on becoming pregnant in an effort to prevent fetal neural tube defects. We evaluated pregnant patients presenting to the emergency department to determine rates of folic acid supplementation. Methods We surveyed a convenience sample of pregnant patients who presented to the University of Utah Emergency Department (ED) between 1 January 2008, and 30 April 2009, regarding pregnan...

  11. Tumultuous Atmosphere (Physical, Mental), the Main Barrier to Emergency Department Inter-Professional Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Varjoshani, Nasrin Jafari; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: A highly important factor in enhancing quality of patient care and job satisfaction of health care staff is inter-professional communication. Due to the critical nature of the work environment, the large number of staff and units, and complexity of professional tasks and interventions, inter-professional communication in an emergency department is particularly and exceptionally important. Despite its importance, inter-professional communication in emergency department seems unfavo...

  12. Primary headache disorder in the emergency department: perspective from a general neurology outpatient clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Gahir, K K; Larner, A J

    2006-01-01

    Over a six month period, 22% of patients with headache seen in general neurology outpatient clinics reported prior attendance at an emergency department because of their headache; 9% of the headache cohort had been admitted to hospital. All had primary headache disorders according to International Headache Society diagnostic criteria. Improved primary care services for headache patients are required to reduce the burden of primary headache disorders seen in emergency departments.

  13. Demographic Analysis of Emergency Department Patients at the Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Lammers (Wim); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); T.M. Mulligan (Terrence); J.C. Christiaanse (Jan); D. den Hartog (Dennis); Y. Lu (Yiming); P. Patka (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractEmergency medicine is an upcoming discipline that is still under development in many countries. Therefore, it is important to gain insight into the organization and patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED). The aim of this cross-sectional study was to provide an epidemiologic

  14. Oxygen therapy for sepsis patients in the emergency department : a little less?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolmeijer, Renate; ter Maaten, Jan C.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Liberal oxygen therapy has been a cornerstone in the treatment of critically ill patients. Recently, awareness of hyperoxia toxicity has emerged. We investigated the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO2) in sepsis patients admitted to the emergency department treated with a reduced ins

  15. Improving Emergency Department Triage Classification with Computerized Clinical Decision Support at a Pediatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisch, Joseph Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is an emergency department (ED) triage classification system based on estimated patient-specific resource utilization. Rules for a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) system based on a patient's chief complaint were developed and tested using a stochastic model for predicting ESI scores.…

  16. Children and adolescents in the Psychiatric Emergency Department: a 10-year survey in Copenhagen County

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taastrøm, Annette; Klahn, Julie; Staal, Nina;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Knowledge on psychiatric emergencies in children and adolescents is limited. The Psychiatric Emergency Departments (PED) in Copenhagen enable the acute examination of children and adolescents 24 h a day, 7 days a week. However, very little is known about who presents to the PED...

  17. A survey of dental school's emergency departments in Ireland and the UK: provision of undergraduate teaching and emergency care

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Aim Emergency dental care is a vital service that new graduates should be prepared to offer. There are few published data relating to emergency dental care education. To assess this, and to gain a profile of accident and emergency departments (A&E) in dental schools, an online survey was sent to all of the dental schools in the Republic of Ireland and the UK. Setting The survey addressed the school's A&E curriculum, teaching methods, undergraduate exposure and departmental details. Results Th...

  18. Investigation and Analysis of Psychological Health Status of Medical Staff in Emergency Department of General Hospital of Zhongshan City Township%中山市乡镇综合医院急诊科医护人员心理健康状况调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昌松; 饶惠平; 张琼; 张建龙

    2014-01-01

    目的:探究中山市乡镇综合医院急诊科医护人员心理健康状况调查状况。方法:选取中山市乡镇综合医院急诊科医护人员160人作为A组,非急诊科(内外科)医护人员160名作为B组,另选择中国常模健康成人160例作为C组,观察对比三组心理健康状况。结果:在躯体不适、强迫、人际关系、抑郁、焦虑、敌对性、恐怖、偏执、精神病性观察项目上,相较于常模C组,A组SCL-90评分最高,B组次之;SDS和SAS评分比较中, A组均最高,其次为B组,C组最低,组间比较差异均具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:为促进急诊医疗质量的提高,需对特定医务人群开展针对性的心理疏导,以改善目前心理健康状况,保证急诊工作质量。%Objective:To explore the mental health status of medical staff in emergency department of general hospital of Zhongshan township. Method:In this survey,three groups were selected to evaluate their mental health status. Group A including 160 medical staff were from the emergency department of Zhongshan Hospital and group B covers other 160 medical staff from non-emergency department(including physicians and surgeons). In addition,another 160 healthy adults sorted out from Chinese Norms were marked as group C. Phychological health status of the three groups were compared. Result:Compared to group C,group A obtained a higher SCL-90 score and group C presented the lower one in the physical discomfort,compulsion,interpersonal sensitivity,depression,anxiety,hostility,phobia,paranoid and psychotism. Furthermore,according to the standard of SDS and SAS score,group A delivered the highest score and group C showed the poorest score,suggesting a significant statistics among the three groups with a parameter of P<0.05. Conclusion:It is necessary for the medical personal to carry out the specific targeted psychological counseling to improve the quality of emergency medical

  19. Optimal older adult emergency care: introducing multidisciplinary geriatric emergency department guidelines from the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Bromley, Marilyn; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Chun, Audrey; Gerson, Lowell W; Greenspan, Jason; Hwang, Ula; John, David P; Lyons, William L; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Mortensen, Betty; Ragsdale, Luna; Rosenberg, Mark; Wilber, Scott

    2014-07-01

    In the United States and around the world, effective, efficient, and reliable strategies to provide emergency care to aging adults is challenging crowded emergency departments (EDs) and strained healthcare systems. In response, geriatric emergency medicine clinicians, educators, and researchers collaborated with the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine to develop guidelines intended to improve ED geriatric care by enhancing expertise, educational, and quality improvement expectations, equipment, policies, and protocols. These Geriatric Emergency Department Guidelines represent the first formal society-led attempt to characterize the essential attributes of the geriatric ED and received formal approval from the boards of directors of each of the four societies in 2013 and 2014. This article is intended to introduce emergency medicine and geriatric healthcare providers to the guidelines while providing recommendations for continued refinement of these proposals through educational dissemination, formal effectiveness evaluations, cost-effectiveness studies, and eventually institutional credentialing.

  20. The risk city cities countering climate change : emerging planning theories and practices around the world

    CERN Document Server

    Jabareen, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary cities face phenomenal risks, and they face particularly high levels of mounting social and environmental risks, including social polarization, urban conflicts, riots, terror, and climate change threats. This book suggests that climate change and its resulting uncertainties challenge the concepts, procedures, and scope of conventional approaches to planning, creating a need to rethink and revise current planning methods. Therefore, this book suggests a paradigm shift in our thinking, interrogation, and planning of our cities. Based on the contemporary conditions of risk at cities

  1. Screening for Suicidal Ideation and Attempts among Emergency Department Medical Patients: Instrument and Results from the Psychiatric Emergency Research Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael H.; Abar, Beau W.; McCormick, Mark; Barnes, Donna H.; Haukoos, Jason; Garmel, Gus M.; Boudreaux, Edwin D.

    2013-01-01

    Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal 15 calls for organizations "to identify patients at risk for suicide." Overt suicidal behavior accounts for 0.6% of emergency department (ED) visits, but incidental suicidal ideation is found in 3%-11.6%. This is the first multicenter study of suicide screening in EDs. Of 2,243 patients in…

  2. Trauma in elderly patients evaluated in a hospital emergency department in Konya, Turkey: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Murat Akinci,1 Necmettin Tufekci,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Melih Azap21Department of Emergency Medicine, Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Konya Numune Hospital, Konya, TurkeyPurpose: Trauma is a common cause of admission to the hospital emergency department. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cause of admission, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients aged ≥65 years admitted to an emergency department in Turkey because of blunt trauma.Materials and methods: Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 568 patients (314 women and 254 men aged ≥65 years who were admitted to an emergency department of a tertiary care hospital.Results: Trauma was caused by low-energy fall in 379 patients (67%, traffic accident in 79 patients (14%, high-energy fall in 69 patients (12%, and other causes in 41 patients (7%. The most frequent sites of injury were the lower extremity, thorax, upper extremity, and head. The femur was the most frequent fracture site. After evaluation in the emergency department, 377 patients (66% were hospitalized. There were 31 patients (5% who died. Risk of hospitalization after trauma was significantly associated with trauma to the lower extremity, thorax, and spine; fractures of the femur and rib; and intracranial injury.Conclusion: Emergency department admission after trauma in patients aged $65 years is common after low-energy falls, and most injuries occur to the extremities. It is important to focus on prevention of falls to decrease the frequency of trauma in the elderly.Keywords: fall, femur, fracture, injury

  3. Time Series Analysis of Emergency Department Length of Stay per 8-Hour Shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels K. Rathlev, MD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The mean emergency department (ED length of stay (LOS is considered a measure ofcrowding. This paper measures the association between LOS and factors that potentially contribute toLOS measured over consecutive shifts in the ED: shift 1 (7:00 AM to 3:00 PM, shift 2 (3:00 PM to 11:00PM, and shift 3 (11:00 PM to 7:00 AM.Methods: Setting: University, inner-city teaching hospital. Patients: 91,643 adult ED patients betweenOctober 12, 2005 and April 30, 2007. Design: For each shift, we measured the numbers of (1 EDnurses on duty, (2 discharges, (3 discharges on the previous shift, (4 resuscitation cases, (5admissions, (6 intensive care unit (ICU admissions, and (7 LOS on the previous shift. For each 24-hour period, we measured the (1 number of elective surgical admissions and (2 hospital occupancy.We used autoregressive integrated moving average time series analysis to retrospectively measurethe association between LOS and the covariates.Results: For all 3 shifts, LOS in minutes increased by 1.08 (95% confidence interval 0.68, 1.50 forevery additional 1% increase in hospital occupancy. For every additional admission from the ED, LOSin minutes increased by 3.88 (2.81, 4.95 on shift 1, 2.88 (1.54, 3.14 on shift 2, and 4.91 (2.29, 7.53 onshift 3. LOS in minutes increased 14.27 (2.01, 26.52 when 3 or more patients were admitted to the ICUon shift 1. The numbers of nurses, ED discharges on the previous shift, resuscitation cases, andelective surgical admissions were not associated with LOS on any shift.Conclusion: Key factors associated with LOS include hospital occupancy and the number of hospitaladmissions that originate in the ED. This particularly applies to ED patients who are admitted to theICU.

  4. Cities, Towns and Villages, Point locations of cities and towns in Arizona., Published in 2006, Arizona State Land Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset as of 2006. It is described as 'Point locations of cities and towns in Arizona.'. Data by this publisher are often provided...

  5. A Comparison of Medical and Psychobehavioral Emergency Department Visits Made by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yona Lunsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective. We describe and contrast medical to psychobehavioral emergency visits made by a cohort of adults with intellectual disabilities. Methods. This was a study of 221 patients with intellectual disabilities who visited the emergency department because of a psychobehavioral or medical emergency. Patient profiles are described and logistic regression was used to assess predictors of psychobehavioral emergencies in this group, including age, residence, psychiatric diagnosis, cognitive level, and life events. Results. Ninety-eight individuals had medical emergencies and 123 individuals presented with psychobehavioral emergencies. The most common medical issue was injury and the most common psychobehavioral issue was aggression. In the multivariate analysis, life events (odds ratio (OR 0.28; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.10 to 0.75, psychiatric diagnosis (OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.12 to 4.95, and age group (OR 4.97; 95% CI 1.28 to 19.38 were associated with psychobehavioral emergencies. Psychobehavioral emergencies were more likely to result in admission and caregivers reported lower rates of satisfaction with these visits. Conclusion. Emergency departments would benefit from greater understanding of the different types of presentations made by adults with intellectual disabilities, given the unique presentations and outcomes associated with them.

  6. Perspective: Academic obstetrics-gynecology departments in the city of Philadelphia: are the wheels coming off?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Damien J

    2011-03-01

    Maternity care in Philadelphia is in an unprecedented and precarious situation, as all the community hospitals that once provided maternity care services have either closed completely or stopped providing maternity services. Six academic medical centers (AMCs) in the city of Philadelphia now provide care to a population of 1.5 million requiring increasingly complex and expensive maternity care, at the same time as insurance premiums and the malpractice crisis in Pennsylvania peaked. The AMCs are able to continue providing maternity care to this population that includes a large proportion of poor, minority, and un- or underinsured patients thanks to government subsidization of resident education, the services provided by resident physicians, and the influx of government and industry research funds, but the financial outlook of academic obstetrics-gynecology departments in this city is dire. Obstetric academic medicine in Philadelphia has come to more closely resemble a "big wheel" tricycle than Flexner's "three-legged stool." Clinical medicine is the driver (the large front wheel and pedal) pulling along education and research, the two smaller wheels in the back. A maternity care alliance is needed in Philadelphia allowing area AMCs to pool and trade resources, reduce costs, improve quality and innovation, and share risks. Philadelphia may serve as an early warning for other cities and AMCs around the country and has the opportunity to serve as a model for how to overcome these serious challenges.

  7. Difficult airway equipment in departments of emergency medicine in Ireland: results of a national survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Adverse effects associated with difficult airway management can be catastrophic and include death, brain injury and myocardial injury. Closed-malpractice claims have shown prolonged and persistent attempts at endotracheal intubation to be the most common situation leading to disastrous respiratory events. To date, there has been no evaluation of the types of difficult airway equipment currently available in Irish departments of emergency medicine. The objective of this survey was to identify the difficult airway equipment available in Irish departments of emergency medicine. METHODS: Departments of emergency medicine in the Republic of Ireland with at least one dedicated Emergency Medicine consultant were surveyed via telephone. RESULTS: All of the departments contacted held at least one alternative device on site for both ventilation and intubation. The most common alternative ventilation device was the laryngeal mask airway (89%). The most common alternative intubating device was the surgical airway device (100%). CONCLUSIONS: Irish departments of emergency medicine compare well with those in the UK and USA, when surveyed concerning difficult airway equipment. However, we believe that this situation could be further improved by training inexperienced healthcare providers in the use of the laryngeal mask airway and intubating laryngeal mask airway, by placing greater emphasis on the ready availability of capnography and by the increased use of portable difficult airway storage units.

  8. Interventions to reduce the risk of violence toward emergency department staff: current approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramacciati N

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Ramacciati,1,2 Andrea Ceccagnoli,2 Beniamino Addey,3 Enrico Lumini,4 Laura Rasero1,5 1Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, 2Emergency Department, S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, 3Emergency Medical System, S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia, 4Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, 5Research and Development Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy Introduction: The phenomenon of workplace violence in health care settings, and especially in the emergency department (ED, has assumed the dimensions of a real epidemic. Many studies highlight the need for methods to ensure the safety of staff and propose interventions to address the problem. Aim: The aim of this review was to propose a narrative of the current approaches to reduce workplace violence in the ED, with a particular focus on evaluating the effectiveness of emergency response programs. Methods: A search was conducted between December 1, 2015 and December 7, 2015, in PubMed and CINAHL. Ten intervention studies were selected and analyzed. Results: Seven of these interventions were based on sectoral interventions and three on comprehensive actions. Conclusion: The studies that have attempted to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions have shown weak evidence to date. Further research is needed to identify effective actions to promote a safe work environment in the ED. Keywords: workplace violence, violence prevention and control, emergency department, aggression, security, review

  9. Federal enclaves: The community culture of Department of Energy cities Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Patrick Kerry

    During the Second World War, the United States Government funded the research of nuclear fusion to create the first atomic weapons. To accomplish this task, the Manhattan Engineering District recruited scientists and engineers to remote sites in New Mexico, Tennessee, and Washington. During the five decades of the Cold War, the congressionally created Atomic Energy Commission, and later the Department of Energy (DOE), funded and operated numerous facilities throughout the United States. The mission of the facilities was to design and stockpile atomic weapons and to further the understanding of nuclear energy. This dissertation examines the influences of the United States federal government on three communities associated with these facilities, Los Alamos, New Mexico, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Livermore, California. As isolated secret cities, these environments each created complex community structures. This work identifies how, unlike other community settings, the influences of the federal government, both directly and indirectly, created distinctive patterns of behavior within the residents of each city. Examining these behaviors within the framework of the dissertation's chapters provides the necessary context to understand fully the community culture of these Department of Energy cities. This work addresses contemporary community settings in new ways. It approaches the topic broadly by examining five specific areas of community interaction: social, political, business and economic, educational, and ethical. Through the use of oral history methodology and techniques, the researcher captured significant information from respondents. This approach provides valuable insights to the behavior and interaction of the individual populations while revealing important insights all aspects of each town's community culture.

  10. Hospital emergency department utilisation rates among the immigrant population in Barcelona, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Oscar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent increase in the number of immigrants of Barcelona represents a challenge for the public healthcare system, the emergency department being the most used healthcare service by this group. However, utilisation rates in our environment have not yet been studied. We aimed to compare emergency department utilisation rates between Spanish-born and foreign-born residents in a public hospital of Barcelona. Methods The study population included all adults residing in the area of study and visiting the emergency department of Hospital del Mar in 2004. The emergency care episodes were selected from the Emergency Department register, and the population figures from the Statistics Department of Barcelona. Emergency care episodes were classified into five large clinical categories. Adjusted rate ratios (RR of utilisation among foreign-born vs. Spanish-born residents were assessed through negative binomial regression. Results The overall utilisation rate was 382 emergency contacts per 1,000 persons-years. The RR for foreign-born versus Spanish-born residents was 0.62 (95% CI: 0.52; 0.74%. The RR was also significantly below one in surgery (0.51, 95% CI: 0.42; 0.63, traumatology (0.47, 95% CI: 0.38; 0.59, medicine (0.48, 95% CI: 0.38; 0.59 and psychiatry (0.42, 95% CI: 0.18; 0.97. No differences were found in utilisation of gynaecology and minor emergency services. Conclusion The overall lower utilisation rates obtained for foreign-born residents is consistent with previous studies and is probably due to the "healthy immigrant effect". Thus, the population increase due to immigration does not translate directly into a corresponding increase in the number of emergency contacts. The lack of differences in minor and gynaecological emergency care supports the hypothesis that immigrants overcome certain barriers by using the emergency department to access to health services. The issue of healthcare barriers should therefore be addressed

  11. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoneking LR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available LR Stoneking,1 AL Waterbrook,1 J Garst Orozco,2 D Johnston,1 A Bellafiore,1 C Davies,3 T Nuño,1 J Fatás-Cabeza,4 O Beita,5 V Ng,1 KH Grall,6 W Adamas-Rappaport7 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Sinai Health System, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, 4Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 5Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital, St Paul, MN, 7Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Background: After emergency department (ED discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit.Objectives: To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency.Methods: Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC and South Campus (SC. SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions.Results: Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study

  12. Examination of triage nurse text narratives to identify sports injury cases in emergency department presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Finch, Caroline; Boufous, Soufiane; Browne, Gary

    2009-09-01

    Narrative text can be a useful means of identifying injury in routine data collections. An analysis of data from a near real-time emergency department surveillance system (NREDSS) in New South Wales (NSW, Australia) was conducted to determine if sports injuries can be identified from routine narrative text recorded in emergency departments. Around one-third of all emergency department (ED) presentations during 1 September 2003 to 15 February 2007 were identified as injury-related. Narrative text searching of triage nursing assessments using keywords identified between 282 (i.e. football) and 26,944 (i.e. play) potential sports injury presentations depending on the selected sports-related keyword used. Routine narrative text descriptions from triage nurse assessments show promise for the identification of sports injury presentations to EDs. Further work is required regarding in-depth assessment of case detection capabilities and the likelihood of improving the quality of narrative text recorded.

  13. Repeated Suicide Attempts and Suicide Among Individuals With a First Emergency Department Contact for Attempted Suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedyszyn, Izabela E; Erlangsen, Annette; Hjorthøj, Carsten;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Emergency departments are important, albeit underutilized, sites for suicide prevention. Preventive strategies and interventions could benefit from a greater understanding of factors influencing the course of suicide risk after emergency department contact due to attempted suicide....... The aim of our study was 2-fold: to identify predictors of repeated suicide attempts and suicide and to investigate the timing of these events. METHODS: Data from Danish nationwide, longitudinal registers were used in this prospective, population-based study of all individuals first presenting...... to an emergency department after attempted suicide (index attempt) between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2011 (N = 11,802). Cox regression analysis identified predictors, and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis modeled the time to repeated suicide attempts and suicide. RESULTS: Sixteen percent of the sample...

  14. A systematic review of triage-related interventions to improve patient flow in emergency departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asplund Kjell

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overcrowding in emergency departments is a worldwide problem. A systematic literature review was undertaken to scientifically explore which interventions improve patient flow in emergency departments. Methods A systematic literature search for flow processes in emergency departments was followed by assessment of relevance and methodological quality of each individual study fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Studies were excluded if they did not present data on waiting time, length of stay, patients leaving the emergency department without being seen or other flow parameters based on a nonselected material of patients. Only studies with a control group, either in a randomized controlled trial or in an observational study with historical controls, were included. For each intervention, the level of scientific evidence was rated according to the GRADE system, launched by a WHO-supported working group. Results The interventions were grouped into streaming, fast track, team triage, point-of-care testing (performing laboratory analysis in the emergency department, and nurse-requested x-ray. Thirty-three studies, including over 800,000 patients in total, were included. Scientific evidence on the effect of fast track on waiting time, length of stay, and left without being seen was moderately strong. The effect of team triage on left without being seen was relatively strong, but the evidence for all other interventions was limited or insufficient. Conclusions Introducing fast track for patients with less severe symptoms results in shorter waiting time, shorter length of stay, and fewer patients leaving without being seen. Team triage, with a physician in the team, will probably result in shorter waiting time and shorter length of stay and most likely in fewer patients leaving without being seen. There is only limited scientific evidence that streaming of patients into different tracks, performing laboratory analysis in the emergency

  15. Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in the Emergency Department - New Techniques for Speed and Diagnostic Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Sheri D; Harrison, Mark A; Duvall, W. Lane

    2012-01-01

    Emergency room evaluations of patients presenting with chest pain continue to rise, and these evaluations which often include cardiac imaging, are an increasing area of resource utilization in the current health system. Myocardial perfusion imaging from the emergency department remains a vital component of the diagnosis or exclusion of coronary artery disease as the etiology of chest pain. Recent advances in camera technology, and changes to the imaging protocols have allowed MPI to become a ...

  16. Correlates of women's cancer screening and contraceptive knowledge among female emergency department patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bock Beth C

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of knowledge regarding preventive health services for women might impede campaigns to expand these services in the emergency department setting. For 18–55-year-old English-speaking women visiting an urban emergency department, we aimed to: (1 Ascertain their knowledge regarding the applicability, purpose, and recommended intervals of three women's cancer screening and three contraceptive methods; and (2 Determine if patient age, race/ethnicity, medical insurance status, and current or recent usage of these methods are associated with greater or lesser knowledge about them. Methods Emergency department-based survey on recent or current usage and knowledge about Pap smears, breast self-examinations, mammograms, condoms, birth control, and emergency contraception. Analyses included calculation of summary statistics and creation of multivariable logistic regression models. Results Of 1,100 patients eligible for the study, 69.9% agreed to participate. Most of the participants were Conclusion Although these female ED patients demonstrated strong knowledge on some women's cancer screening and contraceptive methods, there were several areas of knowledge deficit. Women without private medical insurance and those who have not used a particular cancer screening or contraceptive method demonstrated less knowledge. Reduced knowledge about women's cancer screening and contraceptive methods should be considered during clinical encounters and when instituting or evaluating emergency department-based initiatives that assess the need for these methods.

  17. The role of teamwork and communication in the emergency department: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, Emily; Sheppard, Lorraine A

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a systematic review using international research to describe the role of teamwork and communication in the emergency department, and its relevance to physiotherapy practice in the emergency department. Searches were conducted of CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Scopus, Cochrane, PEDro, Medline, Embase, Amed and PubMed. Selection criteria included full-text English language research papers related to teamwork and/or communication based directly in the emergency department, involvement of any profession in the emergency department, publication in peer-reviewed journals, and related to adult emergency services. Studies were appraised using a validated critical appraisal tool. Fourteen eligible studies, all of mid-range quality, were identified. They demonstrated high levels of staff satisfaction with teamwork training interventions and positive staff attitudes towards the importance of teamwork and communication. There is moderate evidence that the introduction of multidisciplinary teams to the ED may be successful in reducing access block, and physiotherapists may play a role in this. The need for teamwork and communication in the ED is paramount, and their roles are closely linked, with the common significant purposes of improving patient safety, reducing clinical errors, and reducing waiting times.

  18. Using a balanced scorecard to improve the performance of an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Hsin; Chen, Ping-Ling; Yang, Ming-Chin; Chang, Wen-Yin; Lee, Haw-Jenn

    2004-01-01

    The performance of the emergency department significantly improved after implementing the balanced scorecard including hours of continuing education attended by the staff, staff job satisfaction, the rate of incomplete laboratory tests within 30 minutes, the average monthly inappropriate return rate, and hospital profit. The results can assist administrators plan for the future. Although this was a pilot program for implementing a balanced scorecard in an emergency department, the indicators used in this study may also be reasonable for a hospital that has limited resources.

  19. Diagnosis of Mondor’s Disease in the Emergency Department with Bedside Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael O’Neal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mondor’s disease is a rare condition characterized by a superficial thrombophlebitis that can occur in the thoracoabdominal and genital areas. Findings with ultrasound in penile Mondor’s disease are readily measurable: a noncompressible penile vein without flow and absence of tears of the corpus cavernosum or tunica albuginea, hematoma, or evidence of fracture of the penis. We present a case of Mondor’s disease, diagnosed with bedside ultrasound, in the emergency department. Ultrasonography is readily available within the emergency department, and we suggest its use in aiding diagnosis of genitourinary disorders such as Mondor’s disease.

  20. Effects of the 2010 World Cup football tournament on emergency department assault attendances in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigg, Zara; Hughes, Karen; Bellis, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    We explore the impact of the 2010 World Cup, held in South Africa, on levels of assault attendances to 15 emergency departments in England. The majority (70.1%) of assault attendees during the 2010 World Cup was male and aged 18-34 years (52.5%). Assault attendances increased by 37.5% on the days that England played (P 001). Preparation for major sporting events in non-host countries should include violence prevention activity. Emergency department data can be used to identify violence associated with such events and thus inform both the targeting of prevention efforts and assessments of their effectiveness.

  1. Balancing Tradition and Transcendence in the Implementation of Emergency-Department Electronic Whiteboads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus; Fleron, Benedicte; Hertzum, Morten

    2010-01-01

    We report from a case study of the implementation of an electronic whiteboard system at two emergency departments at Danish hospitals. The purpose of the whiteboards is to support the clinicians in maintaining an overview of the patients at the departments. The electronic whiteboard system...... was designed in collaboration with clinicians from the departments. Compared to existing dry-erase whiteboards, the electronic whiteboards present more information and allow some automated updating. Based on observations supported by interviews we describe how tradition and transcendence were balanced...... in the implementation of the whiteboards at the two emergency departments. The electronic whiteboards were initially configured to resemble the dry-erase whiteboards and then gradually reconfigured and extended through an improvisational process, along with changes in the clinicians’ work practices....

  2. Temporal patterns of emergency calls of a metropolitan city in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Yuan, Ning; Pan, Lin; Jiao, Pengfei; Dai, Weidi; Xue, Guixiang; Liu, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative understanding of human communication behavior, one of the fundamental human activities, is of great value in many practical problems, ranging from urban planning to emergency management. Most of the recent studies have focused on human communication under normal situations. Here, we study the temporal patterns of emergency calls, which is a special kind of human communication activity under emergency circumstances, by analyzing a dataset of emergency call records that collected from a metropolitan city in China during a five year period. We find that most individuals rarely make emergency calls. The distribution of inter-call durations decays as double power law along with an exponential tail. We also discover that, comparing with the normal communication activities, the activity of calling the emergency number shows more significant characteristics of burstiness and memory. We further demonstrate that the behavior of calling the emergency number when people encounter extreme events could be explained by an event-driven memory process.

  3. Accreditation of Emergency Department at a Teaching Hospital in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Farzianpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Considering the importance of emergency departments in healthcare system and the high mortality rate of patients referred to these departments, it is crucial to provide quality services in emergency departments. Accreditation is a systematic process for improving quality of care and it enables managers to assess and evaluate the healthcare system. Accreditation of an organization provides an obvious commitment for improving quality of safety, quality of patient care, ensuring safety surveillance and continuous activities for reducing dangers which threaten patients and staff. Therefore, given the vital role as well as and the perpetual and indispensable service provided by the emergency departments, it is necessary to re-evaluate the manner of service provision in these departments according to the standards and criteria of accreditation, so that an observance of these criteria will lead to improvement of emergency medicine in Iran. Thus, the present study was undertaken with the purpose of accreditation of emergency department of a teaching hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences according to the standards of Iranian Deputy of Health and the JCI. Approach: This is a descriptive-analytic study with a cross-sectional structure. Our study population consisted of 50 individuals of the healthcare staff (physicians and nurses working in morning and evening work shifts of the emergency department in the teaching hospital. Data collection tools consisted of standard questionnaires of the Deputy of Health (9 series and questionnaires developed by authors based on the standards of the Joint Commission International (JCI regarding patient satisfaction with services provided in emergency departments. In order to determine the reliability and validity of the data collection tools, professors and experts reviewed the questionnaire of quality and patient safety in accordance with standards of quality patient safety from the

  4. Characteristics of female victims of assault attending a Scottish accident and emergency department.

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, J; Kariya, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the characteristics of female victims of assault with those of male victims and to see if there is a difference between female victims of domestic assault and females assaulted by strangers or acquaintances. DESIGN: A two month prospective study (June and July 1995) of all assault victims attending a Scottish accident and emergency (A&E) department. SETTING: A large district general A&E department (the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Paisley) seeing 60,000 new patients per y...

  5. Benign Nuchal Rigidity: The Emergency Department Evaluation of Acute Prevertebral Calcific Tendonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Levy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute prevertebral calcific tendonitis (APCT is a rare condition, the exact incidence of which isunknown. It is of particular interest to the emergency physician owing to the other potentiallydevastating conditions in the differential diagnosis of neck stiffness and/or odynophagia (includingretropharyngeal abscess, infectious spondylitis, and meningitis. In contrast, APCT has a benignclinical course and can be easily managed in the emergency department. We will present a case ofAPCT, followed by a brief discussion of the disease and current literature. [West J Emerg Med.2012;13(1:114–116.

  6. Ultrasound-guided Intraarticular Hip Injection for Osteoarthritis Pain in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik S Anderson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-guided intraarticular hip corticosteroid injections may be useful for emergency care providers treating patients with painful exacerbations of osteoarthritis of the hip. Corticosteroid injection is widely recommended as a first-line treatment for painful osteoarthritis of the hip. Bedside ultrasound is readily available in most emergency departments; however, using ultrasound to guide therapeutic hip injections has not yet been described in emergency practice. Herein, we present the first description of a successful emergency physician-performed ultrasound-guided hip injection of local anesthetic and corticosteroid for pain control in a patient with an acute exacerbation of osteoarthritis. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:505–508.

  7. The incidence of injury presentations to emergency departments: what we don't know can hurt us.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meaney, S

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of injury presentations to emergency departments in the Republic of Ireland has not been established. Data were collected relating to all injuries that presented on every eighth day in July-December 2005 to the three hospitals in Cork City. In total, 2,967 injury presentations were recorded. The total, male and female age-adjusted rate of injury presentations was 11,322, 13,933 and 8,550 per 100,000, respectively. The peak male rate was among 15-29 year-olds (26,735 per 100,000), 2.5 times the female rate in the same age range (10,719 per 100,000). The peak female rate was among over 85 year-olds (18,543 per 100,000). Place of injury, activity at time of injury and underlying substance\\/object causing injury were unspecified for 44%, 46% and 43% of recorded injuries. Improving the recording of injury data needs to be prioritised in Irish emergency departments ideally in conjunction with the development of a national injury surveillance system.

  8. Goldratt’s Theory Applied to the Problems Associated with an Emergency Department at a Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Nayak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare costs continue to increase dramatically, while quality remains a significant problem. Reform measures initiated by the government will drive expansion of these costs, further stressing taxpayers and employers, and forcing hospitals to adopt fundamental changes as they try to adjust to increased demands for services and to lessening reimbursements from all payers. This struggle is best seen at the point of entry for many at a hospital: the emergency department (ED. It is at the emergency department that patients’ expectations regarding staff communication with patients, wait times, the triage process, capacity and payment will determine a significant part of a hospital’s revenue. Using Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt’s Thinking Process, we will determine what core problem(s are causing a 362-bed regional West Texas hospital emergency department to lose revenue. Evaluation of the current emergency department will determine the Undesirable Effects (UDE. Using that information will lead to the construction of the Current Reality Tree (CRT, which will bring focus to the core problem(s. To break the constraints, which are the core problem(s, an Evaporative Cloud (EC is generated. And, the end result will be to construct a Future Reality Tree (FRT, which will validate the idea(s generated in the EC. It was determined that there are ten major UDE’s that affected this hospital’s emergency department. They were focused around staff communication, wait times, triage process, information management, service provided and bill collections. A conclusion was made that the core problem dealt with triaging patients and utilization of the services provided by the hospital. Since the reimbursement rate is affected by the patient’s satisfaction, the areas to focus on would be: triage, education, communication and retention. Although it may be neither feasible nor desirable to meet all the patient’s expectations, increased focus on those areas may

  9. Effects of a Dedicated Regional Psychiatric Emergency Service on Boarding of Psychiatric Patients in Area Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Zeller

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mental health patients boarding for long hours, even days, in United States emergency departments (EDs awaiting transfer for psychiatric services has become a considerable and widespread problem. Past studies have shown average boarding times ranging from 6.8 hours to 34 hours. Most proposed solutions to this issue have focused solely on increasing available inpatient psychiatric hospital beds, rather than considering alternative emergency care designs that could provide prompt access to treatment and might reduce the need for many hospitalizations. One suggested option has been the “regional dedicated emergency psychiatric facility,” which serves to evaluate and treat all mental health patients for a given area, and can accept direct transfers from other EDs. This study sought to assess the effects of a regional dedicated emergency psychiatric facility design known at the “Alameda Model” on boarding times and hospitalization rates for psychiatric patients in area EDs. Methods: Over a 30-day period beginning in January 2013, 5 community hospitals in Alameda County, California, tracked all ED patients on involuntary mental health holds to determine boarding time, defined as the difference between when they were deemed stable for psychiatric disposition and the time they were discharged from the ED for transfer to the regional psychiatric emergency service. Patients were also followed to determine the percentage admitted to inpatient psychiatric units after evaluation and treatment in the psychiatric emergency service.Results: In a total sample of 144 patients, the average boarding time was approximately 1 hour and 48 minutes. Only 24.8% were admitted for inpatient psychiatric hospitalization from the psychiatric emergency service. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that the Alameda Model of transferring patients from general hospital EDs to a regional psychiatric emergency service reduced the length of boarding

  10. Policy and procedures for domestic violence patients in Canadian emergency departments: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotch, D; Grunfeld, A; Mackay, K; Ritch, L

    1996-08-01

    A cross-sectional research survey aimed to obtain information concerning 1) the proportion of Canadian emergency departments with domestic violence intervention policies and procedures; 2) how hospitals identify and provide service to patients who have been abused; and 3) measures that have been problematic/helpful in implementing domestic violence protocols in emergency departments. The study sample included 230 Canadian hospitals with emergency departments. Results showed that 198 hospitals returned the questionnaires, of which 39% indicated that there were policies and procedures concerning domestic violence for the emergency departments. Large, major hospitals were more likely than smaller community hospitals to have policies or protocols in place. About 26 hospitals reported screening all patients for domestic violence and 61 hospitals provided referral services and 46 hospitals provided on-site counseling. Physicians were principally involved in the physical examination, referral and identification. Follow-up, emotional support, and safety planning were provided by social workers. Findings of this survey encourage hospitals and individual health care providers to adopt guidelines concerning domestic violence to ensure a widespread adoption and implementation.

  11. Learning to Promote Health at an Emergency Care Department: Identifying Expansive and Restrictive Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Maria; Ekberg, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a planned workplace health promotion intervention, and the aim is to identify conditions that facilitated or restricted the learning to promote health at an emergency care department in a Swedish hospital. The study had a longitudinal design, with interviews before and after the intervention and follow-up…

  12. Endoscopic Removal of an Inadvertently Swallowed Toothbrush in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Martyn Harvey; Grant Cave; Gaynor Prince

    2012-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl inadvertently swallowed a toothbrush during attempted manual induction of emesis. The 20 cm toothbrush was successfully removed via overtube facilitated endoscopy using a retractable snare while the patient was sedated in the emergency department.

  13. Endoscopic Removal of an Inadvertently Swallowed Toothbrush in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn Harvey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old girl inadvertently swallowed a toothbrush during attempted manual induction of emesis. The 20 cm toothbrush was successfully removed via overtube facilitated endoscopy using a retractable snare while the patient was sedated in the emergency department.

  14. What Drives Emergency Department Patient Satisfaction? An Empirical Test using Structural Equation Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Patient satisfaction determinants in emergency departments (EDs) have for decades been heavily investigated. Despite great focus, a lack of consensus about which parameters are deemed most important remains. This study proposes an integrated framework for ED patient satisfaction, testing four key...

  15. Validity of different pediatric early warning scores in the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Seiger (Nienke); I.K. MacOnochie (Ian); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Pediatric early warning scores (PEWS) are being advocated for use in the emergency department (ED). The goal of this study was to compare the validity of different PEWS in a pediatric ED. Methods: Ten different PEWS were evaluated in a large prospective cohort. We included chi

  16. A Profile on Emergency Department Utilization in Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guodong; Pearl, Amanda M.; Kong, Lan; Leslie, Douglas L.; Murray, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    There has been an increase in utilization of the Emergency Department (ED) in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) which may reflect a deficit of services (Green et al., "Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry" 40(3):325-332, 2001; Gurney et al., "Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent…

  17. Improving Emergency Department Door to Doctor Time and Process Reliability: A Successful Implementation of Lean Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mazen J; El-Eid, Ghada R; Saliba, Miriam; Jabbour, Rima; Hitti, Eveline A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of using lean management methods on improving emergency department door to doctor times at a tertiary care hospital.We performed a before and after study at an academic urban emergency department with 49,000 annual visits after implementing a series of lean driven interventions over a 20 month period. The primary outcome was mean door to doctor time and the secondary outcome was length of stay of both admitted and discharged patients. A convenience sample from the preintervention phase (February 2012) was compared to another from the postintervention phase (mid-October to mid-November 2013). Individual control charts were used to assess process stability.Postintervention there was a statistically significant decrease in the mean door to doctor time measure (40.0 minutes ± 53.44 vs 25.3 minutes ± 15.93 P < 0.001). The postintervention process was more statistically in control with a drop in the upper control limits from 148.8 to 72.9 minutes. Length of stay of both admitted and discharged patients dropped from 2.6 to 2.0 hours and 9.0 to 5.5 hours, respectively. All other variables including emergency department visit daily volumes, hospital occupancy, and left without being seen rates were comparable.Using lean change management techniques can be effective in reducing door to doctor time in the Emergency Department and improving process reliability.

  18. The value of the clinical impression in recognizing and treating sepsis patients in the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, Anna Elizabeth; Holman, Mirjam; ter Maaten, Jan Cornelis

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Immediate bedside recognition of sepsis in the emergency department (ED) enables early treatment. This study aims to investigate whether the clinical impression score of different health care providers (a) is a good predictor of the severity of sepsis, (b) is mutually agreed, and (c) corr

  19. Nurse-administered early warning score system can be used for emergency department triage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthea; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Maaløe, Rikke;

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that early warning score systems can identify in-patients at high risk of catastrophic deterioration and this may possibly be used for an emergency department (ED) triage. Bispebjerg Hospital has introduced a multidisciplinary team (MT) in the ED activated by the Bispebjerg Early...

  20. Trauma team activation varies across Dutch emergency departments: a national survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egberink, Rolf; Otten, Harm-Jan; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Vugt, van Arie B.; Doggen, Carine J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tiered trauma team response may contribute to efficient in-hospital trauma triage by reducing the amount of resources required and by improving health outcomes. This study evaluates current practice of trauma team activation (TTA) in Dutch emergency departments (EDs). Methods A survey w

  1. Dermatobia hominis in the accident and emergency department: "I've got you under my skin".

    OpenAIRE

    MacNamara, A; Durham, S

    1997-01-01

    An unusual form of larval infestation from South America is presented which, in view of increasing tourism to South america's tropical areas, may present to any accident and emergency department. Infestation with Dermatobia hominis is reviewed in terms of clinical recognition and life cycle. Techniques of removal are described.

  2. Dermatobia hominis in the accident and emergency department: "I've got you under my skin".

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNamara, A; Durham, S

    1997-05-01

    An unusual form of larval infestation from South America is presented which, in view of increasing tourism to South america's tropical areas, may present to any accident and emergency department. Infestation with Dermatobia hominis is reviewed in terms of clinical recognition and life cycle. Techniques of removal are described.

  3. Pharmacist advice is accepted more for medical than for surgical patients in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer Mogensen, Christian; Olsen, Inger; Thisted, Anette Rehn

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacists' advice may reduce medication errors in the emergency department (ED). However, pharmacists' recommendations are of little value if not acknowledged by physicians. The aim of the present study was to analyze how often and which categories of pharmacist recommendations were taken...... into account by the physicians in a Danish ED. Special attention is paid to problems of significant or vital importance....

  4. Is culture associated with patient safety in the emergency department? A study of staff perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Wagner, C.; Dyck, C. van; Twisk, J.W.R.; Bruijne, M.C. de

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the patient safety culture of Dutch emergency departments (EDs), to examine associations between safety culture dimensions and patient safety grades as reported by ED staff and to compare these associations between nurses and physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey conducte

  5. Emergency department information systems: the technology today, the outlook for tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Emergency department information systems (EDISs) have been available for many years, but they are recently attracting wider interest. In this article, we discuss the forces shaping the EDIS market and how they should play a role in your purchasing decisions. We also offer implementation guidance and provide an overview that describes the key modules that purchasers will select among when configuring their systems.

  6. Factors predicting early outcome in patients admitted at emergency department with severe head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejeb Belfekih Imen

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Improving pre-hospital care and ovoid futile resuscitation to given priority in resource allocation and urgent CT scan of the head to look for operable mass lesions as early detection should improve the prognosis of severe head injury at emergency department.

  7. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury In Children: An Evidence-Based Review Of Emergency Department Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Kirsten; Fairbrother, Hilary

    2016-10-01

    More than 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries occur in adults and children each year in the United States, with approximately 30% occurring in children aged blood pressure in the emergency department to improve neurologic outcomes following pediatric severe traumatic brain injury.

  8. Calibrating Urgency: Triage Decision-Making in a Pediatric Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vimla L.; Gutnik, Lily A.; Karlin, Daniel R.; Pusic, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Triage, the first step in the assessment of emergency department patients, occurs in a highly dynamic environment that functions under constraints of time, physical space, and patient needs that may exceed available resources. Through triage, patients are placed into one of a limited number of categories using a subset of diagnostic information.…

  9. Impact of human coronavirus infections in otherwise healthy children who attended an emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Susanna; Bosis, Samantha; Niesters, Hubert G M; Tremolati, Elena; Begliatti, Enrica; Rognoni, Alessandro; Tagliabue, Claudia; Principi, Nicola; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2006-01-01

    This prospective clinical and virological study of 2,060 otherwise healthy children aged <15 years of age (1,112 males; mean age +/- SD, 3.46 +/- 3.30 years) who attended the Emergency Department of Milan University's Institute of Pediatrics because of an acute disease excluding trauma during the wi

  10. Facilitators and barriers to screening for child abuse in the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.F.M. Louwers (Eveline (Eefje)); I.J. Korfage (Ida); M.J. Affourtit (Marjo); H.J. de Koning (Harry); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To identify facilitators of, and barriers to, screening for child abuse in emergency departments (ED) through interviews with ED staff, members of the hospital Board, and related experts.Methods: This qualitative study is based on semi-structured interviews with 27 profession

  11. Use of alarm features in referral of febrile children to the emergency department : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ierland, Yvette; Elshout, Gijs; Moll, Henritte A.; Nijman, Ruud G.; Vergouwe, Yvonne; van der Lei, Johan; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Oostenbrink, Rianne

    2014-01-01

    Background The diagnostic value of alarm features of serious infections in low prevalence settings is unclear. Aim To explore to what extent alarm features play a role in referral to the emergency department (ED) by GPs who face a febrile child during out-of-hours care. Design and setting Observatio

  12. Use of mobile devices in the emergency department: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexheimer, Judith W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-12-01

    Electronic health records are increasingly used in regional health authorities, healthcare systems, hospitals, and clinics throughout North America. The emergency department provides care for urgent and critically ill patients. Over the past several years, emergency departments have become more computerized. Tablet computers and Smartphones are increasingly common in daily use. As part of the computerization trend, we have seen the introduction of handheld computers, tablets, and Smartphones into practice as a way of providing health professionals (e.g. physicians, nurses) with access to patient information and decision support in the emergency department. In this article, we present a scoping review and outline the current state of the research using mobile devices in the emergency departments. Our findings suggest that there is very little research evidence that supports the use of these mobile devices, and more research is needed to better understand and optimize the use of mobile devices. Given the prevalence of handheld devices, it is inevitable that more decision support, charting, and other activities will be performed on these devices. These developments have the potential to improve the quality and timeliness of care but should be thoroughly evaluated.

  13. Support for Emergency Department Screening for Intimate Partner Violence Depends on Perceived Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witting, Michael D.; Furuno, Jon P.; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Krugman, Scott D.; Perisse, Andre R. S.; Limcangco, Rhona

    2006-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) screening for intimate partner violence (IPV) faces logistic difficulties and has uncertain efficacy. We surveyed 146 ED visitors and 108 ED care providers to compare their support for ED IPV screening in three hypothetical scenarios of varying IPV risk. Visitor support for screening was 5 times higher for the high-risk…

  14. Factors influencing the implementation of the guideline Triage in emergency departments : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.A.P.; Achterberg, Theo van; Adriaansen, Marian; Mintjes, Joke; Schalk, D.M.J.; Kampshoff, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    This is an exploratory study using a qualitative design including: a questionnaire sent to all emergency departments in the Netherlands (n = 108): four focus group interviews, including nurses and ward managers and in-depth interviews with ward managers and doctors. Based on the results, tailored im

  15. Child Maltreatment and Onset of Emergency Department Presentations for Suicide-Related Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Anne E.; Boyle, Michael H.; Bethell, Jennifer; Wekerle, Christine; Goodman, Deborah; Tonmyr, Lil; Leslie, Bruce; Lam, Kelvin; Manion, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether the rates of a first presentation to the emergency department (ED) for suicide-related behavior (SRB) are higher among children/youth permanently removed from their parental home because of substantiated maltreatment than their peers. To describe the health care settings accessed by these children/youth before a…

  16. Rural-Urban Disparities in Child Abuse Management Resources in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Esther K.; Spiro, David M.; Lowe, Robert A.; Newgard, Craig D.; Hall, Michael Kennedy; McConnell, Kenneth John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize differences in child abuse management resources between urban and rural emergency departments (EDs). Methods: We surveyed ED directors and nurse managers at hospitals in Oregon to gain information about available abuse-related resources. Chi-square analysis was used to test differences between urban and rural EDs.…

  17. ['See and Treat' in the Emergency Department: legal aspects and professional nursing responsibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radice, Cristiano; Ghinaglia, Monica; Doneda, Renzo; Bollini, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    The article aim to analyze the legal aspects of professional responsibility in the autonomous nursing care of a patient with a minor health problem treated in a See and Treat area of the Emergency Department through a literature review and an analyses of the Italian legislation about professional exercise. Recent studies have shown that the treatment of the emergency patients affected by minor health problems in separated areas of the A&E by skilled nurses proved to be effective in reducing time to medical examination and the overall time spent in the Emergency Department. Several studies have shown the positive effects of the Emergency Nurse Practitioner (ENP) in terms of reduction of time to medical examination with an increase in patient satisfaction, maintaining an adequate level of quality in the care of patients with minor health problems. The introduction of a See and Treat area, together with the institution of advanced post-triage protocols, represents a possible answer to the overcrowding of the Emergency Department. The aim is the reduction of waiting times and proper allocation of both material and professional resources. The "See and Treat" nurse represents an expert nurse, with an adequate level of competence, who acts in respect to the clinical protocols shared between physicians and nurses. The Italian legislation is not in contrast with the introduction of the See and Treat nurse, on the contrary it offers opportunities for further professional development.

  18. Risk assessment Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (DOE/KCP) PCB discharge to Blue River Sewage Treatment Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidambariah, Venkatesh; Garrett, J.K.; King, K.H.; Yambert, M.W.; Travis, C.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-09-29

    The Environmental Protection Department of the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (DOE/KCP) requested that a risk assessment be performed on the potential health effects of discharges of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the DOE/KCP to the Blue River Sewage Treatment Plant, Kansas City's largest publicly owned treatment works facility (Kansas City POTW). The major objectives of this risk assessment are (1) to determine the potential health impacts of DOE/KCP's current discharges of PCBs to the Kansas City POTW via all reasonable exposure pathways and (2) to determine a health-based, safe'' discharge level for PCBs to the Kansas City POTW. The present risk assessment considers both occupational and public impacts of PCB discharges from the DOE/KCP. Two occupational exposure scenarios assessed are (1) risk to Kansas City POTW sewer line maintenance workers and (2) risk to Kansas City POTW workers during routine operations of the facility. Both types of workers may be dermally exposed to PCBs in sewage. Public risks considered include risk to populations living within 50 km of the Kansas City POTW via inhalation of PCBs from sludge incinerated at the facility. Additionally, risk to the general public associated with PCB releases from the Kansas City POTW to the Missouri River is assessed. These pathways include ingestion of PCBs in drinking water supplied by the Missouri River, dermal adsorption and accidental ingestion of PCBs while swimming in the Missouri River, and ingestion of PCBs through consumption of fish taken from the Missouri River. Risk to breastfed infants from ingestion of PCBs through mothers' milk is also assessed. 108 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Pediatric information seeking behaviour, information needs, and information preferences of health care professionals in general emergency departments: Results from the Translating Emergency Knowledge for Kids (TREKK) Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Shannon D; Albrecht, Lauren; Given, Lisa M; Hartling, Lisa; Johnson, David W; Jabbour, Mona; Klassen, Terry P

    2017-01-09

    The majority of children requiring emergency care are treated in general emergency departments (EDs) with variable levels of pediatric care expertise. The goal of the Translating Emergency Knowledge for Kids (TREKK) initiative is to implement the latest research in pediatric emergency medicine in general EDs to reduce clinical variation.

  20. Evaluation and management of acute abdominal pain in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macaluso CR

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Christopher R Macaluso, Robert M McNamaraDepartment of Emergency Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Evaluation of the emergency department patient with acute abdominal pain is sometimes difficult. Various factors can obscure the presentation, delaying or preventing the correct diagnosis, with subsequent adverse patient outcomes. Clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those life-threatening conditions that require timely intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. This article will review general information on abdominal pain and discuss the clinical approach by review of the history and the physical examination. Additionally, this article will discuss the approach to unstable patients with abdominal pain.Keywords: acute abdomen, emergency medicine, peritonitis

  1. Determining the rate of follow-up after hospital emergency department visits for dental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Beau Meyer,1,2 Eric Adkins,3,4 Nathan M Finnerty,4 Fonda G Robinson5 1Division of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 2Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 3The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Department, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, 5Clinic Administration and Patient Care, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Background: Emergency department (ED visits for dental reasons continue to impact EDs nationwide. This investigation determined the rate of follow-up in an emergency dental clinic (EDC after hospital ED visits for nontraumatic dental conditions. Methods: This prospective investigation reports the number of patients who presented to an ED for nontraumatic dental conditions and the rate of follow-up at an EDC. Upon ED discharge, patients were provided instructions to follow-up for low-cost care at the EDC. Telephone contact was attempted following failed referrals. Descriptive statistics were reported for comparing referral sources and demographic trends. Results: Two hundred and forty-seven referrals were made and 31% followed up for definitive treatment at the EDC. More referrals were made on weekends than on weekdays. Failed referrals were unreachable by telephone in 75% of cases. Tooth extraction was the most common treatment rendered in the EDC. Of the ED patients who accessed EDC care, 14% became comprehensive patients in the EDC's regular dental clinic. Conclusion: Less than one-third of ED referrals to the EDC followed up for definitive care when provided an opportunity to do so, and 75% of referrals were unreachable by telephone in the week following the ED dental visit. Keywords: emergencies, dental health services, health services accessibility, access to care, dental emergency treatment

  2. Psychiatric and Medical Management of Marijuana Intoxication in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui, Quan M.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We use a case report to describe the acute psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency setting. A 34-year-old woman presented with erratic, disruptive behavior and psychotic symptoms after recreational ingestion of edible cannabis. She was also found to have mild hypokalemia and QT interval prolongation. Psychiatric management of cannabis psychosis involves symptomatic treatment and maintenance of safety during detoxification. Acute medical complications of marijuana use are primarily cardiovascular and respiratory in nature; electrolyte and electrocardiogram monitoring is indicated. This patient’s psychosis, hypokalemia and prolonged QTc interval resolved over two days with supportive treatment and minimal intervention in the emergency department. Patients with cannabis psychosis are at risk for further psychotic sequelae. Emergency providers may reduce this risk through appropriate diagnosis, acute treatment, and referral for outpatient care. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(3:414–417.

  3. Evaluation of emergency medical technicians intermediate prediction about their transported patients final disposition in emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzalimoghadam, Mohammad; Mozafari, Javad; Talebian, Mohammad Taghi; Mohammadnejad, Esmaeil; Kasaeian, Amir

    2013-08-07

    This was a prospective cross-sectional study of consecutive transported patients by emergency medical service (EMS) to a referral hospital. The goal of this study was the evaluation of emergency medical technician intermediate prediction about their transported patients disposition in Emergency Department of Imam Khomeini Hospital. 2950 patients were transported to this hospital, Questionnaires were submitted in 300 of consecutive patient transports and completed data were obtained and available upon arrival at hospital for 267 of these cases. Emergency medical technicians intermediate (EMT-I) were asked to predict whether the transported patient would require admission to the hospital, and if so, what will be their prediction of patient actual disposition. Their predictions were compared with emergency specialist physicians. EMT-I predicted that 208 (78%) transports would lead to admission to the hospital, after actual disposition, 232 (%87) patients became admitted. The sensitivity of predicting any admission was 65%, with positive predictive value (PPV) of 39% and specificity of 86% with negative predictive value (NPV) of 94%. The sensitivity of predicting trauma patients (56.2% of total patients) was 55% with PPV of 38%, specificity of 86% and for Non-trauma patients' sensitivity was 80% with PPV of 40% and specificity of 82%. EMT-I in our emergency medical system have very limited ability in prediction of admission and disposition in transported patients and their prediction were better in Non-trauma patients. So in our EMS, the pre-hospital diversion and necessity of transporting policies should not be based on EMS personnel disposition.

  4. Evaluation of emergency medical technicians intermediate prediction about their transported patients final disposition in emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Afzalimoghadam

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This was a prospective cross-sectional study of consecutive transported patients by emergency medical service (EMS to a referral hospital. The goal of this study was the evaluation of emergency medical technician intermediate prediction about their transported patients disposition in Emergency Department of Imam Khomeini Hospital. 2950 patients were transported to this hospital, Questionnaires were submitted in 300 of consecutive patient transports and completed data were obtained and available upon arrival at hospital for 267 of these cases. Emergency medical technicians intermediate (EMT-I were asked to predict whether the transported patient would require admission to the hospital, and if so, what will be their prediction of patient actual disposition. Their predictions were compared with emergency specialist physicians. EMT-I predicted that 208 (78% transports would lead to admission to the hospital, after actual disposition, 232 (%87 patients became admitted. The sensitivity of predicting any admission was 65%, with positive predictive value (PPV of 39% and specificity of 86% with negative predictive value (NPV of 94%. The sensitivity of predicting trauma patients (56.2% of total patients was 55% with PPV of 38%, specificity of 86% and for Non-trauma patients' sensitivity was 80% with PPV of 40% and specificity of 82%. EMT-I in our emergency medical system have very limited ability in prediction of admission and disposition in transported patients and their prediction were better in Non-trauma patients. So in our EMS, the pre-hospital diversion and necessity of transporting policies should not be based on EMS personnel disposition.

  5. Factors predicting early outcome in patients admitted at emergency department with severe head trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rejeb Belfekih Imen; Chakroun Olfa; Chtara Kamilia; Boujelbene Meriam; Ksibi Hichem; Chaari Adel; Bahloul Mabrouk; Rekik Noureddine

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To determine predictive factors of early mortality among severe traumatic brain injury in emergency department. Methods: This study is based on a retrospective analysis of 198 admitted in emergency depatment with severe head injury (Glasgow coma scale score≤8) of an university hospital (Sfax, Tunisia). Basic demographic, clinical, biological and radiological data were recorded on admission and during emergency department stay. Results: Forty two patients were died. Univariate analysis showed that the presence of shock, cardiac arrest, bilateral mydriasis, high value of injury severity score and low value of Glasgow coma scale were associated with mortality. Moreover, meningeal hemorrhage, cerebral and subdural haematoma were associated with poorer outcome. Multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with a poor prognosis were cardiac arrest cerebral and the presence of cerebral haematoma. Conclusions: Improving pre-hospital care and ovoid futile resuscitation to given priority in resource allocation and urgent CT scan of the head to look for operable mass lesions as early detection should improve the prognosis of severe head injury at emergency department.

  6. Practical implications of implementing emergency department crowding interventions: summary of a moderated panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jesse M; Pilgrim, Randy L; Schneider, Sandra M; Siegel, Bruce; Viccellio, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding continues to be a major public health problem in the United States and around the world. In June 2011, the Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference focused on exploring interventions to alleviate ED crowding and to generate a series of research agendas on the topic. As part of the conference, a panel of leaders in the emergency care community shared their perspectives on emergency care, crowding, and some of the fundamental issues facing emergency care today. The panel participants included Drs. Bruce Siegel, Sandra Schneider, Peter Viccellio, and Randy Pilgrim. The panel was moderated by Dr. Jesse Pines. Dr. Siegel's comments focused on his work on Urgent Matters, which conducted two multihospital collaboratives related to improving ED crowding and disseminating results. Dr. Schneider focused on the future of ED crowding measures, the importance of improving our understanding of ED boarding and its implications, and the need for the specialty of emergency medicine (EM) to move beyond the discussion of unnecessary visits. Dr. Viccellio's comments focused on several areas, including the need for a clear message about unnecessary ED visits by the emergency care community and potential solutions to improve ED crowding. Finally, Dr. Pilgrim focused on the effect of effective leadership and management in crowding interventions and provided several examples of how these considerations directly affected the success or failure of well-constructed ED crowding interventions. This article describes each panelist's comments in detail.

  7. Swedish emergency department triage and interventions for improved patient flows: a national update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrokhnia Nasim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Scandinavia, emergency department triage and patient flow processes, are under development. In Sweden, the triage development has resulted in two new triage scales, the Adaptive Process Triage and the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System. Both these scales have logistic components, aiming to improve patient flows. The aim of this study was to report the development and current status of emergency department triage and patient flow processes in Sweden. Methods In 2009 and 2010 the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment sent out a questionnaire to the ED managers in all (74 Swedish hospital emergency departments. The questionnaire comprised questions about triage and interventions to improve patient flows. Results Nearly all (97% EDs in Sweden employed a triage scale in 2010, which was an increase from 2009 (73%. Further, the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System was the triage scale most commonly implemented across the country. The implementation of flow-related interventions was not as common, but more than half (59% of the EDs have implemented or plan to implement nurse requested X-ray. Conclusions There has been an increase in the use of triage scales in Swedish EDs during the last few years, with acceleration for the past two years. Most EDs have come to use the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System, which also indicates regional co-operation. The implementation of different interventions for improved patient flows in EDs most likely is explained by the problem of crowding. Generally, more studies are needed to investigate the economical aspects of these interventions.

  8. Prospective Analysis of Geriatric Patients Admitted to Emergency Department With Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir Akturk

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to reveal the demographic characteristics, causes of trauma, physical examination findings, the presence of fractures and the status of the outcome of the geriatric trauma patients admitted to the emergency department of an educational research hospital. Material and Methods: This study covers all the cases over 65 years who were admitted to emergency department with trauma between September 1 2011-31 August 2012. The demographic characteristics of the patients such as, age, gender, date of application and as well as the causes of trauma, physical examination findings and outcome situation in the emergency department were evaluated. The study was performed prospectively. SPSS V.20 was used for statistical analysis of the data obtained. Results: Total 175 patients were included to the study, 74 were male (42.28% and 101 were female (57.72%. The mean age of male patients were 75.01 ± 6.557 while the mean age of female patients were 76.10 ± 7.353. The most common cause of trauma in both gender was falls. This rate was 91.1% in female and 8.9% in male patients. 40.6% of the female patients and 27% of the male patients were admitted to the hospital before because of any trauma. The most common form of trauma according to exposed body localization in both gender was extremity traumas. It was seen in 51.5% of the females and 56.8% of the males. 30 female patients (29.7% and 13 male patients (17.6% had fracture in limbs. 78.3% of all patients were discharged from the emergency department and 21.7% of the patients were hospitalised. None of the patients were died in emergency department and none of the patients were referred to another institution from the emergency department. Total 38 patients were hospitalised, 32 of them were discharged, 2 of them were referred to another institution, and 4 of them were died. 26 of 38 hospitalised patients had undergone surgery while 20 of them were orthopedic surgeries

  9. Acute Testicular Ischemia following Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair Identified in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Finnerty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR is perhaps the most widely utilized surgical procedure for patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysms. This procedure is minimally invasive and reduces inpatient hospitalization requirements. The case involves a 72-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with right testicular ischemia two days following EVAR. Given the minimal inpatient hospitalization associated with this procedure, emergency physicians are likely to encounter associated complications. Ischemic and thromboembolic events following EVAR are extremely rare but require prompt vascular surgery intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality.

  10. How urgent are cases brought to the emergency department by ambulance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melih Yuksel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Emergency departments are the first places to which patients present with unexpected or unforeseen health problems. The purpose of this study was to assess the urgency of cases brought by ambulance to the Hospital on the basis of a three-level triage system. Methods: This study was performed between 01.06.2013 and 31.09.2013 at the Diyarbakır Education and Research Hospital. Our emergency service unit is a third degree service for all adult patient groups and all child trauma types. Triage of patients brought to the emergency department by ambulance was performed by emergency medicine specialists. Patients’ vital findings, identity data and triage categories were assessed. Results: 712 patients were included, 382 (53.7% male and 330 (46.3% female, with a mean age of 45. In this study, 619 (86.9% patients were transferred from the scene and 93 (13.1 between hospitals, 483 (67.8% patients were brought by emergency medicine technician (EMT teams, 107 (15% by physician-led teams, 107 (15 by paramedic teams and 15 (2.1% by other teams, 442 (62.1% patients were assessed as yellow, 141 (19.8% as green and 129 (19.1% as red zone. Five hundred eighty (81.5% patients were discharged and 115 (15.9% were hospitalized. Conclusion: Emergency health services are clearly developing rapidly in Turkey. In order for pre-hospital emergency health services not to be abused, we think that these services should be up to the standards of those in developed countries and that public awareness needs to be increased, particularly with regard to triage. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (2: 126-129

  11. Alternative Destination Transport? The Role of Paramedics in Optimal Use of the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Neeki

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alternative destination transportation by emergency medical services (EMS is a subject of hot debate between those favoring all patients being evaluated by an emergency physician (EP and those recognizing the need to reduce emergency department (ED crowding. This study aimed to determine whether paramedics could accurately assess a patient’s acuity level to determine the need to transport to an ED. Methods: We performed a prospective double-blinded analysis of responses recorded by paramedics and EPs of arriving patients’ acuity level in a large Level II trauma center between April 2015 and November 2015. Under-triage was defined as lower acuity assessed by paramedics but higher acuity by EPs. Over-triage was defined as higher acuity assessed by paramedics but lower acuity by EPs. The degree of agreement between the paramedics and EPs’ evaluations of patient’s acuity level was compared using Chi-square test. Results: We included a total of 503 patients in the final analysis. For paramedics, 2 51 (49.9% patients were assessed to be emergent, 178 (35.4% assessed as urgent, and 74 (14.7% assessed as non-emergent/non-urgent. In comparison, the EPs assessed 296 (58.9% patients as emergent, 148 (29.4% assessed as urgent, and 59 (11.7% assessed as non-emergent/ non-urgent. Paramedics agreed with EPs regarding the acuity level assessment on 71.8% of the cases. The overall under- and over-triage were 19.3% and 8.9%, respectively. A moderate Kappa=0.5174 indicated moderate inter-rater agreement between paramedics’ and EPs’ assessment on the same cohort of patients. Conclusion: There is a significant difference in paramedic and physician assessment of patients into emergent, urgent, or non-emergent/non-urgent categories. The field triage of a patient to an alternative destination by paramedics under their current scope of practice and training cannot be supported.

  12. Patient Ethnicity Affects Triage Assessments and Patient Prioritization in U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Jacob M; Coulombe, Patrick; Alcock, Joe; Kruger, Eric; Stith, Sarah S; Strenth, Chance; Parshall, Mark; Cichowski, Sara B

    2016-04-01

    Ethnic minority patients receive lower priority triage assignments in Veteran's Affairs (VA) emergency departments (EDs) compared to White patients, but it is currently unknown whether this disparity arises from generalized biases across the triage assessment process or from differences in how objective and/or subjective institution-level or person-level information is incorporated into the triage assessment process, thus contributing to disparate treatment.The VA database of electronic medical records of patients who presented to the VA ED from 2008 to 2012 was used to measure patient ethnicity, self-reported pain intensity (PI) levels, heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and nurse-provided triage assignment, the Emergency Severity Index (ESI) score. Multilevel, random effects linear modeling was used to control for demographic and clinical characteristics of patients as well as age, gender, and experience of triage nurses.A total of 359,642 patient/provider encounters between 129,991 VA patients and 774 nurses were included in the study. Patients were 61% non-Hispanic White [NHW], 28% African-American, 7% Hispanic, 2% Asian-American, nurses and patients, African-American, Hispanic, and mixed-ethnicity patients reported higher average PI scores but lower HRs and RRs than NHW patients. NHW patients received higher priority ESI ratings with lower PI when compared against African-American patients. NHW patients with low to moderate HRs also received higher priority ESI scoring than African-American, Hispanic, Asian-American, and Mixed-ethnicity patients; however, when HR was high NHWs received lower priority ESI ratings than each of the minority groups (except for African-Americans).This study provides evidence for systemic differences in how patients' vital signs are applied for determining ESI scores for different ethnic groups. Additional prospective research will be needed to determine how this specific person-level mechanism affects healthcare quality and

  13. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths — United States, 2001–2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In general, total combined rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and deaths have increased over the past...

  14. Implementation of a clinical pathway for emergency department out-patient management of deep vein thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kidney, R

    2010-09-01

    There is good evidence demonstrating that outpatient management of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is feasible and safe. However, few emergency departments in Ireland have implemented care pathways for outpatient management of DVT. The aim of this study was to examine the safety and efficacy of implementing an Emergency Department (ED)- care pathway for outpatient management of patients with DVT. A retrospective observational study of this care pathway introduced at our institution was performed. The primary outcome measure was the number of hospital admissions avoided by using the care pathway. Two hundred and eighty-four patients presenting to the ED with suspected lower limb DVT, were managed using the care pathway over a 6 month period. Forty-nine patients (17%) had a DVT diagnosed. Thirty-nine patients (81%) were suitable for outpatient DVT management. Ten patients (19%) were admitted to hospital. At 3 months there were no reported cases of the following complications: missed DVT, pulmonary embolism or death.

  15. Game theoretic analysis of congestion, safety and security networks, air traffic and emergency departments

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing reader insights into the roles of intelligent agents in networks, air traffic and emergency departments, this volume focuses on congestion in systems where safety and security are at stake, devoting special attention to applying game theoretic analysis of congestion to: protocols in wired and wireless networks; power generation, air transportation and emergency department overcrowding. Reviewing exhaustively the key recent research into the interactions between game theory, excessive crowding, and safety and security elements, this book establishes a new research angle by illustrating linkages between the different research approaches and serves to lay the foundations for subsequent analysis. Congestion (excessive crowding) is defined in this work as all kinds of flows; e.g., road/sea/air traffic, people, data, information, water, electricity, and organisms. Analyzing systems where congestion occurs – which may be in parallel, series, interlinked, or interdependent, with flows one way or both way...

  16. Multi-agent Architecture for the Multi-Skill Tasks Modeling at the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmi, Ines; Zgaya, Hayfa; Hammadi, Slim; Gammoudi, Lotfi; Martinot, Alain; Beuscart, Régis; Renard, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Patient journey in the Pediatric Emergency Department is a highly complex process. Current approaches for modeling are insufficient because they either focus only on the single ancillary units, or therefore do not consider the entire treatment process of the patients, or they do not account for the dynamics of the patient journey modeling. Therefore, we propose an agent based approach in which patients and emergency department human resources are represented as autonomous agents who are able to react flexible to changes and disturbances through pro-activeness and reactiveness. The main aim of this paper is to present the overall design of the proposed multi-agent system, emphasizing its architecture and the behavior of each agent of the model. Besides, we describe inter-agent communication based on the agent interaction protocol to ensure cooperation between agents when they perform the coordination of tasks for the users. This work is integrated into the ANR HOST project (ANR-11-TecSan-010).

  17. Barriers and facilitators for implementing a new screening tool in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Jeanette W.; Sivertsen, Ditte M.; Petersen, Janne;

    2016-01-01

    Domains Framework guided data collection and analysis. Content analysis was performed whereby new themes and themes already existing within each domain were described. Results: Six predominant domains were identified: (1) professional role and identity; (2) beliefs about consequences; (3) goals; (4......Aim: The aim was to identify the factors that were perceived as most important as facilitators or barriers to the introduction and intended use of a new tool in the emergency department among nurses and a geriatric team. Background: A high incidence of functional decline after hospitalisation...... to identify patients at particularly high risk of functional decline and readmission was developed. Design: Qualitative study based on semistructured interviews with nurses and a geriatric team in the emergency department and semistructured single interviews with their managers. Methods: The Theoretical...

  18. E-FAST:A propos of hemopericardium in the Emergency Department

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alejandro Cardozo; Federico Puerta; Libardo Valencia

    2016-01-01

    The extended-focused assessment with sonography in trauma is still recognized as a technique approach to patients whose trauma involves the chest and the abdomen, with the aim of ruling out conditions as pneumothorax, hemothorax, pericardial effusion/cardiac tamponade, and intraperitoneal free fluid. Although CT is the gold standard test, the inconvenience of moving unstable patients and the amount of time it takes to carry it out, makes it not always possible in the Emergency Department, which positions the ultrasound as an ideal tool in the evaluation of patients with trauma in the Emergency Department. In this case report, we presented the case of a patient who complains of multiple stab wounds, and the extended-focused assessment with sonography in trauma confirmed the diagnostic impressions.

  19. The Feasibility of Utilizing a Comic for Education in the Emergency Department Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Aaron; Drendel, Amy L; Ashwal, Gary; Thomas, Alex

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of a comic education module in the Emergency Department setting. A convenience sample of 50 injured children and their caregivers were enrolled. The comic was found to be likeable, easy to read, and provided important information to both children and their caregivers. Total time to read the comic was three minutes (SD 1.4, range 1.4-7.1). Most children (60%) read the comic independently, including all children over age 14 years. At 72-hour phone follow-up, 86% of caregivers had accurate recall of all three comic teaching points. This innovative comic educational module is feasible for use for children ages 4-18 years in the Emergency Department. Though this comic was intended to educate children, caregivers recalled all three teaching points 72 hours after discharge.

  20. [Simulation of a hospital emergency department and its potential use in management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber Pérez, P; González López-Valcárcel, B

    1994-01-01

    We developed a computer simulation model of Emergency Department Operations of the Hospital Ntra. Sra. del Pino as a queue system. We designed and analyzed alternative functional structures of the Department and their implications on resources organization and reallocation. We programmed the operations, relations and flows between the components of the system with the simulation language SIMSCRIPT II.5. We have designed alternative configurations to assess how technical efficiency could be improved through the reallocation of human resources; how the system react would to interarrival time of patients changes; and what decisions must be taken about resources allocation in order to improve efficiency. Triage, Emergency Laboratory and radiology have the maximum average waiting times (11, 31 and 12 minutes, respectively). Some alternative organization patterns may improve this problem. Their social cost is also quantified in this work.

  1. Success of applying early goal-directed therapy for septic shock patients in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worapratya P

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Panita Worapratya,1 Apisit Wanjaroenchaisuk,2 Jutharat Joraluck,3 Prasit Wuthisuthimethawee1 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Songklanagarind Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, 2Emergency Department, Samitivej Thonburi Hospital, Bangkok, 3Emergency Department, Hatyai Hospital, Hatyai, Songkhla, Thailand Background: Since early goal-directed therapy (EGDT became standard care in severe sepsis and septic shock patients in intensive care units many years ago, we suppose that the survival rate of severe sepsis and septic shock patients improves if the resuscitative procedure is quickly implemented and is initiated in the emergency room. Objective: We aimed at recording emergency department time to improve our patient care system as well as determine the rate at which EGDT goals can be achieved. The second analysis is to find out how much we can improve the survival rate. Methods: This was a prospective observational study in an emergency room setting at a tertiary care facility where EGDT was applied for resuscitation of severe sepsis and septic shock patients. The data recorded were the initial vital signs, APACHE II (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, SAP II (Simplified Acute Physiology II score, SOFA (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, time at which EGDT goals were achieved (central venous oxygen saturation [Scvo2] >70%, initial and final diagnosis, and outcome of treatment. The t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to compare between the achieved goal and nonachieved goal groups. Results: There were 63 cases of severe sepsis in the study period. Only 55 patients submitted a signed consent form and had central line insertion. Twenty-eight (50.9% cases were male. Thirty-nine (70.9% patients achieved the goal, and the mean SAP II score was 8. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (P-value =0.097. Thirty of the 39 patients (70.9% survived in

  2. Prevalence of intimate partner violence in patients presenting with traumatic injuries to a Guyanese emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) occurs throughout the world, and has both short- term and long- term negative health effects. Little is know about the prevalence of IPV in patients presenting to Emergency Departments (EDs) in the developing world. This information is needed to help delineate the scope of the problem and shape effective interventions to combat IPV. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of intimate partner violence in adult patients with acute tra...

  3. Goldratt’s Theory Applied to the Problems Associated with an Emergency Department at a Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Soumya Nayak; Lloyd J. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare costs continue to increase dramatically, while quality remains a significant problem. Reform measures initiated by the government will drive expansion of these costs, further stressing taxpayers and employers, and forcing hospitals to adopt fundamental changes as they try to adjust to increased demands for services and to lessening reimbursements from all payers. This struggle is best seen at the point of entry for many at a hospital: the emergency department (ED). It is at the eme...

  4. Report of an audit of nurse triage in an accident and emergency department.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, T W; Tseng, G; Lee, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    The nurse triage process in an accident and emergency (A&E) department was audited as part of the nursing quality assurance programme. It was found that in most cases documentation was adequate and guidelines had been adhered to. Triage decisions were accurate in most cases using the discharge diagnosis as a bench-mark. Waiting time improvements were also seen. Triage audit was a useful tool in the continuous quality improvement effort.

  5. Self Inflicted Injuries among Children in United States - estimates from a nationwide emergency department sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Sulyman

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objectives of the current study are to provide nationally representative estimates of hospital based emergency department visits (ED attributed to self inflicted injuries and attempted suicides among children in United States; and to identify potential methods of such intentional self inflicted injuries and attempted suicides. METHODS: The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (year 2007 was used. All ED visits occurring among children (aged ≤18 years with an External Cause of Injury for any of self inflicted injuries were selected. Outcomes examined include hospital ED charges and hospitalization charges. All estimates were projected to national levels. RESULTS: 77,420 visits to hospital based emergency departments were attributed to self inflicted injuries among children (26,045 males and 51,370 females. The average age of the ED visits was 15.7 years. 134 patients died in ED's (106 males and 28 females and 93 died in hospitals following in-patient admission (75 males and 18 females. A greater proportion of male ED visits were discharged routinely as opposed to female ED visits (51.1% versus 44%. A greater proportion of male ED visits also died in the emergency departments compared to female visits (0.4% versus 0.05%. 17,965 ED visits necessitated admission into same hospital. The mean charge for each ED visit was $1,874. Self inflicted injuries by poisoning were the most frequently reported sources accounting for close to 70% of all ED visits. CONCLUSIONS: Females comprise a greater proportion of ED visits attributed to self inflicted injuries. 227 children died either in the ED's or in hospitals. The current study results highlight the burden associated with such injuries among children.

  6. Weber B Distal Fibular Fracture Diagnosed by Point of Care Ultrasound in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Makinen, James

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 45 year-old woman who presented to the Emergency Department (ED) after an acute ankle inversion injury. After history and physical exam suggested a potential fracture, point of care (POC) ultrasound demonstrated a cortical defect of the distal fibula, consistent with fracture. Plain radiography failed to demonstrate a fracture. Later, the fracture was identified as a Weber B distal fibular fracture by stress-view radiography. This case reviews the evaluation of acute a...

  7. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Fever 1 in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayriye Gonullu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare and life threatening complication of antipsychotic therapy. It presents with fever, altered mental status, autonomic instability and muscle rigidity. Differential diagnosis consist many conditions. NMS is a diagnosis of exclusion. NMS is in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with fever to emergency department, where careful history and previous medication use is essential for diagnosing and treating this phenomenon.

  8. Understanding patient acceptance and refusal of HIV testing in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Christopoulos Katerina A; Weiser Sheri D; Koester Kimberly A; Myers Janet J; White Douglas AE; Kaplan Beth; Morin Stephen F

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Despite high rates of patient satisfaction with emergency department (ED) HIV testing, acceptance varies widely. It is thought that patients who decline may be at higher risk for HIV infection, thus we sought to better understand patient acceptance and refusal of ED HIV testing. Methods In-depth interviews with fifty ED patients (28 accepters and 22 decliners of HIV testing) in three ED HIV testing programs that serve vulnerable urban populations in northern California. Re...

  9. Effect of Language Barriers on Follow-up Appointments After an Emergency Department Visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Joshua; Baker, David W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether patients who encountered language barriers during an emergency department visit were less likely to be referred for a follow-up appointment and less likely to complete a recommended appointment. DESIGN Cohort study. SETTING Public hospital emergency department. PARTICIPANTS English- and Spanish-speaking patients (N =714) presenting with nonemergent medical problems. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Patients were interviewed to determine sociodemographic information, health status, whether an interpreter was used, and whether an interpreter should have been used. The dependent variables were referral for a follow-up appointment after the emergency department visit and appointment compliance, as determined by chart review and the hospital information system. The proportion of patients who received a follow-up appointment was 83% for those without language barriers, 75% for those who communicated through an interpreter, and 76% for those who said an interpreter should have been used but was not (P =.05). In multivariate analysis, the adjusted odds ratio for not receiving a follow-up appointment was 1.92 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11 to 3.33) for patients who had an interpreter and 1.79 (95% CI, 1.00 to 3.23) for patients who said an interpreter should have been used (compared with patients without language barriers). Appointment compliance rates were similar for patients who communicated through an interpreter, those who said an interpreter should have been used but was not, and those without language barriers (60%, 54%, and 64%, respectively; P =.78). CONCLUSIONS Language barriers may decrease the likelihood that a patient is given a follow-up appointment after an emergency department visit. However, patients who experienced language barriers were equally likely to comply with follow-up appointments. PMID:10760001

  10. Online Health Information Impacts Patients’ Decisions to Seek Emergency Department Care

    OpenAIRE

    Pourmand, Ali; Sikka, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of online health information (OHI) and patients’ decisions to seek emergency department (ED) care. Methods: We conducted a survey of a convenience sample of 489 ambulatory patients at an academic ED between February and September 2006. The primary measure was the prevalence of Internet use, and the secondary outcome was the impact of OHI on patients’ decision to seek ED care. Results: The study group comprised 175 (38%) males. Mean age wa...

  11. Another look at Emergency Department HIV screening in practice: no need to revise expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czarnogosrki Maggie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent study reported a lower than expected specificity and positive predictive value of the rapid oral HIV test in the setting of routine emergency department (ED screening. These results appeared inconsistent with the findings in another urban Emergency Department during the same time period. Objective To compare the specificity and positive predictive vale (PPV of an oral rapid HIV test used in an ED screening program in Washington DC with that performed in the USHER clinical trial. Design Period cross-sectional analysis of rapid oral HIV testing conducted in an ongoing HIV screening program emergency department patients. Setting The George Washington University Emergency Department (Washington DC from 7 February to 1 October 2007. Patients 1,560 adults seen in the ED for non-HIV-related presenting complaints, who participated in the HIV screening program. Intervention Rapid HIV testing with the OraQuick ADVANCE Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test (OraSure Technologies, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Patients with reactive rapid test results were offered Western blot testing for confirmation. Measurements Specificity and positive predictive value for the program were determined. Findings were compared to those found in the USHER trial. Results Of 1,560 patients screened for HIV, 13 [0.8%, 95% CI 0.38% to 1.28%] had a reactive HIV screening test, and all were confirmed to be positive by Western Blot. The specificity was 100% (95% CI 99.6%-100%. Limitation Since non-reactive tests were not confirmed, the test sensitivity cannot be determined. Conclusion Review of our data conflict with findings from the USHER study surrounding false positive OraQuick HIV screening. Our data suggest that rapid HIV screening protocols implemented in EDs outside of the clinical trial paradigm perform effectively without an excess of false positive results. Compared with other screening tests, HIV rapid screening should remain an essential component of ED

  12. Web-Based Predictive Analytics to Improve Patient Flow in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, David L.

    2012-01-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) simulation project was established to demonstrate how requirements-driven analysis and process simulation can help improve the quality of patient care for the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA) Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMC). This project developed a web-based simulation prototype of patient flow in EDs, validated the performance of the simulation against operational data, and documented IT requirements for the ED simulation.

  13. Bicycle-related injuries: a survey in a pediatric emergency department.

    OpenAIRE

    Cushman, R; Down, J; MacMillan, N; Waclawik, H

    1990-01-01

    The number of bicycle-related injuries has risen significantly with the increased popularity of bicycle riding in Canada. The risk of injury is highest among children. To assess the magnitude of the problem and to identify the contributing factors we used a questionnaire, injury reports and patient charts to survey bicycle-related injuries among children brought to the emergency department of the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, between May 1 and Sept. 30, 1988. The questionnai...

  14. “Sickle Cell Disease in the Emergency Department: Atypical Complications and Management”

    OpenAIRE

    Brandow, Amanda M.; Liem, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is the most common inherited blood disorder in the United States. This disorder of hemoglobin structure leads to a chronic hemolytic anemia and complex chronic disease manifested by sudden, severe, and life-threatening complications. These acute complications can occur in any organ system beginning in early childhood and lasting throughout life. The intermittent nature and acuity of these complications lend the emergency department to be an important site of care. The hall...

  15. The intersecting roles of violence, gender, and substance use in the emergency department: a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Esther K; Benz, Madeline; Rybarczyk, Megan; Broderick, Kerry; Linden, Judith; Boudreaux, Edwin D; Ranney, Megan L

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between gender, violence, and substance use in the emergency department (ED) is complex. This article examines the role of gender in the intersection of substance use and three types of violence: peer violence, intimate partner violence, and firearm violence. Current approaches to treatment of substance abuse and violence are similar across both genders; however, as patterns of violence and substance abuse differ by gender, interventions may be more effective if they are designed with a specific gender focus.

  16. Pediatric tea tree oil aspiration treated with surfactant in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David B; Wang, George S; Buchanan, Jennie A

    2015-04-01

    Tea tree oil is an essential oil containing a mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons. We describe an 18-month-old male patient who ingested tea tree oil, developed central nervous system depression, respiratory distress, and received early emergency department treatment with surfactant. Early treatment of hydrocarbon pneumonitis with surfactant has not been previously described. Early administration of surfactant should be further evaluated for treatment of hydrocarbon aspiration.

  17. Design and evaluation of analytical tools for emergency department management based on machine learning techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The Spanish National Healthcare System (NHS) is mostly publicly funded and provided. It is considered highly cost-efficient according to international studies based on World Health Organization (WHO) data. However, the contention of healthcare costs increases while maintaining adequate levels of quality of care, is still a largely unsolved problem. In recent years, Emergency Departments (EDs) of specialized care hospitals have been subjected to budget restrictions, increased visits and increa...

  18. Insufficient knowledge about battered child syndrome among doctors in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Jenny Korsgaard; Bersang, Ann Buhl; Thorninger, Rikke;

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the present knowledge regarding battered child syndrome (BCS) among doctors in the emergency department. Nineteen doctors with different educational levels from seven hospitals in Denmark were interviewed. For children younger than 18 months, 68%, 65% and 25......% of the participants related femur-, collum costae- and corner fractures to BCS respectively. We found that more than one third of the 19 doctors did not know which fractures to look for when suspecting BCS....

  19. Lack of Gender Disparities in Emergency Department Triage of Acute Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Tracy E.; Choo, Esther K.; Seigel, Todd A.; Palms, Danielle; Silver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Previous literature has shown gender disparities in the care of acute ischemic stroke. Compared to men, women wait longer for brain imaging and are less likely to receive intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Emergency department (ED) triage is an important step in the rapid assessment of stroke patients and is a possible contributor to disparities. It is unknown whether gender differences exist in ED triage of acute stroke patients. Our primary objective was to d...

  20. Identifying Patients at Risk of Deterioration in the Joint Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2015-01-01

    at the case through the lenses of common information spaces. In particular, we apply Bossen’s seven-parameter framework to discover new dimensions of how Emergency Departments and individual clinicians identify and respond to unforeseen events, and how they handle the associated cognitive challenges. We...... complement these findings with a review of a novel taxonomy for patient monitoring. Our contribution is the identification of four improvement areas for patient monitoring platforms in terms of support for the identification of patient deterioration....

  1. Supporting Patient Care in the Emergency Department with a Computerized Whiteboard System

    OpenAIRE

    Aronsky, Dominik; Jones, Ian; Lanaghan, Kevin; Slovis, Corey M.

    2008-01-01

    Efficient information management and communication within the emergency department (ED) is essential to providing timely and high-quality patient care. The ED whiteboard (census board) usually serves as an ED’s central access point for operational and patient-related information. This article describes the design, functionality, and experiences with a computerized ED whiteboard, which has the ability to display relevant operational and patient-related information in real time. Embedded functi...

  2. The Impact of Emergency Physician Seniority on Clinical Efficiency, Emergency Department Resource Use, Patient Outcomes, and Disposition Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao-Jui; Syue, Yuan-Jhen; Tsai, Tsung-Cheng; Wu, Kuan-Han; Lee, Chien-Hung; Lin, Yan-Ren

    2016-02-01

    The ability of emergency physicians (EPs) to continue within the specialty has been called into question due to high stress in emergency departments (EDs).The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of EP seniority on clinical performance.A retrospective, 1-year cohort study was conducted across 3 EDs in the largest health-care system in Taiwan. Participants included 44,383 adult nontrauma patients who presented to the EDs. Physicians were categorized as junior, intermediate, and senior EPs according to ≤5, 6 to 10, and >10 years of ED work experience. The door-to-order and door-to-disposition time were used to evaluate EP efficiency. Emergency department resource use indicators included diagnostic investigations of electrocardiography, plain film radiography, laboratory tests, and computed tomography scans. Discharge and mortality rates were used as patient outcomes. Disposition accuracy was evaluated by ED revisit rate.Senior EPs were found to have longer door-to-order (11.3, 12.4 minutes) and door-to-disposition (2, 1.7 hours) time than nonsenior EPs in urgent and nonurgent patients (junior: 9.4, 10.2 minutes and 1.7, 1.5 hours; intermediate: 9.5, 10.7 minutes and 1.7, 1.5 hours). Senior EPs tended to order fewer electrocardiograms, radiographs, and computed tomography scans in nonurgent patients. Adjusting for age, sex, disease acuity, and medical setting, patients treated by junior and intermediate EPs had higher mortality in the ED (adjusted odd ratios, 1.5 and 1.6, respectively).Compared with EPs with ≤10 years of work experience, senior EPs take more time for order prescription and patient disposition, use fewer diagnostic investigations, particularly for nonurgent patients, and are associated with a lower ED mortality rate.

  3. Clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with valvular heart disease admitted to the emergency department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Ricardo Casalino Sanches de [Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Katz, Marcelo [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tarasoutchi, Flávio [Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with valvular heart disease who arrived decompensated at the emergency department of a university hospital in Brazil. A descriptive analysis of clinical and echocardiographic data of 174 patients with severe valvular disease, who were clinically decompensated and went to the emergency department of a tertiary cardiology hospital, in the State of São Paulo, in 2009. The mean age of participants was 56±17 years and 54% were female. The main cause of valve disease was rheumatic in 60%, followed by 15% of degenerative aortic disease and mitral valve prolapse in 13%. Mitral regurgitation (27.5%) was the most common isolated valve disease, followed by aortic stenosis (23%), aortic regurgitation (13%) and mitral stenosis (11%). In echocardiographic data, the mean left atrial diameter was 48±12mm, 38±12mm for the left ventricular systolic diameter, and 54±12mm for the diastolic diameter; the mean ejection fraction was 56±13%, and the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 53±16mmHg. Approximately half of patients (44%) presented atrial fibrillation, and over one third of them (37%) had already undergone another cardiac surgery. Despite increased comorbidities and age-dependent risk factors commonly described in patients with valvular heart disease, the clinical profile of patients arriving at the emergency department represented a cohort of rheumatic patients in more advanced stages of disease. These patients require priority care in high complexity specialized hospitals.

  4. An emergency department-based domestic violence intervention program: findings after one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotch, D; Grunfeld, A F; Mackay, K; Cowan, L

    1996-01-01

    This article reports findings from the first year of operation of an emergency department-based domestic violence intervention program in one of Canada's major metropolitan areas. The program has established methods for identifying, treating, and following up battered women. Information on several key variables is now available for the group of 279 individuals who were the program's first patients. Two out of three (68%) of the patients seen were assaulted by their current spouse. Nine percent (9%) were abused by former spouses from whom they were separated or divorced. Twelve percent (12%) were assaulted by someone they were dating. Women in the program who were abused by a former or current spouse experienced severe violence, with 81% being kicked, bitten, or hit; 60% being pushed, grabbed, or shoved; 55% being threatened; and 30% being choked. Follow-up connection could only be made with 140 women (50%), highlighting the need for focused interventions during the emergency department visit. The findings confirm that women are being injured, often seriously, by those with whom they have close relationships. We present a program for addressing the needs of battered women seen in emergency departments.

  5. Disruptive Behaviors in an Emergency Department: the Perspective of Physicians and Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddineshat, Maryam; Rosenstein, Alan H; Akaberi, Arash; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Disruptive behaviors cause many problems in the workplace, especially in the emergency department (ED).This study was conducted to assess the physician’s and nurse’s perspective toward disruptive behaviors in the emergency department. Methods: In this cross-sectional study a total of 45 physicians and 110 nurses working in the emergency department of five general hospitals in Bojnurd participated. Data were collected using a translated, changed, and validated questionnaire (25 item). The collected data were analyzed by SPSS ver.13 software. Results: Findings showed that physicians gave more importance to nurse-physician relationships in the ED when compared to nurses’ perspective (90% vs. 70%). In this study, 81% of physicians and 52% of nurses exhibited disruptive behaviors. According to the participants these behaviors could result in adverse outcomes, such as stress (97%), job dissatisfaction and can compromise patient safety (53%), quality of care (72%), and errors (70%). Conclusion: Disruptive behaviors could have a negative effects on relationships and collaboration among medical staffs, and on patients’ quality of care as well. It is essential to provide some practical strategies for prevention of these behaviors. PMID:27752490

  6. Calcium Disorders in the Emergency Department: Independent Risk Factors for Mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Sauter

    Full Text Available Calcium disorders are common in both intensive care units and in patients with chronic kidney disease and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. It is unknown whether calcium abnormalities in unselected emergency department admissions have an impact on in-hospital mortality.This cross-sectional analysis included all admissions to the Emergency Department at the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland from 2010 to 2011. For hyper- and hypocalcaemic patients with a Mann-Whitney U-test, the differences between subgroups divided by age, length of hospital stay, creatinine, sodium, chloride, phosphate, potassium and magnesium were compared. Associations between calcium disorders and 28-day in-hospital mortality were assessed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model.8,270 patients with calcium measurements were included in our study. Overall 264 (3.2% patients died. 150 patients (6.13% with hypocalcaemia and 7 patients with hypercalcaemia (6.19% died, in contrast to 104 normocalcaemic patients (1.82%. In univariate analysis, calcium serum levels were associated with sex, mortality and pre-existing diuretic therapy (all p<0.05. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, hypocalcaemia and hypercalcaemia were independent risk factors for mortality (HR 2.00 and HR 1.88, respectively; both p<0.01.Both hypocalcaemia and hypercalcaemia are associated with increased 28-day in-hospital mortality in unselected emergency department admissions.

  7. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions in the emergency department: An ethnography of tacit knowledge in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummell, Stephen P; Seymour, Jane; Higginbottom, Gina

    2016-05-01

    Despite media images to the contrary, cardiopulmonary resuscitation in emergency departments is often unsuccessful. The purpose of this ethnographic study was to explore how health care professionals working in two emergency departments in the UK, make decisions to commence, continue or stop resuscitation. Data collection involved participant observation of resuscitation attempts and in-depth interviews with nurses, medical staff and paramedics who had taken part in the attempts. Detailed case examples were constructed for comparative analysis. Findings show that emergency department staff use experience and acquired tacit knowledge to construct a typology of cardiac arrest categories that help them navigate decision making. Categorisation is based on 'less is more' heuristics which combine explicit and tacit knowledge to facilitate rapid decisions. Staff then work as a team to rapidly assimilate and interpret information drawn from observations of the patient's body and from technical, biomedical monitoring data. The meaning of technical data is negotiated during staff interaction. This analysis was informed by a theory of 'bodily' and 'technical' trajectory alignment that was first developed from an ethnography of death and dying in intensive care units. The categorisation of cardiac arrest situations and trajectory alignment are the means by which staff achieve consensus decisions and determine the point at which an attempt should be withdrawn. This enables them to construct an acceptable death in highly challenging circumstances.

  8. Image and Imaging an Emergency Department: Expense and Benefit of Different Quality Assessment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Andrea Pfortmueller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this era of high-tech medicine, it is becoming increasingly important to assess patient satisfaction. There are several methods to do so, but these differ greatly in terms of cost, time, and labour and external validity. The aim of this study is to describe and compare the structure and implementation of different methods to assess the satisfaction of patients in an emergency department. Methods. The structure and implementation of the different methods to assess patient satisfaction were evaluated on the basis of a 90-minute standardised interview. Results. We identified a total of six different methods in six different hospitals. The average number of patients assessed was 5012, with a range from 230 (M5 to 20 000 patients (M2. In four methods (M1, M3, M5, and M6, the questionnaire was composed by a specialised external institute. In two methods, the questionnaire was created by the hospital itself (M2, M4.The median response rate was 58.4% (range 9–97.8%. With a reminder, the response rate increased by 60% (M3. Conclusion. The ideal method to assess patient satisfaction in the emergency department setting is to use a patient-based, in-emergency department-based assessment of patient satisfaction, planned and guided by expert personnel.

  9. Management of traumatic wounds in the Emergency Department: a secondary publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Prevaldi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic wounds are among the most common problems leading people to the Emergency Department (ED, accounting for approximately 5.4% of all the visits, and up to 24% of all the medical lawsuits. In order to provide a standardized method for wound management in the ED, we have organized a workshop, involving several Italian and European experts. Later, all the discussed statements have been submitted for external validation to a multidisciplinary expert team, based on the so-called Delphi method. Eight main statements have been established, each of them comprising different issues, covering the fields of wound classification, infectious risk stratification, tetanus and rabies prophylaxis, wound cleansing, pain management, and suture. Here we present the results of this work, shared by the Academy of Emergency Medicine and Care and the World Society of Emergency Surgery.

  10. Ameliorating the emergency department workflow by involving the observation unit: effects on crowding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primiano Iannone

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Crowding adversely affects the performance of emergency departments (EDs by worsening efficiency, timeliness of care, clinical outcomes and patients’ satisfaction. We describe in this study our attempt at improving crowding by modifying the roles and workflow of the ED physicians. The observation unit physician was given the additional duty of prioritizing admissions and managing unclear, complex cases, which were previously under the responsibility of front line emergency physicians. We analyzed two corresponding periods, both before the intervention (9897 ED attendances in 2012 and after the intervention (10,297 attendances in 2013. Most of the crowding indices improved significantly, including timeliness of triage, of first medical contact, access to resus area, and overall length of stay in ED. Also, emergency hospital admissions, average specialist consultations and imaging studies per patient decreased significantly. The observation unit workload increased. There was no significant excess of adverse events.

  11. Usability evaluation of an emergency department information system prototype designed using cognitive systems engineering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lindsey N; Benda, Natalie C; Hegde, Sudeep; McGeorge, Nicolette M; Guarrera-Schick, Theresa K; Hettinger, A Zachary; LaVergne, David T; Perry, Shawna J; Wears, Robert L; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Bisantz, Ann M

    2017-04-01

    This article presents an evaluation of novel display concepts for an emergency department information system (EDIS) designed using cognitive systems engineering methods. EDISs assist emergency medicine staff with tracking patient care and ED resource allocation. Participants performed patient planning and orientation tasks using the EDIS displays and rated the display's ability to support various cognitive performance objectives along with the usability, usefulness, and predicted frequency of use for 18 system components. Mean ratings were positive for cognitive performance support objectives, usability, usefulness, and frequency of use, demonstrating the successful application of design methods to create useful and usable EDIS concepts that provide cognitive support for emergency medicine staff. Nurse and provider roles had significantly different perceptions of the usability and usefulness of certain EDIS components, suggesting that they have different information needs while working.

  12. Challenging the dominant logic of Emergency Departments: guidelines from chaos theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnis, A; White, K R

    1999-01-01

    Chaos is order without predictability (1 ). Any unfortunate patient who has recently made a trek to an Emergency Department (ED) or even better, has watched the immensely popular TV show, ER, knows that the visit can be a frustrating and a time consuming experience. The waits are so protracted that one can observe all cycles of birth, death, love, and romance in the waiting room. The process is tedious for the patient who must tell one's tale to a triage nurse, a registration clerk, the primary nurse, the nursing care partner, and finally the emergency physician. Then, the patient must face more delays while being pushed, ineffectively, in a horizontal fashion, through vertical functional silos of care, such as laboratory and radiology. The mind-set or dominant logic of this system of ED patient flow assumes that waits are acceptable and unavoidable, and that the function of the ED is to care for only the truly emergent patient. This dominant logic, coupled with the market constraints of population-based versus case-based payment mechanisms, has led to a declining trend in ED visits for the first time in 20 years (2). In order to improve the quality of ED care as well as to increase acceptability for patient and payer, the dominant logic must be challenged. An understanding of chaos theory and perception of the Emergency Department as a complex adaptive system foster methods for challenging the dominant logic.

  13. Therapeutic conflicts in emergency department patients with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Markun

    Full Text Available Patients with multimorbidity are an increasing concern in healthcare. Clinical practice guidelines, however, do not take into account potential therapeutic conflicts caused by co-occurring medical conditions. This makes therapeutic decisions complex, especially in emergency situations.The aim of this study was to identify and quantify therapeutic conflicts in emergency department patients with multimorbidity.We reviewed electronic records of all patients ≥18 years with two or more concurrent active medical conditions, admitted from the emergency department to the hospital ward of the University Hospital Zurich in January 2009. We cross-tabulated all active diagnoses with treatments recommended by guidelines for each diagnosis. Then, we identified potential therapeutic conflicts and classified them as either major or minor conflicts according to their clinical significance.166 emergency inpatients with multimorbidity were included. The mean number of active diagnoses per patient was 6.6 (SD±3.4. We identified a total of 239 therapeutic conflicts in 49% of the of the study population. In 29% of the study population major therapeutic conflicts, in 41% of the patients minor therapeutic conflicts occurred.Therapeutic conflicts are common among multimorbid patients, with one out of two experiencing minor, and one out of three experiencing major therapeutic conflicts. Clinical practice guidelines need to address frequent therapeutic conflicts in patients with co-morbid medical conditions.

  14. An emergency department intervention to protect an overlooked group of children at risk of significant harm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaye, P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Parental psychiatric disorder, especially depression, personality disorder and deliberate self-harm, is known to put children at greater risk of mental illness, neglect or physical, emotional and sexual abuse. Without a reliable procedure to identify children of parents presenting with these mental health problems, children at high risk of significant harm can be easily overlooked. Although deliberate self-harm constitutes a significant proportion of emergency presentations, there are no guidelines which address the emergency physician\\'s role in identifying and assessing risk to children of these patients. METHODS: A robust system was jointly developed with the local social services child protection team to identify and risk-stratify children of parents with mental illness. This allows us to intervene when we identify children at immediate risk of harm and to ensure that social services are aware of potential risk to all children in this group. The referral process was audited repeatedly to refine the agreed protocol. RESULTS: The proportion of patients asked by the emergency department personnel about dependent children increased and the quality of information received by the social services child protection team improved. CONCLUSIONS: All emergency departments should acknowledge the inadequacy of information available to them regarding patients\\' children and consider a policy of referral to social services for all children of parents with mental health presentations. This process can only be developed through close liaison within the multidisciplinary child protection team.

  15. Data Mining and Visualization of Grid-Based City Emergency System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Jingsheng; SUN Jizhou; LIU Muxing; ZHANG Xu; HE Hong

    2005-01-01

    A cluster analyzing algorithm based on grids is introduced in this paper,which is applied to data mining in the city emergency system. In the previous applications, data mining was based on the method of analyzing points and lines, which was not efficient enough in dealing with the geographic information in units of police areas. The proposed algorithm maps an event set stored as a point set to a grid unit set, utilizes the cluster algorithm based on grids to find out all the clusters, and shows the results in the method of visualization. The algorithm performs well when dealing with high dimensional data sets and immense data. It is suitable for the data mining based on geogra-phic information system and is supportive to decision-makings in the city emergency system.

  16. A Radiation Homeland Security Workshop Presented to the City of Berkeley Fire Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, Howard

    2005-04-01

    A radiation incident in a community, ranging from a transportation accident to a dirty bomb, is expected to be rare, but still can occur. First responders to such an incident must be prepared. City of Berkeley officials met with members of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory staff and agreed that the laboratory participants would create material and teach it to all of their fire fighting staff. To design such a course, nuclear physicists, biologists and health physicists merged some of their existing teaching material together with previous homeland security efforts to produce a course that lasted one full day. The material was designed to help alleviate the myths and fear of radiation experienced by many first responders. It included basic nuclear physics information, biological effects, and methods that health physicists use to detect and handle radiation. The curriculum included several hands on activities which involved working directly with the meters the Berkeley Fire Department possessed. In addition, I will discuss some observations from teaching this course material plus some unusual problems that we encountered, such as suddenly the whole class responding to a fire.

  17. Occupational chemical burns: a 2-year experience in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touzopoulos P

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Panagiotis Touzopoulos1, Paul Zarogoulidis2, Alexandros Mitrakas1, Michael Karanikas1, Panagiotis Milothridis1, Dimitrios Matthaios1, Ioannis Kouroumichakis3, Stella Proikaki3, Paschalis Pavlioglou3, Nikolaos Katsikogiannis4, Theodoros C Constantinidis511st University Surgical Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 2Pulmonary Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 32nd Internal Medicine Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 4Surgical Department (NHS, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, 5Medical School, Laboratory of Hygiene and Environmental Protection, Democritus University of Thrace, Regional Laboratory of Public Health (Eastern Macedonia-Thrace, GreeceAbstract: Chemical burn injuries are a result of exposure to acid, alkali, or organic compounds. In this retrospective study, a total of 21 patients suffering occupational chemical burns, came to the emergency room at the University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, from 2008 to 2010; 76.2% were workers, 19% were farmers, and 4.8% were desk officers. The majority of burns were due to exposure to acid (61.9%. Upper extremities were the most frequently injured area followed by the lower extremities and thorax. None of the patients needed further hospital care, but in the follow-up, four of the patients suffered keloid. Proper surgical treatment at the emergency room decreases the length of hospital stay for patients who suffer chemically induced burns.Keywords: chemical burns, surgical treatment, labor accidents

  18. City-scale accessibility of emergency responders operating during flood events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Pattison, Ian; Wilby, Robert; Bosher, Lee; Patel, Ramila; Thompson, Philip; Trowell, Keith; Draycon, Julia; Halse, Martin; Yang, Lili; Ryley, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Emergency responders often have to operate and respond to emergency situations during dynamic weather conditions, including floods. This paper demonstrates a novel method using existing tools and datasets to evaluate emergency responder accessibility during flood events within the city of Leicester, UK. Accessibility was quantified using the 8 and 10 min legislative targets for emergency provision for the ambulance and fire and rescue services respectively under "normal" no-flood conditions, as well as flood scenarios of various magnitudes (1 in 20-year, 1 in 100-year and 1 in 1000-year recurrence intervals), with both surface water and fluvial flood conditions considered. Flood restrictions were processed based on previous hydrodynamic inundation modelling undertaken and inputted into a Network Analysis framework as restrictions for surface water and fluvial flood events. Surface water flooding was shown to cause more disruption to emergency responders operating within the city due to its widespread and spatially distributed footprint when compared to fluvial flood events of comparable magnitude. Fire and rescue 10 min accessibility was shown to decrease from 100, 66.5, 39.8 and 26.2 % under the no-flood, 1 in 20-year, 1 in 100-year and 1 in 1000-year surface water flood scenarios respectively. Furthermore, total inaccessibility was shown to increase with flood magnitude from 6.0 % under the 1 in 20-year scenario to 31.0 % under the 1 in 100-year flood scenario. Additionally, the evolution of emergency service accessibility throughout a surface water flood event is outlined, demonstrating the rapid impact on emergency service accessibility within the first 15 min of the surface water flood event, with a reduction in service coverage and overlap being observed for the ambulance service during a 1 in 100-year flood event. The study provides evidence to guide strategic planning for decision makers prior to and during emergency response to flood events at the city

  19. Oral ondansetron administration in emergency departments to children with gastroenteritis: an economic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen B Freedman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of antiemetics for children with vomiting is one of the most controversial decisions in the treatment of gastroenteritis in developed countries. Ondansetron, a selective serotonin receptor antagonist, has been found to be effective in improving the success of oral rehydration therapy. However, North American and European clinical practice guidelines continue to recommend against its use, stating that evidence of cost savings would be required to support ondansetron administration. Thus, an economic analysis of the emergency department administration of ondansetron was conducted. The primary objective was to conduct a cost analysis of the routine administration of ondansetron in both the United States and Canada. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cost analysis evaluated oral ondansetron administration to children presenting to emergency departments with vomiting and dehydration secondary to gastroenteritis from a societal and health care payer's perspective in both the US and Canada. A decision tree was developed that incorporated the frequency of vomiting, intravenous insertion, hospitalization, and emergency department revisits. Estimates of the monetary costs associated with ondansetron use, intravenous rehydration, and hospitalization were derived from administrative databases or emergency department use. The economic burden in children administered ondansetron plus oral rehydration therapy was compared to those not administered ondansetron employing deterministic and probabilistic simulations. We estimated the costs or savings to society and health care payers associated with the routine administration of ondansetron. Sensitivity analyses considered variations in costs, treatment effects, and exchange rates. In the US the administration of ondansetron to eligible children would prevent approximately 29,246 intravenous insertions and 7,220 hospitalizations annually. At the current average wholesale price, its routine administration

  20. Characteristics of patients and families who make early return visits to the pediatric emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logue EP

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Erin Patricia Logue,1 Samina Ali,2,3 Judith Spiers,4 Amanda S Newton,2,3 Janice A Lander4 1 Alberta Health Services, 2Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, 3Women and Children’s Health Research Institute, 4Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to identify reasons why parents make early return visits, within 72 hours of discharge from a tertiary care pediatric emergency department (PED. A secondary objective was to investigate associated demographic and diagnostic variables. Methods: A survey was conducted with a convenience sample of parents of children returning to the PED within 72 hours of discharge. A chart review was also completed for consented survey participants. Recruitment occurred from September 2005 to August 2006 at the Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Results: A total of 264 parents were approached to participate. Overall, 231 surveys were returned and 212 (92% charts were reviewed. The overall rate of early return during the study period was 5.4%. More than half of parents stated that they returned because their child's condition worsened and many parents (66.7% reported feeling stressed. Patients were typically under 6 years of age (67.4%, and most frequently diagnosed with infectious diseases (38.0%. Patients triaged with the Canadian Emergency Department Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS as CTAS 2 (emergent for initial visits were more likely to be admitted on return, regardless of age (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Variables associated with early returns included young age, diagnosis, triage acuity, and parental stress. Future variable definition should include a deeper exploration of modifiable factors such as parental stress and patient education. These next steps may help direct interventions and resources to address needs in this group and possibly pre-empt the need to return

  1. The level of evidence for emergency department performance indicators: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Michael; Kiuru, Sampsa; Castrèn, Maaret; Kurland, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive systematic review of emergency department performance indicators in relation to evidence. A systematic search was performed through PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and COCHRANE databases with (and including synonyms of) the search words: [emergency medicine OR emergency department] AND [quality indicator(s) OR performance indicator(s) OR performance measure(s)]. Articles were included according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria using the PRISMA protocol. The level of evidence was rated according to the evidence levels by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Performance indicators were extracted and organized into five categories; outcome, process, satisfaction, equity and structural/organizational measures. Six thousand four hundred and forty articles were initially identified; 127 provided evidence for/against a minimum of one performance indicator: these were included for further study. Of the 127 articles included, 113 (92%) were primary research studies and only nine (8%) were systematic reviews. Within the 127 articles, we found evidence for 202 individual indicators. Approximately half (n=104) of all this evidence (n=202) studied process-type indicators. Only seven articles (6%) qualified for high quality (level 1b). Sixty-six articles (51%) were good retrospective quality (level 2b or better), whereas the remaining articles were either intermediate quality (25% level 3a or 3b) or poor quality (17% level 4 or 5). We found limited evidence for most emergency department performance indicators, with the majority presenting a low level of evidence. Thus, a core group of evidence-based performance indicators cannot currently be recommended on the basis of this broad review of the literature.

  2. Management of critically ill patients receiving noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Louise RoseLawrence S Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Patients requiring noninvasive and invasive ventilation frequently present to emergency departments, and may remain for prolonged periods due to constrained critical care services. Emergency clinicians often do not receive the same education on management of mechanical ventilation or have similar exposure to these patients as do their critical care colleagues. The aim of this review was to synthesize the evidence on management of patients requiring noninvasive and invasive ventilation in the emergency department including indications, clinical applications, monitoring priorities, and potential complications. Noninvasive ventilation is recommended for patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Less evidence supports its use in asthma and other causes of acute respiratory failure. Use of noninvasive ventilation in the prehospital setting is relatively new, and some evidence suggests benefit. Monitoring priorities for noninvasive ventilation include response to treatment, respiratory and hemodynamic stability, noninvasive ventilation tolerance, detection of noninvasive ventilation failure, and identification of air leaks around the interface. Application of injurious ventilation increases patient morbidity and mortality. Lung-protective ventilation with low tidal volumes based on determination of predicted body weight and control of plateau pressure has been shown to reduce mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, and some evidence exists to suggest this strategy should be used in patients without lung injury. Monitoring of the invasively ventilated patient should focus on assessing response to mechanical ventilation and other interventions, and avoiding complications, such as ventilator-associated pneumonia. Several key aspects of management of noninvasive

  3. Hospital admissions for hypertensive crisis in the emergency departments: a large multicenter Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Giuliano; Pascale, Claudio; Fornengo, Paolo; Arras, Sebastiana; Piras, Carmela; Panzarasa, Pietro; Carmosino, Gianpaolo; Franza, Orietta; Semeraro, Vincenzo; Lenti, Salvatore; Pietrelli, Susanna; Panzone, Sergio; Bracco, Christian; Fiorini, Roberto; Rastelli, Giovanni; Bergandi, Daniela; Zampaglione, Bruno; Musso, Roberto; Marengo, Claudio; Santoro, Giancarlo; Zamboni, Sergio; Traversa, Barbara; Barattini, Maddalena; Bruno, Graziella

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data on the impact of hypertensive crises (emergencies and urgencies) on referral to the Emergency Departments (EDs) are lacking, in spite of the evidence that they may be life-threatening conditions. We performed a multicenter study to identify all patients aged 18 years and over who were admitted to 10 Italian EDs during 2009 for hypertensive crises (systolic blood pressure ≥220 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥120 mmHg). We classified patients as affected by either hypertensive emergencies or hypertensive urgencies depending on the presence or the absence of progressive target organ damage, respectively. Logistic regression analysis was then performed to assess variables independently associated with hypertensive emergencies with respect to hypertensive urgencies. Of 333,407 patients admitted to the EDs over the one-year period, 1,546 had hypertensive crises (4.6/1,000, 95% CI 4.4-4.9), and 23% of them had unknown hypertension. Hypertensive emergencies (n = 391, 25.3% of hypertensive crises) were acute pulmonary edema (30.9%), stroke (22.0%,), myocardial infarction (17.9%), acute aortic dissection (7.9%), acute renal failure (5.9%) and hypertensive encephalopathy (4.9%). Men had higher frequency than women of unknown hypertension (27.9% vs 18.5%, phypertensive patients, a larger proportion of men than women reported not taking anti-hypertensive drug (12.6% among men and 9.4% among women (phypertensive emergencies than urgencies (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.06-1.70), independently of presenting symptoms, creatinine, smoking habit and known hypertension. This study shows that hypertensive crises involved almost 5 out of 1,000 patients-year admitted to EDs. Sex differences in frequencies of unknown hypertension, compliance to treatment and risk of hypertensive emergencies might have implications for public health programs.

  4. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis in Increasing the Revenue of Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Rahmati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Successful performance of emergency department(ED is one of the important indications of increasing the satisfaction among referees. The insurance of such successful performance is fiscal discipline and avoiding from non-beneficial activities in this department. Therefore, the increasing revenue of emergency department is one of the interested goals of hospital management system. According to above-mentioned, the researchers assessed problems lead to loss the revenue of ED and eliminate them by using failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA.Methods: This was the prospective cohort study performed during 18 months, set in 6 phases. In the first phase, the failures were determined and some solutions suggested to eliminate them. During 2-5 phases, based on the prioritizing the problems, solutions were performed. In the sixth phase, final assessment of the study was done. Finally, the feedback of system’s revenue was evaluated and data analyzed using repeated measure ANOVA.Results: Lack of recording the consuming instrument and attribution of separate codes for emergency services of hospitalized patients were the most important failures that lead to decrease the revenue of ED. Such elimination caused to 75.9% increase in revenue within a month (df = 1.6; F = 84.0; p<0.0001.  Totally, 18 months following the eliminating of failures caused to 328.2% increase in the revenue of ED (df = 15.9; F = 215; p<0.0001.Conclusion: The findings of the present study shows that failure mode and effect analysis, can be used as a safe and effected method to reduce the expenses of ED and increase its revenue.

  5. 38 CFR 17.95 - Outpatient medical services for Department of Veterans Affairs employees and others in emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services for Department of Veterans Affairs employees and others in emergencies. 17.95 Section 17.95... Outpatient medical services for Department of Veterans Affairs employees and others in emergencies. Outpatient medical services for which charges shall be made as required by § 17.101 may be authorized...

  6. 38 CFR 17.51 - Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.51 Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals. 17.51 Section 17.51...

  7. A cluster randomised trial to assess the impact of clinical pathways on AMI management in rural Australian emergency departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snow Pamela C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People living in rural Australia are more likely to die in hospital following an acute myocardial infarction than those living in major cities. While several factors, including time taken to access hospital care, contribute to this risk, it is also partially attributable to the lower uptake of evidence-based guidelines for the administration of thrombolytic drugs in rural emergency departments where up to one-third of eligible patients do not receive this life-saving intervention. Clinical pathways have the potential to link evidence to practice by integrating guidelines into local systems, but their impact has been hampered by variable implementation strategies and sub-optimal research designs. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of a five-step clinical pathways implementation process on the timely and efficient administration of thrombolytic drugs for acute myocardial infarctions managed in rural Australian emergency departments. Methods/Design The design is a two-arm, cluster-randomised trial with rural hospital emergency departments that treat and do not routinely transfer acute myocardial infarction patients. Six rural hospitals in the state of Victoria will participate, with three in the intervention group and three in the control group. Intervention hospitals will participate in a five-step clinical pathway implementation process: engagement of clinicians, pathway development according to local resources and systems, reminders, education, and audit and feedback. Hospitals in the control group will each receive a hard copy of Australian national guidelines for chest pain and acute myocardial infarction management. Each group will include 90 cases to give a power of 80% at 5% significance level for the two primary outcome measures: proportion of those eligible for thrombolysis receiving the drug and time to delivery of thrombolytic drug. Discussion Improved compliance with thrombolytic guidelines via

  8. Evaluation of a New Noninvasive Device in Determining Hemoglobin Levels in Emergency Department Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Knutson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Masimo Radical-7 Pulse CO-Oximeter is a medical device recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration that performs noninvasive oximetry and estimated venous or arterial hemoglobin measurements. A portable, noninvasive device that rapidly measures hemoglobin concentration could be useful in both austere and modern hospital settings. The objective of this study is to determine the degree of variation between the device’s estimated hemoglobin measurement and the actual venous hemoglobin concentration in undifferentiated emergency department (ED patients.Methods: We conducted a prospective, observational, cross-sectional study of adult patients presenting to the ED. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample of adult ED patients who required a complete blood count as part of their care in the ED. A simultaneous probe hemoglobin was obtained and recorded.Results: Bias between probe and laboratory hemoglobin measurements was _0.5 (95% confidence interval,_0.8 to_0.1 but this was not statistically significant from 0 (t 0.05,124¼0.20, P . 0.5. The limits of agreement were _4.7 and 3.8, beyond the clinically relevant standard of equivalency of 6 1 g/dL.Conclusion: These data suggest that noninvasive hemoglobin determination is not sufficiently accurate for emergency department use. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(3:283–286.

  9. Sedative Dosing Of Propofol For Treatment Of Migraine Headache In The Emergency Department: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosier, Jarrod

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Migraine headaches requiring an emergency department visit due to failed outpatient rescue therapy present a significant challenge in terms of length of stay (LOS and financial costs. Propofol therapy may be effective at pain reduction and reduce that length of stay given its pharmacokinetic properties as a short acting intravenous sedative anesthetic and pharmacodynamics on GABA mediated chloride flux.Methods: Case series of 4 patients presenting to an urban academic medical center with migraine headache failing outpatient therapy. Each patient was given a sedation dose (1 mg/kg of propofol under standard procedural sedation precautions.Results: Each of the 4 patients experienced dramatic reductions or complete resolution of headache severity. LOS for 3 of the 4 patients was 50% less than the average LOS for patients with similar chief complaints to our emergency department. 1 patient required further treatment with standard therapy but had a significant reduction in pain and a shorter LOS. There were no episodes of hypotension, hypoxia, or apnea during the sedations.Conclusion: In this small case series, sedation dose propofol appears to be effective and safe for the treatment of refractory migraines, and may result in a reduced LOS. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(6:646-649.

  10. Seasonal ARMA-based SPC charts for anomaly detection: Application to emergency department systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kadri, Farid

    2015-10-22

    Monitoring complex production systems is primordial to ensure management, reliability and safety as well as maintaining the desired product quality. Early detection of emergent abnormal behaviour in monitored systems allows pre-emptive action to prevent more serious consequences, to improve system operations and to reduce manufacturing and/or service costs. This study reports the design of a new methodology for the detection of abnormal situations based on the integration of time-series analysis models and statistical process control (SPC) tools for the joint development of a monitoring system to help supervising of the behaviour of emergency department services (EDs). The monitoring system developed is able to provide early alerts in the event of abnormal situations. The seasonal autoregressive moving average (SARMA)-based exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) anomaly detection scheme proposed was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the paediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital centre, France. The method developed utilizes SARMA as a modelling framework and EWMA for anomaly detection. The EWMA control chart is applied to the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the SARMA model. The detection results of the EWMA chart are compared with two other commonly applied residual-based tests: a Shewhart individuals chart and a Cumulative Sum (CUSUM) control chart.

  11. Improved Principal Component Analysis for Anomaly Detection: Application to an Emergency Department

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2015-07-03

    Monitoring of production systems, such as those in hospitals, is primordial for ensuring the best management and maintenance desired product quality. Detection of emergent abnormalities allows preemptive actions that can prevent more serious consequences. Principal component analysis (PCA)-based anomaly-detection approach has been used successfully for monitoring systems with highly correlated variables. However, conventional PCA-based detection indices, such as the Hotelling’s T2T2 and the Q statistics, are ill suited to detect small abnormalities because they use only information from the most recent observations. Other multivariate statistical metrics, such as the multivariate cumulative sum (MCUSUM) control scheme, are more suitable for detection small anomalies. In this paper, a generic anomaly detection scheme based on PCA is proposed to monitor demands to an emergency department. In such a framework, the MCUSUM control chart is applied to the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the PCA model. The proposed PCA-based MCUSUM anomaly detection strategy is successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department in the Lille Regional Hospital Centre, France. The detection results evidence that the proposed method is more effective than the conventional PCA-based anomaly-detection methods.

  12. Emergency department-based interventions for women suffering domestic abuse: a critical literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sereena; Boyle, Adrian

    2017-02-01

    Domestic abuse represents a serious public health and human rights concern. Interventions to reduce the risk of abuse include staff training and standardized documentation improving detection and adherence to referral pathways. Interventional studies have been conducted in primary care, maternity and outpatient settings. Women disclosing abuse in emergency departments differ from women attending other healthcare settings, and it is unclear whether these interventions can be transferred to the emergency care setting. This review examines interventional studies to evaluate the effectiveness of emergency department-based interventions in reducing domestic abuse-related morbidity. Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane Library were searched, according to prespecified selection criteria. Study quality was assessed using the Jadad scale. Of 273 search results, nine were eligible for review. Interventions involving staff training demonstrated benefits in subjective measures, such as staff knowledge regarding abuse, but no changes in clinical practice, based on detection and referral rates. When staff training was implemented in conjunction with supporting system changes - for example, standardized documentation for assessment and referral - clinically relevant improvements were noted. Interventions centred around staff training are insufficient to bring about improvements in the management and, thus, outcome of patients suffering abuse. Instead, system changes, such as standardized documentation and referral pathways, supported by training, may bring about beneficial changes. It remains uncertain whether surrogate outcomes employed by most studies translate to changes in abuse-related morbidity: the ultimate goal.

  13. The economic role of the Emergency Department in the health care continuum: applying Michael Porter's five forces model to Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jesse M

    2006-05-01

    Emergency Medicine plays a vital role in the health care continuum in the United States. Michael Porters' five forces model of industry analysis provides an insight into the economics of emergency care by showing how the forces of supplier power, buyer power, threat of substitution, barriers to entry, and internal rivalry affect Emergency Medicine. Illustrating these relationships provides a view into the complexities of the emergency care industry and offers opportunities for Emergency Departments, groups of physicians, and the individual emergency physician to maximize the relationship with other market players.

  14. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein cannot differentiate bacterial or viral infection in COPD exacerbation requiring emergency department visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang CH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Hao Chang,1 Kuo-Chien Tsao,2,3 Han-Chung Hu,1,4 Chung-Chi Huang,1,4 Kuo-Chin Kao,1,4 Ning-Hung Chen,1,4 Cheng-Ta Yang,1,4 Ying-Huang Tsai,4,5 Meng-Jer Hsieh4,51Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Linkou Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung Medical Foundation, Chang-Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Linkou Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung Medical Foundation; 3Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 4Department of Respiratory Therapy, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 5Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Chiayi Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung Medical Foundation, Puzi City, TaiwanBackground: Viral and bacterial infections are the most common causes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations. Whether serum inflammatory markers can differentiate bacterial from virus infection in patients with COPD exacerbation requiring emergency department (ED visits remains controversial.Methods: Viral culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were used to identify the viruses in the oropharynx of patients with COPD exacerbations. The bacteria were identified by the semiquantitative culture of the expectorated sputum. The peripheral blood white blood cell (WBC counts, serum C-reactive protein (CRP, procalcitonin (PCT, and clinical symptoms were compared among patients with different types of infections.Results: Viruses were isolated from 16 (22.2% of the 72 patients enrolled. The most commonly identified viruses were parainfluenza type 3, influenza A, and rhinovirus. A total of 30 (41.7% patients had positive bacterial cultures, with the most commonly found bacteria being Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. Five patients (6.9% had both positive sputum cultures and virus identification. The WBC, CRP, and PCT levels of the bacteria-positive and bacteria

  15. Analysis of Leadership Flexibility Capability of District/City Public Health Department in North Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Rifai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Leadership has an important role in the organization as leader is in charge of supervising and controlling the course of an organization. Ability to lead in mobilizing and empowering employees will affect the performance of the organization. This behavior has a significant impact on the attitudes, behavior and performance of employees. The results of the study showed there is a significant relationship between characteristics such as age (p = 0.004, education(p = 0.034, work experience (p = 0.000, the experience of the organization (p = 0.000, and educational hierarchy (p =0.000 for leadership flexibility. Sex variable is not significant to the leadership flexibility (p = 0.801. There is a relationship with the flexibility of directive leadership style (p = 0.027, supportive leadership style (p = 0.046, and participative leadership style (p = 0.009 with the flexibility of leadership. There is aso a relationship between achievement-oriented leadership style and leadership flexibility (p = 0.000. There is a relationship between the individual characteristics of leadership style and versatility with variable: educational level of leadership (p = 0.021; OR = 19.265. The result suggests that we need more organized seminars / work shop / scientific studies that stimulate the realization of learning about leadership flexibility in improving the performance of the District/City Health Office and it is necessary to study theperformance of the head of the Department of Health assessment intensively and periodically

  16. Emergency Department Crowding and Time to Antibiotic Administration in Febrile Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K Light

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early antibiotic administration is recommended in newborns presenting with febrile illness to emergency departments (ED to avert the sequelae of serious bacterial infection. Although ED crowding has been associated with delays in antibiotic administration in a dedicated pediatric ED, the majority of children that receive emergency medical care in the U.S. present to EDs that treat both adult and pediatric emergencies. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between time to antibiotic administration in febrile newborns and crowding in a general ED serving both an adult and pediatric population.Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 159 newborns presenting to a general ED between 2005 and 2011 and analyzed the association between time to antibiotic administration and ED occupancy rate at the time of, prior to, and following infant presentation to the ED.Results: We observed delayed and variable time to antibiotic administration and found no association between time to antibiotic administration and occupancy rate prior to, at the time of, or following infant presentation (P > 0.05. ED time to antibiotic administration was not associated with hospital length of stay, and there was no inpatient mortality.Conclusion: Delayed and highly variable time to antibiotic treatment in febrile newborns was common but unrelated to ED crowding in the general ED study site. Guidelines for time to antibiotic administration in this population may reduce variability in ED practice patterns. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:518-524.

  17. Attitudes of patients and physicians regarding physician dress and demeanor in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, H G; Solot, J A

    1989-02-01

    To compare the opinions of patients and physicians regarding physician dress and demeanor in the emergency department, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 190 ED patients and 129 medical specialists, family practitioners, surgeons, and emergency physicians in a community hospital. Seventy-three percent of physicians and 43% of patients thought that physical appearance influenced patient opinion of medical care. Forty-nine percent of patients believed emergency physicians should wear white coats, but only 18% disliked scrub suits. Patients were more tolerant of casual dress than were physicians. Both groups disliked excessive jewelry, prominent ruffles or ribbons, long fingernails, blue jeans, and sandals. Opinions and practices of emergency physicians were similar to those of other medical specialists. Most physicians (96%) addressed patients by surname or title, but 43% of patients preferred being called by their first names. The age, gender, income, and education of patients did not influence how they wished to be addressed. Larger studies are needed to assess the influence of age, sex, race, and depth of feeling regarding first-name address and physician attire in the ED.

  18. Proposal for a Stratification Tool for Emergency Department Diabetic Patients with Uncomplicated Acute Hyperglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Alberto Corona Martínez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Emergency care services have got an organizational tool of evident usefulness in the stratification of patients. This paper shows a stratification tool for diabetic patients with uncomplicated acute hyperglycemia in the Emergency Department. Group discussion, a process based on several guidelines or principles, was used in its design. The stratification tool classifies patients into one of four groups distinguishable from each other, which contribute to performance of different procedures on patients. It is based on the analysis of clinical information complemented with blood glucose readings, specifically for decision making; each group has a defined context, actions to take and pillars of therapeutic management, primarily focusing on insulin therapy. The tool is accompanied by a flow chart for management of diabetic patients with uncomplicated acute hyperglycemia in the yellow zone.

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS Migration to the Heart Diagnosed by Emergency Department Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlan Wendler

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old man presented to our emergency department with altered mental status. He had a past medical history significant for cirrhosis and previous placement of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS. On cardiac auscultation, a new heart murmur and an unexpected degree of cardiac ectopy were noted. On the 12-lead electrocardiogram, the patient was noted to have multiple premature atrial contractions, corroborating the irregular heart rhythm on physical exam. A focused bedside emergency ultrasound of the heart was then performed. This exam revealed an apparent foreign body in the right atrium. It appeared as if the patient’s TIPS had migrated from the heart into the right atrium. This case, as well as the literature describing thisunusual complication of TIPS placement, is reviewed in this case report

  20. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Hereditary Angioedema Diagnosed by Ultrasound in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Riguzzi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal angioedema is a less recognized type of angioedema, which can occur in patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE. The clinical signs may range from subtle, diffuse abdominal pain and nausea, to overt peritonitis. We describe two cases of abdominal angioedema in patients with known HAE that were diagnosed in the emergency department by point-of-care (POC ultrasound. In each case, the patient presented with isolated abdominal complaints and no signs of oropharyngeal edema. Findings on POC ultrasound included intraperitoneal free fluid and bowel wall edema. Both patients recovered uneventfully after receiving treatment. Because it can be performed rapidly, requires no ionizing radiation,and can rule out alternative diagnoses, POC ultrasound holds promise as a valuable tool in the evaluation and management of patients with HAE. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  1. Nurses’ Evaluation of a New Formalized Triage System in the Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm Johansen, Mette; Forberg, Jakob Lundager

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Formalized triage in the emergency department (ED) is not widely used in Denmark; this study explores the effects of introducing a five-level process triage system in a Danish ED. Material and methods: Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 15 emergency nurses....... The interviews were preceded by observations of the work of the ED nurses in which focus was on the triage process. Results: Formalized triage was experienced to improve the overview of patients and resources at the ED, and the nurses described that they felt more assured when prioritizing between patients....... Communication and coordination were also improved by the triage system. But more time spent on documentation and re-evaluation may cause the nurses to feel professionally inadequate if adequate resources are not provided. Furthermore, the triage system has reduced the focus on the humanistic and psychosocial...

  2. Achieve Sustainable Hospital Excellence Through 5-S in an Emergency Department in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsoi Vincent F. K.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available 5-S is the first step towards TQM. Over the last century, the Japanese have formalised the technique and named it as 5-S Practice. Since 1993, Sam Ho has improved and defined its terms in English/Chinese and developed the world's first 5-S Audit Checklist. In the article, an emergency department of a Hong Kong hospital was examined against 5-S 50-point Checklist for the improvement of their quality assurance systems towards its accreditation process with Australian standards. The findings evidently reveal that the impact of 5-S on hospital quality assurance in the unit are positive. Riding on the above scenario, the research aim is to identify whether the 5-S practice is a suitable and effective tool for healthcare quality assurance in an emergency setting which is led towards its accreditation process set by other mechanisms.

  3. Indices of agreement between neurosurgeons and a radiologist in interpreting tomography scans in an emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules Carlos Dourado

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The power of interpretation in the analysis of cranial computed tomography (CCT among neurosurgeons and radiologists has rarely been studied. This study aimed to assess the rate of agreement in the interpretation of CCTs between neurosurgeons and a radiologist in an emergency department. Method 227 CCT were independently analyzed by two neurosurgeons (NS1 and NS2 and a radiologist (RAD. The level of agreement in interpreting the examination was studied. Results The Kappa values obtained between NS1 and NS2 and RAD were considered nearly perfect and substantial agreement. The highest levels of agreement when evaluating abnormalities were observed in the identification of tumors, hydrocephalus and intracranial hematomas. The worst levels of agreement were observed for leukoaraiosis and reduced brain volume. Conclusions For diseases in which the emergency room procedure must be determined, agreement in the interpretation of CCTs between the radiologist and neurosurgeons was satisfactory.

  4. Systolic blood pressure and short-term mortality in the emergency department and prehospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders Kasper Bruun; Holler, Jon Gitz; Mikkelsen, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    staffed mobile emergency care unit in Odense between 2007 and 2013. We used the first recorded systolic blood pressure and the main outcome was 7-day mortality. Best performing thresholds were identified with methods based on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and multivariate regression......INTRODUCTION: Systolic blood pressure is a widely used tool to assess circulatory function in acutely ill patients. The systolic blood pressure limit where a given patient should be considered hypotensive is the subject of debate and recent studies have advocated higher systolic blood pressure...... thresholds than the traditional 90 mmHg. The aim of this study was to identify the best performing systolic blood pressure thresholds with regards to predicting 7-day mortality and to evaluate the applicability of these in the emergency department as well as in the prehospital setting. METHODS...

  5. Syncope In Pediatric Patients: A Practical Approach To Differential Diagnosis And Management In The Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fant, Collen; Cohen, Arl

    2017-04-01

    Syncope is a condition that is often seen in the emergency department. Most syncope is benign, but it can be a symptom of a life-threatening condition. While syncope often requires an extensive workup in adults, in the pediatric population, critical questioning and simple, noninvasive testing is usually sufficient to exclude significant or life-threatening causes. For low-risk patients, resource-intensive workups are rarely diagnostic, and add significant cost to medical care. This issue will highlight critical diseases that cause syncope, identify high-risk "red flags," and enable the emergency clinician to develop a cost-effective, minimally invasive algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric syncope.

  6. Overcoming Barriers to the Use of Osteopathic Manipulation Techniques in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberge, Raymond J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteopathic Manipulation Techniques (OMT have been shown to be effective therapeutic modalities in various clinical settings, but appear to be underutilized in the emergency department (ED setting.Objective: To examine barriers to the use of OMT in the ED and provide suggestions to ameliorate these barriers.Methods: Literature reviewResults: While the medical literature cites numerous obstacles to the use of OMT in the ED setting, most can be positively addressed through education, careful planning, and ongoing research into use of these techniques. Recent prospective clinical trials of OMT have demonstrated the utility of these modalities.Conclusion: Osteopathic Manipulation Techniques are useful therapeutic modalities that could be utilized to a greater degree in the ED. As the number of osteopathic emergency physicians increases, the opportunity to employ these techniques should increase.[WestJEM. 2009;10:184-189.

  7. Simulation modelling of a patient surge in an emergency department under disaster conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Gul

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of emergency departments (EDs in handling patient surges during disaster times using the available resources is very important. Many EDs require additional resources to overcome the bottlenecks in emergency systems. The assumption is that EDs consider the option of temporary staff dispatching, among other options, in order to respond to an increased demand or even the hiring temporarily non-hospital medical staff. Discrete event simulation (DES, a well-known simulation method and based on the idea of process modeling, is used for establishing ED operations and management related models. In this study, a DES model is developed to investigate and analyze an ED under normal conditions and an ED in a disaster scenario which takes into consideration an increased influx of disaster victims-patients. This will allow early preparedness of emergency departments in terms of physical and human resources. The studied ED is located in an earthquake zone in Istanbul. The report on Istanbul’s disaster preparedness presented by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA and Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality (IMM, asserts that the district where the ED is located is estimated to have the highest injury rate. Based on real case study information, the study aims to suggest a model on pre-planning of ED resources for disasters. The results indicate that in times of a possible disaster, when the percentage of red patient arrivals exceeds 20% of total patient arrivals, the number of red area nurses and the available space for red area patients will be insufficient for the department to operate effectively. A methodological improvement presented a different distribution function that was tested for service time of the treatment areas. The conclusion is that the Weibull distribution function used in service process of injection room fits the model better than the Gamma distribution function.

  8. Brief interventions for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption in accident and emergency departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin eWojnar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of alcohol abuse among patients treated in accident and emergency departments (A&E is considered substantial. This paper is a narrative review of studies investigating the effectiveness of brief interventions (BI for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption in A&E. A&E departments in hospitals (and other health care infrastructures are commonly the place where serious consequences of alcohol drinking are seen and need to be tackled, supporting the suggested theoretical usefulness of delivering brief interventions in this environment. Available research shows that brief interventions (BI may be considered a valuable technique for dealing with alcohol-related problems. However, it is suggested that the usefulness of BI may depend significantly on the target population to be dealt with. BI have proved to be beneficial for male individuals and those patients who do not abuse other psychoactive substances. In contrast, evidence indicates that brief interventions in A&E settings are not effective at all when dealing with men admitted as a consequence of a violence-related event. In addition, some studies were unable to confirm the effectiveness of BI in female population, in emergency setting. Studies investigating the association between drinking patterns and the effectiveness of brief interventions also present inconsistent results. Most studies assessing the effectiveness of BI in A&E settings only adopted a short perspective (looking at the impact up to a maximum of twelve months after the BI was delivered. When assessing the effects of BI, both the amount of alcohol consumed as well as expected reductions in alcohol consequences, such as injuries, can be taken into account. Evidence on the implementation of brief intervention in emergency departments remains inconclusive as to whether there are clear benefits. A variety of outcome measures and assessing procedures were used in the different studies, which have investigated this

  9. Trends in CT Request and Related Outcomes in a Pediatric Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S.M. Saiful; Abru, Amir Fattah; Al Obaidani, Saeed; Shabibi, Saud Al; Al Farsi, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To study and to establish the overall trends of computed tomography (CT) use and associated outcomes in the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Royal Hospital, Oman, from 2010 to 2014. Methods The hospital electronic medical record was retrospectively searched to find children (from birth to 12 years old) who had visited the PED and the number of CT requests between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014. The types of CT examinations ordered were analyzed according to anatomical location and were as follows; head, abdomen/pelvis, chest, cervical spine/neck, and others. Results There were a total of 67 244 PED visits during the study period, 569 of which received 642 CT scans. There was a remarkable rise in CT uses per 1000 visits from 7 in 2010 to 12 in 2014. There was a 56% hike in CT requests from 87 in 2010 to 175 in 2014 while the number of pediatric emergency visits rose by about 28% from 11 721 to 15 052. Although head CT scans were the most common, cervical spine CT scans had the highest rate of increase (600%) followed by the chest (112%), head (54%) and abdomen (13%). There were no significant changes in other CT scan requests. The cost of CT scans increased from $18 096 to $36 400 during the study period, which increased the average PED cost by about $2 per visit. The average time between a CT being requested and then performed was 1.24 hours. Conclusions CT use in the pediatric emergency department has risen significantly at a rate that markedly exceeds the growth of emergency visits. This is associated with an increase in PED costs and longer waiting times. PMID:27602191

  10. Trends in CT Request and Related Outcomes in a Pediatric Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Saiful Islam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study and to establish the overall trends of computed tomography (CT use and associated outcomes in the pediatric emergency department (PED at Royal Hospital, Oman, from 2010 to 2014. Methods: The hospital electronic medical record was retrospectively searched to find children (from birth to 12 years old who had visited the PED and the number of CT requests between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014. The types of CT examinations ordered were analyzed according to anatomical location and were as follows; head, abdomen/pelvis, chest, cervical spine/neck, and others. Results: There were a total of 67 244 PED visits during the study period, 569 of which received 642 CT scans. There was a remarkable rise in CT uses per 1000 visits from 7 in 2010 to 12 in 2014. There was a 56% hike in CT requests from 87 in 2010 to 175 in 2014 while the number of pediatric emergency visits rose by about 28% from 11 721 to 15 052. Although head CT scans were the most common, cervical spine CT scans had the highest rate of increase (600% followed by the chest (112%, head (54% and abdomen (13%. There were no significant changes in other CT scan requests. The cost of CT scans increased from $18 096 to $36 400 during the study period, which increased the average PED cost by about $2 per visit. The average time between a CT being requested and then performed was 1.24 hours. Conclusions: CT use in the pediatric emergency department has risen significantly at a rate that markedly exceeds the growth of emergency visits. This is associated with an increase in PED costs and longer waiting times.

  11. Point-of-care sonographic detection of intestinal ascaris lumbricoides in the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, David O; Gurwitz, Avrahom; Tsung, James W

    2010-08-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound use is rapidly growing in acute-care settings such as pediatric emergency departments, and new applications are continually being explored. This is especially true in the developing world where the World Health Organization estimates that 75% of people have no access to any imaging or availability of more costly imaging technology may be limited (Essential Health Technologies Strategy 2004-2007). We report a case of intestinal roundworm infection in a 3-year-old boy and describe the ultrasound findings of Ascaris lumbricoides.

  12. Visual Overview, Oral Detail: The Use of an Emergency-Department Whiteboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    and with the coordinating nurse, who is the main keeper of the whiteboard. On the basis of observations, we find that coordination is accomplished through a highly intertwined process of technologically mediated visual overview combined with orally communicated details. The oral details serve to clarify and elaborate......Whiteboards facilitate coordinative practices by making information publicly accessible and thereby strengthening communication and joint commitment about it. This study investigates how coordination is accomplished in an emergency department through interactions with the whiteboard...... instrumental and communicative coordination are central to the coordinative function of the whiteboard. We discuss this and other implications for design....

  13. Work-Practice Changes Associated with an Electronic Emergency-Department Whiteboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Electronic whiteboards are introduced at emergency departments (EDs) to improve work practices. This study investigates whether the time physicians and nurses at an ED spend in patient rooms versus at the control desk increases after the introduction of an electronic whiteboard. After using...... this whiteboard for four months nurses, but not physicians, spend more of their time with the patients. With the electronic whiteboard, nurses spend 28% of their time in patient rooms and physicians 20%. Importantly, the changes facilitated by the electronic whiteboard are also dependent on implementation issues...

  14. Acute Mallory-Weiss syndrome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation by health care providers in the emergency department

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dae Hee Kim; Dong Yoon Rhee; Seon Hee Woo; Woon Jeong Lee; Seung Hwan Seol; Won Jung Jeong

    2015-01-01

    A report of a 62-year-old female patient with severe Mallory-Weiss syndrome after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by health care providers in the emergency department is presented. The bleeding continued for five days, and the patient’s total blood loss was estimated to be approximately 3 000 mL. After 7 days, the patient died due to respiratory distress syndrome. Severe Mallory-Weiss syndrome afterCPR may occur and should be considered as a potentially serious complication afterCPR.

  15. Predictive Factors of Suicide Attempt and Non-Suicidal Self-Harm in Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Saad Salman; Jawaria Idrees; Fahad Hassan; Fariha Idrees; Mashaal Arifullah; Sareer Badshah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Suicide is the third cause of mortality in America, second leading cause of death in developed countries, and one of the major health problems. Self-harm is self-inflicted damage to one’s self with or without suicidal intent. In the present study, the predictive factors of suicide attempt and non-suicidal self-harm were evaluated in patients referred to emergency department (ED) with these problem. Methods: The total number of 45 patients with suicide attempt or self-harm admitt...

  16. Coordinating a Team Response to Behavioral Emergencies in the Emergency Department: A Simulation-Enhanced Interprofessional Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrose H. Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While treating potentially violent patients in the emergency department (ED, both patients and staff may be subject to unintentional injury. Emergency healthcare providers are at the greatest risk of experiencing physical and verbal assault from patients. Preliminary studies have shown that a teambased approach with targeted staff training has significant positive outcomes in mitigating violence in healthcare settings. Staff attitudes toward patient aggression have also been linked to workplace safety, but current literature suggests that providers experience fear and anxiety while caring for potentially violent patients. The objectives of the study were (1 to develop an interprofessional curriculum focusing on improving teamwork and staff attitudes toward patient violence using simulation-enhanced education for ED staff, and (2 to assess attitudes towards patient aggression both at pre- and post-curriculum implementation stages using a survey-based study design. Methods: Formal roles and responsibilities for each member of the care team, including positioning during restraint placement, were predefined in conjunction with ED leadership. Emergency medicine residents, nurses and hospital police officers were assigned to interprofessional teams. The curriculum started with an introductory lecture discussing de-escalation techniques and restraint placement as well as core tenets of interprofessional collaboration. Next, we conducted two simulation scenarios using standardized participants (SPs and structured debriefing. The study consisted of a survey-based design comparing pre- and post-intervention responses via a paired Student t-test to assess changes in staff attitudes. We used the validated Management of Aggression and Violence Attitude Scale (MAVAS consisting of 30 Likert-scale questions grouped into four themed constructs. Results: One hundred sixty-two ED staff members completed the course with >95% staff participation

  17. Must we review printed lab reports without checking them? A prospective analysis of emergency department practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCabe, A

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated if results of haematology and biochemistry laboratory tests, carried out at the point of care in our Emergency Department, are checked by the clinician who ordered the test, mitigating the requirement to check printed reports later. Five hundred and nineteen (519) laboratory reports were examined for significant abnormal results and documentation in clinical notes. Thirty percent (30%, n = 158) of these met the inclusion criteria for \\'significantly abnormal\\' laboratory results. Of the 158 significantly abnormal results, 34.8% (n = 55) were not documented in the ED clinical case notes. No patient was discharged inappropriately. Our study suggests it is safe to stop routinely rechecking printed biochemistry and haematology laboratory reports in our department.

  18. Are we prepared for a growing population? Morbid obesity and its implications in Irish emergency departments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    Two percent of the Irish population is morbidly obese with this figure expected to rise significantly. This survey aimed to establish the present logistical capacity of Irish emergency departments (EDs) to adequately cater for the bariatric patients. A telephone survey was carried out of 37 health service executive EDs over a 5-day period in October 2008. Questions were posed to the departmental lead nurse regarding facilities (Supplemental digital content 1). No ED had adequate facilities. Two of 37 units questioned had on-site hoists designed to lift patients of more than 170 kg. Four departments had rapid access to mattresses within the hospital and three of these four had access to beds and trolleys for weighing patients. Two percent of the Irish population is morbidly obese with this figure expected to rise significantly to more than 150 kg. One department had access to commodes, chairs, wheelchairs and trolleys from inpatient services. All departments had extra-wide blood pressure cuffs and 12 had a difficult airways trolley. Necessary infrastructure and equipment for bariatric patients is deficient in the majority of Irish EDs.

  19. Gis-Based Accessibility Analysis of Urban Emergency Shelters: the Case of Adana City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, M.; Uslu, C.

    2016-10-01

    Accessibility analysis of urban emergency shelters can help support urban disaster prevention planning. Pre-disaster emergency evacuation zoning has become a significant topic on disaster prevention and mitigation research. In this study, we assessed the level of serviceability of urban emergency shelters within maximum capacity, usability, sufficiency and a certain walking time limit by employing spatial analysis techniques of GIS-Network Analyst. The methodology included the following aspects: the distribution analysis of emergency evacuation demands, the calculation of shelter space accessibility and the optimization of evacuation destinations. This methodology was applied to Adana, a city in Turkey, which is located within the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic system, the second major earthquake belt after the Pacific-Belt. It was found that the proposed methodology could be useful in aiding to understand the spatial distribution of urban emergency shelters more accurately and establish effective future urban disaster prevention planning. Additionally, this research provided a feasible way for supporting emergency management in terms of shelter construction, pre-disaster evacuation drills and rescue operations.

  20. It Could Never Happen Here: Promoting Violence Prevention Education for Emergency Department Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Lynne H

    2016-08-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.1 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "It Could Never Happen Here: Promoting Violence Prevention Education for Emergency Department Nurses," found on pages 356-360, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until July 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Suggest strategies targeted for emergency department nurses to prevent or mitigate their exposure

  1. The preliminary experience in the emergency department of a newly opened penitentiary institution hospital in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Koc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergency cases become a widespread problem in prisons across Turkey. The opening of a new prison hospital in January 2012 within the catchment of Silivri Penitentiary Institution gave a unique opportunity to treat the inmates quickly. Aims: The study was to conduct an extensive review for documentation of prisoners′ healthcare problems leading to emergency admission following the first year after the opening of Penitentiary Institution Hospital and point to decrease redundant hospital transfers of this individual cohort. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out where 12,325 visits to the Silivri Penitentiary Institution Hospital for emergency visits from the period of 1 st January 2012 to the 31 st December 2012 were identified from electronic medical records. After obtaining consent from the local IRB, data including details of the type, cause and nature of the complaints of the illnesses were processed. Results: In the 12-month period, there were 12,325 visits to the emergency department, of which 4328 for surgical conditions (35.1%, 2684 for medical disorders (21.8%, 1867 for sports injuries (15.2%, 1327 for Ear Nose Throat (ENT problems (10.8%, 827 for psychiatric disorders (6.70%, 396 for violence injury (3.2%, 169 for self harm (1.4%, and 727 for miscellaneous (5.8%. The most common cause of emergency visits was sports injuries, followed by non-specific abdominal pain and ENT problems. Eighteen prisoners re-attended 243 times, ranging from 8 visits to a maximum of 56 visits. Conclusion: Inmates in prison have a wide range of complaints, and sometimes these complaints do not suggest an illness. Prison population exhibited substantially higher prevalence rates of diseases than the civilian population. We conclude that this new healthcare system in prisons will prevent redundant hospital transfers and guarantee detainees have access to the same health care that is offered to non-detained population.

  2. Complaints and Diagnoses of Emergency Department Patients in the Netherlands: A Comparative Study of Integrated Primary and Emergency Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A M H Thijssen

    Full Text Available In the Netherlands, an increasing number of emergency departments (EDs and general practitioner cooperatives collaborate by creating one Emergency-Care-Access-Point (ECAP. This has resulted in fewer patients at ECAP EDs. The objective of this study was to explore differences in patient characteristics, presented complaints and ED discharge diagnoses between EDs with an ECAP and EDs without an ECAP.A retrospective observational study was performed with 1800 consecutive patient records sampled from six EDs spread over the Netherlands in 2013. We extracted data on time and date of presentation, sex, age, presenting complaint, discharge diagnosis, origin and follow up.At ECAP EDs, the mean age was 47.8 years (95%CI 46.1-49.4 compared to 41.3 (95%CI 39.7-42.9. Compared to non-ECAP EDs, more patients were referred by medical professionals (74.7% versus 46.8%, more patients received hospital admission (45.2% versus 29.0% and fewer patients received GP follow-up (4.1% versus 16.9%. There was no significant difference in presenting complaints between ECAP and non-ECAP EDs. Most prevalent complaints were trauma (25.7% versus 29.7%, abdominal pain (12.1% versus 10.9% and general symptoms (7.8% versus 4.8%. The most prevalent ED diagnoses significantly differed with fractures and dislocations (10.8%, sprains and strains (10.4% and respiratory infections (6.8% at ECAP EDs versus fractures and dislocations (10.7%, wounds (9.3% and sprains and strains (8.9% at non-ECAP EDs.Compared to non-ECAP EDs, patients at ECAP EDs were older, medical professionals referred more patients and more patients received a hospital admission. We found some small differences in discharge diagnoses between ECAP EDs compared to non-ECAP EDs, but no difference in presented complaints.

  3. Complaints and Diagnoses of Emergency Department Patients in the Netherlands: A Comparative Study of Integrated Primary and Emergency Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Wendy A. M. H.; van Miero, Elske; Willekens, Maartje; Rebel, Jasper; Sandel, Maro H.; Giesen, Paul; Wensing, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the Netherlands, an increasing number of emergency departments (EDs) and general practitioner cooperatives collaborate by creating one Emergency-Care-Access-Point (ECAP). This has resulted in fewer patients at ECAP EDs. The objective of this study was to explore differences in patient characteristics, presented complaints and ED discharge diagnoses between EDs with an ECAP and EDs without an ECAP. Methods A retrospective observational study was performed with 1800 consecutive patient records sampled from six EDs spread over the Netherlands in 2013. We extracted data on time and date of presentation, sex, age, presenting complaint, discharge diagnosis, origin and follow up. Results At ECAP EDs, the mean age was 47.8 years (95%CI 46.1-49.4) compared to 41.3 (95%CI 39.7-42.9). Compared to non-ECAP EDs, more patients were referred by medical professionals (74.7% versus 46.8%), more patients received hospital admission (45.2% versus 29.0%) and fewer patients received GP follow-up (4.1% versus 16.9%). There was no significant difference in presenting complaints between ECAP and non-ECAP EDs. Most prevalent complaints were trauma (25.7% versus 29.7%), abdominal pain (12.1% versus 10.9%) and general symptoms (7.8% versus 4.8%). The most prevalent ED diagnoses significantly differed with fractures and dislocations (10.8%), sprains and strains (10.4%) and respiratory infections (6.8%) at ECAP EDs versus fractures and dislocations (10.7%), wounds (9.3%) and sprains and strains (8.9%) at non-ECAP EDs. Conclusion Compared to non-ECAP EDs, patients at ECAP EDs were older, medical professionals referred more patients and more patients received a hospital admission. We found some small differences in discharge diagnoses between ECAP EDs compared to non-ECAP EDs, but no difference in presented complaints. PMID:26131564

  4. Supervision and feedback for junior medical staff in Australian emergency departments: findings from the emergency medicine capacity assessment study

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    Weiland Tracey J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical supervision and feedback are important for the development of competency in junior doctors. This study aimed to determine the adequacy of supervision of junior medical staff in Australian emergency departments (EDs and perceived feedback provided. Methods Semi-structured telephone surveys sought quantitative and qualitative data from ED Directors, Directors of Emergency Medicine Training, registrars and interns in 37 representative Australian hospitals; quantitative data were analysed with SPSS 15.0 and qualitative data subjected to content analysis identifying themes. Results Thirty six of 37 hospitals took part. Of 233 potential interviewees, 95 (40.1% granted interviews including 100% (36/36 of ED Directors, and 96.2% (25/26 of eligible DEMTs, 24% (19/81 of advanced trainee/registrars, and 17% (15/90 of interns. Most participants (61% felt the ED was adequately supervised in general and (64.2% that medical staff were adequately supervised. Consultants and registrars were felt to provide most intern supervision, but this varied depending on shift times, with registrars more likely to provide supervision on night shift and at weekends. Senior ED medical staff (64% and junior staff (79% agreed that interns received adequate clinical supervision. Qualitative analysis revealed that good processes were in place to ensure adequate supervision, but that service demands, particularly related to access block and overcrowding, had detrimental effects on both supervision and feedback. Conclusions Consultants appear to provide the majority of supervision of junior medical staff in Australian EDs. Supervision and feedback are generally felt to be adequate, but are threatened by service demands, particularly related to access block and ED overcrowding.

  5. The Efficacy of Mew Score in Renal Transplant Recipients Referred to Emergency Department

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    Egemen Kocabas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The best treatment option in relation to the advantages in survival in chronic renal disease and in life quality is renal transplantation. During or after the renal transplantation some complications may occur depending on technical reasons. In long term, various infections and metabolic disorders can appear as a result of current immunosuppressive treatments. The present study was conducted in order to determine critical conditions in management of renal transplant cases in Emergency Department and to investigate the efficacy of MODIFIED EARLY WARNING (MEW score in determining the morbidity and acute renal failure (ARF in renal transplant cases. Material and Method: 172 renal transplant recipients presenting to Uludag University Medicine Faculty Emergency Department were investigated prospectively. The patients, whose MEW scores were calculated, were evaluated in terms of the diagnoses, hospitalisation reasons, and presence of (ARF attack and the relationship with MEW score was investigated. Results: 22.8% (n:26 of applications matched with sepsis and significant difference was found out in those patients in terms of ARF (p

  6. Patients Prefer Boarding in Inpatient Hallways: Correlation with the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score

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    John R. Richards

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The boarding of patients in Emergency Department (ED hallways when no inpatient beds are available is a major cause of ED crowding. One solution is to board admitted patients in an inpatient rather than ED hallway. We surveyed patients to determine their preference and correlated their responses to real-time National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score (NEDOCS. Methods. This was a survey of admitted patients in the ED of an urban university level I trauma center serving a community of 5 million about their personal preferences regarding boarding. Real-time NEDOCS was calculated at the time each survey was conducted. Results. 99 total surveys were completed during October 2010, 42 (42% patients preferred to be boarded in an inpatient hallway, 33 (33% preferred the ED hallway, and 24 (24% had no preference. Mean (±SD NEDOCS (range 0–200 was 136±46 for patients preferring inpatient boarding, 112±39 for ED boarding, and 119±43 without preference. Male patients preferred inpatient hallway boarding significantly more than females. Preference for inpatient boarding was associated with a significantly higher NEDOCS. Conclusions. In this survey study, patients prefer inpatient hallway boarding when the hospital is at or above capacity. Males prefer inpatient hallway boarding more than females. The preference for inpatient hallway boarding increases as the ED becomes more crowded.

  7. Primary care presentations at emergency departments: rates and reasons by age and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminski, Peter; Bezzina, Andrew J; Lago, Luise P; Eagar, Kathy

    2008-11-01

    Primary care presentations at emergency departments (EDs) have been the subject of much attention in recent years. This paper is a demographic analysis using administrative data from the Emergency Department Information System (EDIS) for 2005 of such presentations in New South Wales EDs and of self-reported reasons for presentation. Age and sex differences in the reasons given by patients for such presentations are analysed using data from a survey of patients conducted in a subset of EDs in 2004. The rate of "potential primary care" presentations varies greatly with age and to a lesser extent with sex. Almost half (47%) of these presentations are made by people under 25 years of age. Children aged 0-4 years account for 14% of the total. The pattern is distinctly different to the corresponding rate of ED presentations that do not fit the "potential primary care" definition. Reasons given for "potential primary care" presentations are consistent across all age groups, reflecting self-assessed urgency, access to diagnostics and self-assessed complexity. Older "primary care" patients are particularly unlikely to give reasons associated with GP affordability or availability for their presentations. Young adults' responses are consistent with the overall population, and children under the age of five seem most susceptible to availability issues.

  8. A rare case of mature cystic teratoma in the emergency department

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeynep Konyar; Gokhan Eyupoglu; Mehmet Tatli; Ozlem Guneysel

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are the most common germ cell tumors among pediatric and female patients, which originates from germ cells layers and can be located everywhere in bodies. They are diagnosed by ultrasonography (US), which was characterized by calcification and cystic anechoic view. Our aim is to attract attention to a 21-year-old female patient with complaint of acute abdominal pain diagnosed with teratoma by early radiological im-aging. The female patient admitted to the emergency department with a new onset of abdominal pain at the lower and left sides of the abdomen for a week. The suprapubic and left costovertebral angle tenderness were found in her physical examination. We firstly chose US for imaging. The US of the abdomen showed multiple cystic masses around uterus. Heterogeneous cystic and calcified lesions were detected on the patients computerized tomography scan, and considered as teratoma. A laparotomy was per-formed by gynecologists. At laparotomy, lobulated cystic masses were removed and the left ovary had been detorsioned. She has been discharged after two days of postoperative observation. For patients of young females with abdominal pain such as rare gyneco-logical diseases, teratoma and ovarian torsion, in the emergency department should be considered and early imaging should be performed.

  9. A Semantic-Based Model for Triage Patients in Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Guilherme; da Costa, Cristiano A; Righi, Rodrigo R

    2017-04-01

    Triage is a process performed in an emergency department that aims to sort patients according to their need for care. When performed speedily and correctly, this process can potentially increase the chances of survival for a patient with serious complications. This study aims to develop a computer model, called UbiTriagem, which supports the process of triage using the concepts of web semantics and ubiquitous computing focused on healthcare. For evaluating the proposal, we performed an analysis of scenario-driven triage based on previously determined ratings. In addition, we conducted a usability evaluation in emergency department with the developed prototype with two user groups: nurses and patients. The main scientific contribution is the automatic triage assessment based on the gathering of patient data on mobile devices, performed automatically through the use of a reasoning technique in an ontology. The results for all evaluations were very positive. The automatic triage assessment has been assertive in 93.3% of the cases and, after adjustments in the model, in 100% of the cases. Regarding user satisfaction, we obtained rates of 98.7% and 96% when considering perception of utility and ease of use, respectively.

  10. After Medicaid Expansion In Kentucky, Use Of Hospital Emergency Departments For Dental Conditions Increased.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Natalia; Grover, Jane; Compton, Rob

    2016-12-01

    Access to oral health care is a critical need for the adult Medicaid population. Following the 2014 expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kentucky, millions of adults became eligible to receive dental benefits. We examined the impact of the expansion on adult Medicaid enrollees' use of hospital emergency departments (EDs) for conditions related to dental or oral health in the period 2010-14. Based on our analysis of data for Kentucky from the State Emergency Department Databases, we found that the rate of discharges for these conditions from the ED increased significantly, from 1,833 per 100,000 population in 2013 to 5,635 in 2014. Adults covered by Medicaid who used the ED for treatment of oral health conditions in 2014 had high levels of chronic comorbidities and were more likely to be male and nonwhite than those in earlier years. To avoid costly and inappropriate use of the ED, states considering adding an adult Medicaid dental benefit should consider also making changes to assist beneficiaries in obtaining access to the dental health care delivery system.

  11. Early detection of sepsis in the emergency department using Dynamic Bayesian Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachimuthu, Senthil K; Haug, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory state due to an infection, and is associated with very high mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic and supportive therapy is associated with improved outcomes. Our objective was to detect the presence of sepsis soon after the patient visits the emergency department. We used Dynamic Bayesian Networks, a temporal probabilistic technique to model a system whose state changes over time. We built, trained and tested the model using data of 3,100 patients admitted to the emergency department, and measured the accuracy of detecting sepsis using data collected within the first 3 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours and 24 hours after admission. The area under the curve was 0.911, 0.915, 0.937 and 0.944 respectively. We describe the data, data preparation techniques, model, results, various statistical measures and the limitations of our experiments. We also briefly discuss techniques to improve accuracy, and the generalizability of our methods to other diseases.

  12. Process Mapping in a Pediatric Emergency Department to Minimize Missed Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Valene; Belostotsky, Vladimir; Roy, Madan; Yamamura, Deborah; Gambarotto, Kathryn; Lau, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in young children and are seen in emergency departments (EDs) frequently. Left untreated, UTIs can lead to more severe conditions. Our goal was to undertake a quality improvement (QI) initiative to help minimize the number of children with missed UTIs in a newly established tertiary care pediatric emergency department (PED). A retrospective chart review was undertaken to identify missed UTIs in children < 3 years old who presented to a children's hospital's ED with positive urine cultures. It was found that there was no treatment or follow-up in 12% of positive urine cultures, indicating a missed or possible missed UTI in a significant number of children. Key stakeholders were then gathered and process mapping (PM) was completed, where gaps and barriers were identified and interventions were subsequently implemented. A follow-up chart review was completed to assess the impact of PM in reducing the number of missed UTIs. Following PM and its implementation within the ED, there was no treatment or follow-up in only 1% of cases. Based on our results, the number of potentially missed UTIs in the ED decreased dramatically, indicating that PM can be a successful QI tool in an acute care pediatric setting. PMID:27974897

  13. Acute Headache at Emergency Department: Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Complicated by Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Cerebral Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is becoming widely accepted as a rare cause of both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke and should be evocated in case of thunderclap headaches associated with stroke. We present the case of a patient with ischemic stroke associated with cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH and reversible diffuse arteries narrowing, leading to the diagnosis of reversible vasoconstriction syndrome. Case Report. A 48-year-old woman came to the emergency department because of an unusual thunderclap headache. The computed tomography of the brain completed by CT-angiography was unremarkable. Eleven days later, she was readmitted because of a left hemianopsia. One day after her admission, she developed a sudden left hemiparesis. The brain MRI showed ischemic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobe and diffuse cSAH. The angiography showed vasoconstriction of the right anterior cerebral artery and stenosis of both middle cerebral arteries. Nimodipine treatment was initiated and vasoconstriction completely regressed on day 16 after the first headache. Conclusion. Our case shows a severe reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome where both haemorrhagic and ischemic complications were present at the same time. The history we reported shows that reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is still underrecognized, in particular in general emergency departments.

  14. Developing an e-learning resource for nurse airway assistants in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Peter; McAleer, Sean

    2017-02-23

    The aims of this project were to determine the required competencies for a nurse in the emergency department assisting with a rapid sequence induction of anaesthesia (RSI), and to produce a relevant e-learning resource. A three-round multidisciplinary Delphi process produced the following competencies: ability to describe the steps and sequence of events of an RSI, familiarity with the equipment used during an RSI, ability to recognise and help manage problems occurring during an RSI, ability to prepare for an RSI, ability to apply cricoid pressure, and understanding the modification of an RSI in special circumstances. An interactive e-learning package was produced and made available online. Twelve emergency department nurses took part in an evaluation of the e-learning package. All either agreed or strongly agreed that they had increased their knowledge and found the learning useful, and 11 out of 12 nurses reported being somewhat or very confident in the role of airway assistant following completion of the learning.

  15. Hospital admissions for hypertensive crisis in the emergency departments: a large multicenter Italian study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Pinna

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data on the impact of hypertensive crises (emergencies and urgencies on referral to the Emergency Departments (EDs are lacking, in spite of the evidence that they may be life-threatening conditions. We performed a multicenter study to identify all patients aged 18 years and over who were admitted to 10 Italian EDs during 2009 for hypertensive crises (systolic blood pressure ≥220 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥120 mmHg. We classified patients as affected by either hypertensive emergencies or hypertensive urgencies depending on the presence or the absence of progressive target organ damage, respectively. Logistic regression analysis was then performed to assess variables independently associated with hypertensive emergencies with respect to hypertensive urgencies. Of 333,407 patients admitted to the EDs over the one-year period, 1,546 had hypertensive crises (4.6/1,000, 95% CI 4.4-4.9, and 23% of them had unknown hypertension. Hypertensive emergencies (n = 391, 25.3% of hypertensive crises were acute pulmonary edema (30.9%, stroke (22.0%,, myocardial infarction (17.9%, acute aortic dissection (7.9%, acute renal failure (5.9% and hypertensive encephalopathy (4.9%. Men had higher frequency than women of unknown hypertension (27.9% vs 18.5%, p<0.001. Even among known hypertensive patients, a larger proportion of men than women reported not taking anti-hypertensive drug (12.6% among men and 9.4% among women (p<0.001. Compared to women of similar age, men had higher likelihood of having hypertensive emergencies than urgencies (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.06-1.70, independently of presenting symptoms, creatinine, smoking habit and known hypertension. This study shows that hypertensive crises involved almost 5 out of 1,000 patients-year admitted to EDs. Sex differences in frequencies of unknown hypertension, compliance to treatment and risk of hypertensive emergencies might have implications for public health programs.

  16. Low-back pain at the emergency department: still not being managed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzardo A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro Rizzardo,1 Luca Miceli,1 Rym Bednarova,2 Giovanni Maria Guadagnin,1 Rodolfo Sbrojavacca,3 Giorgio Della Rocca11Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Academic Hospital of Udine, University of Udine, Udine, 2Pain Medicine and Palliative Care, Health Company Number 2, Gorizia, 3Emergency Department, Academic Hospital of Udine, Udine, ItalyBackground: Low-back pain (LBP affects about 40% of people at some point in their lives. In the presence of “red flags”, further tests must be done to rule out underlying problems; however, biomedical imaging is currently overused. LBP involves large in-hospital and out-of-hospital economic costs, and it is also the most common musculoskeletal disorder seen in emergency departments (EDs.Patients and methods: This retrospective observational study enrolled 1,298 patients admitted to the ED, including all International Classification of Diseases 10 diagnosis codes for sciatica, lumbosciatica, and lumbago. We collected patients’ demographic data, medical history, lab workup and imaging performed at the ED, drugs administered at the ED, ED length of stay (LOS, numeric rating scale pain score, admission to ward, and ward LOS data. Thereafter, we performed a cost analysis.Results: Mean numeric rating scale scores were higher than 7/10. Home medication consisted of no drug consumption in up to 90% of patients. Oxycodone–naloxone was the strong opioid most frequently prescribed for the home. Once at the ED, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates were administered to up to 72% and 42% of patients, respectively. Imaging was performed in up to 56% of patients. Mean ED LOS was 4 hours, 14 minutes. A total of 43 patients were admitted to a ward. The expense for each non-ward-admitted patient was approximately €200 in the ED, while the mean expense for ward-admitted patients was €9,500, with a mean LOS of 15 days.Conclusion: There is not yet a defined therapeutic care process for the

  17. Emergency Department Crowding and Loss of Medical Licensure: A New Risk of Patient Care in Hallways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Derlet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 32-year-old male recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes treated at an urban university emergency department (ED crowded to 250% over capacity. His initial symptoms of shortness of breath and feeling ill for several days were evaluated with chest radiograph, electrocardiogram (EKG, and laboratory studies, which suggested mild diabetic ketoacidosis. His medical care in the ED was conducted in a crowded hallway. After correction of his metabolic abnormalities he felt improved and was discharged with arrangements made for outpatient follow-up. Two days later he returned in cardiac arrest, and resuscitation efforts failed. The autopsy was significant for multiple acute and chronic pulmonary emboli but no coronary artery disease. The hospital settled the case for $1 million and allocated major responsibility to the treating emergency physician (EP. As a result the state medical board named the EP in a disciplinary action, claiming negligence because the EKG had not been personally interpreted by that physician. A formal hearing was conducted with the EP’s medical license placed in jeopardy. This case illustrates the risk to EPs who treat patients in crowded hallways, where it is difficult to provide the highest level of care. This case also demonstrates the failure of hospital administration to accept responsibility and provide resources to the ED to ensure patient safety. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:137–141.

  18. Online Health Information Impacts Patients’ Decisions to Seek Emergency Department Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourmand, Ali

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the impact of online health information (OHI and patients’ decisions to seek emergency department (ED care.Methods: We conducted a survey of a convenience sample of 489 ambulatory patients at an academic ED between February and September 2006. The primary measure was the prevalence of Internet use, and the secondary outcome was the impact of OHI on patients’ decision to seek ED care.Results: The study group comprised 175 (38% males. Mean age was 33 years old; 222 (45.4% patients were white, 189 (38.7% patients were African American, and 33 (6.7% were Hispanic. 92.6% had Internet access, and 94.5% used email; 58.7% reported that OHI was easy to locate, while 49.7% felt that it was also easy to understand. Of the subjects who had Internet access, 15.1% (1.6, 95% CI 1.3-2.0 stated that they had changed their decision to seek care in the ED.Conclusion: This study suggests that Internet access in an urban adult ED population may mirror reported Internet use among American adults. Many ED patients report that they are able to access and understand online health information, as well as use it to make decisions about seeking emergency care. [West J Emerg Med. 2011; 12(2:174-177.

  19. Emergency Department Ultrasound Is not a Sensitive Detector of Solid Organ Injury

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    Kendall, John L

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the sensitivity and specificity of emergency department (ED ultrasound for the detection of solid organ injury following blunt abdominal trauma.Methods: A prospective cohort study performed in the ED of an urban Level I trauma center on patients who sustained blunt abdominal trauma. Following initial standard trauma evaluation, patients underwent a secondary ultrasound examination performed specifically to identify injury to the liver or spleen, followed by computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen. Ultrasound examinations were performed by emergency medicine residents or attending physicians experienced in the use of ultrasound for detecting hemoperitoneum. Ultrasonographers prospectively determined the presence or absence of liver or spleen injury. CT findings were used as the criterion standard to evaluate the ultrasound results.Results: From July 1998 through June 1999, 152 patients underwent secondary ultrasound examination and CT. Of the 152 patients, nine (6% had liver injuries and 10 (7% had spleen injuries. Ultrasound correctly detected only one of the liver injuries for a sensitivity of 11% (95% CI: 0%-48% and a specificity of 98% (95% CI: 94%-100%. Ultrasound correctly detected eight spleen injuries for a sensitivity of 80% (95% CI: 44%-98% and a specificity of 99% (95% CI: 95%-100%.Conclusion: Emergency ultrasound is not sensitive or specific for detecting liver or spleen injuries following blunt abdominal trauma.[WestJEM. 2009;10:1-5.

  20. [Nurse-performed FAST ultrasound in the emergency department: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storti, Matteo; Musella, Lorenzo; Cianci, Vito

    2013-01-01

    Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (commonly abbreviated as FAST) is considered for patients with blunt abdominal trauma as the gold standard for accident assessment in site. This method is increasingly used even by not radiologists professionals, as well as by nurses who works in emergency settings. This systematic review is aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of ultrasound FAST performed by nurses in emergencies department. Seven databases of primary and secondary literature as well as three national journals relevant to the field were consulted. The review was conducted between March and August 2011 developing 9 search strings. Articles have been critically reviewed by two authors independently. No restriction on language or time of publication have been used. A total of 4767 documents were displayed, of those only 4 were considered to be reviewed. A total of 1035 FAST ultrasound performed by nurses were included. The results show that the use of ultrasound FAST performed by trained nurses is very effective, with a sensitivity of 84% (95% CI 72.1-92.2) and a specificity of 97.37% (95% CI 92.55-99.10) . Practice execution time was an average of 156 seconds (2.6 minutes), median time of 138 seconds (range = 76 to 357). Just one study specified the training course that nurses were required to attend. To sum up, FAST ultrasound performed by nurses have an important role in emergencies management as well as in triage setting as valid screening tool.

  1. Predictors of early arrival at the emergency department in acute ischaemic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curran, C

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: A requirement of an effective acute stroke service is the early arrival of patients to the hospital emergency department (ED). This will allow the possible use of thrombolytic therapy or other acute interventions within a limited time window. AIMS: We investigated the predictors of early arrival in a single hospital serving a mixed urban and rural catchment area. METHODS: A retrospective review of all case notes for 1 year was performed. RESULTS: Of 105 acute strokes, 91 were cerebral infarcts and a total of 71 cases presenting initially to the ED had timing available for analysis. 39.4% presented within 3 h, and 12.7% were potentially suitable for thrombolysis. Those living closer to the hospital were not more likely to arrive within 3 h (Z = -0.411, p = 0.68). Presenting directly to the hospital by emergency services (or private transport) was significantly associated with early arrival in a univariate comparison (p < 0.001), and in a multivariate model. CONCLUSION: The only independent predictor of early arrival to the ED is direct presentation. Improved public education of the importance of recognition of stroke symptoms and rapid contact with the emergency services will improve the early attendance following acute stroke, allowing increased use of acute stroke treatments.

  2. Physician and Nurse Acceptance of Technicians to Screen for Geriatric Syndromes in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian F Gage

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate emergency medicine physician and nurse acceptance of nonnurse, nonphysician screening for geriatric syndromes. Methods: This was a single-center emergency department (ED survey of physicians and nurses after an 8-month project. Geriatric technicians were paid medical student research assistants evaluating consenting ED patients older than 65 years for cognitive dysfunction, fall risk, or functional decline. The primary objective of this anonymous survey was to evaluate ED nurse and physician perceptions about the geriatric screener feasibility and barriers to implementation. In addition, as a secondary objective, respondents reported ongoing geriatric screening efforts independent of the research screeners. Results: The survey was completed by 72% of physicians and 33% of nurses. Most nurses and physicians identified geriatric technicians as beneficial to patients without impeding ED throughput. Fewer than 25% of physicians routinely screen for any geriatric syndromes. Nurses evaluated for fall risk significantly more often than physicians, but no other significant differences were noted in ongoing screening efforts. Conclusion: Dedicated geriatric technicians are perceived by nurses and physicians as beneficial to patients with the potential to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes. Most nurses and physicians are not currently screening for any geriatric syndromes. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:489–495.

  3. Lean techniques for the improvement of patients’ flow in emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, HY; Lo, SM; Lee, LLY; Lo, WYL; Yu, WC; Wu, YF; Ho, ST; Yeung, RSD; Chan, JTS

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency departments (EDs) face problems with overcrowding, access block, cost containment, and increasing demand from patients. In order to resolve these problems, there is rising interest to an approach called “lean” management. This study aims to (1) evaluate the current patient flow in ED, (2) to identify and eliminate the non-valued added process, and (3) to modify the existing process. METHODS: It was a quantitative, pre- and post-lean design study with a series of lean management work implemented to improve the admission and blood result waiting time. These included structured re-design process, priority admission triage (PAT) program, enhanced communication with medical department, and use of new high sensitivity troponin-T (hsTnT) blood test. Triage waiting time, consultation waiting time, blood result time, admission waiting time, total processing time and ED length of stay were compared. RESULTS: Among all the processes carried out in ED, the most time consuming processes were to wait for an admission bed (38.24 minutes; SD 66.35) and blood testing result (mean 52.73 minutes, SD 24.03). The triage waiting time and end waiting time for consultation were significantly decreased. The admission waiting time of emergency medical ward (EMW) was significantly decreased from 54.76 minutes to 24.45 minutes after implementation of PAT program (Plean management can improve the patient flow in ED. Acquiescence to the principle of lean is crucial to enhance high quality emergency care and patient satisfaction. PMID:25215143

  4. Occupational stress and coping strategies among emergency department nurses of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dong-Mei; Sun, Ning; Hong, Su; Fan, Yu-ying; Kong, Fan-ying; Li, Qiu-jie

    2015-08-01

    Emergency department(ED) nurses work in a rapidly changing environment with patients that have wide variety of conditions. Occupational stress in emergency department nurses is a common problem. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between coping strategies and occupational stress among ED nurses in China. A correlational, cross-sectional design was adopted. Two questionnaires were given to a random sample of 127 ED nurses registered at the Heilongjiang Nurses' Association. Data were collected from the nurses that worked in the ED of five general hospitals in Harbin China. Occupational stress and coping strategies were measured by two questionnaires. A multiple regression model was applied to analyze the relationship between stress and coping strategies. The stressors of ED nurses mainly come from the ED specialty of nursing (2.97±0.55), workload and time distribution (2.97±0.58). The mean score of positive coping strategies was 2.19±0.35, higher than the norm (1.78±0.52). The mean score of negative coping strategies was 1.20±0.61, lower than the norm (1.59±0.66), both had significant statistical difference (Pprofessional were the influence factors about occupational stress to positive coping styles. Too much documents work, and medical insurance for ED nurses were the influential factors on occupational stress to negative coping styles. This study identified several factors associated with occupational stress in ED nurses. These results could be used to guide nurse managers of ED nurses to reduce work stress. The managers could pay more attention to the ED nurse's coping strategies which can further influence their health state and quality of nursing care. Reducing occupational stress and enhancing coping strategies are vital not only for encouraging nurses but also for the future of nursing development.

  5. Effectiveness Of Bureaucracy In The Implementation Of Free Education System In The Department Of Education Makassar City

    OpenAIRE

    Sunusi, Syahribulan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explain the effectiveness of the bureaucracy in organizing a free education system in Makassar City Department of Education. Deductive approach qualitative research through case studies. Data collected through observation, interviews, and documentation. Data were analyzed through data reduction techniques, presentation of data, conclusions, and verification. The effectiveness of the bureaucracy can be seen with the achievement of goals and objectives. Goals to be achieved, ...

  6. Urban Automation Networks: Current and Emerging Solutions for Sensed Data Collection and Actuation in Smart Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carles; Paradells, Josep

    2015-09-10

    Urban Automation Networks (UANs) are being deployed worldwide in order to enable Smart City applications. Given the crucial role of UANs, as well as their diversity, it is critically important to assess their properties and trade-offs. This article introduces the requirements and challenges for UANs, characterizes the main current and emerging UAN paradigms, provides guidelines for their design and/or choice, and comparatively examines their performance in terms of a variety of parameters including coverage, power consumption, latency, standardization status and economic cost.

  7. An evaluation of emergency room services during the New York City house officer strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, J J; Greene, M

    1976-02-01

    A chart audit of emergency services provided by attending staff during the New York City House Officers' strike is compared to an audit of work previously performed by house staff. The usual quality of services provided in this institution was maintained during the strike. However, deficiencies in quality noted in house staff charts, continued to be noted in the charts of attending staff. Failure to improve quality of medical records when trained staff substitute for trainees suggests that the central strike issue of poor working conditions contributes to low quality of care.

  8. Urban Automation Networks: Current and Emerging Solutions for Sensed Data Collection and Actuation in Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Gomez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urban Automation Networks (UANs are being deployed worldwide in order to enable Smart City applications. Given the crucial role of UANs, as well as their diversity, it is critically important to assess their properties and trade-offs. This article introduces the requirements and challenges for UANs, characterizes the main current and emerging UAN paradigms, provides guidelines for their design and/or choice, and comparatively examines their performance in terms of a variety of parameters including coverage, power consumption, latency, standardization status and economic cost.

  9. Urban Automation Networks: Current and Emerging Solutions for Sensed Data Collection and Actuation in Smart Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carles; Paradells, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Urban Automation Networks (UANs) are being deployed worldwide in order to enable Smart City applications. Given the crucial role of UANs, as well as their diversity, it is critically important to assess their properties and trade-offs. This article introduces the requirements and challenges for UANs, characterizes the main current and emerging UAN paradigms, provides guidelines for their design and/or choice, and comparatively examines their performance in terms of a variety of parameters including coverage, power consumption, latency, standardization status and economic cost. PMID:26378534

  10. Emergence and Epidemiology of Ciguatera in the Coastal Cities of Southern China

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Y. K. Chan

    2015-01-01

    In the present review of 23 published case studies, the main objective is to report the emergence and epidemiology of ciguatera in the coastal cities of southern China. There was a sudden surge in ciguatera outbreaks in 2004. Ciguatera mostly occurred in the Guangdong Province. In Shenzhen, the incidence of ciguatera in 2004 was estimated to be over 7.5 per million people. In Foshan and Zhongshan, three large outbreaks each affecting over 100–200 subjects (caused by tiger grouper served at b...

  11. Setting up and functioning of an Emergency Medicine Department: Lessons learned from a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Asish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Tertiary care teaching hospitals remain referral centres for victims of trauma and mass casualty. Often specialists from various disciplines manage these crowded casualty areas. These age old casualty areas are being replaced, throughout the country by Emergency Medicine Departments (EMDs, presumed to be better planned to confront a crisis. We aimed to gather basic data contributive in setting up of an EMD at a tertiary care teaching hospital from the lessons learned from functioning existent systems. Methods: This is primarily a questionnaire-based descriptive study at tertiary care referral centres across the country, which was purposively selected.The study models included one from a hospital without designated EMD and the other four from hospitals with established EMDs. Direct observation and focus group meetings with experienced informants at these hospitals contributed to the data. In the absence of a validated hospital preparedness assessment scale, comparison was done with regard to quantitative, qualitative and corroborative parameters using descriptive analysis. Results: The EMDs at best practice models were headed by specialist in Emergency Medicine assisted by organised staff, had protocols for managing mass casualty incident (MCI, separate trauma teams, ergonomic use of infrastructure and public education programmes. In this regard, these hospitals seemed well organised to manage MCIs and disasters. Conclusion: The observation may provide a preliminary data useful in setting up an EMD. In the absence of published Indian literature, this may facilitate further research in this direction. Anaesthesiologists, presently an approved Faculty in Emergency Medicine training can provide creative input with regard to its initial organisation and functioning, thus widening our horizons in a country where there is a severe dearth of trained emergency physicians.

  12. The Quality of Patients’ Files Documentation in Emergency Department; a Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Esmailian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency departments as one of the most important wards of hospitals, provide the emergency therapeutic care to decrease the mortality and disability rates among patients. The management and evaluation of emergency activities are possible through timely, accurate, and complete registration of information, based on standard rules. Thus, the aim of this research was detecting the observance rate of documentation standards in the emergency department of Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan, to find patients’ files documentation failures and eliminate them. Methods: I This was a cross sectional study performed in the emergency department of Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan, 2009. For data gathering, a checklist included 23 questions in two parts was used. The first and second parts had 9 and 14 questions to detect observance rate of patients’ characteristics documentation and nurse reports documentation, respectively. Based on Likert scale, the answer of each option includes blank (score 1, illegible (score 2, incomplete (score 3, and complete (score 4. Therefore, the minimum and maximum reachable scores were determined 9-36 in the documentation of patients’ characteristics and 14-56 in the nurse reports. Data was analyzed using SPSS 8 and Chi-squared test and Fisher’s exact test were applied to compare qualitative data. Student’s t-test was used to compare quantitative information, too. P<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: 300 documents were studied in this research. The average of reached score in the quality assessment of patients record completion was 24.66±17 (15-34, (the maximum reachable score was 36. The total score of emergency patients records was 61.8±4.8 (45-74 from total of 92 reachable scores. The average of total reached score for nurse reports was 37.2±3.7 (28-46, (with the maximum reachable score of 56. No significant difference was seen in the accuracy of patients’ documentation according to referring

  13. What parental characteristics can predict child maltreatment at the Emergency Department? Considering expansion of the Hague Protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diderich, H.M.; Dechesne, M.; Fekkes, M.; Verkerk, P.H.; Buitendijk, S.E.; Oudesluys-Murphy, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Hague Protocol considers three parental characteristics of Emergency Department adult patients to identify child abuse: (a) domestic violence, (b) intoxication, and (c) suicide attempt or auto mutilation. This study investigated whether additional parental characteristics could be included to im

  14. An Instrument to Prepare for Acute Care of the Individual with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Arvind; Migyanka, Joann M.; Cramer, Ryan; McGonigle, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We present an instrument to allow individuals with autism spectrum disorder, their families and/or their caregivers to prepare emergency department staff for the care needs of this patient population ahead of acute presentation.

  15. A Rural-Urban Comparison in Emergency Department Visits for U.S. Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanqing; Mason, Ashley E; Boyd, Brian; Sikich, Linmarie; Baranek, Grace

    2017-03-01

    We examined rural-urban differences in emergency department visits, and child and clinical characteristics associated with visits for U.S. children aged 3-17 years with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Rural children with ASD were twice more likely to have emergency department visits in urban hospitals than rural children without ASD. The children with ASD in rural areas were economically disadvantaged and concentrated in the South and Midwest regions. Rural children diagnosed with ASD and multiple comorbidities during emergency department visits were 1.6 times as that of urban children. Rural children with ASD, particularly those with multiple comorbidities, require more emergency department services when compared with urban children with ASD.

  16. The effect of establishing a new, reorganized emergency department on quality of clinical healthcare and patient satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Maria Søe

    satisfaction and readmissions and mortality. In summary, we saw an overall improvement in healthcare quality and patient satisfaction after the establishment of the new emergency department at Nykøbing Falster Hospital. During the same period, a general improvement in the quality of emergency healthcare...... beds, and to determine whether a consistency was seen between the treatment given and the patients’ experience of the treatment. Study I describes the quality of care before and after the establishment of a new emergency department at Nykøbing Falster Hospital by measuring five common disease groups...... based on data from the National Indicators Project. The study showed an overall improvement of 48% (15/31) in the indicators. The greatest improvement was seen in stroke patients, which had been a special focus in the emergency department investigated. In Study II patient satisfaction in the emergency...

  17. The nature and causes of unintended events reported at ten emergency departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wal Gerrit

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies on patient safety have shown that a substantial number of patients suffer from unintended harm caused by healthcare management in hospitals. Emergency departments (EDs are challenging hospital settings with regard to patient safety. There is an increased sense of urgency to take effective countermeasures in order to improve patient safety. This can only be achieved if interventions tackle the dominant underlying causes. The objectives of our study are to examine the nature and causes of unintended events in EDs and the relationship between type of event and causal factor structure. Methods Study at EDs of 10 hospitals in the Netherlands. The study period per ED was 8 to 14 weeks, in which staff were asked to report unintended events. Unintended events were broadly defined as all events, no matter how seemingly trivial or commonplace, that were unintended and could have harmed or did harm a patient. Reports were analysed with a Root Cause Analysis tool (PRISMA by an experienced researcher. Results 522 unintended events were reported. Of the events 25% was related to cooperation with other departments and 20% to problems with materials/equipment. More than half of the events had consequences for the patient, most often resulting in inconvenience or suboptimal care. Most root causes were human (60%, followed by organisational (25% and technical causes (11%. Nearly half of the root causes was external, i.e. attributable to other departments in or outside the hospital. Conclusion Event reporting gives insight into diverse unintended events. The information on unintended events may help target research and interventions to increase patient safety. It seems worthwhile to direct interventions on the collaboration between the ED and other hospital departments.

  18. Nutritional Situation Assessment of 65 Years Old Patient Who Applicate to Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižsmail Nalbur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study.we want to purpose that nutritinos and socio-demographic situations who over 65 years old patients come in one of the most important 3rd degree hospital emergeny department. Material and Method: We practice Mini Nutritional Assessment test descriptive and forward-looking on 93 women and 111 men totally 204 patients between 15.03.2014-30.03.2014 who applicate emergency department. Results: In these group % 68.61 0f patient was between 65-79 years old; % 31.39 of was patient over 80 years old. After Mini Nutritional Assessment test results patient of % 60.8 in Group 1; % 18.6 in Group 2; % 20.6 in Group 3. However in Goup1 and 2 there was no important difference between gender (p=0.196, p=0.216; in Group 3 male gender was meaningful more than female (p=0.024. In Group 1 and Group 2 65-79 years old patient group was meaningful more than 80 years ol patient group (p=0.02, p=0.017. In Group 3 there was no difference beween in these groups (p=0.109. In this study groups there was meaningful difference between age and weight (p<0.001, there was no diffeence for height (p=0.722. In Group 2 avarege of arm circumference and calf circumference higher than Group 3 (p=0.010, p=0.016. In this study patients who hospitalized in intensive care unit after this treatmet in emergengy department meaningful more than Group 1 and 2 (p=0.038. Discussion: Early diagnosis of malnutrition in elderly patient who applicate emergengy department is important for treatment.

  19. The emerging trend in the epidemiology of gunshot injuries in the emergency department of a Nigerian tertiary hospital in a State without formal prehospital emergency medical services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Uche Pascal Iloh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Gunshot injuries (GSIs though a rarity in Nigeria before the Nigerian civil war have now become rampant with variable epidemiology. It is emerging as a common cause of trauma-related emergency hospitalizations. Aim: The study was aimed at reviewing the epidemiology of gunshot injuries in the emergency department (ED of a Nigerian tertiary hospital over a 5-year period. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of GSIs seen at the ED of Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Nigeria using data from medical records, patients′ case notes, ED admission registers, and nurses′ report books. The data collected included age, sex, place of the incidence, time of the incidence, time of presentation to the hospital, anatomic sites, and etiology of the injury. Results : The age ranged from 14 years to 80 years with mean age of 47 ± 8.1 years. There were 95 males and 22 females with a male to female ratio of 4.3:1. The three most common causes were armed robbery (31.6%, kidnapping (21.3%, and police brutality (17.9%. The incident predominantly affected the middle age group (57.3%, occurred mostly during the day time (72.6%, affecting mainly the lower limbs (65.8% and majority (84.6% of the victims presented 1 hour after the injury. None of the victims received prehospital care. Conclusion: There was variability in the epidemiology of GSIs with kidnapping and police brutality emerging among preeminent contributors and downward trend of armed robbery-related GSIs. The incident occurred predominantly during the day time and most victims presented late to the ED. Interventional strategies including the responsible security apparatus system are advocated.

  20. 75 FR 36676 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Jefferson... completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources... Department of Natural Resources professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Osage...

  1. Measuring emergency department nurses' attitudes towards deliberate self-harm using the Self-Harm Antipathy Scale.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conlon, Mary

    2012-01-31

    The emergency department is an important gateway for the treatment of self-harm patients. Nurses\\' attitudes towards patients who self-harm can be negative and often nurses experience frustration, helplessness, ambivalence and antipathy. Patients are often dissatisfied with the care provided, and meeting with positive or negative attitudes greatly influences whether they seek additional help. A quantitative design was utilised to measure emergency department nurses\\' attitudes towards deliberate self-harm. The \\'Self-Harm Antipathy Scale\\

  2. Hospital Factors Impact Variation in Emergency Department Length of Stay more than Physician Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Scott P.; Cornelius, Angela P.; Addison, J. Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To analyze the correlation between the many different emergency department (ED) treatment metric intervals and determine if the metrics directly impacted by the physician correlate to the “door to room” interval in an ED (interval determined by ED bed availability). Our null hypothesis was that the cause of the variation in delay to receiving a room was multifactorial and does not correlate to any one metric interval. Methods We collected daily interval averages from the ED information system, Meditech©. Patient flow metrics were collected on a 24-hour basis. We analyzed the relationship between the time intervals that make up an ED visit and the “arrival to room” interval using simple correlation (Pearson Correlation coefficients). Summary statistics of industry standard metrics were also done by dividing the intervals into 2 groups, based on the average ED length of stay (LOS) from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2008 Emergency Department Summary. Results Simple correlation analysis showed that the doctor-to-discharge time interval had no correlation to the interval of “door to room (waiting room time)”, correlation coefficient (CC) (CC=0.000, p=0.96). “Room to doctor” had a low correlation to “door to room” CC=0.143, while “decision to admitted patients departing the ED time” had a moderate correlation of 0.29 (p <0.001). “New arrivals” (daily patient census) had a strong correlation to longer “door to room” times, 0.657, p<0.001. The “door to discharge” times had a very strong correlation CC=0.804 (p<0.001), to the extended “door to room” time. Conclusion Physician-dependent intervals had minimal correlation to the variation in arrival to room time. The “door to room” interval was a significant component to the variation in “door to discharge” i.e. LOS. The hospital-influenced “admit decision to hospital bed” i.e. hospital inpatient capacity, interval had a correlation to

  3. Cities and Systemic Change for Sustainability: Prevailing Epistemologies and an Emerging Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Wolfram

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cities are key for sustainability and the radical systemic changes required to enable equitable human development within planetary boundaries. Their particular role in this regard has become the subject of an emerging and highly interdisciplinary scientific debate. Drawing on a qualitative literature review, this paper identifies and scrutinizes the principal fields involved, asking for their respective normative orientation, interdisciplinary constitution, theories and methods used, and empirical basis to provide orientations for future research. It recognizes four salient research epistemologies, each focusing on a distinct combination of drivers of change: (A transforming urban metabolisms and political ecologies; (B configuring urban innovation systems for green economies; (C building adaptive urban communities and ecosystems; and (D empowering urban grassroots niches and social innovation. The findings suggest that future research directed at cities and systemic change towards sustainability should (1 explore interrelations between the above epistemologies, using relational geography and governance theory as boundary areas; (2 conceive of cities as places shaped by and shaping interactions between multiple socio-technical and social-ecological systems; (3 focus on agency across systems and drivers of change, and develop corresponding approaches for intervention and experimentation; and (4 rebalance the empirical basis and methods employed, strengthening transdisciplinarity in particular.

  4. Analysis on the Emergency Contraception Knowledge Level and Its Influencing Factors among Abortion Patients in Shanghai City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵双玲; 楼超华; 高尔生

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the knowledge level of emergency contraception, explore the determinants of the knowledge level among women seeking abortion and give suggestions on how to improve the quality of emergency contraception service.Method A total of 606 women requiring abortion at three MCHs in Shanghai City were interviewed face to face with structured questionnaire.Results 63. 7% of unwanted pregnancy could use EC to prevent. Subjects got their knowledge on EC mainly from books~newspapers~magazines and relatives/friends/parents. The proportion of the awareness of EC was 28. 5%. Most subjects were aware of hormonal EC pill, but only 14. 9% of them knew that the pill should be taken within 72 hours after the intercourse. Among the subjects who were aware of EC, the average score of the knowledge was lower than half of the full marks. The lower the subject's educational level was, the less likely they were aware of EC and the lower score of the knowledge of EC they had. The score of the knowledge of EC was higher among subjects who learned of EC mainly from family planning publicity.Conclusion It is urgent to popularize EC in order to reduce unwanted pregnancy and induced abortion. The information, including EC can be used in which situations, it's advantages and disadvantages as well as indication, should be given to women in an appropriate way and using plain language. The departments of family planning should play a leading role in improving women's knowledge of EC.

  5. Sociotechnical design of an electronic tool for managing transient ischemic attack in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Francis; Partridge, Colin; Penn, Andrew; Stanley, Dana; Votova, Kristine; Bibok, Maximilian; Harris, Devin; Lu, Linghong

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the adoption of a prototype electronic decision support tool for managing transient ischemic attack (TIA) in the Emergency Department (ED) of a health region in Canada. A clinician-driven sociotechnical design approach is used to develop, test and implement the prototype with the aim to improve TIA management in the ED. In this study, we worked closely with ED staff to: identify issues and needs in TIA management; build/test/refine prototype versions of the electronic TIA decision support tool; and explore strategies to implement the tool for routine use in the ED. A blood protein biomarker test under development will also be incorporated as part of this tool in a subsequent phase. Thus far the prototype has demonstrated the potential to improve triage, risk stratification, and disposition decisions based on historical TIA and mimic cases. A prospective multi-site clinical utility study is planned for spring of 2016.

  6. Noise Levels in Two Emergency Departments Before and After the Introduction of Electronic Whiteboards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Hospital work generates noise. This article investigates the noise level in emergency departments (EDs) to assess the need to address this aspect of the work environment and to investigate whether the replacement of dry-erase with electronic whiteboards lowers the noise level. Method......: In Study I we measured the noise level at the three coordination centres of an ED while it was still using dry-erase whiteboards and after it had switched to electronic whiteboards. In Study II we made similar noise measurements at another ED, supplemented with observation. Results: The median daily...... equivalent continuous noise levels were 60.0, 55.3, and 55.4 dB(A) at the three coordination centres in Study I and 56.5 dB(A) at the coordination centre in Study II. In both studies the noise levels were higher during workdays than weekends and higher during day and evening shifts than during night shifts...

  7. Selection bias in follow-up interviews with individuals attending the emergency department for occupational injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oesterlund, Anna H; Lander, Flemming; Rytter, Søren;

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether supplementary interview participation was comparable for occupationally injured patients attending two hospital emergency departments and to investigate the magnitude of selection bias in relation to sex, age, severity, job tasks and industry risk level. METHODS...... were compared for study recruitment by age and sex. Respondents and non-respondents to the interview were compared for age, sex, injury severity, job tasks and industry risk level. RESULTS: Of 4002 patients attending the two hospitals, 1693 (42%) participated in the interview. One hospital had...... a markedly higher response rate to the questionnaire, but the proportions of participation in the interview were similar in the two hospitals. Patients aged job task and industry risk level were not significantly different...

  8. Sudden unexpected infant death: differentiating natural from abusive causes in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Kirsten

    2012-10-01

    Sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUIDs) are deaths in infants younger than 12 months that occur suddenly, unexpectedly, and without obvious cause in the emergency department (ED). Sudden infant death syndrome, the leading cause of SUID in the United States, is much more common, but fatal child abuse and neglect have been sometimes mistaken for sudden infant death syndrome. The distinction between these 2 entities can only be made after a thorough investigation of the scene, interview of caregivers, and a complete forensic autopsy. Development of ED guidelines for the reporting and evaluation of SUID, in collaboration with the local medical examiner and child death review teams, will enable ED practitioners to collect important information in a compassionate manner that will be valuable to the investigating personnel.

  9. Feasibility of nurses measuring gait speed in older community-dwelling Emergency Department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Paula W; Evans, Dian Dowling; Clevenger, Carolyn K; Ardisson, Michelle; Hwang, Ula

    Gait speed assessment is a rapid, simple and objective measure for predicting risk of unfavorable outcomes which may provide better prognostic and reliable information than existing geriatric ED (Emergency Department) screening tools. This descriptive pilot project was designed to determine feasibility of implementing gait speed screening into routine nursing practice by objectively identifying patients with sub-optimal gait speeds. Participants included community-dwelling adults 65 years and older with plans for discharge following ED treatment. Patients with a gait speed <1.0 m/s were identified as "high-risk" for an adverse event, and referred to the ED social worker for individualized resources prior to discharge. Thirty-five patients were screened and nurse initiated gait speed screens were completed 60% of the time. This project demonstrates ED gait speed screening may be feasible. Implications for practice should consider incorporating gait speed screening into routine nursing assessment to improve provider ED decision-making and disposition planning.

  10. Rationalising Transgression: A Grounded Theory Explaining how Emergency Department Registered Nurses Rationalise Erroneous Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Flenady

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this classic grounded theory study was to unearth the main concern of emergency department (ED registered nurses (RN when they perform respiratory rate observations to generate a substantive theory that explicates how the identified problem is resolved. Analysis of data collected from 79 registered nurses revealed that health sector forced compliance in recording observations meant that ED RNs are more than likely to record a respiratory rate without actually counting respirations. This erroneous behaviour provokes varying degrees of emotional discomfort as the nurses’ actions are often incongruent with their professional values and beliefs. The theory Rationalising Transgression explains how nurses continually resolve this issue by compensating, minimalizing, or trivialising to titrate the level of emotional discomfort associated with erroneous behaviour, consequently facilitating the rationalisation of transgression.

  11. The impact of a major televised sporting event on emergency department census.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, N T; Moscati, R; Jehle, D; Ciotoli, M

    1994-01-01

    This study examines the effect of a major televised sporting event, the Super Bowl, on emergency department (ED) census. Daily patient census figures for the month of January 1988-1992 were obtained. Individual shift census was divided by monthly mean census to compare relative volume. Census figures for 4 of the 5 Super Bowl days were significantly lower than the remaining 143 days studied. The day of the Super Bowl was the month's slowest shift for 3 of the 5 days. When the local team was a playoff participant, a stronger association was noted. The results demonstrate a significant decrease in ED utilization coinciding with the Super Bowl broadcast. Major televised events can significantly decrease ED volume, especially when local interest is present. Staffing changes may then be made accordingly.

  12. Geriatric Nursing Assessment and Intervention in an Emergency Department – a Pilot Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Wagner, Lis; Henriksen, Carsten;

    2012-01-01

    assessment the nurse made relevant referrals to the geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, general practitioner or made arrangements with next-of-kin. Results One hundred and fifty people participated, mean age was 81.7. At discharge they had a mean of 1.9 unresolved problems, after 1 month 0......Aim To describe and test a model for structured nursing assessment and intervention to older people discharged from Emergency Department (ED). Background Older people recently discharged from hospital are at high risk of readmission. This risk may increase when they are discharged straight home...... from an ED as time pressure requires staff to focus on the presenting problem although many have complex, unresolved, care needs. Method A prospective descriptive study was conducted. Older people aged 70 and over and at risk of adverse health and functional outcome were included. Intervention...

  13. Nursing Assessment and Intervention to Geriatric Patients Discharged from Emergency Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, Carsten;

    2011-01-01

    % of geriatric patients have complex and often unresolved caring needs. Objective: To investigate a structured nursing intervention’s impact on geriatric patients’ unresolved problems and their use of help from the community health centre. Method: We conducted a prospective descriptive study of selected...... relevant referrals to geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, primary physician or arrangements with next-of-kin. Findings: 150 geriatric patients participated, mean age 81.7 (70-99). At discharge they had in mean 2 164 (0-9) unresolved problems, after 1 month 0.8 (0-5), and after 6 months 0......Background: Geriatric patients recently discharged from hospital are at risk of unplanned readmissions and admission to nursing home. When discharged directly from Emergency Department (ED) the risk increases, as time pressure often requires focus on the presenting problem, although 80...

  14. Nursing Assessment and Intervention to Geriatric Patients Discharged From Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, Carsten;

    to the geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, primary physician or arrangements with next-of-kin. Findings: Primary endpoints will be presented as unplanned readmission to ED; admission to nursing home; and death. Secondary endpoints will be presented as physical function; depressive symptoms......; health related quality of life; and hours of help received from the community. Conclusion: The presentation at the conference will include results collected at one and six months follow-up, this will show if a two-stage intervention consisting of screening with the ISAR 1 tool followed by structured......Background: Geriatric patients recently discharged from hospital are at risk of unplanned readmissions and admission to nursing home. When discharged directly from Emergency Department (ED) the risk increases, as time pressure often requires focus on the presenting problem, although 80...

  15. Management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with the canalith repositioning maneuver in the emergency department setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, David B; Sacco, Regina; Rupp, Valerie

    2010-10-01

    Vertigo is a common clinical manifestation in the emergency department (ED). It is important for physicians to determine if the peripheral cause of vertigo is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), a disorder accounting for 20% of all vertigo cases. However, the Dix-Hallpike test--the standard for BPPV diagnosis--is not common in the ED setting. If no central origin of the vertigo is determined, patients in the ED are typically treated with benzodiazepine, antihistamine, or anticholinergic agents. Studies have shown that these pharmaceutical treatment options may not be the best for patients with BPPV. The authors describe a case of a 38-year-old woman who presented to the ED with complaints of severe, sudden-onset vertigo. The patient's BPPV was diagnosed by means of a Dix-Hallpike test and the patient was acutely treated in the ED with physical therapy using the canalith repositioning maneuver.

  16. Geographic information system data from ambulances applied in the emergency department: effects on patient reception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaber, Nikolaj; Pedersen, Iben Duvald; Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency departments (ED) recognize crowding and handover from prehospital to in-hospital settings to be major challenges. Prehospital Geographical Information Systems (GIS) may be a promising tool to address such issues. In this study, the use of prehospital GIS data was implemented...... was displayed in the ED. Data included real-time estimated time of arrival, distance to ED, dispatch criteria, patient data and ambulance contact information. Data was used by coordinating nurses for time activation of TT and MET involved in the initial treatment of severely-injured or critically-ill patients....... DISCUSSION: The contradiction of measured median wait time and nurses perceived improved timing of team activation may result from having both RT- ETA and supplemental patient information not only for seriously-injured or critically-ill patients received by the TT and MET, but for all patients transported...

  17. The Difficult Diagnosis of Ischaemic Papillary Muscle Rupture; Case report from an urban emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T. Braun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of severe ischaemic papillary muscle rupture in a 67-year-old male patient who was admitted to the Emergency Department of the University Hospital Bern, Switzerland, in November 2013 with acute chest pain. On admission, the patient’s blood pressure was 60/40 mm/Hg, his pulse was 110 beats per minute and his respiratory rate was 20 breaths per minute. An electrocardiogram was normal and focused assessment with sonography in trauma was negative. Transthoracic echocardiography showed possible thickening of the mitral valve leaflet with no indications of severe mitral insufficiency or wall motion abnormalities. Triple-ruleout computed tomography angiography revealed no pulmonary emboli or aortic dissection, although coronary atherosclerosis was present. Finally, severe insufficiency of the mitral valve with rupture of the papillary muscle, likely due to ischaemia, was observed via transoesophageal echocardiography. The patient underwent a successful surgical intervention and was discharged 10 days later in stable condition.

  18. Pediatric volleyball-related injuries treated in US emergency departments, 1990-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Katherine A; Shields, Brenda J; Smith, Gary A

    2011-09-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of pediatric volleyball-related injuries treated in US hospital emergency departments. Data for children younger than 18 years obtained from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission from 1990 through 2009 were analyzed. An estimated 692 024 volleyball-related injuries to children younger than 18 years occurred during the study period. The annual number of injuries declined significantly by 23% during the study period; however, the annual injury rate remained unchanged, and the number of volleyball-related concussions/closed head injuries increased significantly. Upper (48%) and lower (39%) extremity injuries occurred most frequently, as did strains/sprains (54%). Contact with the net/pole was associated with concussions/closed head injury our findings indicate opportunities for making volleyball an even safer sport for children. Protective padding, complying with US volleyball standards, should cover all volleyball poles and protruding hardware to prevent impact-related injuries.

  19. Social Work and the HIV Care Continuum: Assisting HIV Patients Diagnosed in an Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Amy; Moore, Eric; Valdez, Andre; Tomlinson, Cheri

    2015-07-01

    Social workers have played an integral role in society's response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic since the discovery of the disease. As the landscape of the epidemic has changed, so has the social work response to it. Social workers are, and have been, central to the success of TESTAZ (Test, Educate, Support, and Treat Arizona), which is a nontargeted, routine opt-out HIV screening program in the emergency department (ED) of Maricopa Medical Center. This article focuses on the crucial role social workers play in every stage of program development, implementation, and patient movement through the stages of the HIV care continuum. Social worker involvement with HIV-positive patients diagnosed in the ED is imperative to achieving patient viral suppression.

  20. Preventing interpersonal violence in emergency departments: practical applications of criminology theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Billy

    2010-01-01

    Over the past two decades, rates of violence in the workplace have grown significantly. Such growth has been more prevalent in some fields than others, however. Research shows that rates of violence against healthcare workers are continuously among the highest of any career field. Within the healthcare field, the overwhelming majority of victims of workplace violence are hospital employees, with those working in emergency departments (EDs) experiencing the lion's share of violent victimization. Though this fact is well-known by medical researchers and practitioners, it has received relatively little attention from criminal justice researchers or practitioners. Unfortunately, this oversight has severely limited the use of effective crime prevention techniques in hospital EDs. The goal of this analysis is to utilize techniques of situational crime prevention to develop an effective and easily applicable crime prevention strategy for hospital EDs.

  1. A proposed simulation optimization model framework for emergency department problems in public hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ireen Munira; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Bakar, Sakhinah Abu; Ahmad, Norazura; Najmuddin, Ahmad Farid

    2015-12-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is a very complex system with limited resources to support increase in demand. ED services are considered as good quality if they can meet the patient's expectation. Long waiting times and length of stay is always the main problem faced by the management. The management of ED should give greater emphasis on their capacity of resources in order to increase the quality of services, which conforms to patient satisfaction. This paper is a review of work in progress of a study being conducted in a government hospital in Selangor, Malaysia. This paper proposed a simulation optimization model framework which is used to study ED operations and problems as well as to find an optimal solution to the problems. The integration of simulation and optimization is hoped can assist management in decision making process regarding their resource capacity planning in order to improve current and future ED operations.

  2. Parental education on asthma severity in the emergency department and primary care follow-up rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kelli W; Word, Carolyn; Streck, Maria R; Titus, M Olivia

    2013-07-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic condition affecting children and a common chief complaint in emergency departments (EDs). We aimed to improve parents' understanding of their child's asthma severity on accessing our pediatric ED for an acute asthma exacerbation. A retrospective chart review was conducted to determine outpatient follow-up rates from our ED in 2010-2011. In an attempt to educate parents at ED discharge about their child's asthma severity at presentation, we included a visual severity scale on their discharge instructions. Postdischarge telephone interviews were completed to determine postintervention follow-up rates. Asthma follow-up rates at 1 week improved from 20.8% to 50% after intervention. This difference was statistically significant after controlling for age and clinical asthma score with logistic regression (P education about a child's initial asthma severity is a simple intervention that significantly improved follow-up rates for children seen in the ED for asthma exacerbation.

  3. Patterns in emergency-department arrivals and length of stay: Input for visualizations of crowding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Crowding is common in emergency departments (EDs) and increases the risk of medical errors, patient dissatisfaction, and clinician stress. The aim of this study is to investigate patterns in patient visits and bottlenecks in ED work in order to discuss the prospects of visualizing such patterns...... to help manage crowding. We analyze two years of data from a Danish ED for patterns in the patient visits and interview six clinicians from the ED about bottlenecks in their work. The hour of the day explains 50% of the variance in the number of patient arrivals. In addition, there are weekly and yearly...... factors important to the evolving balance between the demand for ED services and the available resources. Visualization of the patterns, thus, appears a promising tool in managing ED crowding. However, visualizations presuppose reliable data and are expected by the clinicians to be accurate and prognostic...

  4. Emergency department external fixation for provisional treatment of pilon and unstable ankle fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig R Lareau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unstable ankle fractures and impacted tibial pilon fractures often benefit from provisional external fixation as a temporizing measure prior to definitive fixation. Benefits of external fixation include improved articular alignment, decreased articular impaction, and soft tissue rest. Uniplanar external fixator placement in the Emergency Department (ED ex-fix is a reliable and safe technique for achieving ankle reduction and stability while awaiting definitive fixation. This procedure involves placing transverse proximal tibial and calcaneal traction pins and connecting the pins with two external fixator rods. This technique is particularly useful in austere environments or when the operating room is not immediately available. Additionally, this bedside intervention prevents the patient from requiring general anesthesia and may be a cost-effective strategy for decreasing valuable operating time. The ED ex-fix is an especially valuable procedure in busy trauma centers and during mass casualty events, in which resources may be limited.

  5. Acinetobacter sp. isolates from emergency departments in two hospitals of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji-Young; Ko, Eun Ah; Kwon, Ki Tae; Lee, Shinwon; Kang, Choel In; Chung, Doo-Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2014-10-01

    A total of 114 Acinetobacter sp. isolates were collected from patients in the emergency departments (EDs) of two Korean hospitals. Most isolates belonged to the Acinetobacter baumannii complex (105 isolates, 92.1 %). Imipenem resistance was found in 39 isolates (34.2 %) of the Acinetobacter sp. isolates, and 6 colistin-resistant isolates were also identified. Species distribution and antimicrobial-resistance rates were different between the two hospitals. In addition, two main clones were identified in the imipenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates from hospital B, but very diverse and novel genotypes were found in those from hospital A. Many Acinetobacter sp. isolates, including the imipenem-resistant A. baumannii, are considered to be associated with the community. The evidence of high antimicrobial resistance and different features in these Acinetobacter sp. isolates between the two EDs suggests the need for continuous testing to monitor changes in epidemiology.

  6. Decreasing avoidable hospital admissions with the implementation of an emergency department case management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharieff, Ghazala Q; Cantonis, Matt; Tressler, Michelle; Whitehead, Mary; Russe, Jamie; Lovell, Eric

    2014-01-01

    With the passage of the Affordable Care Act, increased emphasis has been placed on optimizing quality and reducing expenditures. The use of an emergency department case manager (EDCM) is reemerging as an important initiative in the quest to provide high-quality care and decrease unnecessary hospital admissions. A pilot study of the use of EDCMs was conducted in one of the authors' EDs during a 6-month trial period. By using evidence-based criteria, the EDCM helped in real time to verify admission criteria, assisted with inpatient versus outpatient designation, found community alternatives to hospital admission, and initiated discharge planning for patients who required admission and were at high risk for readmission. EDCMs also worked with pharmacists to assist with medication management for patients who required assistance with obtaining prescriptions. Because of the pilot study's success, the authors' health care system will be implementing EDCMs throughout the organization.

  7. Patterns in emergency-department arrivals and length of stay: Input for visualizations of crowding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Crowding is common in emergency departments (EDs) and increases the risk of medical errors, patient dissatisfaction, and clinician stress. The aim of this study is to investigate patterns in patient visits and bottlenecks in ED work in order to discuss the prospects of visualizing such patterns...... to help manage crowding. We analyze two years of data from a Danish ED for patterns in the patient visits and interview six clinicians from the ED about bottlenecks in their work. The hour of the day explains 50% of the variance in the number of patient arrivals. In addition, there are weekly and yearly...... patterns in patient arrivals. With respect to the flow of patients through the ED, length of stay increases from low to medium triage levels and then decreases from medium to high triage levels. Also, length of stay increases with patient age. The bottlenecks in the work in the ED relate to patient input...

  8. Whiteboard Icons to Support the Blood-Test Process in an Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torkilsheyggi, Arnvør Martinsdottir á; Hertzum, Morten; From, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    The competent treatment of emergency department (ED) patients requires an effective and efficient process for handling laboratory tests such as blood tests. This study investigates how ED clinicians go about the process, from ordering blood tests to acknowledging their results and, specifically......, assesses the use of whiteboard icons to support this process. On the basis of observation and interviews we find that the blood-test process is intertwined with multiple other temporal patterns in ED work. The whiteboard icons, which indicate four temporally distinct steps in the blood-test process......, support the nurses in maintaining the flow of patients through the ED and the physicians in assessing test results at timeouts. The main results of this study are, however, that the blood-test process is temporally and collaboratively complex, that the whiteboard icons pass by most of this complexity...

  9. Assessment and Management of Work-Related Stress in Hospital Emergency Departments in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ettorre, Gabriele; Greco, Maria Rita

    2016-01-01

    Recent changes in the organization of the healthcare system, triggered by the current economic crisis in Italy, require interventions aimed at minimizing the impact of work-related stress (WRS) on healthcare workers' health status and well-being. Emergency department (ED) personnel appear to be particularly vulnerable to WRS as a consequence of specific occupational risk factors. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to analyze the level of WRS after improvement interventions implemented by the management staff of the ED and focused on work context factors. The assessment of WRS showed that nurses and physicians of the ED are exposed to a medium level of risk; the improvement interventions aimed at reducing WRS were focused on: (1) function and organizational culture; (2) role within the occupational organization; and (3) relationships at work policy. These interventions were found to be significantly effective in reducing the risk of WRS.

  10. Emergency planning and response: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the recommendations contained in the President's Commission Report on the Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident (the Kemeny Commission report) that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors have been reviewed. The assessments of the 13 facilities are based on information provided by the individual operator organizations and/or cognizant DOE Field Offices. Additional clarifying information was supplied in some, but not all, instances. This report indicates how these 13 reactor facilities measure up in light of the Kemeny and other TMI-related studies and recommendations, particularly those that have resulted in upgraded Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in the area of emergency planning and response.

  11. Hepatic toxocariasis: a rare cause of right upper abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coşkun, Figen; Akıncı, Emine

    2013-01-01

    Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati are common helminths that reside in the intestinal tract of cats and dogs. Toxocariasis and, commonly, T. canis, is a disease commonly seen in children, which is characterised by hypereosinophilia, hepatomegaly, fever, transient pulmonary infiltration, and hypergammaglobulinaemia. Humans, who are not the actual host for these parasitic worms, are infected following oral intake of the infective eggs. Radiological differentiation of hepatic toxocariasis can be difficult, as liver lesions, which present as multiple hypoechoic lesions with regular borders, can look like a tumour, an infarction or an infection. We report on a case that presented to our emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain. During the initial review, the pathology in the liver was thought to be an infarction or an infection; however, the patient was diagnosed with hepatic toxocariasis following further evaluation.

  12. Evaluation of Stress Experienced by Emergency Telecommunications Personnel Employed in a Large Metropolitan Police Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Sandra L; Perkhounkova, Yelena; Hein, Maria; Chung, Sophia J; Anderson, Amanda A

    2016-12-09

    Emergency telecommunications personnel (ETCP) form the hub of police agencies and persistently deal with distressing situations on a daily basis, making them highly susceptible to psychological and physiological ailments. To date, few studies have examined the necessity or feasibility of implementing a resilience training intervention for ETCP. In this study, the authors assessed baseline psychological data from the ETCP of a large police department to determine the differences in baseline measures for ETCP and police officers. Participants included ETCP ages 29 to 64 years (n = 19). Results showed that ETCP self-reported greater levels of psychological stress compared with police officers (p < .05) for the majority of measures; ETCP experience excessive levels of stress and greater prevalence of chronic disease. Consideration should be given to piloting resilience interventions within this group to manage stress; improve health, performance, and decision making; and decrease the prevalence of chronic disease.

  13. High Feasibility of Empiric HIV Treatment for Patients With Suspected Acute HIV in an Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Arora, Sanjay; Walsh, Kristin B; Lora, Meredith; Merjavy, Stephen; Livermore, Shanna; Menchine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Earlier intervention in acute HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and may decrease HIV transmission. We developed criteria for empiric antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an emergency department (ED) routine HIV screening program. We assessed the feasibility and willingness of patients with suspected acute HIV infection in the ED to begin ART. A suspected acute HIV infection was defined as a positive HIV antigen antibody combination immunoassay with pending HIV-antibody differentiation test results and HIV RNA viral load. During the study period, there were 16 confirmed cases of acute HIV infection: 11 met our criteria for empiric ART and agreed to treatment, 10 were prescribed ART, and 1 left the ED against medical advice without a prescription for ART. Eight patients completed at least one follow-up visit. Empiric HIV treatment in an ED is feasible, well received by patients, and offers a unique entry point into the HIV care continuum.

  14. A simulation-based training program improves emergency department staff communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Lynn A; Warren, Otis; Gardner, Liz; Rojek, Adam; Lindquist, David G

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of Project CLEAR!, a novel simulation-based training program designed to instill Crew Resource Management (CRM) as the communication standard and to create a service-focused environment in the emergency department (ED) by standardizing the patient encounter. A survey-based study compared physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the quality of communication before and after the training program. Surveys were developed to measure ED staff perceptions of the quality of communication between staff members and with patients. Pretraining and posttraining survey results were compared. After the training program, survey scores improved significantly on questions that asked participants to rate the overall communication between staff members and between staff and patients. A simulation-based training program focusing on CRM and standardizing the patient encounter improves communication in the ED, both between staff members and between staff members and patients.

  15. The Impact of Integrating Crisis Teams into Community Mental Health Services on Emergency Department and Inpatient Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Sean; Lawman, Bronwyn; Reed, Fiona; Hawke, Kari; Plummer, Virginia; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2016-12-01

    This investigation focused on the impact of integrating crisis team members into community mental health services on emergency department and adult mental health inpatient unit demand within an Australian public health service. Mixed methods were used including (a) the comparison of service use data with that of two other comparable services (both of which had community-based crisis teams), (b) surveys of (i) patients and carers and (ii) staff, and (c) focus groups with staff. The numbers of emergency department presentations with mental health conditions and adult mental health inpatient separations increased 13.9 and 5.7 %, respectively, from FY2006/07 to FY2012/13. Between the three services, there were minimal differences in the percentages of presentations with mental health conditions, the distribution of mental health presentations across a 24-h period, and the triage categories assigned to these patients. Survey participants reported that patients used the emergency department due to the urgency of situations, perceptions that gaining access to mental health services would take less time, and the unavailability of mental health services when help is needed. Staff identified several issues (e.g. inappropriate referrals) that may be unnecessary in increasing emergency department demand. The integration of crisis team members into community mental health services does not seem to have produced an increase in emergency department admissions or inpatient separations beyond what might be expected from population growth. The potential may exist, however, to reduce emergency department admissions through addressing the issue of inappropriate referrals.

  16. Examining user satisfaction with single sign-on and computer application roaming within emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Patti; Zhang, Xiaoni

    2015-06-01

    In an age where mandatory computer usage within clinical care settings is a non-negotiable term of employment, the amount of applications a provider must access to document care is rapidly increasing. Each application contains an associated username and password. The increasing frequency with which clinicians have to log in and out of different applications is a source of frustration for many healthcare professionals. Healthcare executives see lost productivity. Single sign-on with added computer application roaming capabilities on shared workstations is a viable solution for both the clinician and the organization. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of implementation of single sign-on technology with application roaming on shared workstations. This study focuses on the perception of satisfaction with the implementation of single sign-on technologies within a midsized integrated delivery health network's five emergency departments. We contribute to theory with the following: (1) the development of a construct called facilitated technology interruptions, (2) validation of the construct facilitated technology interruptions, and (3) application of a quantitative method to test the relationship between facilitated technology interruptions and user satisfaction. We surveyed five emergency departments and proposed five hypotheses. We found the positive relationship between facilitated technology interruptions and user satisfaction; the positive relationships between effort expectancy and satisfaction, and effort expectancy and willingness to recommend; and the positive relationship between satisfaction and willingness to recommend. We did not confirm the positive relationship between facilitated technology interruptions and willingness to recommend. We conclude that single sign-on technology increases user satisfaction. Other organizations may use the findings from this study and perform pre-single sign-on versus post-single sign-on evaluations. In practice

  17. Profiling police presentations of mental health consumers to an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soung; Brunero, Scott; Fairbrother, Greg; Cowan, Darrin

    2008-10-01

    Public mental health systems have been called on to better meet the needs of consumers presenting to health services with the police, yet few studies have examined police presentations among mental health consumers in large public mental health systems. This study was designed to determine the frequency profile and characteristics of consumers of mental health services brought in by police to an emergency department (ED) in Sydney, Australia. Using data from the emergency department information system and obtaining the psychiatric assessment from the medical record, we have examined trends and characteristics in mental health presentations brought in by the police to a general ED between 2003 and 2005. The sample consisted of 542 consumers with a mental health problem brought in by the police to the ED of a 350-bed community hospital. The characteristics of this group were compared with those of all mental health related ED presentations for the same period using logistic regression. Results indicated that police presentations are likely to be young males who are unemployed, have past and present alcohol and other drugs use, present after hours, and are admitted to hospital as a result of their presentation. These consumers are likely to have a presenting problem of a psychotic disorder, less likely to have a presenting problem of depression and/or anxiety, and given a triage code of three or higher. The study results highlight the importance of the availability of 24-hour access to mental health care to ensure a quick care delivery response. Police presentations to EDs with mental health issues are an indicator of significant impact on health services, especially with the current overcrowding of EDs and the associated long waiting times. Systems need to be developed that facilitate collaboration between EDs, hospital security, police services, mental health, and ambulance services.

  18. Eliciting comprehensive medication histories in the emergency department: the role of the pharmacist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crook M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Committee guidelines call for a detailed medication history to be taken at the first point of admission to hospital. Accurate medication histories are vital in optimising health outcomes and have been shown to reduce mortality rates. This study aimed to examine the accuracy of medication histories taken in the Emergency Department of the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Medication histories recorded by medical staff were compared to those elicited by a pharmacy researcher. The study, conducted over a six-week period, included 100 patients over the age of 70, who took five or more regular medications, had three or more clinical co-morbidities and/or had been discharged from hospital in three months prior to the study. Following patient interviews, the researcher contacted the patient’s pharmacist and GP for confirmation and completion of the medication history. Out of the 1152 medications recorded as being used by the 100 patients, discrepancies were found for 966 medications (83.9%. There were 563 (48.9% complete omissions of medications. The most common discrepancies were incomplete or omitted dosage and frequency information. Discrepancies were mostly medications that treated dermatological and ear, nose and throat disorders but approximately 29% were used to treat cardiovascular disorders. This study provides support for the presence of an Emergency Department pharmacist who can compile a comprehensive and accurate medication history to enhance medication management along the continuum of care. It is recommended that the patient’s community pharmacy and GP be contacted for clarification and confirmation of the medication history.

  19. Evaluation of pregnant patients admitted to the emergency department with suicide attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yılmaz Zengin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the pregnancy period, the incidence of suicide attempt is lower compared to other life-periods. However, according to the recent studies, suicide attempts may lead life-threatening consequences in high-risk pregnant women. The aim of this study is to compare pregnant patients admitted to the emergency department for suicide attempt in terms of their sociodemographic and clinical properties and suicide attempt methods. Methods: In this study, 56 patients admitted to the emergency department of university for suicide attempt between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014, were included and they were classified according to suicide attempt methods into 2 groups as violent ones. Group 1 included violent methods as hanging, jumping, shooting and Group 2 included non-violent method as drugs. The study was a retrospective cross-sectional study. The sociodemographic, psychiatric and clinical properties of the patients were identified by patient registry system and patient files, and inter-group differences were compared. Results: In this study, 15 (26.7% patients in the violent suicide attempt group, and 41 (73.3% patients in the non-violent suicide attempt group, totally 56 patients were included. In the non-violent suicide attempt group, cigarette smoking, suicide attempt due to boredom, and live birth was significantly higher as compared to violent group; hospitalization period and fetal death was lower (p=0.04; p=0.006; p=0.004; p=0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Most of our pregnant suicide attempt patients are in the non-violent group, however, violent suicide attempt increased hospitalization period and fetal mortality significantly. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (2: 115-120

  20. The use of a new automatic device for patients' assessment at Triage in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Di Somma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess time saving in an Emergency Department arising out of the introduction of automatic devices (Carescape™ V100 to measure vital signs compared to the manual devices. Methods: We performed a prospective, observational study of eligible patients referring to Sant’Andrea Hospital Emergency Department during the entire month of October 2009, randomly assigned into two groups. In the first group of 476 patients vital signs measurements were detected with manual devices, while in the second group of 477 patients with automatic device Carescape™ V100. Results: Data indicated that the comparison of the total time between the two groups gave a significant difference (1993 vs 1518 min, p < 0.001. No differences were found with respect to age, sex and priority codes. Significant differences were also found when comparing the subgroups of the same acuity categories: white codes 4.33 vs 2.27 (min, p < 0.05; green codes 4.28 vs 3.37 (min, p < 0.001; yellow codes 3.92 vs 2.72 (min, p < 0.001. Conclusions: Our data demonstrated a statistical significance between the two groups with a difference of 475 minutes spent in Triage procedures including vital signs measurements. In conclusion time saved by vital signs automatic device could allow ED physicians to make a qualified approach with an earlier diagnosis and a more rapid and effective therapy, possibly improving patients’ outcomes. ABSTRACT of data concerning vital signs quality assessment, because we did not compare the two methods in the same patient and we did not correlate Triage priority evaluation with patients’ outcomes. In the future further studies should be specifically aimed to address this issue. In conclusion time saved by vital signs automatic device could allow ED physicians to make a qualified approach to patient with an earlier diagnosis and a more rapid and effective therapy, possibly improving patients’ outcomes.